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Sample records for abrupt millennial-scale climate

  1. Influence of external forcings on abrupt millennial-scale climate changes: a statistical modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Takahito; Crucifix, Michel

    2016-07-01

    The last glacial period was punctuated by a series of abrupt climate shifts, the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events. The frequency of DO events varied in time, supposedly because of changes in background climate conditions. Here, the influence of external forcings on DO events is investigated with statistical modelling. We assume two types of simple stochastic dynamical systems models (double-well potential-type and oscillator-type), forced by the northern hemisphere summer insolation change and/or the global ice volume change. The model parameters are estimated by using the maximum likelihood method with the NGRIP Ca^{2+} record. The stochastic oscillator model with at least the ice volume forcing reproduces well the sample autocorrelation function of the record and the frequency changes of warming transitions in the last glacial period across MISs 2, 3, and 4. The model performance is improved with the additional insolation forcing. The BIC scores also suggest that the ice volume forcing is relatively more important than the insolation forcing, though the strength of evidence depends on the model assumption. Finally, we simulate the average number of warming transitions in the past four glacial periods, assuming the model can be extended beyond the last glacial, and compare the result with an Iberian margin sea-surface temperature (SST) record (Martrat et al. in Science 317(5837): 502-507, 2007). The simulation result supports the previous observation that abrupt millennial-scale climate changes in the penultimate glacial (MIS 6) are less frequent than in the last glacial (MISs 2-4). On the other hand, it suggests that the number of abrupt millennial-scale climate changes in older glacial periods (MISs 6, 8, and 10) might be larger than inferred from the SST record.

  2. Persistent millennial-scale climate variability in the eastern tropical North Pacific over the last two glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano-Torres, Elsa; Ganeshram, Raja S.; Pichevin, Laetitia E.; Salas-de-Leon, David Alberto

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution sediment records from the eastern tropical North Pacific (ETNP) spanning the last ~240 ka B.P. were studied to document the nature of millennial-scale climatic events in the tropical Pacific and to investigate teleconnection mechanisms. We present organic carbon (%OC) and diffuse spectral reflectivity records as indicative of upwelling and productivity changes off NW Mexico over the middle to late Pleistocene. The new productivity records document the persistence of abrupt millennial-scale changes over the last two glacial cycles. Detailed spectral and wavelet time series analyses show the predominance of longer climatic cycles (2-6 ka) during the last and the penultimate glacial periods. The persistence of millennial variability during the penultimate glacial, in absence of large ice rafted debris events in the North Atlantic, suggests that freshwater input through ice sheet dynamics is not essential for millennial-scale climate variability. Given the worldwide emerging picture of remarkable similar millennial-scale records over long time periods, we suggest that the pacing of this climate variability may represent a natural resonance in the climate system, amplified by a tightly coupled oceanic and atmospheric teleconnection processes. We present a schematic scenario of millennial-scale climate change depicting the role of the tropical Pacific in this global teleconnection system by linking productivity and upwelling changes in the ETNP with shifts in the position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and the strength of the subtropical North Pacific High.

  3. Was millennial scale climate change during the Last Glacial triggered by explosive volcanism?

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, James U.L.; Brown, Richard J.; McElwaine, Jim N.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for millennial scale climate change within glacial time intervals are equivocal. Here we show that all eight known radiometrically-dated Tambora-sized or larger NH eruptions over the interval 30 to 80 ka BP are associated with abrupt Greenland cooling (>95% confidence). Additionally, previous research reported a strong statistical correlation between the timing of Southern Hemisphere volcanism and Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events (>99% confidence), but did not identify a causative mechanism. Volcanic aerosol-induced asymmetrical hemispheric cooling over the last few hundred years restructured atmospheric circulation in a similar fashion as that associated with Last Glacial millennial-scale shifts (albeit on a smaller scale). We hypothesise that following both recent and Last Glacial NH eruptions, volcanogenic sulphate injections into the stratosphere cooled the NH preferentially, inducing a hemispheric temperature asymmetry that shifted atmospheric circulation cells southward. This resulted in Greenland cooling, Antarctic warming, and a southward shifted ITCZ. However, during the Last Glacial, the initial eruption-induced climate response was prolonged by NH glacier and sea ice expansion, increased NH albedo, AMOC weakening, more NH cooling, and a consequent positive feedback. Conversely, preferential SH cooling following large SH eruptions shifted atmospheric circulation to the north, resulting in the characteristic features of DO events. PMID:26616338

  4. Was millennial scale climate change during the Last Glacial triggered by explosive volcanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, James U. L.; Brown, Richard J.; McElwaine, Jim N.

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms responsible for millennial scale climate change within glacial time intervals are equivocal. Here we show that all eight known radiometrically-dated Tambora-sized or larger NH eruptions over the interval 30 to 80 ka BP are associated with abrupt Greenland cooling (>95% confidence). Additionally, previous research reported a strong statistical correlation between the timing of Southern Hemisphere volcanism and Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events (>99% confidence), but did not identify a causative mechanism. Volcanic aerosol-induced asymmetrical hemispheric cooling over the last few hundred years restructured atmospheric circulation in a similar fashion as that associated with Last Glacial millennial-scale shifts (albeit on a smaller scale). We hypothesise that following both recent and Last Glacial NH eruptions, volcanogenic sulphate injections into the stratosphere cooled the NH preferentially, inducing a hemispheric temperature asymmetry that shifted atmospheric circulation cells southward. This resulted in Greenland cooling, Antarctic warming, and a southward shifted ITCZ. However, during the Last Glacial, the initial eruption-induced climate response was prolonged by NH glacier and sea ice expansion, increased NH albedo, AMOC weakening, more NH cooling, and a consequent positive feedback. Conversely, preferential SH cooling following large SH eruptions shifted atmospheric circulation to the north, resulting in the characteristic features of DO events.

  5. Millennial scale climatic responses through a Late Miocene precession cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzocchi, Alice; Lunt, Dan; Flecker, Rachel; Bradshaw, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    Late Miocene (11.61-5.33 Ma) climate is thought to have been warmer and wetter than the present, with nearly ice-free conditions over the Northern Hemisphere, and significant differences in vegetation distribution. There still is considerable uncertainty in the reconstructed CO2 levels for this time period, fostered by the temporally and spatially biased distribution of the available proxy record. Previous model-data comparison studies (i.e. Bradshaw et al., 2012; Pound et al., 2011) highlighted the mismatch between model results and proxy data for this time period. Here, we investigate how taking into account the variability due to changes in orbital forcing can account for some of these differences. We also explore the orbital control on the monsoonal systems at millennial scale resolution, as well as the impact of background CO2 on orbital sensitivity. Long-term changes in seasonal and latitudinal solar insolation are generated by periodic oscillations in the Earth's orbit and tilt relative to the Sun. These cycles have a modulating effect on climate and ocean circulation patterns. A record of this signal can be found in a number of terrestrial and marine sedimentary sequences. A series of 22 fully coupled atmosphere-ocean-vegetation simulations has been run through an entire precession cycle during the Late Miocene (~6.5 Ma). These experiments were performed using HadCM3L (Hadley Centre Coupled Model, Version 3 - Low resolution ocean) with TRIFFID (Top-down Representation of Interactive Foliage and Flora Including Dynamics) to test the climatic response to changes in orbital forcing. The Mediterranean Sea provides a remarkable geological record for this time slice. Several sequences around the basin margins have been astronomically tuned so that high resolution geological data can be directly compared with our model results. However, this is not the case for the rest of the world, where the distribution of climate proxy data for the Late Miocene is sparse

  6. Masked millennial-scale climate variations in South West Africa during the last glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessler, I.; Dupont, L.; Handiani, D.; Paul, A.; Merkel, U.; Wefer, G.

    2011-10-01

    Large and abrupt shifts between extreme climatic conditions characterise the last glacial and deglacial period and are thought to be transmitted by the atmospheric and oceanic circulation. Millennial-scale climatic shifts associated with North Atlantic Heinrich Stadials (HSs) are thought to be closely related to a reduction of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), which lead to the accumulation of heat in the South Atlantic and a southward shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Due to the linkage between the oceans and the atmosphere it is assumed that HSs also influence the vegetation composition in the African tropics. To address the connection between tropical African vegetation development and high-latitude climate change we present a high-resolution marine pollen record from ODP Site 1078 (off Angola) covering the period 50-10 ka BP. Although several tropical African vegetation and climate reconstructions indicate an impact of HSs on the African subcontinent, our vegetation record shows no response. Model simulations conducted with an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC) including a dynamical vegetation component lead to the hypothesis that the vegetation response during HSs might have been muted by mechanisms that partly cancel each other.

  7. Millennial-scale climate instabilities in the subtropical Atlantic during MIS 6 and 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheinwald, A.; Billups, K.

    2012-12-01

    We have constructed a high resolution (~200 year) planktonic foraminiferal stable isotope record spanning Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 6 and 7 in the subtropical Atlantic (ODP Site 1059). The record fills a gap in a ~1 million year long time series of millennial-scale surface ocean hydrography in this region. Our ultimate goal is to test the hypothesis that millennial-scale climate signals in the northwestern subtropical Atlantic are linked to external driving factors such as the harmonics of precession. Results show that longer-term trends in the oxygen isotope data spanning MIS 6-7 closely follow precessional forcing allowing us to refine the original age model of Grützner et al. (2002). High frequency variations are superimposed on the long-term trend during both the glacial MIS 6 and the interglacial MIS 7. Spectral analyses indicate high concentration of power at millennial-scale periodicities of 10.9 kyr, 5.2 kyr, and 2.8 kyr. These periodicities are close to those expected from harmonics of precessional forcing during this interval of time (11.5 kyr, 5.8 kyr, 2.8 kyr). We will show the evolution of the millennial-scale periodicities in this region over the past 1 million years by splicing the record into published ones and unifying the age model.

  8. Sea ice and millennial-scale climate variability in the Nordic seas 90 kyr ago to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Ulrike; Rasmussen, Tine L.; Stein, Ruediger; Ezat, Mohamed M.; Fahl, Kirsten

    2016-07-01

    In the light of rapidly diminishing sea ice cover in the Arctic during the present atmospheric warming, it is imperative to study the distribution of sea ice in the past in relation to rapid climate change. Here we focus on glacial millennial-scale climatic events (Dansgaard/Oeschger events) using the sea ice proxy IP25 in combination with phytoplankton proxy data and quantification of diatom species in a record from the southeast Norwegian Sea. We demonstrate that expansion and retreat of sea ice varies consistently in pace with the rapid climate changes 90 kyr ago to present. Sea ice retreats abruptly at the start of warm interstadials, but spreads rapidly during cooling phases of the interstadials and becomes near perennial and perennial during cold stadials and Heinrich events, respectively. Low-salinity surface water and the sea ice edge spreads to the Greenland-Scotland Ridge, and during the largest Heinrich events, probably far into the Atlantic Ocean.

  9. Millennial-scale climate variability in North America during the past 14,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viau, Andre Ernest J.

    Variations in the Earth's climate occur on many time and space scales. A recent focus of paleoclimate research is the so-called 1500-year North Atlantic quasi-periodic cycle, and has revolved around three main themes. First, what are the underlying causes and physical mechanisms governing these millennial-scale variations? Next, are they global or restricted to certain sensitive regions of the planet? Last, what is the magnitude of the temperature changes of these variations, and do they vary in time and space? This dissertation explores millennial-scale climate variability in North America during the past 14,000 years using a dense network of fossil pollen data, which is used as proxy for climate variations. Three independent approaches are used to quantify these changes. A mixture modelling analysis of radiocarbon dates on pollen transitions, a principal component analysis of pollen diagrams from all of North America, and a mean July temperature reconstruction based on the method of modern analogue (MAT) all reveal millennial-scale climate variability throughout North America during the past 14,000 years. The identified transitions generally correlate well with other proxy-climate records from the North Atlantic region. However, certain mismatches occurred particularly at 9, 6 and 4 ka BP. If we assume the dominant millennial-scale period is 1150-years, the records become more consistent. North American temperature variability was not unidirectional nor uniformly distributed in space, suggesting large-scale ocean-atmospheric reorganizations at the transitions. Correlation between the proxy-climate and cosmogenic nuclide records supports a variable solar output hypothesis as the fundamental cause for century to millennial-scale climate variability. The mean July temperature of North America varied on the order of 0.2 to 0.4°C during the Holocene and 0.4° and 0.6°C during the deglaciation. Temperature was more variable during the late glacial, possibly due to

  10. Mid-Pleistocene Orbital and Millennial Scale Climate Change in a 200 ky lacustrine sediment core from SW North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawcett, P. J.; Werne, J. P.; Anderson, R. S.; Heikoop, J. M.; Brown, E. T.; Berke, M. A.; Smith, S.; Goff, F. E.; Hurley, L. L.; Cisneros Dozal, L. M.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Huang, Y.; Toney, J. L.; Fessenden, J. E.; Woldegabriel, G. W.; Geissman, J. W.; Allen, C. D.

    2009-12-01

    progressive declines in cold boreal taxa pollen percentages (Picea, Abies), while others are characterized by abrupt warmings and decreases in boreal taxa pollen. Maximum interstadial temperatures are followed by abrupt coolings of as much as 6 to 7°C, and rapid increases in Picea and Abies pollen. These results show that the continental climate of SW North America had a strong response to millennial-scale climate change as well as to orbital forcing, even during a time of muted precessional cycles (MIS 11).

  11. Millennial-scale Climate Variability During the Last Interglacial Recorded in Two Speleothems from Eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Rowe, H. D.; Rao, Z.; Buckles, J. A.; Wang, X.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    Two speleothems from eastern North America grew throughout the warmest part of the Last Interglacial (128 -120 ka BP). High-resolution stable isotope δ18O and δ13C records are constrained by 20 230Th age dates. The high-resolution speleothem records from Morril's Cave (aka Worley's Cave) in the eastern North America region demonstrate millennial-scale climate variability. ''Warmer-wetter'' periods are interspersed with ''cooler-drier'' periods at millennial-scale based on shifts of stable isotope values. Between 123.8 to 123.6 BP, both δ18O and δ13C values dropped more than 2‰ in the TNMOR1-12 speleothem record. The abrupt negative excursions of δ18O and δ13C values indicate the transition from the "coolest-driest" to the "warmest-wettest" in the middle of MIS 5e. Overall, the isotope record is anti-phasing with a stalagmite record from southwestern France (BDinf), which may indicate that orbitally driven western Europe and eastern North America anti-phasing precipitation occurred during the warmest period of the Last Interglacial.

  12. Early Pleistocene sea level and millennial-scale climate fluctuations: a view from the tropical Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alix Jakob, Kim; Friedrich, Oliver; Pross, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    This project aims at deciphering the rate of sea level variability and its effect on millennial-scale climate fluctuations during the final phase of the intensification of northern hemisphere glaciation (NHG). Millennial-scale climate fluctuations appear to have changed significantly at glacial-interglacial time scales during the late Pliocene and Pleistocene. Thereby, millennial-scale climate fluctuations under a warmer climate during late Pliocene and early Pleistocene show markedly lower ampitudes compared to the fluctuations of the late Pleistocene. Numerous Pleistocene proxy records (e.g. McManus et al., 1999) suggest that this difference can be explained by an ice-volume/sea-level threshold that amplifies millennial-scale climate fluctuations and was not reached prior to the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT). However, new records question the existence of this threshold (Bolton et al., 2010) and indicate that either the amplification of millennial-scale climate fluctuations before the MPT required a higher ice-volume threshold than in the late Pleistocene, that ice-volume had no significant effect on the amplitude of climate fluctuations, and/or the available sea level estimates for the early Pleistocene are inaccurate. For identifying the mechanisms underlying the dynamics of early Pleistocene ice sheets, material from the tropical Pacific Ocean (ODP Site 849) is studied over a time interval from 2.6 to 2.4 Ma (marine isotope stages 104 to 96). In summary, the main deliverables are (1) the establishment of a precise δ18O chemostratigraphy using the benthic foraminifera Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi by tuning the δ18O dataset to the LR04 benthic isotope stack (Lisiecki & Raymo, 2005), and (2) providing high-resolution (˜700 years) Mg/Ca and δ18O datasets using the benthic foraminifera Oridorsalis umbonatus and the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber. This combined geochemical approach will be used to address the following research questions: (1

  13. Tropical teleconnections to Antarctic circulation during the millennial-scale Dansgaard-Oeschger climate cycles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markle, B. R.; Steig, E. J.; Buizert, C.; Pedro, J. B.; Bitz, C. M.; Ding, Q.; Fudge, T. J.; Schoenemann, S. W.; Sowers, T. A.; Jones, T. R.; White, J. W. C.

    2014-12-01

    The abrupt Dansgaard-Oeschger events define Northern Hemisphere (NH) climate variability during the last glacial period. They are out of phase with gradual temperature variations recorded in Antarctic ice cores. Ocean teleconnections are thought to link the temperatures of both hemispheres via the thermal bipolar seesaw. Additionally, atmospheric teleconnections link the NH to tropical circulation - in particular the position of the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Recent modeling has demonstrated the influence of the ITCZ on the Southern Hemisphere (SH) jets. In the context of millennial variability, this suggests that changes in high latitude SH atmospheric circulation could have been in-phase with the distant D-O signal, rather than local temperatures. To date, there has been little proxy evidence spanning the last glacial period to support this prediction. We examine phasing between δ18O, methane concentration, and deuterium excess data form the new West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide ice core. Deuterium excess is a second order isotope parameter, sensitive to ocean surface conditions and atmospheric circulation. We resolve a long-standing issue by redefining this parameter, revealing zonally coherent millennial-scale sea surface temperature changes in the Southern Ocean. Superimposed upon this variability, we find evidence for changes in SH atmospheric circulation in phase with the D-O events. This is found in the strong and in-phase coherence between deuterium excess and atmospheric methane. Methane records tropical hydrological changes and is identical to the abrupt D-O signal. WAIS deuterium excess tracks methane during D-O events, showing large variability significantly before local temperature change. We interpret Antarctic deuterium excess to be driven by two primary signals: 1) variability in Southern Ocean sea surface temperatures at fixed locations, and 2) variability in the spatial sampling of that surface water. The latter is driven by

  14. Glacial-Interglacial, Orbital and Millennial-Scale Climate Variability for the Last Glacial Cycle at Shackleton Site U1385 based on Dinoflagellate Cysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datema, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Shackleton Site (IODP Expedition 339 Site U1385), located off the West-Portuguese Margin, preserves a continuous high-fidelity record of millennial-scale climate variability for the last several glacial cycles (~1.4 Myr) that can be correlated precisely to patterns observed in polar ice cores. In addition, rapid delivery of terrestrial material to the deep-sea environment allows the correlation of these marine records to European terrestrial climate records. This unique marine-ice-terrestrial linkage makes the Shackleton Site the ideal reference section for studying Quaternary abrupt climate change. The main objective of studying Site U1385 is to establish a marine reference section of Pleistocene climate change. We generated (sub)millennial-scale (~600 year interval) dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) assemblage records from Shackleton Site U1385 (IODP Expedition 339) to reconstruct sea surface temperature (SST) and productivity/upwelling over the last 152 kyrs. In addition, our approach allows for detailed land-sea correlations, because we also counted assemblages of pollen and spores from higher plants. Dinocyst SST and upwelling proxies, as well as warm/cold pollen proxies from Site U1385 show glacial-interglacial, orbital and stadial-interstadial climate variability and correlate very well to Uk'37, planktic foraminifer δ18O and Ca/Ti proxies of previously drilled Shackleton Sites and Greenland Ice Core δ18O. The palynological proxies capture (almost) all Dansgaard-Oeschger events of the last glacial cycle, also before ~70 ka, where millennial-scale variability is overprinted by precession. We compare the performance and results of the palynology of Site U1385 to proxies of previously drilled Shackleton Sites and conclude that palynology strengthens the potential of this site to form a multi-proxy reference section for millennial scale climate variability across the Pleistocene-Holocene. Finally, we will present a long-term paleoceanographic perspective down

  15. Black Sea temperature response to glacial millennial-scale climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegwerth, Antje; Ganopolski, Andrey; Ménot, Guillemette; Kaiser, Jérôme; Dellwig, Olaf; Bard, Edouard; Lamy, Frank; Arz, Helge W.

    2015-10-01

    The Eurasian inland propagation of temperature anomalies during glacial millennial-scale climate variability is poorly understood, but this knowledge is crucial to understanding hemisphere-wide atmospheric teleconnection patterns and climate mechanisms. Based on biomarkers and geochemical paleothermometers, a pronounced continental temperature variability between 64,000 and 20,000 years ago, coinciding with the Greenland Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles, was determined in a well-dated sediment record from the formerly enclosed Black Sea. Cooling during Heinrich events was not stronger than during other stadials in the Black Sea. This is corroborated by modeling results showing that regular Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles penetrated deeper into the Eurasian continent than Heinrich events. The pattern of coastal ice-rafted detritus suggests a strong dependence on the climate background state, with significantly milder winters during periods of reduced Eurasian ice sheets and an intensified meridional atmospheric circulation.

  16. A 0.6 million year record of millennial-scale climate variability in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Kelly Ann; Peterson, Larry C.

    2014-02-01

    A ~600 kyr long scanning X-ray fluorescence record of redox variability from the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela, provides insight into rapid climate change in the tropics over the past five glacial-interglacial cycles. Variations in the sediment accumulation of the redox-sensitive element molybdenum (Mo) can be linked to changes in Intertropical Convergence Zone migration and reveal that millennial-scale variability is a persistent feature of tropical climate over the past 600 kyr, including during periods of interglacial warmth. This new record supports the idea that high-frequency tropical climate variability is not controlled solely by ice volume changes, with implications for the role of high-latitude forcing of Intertropical Convergence Zone position and tropical hydrology on millennial timescales.

  17. Sea ice and millennial-scale climate variability in the Nordic seas 90 kyr ago to present

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Ulrike; Rasmussen, Tine L.; Stein, Ruediger; Ezat, Mohamed M.; Fahl, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    In the light of rapidly diminishing sea ice cover in the Arctic during the present atmospheric warming, it is imperative to study the distribution of sea ice in the past in relation to rapid climate change. Here we focus on glacial millennial-scale climatic events (Dansgaard/Oeschger events) using the sea ice proxy IP25 in combination with phytoplankton proxy data and quantification of diatom species in a record from the southeast Norwegian Sea. We demonstrate that expansion and retreat of sea ice varies consistently in pace with the rapid climate changes 90 kyr ago to present. Sea ice retreats abruptly at the start of warm interstadials, but spreads rapidly during cooling phases of the interstadials and becomes near perennial and perennial during cold stadials and Heinrich events, respectively. Low-salinity surface water and the sea ice edge spreads to the Greenland–Scotland Ridge, and during the largest Heinrich events, probably far into the Atlantic Ocean. PMID:27456826

  18. Sea ice and millennial-scale climate variability in the Nordic seas 90 kyr ago to present.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Ulrike; Rasmussen, Tine L; Stein, Ruediger; Ezat, Mohamed M; Fahl, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    In the light of rapidly diminishing sea ice cover in the Arctic during the present atmospheric warming, it is imperative to study the distribution of sea ice in the past in relation to rapid climate change. Here we focus on glacial millennial-scale climatic events (Dansgaard/Oeschger events) using the sea ice proxy IP25 in combination with phytoplankton proxy data and quantification of diatom species in a record from the southeast Norwegian Sea. We demonstrate that expansion and retreat of sea ice varies consistently in pace with the rapid climate changes 90 kyr ago to present. Sea ice retreats abruptly at the start of warm interstadials, but spreads rapidly during cooling phases of the interstadials and becomes near perennial and perennial during cold stadials and Heinrich events, respectively. Low-salinity surface water and the sea ice edge spreads to the Greenland-Scotland Ridge, and during the largest Heinrich events, probably far into the Atlantic Ocean. PMID:27456826

  19. Origin of millennial-scale climate signals in the subtropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billups, K.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, I am testing the hypothesis that millennial-scale climate signals in the northwestern subtropical Atlantic are linked to external driving factors such as the harmonics of precession. The test is based on the observation that the precession period is not stationary through time. For example, between 900 and 340 Ka the time interval between successive precession minima (or maxima) ranges primarily from 17 kyr to 21 kyr with discrete intervals lasting up to ~30 kyr (spectral power centered on the 23 kyr and 19 kyr periodicities). After 340 Ka, however, precession minima (or maxima) consistently occur at longer intervals, between 21 kyr and 25 kyr (spectral power focused at the 23 kyr period). If in proxy records millennial-scale variations reflect the harmonics of precession, I expect that the millennial-scale periodicity associated with the 19 kyr precession period (e.g., the 4.8 kyr peak) loses power as the primary orbital peak loses power at 340 Ka. First order tests of this idea can be made using published planktic foraminiferal δ18O records from ODP Site 1059 (Hagen and Keigwin, 2002; Oppo et al., 2001) in the northwestern subtropical Atlantic spanning Marine Isotope Stages 2-6 (~20-150 Ka) and Site 1058 spanning MIS 12-22 (~450-900 Ka, Weirauch et al., 2008). After filtering the records to remove the 100 kyr cycle, the older time slice contains both precession peaks (23 and 19 kyr). Significant (95% confidence interval) suborbital peaks occur at 12 kyr, 5.7 kyr and 5.0 kyr, which are close to the periodicities of the expected harmonics. The younger time slice shows only one precession peak centered at ~23 kyr and significant (95% confidence interval) sub-orbital peaks at 11.2 kyr, and 5 kyr. Only the 11.2 kyr peak agrees with the expected period of the second harmonic of the 23 kyr precession peak. We are currently generating high resolution planktic foraminiferal stable isotope records in this region to span MIS 7, which, together with data from

  20. Millennial-scale precipitation variability over Easter Island (South Pacific) during MIS 3: inter-hemispheric teleconnections with North Atlantic abrupt cold events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalef, O.; Cacho, I.; Pla-Rabes, S.; Cañellas-Boltà, N.; Pueyo, J. J.; Sáez, A.; Pena, L. D.; Valero-Garcés, B. L.; Rull, V.; Giralt, S.

    2015-04-01

    Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3, 59.4-27.8 kyr BP) is characterized by the occurrence of rapid millennial-scale climate oscillations known as Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles (DO) and by abrupt cooling events in the North Atlantic known as Heinrich events. Although both the timing and dynamics of these events have been broadly explored in North Atlantic records, the response of the tropical and subtropical latitudes to these rapid climatic excursions, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere, still remains unclear. The Rano Aroi peat record (Easter Island, 27° S) provides a unique opportunity to understand atmospheric and oceanic changes in the South Pacific during these DO cycles because of its singular location, which is influenced by the South Pacific Anticyclone (SPA), the Southern Westerlies (SW), and the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) linked to the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). The Rano Aroi sequence records 6 major events of enhanced precipitation between 38 and 65 kyr BP. These events are compared with other hydrological records from the tropical and subtropical band supporting a coherent regional picture, with the dominance of humid conditions in Southern Hemisphere tropical band during Heinrich Stadials (HS) 5, 5a and 6 and other Stadials while dry conditions prevailed in the Northern tropics. This antiphased hydrological pattern between hemispheres has been attributed to ITCZ migration, which in turn might be associated with an eastward expansion of the SPCZ storm track, leading to an increased intensity of cyclogenic storms reaching Easter Island. Low Pacific Sea Surface Temperature (SST) gradients across the Equator were coincident with the here-defined Rano Aroi humid events and consistent with a reorganization of Southern Pacific atmospheric and oceanic circulation also at higher latitudes during Heinrich and Dansgaard-Oeschger stadials.

  1. Geochemical evidence for Holocene millennial-scale climatic and environmental changes in the south-eastern Mu Us Desert, northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing; Jin, Heling; Sun, Liangying; Sun, Zhong; Zhao, Shuang

    2015-10-01

    Deserts and sandylands that are located in the semi-arid and arid regions in the middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere are usually regarded as environmentally sensitive change belts which respond to global climatic change. In northern China, activation or immobilization of sand dunes is mainly influenced by humid and dry variation and is related to stronger or weaker Asian monsoons. In this paper, the history of Holocene millennial-scale climatic and environmental change is reconstructed by the systematic analysis of the geochemical element contents and parameters, along with the OSL and 14C chronologies, from the different lithologies of the palaeosol-aeolian sand sequence in the south-eastern Mu Us Desert, northern China. Our results indicate that the region was dominated by a dry climate with intensive aeolian activity before 7.2 ka BP, and there was an optimal humid climate and fixed desert in 7.2-4.6 ka. Afterwards, the dune fields became mobile again as the effective humidity declined. Additionally, six dry events were discovered with times of ~7.2, 7.0-6.8, 6.6-5.7, 4.6-4.1, 3.7-3.5, and 3.3-2.5 ka, which were not only coincident with the intervals of millennial-scale weaker Asian summer monsoons, but also accordant with the cold events evidenced in the ice cores and deep-sea deposits of the high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. In general, the Holocene climatic and environmental changes had the characteristics of the "monsoonal mode" and "abrupt millennial-scale oscillation" in the Mu Us Desert.

  2. Millennial Scale Variability of the AMOC and its Link to Climate During the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornalley, D. J.; Oppo, D.; Keigwin, L. D.; Hall, I. R.; Moffa Sanchez, P.

    2014-12-01

    Several proxy and modelling studies suggest that there may have been considerable change in the operation the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) during the Holocene. Yet despite its importance for regional and global climate, the Holocene history of the AMOC is poorly constrained. Improving our knowledge of past AMOC variability will contribute to our general understanding of the dynamics of ocean circulation and the role it may play in causing or amplifying climate variability on millennial timescales. We present Holocene grain-size records in depth transects from Blake Outer Ridge and Cape Hatteras, sampling the full-depth range of the Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC), the lower limb of the AMOC. These records will complement a depth-transect of grain-size records sampling the Iceland-Scotland (I-S) overflow, showing Holocene variations that reflect deglacial meltwater forcing in the early Holocene and insolation-forced trends from the middle-to-late Holocene (Thornalley et al., 2013, Climate of the Past). We will also present detailed grain-size records for the last 2,000 years, both in a depth transect of cores off Cape Hatteras, and from cores in the Iceland Basin, sampling the I-S overflow. Our extensive datasets enable us to provide a coherent synthesis of changes in the flow strength of key components of the AMOC on centennial-millennial and orbital timescales, which we can use to develop our understanding of past millennial-scale climate variability. Specific questions to be addressed include: How well coupled are Holocene trends in Iceland-Scotland overflow and the DWBC? How did I-S overflow and the AMOC vary during the last millennia, including the last ~150 years since the end of the Little Ice Age? Initial results suggest a long-term anti-phasing of the Nordic overflows, wherein mid-late Holocene weakening of the I-S overflow has been compensated for by a strengthening of Denmark Strait overflow. We will also report on pronounced

  3. Millennial scale precipitation changes over Easter Island (Southern Pacific) during MIS 3: Inter-hemispheric connections during North Atlantic abrupt cold events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalef, Olga; Cacho, Isabel; Pla-Rabes, Sergi; Cañellas-Boltà, Núria; Pueyo, Juan Jose; Sáez, Alberto; Valero-Garcés, Blas L.; Giralt, Santiago

    2013-04-01

    Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 climate has been globally characterized by the occurrence of millennial-scale climate variations defined over North Atlantic as Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events. Despite climate variability has been broadly explored over North Atlantic records, the response of the tropical and subtropical latitudes, especially in the Southern Hemisphere, still remains as a matter of debate. Rano Aroi peat record (Easter Island, Chile, 27°S) provides a unique opportunity to understand Southern Pacific atmospheric and oceanic changes during these stadial-interstadial transitions because of its exceptional location on the interplay of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), the South Pacific Anticyclone (SPA) and the Southern Westerlies (SW). Rano Aroi record contains 8 main enhanced precipitation events between 70 and 40 kyr BP that can be correlated with the timing of Heinrich events 5, 5a and 6 as well as other cold stadials. These humid events are also present in other Southern Hemisphere continental sites and correspond to dry periods on Northern Hemisphere records. This opposite hydrologic trend has been explained by the latitudinal migration of ITCZ and has been supported by several climatic models. As Easter Island precipitation is mainly dependent on SPCZ storm track belt activity, we suggest that the southern migration of the ITCZ is associated to an expansion of SPCZ to the east. This process should be intimately related to a weakening of the Walker circulation, which is further supported by an estimation of d18Osw gradient along the equator for the same time period. Consequently, atmospheric and oceanic responses during these cold stadials and Heinrich events might lead to a configuration that resembles the warm ENSO state over Southern Pacific, as previously suggested by some global climatic models. Rano Aroi record clearly points out that shifts in hydrological cycle in tropical Southern

  4. Tracking millennial-scale climate variability through the Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 12 using terrigenous biomarkers in lacustrine sediments from Valles Caldera, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, S.; Werne, J. P.; Brown, E. T.; Anderson, R. S.; Fawcett, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Quaternary is characterized by cyclic intervals of warm interglacial and cold glacial stages with the MIS 12 highlighted as one of the most severe glacial stages. Recent studies reported abrupt climatic episodes at millennial scale during MIS 12 and the transition to MIS 11 similar to Dansgaard-Oeschger [D/O] and Heinrich events but weaker in amplitude than the dramatic oscillations observed in the last glacial period. The climate variability of MIS 12 is well documented in marine and ice-sheet isotopic records but terrestrial records are scarce and often fragmented. We will present a high-resolution paleoclimate reconstruction through the MIS 12, including MIS 13-12 and MIS 12-11 transitions, from paleo-lake sediments taken in Valles Caldera, New Mexico. Measurements including scanning X-ray fluorescence, pollen, terrigenous biomarkers and bulk and compound-specific stable isotopes that usually serve as paleoclimatic proxies of precipitation and vegetation will be contrasted. Terrigenous lipid biomarkers confirm that vegetation responds rapidly to millennial-scale climate variability and provide knowledge of how these millennial oscillations impacted western North America.

  5. Geochemical proxies and millennial-scale climate variability during MIS 3 at Lake Chalco, central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, E.; Lozano, S.; Roy, P.; Ortega, B.; Caballero, M.

    2013-05-01

    The Basin of Mexico (20N, 99W; 2240 m.a.s.l.) is present at the northern limit of the American tropics and is surrounded by up to 5400 m high mountains. The Lake Chalco is situated at the southern part of the basin and spreads over 120 km2. The precipitation in the modern era is influenced by the seasonal displacement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and the high-pressure belt located at about 35 N. Five cores were drilled (up to 122.5 m depth) in order to document climate variability in paleohydrological conditions during the late Quaternary. The age model includes several 14C dates and tephra layers present in the upper 25 m of the core. We documented millennial-scale events during MIS 3 based on geochemical data (total organic carbon (TOC), total inorganic carbon (TIC), C/N ratio) and abundance of charcoal particles. By temporal correlation with GISP2 core we founded that Greenland interstadials match with TOC percentages suggesting wet conditions while stadials match with high TIC percentages and high charcoal concentrations suggesting dry conditions. We compared our data with speleothem records (δ18O) from Fort Station Cave (New Mexico) and Terciopelo Cave (Costa Rica), our preliminary results indicate that Chalco record has a similar climatic signal as Terciopelo Cave, both presented wet interstadials and dry stadials which appear to have been regulated by the seasonal migration of the ITCZ.

  6. Millennial-scale climate variability in response to changing glacial and orbital boundary conditions during the Mid-Pleistocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, Patrizia; Crowhurst, Simon; Drysdale, Russell; Bajo, Petra; Barbante, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    The Mid-Pleistocene transition represents perhaps the most important climate transition in the Quaternary period, yet it is one of the most poorly understood. Although the exact timing and mechanism of the onset of the "100 kyr" regime remain a matter of debate, it is well established that the overall periodicity of the glacial-interglacial cycles changed from a dominant 41 kyr obliquity periodicity prior to ~0.9 Ma to a dominant late Pleistocene 100 kyr variance. This change in the frequency domain was associated with an increase in the amplitude of global ice volume variations that, superimposed on a long-term climatic trend towards more glacial conditions over millions of years, produced some of the most extreme glaciations recorded. This interval of time has often been considered to be important in relation to long-term Milankovitch-scale climate variability. In contrast, here, special emphasis will be placed on assessing the presence and the characteristics of the suborbital-scale variability, and reconstructing the evolution of millennial-scale climate variability as the average climate state evolve toward generally colder conditions with larger ice sheets, and the spectral character of climate variability shifted from dominantly 41 kyr to 100 kyr. Appealing evidence suggests that millennial-scale climate variability is amplified during times of intense forcing changes, but this rapid variability has not been thoroughly explored yet at the time when the major changes in climate periodicity occurred. To address these questions, we have examined the record of climatic conditions from Marine Isotope Stages 25 to 16 (~970-650 ka) using high-resolution stable isotope records from benthic and planktonic foraminifera from a sedimentary sequence in the North Atlantic (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 306, Site U1313) in order to assess millennial-scale changes in sea-surface and deep-water conditions, the dynamics of thermohaline deep-water circulation

  7. Origin of millennial-scale climate instabilities in the subtropical Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billups, K.; Scheinwald, A.; Dahl, P.

    2013-12-01

    We have generated a high resolution (~250-500 year) planktonic foraminiferal stable isotope record (Globigerinoides ruber white, senso lato) spanning Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 6 through 8 in the northwestern subtropical Atlantic (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 172 Site 1059). The record fills a gap in an about 1.3 million year long time series of millennial-scale surface ocean hydrography in this region. We test the hypothesis that sub-orbital climate signals are linked to a response to precession forcing in tropical latitudes. Power spectra provide evidence for an increase in the length of half precession cycles as the 19 kyr precession period disappears from the insolation forcing at about 320 Ka in first order support of the hypothesis. In the time series, half precession (and quarter precession cycles when present) are evident as double (and quadruple) peaks within the given precession framework. However, in the time series there is no match between the amplitude modulation of the precession signal and its harmonics. During the time interval between 340-0 Ka (MIS 9-1) when the temporal resolution is high (250 year time step), the power spectra also contain significant peaks in the Dansgaard-Oeschger band (~1-8-1.5 kyr). Comparison of filter output with the time series, however, illustrates that there are only few instances where these types of variations are distinct in the foraminiferal δ18O record. We conclude that the evolution of half precession cycles over the time interval is largely consistent with a response to low latitude insolation, such as introduced by insolation maxima at the equinoxes and solstices (e.g., Short et al., 1991). Our analysis also shows that quarter precession cycles are present in the time series, at least intermittently, but we cannot uniquely tie them to changes in the primary precession signal. Our study highlights the importance of evaluating variations in the original time series to guide interpretations of significant peaks in

  8. The Arctic Holocene Transitions Proxy Climate Database — Principal Millennial-Scale Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, D. S.; McKay, N.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic Holocene Transitions (AHT) Project is a community-based, PAGES-endorsed effort to investigate centennial-scale variability in the Arctic climate system during the Holocene, and to understand the feedbacks that lead to pronounced changes. The AHT project recently released a major database of Arctic Holocene proxy climate records (Clim. Past-Disc. 10:1). The systematic review of marine and terrestrial proxy climate time series is based on quantitative screening criteria with new approaches for assessing the geochronological accuracy of age models and for characterizing the climate variables represented by the proxies. Records from only 39% of the sites could be found in the primary paleoclimate data repositories, underscoring the importance of such community-based efforts to assembling a comprehensive product. The database authors, including representatives from six Arctic regions, considered published records from nearly 500 sites. Of these, time series from 170 sites met the criteria for inclusion in the database. Namely, the records are located north of 58°N, extend back at least to 6 cal ka (84% extend back > 8 ka), are resolved at sub-millennial scale (at least one value every 400 ± 200 yr) and have age models constrained by at least one age every 3000 yr. The database contains proxy records from lake sediment (60%), marine sediment (32%), glacier ice (5%), and other sources. Most (60%) reflect temperature (mainly summer warmth) and are primarily based on pollen, chironomid or diatom assemblages. Many (15%) reflect some aspect of hydroclimate as inferred from stable isotopes, pollen assemblages, and other indicators. Principal component (PC) analyses indicates that the predominant pattern of change in temperature-sensitive time series is a ramp between 5 and 3 ka that separates millennial-long intervals of less-pronounced change. This shift corresponds to cooling at most sites, but a substantial fraction of sites warm across this transition. Between

  9. Millennial-Scale Climate Variability During a mid-Pleistocene Glacial (MIS 12) from a Terrestrial Lacustrine Record in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawcett, P. J.; Brown, E. T.; Werne, J. P.; Contreras, S.; Anderson, R. S.; Dodd, J. P.; Sharp, Z. D.; Heikoop, J. M.; Allen, C. D.

    2011-12-01

    We present a high-resolution terrestrial climate record from the Valles Caldera, New Mexico which spans some 200,000 years from mid MIS 14 to early MIS 10. The glacial periods represented in the record exhibit millennial-scale Dansgaard-Oeschger like variability, especially in MIS 12, one of the coldest glacials in the Pleistocene. High resolution proxies from core VC-3 including scanning XRF data, sediment density, color, and magnetic susceptibility show approximately 23 millennial-scale oscillations in MIS 12 with an average duration of 2,300 years. Many of these oscillations are characterized by relatively slow coolings followed by abrupt warmings, similar to D-O events in the Greenland ice core record. MBT/CBT MAT estimates in the MIS 12 portion of the core show stadial to interstadial warmings of up to 6 °C. The VC-3 stadials correlate with high percentages of boreal taxa pollen ( Picea, Abies ) (up to 25%) while interstadials have lower boreal pollen percentages (~5%) and many correlate with local maxima in Juniperus> and Quercus> . Significant changes in the hydrologic cycle also occur at these millennial timescales. Oxygen isotope data from diatom silica record changes of up to 10 per mil from stadial to interstadial, probably reflecting a combination of changes in moisture source (Pacific vs. Gulf of Mexico), moisture transport pathway, and the seasonality of precipitation. Several interstadials correlate with increases in Cyperaceae (sedge) pollen suggesting a shallower lake with a broad marshy zone around its margin. This zone was minimized during stadials when the lake was deeper. Interstadial shallowing probably resulted from higher evaporation rates and/or a reduction in winter precipitation. This combination of proxies from the Valles Caldera suggests that glacial stage millennial-scale climate variability in the American southwest was strongly driven by changes in the strength and location of the winter polar jet, which in turn affected the local

  10. Masked millennial-scale climate variations in South West Africa during the last glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessler, I.; Dupont, L.; Handiani, D.; Paul, A.; Merkel, U.; Wefer, G.

    2012-04-01

    To address the connection between tropical African vegetation development and high-latitude climate change we present a high-resolution pollen record from ODP Site 1078 (off Angola) covering the period 50-10 ka BP. Although several tropical African vegetation and climate reconstructions indicate an impact of Heinrich Stadials (HSs) in Southern Hemisphere Africa, our vegetation record shows no response. Model simulations conducted with an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity including a dynamical vegetation component provide one possible explanation. Because both precipitation and evaporation increased during HSs and their effects nearly cancelled each other, there was a negligible change in moisture supply. Consequently, the resulting climatic response to HSs might have been too weak to noticeably affect the vegetation composition in the study area. Our results also show that the response to HSs in southern tropical Africa neither equals nor mirrors the response to abrupt climate change in northern Africa.

  11. A review of millennial-scale climate variability over the past 1.5-million year from marine sediment cores in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodell, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Our view of millennial-scale climate variability is shaped by the last glacial cycle when frequent, large and abrupt temperature changes occurred over Greenland and the North Atlantic, including "Dansgaard-Oeschger" and "Heinrich events". The leading cause to explain these events is freshwater forcing from ice-sheets that affected sea ice extent, heat transport, and Atlantic Meridional Overturing Circulation. Several long records now exist that extend the history of millennial climate variability back to ~1.5 Ma. These records document how suborbital variability evolved as boundary conditions changed throughout the Pleistocene, including the Middle Pleistocene Transition (MPT) when the climate system transitioned from smaller ice volume fluctuations dominated by 41-kyr cycles before 1250 ka to larger ice sheets with quasi 100-kyr cycles after 650 ka. Examination of these records lead to the following observations: Millennial-scale variability was a persistent feature of glacial climates for the past 1.5 Ma. Suborbital climate variability was enhanced during glacial periods ("noisy glacials") and suppressed during full interglacial periods ("quiet intergalcials") The occurrence of strong millennial variability appears to be related to an ice-sheet size/volume threshold (McManus et al., 1999), presumably triggered when ice sheets grow large enough to reach the coast and interact with the ocean. No two glacial cycles were alike with respect to either the magnitude or pacing of millennial climate variability. The most significant change in ice rafted detritus (IRD) that occurred across the MPT was the appearance of Heinrich events, whose widespread occurrence was limited to the last ~650 ka (since MIS 16) The growth of very large ice sheets in the latest Pleistocene introduced a new type of dynamic behavior of the Laurentide Ice Sheet marked by Heinrich layers. IRD and benthic δ13C were tightly coupled during glacials periods for the last 1.5 Ma, supporting a

  12. Millennial scale change in climate and iceberg calving on the Svalbard margin during MIS 2 and 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessen, S. P.; Rasmussen, T. L.

    2009-04-01

    We present results on the millennial scale Dansgaard-Oescger events from the high Arctic (>76N), and the response of the Svalbard-Barents Sea Ice Sheet to rapid climate change. The study is based on the distribution of planktic δ18O values, magnetic susceptibility and the concentration and composition of ice rafted debris (IRD) in two different size fractions in two marine sediment cores from the west Svalbard margin at 1130 and 1880 meter water depth. Both cores cover the Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 2 and 3 in high resolution. The magnetic susceptibility and the oxygen isotope records can be correlated in great detail to previously published records from the southern Norwegian Sea and northern North Atlantic and show a similar pattern of variation with high values during the warm interstadial periods and low values during cold stadial phases. In both cores we find higher IRD concentrations and fluxes during the warm interstadial phases than during the cold stadial phases. The composition of IRD also changes with the millennial scale shifts. In the interstadial phases, the IRD consists of characteristic dark coloured, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks (schists, slates, shales and sandstones) derived from local sources from Svalbard and the Barents Sea. In the stadial phases the IRD is composed predominantly of quartz derived from sources elsewhere. Our results demonstrate that outlet glaciers from the Svalbard-Barents Sea Ice Sheet responded to the interstadial-stadial climatic fluctuations, with highest calving rates during climatic warmth. This is in anti-phase with ice sheets from lower latitudes, i.e. the Icelandic, Scandinavian, and British ice sheets, which have all been reported to calve within the cold stadial phase. The response of the high Arctic ice sheet indicates that ocean and atmospheric heat was the trigger for the iceberg release.

  13. Orbital- to millennial-scale abrupt hydrologic change in central Indonesia during the past 120,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, J. M.; Konecky, B.; Costa, K.; Bijaksana, S.; Vogel, H.; King, J. W.; Cahyarini, S. Y.; Tamuntuan, G. H.; Huang, Y.; Noren, A. J.; Wattrus, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    Oxygen isotopic reconstructions from Chinese speleothems have shown that Asian summer monsoon variability is dominated by 23,000-year precession cycles through much of the late Pleistocene. Recent speleothem 18O/16O records from Borneo suggest that the strong response to precession extends to at least 4°N at the western edge of the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool. Yet climate models indicate that tropical Western Pacific precipitation varies strongly in response to both direct insolation forcing as well as glacial processes, including the extent of ice sheets, atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, and changes in sea level. Unfortunately, long records of terrestrial hydrology from the tropical western Pacific are scarce, limiting our ability to test the influence of these forcings. Here we present a new reconstruction of hydrologic variations spanning the last ~120 kyr BP from Lake Towuti, Sulawesi (2.5° S, 121° E), the largest lake in Indonesia. Our record, based upon sedimentological, geochemical, and compound-specific stable isotopic data, comprises the first long, continuous paleolimnological reconstruction from central Indonesia, and allows a preliminary test of the relative effects of precession versus glacial forcing on tropical western Pacific climate. In particular, we evaluate profiles of magnetic susceptibility, organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations and isotopic compositions, core-scanning x-ray fluoresecence data, and D/H ratios of terrestrial leaf waxes during the past 120 kyr BP, comparing the response of these proxies during the Last Glacial Maximum versus Marine Isotope Stage 5, when 23-kyr insolation cycles were amplified by high eccentricity. Peaks in magnetic susceptibility, high concentrations of terrigenous sediments, and D-depleted terrestrial leaf waxes suggest that the LGM is marked by wet conditions in this part of Indonesia. All proxies exhibit a strong response to the LGM, in contrast to MIS5 when most proxies vary weakly. The strong

  14. Southern Ocean Deep-Convection as a Driver of Centennial-to-Millennial-Scale Climate Variability at Southern High Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, J. B.; Martin, T.; Steig, E. J.; Jochum, M.; Park, W.; Rasmussen, S.

    2014-12-01

    Antarctic Isotope Maxima (AIM) are centennial-to-millennial scale warming events observed in Antarctic ice core records from the last glacial period and deglaciation. Mounting evidence links AIM events to parallel variations in atmospheric CO2, Southern Ocean (SO) sea surface temperatures and Antarctic Bottom Water production. According to the prevailing view, AIM events are forced from the North Atlantic by melt-water discharge from ice sheets suppressing the production of North Atlantic Deep Water and associated northward heat transport in the Atlantic. However observations and model studies increasingly suggest that melt-water fluxes have the wrong timing to be invoked as such a trigger. Here, drawing on results form the Kiel Climate Model, we present an alternative hypothesis in which AIM events are forced via internal oscillations in SO deep-convection. The quasi-periodic timescale of deep-convection events is set by heat (buoyancy) accumulation at SO intermediate depths and stochastic variability in sea ice conditions and freshening at the surface. Massive heat release from the SO convective zone drives Antarctic and large-scale southern hemisphere warming via a two-stage process involving changes in the location of Southern Ocean fronts, in the strength and intensity of the Westerlies and in meridional ocean and atmospheric heat flux anomalies. The potential for AIM events to be driven by internal Southern Ocean processes and the identification of time-lags internal to the southern high latitudes challenges conventional views on the North Atlantic as the pacemaker of millennial-scale climate variability.

  15. Decadal to Millennial Scale Climate Variability in the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steponaitis, E. A.; Keigwin, L. D.

    2009-12-01

    We analyze a 288 centimeter giant gravity core (CH1204 GGC-5) and a 53 centimeter multicore (OCE400 MC-44) from the Jordan Basin in the Gulf of Maine to construct an approximately 10,000 year record of past sea surface temperature. δ18O values and assemblages of planktonic foraminifera species, primarily the left and right coiling varieties of Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, serve as proxies for sea surface temperature. The 10,000 year, low-resolution δ18O record from CH1204 GGC-5 suggests long-term cooling with significant millennial-scale fluctuations; the approximately 200 year, high-resolution δ18O record from OCE400 MC-44 shows a decadal-scale signal with no apparent trend. Comparison of the high-resolution record of OCE400 MC-44 with the low-resolution record of CH1204 GGC-5 is relevant to our understanding of Holocene modes of the North Atlantic Oscillation, the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, and the strength of the Labrador Current.

  16. The Greening of the McGill Paleoclimate Model. Part II: Simulation of Holocene Millennial-Scale Natural Climate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysak, L. A.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Brovkin, V.

    2003-12-01

    Multiple proxy data reveal that the middle Holocene (6 kyr BP) was warmer than the early Holocene (8 kyr BP) as well as the preindustrial period (1700 AD) in most regions of the Northern Hemisphere. This warmth is somewhat counterintuitive because the summer insolation was decreasing during this time. Cooling in the late Holocene (after 6 kyr BP) is hypothesized to be due mainly to the astronomical forcing. This cooling was also accompanied by significant changes in vegetation cover (i.e., treeline retreat from northern high latitudes; the desertification of the Sahara/Sahel region) and a small but gradual increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration (from 260 ppm to 280 ppm). The early-to-middle Holocene warming, on the other hand, is hypothesized to be due in part to ice-albedo feedback in Northern America, associated with decreases in the Laurentide ice sheet, which completely disappeared by 6 kyr BP. The snow-vegetation-albedo feedback is also hypothesized to have played a role in this early warming event. To test the above hypotheses, the earlier geophysical McGill Paleoclimate Model has been coupled to the vegetation model known as VECODE (VEgetation COntinuous DEscription, one of the simpler dynamic global vegetation models), and a number of sensitivity experiments have been performed. The model results illustrate the role that Northern Hemisphere land cover changes played in explaining the natural millennial-scale climate variability from the early Holocene (8 kyr BP) to the preindustrial period (1700 AD).

  17. Millennial-scale vegetation dynamics in an estuary at the onset of the Miocene Climate Optimum

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Andrea; Harzhauser, Mathias; Mandic, Oleg; Roetzel, Reinhard; Ćorić, Stjepan; Bruch, Angela A.; Zuschin, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Pollen analyses have been proven to possess the possibility to decipher rapid vegetational and climate shifts in Neogene sedimentary records. Herein, a c. 21-kyr-long transgression–regression cycle from the Lower Austrian locality Stetten is analysed in detail to evaluate climatic benchmarks for the early phase of the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum and to estimate the pace of environmental change. Based on the Coexistence Approach, a very clear signal of seasonality can be reconstructed. A warm and wet summer season with c. 204–236 mm precipitation during the wettest month was opposed by a rather dry winter season with precipitation of c. 9–24 mm during the driest month. The mean annual temperature ranged between 15.7 and 20.8 °C, with about 9.6–13.3 °C during the cold season and 24.7–27.9 °C during the warmest month. In contrast, today’s climate of this area, with an annual temperature of 9.8 °C and 660 mm rainfall, is characterized by the winter season (mean temperature: −1.4 °C, mean precipitation: 39 mm) and a summer mean temperature of 19.9 °C (mean precipitation: 84 mm). Different modes of environmental shifts shaped the composition of the vegetation. Within few millennia, marshes and salt marshes with abundant Cyperaceae rapidly graded into Taxodiaceae swamps. This quick but gradual process was interrupted by swift marine ingressions which took place on a decadal to centennial scale. The transgression is accompanied by blooms of dinoflagellates and of the green alga Prasinophyta and an increase in Abies and Picea. Afterwards, the retreat of the sea and the progradation of estuarine and wetland settings were a gradual progress again. Despite a clear sedimentological cyclicity, which is related to the 21-kyr precessional forcing, the climate data show little variation. This missing pattern might be due to the buffering of the precessional-related climate signal by the subtropical vegetation. Another explanation could be the method

  18. The nature of millennial-scale climate variability during the last two glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Luke; Margari, Vasiliki; Tzedakis, Chronis; Ganopolski, Andrey; Vautravers, Maryline; Shackleton, Nicholas

    2010-05-01

    During the last glacial period, iceberg discharges into the North Atlantic led to a disruption of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), a cooling of the Northern Hemisphere, and a warming of Antarctica. This asymmetric response has been explained in terms of a bipolar seesaw mechanism, whereby changes in the strength of the AMOC result in changes in interhemispheric heat transport. However, it remains unclear to what extent the response of the AMOC and the operation of the bipolar seesaw may depend on background climate conditions, or the magnitude/delivery of freshwater flux to the North Atlantic. Here we present foraminiferal isotope and pollen records from the Portuguese margin from the last and penultimate glacial periods. A comparison of our records with temperature reconstructions from Antarctica indicates that the bipolar seesaw was a characteristic feature of both glacial periods. However, our comparison also underlines the dependence of the bipolar seesaw on background climate as well as the magnitude of iceberg discharge. Our results suggest that an intensified hydrological cycle may lead to a weaker overturning circulation with a smaller disruption threshold and extended North Atlantic stadial durations.

  19. The nature of millennial-scale climate variability during the past two glacial periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margari, V.; Skinner, L. C.; Tzedakis, P. C.; Ganopolski, A.; Vautravers, M.; Shackleton, N. J.

    2010-02-01

    During the last glacial period, iceberg discharges into the North Atlantic disrupted the meridional overturning circulation, leading to cooling in the Northern Hemisphere and warming in Antarctica. This asymmetric response can be explained by a bipolar see-saw mechanism, whereby changes in the strength of the meridional overturning circulation lead to changes in the interhemispheric heat transport. It is unclear, however, to what extent the response of the overturning circulation is a function of freshwater flux and boundary climate conditions. Here we use foraminiferal isotope and pollen records from the Portuguese margin to reconstruct surface- and deep-water hydrography and atmospheric changes during the last and penultimate glacial periods. When we compare our records with temperature reconstructions from Antarctica, we find that the bipolar see-saw was a characteristic feature of both glacial periods. However, the comparison also underlines the dependence of the bipolar see-saw on background climate and magnitude of iceberg discharge. It also suggests that an intensified hydrological cycle may lead to a weaker overturning circulation with a smaller disruption threshold and extended North Atlantic stadial durations.

  20. Fire-induced erosion and millennial-scale climate change in northern ponderosa pine forests.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Jennifer L; Meyer, Grant A; Jull, A J Timothy

    2004-11-01

    Western US ponderosa pine forests have recently suffered extensive stand-replacing fires followed by hillslope erosion and sedimentation. These fires are usually attributed to increased stand density as a result of fire suppression, grazing and other land use, and are often considered uncharacteristic or unprecedented. Tree-ring records from the past 500 years indicate that before Euro-American settlement, frequent, low-severity fires maintained open stands. However, the pre-settlement period between about ad 1500 and ad 1900 was also generally colder than present, raising the possibility that rapid twentieth-century warming promoted recent catastrophic fires. Here we date fire-related sediment deposits in alluvial fans in central Idaho to reconstruct Holocene fire history in xeric ponderosa pine forests and examine links to climate. We find that colder periods experienced frequent low-severity fires, probably fuelled by increased understory growth. Warmer periods experienced severe droughts, stand-replacing fires and large debris-flow events that comprise a large component of long-term erosion and coincide with similar events in sub-alpine forests of Yellowstone National Park. Our results suggest that given the powerful influence of climate, restoration of processes typical of pre-settlement times may be difficult in a warmer future that promotes severe fires. PMID:15525985

  1. Origin of millennial-scale climate signals in the subtropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billups, Katharina; Scheinwald, Andre

    2014-06-01

    We present a high-resolution planktonic foraminiferal stable isotope record (Globigerinoides ruber) spanning marine oxygen isotope stages (MISs) 6 through 8 in the northwestern subtropical Atlantic Ocean (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 172 Site 1059). The record fills a gap to produce an about 1.3 Myr long continuous time series of high-frequency (> ~1/12 kyr) surface ocean hydrography, the first of this kind. We test the hypothesis that the suborbital climate signals (i.e., half and quarter precession cycles) are linked to precession forcing in tropical latitudes. Semiprecession cycles present between 0 and 320 ka are of the right periodicity to relate to the dominant precession forcing (23 kyr). These cycles are evident as double peaks within the given precession framework, and there is good match in the amplitude modulation of the filter output and the δ18O time series. Quarter precession cycles dominate the suborbital spectra between 320 ka and 1.3 Ma. Periodicities are close to those expected from the harmonics of the dominant precession peaks in the δ18O record, but present in the time series only intermittently, and their amplitude modulation does not match that of the primary precession period. Thus, only the half precession cycles evidence a response to low-latitude insolation such as that introduced by insolation maxima at the equinoxes or solstices during the course of a precession cycle. Additionally, we find well-defined, rapid (~1.5-2 kyr) variations across the first of the interglacial maxima of MIS 7 adding to evidence of non-ice sheet-related forcing factors in driving climate instabilities.

  2. Three climate cycles of millennial-scale vegetation change in Africa (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, L. M.

    2010-12-01

    Marine sediments can deliver long well-dated continuous sequences of environmental change, not only of the ocean but also of the continents. Vegetation records from these archives are often the only land-cover records to encompass several climate cycles. Comparing vegetation development during several cycles uncovers the structural and systematic differences between glacial and interglacial vegetation. Such data may help with the validation of the current earth system models including dynamic vegetation modules. A number of marine pollen records from the East Atlantic (ODP658, GIK16415, GIK16776, GIK16867, GeoB1016) and a new one from the Indian Ocean (MD96-2048) register the vegetation development in West and South Africa over a period of more than 300 thousand years covering at least three full glacial-interglacial cycles. From these dataset typical patterns of vegetation change in Africa are inferred and differences between cycles are discussed. Both latitudinal and altitudinal shifts in the vegetation have been recorded by pollen of e.g. Chenopods, Asteraceae (daisies), Ericaceae (heath), Podocarpus (yellow wood), Poaceae (grass), and lowland forest. While latitudinal shifts in the area of desert and savannah are typical in West Africa, altitudinal changes of the belt with mountainous forest and mountainous shrubs are more common in Southern Africa. During glacial times, vegetation includes ericaceous shrubs in Southern Africa, while desert shrubs expand in West Africa, and the area of the lowland forests is strongly reduced on the whole continent.

  3. Tracking millennial-scale climate change by analysis of the modern summer precipitation in the marginal regions of the Asian monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu; Wang, Nai'ang; Chen, Hongbao; Li, Zhuolun; Zhou, Xuehua; Zhang, Chengqi

    2012-09-01

    The Asian summer monsoon and the westerly winds interact in the mid-latitude regions of East Asia, so that climate change there is influenced by the combined effect of the two climate systems. The Holocene millennial-scale Asian summer monsoon change shows the out-of-phase relationship with the moisture evolution in arid Central Asia. Although much research has been devoted to the long-term climate change, little work has been done on the mechanism. Summer precipitation, in the marginal regions of the Asian monsoon, is strongly affected by the monsoon and the westerly winds. The purpose of this paper is to examine the mechanism of the millennial-scale out-of-phase relationship by modern summer precipitation analysis in the northwest margin of the Asian monsoon (95-110°E, 35-45°N). First, the method of Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis was carried out to the 1960-2008 summer rainfall data from 64 stations in that region; then the water vapor transportation and geopotential height field data were studied, in order to explain and understand the factors that influence the summer precipitation; lastly, the East Asian Summer Monsoon Index (EASMI), South Asian Summer Monsoon Index (SASMI), Summer Westerly Winds Index (SWI) were compared with the EOF time series. The results indicate the complicated interannual-scale interaction between the Asian summer monsoon and the westerly winds, which can result in the modern out-of-phase relationship in the study area. This study demonstrates that the interaction between the two climate systems can be considered as a factor for the millennial-scale out-of-phase relationship.

  4. Abrupt glacial climate shifts controlled by ice sheet changes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Lohmann, Gerrit; Knorr, Gregor; Purcell, Conor

    2014-08-21

    During glacial periods of the Late Pleistocene, an abundance of proxy data demonstrates the existence of large and repeated millennial-scale warming episodes, known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events. This ubiquitous feature of rapid glacial climate change can be extended back as far as 800,000 years before present (BP) in the ice core record, and has drawn broad attention within the science and policy-making communities alike. Many studies have been dedicated to investigating the underlying causes of these changes, but no coherent mechanism has yet been identified. Here we show, by using a comprehensive fully coupled model, that gradual changes in the height of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets (NHISs) can alter the coupled atmosphere-ocean system and cause rapid glacial climate shifts closely resembling DO events. The simulated global climate responses--including abrupt warming in the North Atlantic, a northward shift of the tropical rainbelts, and Southern Hemisphere cooling related to the bipolar seesaw--are generally consistent with empirical evidence. As a result of the coexistence of two glacial ocean circulation states at intermediate heights of the ice sheets, minor changes in the height of the NHISs and the amount of atmospheric CO2 can trigger the rapid climate transitions via a local positive atmosphere-ocean-sea-ice feedback in the North Atlantic. Our results, although based on a single model, thus provide a coherent concept for understanding the recorded millennial-scale variability and abrupt climate changes in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system, as well as their linkages to the volume of the intermediate ice sheets during glacials. PMID:25119027

  5. Abrupt glacial climate shifts controlled by ice sheet changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Lohmann, Gerrit; Knorr, Gregor; Purcell, Conor

    2014-08-01

    During glacial periods of the Late Pleistocene, an abundance of proxy data demonstrates the existence of large and repeated millennial-scale warming episodes, known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events. This ubiquitous feature of rapid glacial climate change can be extended back as far as 800,000 years before present (BP) in the ice core record, and has drawn broad attention within the science and policy-making communities alike. Many studies have been dedicated to investigating the underlying causes of these changes, but no coherent mechanism has yet been identified. Here we show, by using a comprehensive fully coupled model, that gradual changes in the height of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets (NHISs) can alter the coupled atmosphere-ocean system and cause rapid glacial climate shifts closely resembling DO events. The simulated global climate responses--including abrupt warming in the North Atlantic, a northward shift of the tropical rainbelts, and Southern Hemisphere cooling related to the bipolar seesaw--are generally consistent with empirical evidence. As a result of the coexistence of two glacial ocean circulation states at intermediate heights of the ice sheets, minor changes in the height of the NHISs and the amount of atmospheric CO2 can trigger the rapid climate transitions via a local positive atmosphere-ocean-sea-ice feedback in the North Atlantic. Our results, although based on a single model, thus provide a coherent concept for understanding the recorded millennial-scale variability and abrupt climate changes in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system, as well as their linkages to the volume of the intermediate ice sheets during glacials.

  6. Impact of millennial-scale Holocene climate variability on eastern North American terrestrial ecosystems: Pollen-based climatic reconstruction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willard, D.A.; Bernhardt, C.E.; Korejwo, D.A.; Meyers, S.R.

    2005-01-01

    We present paleoclimatic evidence for a series of Holocene millennial-scale cool intervals in eastern North America that occurred every ???1400 years and lasted ???300-500 years, based on pollen data from Chesapeake Bay in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. The cool events are indicated by significant decreases in pine pollen, which we interpret as representing decreases in January temperatures of between 0.2??and 2??C. These temperature decreases include excursions during the Little Ice Age (???1300-1600 AD) and the 8 ka cold event. The timing of the pine minima is correlated with a series of quasi-periodic cold intervals documented by various proxies in Greenland, North Atlantic, and Alaskan cores and with solar minima interpreted from cosmogenic isotope records. These events may represent changes in circumpolar vortex size and configuration in response to intervals of decreased solar activity, which altered jet stream patterns to enhance meridional circulation over eastern North America. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Implications of abrupt climate change.

    PubMed Central

    Alley, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    Records of past climates contained in ice cores, ocean sediments, and other archives show that large, abrupt, widespread climate changes have occurred repeatedly in the past. These changes were especially prominent during the cooling into and warming out of the last ice age, but persisted into the modern warm interval. Changes have especially affected water availability in warm regions and temperature in cold regions, but have affected almost all climatic variables across much or all of the Earth. Impacts of climate changes are smaller if the changes are slower or more-expected. The rapidity of abrupt climate changes, together with the difficulty of predicting such changes, means that impacts on the health of humans, economies and ecosystems will be larger if abrupt climate changes occur. Most projections of future climate include only gradual changes, whereas paleoclimatic data plus models indicate that abrupt changes remain possible; thus, policy is being made based on a view of the future that may be optimistic. PMID:17060975

  8. Geochemical multielement signatures of glacial and interglacial facies of the Okhotsk Sea deepwater sediments during the past 350 kyr: A response to global climate changes at the orbital and millennial scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebykin, Eugene P.; Gorbarenko, Sergey A.; Stepanova, Ol'ga G.; Panov, Vsevolod S.; Goldberg, Evgeny L.

    2015-03-01

    The previously dated deepwater sediment core MR06-04 PC-7R (length 1723 cm; 350 kyr) recovered from the central Okhotsk Sea (OS) was analyzed for biogenic compounds and for 63 chemical elements (using the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry method) with a high resolution (1 cm; ~200 years). A one box model with two main members" and mathematical methods (based on multielemental composition of sediments) for the calculation of weight fractions (at each time slice) of two main types of geochemical facies that dominate during considerably diverse climatic periods (glacial maxima and interglacial optima) were proposed and tested. This model can be applied to other analogous natural systems whose sedimentation is driven by two main types of geochemical facies. The application of the developed model to the studied core revealed that variations of weight fractions of the typical interglacial and glacial geochemical facies in the sediments along the core depth (named as warm and cold "covariators," respectively) change synchronously with global and regional climate variability. Profiles of warm and inversed cold covariators coincide tightly, and their values increase during warm marine isotope stages and substages and decrease during cold ones over the last 350 kyr. Millennial scale changes in covariators had occurred simultaneously with abrupt variability in the OS productivity and sediment lithology and with millennial global climate variability. Some discrepancies in the warm and inversed cold covariators calculated using specific mathematical treatments revealed the episodic influence of volcanogenic matter presented in the core by visible tephra layers and cryptotephras.

  9. Dinoflagellate cysts as indicators of millennial scale climatic and oceanographic variability in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (Mexico) during the Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Andrea M.; Mertens, Kenneth N.; Pospelova, *Vera; Pedersen, Thomas F.; Ganeshram, Raja S.

    2015-04-01

    A high-resolution record of organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst production in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (Mexico) reveals a complex paleoceanographic history over the last ~40 ka. Guaymas Basin is an excellent location to perform high resolution studies of changes in Late Quaternary climate and paleo-productivity because it is characterized by high primary productivity, high sedimentation rates, and low oxygen bottom waters. These factors contribute to the deposition and preservation of laminated sediments throughout large portions of core MD02-2515. This is one of the first studies in the Northeast Pacific to document dinoflagellate cyst production at a centennial to millennial scale throughout the Late Quaternary. Based on the cyst assemblages three major dinoflagellate cyst zones were established, and roughly correspond to Marine Isotope Stages 1 to 3. The most dominant dinoflagellate cyst taxa found throughout the core were Brigantedinium spp. and Operculodinium centrocarpum. Dansgaard-Oeschger event 8 is observed in the dinoflagellate cyst record, and is characterized by an increase in warm water taxa such as Spiniferites pachydermus. Other intervals of interest are the Younger Dryas where cooler sea-surface conditions are not recorded, and the Holocene which is characterized by the consistent presence of warm water species Stelladinium reidii, Tuberculodinidum vancampoae, Bitectatodinium spongium and an increase in Quinquecuspis concreta. Changes in cyst assemblages, concentrations and species diversity, along with geochemical data reflect major orbital to millennial-scale climatic and oceanographic changes. Keywords: Dansgaard-Oeschger events; dinoflagellate cyst; Gulf of California; late Quaternary climate change; upwelling; Younger Dryas.

  10. Astronomical forcing, insolation and millennial-scale climate variability: evidence from the North Atlantic Ocean (IODP Expedition 306, Site U1313) during the Early-Middle Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, Patrizia; Crowhurst, Simon; Naafs, David; Barbante, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Hays, Imbrie and Shackleton (1976), a plethora of studies mostly based on marine sediments collected during DSDP-ODP-IODP Expeditions has demonstrated a correlation between orbital variations and climatic change. However, information on how changes in orbital boundary conditions affected the frequency and amplitude of millennial-scale climate variability is still fragmentary. Here we examine the record of climatic conditions from MIS 23 to 17 (c. 920-670 ka) using high-resolution stable isotope records from benthic and planktonic foraminifera from a sedimentary sequence in the North Atlantic (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 306, Site U1313) in order to evaluate the climate system's response in the millennial band to known orbitally induced insolation changes. Special emphasis is placed on Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 19, an interglacial centred at around 785 ka during which the insolation appears comparable to the current orbital geometry: MIS 19 is characterised by a minimum of the 400-kyr eccentricity cycle, subdued amplitude of precessional changes, and small amplitude variations in insolation making this marine isotopic stage a potential astronomical analogue for the Holocene and its future evolution, if this remains governed by natural forcing (Loutre and Berger 2000). Benthic and planktonic foraminiferal oxygen isotope values indicate relatively stable conditions during the peak warmth of MIS 19, but sea-surface and deep-water reconstructions start diverging during the transition towards the glacial MIS 18, when large, cold excursions disrupt the surface waters whereas low amplitude millennial scale fluctuations persist in the deep waters as recorded by the oxygen isotope signal (Ferretti et al., 2015). The glacial inception occurred at ˜779 ka, in agreement with an increased abundance of tetra-unsaturated alkenones, reflecting the influence of icebergs and associated meltwater pulses and high-latitude waters at the study

  11. Climatically related millennial-scale fluctuations in strength of California margin oxygen-minimum zone during the past 60 k.y.

    SciTech Connect

    Cannariato, K.G.; Kennett, J.P.

    1999-11-01

    A strong oxygen-minimum zone (OMZ) currently exists along the California margin because of a combination of high surface-water productivity and poor intermediate-water ventilation. However, the strength of this OMZ may have been sensitive to late Quaternary ocean-circulation and productivity changes along the margin. Although sediment-lamination strength has been used to trace ocean-oxygenation changes in the past, oxygen levels on the open margin are not sufficiently low for laminations to form. In these regions, benthic foraminifera are highly sensitive monitors of OMZ strength, and their fossil assemblages can be used to reconstruct past fluctuations. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1017, off Point Conception, exhibit major and rapid faunal oscillations in response to late Quaternary millennial-scale climate change (Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles) on the open central California margin. These faunal oscillations can be correlated to and are apparently synchronous with those reported from Santa Barbara Basin. Together they represent major fluctuations in the strength of the OMZ which were intimately associated with global climate change--weakening, perhaps disappearing, during cool periods and strengthening during warm periods. These rapid, major OMZ strength fluctuations were apparently widespread on the Northeast Pacific margin and must have influenced the evolution of margin biota and altered biogeochemical cycles with potential feedbacks to global climate change.

  12. Agulhas salt-leakage oscillations during abrupt climate changes of the Late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Gianluca; Zahn, Rainer; Ziegler, Martin; Purcell, Conor; Knorr, Gregor; Hall, Ian R.; Ziveri, Patrizia; Elderfield, Henry

    2013-09-01

    An ensemble of new, high-resolution records of surface ocean hydrography from the Indian-Atlantic oceanic gateway, south of Africa, demonstrates recurrent and high-amplitude salinity oscillations in the Agulhas Leakage area during the penultimate glacial-interglacial cycle. A series of millennial-scale salinification events, indicating strengthened salt leakage into the South Atlantic, appear to correlate with abrupt changes in the North Atlantic climate and Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). This interhemispheric coupling, which plausibly involved changes in the Hadley Cell and midlatitude westerlies that impacted the interocean transport at the tip of Africa, suggests that the Agulhas Leakage acted as a source of negative buoyancy for the perturbed AMOC, possibly aiding its return to full strength. Our finding points to the Indian-to-Atlantic salt transport as a potentially important modulator of the AMOC during the abrupt climate changes of the Late Pleistocene.

  13. Can uncertain landscape evolution models discriminate between landscape responses to stable and changing future climate? A millennial-scale test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temme, A. J. A. M.; Baartman, J. E. M.; Schoorl, J. M.

    2009-10-01

    In the light of increasing societal interest in the effects of climate change, geomorphologists face the task of discriminating between natural landscape changes and landscape changes that result from human-induced climate change. Landscape Evolution Models (LEMs) are available for this purpose, but their application for prediction of future landscapes is problematic. Calibration of LEMs on a sufficiently long palaeo-record of landscape change solves some of these problems, but large uncertainties in input (e.g. climate) records and process descriptions remain. Using one of the few existing ka-scale LEM studies as starting point, this paper explores how uncertainty in the LEM LAPSUS (LandscApe ProcesS modelling at mUlti dimensions and scaleS, [Schoorl, J.M., Veldkamp, A. and Bouma, J., 2002. Modeling water and soil redistribution in a dynamic landscape context. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 66(5): 1610-1619]) affects its ability to discriminate future one-thousand year landscape change under stable climate from that under human-induced changed climate. Okhombe Valley in South Africa is used as a case study area. LEM uncertainty is characterized by different levels of parameter uncertainty. Results indicate that even under high levels of parameter uncertainty, LEM LAPSUS discriminates between responses to stable and changed climates for some zones in the landscape. Although confidence in model predictions remains limited, some explorative and relative conclusions about the effects of changed climate on future landscape evolution of Okhombe Valley are drawn. Finally, some possibilities and limitations of future studies on landscape evolution under changing climate are discussed.

  14. Relaxation Oscillations as a Mechanism of Abrupt Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, O.; Jackson, C.; Nilsson, J.; Paul, A.; Stocker, T.

    2007-12-01

    Climate variability at the millennial time scale is difficult to rationalize, as the frequency 0.001 1/yr falls near the middle of a wide gap in the spectrum of external forcing on the climate system (between the low-frequency orbital components and the high-frequency tidal components). This situation prompted interest in the possibility for the climate system to undergo self-sustained or self-excited oscillations. Our contribution will comprise two parts. First, we will review elements from the theory of non-linear vibrations that provide a framework for the discussion of the fundamental mechanisms responsible for millennial-scale climate variability. Particular emphasis will be put on the self-sustained oscillations that occur in physical systems with one degree of freedom. In such systems self-sustained oscillations arise from the nonlinear dependence of the damping force on velocity. In the limit of very large nonlinearity, the oscillator stores energy for a relatively long period of time and releases this energy in a relatively short time, i.e., the oscillations are strongly asymmetric (relaxation oscillations). Second, we will examine the self-sustained oscillations of the meridional overturning circulation simulated by an ocean circulation model when subject to large freshwater forcing (salt addition at low latitudes and salt extraction at high latitudes). A scaling analysis provides evidence that these oscillations can be fundamentally interpreted as relaxation oscillations : the model ocean stores potential energy in the form of an unstable vertical temperature gradient for a relatively long period of time (phase of reduced MOC) and converts this potential energy into kinetic energy (phase of intense MOC) when the unstable vertical temperature gradient dominates the stable vertical salinity gradient in the density stratification. The merits and weaknesses of the hypothesis of relaxation oscillations as a mechanism of abrupt climate change will be discussed.

  15. Decadal to millennial-scale solar forcing of Last Glacial Maximum climate in the Estancia Basin of central New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menking, Kirsten M.

    2015-05-01

    Lacustrine sediments from the Estancia Basin of central New Mexico reveal decadal to millennial oscillations in the volume of Lake Estancia during Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) time. LGM sediments consist of authigenic carbonates, detrital clastics delivered to the lake in stream flow pulses, and evaporites that precipitated in mudflats exposed during lake lowstands and were subsequently blown into the lake. Variations in sediment mineralogy thus reflect changes in hydrologic balance and were quantified using Rietveld analysis of X-ray diffraction traces. Radiocarbon dates on ostracode valve calcite allowed the construction of mineralogical time series for the interval ~ 23,600 to ~ 18,300 ka, which were subjected to spectral analysis using REDFIT (Schulz and Mudelsee, 2002). Dominant periods of ~ 900, ~ 375, and ~ 265 yr are similar to cycles in Holocene 14C production reported for a variety of tree ring records, suggesting that the Lake Estancia sediments record variations in solar activity during LGM time. A prominent spectral peak with a period of ~ 88 yr appears to reflect the solar Gleissberg cycle and may help, along with the ~ 265 yr cycle, to explain an ongoing mystery about how Lake Estancia was able to undergo abrupt expansions without overflowing its drainage basin.

  16. Investigating the spatial expression of millennial-scale Holocene climate changes: a multi-proxy lake sediment approach, Finnish Lapland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fower, D.; Wilson, G. P.; Pepin, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    Recent research has identified global Holocene climate instability. Oscillations at c. 2500 year intervals, identified in ocean and ice core records, are thought to be driven by solar variation. The North Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC), a regulator of climate, oscillates with quasi-periodicities of c. 1500 years, the cause and spatial expression of which is uncertain. This project investigates how these subtle oscillations influenced the climate of northern Scandinavia through high-resolution, multi-proxy analysis (diatoms, isotope geochemistry, organic content, particle size, biogenic silica) of a lacustrine sediment sequence in Northern Finland. The resulting high-resolution, multi-proxy climate record clarifies the role of the THC in driving terrestrial climate change in this region. A 1.99m sediment core was extracted from Sirrajärvi, Northern Finnish Lapland in March 2012. Lake Sirrajävri (69.761619oN, 26.892815oE) is located 208 m.a.s.l. and lies at the boreal forest-alpine tundra ecotone. It is surrounded by low alpine heaths and isolated stands of birch (Betula pubescens spp. tortuosa). The lake is situated within a nature reserve, and <4km to Kevo subarctic research station, which houses a meteorological station with >50 yrs. of observations. The lake, which is 0.182 km2 in area and 11.2m deep at the centre, is ice covered between Sept. and May. The duration of lake ice cover is the main influencing factor on lake physio- chemistry and thus diatom ecology. The lake is hydrologically open and δ18O analysis of its waters (-11.2‰) predominantly reflects the mean annual weighted isotopic composition of precipitation. The core has been dated at 11160 yrs BP at 195cm and 2810 yrs BP at 69cm. In addition, sediment was collected from 30 lakes along a north-south transect in Finland in July 2012 to form the basis of a diatom-based transfer function, used to identify the major influencing variable(s) on diatom species assemblages which, in turn, is

  17. Holocene multidecadal- to millennial-scale variations in Iceland-Scotland overflow and their relationship to climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mjell, Tor Lien; Ninnemann, Ulysses S.; Eldevik, Tor; Kleiven, Helga Kikki F.

    2015-05-01

    The Nordic Seas overflows are an important part of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation. While there is growing evidence that the overflow of dense water changed on orbital time scales during the Holocene, less is known about the variability on shorter time scales beyond the instrumental record. Here we reconstruct the relative changes in flow strength of Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW), the eastern branch of the overflows, on multidecadal-millennial time scales. The reconstruction is based on mean sortable silt (SS>¯) from a sediment core on the Gardar Drift (60°19'N, 23°58'W, 2081 m). Our SS>¯ record reveals that the main variance in ISOW vigor occurred on millennial time scales (1-2 kyr) with particularly prominent fluctuations after 8 kyr. Superimposed on the millennial variability, there were multidecadal-centennial flow speed fluctuations during the early Holocene (10-9 kyr) and one prominent minimum at 0.9 kyr. We find a broad agreement between reconstructed ISOW and regional North Atlantic climate, where a strong (weak) ISOW is generally associated with warm (cold) climate. We further identify the possible contribution of anomalous heat and freshwater forcing, respectively, related to reconstructed overflow variability. We infer that ocean poleward heat transport can explain the relationship between regional climate and ISOW during the middle to late Holocene, whereas freshwater input provides a possible explanation for the reduced overflow during early Holocene (8-10 kyr).

  18. Millennial scale system impulse response of polar climates - deconvolution results between δ 18O records from Greenland and Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischmann, E.; Yang, X.; Rial, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Deconvolution has long been used in science to recover real input given a system's impulse response and output. In this study, we applied spectral division deconvolution to select, polar, δ 18O time series to investigate the possible relationship between the climates of the Polar Regions, i.e. the equivalent to a climate system's ';impulse response.' While the records may be the result of nonlinear processes, deconvolution remains an appropriate tool because the two polar climates are synchronized, forming a Hilbert transform pair. In order to compare records, the age models of three Greenland and four Antarctica records have been matched via a Monte Carlo method using the methane-matched pair GRIP and BYRD as a basis for the calculations. For all twelve polar pairs, various deconvolution schemes (Wiener, Damped Least Squares, Tikhonov, Kalman filter) give consistent, quasi-periodic, impulse responses of the system. Multitaper analysis reveals strong, millennia scale, quasi-periodic oscillations in these system responses with a range of 2,500 to 1,000 years. These are not symmetric, as the transfer function from north to south differs from that of south to north. However, the difference is systematic and occurs in the predominant period of the deconvolved signals. Specifically, the north to south transfer function is generally of longer period than the south to north transfer function. High amplitude power peaks at 5.0ky to 1.7ky characterize the former, while the latter contains peaks at mostly short periods, with a range of 2.5ky to 1.0ky. Consistent with many observations, the deconvolved, quasi-periodic, transfer functions share the predominant periodicities found in the data, some of which are likely related to solar forcing (2.5-1.0ky), while some are probably indicative of the internal oscillations of the climate system (1.6-1.4ky). The approximately 1.5 ky transfer function may represent the internal periodicity of the system, perhaps even related to the

  19. Northern Rocky Mountain Wildfires and Debris Flows: Millennial-Scale Interactions among Climate, Fire, Vegetation, and Geomorphic Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, J. L.; Riley, K. E.; Weppner, K.

    2012-12-01

    As summer droughts and rising temperatures in the Western U.S. continue to fuel large wildfires, understanding the role of fire in mountain ecosystems becomes increasingly relevant. Past relationships among fire, climate, and vegetation change may help place recent fires within a historic context. In addition, post-fire floods and debris flows contribute large amounts of sediment to rivers and streams. Quantifying fire-related sediment inputs is important for disciplines ranging from stream ecology to landscape evolution. We examine evidence of fires and related hillslope erosion through 14C dating of alluvial charcoal fragments preserved in Holocene fire-related deposits in alluvial fans and stream sediments throughout a range of ecosystems in Idaho, USA. In addition, we measure sediment yields from recent fire-related debris flows and extrapolate the contribution of fire-related sediment inputs to streams over millennial timescales. Over Holocene timescales, independent records of forest-fires and fire-related erosion from ecosystems ranging from sagebrush steppe, pinion-juniper, ponderosa pine, lodgepole pine and mixed conifer forests indicate that sedimentation rates and processes on alluvial fans vary temporally with Holocene climate, and spatially with vegetation type. Despite variations in ecosystem type and associated fire regimes, many sites show similar broad-scale patterns. During the Pleistocene-Holocene transition large fires burned across many ecosystems. The mid-Holocene (~4-8 ka) is characterized by few fire-related deposits; however, this relatively fire-free interval is punctuated by fire peaks and associated sheetflooding ~7-6 ka. Since regional paleoclimatic reconstructions indicate the mid-Holocene was generally warm and dry the lack of fire is somewhat counterintuitive; however, decreased fuel loads, combined with perhaps a more stable climate may reduce fire and storm intensity and frequency. The late Holocene (last ~3 ka) cooler, wetter and

  20. Estimating changes in temperature extremes from millennial-scale climate simulations using generalized extreme value (GEV) distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Whitney K.; Stein, Michael L.; McInerney, David J.; Sun, Shanshan; Moyer, Elisabeth J.

    2016-07-01

    Changes in extreme weather may produce some of the largest societal impacts of anthropogenic climate change. However, it is intrinsically difficult to estimate changes in extreme events from the short observational record. In this work we use millennial runs from the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) in equilibrated pre-industrial and possible future (700 and 1400 ppm CO2) conditions to examine both how extremes change in this model and how well these changes can be estimated as a function of run length. We estimate changes to distributions of future temperature extremes (annual minima and annual maxima) in the contiguous United States by fitting generalized extreme value (GEV) distributions. Using 1000-year pre-industrial and future time series, we show that warm extremes largely change in accordance with mean shifts in the distribution of summertime temperatures. Cold extremes warm more than mean shifts in the distribution of wintertime temperatures, but changes in GEV location parameters are generally well explained by the combination of mean shifts and reduced wintertime temperature variability. For cold extremes at inland locations, return levels at long recurrence intervals show additional effects related to changes in the spread and shape of GEV distributions. We then examine uncertainties that result from using shorter model runs. In theory, the GEV distribution can allow prediction of infrequent events using time series shorter than the recurrence interval of those events. To investigate how well this approach works in practice, we estimate 20-, 50-, and 100-year extreme events using segments of varying lengths. We find that even using GEV distributions, time series of comparable or shorter length than the return period of interest can lead to very poor estimates. These results suggest caution when attempting to use short observational time series or model runs to infer infrequent extremes.

  1. Reconstruction of Centennial and Millennial-scale Climate and Environmental Variability during the Holocene in the Central Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, N.; Porinchu, D.; MacDonald, G.; Moser, K.

    2007-12-01

    The Arctic and sub-Arctic regions are experiencing dramatic changes in surface temperature, sea-ice extent, glacial melt, river discharge, soil carbon storage and snow cover. According to the IPCC high latitude regions are expected to warm between 4°C and 7°C over the next 100 years. The magnitude of warming and the rate at which it occurs will dwarf any previous warming episodes experienced by latitude regions over the last 11,000 years. It is critical that we improve our understanding of how the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions responded to past periods of warming, especially in light of the changes these regions will be experiencing over the next 100 years. One of the lines of evidence increasingly utilized in multi-proxy paleolimnological research is the Chironomidae (Insecta: Diptera). Also known as non-biting midge flies, chironomids are ubiquitous, frequently the most abundant insects found in freshwater ecosystems and very sensitive to environmental conditions. This research uses Chironomidae to quantitatively characterize climate and environmental conditions of the continental interior of Arctic Canada during the Holocene. Spanning four major vegetation zones (boreal forest, forest-tundra, birch tundra and herb tundra), the surface samples of 80 lakes recovered from the central Canadian Arctic were used to assess the relationship of 22 environmental variables with the chironomid distribution. Redundancy analysis (RDA) identified four variables, total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), pH, summer surface water temperature (SSWT) and depth, which best explain the variance in the distribution of chironomids within these ecoregions. In order to provide new quantitative estimates of SSWT, a 1-component weighted average partial least square (WA-PLS) model was developed (r2jack = 0.76, RMSEP = 1.42°C) and applied downcore in two low arctic continental Nunavut lakes located approximately 50 km and 200 km north of modern treeline. This robust midge-inferred temperature

  2. Sub-Millennial Scale Climatic and Hydrologic Variability in the Gulf of Mexico during the Early Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodico, J. M.; Flower, B. P.; Quinn, T. M.

    2005-12-01

    Sediment core MD02-2550 from Orca Basin located in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) provides a high-resolution early Holocene record of climatic and hydrologic changes from ~10.5 to 7 thousand calendar years before present (ka). Paired analyses of Mg/Ca and δ18O on the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber (white variety, 250-355 μm) sampled at ~ 20 year resolution were used to generate proxy records of sea surface temperature (SST) and the δ18O of seawater in the GOM (δ18OGOM). The Mg/Ca-SST record contains an overall ~(~1.5 °C warming trend from 10.5 to 7 ka that appears to track the intensity of the annual insolation cycle and six temperature oscillations (~0.5-2 °C), the frequency of which are consistent with those found in records of solar variability. The δ18OGOM record contains five ~0.5 ‰ oscillations from 10.5 to 7 ka that bear some resemblance to regional hydrologic records from Haiti and the Cariaco Basin, plus a ~ -0.8 ‰ excursion that may be associated with the "8.2 ka event" recorded in Greenland air temperatures. The δ18OGOM record, if interpreted as a salinity proxy, suggest large salinity fluctuations (> 2 ‰) reflecting changes in evaporation-precipitation (E-P) and Mississippi River input to the GOM. Percent Globigerinoides sacculifer records from three cores in the GOM exhibit remarkably coherent changes, suggesting episodic centennial-scale incursions of Caribbean waters. Spectral analysis of the Mg/Ca-SST and the δ18OGOM time series indicate that surface water conditions may be influenced by solar variations because they share significant periods of variability with atmospheric Δ14C near 700, 200, and 80-70 years. Our results add to the growing body of evidence that the sub-tropics were characterized by significant decadal to centennial-scale climatic and hydrologic variability during the early Holocene.

  3. Holocene lake salinity changes in the Wimmera, southeastern Australia, provide evidence for millennial-scale climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Justine; Radke, Lynda C.; Olley, Jon; Juggins, Steve; De Deckker, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Palaeosalinity records for groundwater-influenced lakes in the southwest Murray Basin were constructed from an ostracod-based, weighted-averaging transfer function, supplemented with evidence from Campylodiscus clypeus (diatom), charophyte oogonia, Coxiella striata (gastropod), Elphidium sp. (foraminifera), Daphniopsis sp. ephippia (Cladocera), and brine shrimp (Parartemia zietziana) faecal pellets, the δ18O of ostracods, and > 130 μm quartz sand counts. The chronology is based on optically stimulated luminescence and calibrated radiocarbon ages. Relatively wet conditions are marked by lower salinities between 9600 yr and 5700 yr ago, but mutually exclusive high- and low-salinity ostracod communities suggest substantial variability in effective precipitation in the early Holocene. A drier climate was firmly in place by 4500 yr and is marked at the groundwater-dominated NW Jacka Lake by an increase in aeolian quartz and, at Jacka Lake, by a switch from surface-water to groundwater dominance. Short-lived, low-salinity events at 8800, 7200, 5900, 4800, 2400, 1300 and 400 yr are similar in timing and number to those recorded on Australia's southern continental shelf, and globally, and provide evidence for the existence of the ~ 1500-yr cycle in mainland southern Australia. We surmise that these are cool events associated with periodic equatorward shifts in the westerly wind circulation.

  4. Laurentide Ice Sheet meltwater and abrupt climate change during the last glaciation

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, H W; Flower, B P; Quinn, T M; Hollander, D J; Guilderson, T P

    2005-10-02

    A leading hypothesis to explain abrupt climate change during the last glacial cycle calls on fluctuations in the margin of the North American Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS), which may have routed freshwater between the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and North Atlantic, affecting North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) variability and regional climate. Paired measurements of {delta}O and Mg/Ca of foraminiferal calcite from GOM sediments reveal five episodes of LIS meltwater input from 28-45 thousand years ago (ka) that do not match the millennial-scale Dansgaard-Oeschger (D/O) warmings recorded in Greenland ice. We suggest that summer melting of the LIS may occur during Antarctic warming and likely contributed to sea-level variability during Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3).

  5. Abrupt climate change and extinction events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    There is a growing body of theoretical and empirical support for the concept of instabilities in the climate system, and indications that abrupt climate change may in some cases contribute to abrupt extinctions. Theoretical indications of instabilities can be found in a broad spectrum of climate models (energy balance models, a thermohaline model of deep-water circulation, atmospheric general circulation models, and coupled ocean-atmosphere models). Abrupt transitions can be of several types and affect the environment in different ways. There is increasing evidence for abrupt climate change in the geologic record and involves both interglacial-glacial scale transitions and the longer-term evolution of climate over the last 100 million years. Records from the Cenozoic clearly show that the long-term trend is characterized by numerous abrupt steps where the system appears to be rapidly moving to a new equilibrium state. The long-term trend probably is due to changes associated with plate tectonic processes, but the abrupt steps most likely reflect instabilities in the climate system as the slowly changing boundary conditions caused the climate to reach some threshold critical point. A more detailed analysis of abrupt steps comes from high-resolution studies of glacial-interglacial fluctuations in the Pleistocene. Comparison of climate transitions with the extinction record indicates that many climate and biotic transitions coincide. The Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction is not a candidate for an extinction event due to instabilities in the climate system. It is quite possible that more detailed comparisons and analysis will indicate some flaws in the climate instability-extinction hypothesis, but at present it appears to be a viable candidate as an alternate mechanism for causing abrupt environmental changes and extinctions.

  6. The effect of abrupt climate changes and climate background conditions in Southern Europe during the last glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Gregor; Martin-Puertas, Celia; Brauer, Achim; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    The last glacial period is characterized by abrupt and large temperature shifts in Greenland and the North Atlantic realm. Pollen and sediment data from Lago Grande di Monticchio (MON) have demonstrated a clear imprint of these fluctuations operating at millennial time-scales. Interestingly, basic mean environmental condition changes with respect to temperature and precipitation occurred during MIS4, separating warm and dry conditions during MIS5 from relatively cold and humid conditions within MIS3. This general climate background shift is superposed by distinct millennial-scale variability at MON. Using a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model applying boundary conditions at 32 ka BP and pre-industrial conditions as a surrogate for MIS3 and MIS5, we have simulated and analysed characteristic changes in Southern Europe during the last glacial. We find that changes in the mean state at MON are mainly related to a partial shift of the North Atlantic deep water (NADW) convection sites from the Nordic Seas to South of Iceland, the presence of the Fennoscandian ice sheet and lower greenhouse gas concentrations. These background characteristics provide the basis for enhanced zonal moisture transport from the eastern North Atlantic to Middle and Southern Europe. Furthermore, simulations of abrupt climate change scenarios show that a deactivation of the convection sites South of Iceland during MIS3 leads to cooler and dryer conditions at MON. Such temperature and precipitation changes are thought to provide a counter-acting effect on woody vegetation and associated pollen signals at MON. This is in contrast to the impact of abrupt climate perturbation scenarios during MIS5, where no significant precipitation changes are detected. Hence, the simulated changes and underlying mechanisms are largely consistent with the recorded proxy evidence with respect to both, mean state and millennial-scale changes.

  7. Abrupt climate change: can society cope?

    PubMed

    Hulme, Mike

    2003-09-15

    Consideration of abrupt climate change has generally been incorporated neither in analyses of climate-change impacts nor in the design of climate adaptation strategies. Yet the possibility of abrupt climate change triggered by human perturbation of the climate system is used to support the position of both those who urge stronger and earlier mitigative action than is currently being contemplated and those who argue that the unknowns in the Earth system are too large to justify such early action. This paper explores the question of abrupt climate change in terms of its potential implications for society, focusing on the UK and northwest Europe in particular. The nature of abrupt climate change and the different ways in which it has been defined and perceived are examined. Using the example of the collapse of the thermohaline circulation (THC), the suggested implications for society of abrupt climate change are reviewed; previous work has been largely speculative and has generally considered the implications only from economic and ecological perspectives. Some observations about the implications from a more social and behavioural science perspective are made. If abrupt climate change simply implies changes in the occurrence or intensity of extreme weather events, or an accelerated unidirectional change in climate, the design of adaptation to climate change can proceed within the existing paradigm, with appropriate adjustments. Limits to adaptation in some sectors or regions may be reached, and the costs of appropriate adaptive behaviour may be large, but strategy can develop on the basis of a predicted long-term unidirectional change in climate. It would be more challenging, however, if abrupt climate change implied a directional change in climate, as, for example, may well occur in northwest Europe following a collapse of the THC. There are two fundamental problems for society associated with such an outcome: first, the future changes in climate currently being

  8. The Science of Abrupt Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overpeck, J. T.

    2002-12-01

    The issue of abrupt climate change has been highlighted by a recent National Academy of Sciences (NRC) study as one of the most troubling potential aspects of future global climate change. The science of abrupt climate change originated in the discovery and study of huge climatic shifts during the last glacial period, particularly in and around the North Atlantic. We now know that ocean thermohaline circulation and circum-North Atlantic climate can change in hard-to-anticipate non-linear ways, and that this type of threat is still very real for the future. At the same time, attention is increasingly being focused on other, equally serious, types of potential "warm climate" abrupt climate change. Worldwide, there is abundant paleoenvironmental evidence for decades-long "megadroughts" that, for example, seemingly occurred on average once or twice a millennium in North America. Dramatic shifts in El Nino - Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability have also occurred in the past, and could be linked to the occurrence of past megadroughts. Evidence also exists that supports the assertion that the frequency of major floods, and/or landfalls by the largest tropical storms, can change significantly and abruptly. However, as with abrupt shifts in ENSO or drought frequency/duration, we still have only an imperfect observational record, and worse, little proven basis for prediction. This is one reason why abrupt change poses a significant threat to technologically-advanced, as well as developing countries. Major abrupt sea level rise is also a major threat, but again, the paleoclimate record indicates that our understanding of processes related to ice cap melting are not as good as we would like. Given that abrupt climatic changes could occur even in the absence of significant anthropogenic climate change, society should act soon to reduce vulnerabilities. However, the most troubling aspect of the issue is that global warming will likely act to increase the probability of

  9. Coupled ocean-land millennial-scale changes 1.26 million years ago, recorded at Site U1385 off Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzedakis, P. C.; Margari, V.; Hodell, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    While a growing body of evidence indicates that North Atlantic millennial-scale climate variability extends to the Early Pleistocene, its impact on terrestrial ecosystems has not been established. Here we present ultra-high resolution (70-140 year) joint foraminiferal isotopic and pollen analyses from IODP Site U1385 off Portugal, focusing on a short glacial section of Marine Isotope Stage 38, ~ 1.26 million years ago. Our records reveal the presence of millennial-scale variability in the coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system in the North Atlantic and provide the first direct evidence for the response of western Iberian vegetation to abrupt climate changes in the Early Pleistocene. The magnitude and pacing of changes bear significant similarities to Dansgaard-Oeschger variability of the last two glacials.

  10. Coupling of millennial-scale changes in sea surface temperature and precipitation off northeastern Brazil with high-latitude climate shifts during the last glacial period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeschke, Andrea; Rühlemann, Carsten; Arz, Helge; Heil, Gerrit; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2007-12-01

    High-resolution records of alkenone-derived sea surface temperatures and elemental Ti/Ca ratios from a sediment core retrieved off northeastern Brazil (4°S) reveal short-term climate variability throughout the past 63,000 a. Large pulses of terrigenous sediment discharge, caused by increased precipitation in the Brazilian hinterland, coincide with Heinrich events and the Younger Dryas period. Terrigenous input maxima related to Heinrich events H6-H2 are characterized by rapid cooling of surface water ranging between 0.5° and 2°C. This signature is consistent with a climate model experiment where a reduction of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and related North Atlantic cooling causes intensification of NE trade winds and a southward movement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, resulting in enhanced precipitation off northeastern Brazil. During deglaciation the surface temperature evolution at the core site predominantly followed the Antarctic warming trend, including a cooling, prior to the Younger Dryas period. An abrupt temperature rise preceding the onset of the Bølling/Allerød transition agrees with model experiments suggesting a Southern Hemisphere origin for the abrupt resumption of the AMOC during deglaciation caused by Southern Ocean warming and associated with northward flow anomalies of the South Atlantic western boundary current.

  11. Approaching the Edge of Abrupt Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadhin, C.; Yi, C.

    2015-12-01

    The phenomenon of Abrupt Climate Change (ACC) became evident as paleoclimate data analyses began revealing that Earth's climate has the ability to rapidly switch from one state to the next in just a few decades after thresholds are crossed. Previously paleo-climatologists thought these switches were gradual but now there is growing concern to identify thresholds and the dominant feedback mechanisms that propel systems toward thresholds. Current human civilization relies heavily on climate stability and ACC threatens immense disruption with potentially disastrous consequences for all ecosystems. Therefore, prediction of the climate system's approach to threshold values would prove vital for the resilience of civilization through development of appropriate adaptation strategies when that shift occurs. Numerous studies now establish that earth systems are experiencing dramatic changes both by system interactions and anthropogenic sources adding urgency for comprehensive knowledge of tipping point identification. Despite this, predictions are difficult due to the immensity of interactions among feedback mechanisms. In this paper, we attempt to narrow this broad spectrum of critical feedback mechanisms by reviewing several publications on role of feedbacks in initiating past climate transitions establishing the most critical ones and significance in current climate changes. Using a compilation of paleoclimate datasets we compared the rates of deglaciations with that of glacial inceptions, which are approximately 5-10 times slower. We hypothesize that the critical feedbacks are unique to each type of transition such that warmings are dominated by the ice-albedo feedback while coolings are a combination of temperature - CO2 and temperature-precipitation followed by the ice-albedo feedbacks. Additionally, we propose the existence of a commonality in the dominant trigger feedbacks for astronomical and millennial timescale abrupt climate shifts and as such future studies

  12. Evidence for millennial-scale climate change during marine isotope stages 2 and 3 at Little Lake, Western Oregon, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grigg, L.D.; Whitlock, C.; Dean, W.E.

    2001-01-01

    Pollen and geochemical data from Little Lake, western Oregon, suggest several patterns of millennial-scale environmental change during marine isotope stage (MIS) 2 (14,100-27,600 cal yr B.P.) and the latter part of MIS 3 (27,600-42,500 cal yr B.P.). During MIS 3, a series of transitions between warm- and cold-adapted taxa indicate that temperatures oscillated by ca. 2??-4??C every 1000-3000 yr. Highs and lows in summer insolation during MIS 3 are generally associated with the warmest and coldest intervals. Warm periods at Little Lake correlate with warm sea-surface temperatures in the Santa Barbara Basin. Changes in the strength of the subtropical high and the jet stream may account for synchronous changes at the two sites. During MIS 2, shifts between mesic and xeric subalpine forests suggest changes in precipitation every 1000-3000 yr. Increases in Tsuga heterophylla pollen at 25,000 and 22,000 cal yr B.P. imply brief warmings. Minimum summer insolation and maximum global ice-volumes during MIS 2 correspond to cold and dry conditions. Fluctuations in precipitation at Little Lake do not correlate with changes in the Santa Barbara Basin and may be explained by variations in the strength of the glacial anticyclone and the position of the jet stream. ?? 2001 University of Washington.

  13. Abrupt climate-independent fire regime changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pausas, Juli G.; Keeley, Jon E.

    2014-01-01

    Wildfires have played a determining role in distribution, composition and structure of many ecosystems worldwide and climatic changes are widely considered to be a major driver of future fire regime changes. However, forecasting future climatic change induced impacts on fire regimes will require a clearer understanding of other drivers of abrupt fire regime changes. Here, we focus on evidence from different environmental and temporal settings of fire regimes changes that are not directly attributed to climatic changes. We review key cases of these abrupt fire regime changes at different spatial and temporal scales, including those directly driven (i) by fauna, (ii) by invasive plant species, and (iii) by socio-economic and policy changes. All these drivers might generate non-linear effects of landscape changes in fuel structure; that is, they generate fuel changes that can cross thresholds of landscape continuity, and thus drastically change fire activity. Although climatic changes might contribute to some of these changes, there are also many instances that are not primarily linked to climatic shifts. Understanding the mechanism driving fire regime changes should contribute to our ability to better assess future fire regimes.

  14. Millennial-scale fluctuations of the European Ice Sheet at the end of the last glacial, and their potential impact on global climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toucanne, Samuel; Soulet, Guillaume; Freslon, Nicolas; Silva Jacinto, Ricardo; Dennielou, Bernard; Zaragosi, Sébastien; Eynaud, Frédérique; Bourillet, Jean-François; Bayon, Germain

    2015-09-01

    Reconstructing Northern Hemisphere ice-sheet oscillations and meltwater routing to the ocean is important to better understand the mechanisms behind abrupt climate changes. To date, research efforts have mainly focused on the North American (Laurentide) ice-sheets (LIS), leaving the potential role of the European Ice Sheet (EIS), and of the Scandinavian ice-sheet (SIS) in particular, largely unexplored. Using neodymium isotopes in detrital sediments deposited off the Channel River, we provide a continuous and well-dated record for the evolution of the EIS southern margin through the end of the last glacial period and during the deglaciation. Our results reveal that the evolution of EIS margins was accompanied with substantial ice recession (especially of the SIS) and simultaneous release of meltwater to the North Atlantic. These events occurred both in the course of the EIS to its LGM position (i.e., during Heinrich Stadial -HS- 3 and HS2; ˜31-29 ka and ˜26-23 ka, respectively) and during the deglaciation (i.e., at ˜22 ka, ˜20-19 ka and from 18.2 ± 0.2 to 16.7 ± 0.2 ka that corresponds to the first part of HS1). The deglaciation was discontinuous in character, and similar in timing to that of the southern LIS margin, with moderate ice-sheet retreat (from 22.5 ± 0.2 ka in the Baltic lowlands) as soon as the northern summer insolation increase (from ˜23 ka) and an acceleration of the margin retreat thereafter (from ˜20 ka). Importantly, our results show that EIS retreat events and release of meltwater to the North Atlantic during the deglaciation coincide with AMOC destabilisation and interhemispheric climate changes. They thus suggest that the EIS, together with the LIS, could have played a critical role in the climatic reorganization that accompanied the last deglaciation. Finally, our data suggest that meltwater discharges to the North Atlantic produced by large-scale recession of continental parts of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets during HS, could have

  15. The role of Southern Ocean winds and CO2 in glacial abrupt climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banderas, R.; Alvarez-Solas, J.; Montoya, M.

    2011-12-01

    The last glacial period (ca. 110-10 kyr before present, hereafter kyr BP) is characterized by substantial climate instability, manifested as climatic variability on millennial timescales. Two types of events dominate this variability: Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events, which involve decadal-scale warming by more than 10K, and Heinrich events, massive iceberg discharges from the Laurentide Ice Sheet at intervals of ca. 10 kyr during peak glacial conditions. Both DO and Heinrich events are associated with widespread centennial to millennial scale climatic changes, including a synchronous temperature response over the North Atlantic and an anti-phase temperature relationship over Antarctica and most of the Southern Ocean, as revealed by a wealth of deep sea sediments and terrestrial record. Recent studies indicate CO2 changes during deglaciation and, possibly, during glacial abrupt climate changes were preceded by significant increases of Southern Ocean upwelling caused by an enhancement and/or a shift of surface winds over that region. The proposed hypothesis is that periods of halted or reduced North Atlantic deep water (NADW) formation resulted in warming of the Southern Ocean through the bipolar see-saw effect leading to a reorganization of Southern Hemisphere (SH) surface winds, and thereby enhanced upwelling and atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Here, the role of SH surface wind and CO2 changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC) is analyzed in a coupled climate model of intermediate complexity. We investigate whether changes in the former could eventually trigger an intensification of the Atlantic overturning circulation and a northward shift of NADW formation, which would allow to explain glacial abrupt climate changes as the result of an oscillation which involves the MOC, CO2 and the winds.

  16. Assessing the persistence of millennial-scale oscillations during the penultimate glacial phase in southern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Graham; Frogley, Mick; Jones, Tim; Leng, Melanie

    2016-04-01

    There is growing evidence that millennial-scale climate oscillations are a pervasive feature of glacial intervals. During the last glaciation (Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2-4), incursions of cold water into the North Atlantic appeared to coincide with abrupt reductions in southern European tree populations (Tzedakis et al., 2004: Geology 32, 109-112), suggesting down-stream impacts on continental temperature and hydroclimate. Ice-rafting into the North Atlantic during the penultimate glacial (MIS 6) is thought to be less extensive than at times during MIS 2-4, perhaps resulting in more subdued climate oscillations. Published pollen data from Lake Ioannina core I-284 (Epirus, NW Greece) suggest pronounced oscillations in tree population extent during early MIS 6 (185-155 ka), followed by much-reduced tree populations and subdued oscillations throughout late MIS 6 (155-135 ka) (Roucoux et al., 2011: Journal of Quaternary Science 26, 616-626). Previous studies of the diatom and isotope records from the MIS 7/6, 6/5e and 2/1 transitions, and from MIS 5e and 1 in Lake Ioannina core I-284 demonstrate the sensitivity of these proxies to changes in regional climate. Here we apply a combined diatom and stable isotope (carbon and oxygen) approach to evaluate the influence of millennial-scale oscillations on southern Europe hydroclimate during MIS 6. The new isotope data from Lake Ioannina core I-284 demonstrates higher precipitation / evaporation (P/E) ratios between c. 178 and 164 ka, associated with peak insolation during MIS 6e, and episodes of planktonic diatom expansion likely reflecting the interstadials of the 6e complex. Close correspondence between diatom planktonic frequencies, arboreal pollen and regional sea-surface temperatures together provide strong evidence for millennial-scale oscillations in regional precipitation at times during the early‒mid MIS 6. The isotope data suggest overall cooler and drier conditions during the mid-late MIS 6, consistent with

  17. Antarctic Forcing of Abrupt Global Climate Change During Isotope Stage 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turney, Christian; Jones, Richard; Phipps, Steven; Thomas, Zoë; Hogg, Alan; Kershaw, Peter; Fogwill, Christopher; Palmer, Jonathan; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Adolphi, Florian; Muscheler, Raimund; Hughen, Konrad; Staff, Richard; Grosvenor, Mark; Golledge, Nicholas; Haberle, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Contrasting Greenland and Antarctic temperature trends during the late Pleistocene (60,000 to 11,650 years ago) are thought to be driven by imbalances in the rate of formation of North Atlantic and Antarctic Deep Water (the 'bipolar seesaw'), with millennial-scale cooling Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events in the north leading warming in the south. An alternative origin for these abrupt climate shifts, however, is the Southern Hemisphere whereby changes are transmitted globally via atmospheric and/or oceanic teleconnections. Testing these competing hypotheses is challenging given the relatively large uncertainties associated with dating terrestrial, marine and ice core chronologies. Here we use a fully coupled climate system model to investigate whether freshening of the Southern Ocean has extra-regional climate impacts. Focusing on an Isotope Stage 3 cooling event preserved in Antarctic ice cores immediately prior to Antarctic Isotope Maximum 4 (AIM 4; around 29,000 years ago) we undertook an ensemble of transient meltwater simulations. We observe no impact on the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) from freshwater hosing in the Southern Ocean but a dramatic warming over the North Atlantic and contrasting precipitation patterns across the low latitudes. Exploiting a new bidecadally-resolved 14C calibration dataset obtained from New Zealand kauri (Agathis australis) we undertook intensive radiocarbon dating and high-resolution multiproxy analysis of the tropical Australia Lynch's Crater terrestrial peat sequence spanning this same period and find a synchronous change in hydroclimate to the purported meltwater event in the Southern Ocean. Our results imply Southern Ocean dynamics played a significant role in driving global climate change across this period via atmospheric teleconnections, with implications for other abrupt events through the late Pleistocene.

  18. Imprint of North-Atlantic abrupt climate changes on western European loess deposits as viewed in a dust emission model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sima, Adriana; Rousseau, Denis-Didier; Kageyama, Masa; Ramstein, Gilles; Schulz, Michael; Balkanski, Yves; Antoine, Pierre; Dulac, François; Hatté, Christine

    2009-12-01

    Western European loess sequences of the last glaciation (˜100,000-15,000 years BP) exhibit strong, cyclic variations of the sedimentation rate, which are coeval to the Greenland stadial/interstadial cycles and the Heinrich events. These North-Atlantic rapid climate changes appear, thus, as a potential cause for the sedimentation variations, via changes in dust intensity cycle. Here we make a first step in testing this hypothesis, by modelling the impact of the North-Atlantic abrupt climate variations on dust emission. Our dust emission calculations use meteorological fields generated by the LMDZ atmospheric general circulation model at a resolution down to 60 km over Western Europe. Three numerical experiments are run, representing a Greenland stadial, an interstadial and a Heinrich event. Orbital parameters and ice-sheet configuration correspond to conditions from Marine Isotope Stage 3 (˜60,000-25,000 years BP), a period characterized by strong millennial-scale climate variability. The only differences we impose in the boundary conditions regard the North-Atlantic surface temperature and sea-ice cover in the latitudinal band 30°-63°N. The changes in wind, precipitation, soil moisture and snow cover from one simulated state to another result in small differences in dust emission intensity. In contrast, when the inhibition of the aeolian erosion by vegetation is taken into account, the dust fluxes for the cold climate states (Greenland stadial and Heinrich event) become generally more than twice higher than those for the relatively warmer Greenland interstadial, in agreement with the loess data. These results support the hypothesis that the North-Atlantic millennial-scale variability is imprinted in Western European loess profiles, and point to vegetation changes as the main factor responsible for millennial-scale sedimentation variations. An analysis for the English Channel and southern North Sea areas, major potential dust sources, shows that the seasonality

  19. The Arctic Grand Challenge: Abrupt Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkniss, P. E.

    2003-12-01

    Trouble in polar paradise (Science, 08/30/02), significant changes in the Arctic environment are scientifically documented (R.E. Moritz et al. ibid.). More trouble, lots more, "abrupt climate change," (R. B. Alley, et al. Science 03/28/03). R. Corell, Arctic Climate Impact Assessment team (ACIA), "If you want to see what will happen in the rest of the world 25 years from now just look what's happening in the Arctic," (Arctic Council meeting, Iceland, 08/03). What to do? Make abrupt Arctic climate change a grand challenge for the IPY-4 and beyond! Scientifically:Describe the "state" of the Arctic climate system as succinctly as possible and accept it as the point of departure.Develop a hypothesis and criteria what constitutes "abrupt climate change," in the Arctic that can be tested with observations. Observations: Bring to bear existing observations and coordinate new investments in observations through an IPY-4 scientific management committee. Make the new Barrow, Alaska, Global Climate Change Research Facility a major U.S. contribution and focal point for the IPY-4 in the U.S Arctic. Arctic populations, Native peoples: The people of the North are living already, daily, with wrenching change, encroaching on their habitats and cultures. For them "the earth is faster now," (I. Krupnik and D. Jolly, ARCUS, 2002). From a political, economic, social and entirely realistic perspective, an Arctic grand challenge without the total integration of the Native peoples in this effort cannot succeed. Therefore: Communications must be established, and the respective Native entities must be approached with the determination to create well founded, well functioning, enduring partnerships. In the U.S. Arctic, Barrow with its long history of involvement and active support of science and with the new global climate change research facility should be the focal point of choice Private industry: Resource extraction in the Arctic followed by oil and gas consumption, return the combustion

  20. Centennial- to millennial-scale climate oscillations in the Central-Eastern Mediterranean Sea between 20,000 and 70,000 years ago: evidence from a high-resolution geochemical and micropaleontological record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprovieri, Mario; Di Stefano, Enrico; Incarbona, Alessandro; Salvagio Manta, Daniela; Pelosi, Nicola; Ribera d'Alcalà, Maurizio; Sprovieri, Rodolfo

    2012-07-01

    Here we present a high-resolution faunal, floral and geochemical (stable isotopes and trace elements) record from the sediments of Ocean Drilling Program Site 963 (central Mediterranean basin), which shows centennial/millennial-scale resemblance to the high-northern latitude rapid temperature fluctuations documented in the Greenland ice cores between 20 and 70 kyr BP. Oxygen and carbon isotopes, planktic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossil distributions suggest that Dansgaard-Oeschger (D/O) and Heinrich events (HE) are distinctly expressed in the Mediterranean climate record. Moreover, recurrent though subdued oscillations not previously identified in the Lateglacial Mediterranean sediments document a significant centennial-scale climate variability in the basin that is greater than previously thought. Alternations between climate regimes dominated by polar outbreaks during D/O stadials and warm D/O interstadials, with associated intensification of continental runoff, are well expressed in the ODP Site 963. These place the Mediterranean basin as an often overlooked recorder of the interplay between large- and regional- scale climate controls at intermediate latitudes, and of the possible interactions between different components of the climate system. Significant changes in Ba/Ca values measured in Globigerinoides ruber shells from a number of D/O stadials and interstadials suggest enhanced freshwater input from the north-eastern Mediterranean borderland during the D/O interstadials. However, the short duration of 3D stratification events never led to complete oxygen consumption along the water column, but clear effects of sluggish 3D circulation in the basin are testified to by negative excursions in δ13C measured in selected species of planktic and benthic foraminifera. HEs are constantly associated with lightening in the δ18O record of planktic foraminifera, possibly because of the impact of iceberg melting in the Iberian Margin on Mediterranean

  1. An abrupt and prominent climatic reversal at 9.2 ka in the northeastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, J.; Huang, Y.; Shuman, B. N.; Oswald, W.; Foster, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    Continental climate during the early Holocene (from 10 to 7 ka) is characterized by multiple abrupt climatic reversals such as the well-known 8.2 ka event that has been observed worldwide and attributed to the terminal collapse of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) in the North American continent. However, many episodes of meltwater releases occurred prior to the final collapse of LIS, their impact on the continental climate is much less understood. We present in this paper decadal-scale hydrogen isotopic records of aquatic and terrestrial plant biomarkers from Blood Pond, Massachusetts during the early Holocene. Our isotopic records infer a cooling of 3~4 degree between 9.3 and 9.1 ka against the millennial scale climate background, mainly induced by changes in precipitation seasonality. In comparison, the 8.2 ka event displays smaller amplitude of temperature cooling of 1~2 degree at our southern New England site. We interpret our observed climatic reversal at ~ 9.2 ka as representing increased proportion of winter precipitation in conjunction with a drier and cooler summer, triggered by slowdown in thermohaline circulation as a result of freshwater release from the proglacial lakes. We attribute the difference in climate response at 8.2 ka and 9.2 ka events to the configuration of LIS, with 9.2 ka LIS having a much stronger blocking effect on the moisture from the Gulf of Mexico during the summer. Our data suggest that the seasonality of the precipitation at the southern New England was highly sensitive to meltwater releases, especially prior to the final collapse of the LIS.

  2. Who is in the Driver's Seat? Millennial-Scale Records of Wildfire in the Western USA Reveal a Complex Interplay of Climate, Fire, and Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, J. L.; Meyer, G. A.; Bigio, E.; Nelson, N.; Poulos, M. J.; Jenkins, S.; Riley, K. E.; Weppner, K.; Svenson, L.; Fitch, E. P.; Frechette, J.

    2015-12-01

    A new synthesis of 10 study areas and >480 14C dates of Holocene fire and erosional response are recorded in alluvial fan sediments of the interior western US. Chronologies are from high elevation mixed conifer forests in the N. Rockies, ponderosa and Douglas-fir forests in the N. Rockies and SW, and low elevation sagebrush steppe and piñon-juniper woodlands near the Snake River Plain. Results are as follows: 1) Late Holocene arrivals of ponderosa, lodgepole and piñon pine at Northern Rockies sites correspond with increased fire severity, linking vegetation and fire regime changes. 2) Deposit types vary with environment; sheetfloods are more common in sparsely vegetated sites and in drier Holocene periods with open forests, whereas dense forests and infrequent severe fires often produce debris flows. 3) Climate variability drives ponderosa pine and Douglas-fir forests in both the SW and N. Rockies to burn 'at both ends of the spectrum', where frequent low-severity fires are typical, but higher-severity fires burn during severe droughts following fuel buildup over wet decades. 4) Fires in dry sage steppe are generally fuel-limited, but burn during prolonged wet and variable climates; grazing, land-use, and invasive species, particularly influence modern fires. 5) At moist high-elevation lodgepole and mixed conifer sites in Yellowstone and central Idaho, episodic large debris flows indicate high severity burns, often during severe multidecadal droughts. 6) Regionally coherent peaks exist ca. 200, 500, 900, 1700 and 2600 cal yr BP, but fire activity is not generally synchronous among sites. Differences in climate among sites likely account for some asynchroneity. 7) Recent severe fires have burned in 8 of 10 sites described; erosional response appears particularly anomalous in the SW, where impacts of fire suppression and land use are greatest. Widespread and severe modern fires may herald the arrival of a no-analog era of fire in the western US.

  3. Millennial-scale climate variability in the subarctic NW-Pacific during the last 150 kyr and implications for upper-ocean stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riethdorf, J.; Max, L.; Nuernberg, D.; Tiedemann, R.; Gorbarenko, S.; Malakhov, M.

    2011-12-01

    Past studies have shown that the mean climate state during the Pliocene warm period, about 3 - 4 million years ago, differed from present day climate in several ways: global temperature was about 3-4 degrees C warmer, the tropical thermocline was warmer and/or deeper, and meridional and zonal sea surface temperature gradients were reduced due to warmer high latitude temperatures but tropical sea surface temperatures that were similar to today. One of the most striking features of the Pliocene warm period is the El Niño-like (El Padre) mean state of the tropical Pacific, which is thought to have far-field impacts. In this study, we present a synthesis of new and published tropical Pacific data, detailing the mean state and higher frequency variability (e.g., using orbital scale records and measurements made on single foraminifera shells), for the purpose of meeting two main goals. First, we highlight important characteristics of the El Padre mean state, which include average Indo-Pacific warm pool temperatures that were similar and east Pacific cold tongue temperatures and cross-Pacific subsurface temperatures that were warmer than today. Because much of the paleotemperature data comes from Mg/Ca ratios measured in planktonic foraminifera, the impact of possible changes in Mg/Ca of seawater on paleotemperature estimates is addressed. We conclude that Mg/Ca-derived temperature estimates could be adjusted by no more than about 1 degree in order to account for seawater chemistry changes. Second, by examining orbital variability and temperature distributions based on single foraminifera analyses, we evaluate whether the cumulative strength of the many feedbacks that are involved in the generation of climate variability may be impacted by the mean state. Data indicate that the amplitude of orbital variability in surface temperature, and possibly the amplitude of ENSO variability, was reduced during the warm Pliocene compared to today. On orbital timescales, the

  4. Millennial-scale oscillation of denitrification intensity in the Arabian Sea during the Late Quaternary and its potential influence on atmospheric N2O and global climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suthhof, Andreas; Ittekkot, Venugopalan; Gaye-Haake, Birgit

    2001-09-01

    The intensity of denitrification in the Arabian Sea during the last 65 kyr is reconstructed using high-resolution δ15N records of three sediment cores in conjunction with other geochemical tracers for water column oxygenation and productivity. The results reveal a close link to the Greenland ice core record with low or absent water column denitrification during the Last Glacial Maximum, the stadials, and at the time of the Heinrich Events including the Younger Dryas. In contrast, denitrification was high during the Holocene and the interstadials. The intensification of denitrification is related to stronger SW monsoonal upwelling, which enhances organic matter flux and degradation, resulting in a strengthening of the midwater oxygen deficiency. Such a combination of enhanced upwelling and denitrification has also been implied for the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP), where these events occur during the Holocene and to some extent during the interstadials, too. Today, the Arabian Sea and the ETNP together contribute substantially to the global marine water column denitrification, and a significant fraction of the ocean-atmosphere N2O flux originates from these areas. Changes in N2O emissions from these areas could thus have effected the recently described stadial/interstadial variations in the atmospheric concentration of this greenhouse gas as deduced from ice cores. Moreover, denitrification is the major sink for oceanic nitrate and provides a primary control for the oceanic nutrient inventory, which in turn influences global primary productivity and CO2 sequestration by the biological pump. Short-term switches between a nondenitrification mode and a denitrification mode in these marine regions therefore have an impact on global climate.

  5. Heinrich-like events in the Southeast Pacific: Abrupt climate change during the last interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobel, A. W.; Mokeddem, Z.; McManus, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    Many previous studies of orbital and sub-orbital scale climate changes in the marine record during the last glacial-interglacial transition have focused on evidence from the Northern Hemisphere. While solar insolation at 65°N evidently plays a primary role in pacing orbital changes, determining the mechanism(s) transferring climatic changes around the globe at orbital and sub-orbital time scales also requires records from the mid and high southern latitudes (Pahnke et al., 2003). Here we present such a record from ODP Leg 202, Site 1234 located 65 km off the Chilean margin (36°13.153'S, 73°40.902'W). With a high sedimentation rate of ~80 cm/kyr, the core site represents an opportunity to examine Marine Isotope Stage 5 (MIS 5), the last interglacial, in high resolution. Using quantifications of ice rafted debris (IRD), foraminiferal abundances, N. pachyderma (sinistral) abundance and oxygen isotopes from planktonic and benthic foraminifera, the present study provides an 80 kyr record of climate change. We resolved MIS 5 in sufficient detail to observe the MIS 5/6 boundary, sub-stages MIS 5a through MIS 5e, and millennial-scale variability during the transition from the last interglacial into the last glacial era. Comparison of our records of MIS 5 with records from the North Atlantic (Oppo et al., 2001) demonstrates that orbital-scale warming in the two hemispheres appears to be approximately synchronous, though from our data it is not possible to infer a precise phase relationship in order to constrain a synchronization mechanism. At shorter time scales, a comparison of our records during the last interglacial with records from the North Atlantic (McManus et al., 1998) shows that episodes of ice rafting at our site, associated with changes in foraminiferal abundances and oxygen isotope content, are similar to, and correlated with, evidence of small-scale Heinrich events in the North Atlantic. This suggests that the expansion and retreat of Andean glaciers, as

  6. The Role of the Tropics in Abrupt Climate Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Alexey

    2013-12-07

    Topics addressed include: abrupt climate changes and ocean circulation in the tropics; what controls the ocean thermal structure in the tropics; a permanent El Niño in paleoclimates; the energetics of the tropical ocean.

  7. Sensitivity and Thresholds of Ecosystems to Abrupt Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peteet, D. M.; Peteet, D. M.

    2001-12-01

    Rapid vegetational change is a hallmark of past abrupt climate change, as evidenced from Younger Dryas records in Europe, eastern North America, and the Pacific North American rim. The potential response of future ecosystems to abrupt climate change is targeted, with a focus on particular changes in the hydrological cycle. The vulnerability of ecosystems is notable when particular shifts cross thresholds of precipitation and temperature, as many plants and animals are adapted to specific climatic "windows". Significant forest species compositional changes occur at ecotonal boundaries, which are often the first locations to record a climatic response. Historical forest declines have been linked to stress, and even Pleistocene extinctions have been associated with human interaction at times of rapid climatic shifts. Environmental extremes are risky for reproductive stages, and result in nonlinearities. The role of humans in association with abrupt climate change suggests that many ecosystems may cross thresholds from which they will find it difficult to recover. Sectors particularly vulnerable will be reviewed.

  8. International policy implications of abrupt climate change scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Molitor, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    New theoretical and empirical evidence supports the view that in the recent past [Holocene] abrupt climate changes occurred over very short [decadal] time periods. One leading possibility of future changes involves the North Atlantic Ocean conveyor that transfers warm surface waters from the equator to northern latitudes and helps maintain Europe`s climate. The predicted abrupt climate change scenario theorizes that the conveyor may be modified as a result of disruption of the thermohaline circulation driving North, Atlantic Deep Water. This would lead, the theory contends, to a rapid cooling of Europe`s climate. In light of the EPCC`s 1995 Second Assessment Report conclusion that there is a {open_quotes}discernible{close_quotes} human influence on the global climate system, there are many emerging questions concerning possible abrupt climate change scenarios.

  9. Abrupt climate change around 4 ka BP: Role of the Thermohaline circulation as indicated by a GCM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaowu; Zhou, Tianjun; Cai, Jingning; Zhu, Jinhong; Xie, Zhihui; Gong, Daoyi

    2004-04-01

    A great deal of palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic evidence suggests that a predominant temperature drop and an aridification occurred at ca. 4.0 ka BP. Palaeoclimate studies in China support this dedution. The collapse of ancient civilizations at ca. 4.0 ka BP in the Nile Valley and Mesopotamia has been attributed to climate-induced aridification. A widespread alternation of the ancient cultures was also found in China at ca. 4.0 ka BP in concert with the collapse of the civilizations in the Old World. Palaeoclimatic studies indicate that the abrupt climate change at 4.0 ka BP is one of the realizations of the cold phase in millennial scale climate oscillations, which may be related to the modulation of the Thermohaline Circulation (THC) over the Atlantic Ocean. Therefore, this study conducts a numerical experiment of a GCM with SST forcing to simulate the impact of the weakening of the THC. Results show a drop in temperature from North Europe, the northern middle East Asia, and northern East Asia and a significant reduction of precipitation in East Africa, the Middle East, the Indian Peninsula, and the Yellow River Valley. This seems to support the idea that coldness and aridification at ca. 4.0 ka BP was caused by the weakening of the THC.

  10. Millennial Scale Cycles from Speleothems of the Gibraltar Caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Meighan; Mattey, Dave; Atkinson, Tim; Hoffmann, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    The Rock of Gibraltar contains many solution caves which initially formed near sea level and now span elevations to over 300m as a result of slow uplift over time. In the modern climate, Gibraltar holds an important position near the southern limit of the tracks taken by the depressions that deliver rainfall to Europe from the North Atlantic sector of the atmosphere. Monitoring in St. Michaels and Ragged Staff caves has been carried out since 2004 by monthly sampling and deployment of logging instruments which reveals that speleothem growth is most strongly influenced by seasonally reversing cave ventilation that permeates the entire rock. The results provide unprecedented insight into how cave environments respond to seasonal change, variations in sea level and neotectonic uplift and the ways that regional climate is recorded as chemical proxies in an evolving cave environment. We present an overview of the results of this proxy record of precipitation, sea level and environmental change, including new analysis within this 500ka record. A general mean isotopic composition of 1ka time slices have been stacked into a preliminary record from over twenty speleothems. Within this we look at higher resolution time slices to examine the occurrence of millennial scale cycles which occur within the Gibraltar record. During glacial maxima, the Gibraltar record shows elevated δ18O and associated higher δ13C caused by greater degassing or lower soil pCO2 from weakened vegetative activity during cool arid glacials. Highly resolved millennial scale warming events which seem to match the Greenland ice core record give insights into SST changes and atmospheric reorganization at Gibraltar.

  11. Millennial-scale tropical atmospheric and Atlantic Ocean circulation change from the Last Glacial Maximum and Marine Isotope Stage 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Them, T. R.; Schmidt, M. W.; Lynch-Stieglitz, J.

    2015-10-01

    Abrupt, millennial-scale climate oscillations, known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) cycles, characterized the climate system of the last glacial period. Although proxy evidence shows that D-O cycles resulted in large-scale changes in atmospheric circulation patterns around the planet, an understanding of how Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) varied across these events remains unclear. Here, we take advantage of the fact that both tropical atmospheric circulation changes corresponding to north-south shifts in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and large-scale changes in ocean circulation associated with AMOC variability can be reconstructed in the same sediment core from the Florida Straits to examine the relationship between atmospheric and ocean circulation changes across D-O events. To reconstruct surface water conditions, Mg/Ca-paleothermometry and stable isotope measurements were combined on the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber (white variety) from sediment core KNR166-2 JPC26 (24°19.61‧N, 83°15.14‧W; 546 m depth) to reconstruct a high-resolution record of sea surface temperature and δO18seawater (a proxy for upper mixed layer salinity) during Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 2 and 3 from 20-35 ka BP. As an additional proxy for upper water column salinity change, we also generate a faunal abundance record of the salinity-sensitive planktonic foraminifera Neogloboquadrina dutertrei. Our results suggest that rapid reductions in sea surface salinity occurred at the onset of D-O interstadials, while stadials are characterized by increased surface salinities. The most likely cause of these salinity changes was variation in the strength and position of the ITCZ across D-O events. Finally, we examine the relationship between millennial-scale atmospheric circulation changes recorded in the planktonic records and ocean circulation changes inferred from the benthic δ18O record from our core. Our results provide some of the first

  12. An Abrupt Centennial-Scale Drought Event and Mid-Holocene Climate Change Patterns in Monsoon Marginal Zones of East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu; Wang, Nai'ang; Zhang, Chengqi

    2014-01-01

    The mid-latitudes of East Asia are characterized by the interaction between the Asian summer monsoon and the westerly winds. Understanding long-term climate change in the marginal regions of the Asian monsoon is critical for understanding the millennial-scale interactions between the Asian monsoon and the westerly winds. Abrupt climate events are always associated with changes in large-scale circulation patterns; therefore, investigations into abrupt climate changes provide clues for responses of circulation patterns to extreme climate events. In this paper, we examined the time scale and mid-Holocene climatic background of an abrupt dry mid-Holocene event in the Shiyang River drainage basin in the northwest margin of the Asian monsoon. Mid-Holocene lacustrine records were collected from the middle reaches and the terminal lake of the basin. Using radiocarbon and OSL ages, a centennial-scale drought event, which is characterized by a sand layer in lacustrine sediments both from the middle and lower reaches of the basin, was absolutely dated between 8.0–7.0 cal kyr BP. Grain size data suggest an abrupt decline in lake level and a dry environment in the middle reaches of the basin during the dry interval. Previous studies have shown mid-Holocene drought events in other places of monsoon marginal zones; however, their chronologies are not strong enough to study the mechanism. According to the absolutely dated records, we proposed a new hypothesis that the mid-Holocene dry interval can be related to the weakening Asian summer monsoon and the relatively arid environment in arid Central Asia. Furthermore, abrupt dry climatic events are directly linked to the basin-wide effective moisture change in semi-arid and arid regions. Effective moisture is affected by basin-wide precipitation, evapotranspiration, lake surface evaporation and other geographical settings. As a result, the time scales of the dry interval could vary according to locations due to different

  13. Sea-ice switches and abrupt climate change.

    PubMed

    Gildor, Hezi; Tziperman, Eli

    2003-09-15

    We propose that past abrupt climate changes were probably a result of rapid and extensive variations in sea-ice cover. We explain why this seems a perhaps more likely explanation than a purely thermohaline circulation mechanism. We emphasize that because of the significant influence of sea ice on the climate system, it seems that high priority should be given to developing ways for reconstructing high-resolution (in space and time) sea-ice extent for past climate-change events. If proxy data can confirm that sea ice was indeed the major player in past abrupt climate-change events, it seems less likely that such dramatic abrupt changes will occur due to global warming, when extensive sea-ice cover will not be present. PMID:14558902

  14. Millennial-scale Asian summer monsoon variations in South China since the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xisheng; Chu, Guoqiang; Sheng, Mei; Zhang, Shuqin; Li, Jinhua; Chen, Yun; Tang, Ling; Su, Youliang; Pei, Junling; Yang, Zhenyu

    2016-10-01

    Characterizing spatiotemporal variability of the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) is critical for full understanding of its behavior, dynamics, and future impacts. The present knowledge about ASM variations since the last glaciation in South China largely relies on several precisely-dated speleothem stable oxygen isotope (δ18 O) records. Although these speleothem δ18 O signals provide useful evidence for regional past environmental changes, their validity for denoting ASM intensity remains a great controversy. The Huguangyan Maar Lake (HML) provides one of the most complete archives of environmental and climatic changes in the tropical-subtropical South and East Asia since the last glaciation. Here we document a continuous centennial- to millennial-scale ASM record over the past 16 ky BP from the high-sedimentation-rate HML sediments. In contrast with the low-amplitude variations of Chinese speleothem-derived δ18 O signals and the Chinese loess-based monsoon precipitation proxy indexes, our multi-proxy records reveal a pattern of high-amplitude regional climatic fluctuations, including fine-scale oscillations during the Bølling-Allerød warming, the 8.2 ka cooling event, and an abrupt climate shift from 6.5-5.9 ka. The existence of Bond-like cold/dry events indicates a distinct influence of the North Atlantic circulation on low-latitude monsoon changes. The broad comparability between the HML paleo-proxies, Chinese speleothem δ18 O records, and the northern hemisphere summer insolation throughout the Holocene, suggests that solar insolation exerts a profound influence on ASM changes. These findings reinforce a model of combined insolation and glacial forcing of the ASM.

  15. Abrupt climate change and thermohaline circulation: Mechanisms and predictability

    PubMed Central

    Marotzke, Jochem

    2000-01-01

    The ocean's thermohaline circulation has long been recognized as potentially unstable and has consequently been invoked as a potential cause of abrupt climate change on all timescales of decades and longer. However, fundamental aspects of thermohaline circulation changes remain poorly understood. PMID:10677464

  16. Abrupt climate change and thermohaline circulation: mechanisms and predictability.

    PubMed

    Marotzke, J

    2000-02-15

    The ocean's thermohaline circulation has long been recognized as potentially unstable and has consequently been invoked as a potential cause of abrupt climate change on all timescales of decades and longer. However, fundamental aspects of thermohaline circulation changes remain poorly understood. PMID:10677464

  17. The role of the thermohaline circulation in abrupt climate change.

    PubMed

    Clark, Peter U; Pisias, Nicklas G; Stocker, Thomas F; Weaver, Andrew J

    2002-02-21

    The possibility of a reduced Atlantic thermohaline circulation in response to increases in greenhouse-gas concentrations has been demonstrated in a number of simulations with general circulation models of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system. But it remains difficult to assess the likelihood of future changes in the thermohaline circulation, mainly owing to poorly constrained model parameterizations and uncertainties in the response of the climate system to greenhouse warming. Analyses of past abrupt climate changes help to solve these problems. Data and models both suggest that abrupt climate change during the last glaciation originated through changes in the Atlantic thermohaline circulation in response to small changes in the hydrological cycle. Atmospheric and oceanic responses to these changes were then transmitted globally through a number of feedbacks. The palaeoclimate data and the model results also indicate that the stability of the thermohaline circulation depends on the mean climate state. PMID:11859359

  18. Response of seafloor ecosystems to abrupt global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffitt, Sarah E.; Hill, Tessa M.; Roopnarine, Peter D.; Kennett, James P.

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is predicted to decrease oceanic oxygen (O2) concentrations, with potentially significant effects on marine ecosystems. Geologically recent episodes of abrupt climatic warming provide opportunities to assess the effects of changing oxygenation on marine communities. Thus far, this knowledge has been largely restricted to investigations using Foraminifera, with little being known about ecosystem-scale responses to abrupt, climate-forced deoxygenation. We here present high-resolution records based on the first comprehensive quantitative analysis, to our knowledge, of changes in marine metazoans (Mollusca, Echinodermata, Arthropoda, and Annelida; >5,400 fossils and trace fossils) in response to the global warming associated with the last glacial to interglacial episode. The molluscan archive is dominated by extremophile taxa, including those containing endosymbiotic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Lucinoma aequizonatum) and those that graze on filamentous sulfur-oxidizing benthic bacterial mats (Alia permodesta). This record, from 16,100 to 3,400 y ago, demonstrates that seafloor invertebrate communities are subject to major turnover in response to relatively minor inferred changes in oxygenation (>1.5 to <0.5 mLṡL-1 [O2]) associated with abrupt (<100 y) warming of the eastern Pacific. The biotic turnover and recovery events within the record expand known rates of marine biological recovery by an order of magnitude, from <100 to >1,000 y, and illustrate the crucial role of climate and oceanographic change in driving long-term successional changes in ocean ecosystems.

  19. Response of seafloor ecosystems to abrupt global climate change

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Sarah E.; Hill, Tessa M.; Roopnarine, Peter D.; Kennett, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is predicted to decrease oceanic oxygen (O2) concentrations, with potentially significant effects on marine ecosystems. Geologically recent episodes of abrupt climatic warming provide opportunities to assess the effects of changing oxygenation on marine communities. Thus far, this knowledge has been largely restricted to investigations using Foraminifera, with little being known about ecosystem-scale responses to abrupt, climate-forced deoxygenation. We here present high-resolution records based on the first comprehensive quantitative analysis, to our knowledge, of changes in marine metazoans (Mollusca, Echinodermata, Arthropoda, and Annelida; >5,400 fossils and trace fossils) in response to the global warming associated with the last glacial to interglacial episode. The molluscan archive is dominated by extremophile taxa, including those containing endosymbiotic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Lucinoma aequizonatum) and those that graze on filamentous sulfur-oxidizing benthic bacterial mats (Alia permodesta). This record, from 16,100 to 3,400 y ago, demonstrates that seafloor invertebrate communities are subject to major turnover in response to relatively minor inferred changes in oxygenation (>1.5 to <0.5 mL⋅L−1 [O2]) associated with abrupt (<100 y) warming of the eastern Pacific. The biotic turnover and recovery events within the record expand known rates of marine biological recovery by an order of magnitude, from <100 to >1,000 y, and illustrate the crucial role of climate and oceanographic change in driving long-term successional changes in ocean ecosystems. PMID:25825727

  20. Response of seafloor ecosystems to abrupt global climate change.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Sarah E; Hill, Tessa M; Roopnarine, Peter D; Kennett, James P

    2015-04-14

    Anthropogenic climate change is predicted to decrease oceanic oxygen (O2) concentrations, with potentially significant effects on marine ecosystems. Geologically recent episodes of abrupt climatic warming provide opportunities to assess the effects of changing oxygenation on marine communities. Thus far, this knowledge has been largely restricted to investigations using Foraminifera, with little being known about ecosystem-scale responses to abrupt, climate-forced deoxygenation. We here present high-resolution records based on the first comprehensive quantitative analysis, to our knowledge, of changes in marine metazoans (Mollusca, Echinodermata, Arthropoda, and Annelida; >5,400 fossils and trace fossils) in response to the global warming associated with the last glacial to interglacial episode. The molluscan archive is dominated by extremophile taxa, including those containing endosymbiotic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Lucinoma aequizonatum) and those that graze on filamentous sulfur-oxidizing benthic bacterial mats (Alia permodesta). This record, from 16,100 to 3,400 y ago, demonstrates that seafloor invertebrate communities are subject to major turnover in response to relatively minor inferred changes in oxygenation (>1.5 to <0.5 mL⋅L(-1) [O2]) associated with abrupt (<100 y) warming of the eastern Pacific. The biotic turnover and recovery events within the record expand known rates of marine biological recovery by an order of magnitude, from <100 to >1,000 y, and illustrate the crucial role of climate and oceanographic change in driving long-term successional changes in ocean ecosystems. PMID:25825727

  1. Detecting abrupt climate changes on different time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyasovszky, István

    2011-10-01

    Two concepts are introduced for detecting abrupt climate changes. In the first case, the sampling frequency of climate data is high as compared to the frequency of climate events examined. The method is based on a separation of trend and noise in the data and is applicable to any dataset that satisfies some mild smoothness and statistical dependence conditions for the trend and the noise, respectively. We say that an abrupt change occurs when the first derivative of the trend function has a discontinuity and the task is to identify such points. The technique is applied to Northern Hemisphere temperature data from 1850 to 2009, Northern Hemisphere temperature data from proxy data, a.d. 200-1995 and Holocene δ18O values going back to 11,700 years BP. Several abrupt changes are detected that are, among other things, beneficial for determining the Medieval Warm Period, Little Ice Age and Holocene Climate Optimum. In the second case, the sampling frequency is low relative to the frequency of climate events studied. A typical example includes Dansgaard-Oeschger events. The methodology used here is based on a refinement of autoregressive conditional heteroscedastic models. The key element of this approach is the volatility that characterises the time-varying variance, and abrupt changes are defined by high volatilities. The technique applied to δ18O values going back to 122,950 years BP is suitable for identifying DO events. These two approaches for the two cases are closely related despite the fact that at first glance, they seem quite different.

  2. Abrupt climate change and collapse of deep-sea ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Cronin, T. M.; Demenocal, P.B.; Okahashi, H.; Linsley, B.K.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the deep-sea fossil record of benthic ostracodes during periods of rapid climate and oceanographic change over the past 20,000 years in a core from intermediate depth in the northwestern Atlantic. Results show that deep-sea benthic community "collapses" occur with faunal turnover of up to 50% during major climatically driven oceanographic changes. Species diversity as measured by the Shannon-Wiener index falls from 3 to as low as 1.6 during these events. Major disruptions in the benthic communities commenced with Heinrich Event 1, the Inter-Aller??d Cold Period (IACP: 13.1 ka), the Younger Dryas (YD: 12.9-11.5 ka), and several Holocene Bond events when changes in deep-water circulation occurred. The largest collapse is associated with the YD/IACP and is characterized by an abrupt two-step decrease in both the upper North Atlantic Deep Water assemblage and species diversity at 13.1 ka and at 12.2 ka. The ostracode fauna at this site did not fully recover until ???8 ka, with the establishment of Labrador Sea Water ventilation. Ecologically opportunistic slope species prospered during this community collapse. Other abrupt community collapses during the past 20 ka generally correspond to millennial climate events. These results indicate that deep-sea ecosystems are not immune to the effects of rapid climate changes occurring over centuries or less. ?? 2008 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  3. Terrestrial Plant Biomarkers Preserved in Cariaco Basin Sediments: Records of Abrupt Tropical Vegetation Response to Rapid Climate Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughen, K. A.; Eglinton, T. I.; Makou, M.; Xu, L.; Sylva, S.

    2004-12-01

    Organic-rich sediments from the anoxic Cariaco Basin, Venezuela, preserve high concentrations of biomarkers for reconstruction of terrestrial environmental conditions. Molecular-level investigations of organic compounds provide a valuable tool for extracting terrestrial signals from these annually laminated marine sediments. Differences in hydrogen isotopic fractionation between C16-18 and C24-30 n-alkanoic acids suggest a marine source for the shorter chain lengths and a terrestrial source for the longer chains. Records of carbon and hydrogen isotopes, as well as average carbon chain length (ACL), from long-chain n-alkanoic acids parallel millennial-scale changes in vegetation and climate between the late Glacial and Preboreal periods, 15,000 to 10,000 years ago. Data from all terrestrial chain lengths were combined to produce single δ D and δ 13C indices through deglaciation, exhibiting enrichment during the late Glacial and Younger Dryas and depletion during the Bolling-Allerod and Preboreal periods. δ D reflects the hydrogen isotopic composition of environmental water used for plant growth, combined with evaporative enrichment within leaf spaces, and as such may act as a proxy for local aridity. Leaf wax δ 13C, which is a proxy for C3 versus C4 metabolic pathways, indicates that C3 plants predominated in the Cariaco watershed during warm/wet Bolling-Allerod and Holocene periods, and C4 plant biomass proliferated during cool/dry Glacial and Younger Dryas intervals. Coupled carbon and hydrogen isotopic measurements together clearly distinguish deglacial climatic periods as wetter with C3 vegetation versus drier with C4 vegetation. High resolution biomarker records reveal the rapidity of vegetation changes in northern South America during the last deglaciation. The leaf wax data reveal that local vegetation biomass, although not necessarily entire assemblages, shifted between arid grassland and wetter forest taxa on timescales of decades. Comparison of ACL

  4. Millennial-scale vegetation changes in the tropical Andes using ecological grouping and ordination methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrego, Dunia H.; Hooghiemstra, Henry; Rama-Corredor, Oscar; Martrat, Belen; Grimalt, Joan O.; Thompson, Lonnie; Bush, Mark B.; González-Carranza, Zaire; Hanselman, Jennifer; Valencia, Bryan; Velásquez-Ruiz, César

    2016-03-01

    We compare eight pollen records reflecting climatic and environmental change from northern and southern sites in the tropical Andes. Our analysis focuses on the last 30 000 years, with particular emphasis on the Pleistocene to Holocene transition. We explore ecological grouping and downcore ordination results as two approaches for extracting environmental variability from pollen records. We also use the records of aquatic and shoreline vegetation as markers for lake level fluctuations and moisture availability. Our analysis focuses on the signature of millennial-scale climate variability in the tropical Andes, in particular Heinrich stadials (HS) and Greenland interstadials (GI). The pollen records show an overall warming trend during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, but the onset of post-glacial warming differs in timing among records. We identify rapid responses of the tropical vegetation to millennial-scale climate variability. The signatures of HS and the Younger Dryas are generally recorded as downslope upper forest line (UFL) migrations in our transect, and are likely linked to air temperature cooling. The GI1 signal is overall comparable between northern and southern records and indicates upslope UFL migrations and warming in the tropical Andes. Our marker for lake level changes indicated a north-to-south difference that could be related to moisture availability. The air temperature signature recorded by the Andean vegetation was consistent with millennial-scale cryosphere and sea surface temperature changes but suggests a potential difference between the magnitude of temperature change in the ocean and the atmosphere. We also show that arboreal pollen percentage (AP %) and detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) scores are two complementary approaches to extract environmental variability from pollen records.

  5. Abrupt climate change and the decline of Indus urbanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodell, D. A.; Dixit, Y.; Petrie, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change has been suggested as a cause for the decline of the cities of the Indus Civilization, which is believed to have begun ~4.0 to 3.9 ky B.P. Previous studies have centered on paleoclimatic records obtained from areas outside the geographic limits of the Indus Civilization, raising questions about their suitability for evaluating past climate-cultural linkages. Here we report a detailed climate record from paleolake Kotla Dahar, Haryana (28°00'095'' N, 76°57'173'' E), located at the eastern edge of the distribution of Indus settlements and ~100km to the east of the city-site of Rakhigarhi in NW India. Regional hydrologic changes are inferred using oxygen-isotope measurements of gastropod aragonite from a 2.88-m sediment section. A permanent ~4‰ increase in δ18O of shell aragonite occurred at ~4.1±0.1 ky B.P., marking an abrupt increase in evaporation/precipitation in the lake catchment. These data provide evidence for a weakening of the monsoon and shift toward drier climate on the plains of northwest (NW) India at ~4.1±0.1 ky B.P. Decreased monsoon rainfall at this time may have been linked to increased ENSO variability, and supports a possible role of climate in the transformation of the Indus Civilization from an urbanized (mature or urban Indus) to a rural (post-urban) society.

  6. Dynamic response of desert wetlands to abrupt climate change

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Kathleen B.; Manker, Craig R.; Pigati, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Desert wetlands are keystone ecosystems in arid environments and are preserved in the geologic record as groundwater discharge (GWD) deposits. GWD deposits are inherently discontinuous and stratigraphically complex, which has limited our understanding of how desert wetlands responded to past episodes of rapid climate change. Previous studies have shown that wetlands responded to climate change on glacial to interglacial timescales, but their sensitivity to short-lived climate perturbations is largely unknown. Here, we show that GWD deposits in the Las Vegas Valley (southern Nevada, United States) provide a detailed and nearly complete record of dynamic hydrologic changes during the past 35 ka (thousands of calibrated 14C years before present), including cycles of wetland expansion and contraction that correlate tightly with climatic oscillations recorded in the Greenland ice cores. Cessation of discharge associated with rapid warming events resulted in the collapse of entire wetland systems in the Las Vegas Valley at multiple times during the late Quaternary. On average, drought-like conditions, as recorded by widespread erosion and the formation of desert soils, lasted for a few centuries. This record illustrates the vulnerability of desert wetland flora and fauna to abrupt climate change. It also shows that GWD deposits can be used to reconstruct paleohydrologic conditions at millennial to submillennial timescales and informs conservation efforts aimed at protecting these fragile ecosystems in the face of anthropogenic warming. PMID:26554007

  7. Dynamic response of desert wetlands to abrupt climate change.

    PubMed

    Springer, Kathleen B; Manker, Craig R; Pigati, Jeffrey S

    2015-11-24

    Desert wetlands are keystone ecosystems in arid environments and are preserved in the geologic record as groundwater discharge (GWD) deposits. GWD deposits are inherently discontinuous and stratigraphically complex, which has limited our understanding of how desert wetlands responded to past episodes of rapid climate change. Previous studies have shown that wetlands responded to climate change on glacial to interglacial timescales, but their sensitivity to short-lived climate perturbations is largely unknown. Here, we show that GWD deposits in the Las Vegas Valley (southern Nevada, United States) provide a detailed and nearly complete record of dynamic hydrologic changes during the past 35 ka (thousands of calibrated (14)C years before present), including cycles of wetland expansion and contraction that correlate tightly with climatic oscillations recorded in the Greenland ice cores. Cessation of discharge associated with rapid warming events resulted in the collapse of entire wetland systems in the Las Vegas Valley at multiple times during the late Quaternary. On average, drought-like conditions, as recorded by widespread erosion and the formation of desert soils, lasted for a few centuries. This record illustrates the vulnerability of desert wetland flora and fauna to abrupt climate change. It also shows that GWD deposits can be used to reconstruct paleohydrologic conditions at millennial to submillennial timescales and informs conservation efforts aimed at protecting these fragile ecosystems in the face of anthropogenic warming. PMID:26554007

  8. Dynamic response of desert wetlands to abrupt climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Springer, Kathleen; Manker, Craig; Pigati, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Desert wetlands are keystone ecosystems in arid environments and are preserved in the geologic record as groundwater discharge (GWD) deposits. GWD deposits are inherently discontinuous and stratigraphically complex, which has limited our understanding of how desert wetlands responded to past episodes of rapid climate change. Previous studies have shown that wetlands responded to climate change on glacial to interglacial timescales, but their sensitivity to short-lived climate perturbations is largely unknown. Here, we show that GWD deposits in the Las Vegas Valley (southern Nevada, United States) provide a detailed and nearly complete record of dynamic hydrologic changes during the past 35 ka (thousands of calibrated 14C years before present), including cycles of wetland expansion and contraction that correlate tightly with climatic oscillations recorded in the Greenland ice cores. Cessation of discharge associated with rapid warming events resulted in the collapse of entire wetland systems in the Las Vegas Valley at multiple times during the late Quaternary. On average, drought-like conditions, as recorded by widespread erosion and the formation of desert soils, lasted for a few centuries. This record illustrates the vulnerability of desert wetland flora and fauna to abrupt climate change. It also shows that GWD deposits can be used to reconstruct paleohydrologic conditions at millennial to submillennial timescales and informs conservation efforts aimed at protecting these fragile ecosystems in the face of anthropogenic warming.

  9. Abrupt climate variability of eastern Anatolia vegetation during the last glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickarski, N.; Kwiecien, O.; Langgut, D.; Litt, T.

    2015-07-01

    Detailed analyses of the Lake Van pollen and stable oxygen isotope record allow the identification of millennial-scale vegetation and environmental changes in eastern Anatolia throughout the last glacial. The climate within the last glacial period (∼75-15 ka BP) was cold and dry, with low arboreal pollen (AP) levels. The driest and coldest period corresponds to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2 (∼28-14.5 ka BP) dominated by the highest values of xerophytic steppe vegetation. Our high-resolution multi proxy record shows rapid expansions and contractions that mimic the stadial-interstadial pattern of the Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events as recorded in the Greenland ice cores, and thus, provide a linkage to North Atlantic climate oscillations. Periods of reduced moisture availability characterized at Lake Van by enhanced xerophytic species correlates well with increase in ice-rafted debris (IRD) and a decrease of sea surface temperature (SST) in the North Atlantic. Furthermore, comparison with the marine realm reveals that the complex atmosphere-ocean interaction can be recognized by the strength and position of the westerlies in eastern Anatolia. Influenced by rough topography at Lake Van, the expansion of temperate species (e.g. deciduous Quercus) was stronger during interstadials DO 19, 17-16, 14, 12 and 8. However, Heinrich events (HE), characterized by highest concentrations of ice-rafted debris in marine sediments, are identified in eastern Anatolia by AP values not lower and high steppe components not more abundant than during DO stadials. In addition, this work is a first attempt to establish a continuous microscopic charcoal record over the last glacial in the Near East, which documents an initial immediate response to millennial-scale climate and environmental variability and enables the shed light on the history of fire activity during the last glacial.

  10. Wildfire responses to abrupt climate change in North America

    PubMed Central

    Marlon, J. R.; Bartlein, P. J.; Walsh, M. K.; Harrison, S. P.; Brown, K. J.; Edwards, M. E.; Higuera, P. E.; Power, M. J.; Anderson, R. S.; Briles, C.; Brunelle, A.; Carcaillet, C.; Daniels, M.; Hu, F. S.; Lavoie, M.; Long, C.; Minckley, T.; Richard, P. J. H.; Scott, A. C.; Shafer, D. S.; Tinner, W.; Umbanhowar, C. E.; Whitlock, C.

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted, based on data from the last few decades and on model simulations, that anthropogenic climate change will cause increased fire activity. However, less attention has been paid to the relationship between abrupt climate changes and heightened fire activity in the paleorecord. We use 35 charcoal and pollen records to assess how fire regimes in North America changed during the last glacial–interglacial transition (15 to 10 ka), a time of large and rapid climate changes. We also test the hypothesis that a comet impact initiated continental-scale wildfires at 12.9 ka; the data do not support this idea, nor are continent-wide fires indicated at any time during deglaciation. There are, however, clear links between large climate changes and fire activity. Biomass burning gradually increased from the glacial period to the beginning of the Younger Dryas. Although there are changes in biomass burning during the Younger Dryas, there is no systematic trend. There is a further increase in biomass burning after the Younger Dryas. Intervals of rapid climate change at 13.9, 13.2, and 11.7 ka are marked by large increases in fire activity. The timing of changes in fire is not coincident with changes in human population density or the timing of the extinction of the megafauna. Although these factors could have contributed to fire-regime changes at individual sites or at specific times, the charcoal data indicate an important role for climate, and particularly rapid climate change, in determining broad-scale levels of fire activity. PMID:19190185

  11. Abrupt climate and vegetation variability of eastern Anatolia during the last glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickarski, N.; Kwiecien, O.; Langgut, D.; Litt, T.

    2015-11-01

    Detailed analyses of the Lake Van pollen, Ca / K ratio, and stable oxygen isotope record allow the identification of millennial-scale vegetation and environmental changes in eastern Anatolia throughout the last glacial (~ 111.5-11.7 ka BP). The climate of the last glacial was cold and dry, indicated by low arboreal pollen (AP) levels. The driest and coldest period corresponds to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2 (~ 28-14.5 ka BP), which was dominated by highest values of xerophytic steppe vegetation. Our high-resolution multi-proxy record shows rapid expansions and contractions of tree populations that reflect variability in temperature and moisture availability. These rapid vegetation and environmental changes can be related to the stadial-interstadial pattern of Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events as recorded in the Greenland ice cores. Periods of reduced moisture availability were characterized by enhanced occurrence of xerophytic species and high terrigenous input from the Lake Van catchment area. Furthermore, the comparison with the marine realm reveals that the complex atmosphere-ocean interaction can be explained by the strength and position of the westerlies, which are responsible for the supply of humidity in eastern Anatolia. Influenced by the diverse topography of the Lake Van catchment, more pronounced DO interstadials (e.g., DO 19, 17-16, 14, 12 and 8) show the strongest expansion of temperate species within the last glacial. However, Heinrich events (HE), characterized by highest concentrations of ice-rafted debris (IRD) in marine sediments, cannot be separated from other DO stadials based on the vegetation composition in eastern Anatolia. In addition, this work is a first attempt to establish a continuous microscopic charcoal record for the last glacial in the Near East. It documents an immediate response to millennial-scale climate and environmental variability and enables us to shed light on the history of fire activity during the last glacial.

  12. Abrupt climate shift in the Western Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, K.; Chiggiato, J.; Bryden, H. L.; Borghini, M.; Ben Ismail, S.

    2016-01-01

    One century of oceanographic measurements has evidenced gradual increases in temperature and salinity of western Mediterranean water masses, even though the vertical stratification has basically remained unchanged. Starting in 2005, the basic structure of the intermediate and deep layers abruptly changed. We report here evidence of reinforced thermohaline variability in the deep western basin with significant dense water formation events producing large amounts of warmer, saltier and denser water masses than ever before. We provide a detailed chronological order to these changes, giving an overview of the new water masses and following their route from the central basin interior to the east (toward the Tyrrhenian) and toward the Atlantic Ocean. As a consequence of this climate shift, new deep waters outflowing through Gibraltar will impact the North Atlantic in terms of salt and heat input. In addition, modifications in the Mediterranean abyssal ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles are to be expected. PMID:26965790

  13. Abrupt climate shift in the Western Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, K; Chiggiato, J; Bryden, H L; Borghini, M; Ben Ismail, S

    2016-01-01

    One century of oceanographic measurements has evidenced gradual increases in temperature and salinity of western Mediterranean water masses, even though the vertical stratification has basically remained unchanged. Starting in 2005, the basic structure of the intermediate and deep layers abruptly changed. We report here evidence of reinforced thermohaline variability in the deep western basin with significant dense water formation events producing large amounts of warmer, saltier and denser water masses than ever before. We provide a detailed chronological order to these changes, giving an overview of the new water masses and following their route from the central basin interior to the east (toward the Tyrrhenian) and toward the Atlantic Ocean. As a consequence of this climate shift, new deep waters outflowing through Gibraltar will impact the North Atlantic in terms of salt and heat input. In addition, modifications in the Mediterranean abyssal ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles are to be expected. PMID:26965790

  14. Abrupt climate shift in the Western Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, K.; Chiggiato, J.; Bryden, H. L.; Borghini, M.; Ben Ismail, S.

    2016-03-01

    One century of oceanographic measurements has evidenced gradual increases in temperature and salinity of western Mediterranean water masses, even though the vertical stratification has basically remained unchanged. Starting in 2005, the basic structure of the intermediate and deep layers abruptly changed. We report here evidence of reinforced thermohaline variability in the deep western basin with significant dense water formation events producing large amounts of warmer, saltier and denser water masses than ever before. We provide a detailed chronological order to these changes, giving an overview of the new water masses and following their route from the central basin interior to the east (toward the Tyrrhenian) and toward the Atlantic Ocean. As a consequence of this climate shift, new deep waters outflowing through Gibraltar will impact the North Atlantic in terms of salt and heat input. In addition, modifications in the Mediterranean abyssal ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles are to be expected.

  15. Millennial-scale variability during the last glacial in vegetation records from North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiménez-Moreno, Gonzalo; Anderson, R. Scott; Desprat, S.; Grigg, L.D.; Grimm, E.C.; Heusser, L.E.; Jacobs, Brian F.; Lopez-Martinez, C.; Whitlock, C.L.; Willard, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution pollen records from North America show that terrestrial environments were affected by Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) and Heinrich climate variability during the last glacial. In the western, more mountainous regions, these climate changes are generally observed in the pollen records as altitudinal movements of climate-sensitive plant species, whereas in the southeast, they are recorded as latitudinal shifts in vegetation. Heinrich (HS) and Greenland (GS) stadials are generally correlated with cold and dry climate and Greenland interstadials (GI) with warm-wet phases. The pollen records from North America confirm that vegetation responds rapidly to millennial-scale climate variability, although the difficulties in establishing independent age models for the pollen records make determination of the absolute phasing of the records to surface temperatures in Greenland somewhat uncertain. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Millennial-Scale ITCZ Variability in the Tropical Atlantic and Dynamics of Amazonian Rain Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Auler, A. S.; Edwards, R. L.; Cheng, H.; Shen, C.; Smart, P. L.; Richards, D. A.

    2003-12-01

    Precipitation in the Amazon Basin is largely related to the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) in the tropical Atlantic which undergoes a regular seasonal migration. We chose a site south of the present day rainforest in semiarid northeastern Brazil, in order to study the timing of pluvial periods when the southern extend of the ITCZ would have been much further south than today. Shifts in the ITCZ position may have influenced the dynamics of rain forest and species diversity. We collected speleothems from northern Bahia state, located southeast of Amazonia. Age determinations with U-series dating methods show that samples grew rapidly during relatively short intervals (several hundreds of years) of glacial periods in the last 210 kyr. In addition, paleopluvial phases delineated by speleothem growth intervals show millennial-scale variations. Pluvial phases coincide with the timing of weak East Asian summer monsoon intensities (Wang et al., 2001, Science 294: 2345-2348), which have been correlated to the timing of stadials in Greenland ice core records and Heinrich events (Bond and Lotti, 1995, Science 267: 1005-1010). Furthermore, these intervals correspond to the periods of light color reflectance of Cariaco Basin sediments from ODP Hole 1002C (Peterson et al., 2000, Science, 290: 1947-1951), which was suggested to be caused by a southward shift of the northernmost position of the ITCZ and decreased rainfall in this region. Abrupt precipitation changes in northeastern Brazil may be due to the southward displacement of the southernmost position of the ITCZ associated with atmosphere-ocean circulation changes caused by (1) an increase in northern high latitude-tropical temperature gradient (Chiang et al., 2003, Paleoceanography, in press), and/or (2) the bipolar seesaw mechanism (Broecker et al., 1998, Paleoceanography 13: 119-121) during these Heinrich events. Pluvial phases are also coincident with higher insolation at 10° S during austral autumn. This

  17. Abrupt shifts in phenology and vegetation productivity under climate extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xuanlong; Huete, Alfredo; Moran, Susan; Ponce-Campos, Guillermo; Eamus, Derek

    2015-10-01

    Amplification of the hydrologic cycle as a consequence of global warming is predicted to increase climate variability and the frequency and severity of droughts. Recent large-scale drought and flooding over numerous continents provide unique opportunities to understand ecosystem responses to climatic extremes. In this study, we investigated the impacts of the early 21st century extreme hydroclimatic variations in southeastern Australia on phenology and vegetation productivity using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Enhanced Vegetation Index and Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index. Results revealed dramatic impacts of drought and wet extremes on vegetation dynamics, with abrupt between year changes in phenology. Drought resulted in widespread reductions or collapse in the normal patterns of seasonality such that in many cases there was no detectable phenological cycle during drought years. Across the full range of biomes examined, we found semiarid ecosystems to exhibit the largest sensitivity to hydroclimatic variations, exceeding that of arid and humid ecosystems. This result demonstrated the vulnerability of semiarid ecosystems to climatic extremes and potential loss of ecosystem resilience with future mega-drought events. A skewed distribution of hydroclimatic sensitivity with aridity is of global biogeochemical significance because it suggests that current drying trends in semiarid regions will reduce hydroclimatic sensitivity and suppress the large carbon sink that has been reported during recent wet periods (e.g., 2011 La Niña).

  18. Millennial-scale sea ice variability in the southern Indian Ocean during the last glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikehara, M.; Katsuki, K.; Yamane, M.; Yokoyama, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean has played an important role in the evolution of the global climate system. Sea ice coverage on sea surface strongly affects the climate of the Southern Hemisphere through its impacts on the energy and gas budget, on the atmospheric circulation, on the hydrological cycle, and on the biological productivity. In this study, we have conducted fundamental analyses of ice-rafted debris (IRD) and diatom assemblage to reveal a rapid change of sea ice distribution in the glacial southern Indian Ocean. Piston cores COR-1bPC and DCR-1PC were collected from the Conrad Rise and Del Caño Rise, Indian sector of the Southern Ocean. Age models of the cores were established by radiocarbon dating and oxygen isotope stratigraphy of planktic and benthic foraminifers. Records of IRD concentration suggest millennial-scale pulses of IRD delivery during the last glacial period. The depositions of rock-fragment IRD excluding volcanic glass and pumice were associated with increasing of sea-ice diatoms, suggesting that the millennial-scale events of cooling and sea-ice expansion were occurred in the southern Indian Ocean during the last glacial period. Provenance study of IRD grains suggest that the source of IRD in the southern Indian Ocean was mainly volcanic arc in the South Atlantic, based on chemical compositions of rock-fragment IRD grains. Thus prominent IRD layers in the glacial Southern Ocean suggest episodes of sea ice expansion and cooling in the Indian sectors of the Southern Ocean.

  19. Catalogue of abrupt shifts in Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change climate models.

    PubMed

    Drijfhout, Sybren; Bathiany, Sebastian; Beaulieu, Claudie; Brovkin, Victor; Claussen, Martin; Huntingford, Chris; Scheffer, Marten; Sgubin, Giovanni; Swingedouw, Didier

    2015-10-27

    Abrupt transitions of regional climate in response to the gradual rise in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations are notoriously difficult to foresee. However, such events could be particularly challenging in view of the capacity required for society and ecosystems to adapt to them. We present, to our knowledge, the first systematic screening of the massive climate model ensemble informing the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report, and reveal evidence of 37 forced regional abrupt changes in the ocean, sea ice, snow cover, permafrost, and terrestrial biosphere that arise after a certain global temperature increase. Eighteen out of 37 events occur for global warming levels of less than 2°, a threshold sometimes presented as a safe limit. Although most models predict one or more such events, any specific occurrence typically appears in only a few models. We find no compelling evidence for a general relation between the overall number of abrupt shifts and the level of global warming. However, we do note that abrupt changes in ocean circulation occur more often for moderate warming (less than 2°), whereas over land they occur more often for warming larger than 2°. Using a basic proportion test, however, we find that the number of abrupt shifts identified in Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenarios is significantly larger than in other scenarios of lower radiative forcing. This suggests the potential for a gradual trend of destabilization of the climate with respect to such shifts, due to increasing global mean temperature change. PMID:26460042

  20. Catalogue of abrupt shifts in Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change climate models

    PubMed Central

    Drijfhout, Sybren; Bathiany, Sebastian; Beaulieu, Claudie; Brovkin, Victor; Claussen, Martin; Huntingford, Chris; Scheffer, Marten; Sgubin, Giovanni; Swingedouw, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Abrupt transitions of regional climate in response to the gradual rise in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations are notoriously difficult to foresee. However, such events could be particularly challenging in view of the capacity required for society and ecosystems to adapt to them. We present, to our knowledge, the first systematic screening of the massive climate model ensemble informing the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report, and reveal evidence of 37 forced regional abrupt changes in the ocean, sea ice, snow cover, permafrost, and terrestrial biosphere that arise after a certain global temperature increase. Eighteen out of 37 events occur for global warming levels of less than 2°, a threshold sometimes presented as a safe limit. Although most models predict one or more such events, any specific occurrence typically appears in only a few models. We find no compelling evidence for a general relation between the overall number of abrupt shifts and the level of global warming. However, we do note that abrupt changes in ocean circulation occur more often for moderate warming (less than 2°), whereas over land they occur more often for warming larger than 2°. Using a basic proportion test, however, we find that the number of abrupt shifts identified in Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenarios is significantly larger than in other scenarios of lower radiative forcing. This suggests the potential for a gradual trend of destabilization of the climate with respect to such shifts, due to increasing global mean temperature change. PMID:26460042

  1. Climate oscillations and abrupt changes in C14 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, T. V.; Tsirulnik, L. B.

    2004-01-01

    The radiocarbon series are analysed by a method of non-linear spectral analysis to detect time intervals of appearance of non-stationary oscillations of large amplitude, and the times of abrupt changes of their oscillation regime. The analysis shows that the most powerful cycles of the spectra can be interpreted in terms of periods (and their respective higher harmonics) of astronomical origin. An intense stationary sinusoid from the spectrum with period T˜6500 yr, the 4th harmonic of the period of equinox precession, correlates with the time variations of the geomagnetic dipole moment. The most powerful non-stationary sinusoid with mean period T=2230 yr, reflects oscillations in C14 data related to the non-dipole part of the geomagnetic field, and correlates with periods of climate warming/cooling. The apparent regularities that can be inferred in the interaction of such two powerful cycles (i.e. stationary and non-stationary parts of the uniform mechanism of the geomagnetic field generation) permit to forecast a tendency of the climate changes. A possible physical mechanism is presented based on a possible transformation, of some signals caused by perturbation of the tidal forces of astronomical origin (that can arise along the orbit of the Earth), into effects that control geophysical systems through small variations of the dissipative parameters of a dynamo system.

  2. East China Sea δ18O Record Detects Millennial-Scale Changes in the East Asian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleeman, E.; Clemens, S. C.; Lawman, A. E.; Kubota, Y.; Holbourn, A. E.; Martin, A.

    2015-12-01

    The East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) brings heavy summer rainfall to some of Asia's most densely-populated areas, impacting agricultural production and water resources. Sediment cores were recovered from International Ocean Drilling Program Site U1429 in the East China Sea (31° 37.04' N, 128° 59.50' E, 732 mbsl). This location receives runoff from the Yangtze River, which serves as a major drainage system for monsoon-induced precipitation. Hence, the δ18O record of planktonic foraminifera at Site U1429 reflects changes in regional, monsoon-driven salinity. The top 100 meters of core at Site U1429 were sampled at a preliminary resolution of 15 cm and processed to isolate the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber for δ18O mass spectrometry analyses. Abrupt, millennial-scale regional climate variability in the EASM and its linkage to orbital forcings have been reconstructed using stratigraphic analysis of δ18O. The sub-orbital scale structure of the δ18O record over the past 400 kyr matches the structures of both the composite speleothem δ18O from eastern China (Sanbao and Hulu caves) and the planktonic δ18O record from northern South China Sea Site 1146. The similarities between these δ18O records indicate a strong regional response to monsoon forcing. Removal of the temperature component of the δ18O signal by using Mg/Ca (G. ruber) paleothermometry will provide a record of changes in the δ18O composition of seawater in response to Yangtze River runoff.

  3. Arctic Ocean freshwater as a trigger for abrupt climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Raymond; Condron, Alan; Coletti, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    The cause of the Younger Dryas cooling remains unresolved despite decades of debate. Current arguments focus on either freshwater from Glacial Lake Agassiz drainage through the St Lawrence or the MacKenzie river systems. High resolution ocean modeling suggests that freshwater delivered to the North Atlantic from the Arctic Ocean through Fram Strait would have had more of an impact on Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) than freshwater from the St Lawrence. This has been interpreted as an argument for a MacKenzie River /Lake Agassiz freshwater source. However, it is important to note that although the modeling identifies Fram Strait as the optimum location for delivery of freshwater to disrupt the AMOC, this does not mean the freshwater source came from Lake Agassiz. Another potential source of freshwater is the Arctic Ocean ice cover itself. During the LGM, ice cover was extremely thick - many tens of meters in the Canada Basin (at least), resulting in a hiatus in sediment deposition there. Extreme ice thickness was related to a stagnant circulation, very low temperatures and continuous accumulation of snow on top of a base of sea-ice. This resulted in a large accumulation of freshwater in the Arctic Basin. As sea-level rose and a more modern circulation regime became established in the Arctic, this freshwater was released from the Arctic Ocean through Fram Strait, leading to extensive sea-ice formation in the North Atlantic (Greenland Sea) and a major reduction in the AMOC. Here we present new model results and a review of the paleoceanographic evidence to support this hypothesis. The bottom line is that the Arctic Ocean was likely a major player in causing abrupt climate change in the past, via its influence on the AMOC. Although we focus here on the Younger Dryas, the Arctic Ocean has been repeatedly isolated from the world ocean during glacial periods of the past. When these periods of isolation ended, it is probable that there were significant

  4. The verification of millennial-scale monsoon water vapor transport channel in northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu; Zhang, Chengqi; Wang, Yue

    2016-05-01

    Long-term changes of the Asian summer monsoon water vapor transport play a pivotal role in the variability of monsoon precipitation. Paleo-climate simulations have shown that there is an important monsoon vapor transport channel in western China. Previous studies mostly focused on the correlation between monsoon precipitation and intensity. Little research has been done on the verification of the water vapor channel. Compared with speleothem and lacustrine systems, the hydrological cycle of land surface sediments is more directly related to the monsoon water vapor. In this study, we used carbonate δ18O and organic matter δ13C of the surface eolian sediments from the piedmont of the northern Qilian Mountains to verify the monsoon water vapor on the Holocene millennial-scale. Two surface sedimentary sections were selected to study paleo-monsoon water vapor transport. Proxy data, including carbonate δ18O and organic matter δ13C of surface eolian sediments, as well as total organic matter and carbonate content were obtained from the two eolian sections. We also synthesized transient simulations of the CCSM3 and the Kiel climate models. The PMIP 3.0 project and TRACE isotopic simulations were also compared with the reconstructed monsoon water vapor transport. Our findings indicate that the strength of the Holocene Asian summer monsoon is consistent with the water vapor transport in western China that has significant impacts to long-term monsoon precipitation in northern China. This study verifies a significant millennial-scale correlation between the monsoon strength and monsoon water vapor transport intensity along the eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau.

  5. Have abrupt climate variations of the last glacial possibly been muted in the south-west African tropics by counteracting mechanisms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessler, I.; Dupont, L.; Handiani, D.; Steinke, S.; Groeneveld, J.; Merkel, U.; Paul, A.

    2012-04-01

    The last glacial period including the last deglaciation (73.5-10 ka BP) is characterised by abrupt shifts between extreme climatic conditions. Millennial-scale climate variations associated with North Atlantic Heinrich Stadials (HSs) are thought to be transmitted by both the atmospheric and oceanic circulation resulting in a near-global footprint. It is further thought that HSs are closely related to a reduction or shut-down of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, which, according to the bipolar-seesaw hypothesis, leads to the accumulation of heat in the South Atlantic. In addition, it is hypothesised that HSs result in a southward shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone which then would likely influence the vegetation composition in the African tropics. To investigate the impact of HSs on the terrestrial African realm and the south-east Atlantic we reconstructed the vegetation development in Angola and the southern Congo Basin as well as the sea surface temperatures (SST) of the south-east Atlantic using marine sediments of ODP Site 1078 (11° 55'S, 13° 24'E, 427 m water depth). Two species of planktonic foraminifera were selected to reconstruct variations in surface water conditions in the south-east Atlantic. Due the ecological and seasonal preferences of Globigerinoides ruber (pink) this species provides a good tool to estimate SST variations during the southern hemisphere summer. In contrast, Globigerina bulloides is representing the Benguela Upwelling System during the southern hemisphere winter. While Mg/Ca-based SSTs of G. ruber (pink) were significantly higher by 1° -2° C during periods of abrupt climate change, the impact of HSs during southern hemisphere winter is less obvious. However, although there are several vegetation records that show an impact of HSs in the African tropics, our high-resolution pollen record from ODP Site 1078 reflects no vegetation changes during periods of HSs. Model simulations conducted with an Earth System

  6. Abrupt climate change and transient climates during the Paleogene: a marine perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zachos, J. C.; Lohmann, K. C.; Walker, J. C.; Wise, S. W.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed investigations of high latitude sequences recently collected by the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) indicate that periods of rapid climate change often culminated in brief transient climates, with more extreme conditions than subsequent long term climates. Two examples of such events have been identified in the Paleogene; the first in latest Paleocene time in the middle of a warming trend that began several million years earlier: the second in earliest Oligocene time near the end of a Middle Eocene to Late Oligocene global cooling trend. Superimposed on the earlier event was a sudden and extreme warming of both high latitude sea surface and deep ocean waters. Imbedded in the latter transition was an abrupt decline in high latitude temperatures and the brief appearance of a full size continental ice-sheet on Antarctica. In both cases the climate extremes were not stable, lasting for less than a few hundred thousand years, indicating a temporary or transient climate state. Geochemical and sedimentological evidence suggest that both Paleogene climate events were accompanied by reorganizations in ocean circulation, and major perturbations in marine productivity and the global carbon cycle. The Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum was marked by reduced oceanic turnover and decreases in global delta 13C and in marine productivity, while the Early Oligocene glacial maximum was accompanied by intensification of deep ocean circulation and elevated delta 13C and productivity. It has been suggested that sudden changes in climate and/or ocean circulation might occur as a result of gradual forcing as certain physical thresholds are exceeded. We investigate the possibility that sudden reorganizations in ocean and/or atmosphere circulation during these abrupt transitions generated short-term positive feedbacks that briefly sustained these transient climatic states.

  7. Abrupt climate events 500,000 to 340,000 years ago: Evidence from subpolar North Atlantic sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Oppo, D.W.; McManus, J.F.; Cullen, J.L.

    1998-02-27

    Subpolar North Atlantic proxy records document millennial-scale climate variations 500,000 to 340,000 years ago. The cycles have an approximately constant pacing that is similar to that documented for the last glacial cycle. These findings suggest that such climate variations are inherent to the late Pleistocene, regardless of glacial state. Sea surface temperature during the warm peak of Marine Isotope Stage 11 (MIS 11) varied by 0.5{degree} to 1{degree}C, less than the 4{degree} to 4.5{degree}C estimated during times of ice growth and the 3{degree}C estimated for glacial maxima. Coherent deep ocean circulation changes were associated with glacial oscillations in sea surface temperature. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Sensitivity and rapidity of vegetational response to abrupt climate change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peteet, D.

    2000-01-01

    Rapid climate change characterizes numerous terrestrial sediment records during and since the last glaciation. Vegetational response is best expressed in terrestrial records near ecotones, where sensitivity to climate change is greatest, and response times are as short as decades.

  9. Abrupt Climate Change: the View from the Past, the Present and the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. W. C.

    2014-12-01

    Climate is changing as humans put more and more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. With CO2 levels today around 400ppm, we are clearly committed to far more climate change, both in the near term, and well beyond our children's future. A key question is how that change will occur. Abrupt climate changes are those that exceed our expectations, preparedness, and ability to adapt. Such changes challenge us economically, physically, and socially. This talk will draw upon results from ice core research over the past twenty years, as well as a new NRC report on abrupt climate change in order to address abrupt change, as seen in the past in ice cores, as seen today in key environmental systems upon which humans depend, and what is may be coming in the future.

  10. Abrupt climate change in southeast tropical Africa influenced by Indian monsoon variability and ITCZ migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, Jessica E.; Russell, James M.

    2007-08-01

    The timing and magnitude of abrupt climate change in tropical Africa during the last glacial termination remains poorly understood. High-resolution paleolimnological data from Lake Tanganyika, Southeast Africa show that wind-driven seasonal mixing in the lake was reduced during the Younger Dryas, Inter-Allerød Cool Period, Older Dryas, and Heinrich Event 1, suggesting a weakened southwest Indian monsoon and a more southerly position of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone over Africa during these intervals. These events in Lake Tanganyika, coeval with millennial and centennial-scale climate shifts in the high latitudes, suggest that changes in ITCZ location and Indian monsoon strength are important components of abrupt global climate change and that their effects are felt south of the equator in Africa. However, we observe additional events in Lake Tanganyika of equal magnitude that are not correlated with high-latitude changes, indicating the potential for abrupt climate change to originate from within tropical systems.

  11. Millennial-scale record of landslides in the Andes consistent with earthquake trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhillips, Devin; Bierman, Paul R.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2014-12-01

    Geologic records of landslide activity offer rare glimpses into landscapes evolving under the influence of tectonics and climate. Because the deposits of individual landslides are unlikely to be preserved, landslide activity in the geologic past is often reconstructed by extrapolating from historic landslide inventories. Landslide deposits have been interpreted as palaeoclimate proxies relating to changes in precipitation, although earthquakes can also trigger landslides. Here we measure cosmogenic 10Be concentrations in individual cobbles from the modern Quebrada Veladera river channel and an adjacent terrace in Peru and calculate erosion rates. We find, in conjunction with a 10Be production model, that the 10Be concentrations of each cobble population record erosion integrated over thousands of years and are consistent with a landslide origin for the cobbles. The distribution of 10Be concentrations in terrace cobbles produced during the relatively wet climate before about 16,000 years ago is indistinguishable from the distribution in river channel cobbles produced during the drier climate of the past few thousand years. This suggests that the amount of erosion from landslides has not changed in response to climatic changes. Instead, our integrated, millennial-scale record of landslides implies that earthquakes may be the primary landslide trigger in the arid foothills of Peru.

  12. Dynamics of climate and ecosystem coupling: abrupt changes and multiple equilibria.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Paul A T; Mastrandrea, Michael D; Schneider, Stephen H

    2002-01-01

    Interactions between subunits of the global climate-biosphere system (e.g. atmosphere, ocean, biosphere and cryosphere) often lead to behaviour that is not evident when each subunit is viewed in isolation. This newly evident behaviour is an emergent property of the coupled subsystems. Interactions between thermohaline circulation and climate illustrate one emergent property of coupling ocean and atmospheric circulation. The multiple thermohaline circulation equilibria that result caused abrupt climate changes in the past and may cause abrupt climate changes in the future. Similarly, coupling between the climate system and ecosystem structure and function produces complex behaviour in certain regions. For example, atmosphere-biosphere interactions in the Sahel region of West Africa lead to multiple stable equilibria. Either wet or dry climate equilibria can occur under otherwise identical forcing conditions. The equilibrium reached is dependent on past history (i.e. initial conditions), and relatively small perturbations to either climate or vegetation can cause switching between the two equilibria. Both thermohaline circulation and the climate-vegetation system in the Sahel are prone to abrupt changes that may be irreversible. This complicates the relatively linear view of global changes held in many scientific and policy communities. Emergent properties of coupled socio-natural systems add yet another layer of complexity to the policy debate. As a result, the social and economic consequences of possible global changes are likely to be underestimated in most conventional analyses because these nonlinear, abrupt and irreversible responses are insufficiently considered. PMID:12079526

  13. Dynamics of climate and ecosystem coupling: abrupt changes and multiple equilibria.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Paul A T; Mastrandrea, Michael D; Schneider, Stephen H

    2002-05-29

    Interactions between subunits of the global climate-biosphere system (e.g. atmosphere, ocean, biosphere and cryosphere) often lead to behaviour that is not evident when each subunit is viewed in isolation. This newly evident behaviour is an emergent property of the coupled subsystems. Interactions between thermohaline circulation and climate illustrate one emergent property of coupling ocean and atmospheric circulation. The multiple thermohaline circulation equilibria that result caused abrupt climate changes in the past and may cause abrupt climate changes in the future. Similarly, coupling between the climate system and ecosystem structure and function produces complex behaviour in certain regions. For example, atmosphere-biosphere interactions in the Sahel region of West Africa lead to multiple stable equilibria. Either wet or dry climate equilibria can occur under otherwise identical forcing conditions. The equilibrium reached is dependent on past history (i.e. initial conditions), and relatively small perturbations to either climate or vegetation can cause switching between the two equilibria. Both thermohaline circulation and the climate-vegetation system in the Sahel are prone to abrupt changes that may be irreversible. This complicates the relatively linear view of global changes held in many scientific and policy communities. Emergent properties of coupled socio-natural systems add yet another layer of complexity to the policy debate. As a result, the social and economic consequences of possible global changes are likely to be underestimated in most conventional analyses because these nonlinear, abrupt and irreversible responses are insufficiently considered. PMID:12079526

  14. Millennial-scale Atlantic/East Pacific sea surface temperature linkages during the last 100,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Nathalie; Kienast, Markus; Kienast, Stephanie S.; Timmermann, Axel

    2014-06-01

    Amplifying both internally generated variability and remote climate signals from the Atlantic Ocean via coupled air-sea instabilities, the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP) is well situated to detect past climate changes and variations in Central American wind systems that dynamically link the Atlantic and the Pacific. Here we compare new and previously published alkenone-based sea surface temperature (SST) reconstructions from diverse environments within the ETP, i.e. the Eastern Pacific Warm Pool (EPWP), the equatorial and the northern Peruvian Upwelling regions over the past 100,000 yr. Over this time period, a fairly constant meridional temperature gradient across the region is observed, indicating similar hydrographic conditions during glacial and interglacial periods. The data further reveal that millennial-scale cold events associated with massive iceberg surges in the North Atlantic (Heinrich events) generate cooling in the ETP from ∼8°N to ∼2°S. Data from Heinrich event 1, however, indicate that the response changes sign south of 2°S. These millennial-scale alterations of the SST pattern across diverse environments of the ETP support previous climate modeling experiments that suggested an Atlantic-Pacific connection caused by the intensification of the Central American gap winds, enhanced upwelling and mixing north of the equator and supported by positive air-sea feedbacks in the eastern tropical Pacific.

  15. Millennial-scale ocean acidification and late Quaternary

    SciTech Connect

    Riding, Dr Robert E; Liang, Liyuan; Braga, Dr Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification by atmospheric carbon dioxide has increased almost continuously since the last glacial maximum (LGM), 21 000 years ago. It is expected to impair tropical reef development, but effects on reefs at the present day and in the recent past have proved difficult to evaluate. We present evidence that acidification has already significantly reduced the formation of calcified bacterial crusts in tropical reefs. Unlike major reef builders such as coralline algae and corals that more closely control their calcification, bacterial calcification is very sensitive to ambient changes in carbonate chemistry. Bacterial crusts in reef cavities have declined in thickness over the past 14 000 years with largest reduction occurring 12 000 10 000 years ago. We interpret this as an early effect of deglacial ocean acidification on reef calcification and infer that similar crusts were likely to have been thicker when seawater carbonate saturation was increased during earlier glacial intervals, and thinner during interglacials. These changes in crust thickness could have substantially affected reef development over glacial cycles, as rigid crusts significantly strengthen framework and their reduction would have increased the susceptibility of reefs to biological and physical erosion. Bacterial crust decline reveals previously unrecognized millennial-scale acidification effects on tropical reefs. This directs attention to the role of crusts in reef formation and the ability of bioinduced calcification to reflect changes in seawater chemistry. It also provides a long-term context for assessing anticipated anthropogenic effects.

  16. Can Abrupt Seasonal Transitions be Predicted in Climate Forecasts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtman, B. P.

    2014-12-01

    There is on ongoing debate in the seasonal prediction community as to whether high frequency weather statistics in climate forecasts have any inherent predictability, and ultimately prediction skill. The North American Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME) seasonal-to-interannual prediction experiment is the ideal test-bed to evaluate the predictability and prediction of weather within climate. NMME is multi-institutional multi-agency system to improve operational monthly and seasonal forecasts based on the prediction systems developed at the major US climate modeling centers (NOAA/EMC, NOAA/GFDL, NCAR, NASA) and Canada. Although currently in an experimental stage, the NMME prediction system has been providing routine real-time monthly and seasonal forecasts since August 2011 that adhere to the CPC operational schedule. In addition to the monthly data, daily output from some of the retrospective forecasts are now being archived. Based on the NMME daily output this talk evaluates the predictability and prediction of two aspects of weather within climate: (i) monsoon onset in India and in South West North America and (ii) onset of spring severe weather in the mid-west US. The analysis estimates predictability by examining how well the individual models "predict" themselves and how well they "predict" other models. Prediction quality is assessed based on comparisons with observational estimates.

  17. Ice-core evidence of abrupt climate changes

    PubMed Central

    Alley, Richard B.

    2000-01-01

    Ice-core records show that climate changes in the past have been large, rapid, and synchronous over broad areas extending into low latitudes, with less variability over historical times. These ice-core records come from high mountain glaciers and the polar regions, including small ice caps and the large ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica. PMID:10677460

  18. Millennial-scale temperature change velocity in the continental northern Neotropics.

    PubMed

    Correa-Metrio, Alexander; Bush, Mark; Lozano-García, Socorro; Sosa-Nájera, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Climate has been inherently linked to global diversity patterns, and yet no empirical data are available to put modern climate change into a millennial-scale context. High tropical species diversity has been linked to slow rates of climate change during the Quaternary, an assumption that lacks an empirical foundation. Thus, there is the need for quantifying the velocity at which the bioclimatic space changed during the Quaternary in the tropics. Here we present rates of climate change for the late Pleistocene and Holocene from Mexico and Guatemala. An extensive modern pollen survey and fossil pollen data from two long sedimentary records (30,000 and 86,000 years for highlands and lowlands, respectively) were used to estimate past temperatures. Derived temperature profiles show a parallel long-term trend and a similar cooling during the Last Glacial Maximum in the Guatemalan lowlands and the Mexican highlands. Temperature estimates and digital elevation models were used to calculate the velocity of isotherm displacement (temperature change velocity) for the time period contained in each record. Our analyses showed that temperature change velocities in Mesoamerica during the late Quaternary were at least four times slower than values reported for the last 50 years, but also at least twice as fast as those obtained from recent models. Our data demonstrate that, given extremely high temperature change velocities, species survival must have relied on either microrefugial populations or persistence of suppressed individuals. Contrary to the usual expectation of stable climates being associated with high diversity, our results suggest that Quaternary tropical diversity was probably maintained by centennial-scale oscillatory climatic variability that forestalled competitive exclusion. As humans have simplified modern landscapes, thereby removing potential microrefugia, and climate change is occurring monotonically at a very high velocity, extinction risk for tropical

  19. Millennial-Scale Temperature Change Velocity in the Continental Northern Neotropics

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Metrio, Alexander; Bush, Mark; Lozano-García, Socorro; Sosa-Nájera, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Climate has been inherently linked to global diversity patterns, and yet no empirical data are available to put modern climate change into a millennial-scale context. High tropical species diversity has been linked to slow rates of climate change during the Quaternary, an assumption that lacks an empirical foundation. Thus, there is the need for quantifying the velocity at which the bioclimatic space changed during the Quaternary in the tropics. Here we present rates of climate change for the late Pleistocene and Holocene from Mexico and Guatemala. An extensive modern pollen survey and fossil pollen data from two long sedimentary records (30,000 and 86,000 years for highlands and lowlands, respectively) were used to estimate past temperatures. Derived temperature profiles show a parallel long-term trend and a similar cooling during the Last Glacial Maximum in the Guatemalan lowlands and the Mexican highlands. Temperature estimates and digital elevation models were used to calculate the velocity of isotherm displacement (temperature change velocity) for the time period contained in each record. Our analyses showed that temperature change velocities in Mesoamerica during the late Quaternary were at least four times slower than values reported for the last 50 years, but also at least twice as fast as those obtained from recent models. Our data demonstrate that, given extremely high temperature change velocities, species survival must have relied on either microrefugial populations or persistence of suppressed individuals. Contrary to the usual expectation of stable climates being associated with high diversity, our results suggest that Quaternary tropical diversity was probably maintained by centennial-scale oscillatory climatic variability that forestalled competitive exclusion. As humans have simplified modern landscapes, thereby removing potential microrefugia, and climate change is occurring monotonically at a very high velocity, extinction risk for tropical

  20. Gradual onset and recovery of the Younger Dryas abrupt climate event in the tropics

    PubMed Central

    Partin, J.W.; Quinn, T.M.; Shen, C.-C.; Okumura, Y.; Cardenas, M.B.; Siringan, F.P.; Banner, J.L.; Lin, K.; Hu, H.-M.; Taylor, F.W.

    2015-01-01

    Proxy records of temperature from the Atlantic clearly show that the Younger Dryas was an abrupt climate change event during the last deglaciation, but records of hydroclimate are underutilized in defining the event. Here we combine a new hydroclimate record from Palawan, Philippines, in the tropical Pacific, with previously published records to highlight a difference between hydroclimate and temperature responses to the Younger Dryas. Although the onset and termination are synchronous across the records, tropical hydroclimate changes are more gradual (>100 years) than the abrupt (10–100 years) temperature changes in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The abrupt recovery of Greenland temperatures likely reflects changes in regional sea ice extent. Proxy data and transient climate model simulations support the hypothesis that freshwater forced a reduction in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, thereby causing the Younger Dryas. However, changes in ocean overturning may not produce the same effects globally as in Greenland. PMID:26329911

  1. Gradual onset and recovery of the Younger Dryas abrupt climate event in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, J. W.; Quinn, T. M.; Shen, C.-C.; Okumura, Y.; Cardenas, M. B.; Siringan, F. P.; Banner, J. L.; Lin, K.; Hu, H.-M.; Taylor, F. W.

    2015-09-01

    Proxy records of temperature from the Atlantic clearly show that the Younger Dryas was an abrupt climate change event during the last deglaciation, but records of hydroclimate are underutilized in defining the event. Here we combine a new hydroclimate record from Palawan, Philippines, in the tropical Pacific, with previously published records to highlight a difference between hydroclimate and temperature responses to the Younger Dryas. Although the onset and termination are synchronous across the records, tropical hydroclimate changes are more gradual (>100 years) than the abrupt (10-100 years) temperature changes in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The abrupt recovery of Greenland temperatures likely reflects changes in regional sea ice extent. Proxy data and transient climate model simulations support the hypothesis that freshwater forced a reduction in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, thereby causing the Younger Dryas. However, changes in ocean overturning may not produce the same effects globally as in Greenland.

  2. Gradual onset and recovery of the Younger Dryas abrupt climate event in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Partin, J W; Quinn, T M; Shen, C-C; Okumura, Y; Cardenas, M B; Siringan, F P; Banner, J L; Lin, K; Hu, H-M; Taylor, F W

    2015-01-01

    Proxy records of temperature from the Atlantic clearly show that the Younger Dryas was an abrupt climate change event during the last deglaciation, but records of hydroclimate are underutilized in defining the event. Here we combine a new hydroclimate record from Palawan, Philippines, in the tropical Pacific, with previously published records to highlight a difference between hydroclimate and temperature responses to the Younger Dryas. Although the onset and termination are synchronous across the records, tropical hydroclimate changes are more gradual (>100 years) than the abrupt (10-100 years) temperature changes in the northern Atlantic Ocean. The abrupt recovery of Greenland temperatures likely reflects changes in regional sea ice extent. Proxy data and transient climate model simulations support the hypothesis that freshwater forced a reduction in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, thereby causing the Younger Dryas. However, changes in ocean overturning may not produce the same effects globally as in Greenland. PMID:26329911

  3. The applicability of research on moving cut data-approximate entropy on abrupt climate change detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hongmei; He, Wenping; Liu, Qunqun; Wang, Jinsong; Feng, Guolin

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the performance of moving cut data-approximate entropy (MC-ApEn) to detect abrupt dynamic changes was investigated. Numerical tests in a time series model indicate that the MC-ApEn method is suitable for the detection of abrupt dynamic changes for three types of meteorological data: daily maximum temperature, daily minimum temperature, and daily precipitation. Additionally, the MC-ApEn method was used to detect abrupt climate changes in daily precipitation data from Northwest China and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) index. The results show an abrupt dynamic change in precipitation in 1980 and in the PDO index in 1976. The times indicated for the abrupt changes are identical to those from previous results. Application of the analysis to observational data further confirmed the performance of the MC-ApEn method. Moreover, MC-ApEn outperformed the moving t test (MTT) and the moving detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) methods for the detection of abrupt dynamic changes in a simulated 1000-point daily precipitation dataset.

  4. Glacial reduction in Drake Passage throughflow and millennial-scale variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, Frank; Arz, Helge; Kilian, Rolf; Lange, Carina; Lembke, Lester; Wengler, Marc; Kaiser, Jerome; Baeza Urrea, Oscar; Hall, Ian; Harada, Naomi; Tiedemann, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    The Drake Passage is a major geographic constriction for the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and controls the exchange of physical, chemical, and biological properties between the three major ocean basins. Resolving changes in the flow of circumpolar water masses through this gateway is therefore crucial for advancing our understanding of the Southern Ocean's role in ocean and climate change on a global scale. Here we reconstruct changes in Drake Passage dynamics over the past 65,000 years based on grain-size and geochemical properties from sediment records from the southernmost continental margin of South America. We reveal an up to ~40% decrease in flow speed along the northernmost Antarctic Circumpolar Current pathway entering the Drake Passage during glacial times. In combination with published sediment records from the Scotia Sea, we argue for a considerable total reduction of Drake Passage transport during the last glacial. Superimposed on this long-term decrease are high-amplitude millennial-scale variations, which parallel Southern Ocean and Antarctic temperature pattern. Strengthened flow occurs during Antarctic warmings. Our results point to a critical role of Drake Passage transport for the global meridional overturning and interbasin exchange in the Southern Ocean most likely regulated by variations in the westerly wind field and changes in the extension of Antarctic sea-ice.

  5. Glacial reduction and millennial-scale variations in Drake Passage throughflow.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Frank; Arz, Helge W; Kilian, Rolf; Lange, Carina B; Lembke-Jene, Lester; Wengler, Marc; Kaiser, Jérôme; Baeza-Urrea, Oscar; Hall, Ian R; Harada, Naomi; Tiedemann, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    The Drake Passage (DP) is the major geographic constriction for the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and exerts a strong control on the exchange of physical, chemical, and biological properties between the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Ocean basins. Resolving changes in the flow of circumpolar water masses through this gateway is, therefore, crucial for advancing our understanding of the Southern Ocean's role in global ocean and climate variability. Here, we reconstruct changes in DP throughflow dynamics over the past 65,000 y based on grain size and geochemical properties of sediment records from the southernmost continental margin of South America. Combined with published sediment records from the Scotia Sea, we argue for a considerable total reduction of DP transport and reveal an up to ∼ 40% decrease in flow speed along the northernmost ACC pathway entering the DP during glacial times. Superimposed on this long-term decrease are high-amplitude, millennial-scale variations, which parallel Southern Ocean and Antarctic temperature patterns. The glacial intervals of strong weakening of the ACC entering the DP imply an enhanced export of northern ACC surface and intermediate waters into the South Pacific Gyre and reduced Pacific-Atlantic exchange through the DP ("cold water route"). We conclude that changes in DP throughflow play a critical role for the global meridional overturning circulation and interbasin exchange in the Southern Ocean, most likely regulated by variations in the westerly wind field and changes in Antarctic sea ice extent. PMID:26417070

  6. Glacial reduction and millennial-scale variations in Drake Passage throughflow

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, Frank; Arz, Helge W.; Kilian, Rolf; Lange, Carina B.; Lembke-Jene, Lester; Wengler, Marc; Kaiser, Jérôme; Baeza-Urrea, Oscar; Hall, Ian R.; Harada, Naomi; Tiedemann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The Drake Passage (DP) is the major geographic constriction for the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and exerts a strong control on the exchange of physical, chemical, and biological properties between the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Ocean basins. Resolving changes in the flow of circumpolar water masses through this gateway is, therefore, crucial for advancing our understanding of the Southern Ocean’s role in global ocean and climate variability. Here, we reconstruct changes in DP throughflow dynamics over the past 65,000 y based on grain size and geochemical properties of sediment records from the southernmost continental margin of South America. Combined with published sediment records from the Scotia Sea, we argue for a considerable total reduction of DP transport and reveal an up to ∼40% decrease in flow speed along the northernmost ACC pathway entering the DP during glacial times. Superimposed on this long-term decrease are high-amplitude, millennial-scale variations, which parallel Southern Ocean and Antarctic temperature patterns. The glacial intervals of strong weakening of the ACC entering the DP imply an enhanced export of northern ACC surface and intermediate waters into the South Pacific Gyre and reduced Pacific–Atlantic exchange through the DP (“cold water route”). We conclude that changes in DP throughflow play a critical role for the global meridional overturning circulation and interbasin exchange in the Southern Ocean, most likely regulated by variations in the westerly wind field and changes in Antarctic sea ice extent. PMID:26417070

  7. Abrupt Climate Change During the Last Glacial Cycle Based on Gulf of Mexico Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, B. P.; Hastings, D. W.; Hill, H.; Quinn, T. M.

    2003-12-01

    Evidence is emerging that the tropical climate system played a major role in past global climate change during the last glacial cycle. However, existing studies indicate asynchronous temperature variability in the western equatorial Atlantic, complicating the identification of causal mechanisms. Because the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) is linked to the equatorial Atlantic, sea-surface temperature (SST) records from the GOM help assess the phasing between low- and high-latitude Atlantic climate. High sedimentation rates of >40 cm/k.y. and laminated sediments in Orca Basin allow sub-centennial-scale resolution. Paired δ 18O and Mg/Ca data on the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber from core EN32-PC6 are used to separate deglacial changes in SST and δ 18Oseawater due to low-salinity meltwater from the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS). Mg-SST increases by >3.0° C between 17.2 and 15.2 ka (calendar years) encompassing Heinrich Event 1 in the North Atlantic. Comparison to polar ice core records indicates GOM SST was not in phase with Greenland air temperature, consistent with thermohaline circulation modulation of Atlantic climate. This warming represents the bulk of the 4.2+/-0.9° C increase from the last glacial maximum (24.0+/-0.8° C) to early Holocene (29.0+/-0.4° C). Subtracting temperature and ice-volume effects from Gs. ruber δ 18O reveals two episodes of LIS meltwater input, one of >1.5% from ca. 16.2-15.7 ka and a second major spike of >2% from ca. 15.2-13.0 ka that encompassed meltwater pulse 1A (mwp-1A) and peaked at ca. 13.4 ka. These results suggest that (1) subtropical Atlantic SST warming preceded peak LIS decay and mwp-1A by >2 k.y., (2) thermohaline circulation may have modulated Atlantic climate on the millennial scale during the last deglaciation, and (3) major LIS meltwater input to the GOM ended before North Atlantic Deep Water suppression during the Younger Dryas. A new 31.79 m Calypso piston core collected in July 2002 on the R/V Marion Dufresne

  8. Millennial-Scale Fluctuations in Stable Isotope and Productivity Proxy Records in the N. South China Sea During the Last Glacial-Interglacial Cycle: Comparison Between the East Asian and South West Monsoons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson, M. J.; Altabet, M. A.

    2001-05-01

    Several published records attest to the response of the mid- and low-latitudes to millennial-scale climatic variability. However, forcings, teleconnections and their relative leads/lags between the sub-tropics and polar latitudes are unclear. We focus on the biological response to fluctuations in East Asian Monsoon intensity on sub-millennial timescales in the South China Sea (SCS) and compare these records with those obtained from the NW Arabian Sea dominated by the SW Monsoon. We have analyzed very rapidly accumulating sediments (c. 50cm/Ka) from the northern SCS recovered during ODP Leg 184 (Site 1144) in a region of high surface productivity c. 400km SE of Hong Kong. The SCS is the largest semi-enclosed marginal basin of the W. Pacific and is especially sensitive to the influences of the West Pacific Warm Pool and East Asian Monsoon. Nutrient supply from localized upwelling during the winter NE monsoon is augmented by cyclonic advection of substantial areas of upwelled water with a high nutrient content both offshore NW Philippines and SW of Taiwan during prevailing NE winds. With temporal resolution <100 yr, our results exhibit millennial-scale variations in both stable isotopes (Nitrogen and Oxygen) and productivity proxies (chlorins, total N) with clear correlation to the oxygen isotopic record of D-O events from the GISP2 ice-core. Apparently rapid and abrupt increases in productivity record intensification of the winter monsoon during cold stades, whilst remote changes in W. Pacific source water outwith the SCS basin appear to control sedimentary isotopic composition. Comparison with similar records in the NW Arabian Sea under the influence of the SW summer monsoon facilitates analysis of the response of the monsoon system to changes in vegetation, albedo and pressure gradient over the Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau (HTP). Monsoon intensity is clearly tightly coupled to high latitude climate change. Variations in seasonal response on the HTP produce quite

  9. Precise interpolar phasing of abrupt climate change during the last ice age

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    WAIS Divide Project Members; Buizert, Christo; Adrian, Betty M.; Ahn, Jinho; Albert, Mary; Alley, Richard B.; Baggenstos, Daniel; Bauska, Thomas K.; Bay, Ryan C.; Bencivengo, Brian B.; Bentley, Charles R.; Brook, Edward J.; Chellman, Nathan J.; Clow, Gary D.; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Conway, Howard; Cravens, Eric; Cuffey, Kurt M.; Dunbar, Nelia W.; Edwards, Jon S.; Fegyveresi, John M.; Ferris, Dave G.; Fitzpatrick, Joan J.; Fudge, T. J.; Gibson, Chris J.; Gkinis, Vasileios; Goetz, Joshua J.; Gregory, Stephanie; Hargreaves, Geoffrey Mill; Iverson, Nels; Johnson, Jay A.; Jones, Tyler R.; Kalk, Michael L.; Kippenhan, Matthew J.; Koffman, Bess G.; Kreutz, Karl; Kuhl, Tanner W.; Lebar, Donald A.; Lee, James E.; Marcott, Shaun A.; Markle, Bradley R.; Maselli, Olivia J.; McConnell, Joseph R.; McGwire, Kenneth C.; Mitchell, Logan E.; Mortensen, Nicolai B.; Neff, Peter D.; Nishiizumi, Kunihiko; Nunn, Richard M.; Orsi, Anais J.; Pasteris, Daniel R.; Pedro, Joel B.; Pettit, Erin C.; Price, P. Buford; Priscu, John C.; Rhodes, Rachael H.; Rosen, Julia L.; Schauer, Andrew J.; Schoenemann, Spruce W.; Sendelbach, Paul J.; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Shturmakov, Alexander J.; Sigl, Michael; Slawny, Kristina R.; Souney, Joseph M.; Sowers, Todd A.; Spencer, Matthew K.; Steig, Eric J.; Taylor, Kendrick C.; Twickler, Mark S.; Vaughn, Bruce H.; Voigt, Donald E.; Waddington, Edwin D.; Welten, Kees C.; Wendricks, Anthony W.; White, James W. C.; Winstrup, Mai; Wong, Gifford J.; Woodruff, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The last glacial period exhibited abrupt Dansgaard–Oeschger climatic oscillations, evidence of which is preserved in a variety of Northern Hemisphere palaeoclimate archives1. Ice cores show that Antarctica cooled during the warm phases of the Greenland Dansgaard–Oeschger cycle and vice versa2, 3, suggesting an interhemispheric redistribution of heat through a mechanism called the bipolar seesaw4, 5, 6. Variations in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) strength are thought to have been important, but much uncertainty remains regarding the dynamics and trigger of these abrupt events7, 8, 9. Key information is contained in the relative phasing of hemispheric climate variations, yet the large, poorly constrained difference between gas age and ice age and the relatively low resolution of methane records from Antarctic ice cores have so far precluded methane-based synchronization at the required sub-centennial precision2, 3,10. Here we use a recently drilled high-accumulation Antarctic ice core to show that, on average, abrupt Greenland warming leads the corresponding Antarctic cooling onset by 218 ± 92 years (2σ) for Dansgaard–Oeschger events, including the Bølling event; Greenland cooling leads the corresponding onset of Antarctic warming by 208 ± 96 years. Our results demonstrate a north-to-south directionality of the abrupt climatic signal, which is propagated to the Southern Hemisphere high latitudes by oceanic rather than atmospheric processes. The similar interpolar phasing of warming and cooling transitions suggests that the transfer time of the climatic signal is independent of the AMOC background state. Our findings confirm a central role for ocean circulation in the bipolar seesaw and provide clear criteria for assessing hypotheses and model simulations of Dansgaard–Oeschger dynamics.

  10. Precise interpolar phasing of abrupt climate change during the last ice age.

    PubMed

    2015-04-30

    The last glacial period exhibited abrupt Dansgaard-Oeschger climatic oscillations, evidence of which is preserved in a variety of Northern Hemisphere palaeoclimate archives. Ice cores show that Antarctica cooled during the warm phases of the Greenland Dansgaard-Oeschger cycle and vice versa, suggesting an interhemispheric redistribution of heat through a mechanism called the bipolar seesaw. Variations in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) strength are thought to have been important, but much uncertainty remains regarding the dynamics and trigger of these abrupt events. Key information is contained in the relative phasing of hemispheric climate variations, yet the large, poorly constrained difference between gas age and ice age and the relatively low resolution of methane records from Antarctic ice cores have so far precluded methane-based synchronization at the required sub-centennial precision. Here we use a recently drilled high-accumulation Antarctic ice core to show that, on average, abrupt Greenland warming leads the corresponding Antarctic cooling onset by 218 ± 92 years (2σ) for Dansgaard-Oeschger events, including the Bølling event; Greenland cooling leads the corresponding onset of Antarctic warming by 208 ± 96 years. Our results demonstrate a north-to-south directionality of the abrupt climatic signal, which is propagated to the Southern Hemisphere high latitudes by oceanic rather than atmospheric processes. The similar interpolar phasing of warming and cooling transitions suggests that the transfer time of the climatic signal is independent of the AMOC background state. Our findings confirm a central role for ocean circulation in the bipolar seesaw and provide clear criteria for assessing hypotheses and model simulations of Dansgaard-Oeschger dynamics. PMID:25925479

  11. Paleoclimate. Synchronization of North Pacific and Greenland climates preceded abrupt deglacial warming.

    PubMed

    Praetorius, Summer K; Mix, Alan C

    2014-07-25

    Some proposed mechanisms for transmission of major climate change events between the North Pacific and North Atlantic predict opposing patterns of variations; others suggest synchronization. Resolving this conflict has implications for regulation of poleward heat transport and global climate change. New multidecadal-resolution foraminiferal oxygen isotope records from the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) reveal sudden shifts between intervals of synchroneity and asynchroneity with the North Greenland Ice Core Project (NGRIP) δ(18)O record over the past 18,000 years. Synchronization of these regions occurred 15,500 to 11,000 years ago, just prior to and throughout the most abrupt climate transitions of the last 20,000 years, suggesting that dynamic coupling of North Pacific and North Atlantic climates may lead to critical transitions in Earth's climate system. PMID:25061208

  12. The role of stochastic noise in the abrupt climatic transitions of the pleistocene

    SciTech Connect

    Matteucci, G.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses of marine [delta][sup 18]O records suggest that the variations of the Earth's orbital parameters have induced and provided the timing of the Pleistocene climatic oscillations. This dissertation analyses some statistical properties of the Pleistocene climate by estimating the Probability Density Function (PDF) of the [delta][sup 18]O record. The results allow to define statistically what were the [open quotes]typical conditions[close quotes] (in a probabilistic sense) of the Quaternary, to identify the modes of the PDF as the mean glacial and interglacial climatic states, and to clarify the meaning and the abruptness of the climatic transitions. A zero-dimensional Energy Balance Model is developed. The nonlinearity of the ice albedo-temperature feedback leads to multiple steady-state equilibria. The role of stochastic perturbations and their interaction with the orbital forcing in producing the periodic and abrupt climatic transitions of the late Pleistocene are illustrated. A stochastic sensitivity analysis is used to clarify the results, especially the selective amplification of the orbitally-induced 100 kyr cycle, and the predictability of the system on the time scales of the orbital cycles. From the analysis of GCM simulations and observational zonally- averaged data a one-dimensional EBM is then developed. The strong nonlinearity of this model and the occurrence of multiple equilibria is caused by the presence of the Thin Ice Cap Instability. A discussion of the features that stochastic perturbations would introduce, follows. Finally a GCM sensitivity study to atmospheric CO[sub 2] shows how the effects of varying CO[sub 2] concentrations can be included in simple EBMs. The role that stochastic perturbations, orbital forcing, and the known past concentrations of atmospheric CO[sub 2] have played in producing the abrupt climatic transitions of the late Pleistocene is discussed.

  13. A seesaw in Mediterranean precipitation during the Roman Period linked to millennial-scale changes in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermody, B. J.; de Boer, H. J.; Bierkens, M. F. P.; Weber, S. L.; Wassen, M. J.; Dekker, S. C.

    2012-03-01

    We present a reconstruction of the change in climatic humidity around the Mediterranean between 3000-1000 yr BP. Using a range of proxy archives and model simulations we demonstrate that climate during this period was typified by a millennial-scale seesaw in climatic humidity between Spain and Israel on one side and the Central Mediterranean and Turkey on the other, similar to precipitation anomalies associated with the East Atlantic/West Russia pattern in current climate. We find that changes in the position and intensity of the jet stream indicated by our analysis correlate with millennial changes in North Atlantic sea surface temperature. A model simulation indicates the proxies of climatic humidity used in our analysis were unlikely to be influenced by climatic aridification caused by deforestation during the Roman Period. That finding is supported by an analysis of the distribution of archaeological sites in the Eastern Mediterranean which exhibits no evidence that human habitation distribution changed since ancient times as a result of climatic aridification. Therefore we conclude that changes in climatic humidity over the Mediterranean during the Roman Period were primarily caused by a modification of the jet stream linked to sea surface temperature change in the North Atlantic. Based on our findings, we propose that ocean-atmosphere coupling may have contributed to regulating Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation intensity during the period of analysis.

  14. Simulating the vegetation response in western Europe to abrupt climate changes under glacial background conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woillez, M.-N.; Kageyama, M.; Combourieu-Nebout, N.; Krinner, G.

    2013-03-01

    The last glacial period has been punctuated by two types of abrupt climatic events, the Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) and Heinrich (HE) events. These events, recorded in Greenland ice and in marine sediments, involved changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and led to major changes in the terrestrial biosphere. Here we use the dynamical global vegetation model ORCHIDEE to simulate the response of vegetation to abrupt changes in the AMOC strength. We force ORCHIDEE offline with outputs from the IPSL_CM4 general circulation model, in which the AMOC is forced to change by adding freshwater fluxes in the North Atlantic. We investigate the impact of a collapse and recovery of the AMOC, at different rates, and focus on Western Europe, where many pollen records are available for comparison. The impact of an AMOC collapse on the European mean temperatures and precipitations simulated by the GCM is relatively small but sufficient to drive an important regression of forests and expansion of grasses in ORCHIDEE, in qualitative agreement with pollen data for an HE event. On the contrary, a run with a rapid shift of the AMOC to a hyperactive state of 30 Sv, mimicking the warming phase of a DO event, does not exhibit a strong impact on the European vegetation compared to the glacial control state. For our model, simulating the impact of an HE event thus appears easier than simulating the abrupt transition towards the interstadial phase of a DO. For both a collapse or a recovery of the AMOC, the vegetation starts to respond to climatic changes immediately but reaches equilibrium about 200 yr after the climate equilibrates, suggesting a possible bias in the climatic reconstructions based on pollen records, which assume equilibrium between climate and vegetation. However, our study does not take into account vegetation feedbacks on the atmosphere.

  15. Millennial-scale interaction between ice sheets and ocean circulation during marine isotope stage 100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Masao; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Sato, Masahiko; Kuwahara, Yoshihiro; Mizuta, Asami; Kita, Itsuro; Sato, Tokiyuki; Kano, Akihiro

    2016-05-01

    Waxing/waning of the ice sheets and the associated change in thermohaline circulation have played an important role in global climate change since major continental ice sheets appeared in the northern hemisphere about 2.75 million years ago. In the earliest glacial stages, however, establishment of the linkage between ice sheet development and ocean circulation remain largely unclear. Here we show new high-resolution records of marine isotope stage 100 recovered from deep-sea sediments on the Gardar Drift, in the subpolar North Atlantic. Results of a wide range of analyses clearly reveal the influence of millennial-scale variability in iceberg discharge on ocean surface condition and bottom current variability in the subpolar North Atlantic during marine isotope stage 100. We identified eight events of ice-rafted debris, which occurred mostly with decreases in sea surface temperature and in current components indicating North Atlantic Deep Water. These decreases are interpreted by weakened deep water formation linked to iceberg discharge, similarly to observations from the last glacial period. Dolomite fraction of the ice-rafted events in early MIS 100 like the last glacial Heinrich events suggests massive collapse of the Laurentide ice sheet in North America. At the same time, our early glacial data suggest differences from the last glacial period: absence of 1470-year periodicity in the interactions between ice sheets and ocean, and northerly shift of the ice-rafted debris belt. Our high-resolution data largely improve the picture of ice-sheet/ocean interactions on millennial time scales in the early glacial period after major Northern Hemisphere glaciation.

  16. North Atlantic ocean circulation and abrupt climate change during the last glaciation.

    PubMed

    Henry, L G; McManus, J F; Curry, W B; Roberts, N L; Piotrowski, A M; Keigwin, L D

    2016-07-29

    The most recent ice age was characterized by rapid and hemispherically asynchronous climate oscillations, whose origin remains unresolved. Variations in oceanic meridional heat transport may contribute to these repeated climate changes, which were most pronounced during marine isotope stage 3, the glacial interval 25 thousand to 60 thousand years ago. We examined climate and ocean circulation proxies throughout this interval at high resolution in a deep North Atlantic sediment core, combining the kinematic tracer protactinium/thorium (Pa/Th) with the deep water-mass tracer, epibenthic δ(13)C. These indicators suggest reduced Atlantic overturning circulation during every cool northern stadial, with the greatest reductions during episodic Hudson Strait iceberg discharges, while sharp northern warming followed reinvigorated overturning. These results provide direct evidence for the ocean's persistent, central role in abrupt glacial climate change. PMID:27365315

  17. Transition process of abrupt climate change based on global sea surface temperature over the past century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Pengcheng; Hou, Wei; Feng, Guolin

    2016-05-01

    A new detection method has been proposed to study the transition process of abrupt climate change. With this method, the climate system transiting from one stable state to another can be verified clearly. By applying this method to the global sea surface temperature over the past century, several climate changes and their processes are detected, including the start state (moment), persist time, and end state (moment). According to the spatial distribution, the locations of climate changes mainly have occurred in the Indian Ocean and western Pacific before the middle twentieth century, in the 1970s in the equatorial middle-eastern Pacific, and in the middle and southern Pacific since the end of the twentieth century. In addition, the quantitative relationship between the transition process parameters is verified in theory and practice: (1) the relationship between the rate and stability parameters is linear, and (2) the relationship between the rate and change amplitude parameters is quadratic.

  18. North Atlantic ocean circulation and abrupt climate change during the last glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, L. G.; McManus, J. F.; Curry, W. B.; Roberts, N. L.; Piotrowski, A. M.; Keigwin, L. D.

    2016-07-01

    The most recent ice age was characterized by rapid and hemispherically asynchronous climate oscillations, whose origin remains unresolved. Variations in oceanic meridional heat transport may contribute to these repeated climate changes, which were most pronounced during marine isotope stage 3, the glacial interval 25 thousand to 60 thousand years ago. We examined climate and ocean circulation proxies throughout this interval at high resolution in a deep North Atlantic sediment core, combining the kinematic tracer protactinium/thorium (Pa/Th) with the deep water-mass tracer, epibenthic δ13C. These indicators suggest reduced Atlantic overturning circulation during every cool northern stadial, with the greatest reductions during episodic Hudson Strait iceberg discharges, while sharp northern warming followed reinvigorated overturning. These results provide direct evidence for the ocean’s persistent, central role in abrupt glacial climate change.

  19. Spontaneous abrupt climate change due to an atmospheric blocking-sea-ice-ocean feedback in an unforced climate model simulation.

    PubMed

    Drijfhout, Sybren; Gleeson, Emily; Dijkstra, Henk A; Livina, Valerie

    2013-12-01

    Abrupt climate change is abundant in geological records, but climate models rarely have been able to simulate such events in response to realistic forcing. Here we report on a spontaneous abrupt cooling event, lasting for more than a century, with a temperature anomaly similar to that of the Little Ice Age. The event was simulated in the preindustrial control run of a high-resolution climate model, without imposing external perturbations. Initial cooling started with a period of enhanced atmospheric blocking over the eastern subpolar gyre. In response, a southward progression of the sea-ice margin occurred, and the sea-level pressure anomaly was locked to the sea-ice margin through thermal forcing. The cold-core high steered more cold air to the area, reinforcing the sea-ice concentration anomaly east of Greenland. The sea-ice surplus was carried southward by ocean currents around the tip of Greenland. South of 70 °N, sea ice already started melting and the associated freshwater anomaly was carried to the Labrador Sea, shutting off deep convection. There, surface waters were exposed longer to atmospheric cooling and sea surface temperature dropped, causing an even larger thermally forced high above the Labrador Sea. In consequence, east of Greenland, anomalous winds changed from north to south, terminating the event with similar abruptness to its onset. Our results imply that only climate models that possess sufficient resolution to correctly represent atmospheric blocking, in combination with a sensitive sea-ice model, are able to simulate this kind of abrupt climate change. PMID:24248352

  20. Spontaneous abrupt climate change due to an atmospheric blocking–sea-ice–ocean feedback in an unforced climate model simulation

    PubMed Central

    Drijfhout, Sybren; Gleeson, Emily; Dijkstra, Henk A.; Livina, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Abrupt climate change is abundant in geological records, but climate models rarely have been able to simulate such events in response to realistic forcing. Here we report on a spontaneous abrupt cooling event, lasting for more than a century, with a temperature anomaly similar to that of the Little Ice Age. The event was simulated in the preindustrial control run of a high-resolution climate model, without imposing external perturbations. Initial cooling started with a period of enhanced atmospheric blocking over the eastern subpolar gyre. In response, a southward progression of the sea-ice margin occurred, and the sea-level pressure anomaly was locked to the sea-ice margin through thermal forcing. The cold-core high steered more cold air to the area, reinforcing the sea-ice concentration anomaly east of Greenland. The sea-ice surplus was carried southward by ocean currents around the tip of Greenland. South of 70°N, sea ice already started melting and the associated freshwater anomaly was carried to the Labrador Sea, shutting off deep convection. There, surface waters were exposed longer to atmospheric cooling and sea surface temperature dropped, causing an even larger thermally forced high above the Labrador Sea. In consequence, east of Greenland, anomalous winds changed from north to south, terminating the event with similar abruptness to its onset. Our results imply that only climate models that possess sufficient resolution to correctly represent atmospheric blocking, in combination with a sensitive sea-ice model, are able to simulate this kind of abrupt climate change. PMID:24248352

  1. Does the trigger for abrupt climate change reside in the ocean or in the atmosphere?

    PubMed

    Broecker, W S

    2003-06-01

    Two hypotheses have been put forward to explain the large and abrupt climate changes that punctuated glacial time. One attributes such changes to reorganizations of the ocean's thermohaline circulation and the other to changes in tropical atmosphere-ocean dynamics. In an attempt to distinguish between these hypotheses, two lines of evidence are examined. The first involves the timing of the freshwater injections to the northern Atlantic that have been suggested as triggers for the global impacts associated with the Younger Dryas and Heinrich events. The second has to do with evidence for precursory events associated with the Heinrich ice-rafted debris layers in the northern Atlantic and with the abrupt Dansgaard-Oeschger warmings recorded in the Santa Barbara Basin. PMID:12791974

  2. Deep-Sea Biodiversity Response to Abrupt Deglacial and Holocene Climate Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuhara, M.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution records of microfossil assemblages from deep-sea sediment cores covering the last 20,000 years in the North Atlantic Ocean were investigated to understand biotic responses to abrupt climate changes over decadal-centennial timescales. The results show pervasive control of deep-sea benthic species diversity by rapidly changing climate. Species diversity rapidly increased during abrupt stadial events during the last deglacial and the Holocene interglacial periods. These included the well-known Heinrich 1, the Younger Dryas, and the 8.2 ka events when the strength of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) decreased. In addition, there is evidence for quasi-cyclic changes in biodiversity at a ~1500-year periodicity. Statistical analyses revealed that AMOC-driven bottom-water-temperature variability is a primary influence on deep-sea biodiversity. Our results may portend pervasive, synchronous and sudden ecosystem responses to human-induced changes to climate and ocean circulation in this century. Exceptionally highly resolved fossil records help us to understand past, present and future ecosystem responses to climate changes by bridging the gap between biological and palaeontological time-scales.

  3. Climatic and Societal Causes for Abrupt Environmental Change in the Mediterranean During the Common Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensing, S. A.; Tunno, I.; Sagnotti, L.; Florindo, F.; Noble, P. J.; Archer, C.; Zimmerman, S. R. H.; Pavón-Carrasco, F. J.; Cifnani, G.; Passigli, S.; Piovesan, G.

    2015-12-01

    We compare climatic and societal causes for abrupt environmental change for the last 2000 years in the Rieti Basin, central Italy using high-resolution sedimentary paleoenvironmental proxies, historical documents, and annually resolved independent climate reconstructions of temperature and precipitation. Pollen zones, identified from temporally constrained cluster analysis, coincide with historic periods developed from well-established ceramic sequences corresponding to the Roman Imperial through Late Antique (1 to 600 CE) Early Medieval (600 to 875 CE), Medieval through Late Medieval (875 to 1400 CE), Renaissance and Modern (1400 to 1725 CE), and Contemporary periods (1725 CE to present). Non-metric dimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination showed that each temporal period occupied a unique ecologic space suggesting that a new landscape was created during each successive historic period. During Roman time, between 1 and 500 CE, a modest decline in forest coincides with a positive phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and drier climate; however mesophyllous forest is preserved. Steep decline in forest cover between 850 and 950 CE coincides with positive temperature anomalies in Europe and a positive NAO. Although this would seem to suggest climate as a cause, temperature and precipitation changes are modest and the magnitude and rapidity of the vegetation change suggests climate played a small role. Archaeological evidence from across Europe identifies socioeconomic factors that produced forest clearing. In contrast, cooler temperatures and a negative NAO (increased ppt) appears to have been a catalyst for land abandonment and forest recovery in the 13th to 14th centuries. The NAO produces opposite effects on societies in the eastern and western Mediterranean with the negative phase in 1400 CE leading to cool wet climate and land abandonment in central Italy but an abrupt shift to drier conditions and change from sedentary village life to nomadism in Syria.

  4. Consistent simulations of multiple proxy responses to an abrupt climate change event.

    PubMed

    LeGrande, A N; Schmidt, G A; Shindell, D T; Field, C V; Miller, R L; Koch, D M; Faluvegi, G; Hoffmann, G

    2006-01-24

    Isotope, aerosol, and methane records document an abrupt cooling event across the Northern Hemisphere at 8.2 kiloyears before present (kyr), while separate geologic lines of evidence document the catastrophic drainage of the glacial Lakes Agassiz and Ojibway into the Hudson Bay at approximately the same time. This melt water pulse may have been the catalyst for a decrease in North Atlantic Deep Water formation and subsequent cooling around the Northern Hemisphere. However, lack of direct evidence for ocean cooling has lead to speculation that this abrupt event was purely local to Greenland and called into question this proposed mechanism. We simulate the response to this melt water pulse using a coupled general circulation model that explicitly tracks water isotopes and with atmosphere-only experiments that calculate changes in atmospheric aerosol deposition (specifically (10)Be and dust) and wetland methane emissions. The simulations produce a short period of significantly diminished North Atlantic Deep Water and are able to quantitatively match paleoclimate observations, including the lack of isotopic signal in the North Atlantic. This direct comparison with multiple proxy records provides compelling evidence that changes in ocean circulation played a major role in this abrupt climate change event. PMID:16415159

  5. Millennial-scale varnish microlamination dating of late Pleistocene geomorphic features in the drylands of western USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tanzhuo; Broecker, Wallace S.

    2013-04-01

    Varnish microlamination (VML) dating is a climate-based correlative age determination technique used to correlate and date various geomorphic features in deserts. In this study, we establish a generalized late Pleistocene (18-74 ka) millennial-scale microlamination sequence in fine-grained, fast-accumulating rock varnish for the drylands of western USA, radiometrically calibrate the sequence and correlate it with the δ18O record in the GISP2 Greenland ice core. We then use this climate-correlated varnish microstratigraphy to estimate surface exposure ages for radiometrically dated late Pleistocene geomorphic features in the study region. The VML dating of debris flow deposits on the Sehoo recessional shorelines of Lake Lahontan at the Jessup embayment of central Nevada yields a minimum-limiting age of 14.95-15.95 ka, in good agreement with a calibrated 14C age of 15.22 ± 0.12 ka for the timing of the lake recession. The VML dating of a giant ejecta block on the rim of Meteor Crater in northern Arizona yields a minimum-limiting age of 49.15 ka, closely matching a thermoluminescence (TL) age of 49 ± 3 ka and slightly younger than a recently updated cosmogenic 36Cl age of 56.0 ± 2.4 ka for the meteor impact event. The VML dating of distal Q2c fan surfaces on Hanaupah Canyon alluvial fan in Death Valley, California, yields a minimum-limiting age of 73.55 ka, in accord with cosmogenic 36Cl depth-profile ages of 66 + 22/-14 ka and 72 + 24/- 20 ka for the same fan deposits. The close agreement between the VML age estimates and the independently derived radiometric ages for these geomorphic features attests to the validity and reliability of millennial-scale VML dating. To further assess its potential in desert geomorphological research, we use the VML method to study alluvial-fan responses to millennial-scale climatic changes. The VML dating of a small tributary fan in Death Valley reveals two episodes of fan aggradation, one ceasing at 73.55-86.75 ka during the dry

  6. Holocene Abrupt Climate Change Over NW Iran: The Hand That Rocked The Cradle Of Civilization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, A.; Pourmand, A.; Canuel, E. A.; Ferer-Tyler, E.; Peterson, L. C.; Aichner, B.; Feakins, S. J.; Daryaee, T.; Djamali, M.; Naderi Beni, A.; Lahijani, H. A. K.; Swart, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Human civilizations around the globe have been influenced by abrupt climate change throughout the Holocene. The paucity of high-resolution palaeoclimate data from the "Cradle of Civilization" in West Asia, however, has limited our ability to evaluate the potential role of Holocene climate variability on early societies. We present a high-resolution, multi-proxy reconstruction of aeolian input and palaeoenvironmental conditions based on a 13-kyr record of ombrotrophic (rain fed) peat from Neor Lake in Northwest Iran. Variations in relative abundances of major and trace elements, total organic carbon (TOC), stable carbon isotopes of TOC (δ13CTOC) and compound-specific leaf wax hydrogen isotope (δD) compositions suggest dry and dusty conditions prevailed during the Younger Dryas, and a substantial increase in atmospheric dust loading and decrease in moisture availability occurred between the early and late Holocene. In addition, variations in radiogenic Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic composition and REE anomalies in samples from Neor peat core indicate significant shifts occurred in source contributions of eolian material to the study area between the Younger Dryas, early and late Holocene. Time-series analysis of aeolian input to NE Iran reveals periodicities at 540, 1050 and 2940 years that correspond with solar variability and internal climate feedbacks identified in other records of Holocene climate change from the northern hemisphere. Transitions in major Mesopotamian and Persian civilizations, including the collapse of the Akkadian empire at 4,200 yr BP, the fall of the Ur III empire at 3,955 yr BP, the fall of Elam empire at 2,500 yr BP and the demise of the Achaemenids around 2,280 BP overlap with major dust events from this study. Several other episodes of enhanced atmospheric dust, however, are not reflected in historical or archaeological accounts of the late Holocene. This indicates either abrupt climate change was not the sole driver of societal changes in the

  7. Millennial-scale trends in west Pacific warm pool hydrology since the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Partin, Judson W; Cobb, Kim M; Adkins, Jess F; Clark, Brian; Fernandez, Diego P

    2007-09-27

    Models and palaeoclimate data suggest that the tropical Pacific climate system plays a key part in the mechanisms underlying orbital-scale and abrupt climate change. Atmospheric convection over the western tropical Pacific is a major source of heat and moisture to extratropical regions, and may therefore influence the global climate response to a variety of forcing factors. The response of tropical Pacific convection to changes in global climate boundary conditions, abrupt climate changes and radiative forcing remains uncertain, however. Here we present three absolutely dated oxygen isotope records from stalagmites in northern Borneo that reflect changes in west Pacific warm pool hydrology over the past 27,000 years. Our results suggest that convection over the western tropical Pacific weakened 18,000-20,000 years ago, as tropical Pacific and Antarctic temperatures began to rise during the early stages of deglaciation. Convective activity, as inferred from oxygen isotopes, reached a minimum during Heinrich event 1 (ref. 10), when the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation was weak, pointing to feedbacks between the strength of the overturning circulation and tropical Pacific hydrology. There is no evidence of the Younger Dryas event in the stalagmite records, however, suggesting that different mechanisms operated during these two abrupt deglacial climate events. During the Holocene epoch, convective activity appears to track changes in spring and autumn insolation, highlighting the sensitivity of tropical Pacific convection to external radiative forcing. Together, these findings demonstrate that the tropical Pacific hydrological cycle is sensitive to high-latitude climate processes in both hemispheres, as well as to external radiative forcing, and that it may have a central role in abrupt climate change events. PMID:17898765

  8. Abrupt post-glacial climate events in West Asia and North Africa monsoon domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasse, Françoise; Van Campo, Elise

    1994-09-01

    Regions beyond the present or past penetration of the Indian and African monsoons have experienced several large and abrupt climatic fluctuations over the past 13 14C kyr. Pollen and lake records from West Asia (Western Tibet and Rajasthan), East Africa (Ethiopia) and West Africa (Western Sahara, Sahel and subequatorial Africa) were selected on the basis of chronological control, sensitivity of both site and environmental indicators to climate change, the continuity of the record, and interdisciplinary control of the palaeoclimatic interpretation. Conditions wetter than those of today prevailed during the early-mid-Holocene period, but major dry spells are recorded at all sites during the intervals ˜ 11.0-9.5 kyr BP, ˜ 8-7 kyr BP and 3-4 kyr BP. Several records also suggest dry events of minor amplitude around 6 kyr BP. Potential boundary forcings of insolation and sea surface and tropical land surface conditions are discussed. The solar radiation accounts for the general envelop of the post-glacial monsoon fluctuations, but explains neither the timing nor the amplitude of the short-term changes. In spite of apparent covariation between fluctuations in sea surface conditions in the North Atlantic and the monsoon record, no direct mechanism could be found relating the intensity of the oceanic thermohaline conveyor belt to the monsoon strength. Changes in tropical land surface conditions (soil moisture negative feedback, and changes in CH 4 production from wetlands) provide a more satisfactory hypothesis for explaining abrupt reversal events.

  9. Dansgaard-Oeschger Cycles in the Gulf of Mexico: A Clue to Abrupt Climate Change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, H. W.; Flower, B. P.; Quinn, T. M.

    2003-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that low-latitude climate variability plays a significant role in abrupt climate change during the last glacial cycle, particularly during the deglaciation. However, there have been few low-latitude marine records that cover the abrupt climate transitions known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) cycles that occurred during Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3; 24-57 ka). Defining the extent of D-O cyclicity in the low latitudes may provide insight into the mechanisms that are responsible for abrupt climate transitions. A 32-m sediment core (MD02-2551) from the Orca Basin, Gulf of Mexico, collected aboard the R/V Marion Dufresne in July 2002, provides new information to address the role of subtropical Atlantic sea-surface temperature (SST) in relation to high-latitude climate change during MIS 3. The location of Orca Basin at the mouth of the Mississippi River is also ideal to record variations in meltwater input from the Laurentide Ice Sheet during the last glacial period. Radiocarbon dates on a 6 m interval of the core, which covers ~30-40 ka, suggests that the average sedimentation rate is >50 cm/1000 years, allowing for 30-year resolution sampling. Paired δ 18O and Mg/Ca data on the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber (pink variety) provide SST and δ 18Oseawater estimates during a series of D-O cycles. Four distinct cycles exist in the isotopic data, which have a similar pattern and likely correspond to Interstadials 5-8, as defined in records from the Greenland ice core. These cycles have an amplitude of >1 ‰ , with values consistently reaching -2 ‰ during Interstadial 8, one of the warmest and longest Interstadials recorded in Greenland ice. The Mg-derived SST has a reduced variability with respect to the isotopic data, suggesting that the large δ 18O shifts are a function of changes in salinity, probably due to a combination of evaporation/precipitation processes and meltwater input from the Laurentide Ice Sheet during Interstadial

  10. Meltwater and Abrupt Climate Change in the Gulf of Mexico During the Last Glacial Termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C.; Flower, B.; Hastings, D.; Randle, N.

    2008-12-01

    During the Last Glacial Termination from 18,000-8,000 cal. yrs B.P., meltwater routing of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) may have been linked to abrupt climatic events, such as the Younger Dryas. Previous studies show episodic meltwater input from the LIS, via the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) several thousand years before the onset of the Younger Dryas until approximately 13,000 cal yrs B.P., when meltwater routing may have switched to a more northern spillway, causing an abrupt change in thermohaline circulation (THC). The exact timing and magnitude of this meltwater input to the GOM is poorly constrained due to the lack of high-resolution data. Also unknown are the detailed relationships between GOM sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity and ice volume, relative to Northern and Southern Hemisphere climate from Greenland and Antarctica ice core records. High sedimentation rates (~40 cm/kyr) from laminated, anoxic Orca Basin core MD02-2550 provide the necessary resolution to assess GOM paleoceanography. Paired Mg/Ca and δ18O values from planktonic Foraminifera species Globigerinoides ruber (pink and white varieties) provide the relative timing of meltwater input and temperature change in the GOM with nearly decadal resolution. δ18Ocalcite results show multiple cool and/or high salinity periods with isotopic excursions of at least 2‰ that coincide with abrupt climatic events in Greenland ice core records, including the Oldest Dryas from 16,200-15,000 cal. yrs B.P. and the Intra-Allerod Cold Period at 13,860-13,560 cal. yrs B.P. Meltwater input to the GOM is seen for several thousand years before the onset of the Younger Dryas with white G. ruber δ18Ocalcite values as low as -4‰. Thirty-three AMS radiocarbon dates and high-resolution δ18O results provide excellent temporal constraints on deglacial climate events, including an abrupt (<200 yrs) cessation of meltwater in the GOM centered at 10,970± 40 radiocarbon yrs B.P., with a δ18O

  11. Abrupt climate-triggered lake ecosystem changes recorded in late glacial lake sediments in northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowinski, M. M.; Zawiska, I.; Ott, F.; Noryskiewicz, A. M.; Apolinarska, K.; Lutynska, M.; Michczynska, D. J.; Brauer, A.; Wulf, S.; Skubala, P.; Blaszkiewicz, M.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to better understand how local lake ecosystems responded to abrupt climate changes through applying multi-proxy sediment analyses. Therefore, we carried out a detailed and high-resolution case study on the late glacial sediment from the Trzechowskie palaeolake located in the eastern part of the Pomeranian Lakeland, northern Poland. We reconstructed climate induced environmental changes in the paleolake and its catchment using biotic proxies (macrofossils, pollen, cladocera, diatoms, oribatidae mite) and classical geochemical proxies (δ18O, δ13C, loss-on-ignition, CaCO3 content) in combination with high-resolution μ-XRF element core scanning. The core chronology has been established by means of biostratigraphy, AMS 14C-dating on plant macro remains, varve counting in laminated intervals and tephrochronology. The latter was possible by the discovery of the late Allerød Laacher See Tephra for the first time at such eastern location. Biogenic accumulation in the lake started rather late during the lateglacial interstadial at 13903×170 cal yrs BP. The rapid and pronounced cooling at the beginning of the Younger Dryas had a major impact on the lake and its catchment as clearly reflected by both, biotic and geochemical proxies. The depositional environment of the lake abruptly changed from a varved to massive gytjia. The pronounced warming at the demise of Younger Dryas cooling is well-reflected in all environmental indicators but with conspicuous leads and lags reflecting complex responses of lake ecosystems to climate warming. The research was supported by the National Science Centre Poland - NN306085037. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute ICLEA (Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution Analysis) funded by the Helmholtz Association.

  12. Orbital and Millennial Scale Variability of the Southeast Asian Monsoon Since 45 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. R.; Griffiths, M. L.; Yang, H.; Wang, J. K.; Wood, C. T.; Henderson, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    Despite significant advances in our understanding of tropical Indo-Pacific and monsoon climate variability on orbital to millennial timescales, we still know very little about the range and mechanisms of variability in the Southeast Asian monsoon region. To address this need, we have developed a new, decadally-resolved speleothem δ18O and δ13C record from two overlapping stalagmites (TM-17 and TM-8), collected from Tham Mai Cave in Northern Laos. The TM-17 stalagmite was dated with 25 U-Th measurements, which indicate nearly continuous growth since 37.8 ka at ~20 microns/year. Based on 16 U-Th dates, the TM-8 stalagmite grew continuously between 33.7 and 45.6 ka at ~35 microns/year. Both samples were microdrilled at ~0.5 mm resolution and >2000 samples were analysed for stable isotope composition (δ18O and δ13C). Based on cave monitoring work conducted since 2010 and the strong correlation between the overlapping segments of the two records, these two speleothems faithfully record the mean δ18O of rainfall at this site, which reflects an integrated signal of upstream rainout over the Bay of Bengal and tropical Indian Ocean. The composite TM record clearly shows orbital and millennial scale variability over the last 45 kyr, with a strong precessional signal during the Holocene and clear δ18O increases during Heinrich Stadials 1-5, the Younger Dryas, and the 8.2 kyr event. The strong similarity between the Tham Mai record and the Chinese speleothem records supports recent interpretations of these records as reflecting large-scale Indian monsoon intensity rather than local precipitation over East Asia. In contrast to δ18O, speleothem δ13C from Tham Mai Cave may be more reflective of local water balance than large-scale monsoon intensity. The composite δ13C record shows increased values during the Heinrich stadials, especially HS1, potentially reflecting dry conditions with increased prior calcite precipitation and/or decreased soil respiration. Interestingly

  13. Links between early Holocene ice-sheet decay, sea-level rise and abrupt climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törnqvist, Torbjörn E.; Hijma, Marc P.

    2012-09-01

    The beginning of the current interglacial period, the Holocene epoch, was a critical part of the transition from glacial to interglacial climate conditions. This period, between about 12,000 and 7,000 years ago, was marked by the continued retreat of the ice sheets that had expanded through polar and temperate regions during the preceding glacial. This meltdown led to a dramatic rise in sea level, punctuated by short-lived jumps associated with catastrophic ice-sheet collapses. Tracking down which ice sheet produced specific sea-level jumps has been challenging, but two events between 8,500 and 8,200 years ago have been linked to the final drainage of glacial Lake Agassiz in north-central North America. The release of the water from this ice-dammed lake into the ocean is recorded by sea-level jumps in the Mississippi and Rhine-Meuse deltas of approximately 0.4 and 2.1 metres, respectively. These sea-level jumps can be related to an abrupt cooling in the Northern Hemisphere known as the 8.2 kyr event, and it has been suggested that the freshwater release from Lake Agassiz into the North Atlantic was sufficient to perturb the North Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. As sea-level rise on the order of decimetres to metres can now be detected with confidence and linked to climate records, it is becoming apparent that abrupt climate change during the early Holocene associated with perturbations in North Atlantic circulation required sustained freshwater release into the ocean.

  14. Monsoon variability in the northeastern Arabian Sea on orbital- and millennial scale during the past 200,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lückge, Andreas; Groeneveld, Jeroen; Steinke, Stephan; Mohtadi, Mahyar; Westerhold, Thomas; Schulz, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    The Dansgaard-Oeschger oscillations and Heinrich events described in the Greenland ice cores and in North Atlantic and Western Mediterranean sediments are also expressed in the climate of the tropics, for example, as documented in Arabian Sea sediments. However, little is known about these fluctuations beyond the reach of the Greenland ice cores. Here, we present high-resolution geochemical, sedimentological as well as micropaleontological data from two cores (SO130-283KL, 987m water depth and SO130-289KL, 571m) off the coast of Pakistan, extending the monsoon record on orbital and millennial scales to the past 200,000 years. The stable oxygen isotope record of the surface-dwelling planktonic foraminifer G. ruber shows a strong correspondence to Greenland ice core δ18O, whereas the deepwater δ18O signal of benthic foraminifera (U. peregrina and G. affinis) reflects patterns recorded in ice cores from Antarctica. Strong shifts in benthic δ18O during stadials/Heinrich events are interpreted to show frequent advances of oxygen-rich intermediate water masses into the Arabian Sea originating from the southern ocean. Alkenone-derived SSTs varied between 23 and 28° C. Highest temperatures were encountered during interglacial MIS 5. Rapid SST changes of 2° C magnitude on millennial scale are overlain by long-term SST fluctuations. Interstadials (of glacial phases) and the cold phases of interglacials are characterized by sediments enriched in organic carbon (up to 4 % TOC) whereas sediments with low TOC contents (< 1 % TOC) appear during stadials and Heinrich events. Shifts at climate transitions, such as onsets of interstadials, were coeval with changes in productivity-related and anoxia-indicating proxies. Interstadial inorganic elemental data consistently show that enhanced fluxes of terrestrial-derived sediments are paralleled by productivity maxima, and are characterized by an increased fluvial contribution from the Indus River. In contrast, stadials are

  15. Biological and physical controls in the Southern Ocean on past millennial-scale atmospheric CO2 changes.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Julia; Skinner, Luke C; Lippold, Jörg; Vogel, Hendrik; Frank, Norbert; Jaccard, Samuel L; Waelbroeck, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Millennial-scale climate changes during the last glacial period and deglaciation were accompanied by rapid changes in atmospheric CO2 that remain unexplained. While the role of the Southern Ocean as a 'control valve' on ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange has been emphasized, the exact nature of this role, in particular the relative contributions of physical (for example, ocean dynamics and air-sea gas exchange) versus biological processes (for example, export productivity), remains poorly constrained. Here we combine reconstructions of bottom-water [O2], export production and (14)C ventilation ages in the sub-Antarctic Atlantic, and show that atmospheric CO2 pulses during the last glacial- and deglacial periods were consistently accompanied by decreases in the biological export of carbon and increases in deep-ocean ventilation via southern-sourced water masses. These findings demonstrate how the Southern Ocean's 'organic carbon pump' has exerted a tight control on atmospheric CO2, and thus global climate, specifically via a synergy of both physical and biological processes. PMID:27187527

  16. Quality assessment of chronologies in Latin American pollen records: a contribution to centennial to millennial scale studies of environmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flantua, S. G. A.; Hooghiemstra, H.; Blaauw, M.

    2015-04-01

    The newly updated inventory of the Latin American Pollen Database (LAPD) offers an important overview of data available for multi-proxy and multi-site purposes. However, heterogeneous paleoecological databases are not suitable to be integrated without an uncertainty assessment of existing chronologies. Therefore, we collected all chronological control points and age model metadata from the LAPD literature to create a complementary chronological database of 5116 dates from 1097 pollen records. We start with an overview on chronological dating and reporting in Central and South America. Specific problems and recommendations for chronology reporting are discussed. Subsequently, we implement a temporal quality assessment of pollen records from northwest South-America to support research on climate forcers and responses at a centennial-millennial time-scale. New chronologies are generated for 233 pollen records based on updated calibration curves. Different time windows are discussed on sample resolution and temporal uncertainty. Approximately one in four pollen diagrams depicts < 500 years resolution data at the Younger Dryas/Holocene transition. Overall, our analyses suggest that the temporal resolution of multi-site syntheses of late Pleistocene fossil pollen records in the northwest South-America is ca. 240 years, a resolution which allows analysis of ecological responses to centennial-millennial-scale climate change during the last deglaciation.

  17. Biological and physical controls in the Southern Ocean on past millennial-scale atmospheric CO2 changes

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Julia; Skinner, Luke C.; Lippold, Jörg; Vogel, Hendrik; Frank, Norbert; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Waelbroeck, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Millennial-scale climate changes during the last glacial period and deglaciation were accompanied by rapid changes in atmospheric CO2 that remain unexplained. While the role of the Southern Ocean as a 'control valve' on ocean–atmosphere CO2 exchange has been emphasized, the exact nature of this role, in particular the relative contributions of physical (for example, ocean dynamics and air–sea gas exchange) versus biological processes (for example, export productivity), remains poorly constrained. Here we combine reconstructions of bottom-water [O2], export production and 14C ventilation ages in the sub-Antarctic Atlantic, and show that atmospheric CO2 pulses during the last glacial- and deglacial periods were consistently accompanied by decreases in the biological export of carbon and increases in deep-ocean ventilation via southern-sourced water masses. These findings demonstrate how the Southern Ocean's 'organic carbon pump' has exerted a tight control on atmospheric CO2, and thus global climate, specifically via a synergy of both physical and biological processes. PMID:27187527

  18. Biological and physical controls in the Southern Ocean on past millennial-scale atmospheric CO2 changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottschalk, Julia; Skinner, Luke C.; Lippold, Jörg; Vogel, Hendrik; Frank, Norbert; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Waelbroeck, Claire

    2016-05-01

    Millennial-scale climate changes during the last glacial period and deglaciation were accompanied by rapid changes in atmospheric CO2 that remain unexplained. While the role of the Southern Ocean as a 'control valve' on ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange has been emphasized, the exact nature of this role, in particular the relative contributions of physical (for example, ocean dynamics and air-sea gas exchange) versus biological processes (for example, export productivity), remains poorly constrained. Here we combine reconstructions of bottom-water [O2], export production and 14C ventilation ages in the sub-Antarctic Atlantic, and show that atmospheric CO2 pulses during the last glacial- and deglacial periods were consistently accompanied by decreases in the biological export of carbon and increases in deep-ocean ventilation via southern-sourced water masses. These findings demonstrate how the Southern Ocean's 'organic carbon pump' has exerted a tight control on atmospheric CO2, and thus global climate, specifically via a synergy of both physical and biological processes.

  19. An abrupt climate event in a coupled ocean-atmosphere simulation without external forcing.

    PubMed

    Hall, A; Stouffer, R J

    2001-01-11

    Temperature reconstructions from the North Atlantic region indicate frequent abrupt and severe climate fluctuations during the last glacial and Holocene periods. The driving forces for these events are unclear and coupled atmosphere-ocean models of global circulation have only simulated such events by inserting large amounts of fresh water into the northern North Atlantic Ocean. Here we report a drastic cooling event in a 15,000-yr simulation of global circulation with present-day climate conditions without the use of such external forcing. In our simulation, the annual average surface temperature near southern Greenland spontaneously fell 6-10 standard deviations below its mean value for a period of 30-40 yr. The event was triggered by a persistent northwesterly wind that transported large amounts of buoyant cold and fresh water into the northern North Atlantic Ocean. Oceanic convection shut down in response to this flow, concentrating the entire cooling of the northern North Atlantic by the colder atmosphere in the uppermost ocean layer. Given the similarity between our simulation and observed records of rapid cooling events, our results indicate that internal atmospheric variability alone could have generated the extreme climate disruptions in this region. PMID:11196636

  20. Impact of abrupt deglacial climate change on tropical Atlantic subsurface temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Matthew W.; Chang, Ping; Hertzberg, Jennifer E.; Them, Theodore R.; Ji, Link; Otto-Bliesner, Bette L.

    2012-01-01

    Both instrumental data analyses and coupled ocean-atmosphere models indicate that Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) variability is tightly linked to abrupt tropical North Atlantic (TNA) climate change through both atmospheric and oceanic processes. Although a slowdown of AMOC results in an atmospheric-induced surface cooling in the entire TNA, the subsurface experiences an even larger warming because of rapid reorganizations of ocean circulation patterns at intermediate water depths. Here, we reconstruct high-resolution temperature records using oxygen isotope values and Mg/Ca ratios in both surface- and subthermocline-dwelling planktonic foraminifera from a sediment core located in the TNA over the last 22 ky. Our results show significant changes in the vertical thermal gradient of the upper water column, with the warmest subsurface temperatures of the last deglacial transition corresponding to the onset of the Younger Dryas. Furthermore, we present new analyses of a climate model simulation forced with freshwater discharge into the North Atlantic under Last Glacial Maximum forcings and boundary conditions that reveal a maximum subsurface warming in the vicinity of the core site and a vertical thermal gradient change at the onset of AMOC weakening, consistent with the reconstructed record. Together, our proxy reconstructions and modeling results provide convincing evidence for a subsurface oceanic teleconnection linking high-latitude North Atlantic climate to the tropical Atlantic during periods of reduced AMOC across the last deglacial transition. PMID:22908256

  1. Theoretical basis for predicting climate-induced abrupt shifts in the oceans

    PubMed Central

    Beaugrand, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Among the responses of marine species and their ecosystems to climate change, abrupt community shifts (ACSs), also called regime shifts, have often been observed. However, despite their effects for ecosystem functioning and both provisioning and regulating services, our understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved remains elusive. This paper proposes a theory showing that some ACSs originate from the interaction between climate-induced environmental changes and the species ecological niche. The theory predicts that a substantial stepwise shift in the thermal regime of a marine ecosystem leads indubitably to an ACS and explains why some species do not change during the phenomenon. It also explicates why the timing of ACSs may differ or why some studies may detect or not detect a shift in the same ecosystem, independently of the statistical method of detection and simply because they focus on different species or taxonomic groups. The present theory offers a way to predict future climate-induced community shifts and their potential associated trophic cascades and amplifications.

  2. Impact of abrupt deglacial climate change on tropical Atlantic subsurface temperatures.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Matthew W; Chang, Ping; Hertzberg, Jennifer E; Them, Theodore R; Ji, Link; J, Link; Otto-Bliesner, Bette L

    2012-09-01

    Both instrumental data analyses and coupled ocean-atmosphere models indicate that Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) variability is tightly linked to abrupt tropical North Atlantic (TNA) climate change through both atmospheric and oceanic processes. Although a slowdown of AMOC results in an atmospheric-induced surface cooling in the entire TNA, the subsurface experiences an even larger warming because of rapid reorganizations of ocean circulation patterns at intermediate water depths. Here, we reconstruct high-resolution temperature records using oxygen isotope values and Mg/Ca ratios in both surface- and subthermocline-dwelling planktonic foraminifera from a sediment core located in the TNA over the last 22 ky. Our results show significant changes in the vertical thermal gradient of the upper water column, with the warmest subsurface temperatures of the last deglacial transition corresponding to the onset of the Younger Dryas. Furthermore, we present new analyses of a climate model simulation forced with freshwater discharge into the North Atlantic under Last Glacial Maximum forcings and boundary conditions that reveal a maximum subsurface warming in the vicinity of the core site and a vertical thermal gradient change at the onset of AMOC weakening, consistent with the reconstructed record. Together, our proxy reconstructions and modeling results provide convincing evidence for a subsurface oceanic teleconnection linking high-latitude North Atlantic climate to the tropical Atlantic during periods of reduced AMOC across the last deglacial transition. PMID:22908256

  3. A comparison of two methods for detecting abrupt changes in the variance of climatic time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, Sergei N.

    2016-06-01

    Two methods for detecting abrupt shifts in the variance - Integrated Cumulative Sum of Squares (ICSS) and Sequential Regime Shift Detector (SRSD) - have been compared on both synthetic and observed time series. In Monte Carlo experiments, SRSD outperformed ICSS in the overwhelming majority of the modeled scenarios with different sequences of variance regimes. The SRSD advantage was particularly apparent in the case of outliers in the series. On the other hand, SRSD has more parameters to adjust than ICSS, which requires more experience from the user in order to select those parameters properly. Therefore, ICSS can serve as a good starting point of a regime shift analysis. When tested on climatic time series, in most cases both methods detected the same change points in the longer series (252-787 monthly values). The only exception was the Arctic Ocean sea surface temperature (SST) series, when ICSS found one extra change point that appeared to be spurious. As for the shorter time series (66-136 yearly values), ICSS failed to detect any change points even when the variance doubled or tripled from one regime to another. For these time series, SRSD is recommended. Interestingly, all the climatic time series tested, from the Arctic to the tropics, had one thing in common: the last shift detected in each of these series was toward a high-variance regime. This is consistent with other findings of increased climate variability in recent decades.

  4. Agriculture, Settlement, and Abrupt Climate Change: The 4.2ka BP event in Northern Mesopotamia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristvet, L.

    2003-12-01

    An abrupt aridification event at 4200 BP has been recorded in 41 paleoclimate proxies in the Old World, from Kilmanjaro, Tanzania to Rajasthan, India, East Asia and the Pacific. This event is particularly well defined for Western Asia, where it has been associated with the abandonment of settlements across the Fertile Crescent and the collapse of states on the Levantine coast and in the dry-farming plains of Northern Mesopotamia, including the Akkadian Empire. Adaptations to climate change are constrained by both local environmental and social factors. Agriculturalists, especially those living in pre-industrial societies, are particularly susceptible to changes in precipitation. The Tell Leilan Regional Survey, which systematically studied sites in a 1650km2 area of Northeastern Syria, records one set of adaptations to this event in an area where dry-farming provided the subsistence base. The survey transect crosses ecotones, from the present 500mm isohyet in the North to the 250mm isohyet in the South, and contains diverse wadi systems, ground water resources, soil profiles, and an ancient marsh/lake-- all of which allow this region to be taken as a microcosm of Northern Mesopotamia. In order to contextualize our study of human response to abrupt climate change, it is necessary to consider how the economic and social systems that were previously in place were transformed by this event. This study attempts to quantify climate change and model its effects on agricultural, pastoral, and settlement systems in Northeastern Syria from 2400-1700 BC. From 2400-2300 BC, optimal climate conditions coincided with the consolidation of an indigenous state. The next century witnessed the Akkadian conquest and imperialization of the Habur plains, which resulted in both the intensification and extensification of agro-production. During the next 300 years, (2200-1900 BC), rainfall plummeted to 70% of the climatic optimum, triggering the abandonment of cities along with their

  5. Reducing The Risk Of Abrupt Climate Change: Emission Corridors Preserving The Thermohaline Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zickfeld, K.

    Paleo-reconstructions have shown that large and abrupt climate changes have occurred throughout the last ice-age cycles. This evidence, supplemented by insights into the complex and nonlinear nature of the climate system, gives raise to the concern that anthropogenic forcing may trigger such events in the future. A prominent example for such a potential climatic shift is the collapse of the North Atlantic thermohaline circu- lation (THC), which would cause a major cooling of the northern North Atlantic and north-western Europe and considerable regional sea level rise, with possibly severe consequences on, e.g., fisheries, agriculture and ecosystems. In this paper we present emission corridors for the 21st century preserving the THC. Emission corridors embrace the range of future emissions beyond which either the THC collapses or the mitigation burden becomes intolerable. They are calculated along the conceptual and methodological lines of the tolerable windows approach. We investigate the sensitivity of the emission corridors to the main uncertain parame- ters (climate and North Atlantic hydrological sensitivities as well as emissions of non CO_2 greenhouse gases). Results show a high dependence of the size of the emis- sion corridors on hydrological and climate sensitivities. For the best-guess values of both parameters we find that the emission corridors are wider than the range spanned by the SRES emissions scenarios. Thus, no immediate mitigation seems necessary in order to preserve the THC. For high but still realistic values of the sensitivities, however, even the low SRES emissions scenarios transgress the corridor boundaries. These findings imply that under 'business as usual' a non-negligible risk of either a THC collapse or an intolerable mitigation burden exists.

  6. North Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and Abrupt Climate Change through the Last Glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, G., III; McManus, J. F.; Curry, W. B.; Keigwin, L. D.; Giosan, L.

    2014-12-01

    The climate of the glacial North Atlantic was punctuated by catastrophic discharges of icebergs (Heinrich events), as well as by more mysterious, abrupt warming events associated with Dansgaard-Oeschger oscillations. These events are suspected to be related to changes in AMOC and its influence on heat transport and the regional and global heat budget. Investigation of these rapid oscillations is often limited by the resolution of sediment records. High accumulation rates at our study site (33.69°N, 57.58°W, 4583m water depth) on the Bermuda Rise allow improved resolution by one to two orders of magnitude. Cores CDH19 (38.81m) and CDH13 (36.70m), were recovered during KNR191, the initial deployment of the RV Knorr's long coring system developed at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution with support from the NSF. These cores contain high quality sediment sections that allow high resolution studies extending through the last glacial cycle at a key location for monitoring past oceanographic and climatic variability. Here we present detailed multi-proxy data from Bermuda Rise sediments reflecting deep ocean chemistry and dynamics of the last glaciation, and combine them with published data to produce a continuous, high resolution record spanning the last 70,000 years. CaCO3 burial fluxes, foraminifera stable isotopes, and sedimentary uranium-series disequilibria (including seawater-derived 231Pa /230Th), display coherent, complementary variability throughout the last glaciation. Glacial values in each proxy are consistent with reduced ventilation and overturning compared to the Holocene, with intervals that indicate substantial millennial reductions in each, and others when they briefly approach Holocene levels. In multiple instances, particularly spanning interstadials eight through twelve (IS8-IS12) our results are consistent with an abrupt, subcentennial acceleration in the export of excess 231Pa from the North Atlantic during stadial-interstadial transitions

  7. Impact of Climate and Fires on Abrupt Permafrost Thaw in Alaskan Tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipman, M. L.; Reents, C.; Greenberg, J. A.; Hu, F.

    2015-12-01

    Thermo-erosion from abrupt permafrost thaw is a key pulse disturbance in the Arctic that may impact the global carbon cycle. Abrupt thaw can occur when the permafrost active layer expands in response to climate warming and/or increased wildfire activity. Understanding these drivers of thermo-erosion is necessary to anticipate feedbacks in the Arctic, where summer temperature and fire frequency are predicted to increase. We examine modern and late-Holocene thermo-erosion in high-fire (Noatak) and low-fire (North Slope) tundra ecoregions of Alaska using a combination of remote-sensing and paleo-records. Lakes with active thaw features were identified through Landsat-7 image classification and time-series analysis based on observed 0.52-0.60 μm reflectance peaks following slump formation. We identified 1067 and 1705 lakes with active features between CE 2000-2012 in the Noatak and North Slope ecoregions, respectively. The density of features was higher in the highly flammable Noatak (0.04 versus 0.01 features km-2, respectively), suggesting that warmer climate and/or fires likely promote high thermo-erosional activity at present. To assess modern signals of thermo-erosion and identify past events, we analyzed soil profiles and lake-sediment cores from both ecoregions using X-ray fluorescence. The ratios of Ca:K and Ca:Sr increased with depth in permafrost soils, were higher in soils from younger versus older slump surfaces, and were significantly correlated with the ratio of carbonate to feldspar and clay minerals in lake sediments (r=0.96 and 0.93, P<0.0001, n=15). We interpret past increases in Ca:K, Ca:Sr, and δ13C as enhanced weathering of carbonate-rich permafrost soils associated with thermo-erosion. At the North Slope site, we identified ten episodes of thermoerosion over the past 6000 years and found strong correspondence to summer temperature trends. Events were more frequent at the Noatak site, where 15 thermo-erosional episodes and 26 fires occurred over

  8. The Role of the Tropics in Last Glacial Abrupt Climate Change from a West Antarctic Ice Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. R.; White, J. W. C.; Steig, E. J.; Cuffey, K. M.; Vaughn, B. H.; Morris, V. A.; Vasileios, G.; Markle, B. R.; Schoenemann, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    Debate exists as to whether last glacial abrupt climate changes in Greenland, and associated changes in Antarctica, had a high-latitude or tropical trigger. An ultra high-resolution water isotope record from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide (WAIS Divide) Ice Core Project has been developed with three key water isotope parameters that offer insight into this debate: δD, δ18O, and deuterium excess (dxs). δD and δ18O are a proxy for local temperature and regional atmospheric circulation, while dxs is primarily a proxy for sea surface temperature at the ice core's moisture source(s) (relative humidity and wind speed also play a role). We build on past studies that show West Antarctic climate is modulated by El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) teleconnection mechanisms, which originate in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, to infer how past ENSO changes may have influenced abrupt climate change. Using frequency analysis of the water isotope data, we can reconstruct the amplitude of ENSO-scale climate oscillations in the 2-15 year range within temporal windows as low as 100 years. Our analysis uses a back diffusion model that estimates initial amplitudes before decay in the firn column. We combine δD, δ18O, and dxs frequency analysis to evaluate how climate variability at WAIS Divide is influenced by tropical climate forcing. Our results should ultimately offer insight into the role of the tropics in abrupt climate change.

  9. Orbital- and Millennial-Scale Changes in the Australasian Monsoon Through the Late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagan, M. K.; Ayliffe, L. K.; Scroxton, N. G.; Krause, C. E.; Kimbrough, A. K.; Hantoro, W. S.; Drysdale, R.; Hellstrom, J.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R.; Zhao, J.; Griffiths, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Speleothem 18O/16O records from China and Borneo have revealed changes in Asian monsoon rainfall over the last ~570,000 years (e.g. Wang et al. 2008, Cheng et al. 2010, Meckler et al. 2012), yet little is known about orbital- and millennial-scale climate change in the 'southern half' of the Australasian monsoon domain. To fill this gap, we aim to build speleothem 18O/16O records for the seasonal monsoon rainfall belt of south-central Indonesia. Between 2006 and 2011, we sampled speleothems in Flores and southwest Sulawesi (latitudes 5-9oS) with U-series ages extending to 92,000 yBP and ~470,000 yBP, respectively. Development of the 18O/16O records for Sulawesi is in progress, but the basal ages of the speleothems (onset of stalagmite growth) are intriguing because they cluster around glacial terminations, when the East Asian monsoon is known to have been weak (Cheng et al. 2010). There is clear antiphasing of the Flores and China speleothem 18O/16O records on precession time-scales over the last ~90,000 years. A distinct maximum in monsoon rainfall in Flores occurred ~21,000 yBP, suggesting the ITCZ moved south during the Last Glacial Maximum in response to the southern hemisphere summer insolation maximum. This finding indicates that ITCZ positioning in tropical Australasia, through its influence on large-scale oceanic-atmospheric circulation, could have played a key role in the rapid rise of atmospheric CO2 and global warming that ultimately led to the demise of the last ice age, as summarised by Denton et al. (2010) and others. The new Flores speleothem 18O/16O records also show that climate change in the North Atlantic region and Australasian monsoon rainfall are inextricably linked on millennial timescales (Griffiths et al. 2009, Lewis et al. 2011). For example, rapid warming in the North Atlantic region during Dansgaard-Oeschger Event 21 (~86,000 yBP) was linked to a synchronous northward shift of the Australasian ITCZ, marking the final demise of MIS 5b. In

  10. Middle East coastal ecosystem response to middle-to-late Holocene abrupt climate changes

    PubMed Central

    Kaniewski, D.; Paulissen, E.; Van Campo, E.; Al-Maqdissi, M.; Bretschneider, J.; Van Lerberghe, K.

    2008-01-01

    The Holocene vegetation history of the northern coastal Arabian Peninsula is of long-standing interest, as this Mediterranean/semiarid/arid region is known to be particularly sensitive to climatic changes. Detailed palynological data from an 800-cm alluvial sequence cored in the Jableh plain in northwest Syria have been used to reconstruct the vegetation dynamics in the coastal lowlands and the nearby Jabal an Nuşayriyah mountains for the period 2150 to 550 B.C. Corresponding with the 4.2 to 3.9 and 3.5 to 2.5 cal kyr BP abrupt climate changes (ACCs), two large-scale shifts to a more arid climate have been recorded. These two ACCs had different impacts on the vegetation assemblages in coastal Syria. The 3.5 to 2.5 cal kyr BP ACC is drier and lasted longer than the 4.2 to 3.9 cal kyr BP ACC, and is characterized by the development of a warm steppe pollen-derived biome (1100–800 B.C.) and a peak of hot desert pollen-derived biome at 900 B.C. The 4.2 to 3.9 cal kyr BP ACC is characterized by a xerophytic woods and shrubs pollen-derived biome ca. 2050 B.C. The impact of the 3.5 to 2.5 cal kyr BP ACC on human occupation and cultural development is important along the Syrian coast with the destruction of Ugarit and the collapse of the Ugarit kingdom at ca. 1190 to 1185 B.C. PMID:18772385

  11. Millennial-scale features in ?18O from a stalagmite in the eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardt, B. F.; Doctor, D. H.; Gao, Y.; Rowe, H. D.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R.

    2013-12-01

    The oxygen isotope record of calcite from a stalagmite collected from Grand Caverns in Virginia, USA shows evidence of millennial-scale variability that appears to be coherent with Dansgaard/Oeschger events observed in Greenland ice. Sample GC-S02 grew from 82 - 13 ka BP and ranges in δ18O composition from -8 to -4 ‰ (VPDB) with multiple instances of millennial-scale changes in excess of 1‰. As δ18O in GC-S02 is more positive during MIS 2 than MIS 3, change in mean annual temperature is not a likely explanation for the observed variability. The carbon and oxygen isotopic records of calcite are independent and show no evidence of covaration (r = -0.1). Changes in the seasonal timing of precipitation provides an alternate explanation for the data, particularly given the potential for warm- and cool-season precipitation to come from different sources (Gulf of Mexico versus the Atlantic ocean). Grand Caverns is located in the Shenandoah River watershed within the Appalachian Great Valley, suggesting a meaningful role for Atlantic moisture. The age model is based on high-precision U-Th ages, making this record a potential benchmark for the region.

  12. Reducing abrupt climate change risk using the Montreal Protocol and other regulatory actions to complement cuts in CO2 emissions

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Mario; Zaelke, Durwood; Sarma, K. Madhava; Andersen, Stephen O.; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran; Kaniaru, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Current emissions of anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs) have already committed the planet to an increase in average surface temperature by the end of the century that may be above the critical threshold for tipping elements of the climate system into abrupt change with potentially irreversible and unmanageable consequences. This would mean that the climate system is close to entering if not already within the zone of “dangerous anthropogenic interference” (DAI). Scientific and policy literature refers to the need for “early,” “urgent,” “rapid,” and “fast-action” mitigation to help avoid DAI and abrupt climate changes. We define “fast-action” to include regulatory measures that can begin within 2–3 years, be substantially implemented in 5–10 years, and produce a climate response within decades. We discuss strategies for short-lived non-CO2 GHGs and particles, where existing agreements can be used to accomplish mitigation objectives. Policy makers can amend the Montreal Protocol to phase down the production and consumption of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) with high global warming potential. Other fast-action strategies can reduce emissions of black carbon particles and precursor gases that lead to ozone formation in the lower atmosphere, and increase biosequestration, including through biochar. These and other fast-action strategies may reduce the risk of abrupt climate change in the next few decades by complementing cuts in CO2 emissions. PMID:19822751

  13. Deglacial abrupt climate change in the Atlantic Warm Pool: A Gulf of Mexico perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Carlie; Flower, Benjamin P.; Hastings, David W.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; Quinn, Kelly A.; Goddard, Ethan A.

    2010-12-01

    During the last deglaciation, Greenland ice core and North Atlantic sediment records exhibit multiple abrupt climate events including the Younger Dryas cold episode (12.9-11.7 ka). However, evidence for the presence of the Younger Dryas in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and the relationship between GOM sea surface temperature (SST) and high-latitude climate change is less clear. We present new Mg/Ca-SST records from two varieties of the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber (white and pink) to assess northern GOM SST history from approximately 18.4-10.8 ka. Thirty-five accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dates from Orca Basin core MD02-2550 provide excellent age control and document high sedimentation rates (˜40 cm/kyr). G. ruber (white and pink) Mg/Ca-SST data exhibit increases (˜4.6 ± 0.6°C and ˜2.2 ± 0.5°C, respectively) from at least 17.8-16.6 ka, with nearly decadal resolution that are early relative to the onset of the Bolling-Allerod interstadial. Moreover, G. ruber (white) SST decreases at 16.0-14.7 ka (˜1.0 ± 0.5°C) and 12.8-11.6 ka (˜2.4 ± 0.6°C) correlate to the Oldest and Younger Dryas in Greenland and Cariaco Basin. The G. ruber (pink) SST record, which reflects differences in seasonality and/or depth habitat, is often not in phase with G. ruber (white) and closely resembles Antarctic air temperature records. Overall, it appears that Orca Basin SST records follow Antarctic air temperature early in the deglacial sequence and exhibit enhanced seasonality during Greenland stadials.

  14. Abrupt Climate Change Caused by Global Fires from a Large Meteor Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardeen, C.; Toon, O. B.; Garcia, R. R.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Wolf, E. T.

    2015-12-01

    Global or near-global fires like those that are thought to have occurred after the Chicxulub asteroid impact are associated with abrupt climate change and the K-Pg mass extinction event. Using the Community Earth System Model (CESM), a three-dimensional coupled climate model with interactive chemistry, we have simulated the climate response to global fires assuming a burden of 70,000 Tg, as estimated from the K-Pg layer sediments by Wolbach et al. (1988). Soot aerosols are lofted by solar heating and remain in the atmosphere for about 6 years, warming the stratosphere by more than 240 K and suppressing completely solar radiation at the surface for 2 years. Global average land surface temperatures cool by -28 K after 3 years and ocean temperatures by -11 K after 4 years. Precipitation is reduced by 80 % for 5 years, and the ozone column is reduced by 80 % for 4 years. The tropical tropopause cold point disappears for a few years, leading to water vapor mixing ratios of > 1000 ppmv in the stratosphere. There is a rapid recovery around year 6, when the soot is removed by wet deposition as stratospheric water condenses and precipitates, but this is followed by a peak in the UV Index in the tropics of over 40 before stratospheric ozone recovers. Ocean temperature cools by more than -2 K to a depth of 300 m, and sea ice develops in the Black Sea, Caspian Sea, and Baltic Sea. Global fires, two years of darkness, extreme surface cooling, significant ocean cooling, increases in sea ice extent and a large short-term increase in UV Index would have been catastrophic for many life forms. This work is the first step in an effort to simulate the climatic effects of all of the aerosols and gases that may have been generated by the Chicxulub impact in a model that has been configured for late-Cretaceous conditions to help assess the role of the Chicxulub impact in the K-Pg extinction.

  15. Millennial-scale precipitation changes in southern Brazil over the past 90,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianfeng; Auler, Augusto S.; Edwards, R. L.; Cheng, Hai; Ito, Emi; Wang, Yongjin; Kong, Xinggong; Solheid, Maniko

    2007-12-01

    A U-Th dated 90,000 year-long speleothem oxygen isotope record from southern Brazil anti-correlates remarkably with the cave calcite records from eastern China, but positively correlates with the speleothem record from northeastern Brazil, suggesting an interhemispheric anti-phasing of rainfall on both millennial and orbital timescales, likely related to displacement in the mean position of the intertropical convergence zone and associated asymmetry in Hadley circulation. The phase relationships among these records are consistent with the hypothesis that abrupt climate events during the last glacial period are triggered by oceanic circulation changes in the high latitudes and enhanced by tropical feedbacks.

  16. Milankovitch and sub-Milankovitch millennial-scale cyclicity in Middle Eocene deep-marine laminated sediments, Ainsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotchman, J. I.; Pickering, K. T.; Robinson, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    Climate variability on the scale of millennia is conspicuous within Quaternary records but has, until recently, been less well documented in records from deeper geological time. Here we utilise multi-element x-ray fluorescence (XRF) data obtained from a Middle Eocene (Lutetian) sediment core (Ainsa basin, Spanish Pyrenees) to identify both Milankovitch and sub-Milankovitch millennial-scale cyclicity. Elemental data were collected from a 28 m interval of core, which consists of deep-marine fine-grained siliciclastic sediments (very thin-bedded/laminated turbiditic and hemi-pelagic deposits). These sediments accumulated during a time interval when coarse clastic supply to the submarine fans was switched off. Analysis of the stratigraphic time series, using the REDFIT program (Schulz and Mudelsee, 2002), reveals the presence of oscillations with wavelengths of 6.84 m and 0.61 m exceeding the 99% confidence level. Within similar surface sediments from the Ainsa basin, such oscillations are manifest as decimetre-scale colour and/or lithological variations. To determine their temporal duration, an age model was calculated from the identification of the three main Milankovitch orbital periods within both the subsurface and laterally adjacent and age-equivalent outcropping strata. These data provide a robust sediment accumulation rate (SAR) of 27.5 cm/kyr. Application of this SAR to the 6.84 m and 0.61 m oscillations yields temporal durations of ~23 kyr and ~2 kyr. The former corresponds to the average precession period, which is believed to have controlled local sediment supply, through changing terrestrial run-off, likely linked to changing precipitation (storminess). The ~2 kyr cyclicity is related to millennial-scale climate variability of unknown origin, but, nonetheless, adds to the growing evidence for the persistence of millennial-scale environmental change in deep geologic time. Schulz, M., and Mudelsee, M., 2002, REDFIT: estimating red-noise spectra directly from

  17. A centennial-scale record of vegetation and climate variability from 312 to 240 ka (Marine Isotope Stages 9c-a, 8 and 7e) from Tenaghi Philippon, NE Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, William J.; Müller, Ulrich C.; Koutsodendris, Andreas; Christanis, Kimon; Pross, Jörg

    2013-10-01

    Based on a new, centennial-scale-resolution pollen record from the terrestrial site of Tenaghi Philippon (NE Greece) we report a series of high-amplitude millennial-scale forest expansion events during the interval from 312 to 240 ka (equivalent to isotopic substages c-a of Marine Isotope Stage [MIS] 9, MIS 8, and the onset of MIS 7e). Pollen-based indices support the climatic interpretation of the forest expansion events as indicators of abrupt increases in temperature and moisture availability in the Mediterranean region. Long-term changes in vegetation cover and composition during the studied interval permit the definition of glacial substages (early, middle and late) analogous to the glacial substages of the last climatic cycle. Within this framework, forest expansion events occurred during the early glacial (equivalent to MIS 9c-a) and the later part of the middle glacial (mid to late MIS 8), but are absent from the early part of the middle glacial (early MIS 8). Forest expansion events are also detected during the Lateglacial and onset of MIS 7, associated with a millennial-scale climate oscillation across the glacial-interglacial transition, i.e. Termination III (T-III). A peak-for-peak match between forest expansion events and Antarctic temperature maxima suggests interhemispheric coupling of millennial-scale climate variability via global oceanic circulation change and synergistic variability in atmospheric circulation consistent with the bipolar see-saw. The resolution of our record (mean: 290 yr) also permits the characterisation of climate evolution over the course of interstadial episodes following forest expansion events, and highlights differences in the characteristics of early and middle glacial interstadials (saw-tooth vs. plateau profile). These differences point to an influence of long-term boundary conditions, especially global ice volume, on the characteristics of millennial-scale events.

  18. Rapid interhemispheric climate links via the Australasian monsoon during the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Ayliffe, Linda K; Gagan, Michael K; Zhao, Jian-xin; Drysdale, Russell N; Hellstrom, John C; Hantoro, Wahyoe S; Griffiths, Michael L; Scott-Gagan, Heather; St Pierre, Emma; Cowley, Joan A; Suwargadi, Bambang W

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed that millennial-scale reorganization of the ocean-atmosphere circulation drives increased upwelling in the Southern Ocean, leading to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and ice age terminations. Southward migration of the global monsoon is thought to link the hemispheres during deglaciation, but vital evidence from the southern sector of the vast Australasian monsoon system is yet to emerge. Here we present a 230thorium-dated stalagmite oxygen isotope record of millennial-scale changes in Australian-Indonesian monsoon rainfall over the last 31,000 years. The record shows that abrupt southward shifts of the Australian-Indonesian monsoon were synchronous with North Atlantic cold intervals 17,600-11,500 years ago. The most prominent southward shift occurred in lock-step with Heinrich Stadial 1 (17,600-14,600 years ago), and rising atmospheric carbon dioxide. Our findings show that millennial-scale climate change was transmitted rapidly across Australasia and lend support to the idea that the 3,000-year-long Heinrich 1 interval could have been critical in driving the last deglaciation. PMID:24309539

  19. Abrupt Climatic Events Observed in Organic-Rich Sediments From Lake Tanganyika, Tropical East Africa, Over the Past 50 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, A. P.; Weyhenmeyer, C. E.; Scholz, C. A.; Swart, P. K.

    2006-12-01

    Abrupt climate changes such as Dansgaard-Oeschger Cycles and Heinrich Events were first detected in high- latitude records, but an increasing number of studies suggest that these rapid changes are actually global events. The degree to which the tropics drive, control and/or respond to such rapid changes is still poorly understood due to a scarcity of data from low-latitude regions. A recently acquired sediment core from Lake Tanganyika, East Africa, provides a unique archive to study abrupt climate events in the tropics throughout the last glaciation. The core provides a continuous, undisturbed and high resolution climate record over the past 100 kyr. An age-depth model based on 25 new radiocarbon dates provides a solid, high-resolution chronology for the past 50 kyr. Throughout this time, several rapid changes in paleoclimate proxy data are observed along the core. Sedimentation rates remained fairly constant from the Holocene until the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) but increased abruptly from ~80 mm/1000 yr to ~150 mm/1000 yr around 18 kyr BP. At the same time, the sediment record reveals a sudden increase in total organic carbon (TOC) from 4% to 12% indicating a rapid increase in organic matter contributions at the end of the LGM. Abrupt changes in TOC and δ13C values are also found at ~38 kyr, ~30 kyr and ~16 kyr BP, suggesting a possible link to Heinrich events 4, 3 and 1, respectively. Forthcoming very high-resolution analyses, to augment existing low-resolution data, include δ13C, δ15N, C/N ratios and TOC values. Furthermore, TEX86 measurements will be carried out to determine whether the observed changes in organic matter contributions are associated with changes in water temperatures. In combination with the solid 14C chronology, the new data will allow us to precisely determine the onset, timing and nature of abrupt changes and evaluate them in the global context.

  20. Modeling past abrupt climate changes: driven oscillators and synchronization phenomena in Paleoclimate theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchionne, Arianna

    2014-05-01

    According to Milankovitch theory of ice ages, summer insolation at high northern latitudes drives the glacial cycles, i.e. the growth and reduction of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, and there is evidence that astronomical forcing controls indeed the timing of Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles. However, the δ18Otime series (the δ18O is a proxy for global ice volume) available for the last few million years reveal a non-linear response of the climate to the external forcing: transitions from the glacial to the interglacial states occur more rapidly than the transitions from the interglacials to the glacials, resulting in the so-called saw-tooth shape of the signal. These terminations were very abrupt compared to the smooth changes in insolation. Moreover, insolation alone cannot explain the Mid-Pleistocene transition. During this event, occurred about one million years ago, the dominant 41 kyr glacial cycles, were replaced by longer saw-tooth shaped cycles with a time scale around 100 kyr. The asymmetry in the oscillations indicates a non-linear response to the orbital forcing, expressed through a bifurcation, or tipping point. As an introduction to the problem, we studied simple driven oscillators that can exhibit asymmetric oscillations between the glacial and interglacial states under the effect of the astronomical forcing, such as the Van der Pool and the Duffing oscillators. In order to understand how these simple low-dimensional models enter theories of ice ages and rapid events, we studied synchronization phenomena between simple driven oscillators and astronomical forcing, focusing on distinguishing between the so-called resonance scenario and the so-called phase locking scenario. We next examined the possible mechanisms for the Mid-Pleistocene transition. Here we show that the transition could be explained as a result of frequency-locking to the external forcing. This change can be interpreted as a result of an internal change in climate response

  1. Internal ice - Sheet variability as source for the multi-century and millennial-scale iceberg events during the Holocene? A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bügelmayer-Blaschek, Marianne; Roche, Didier M.; Renssen, Hans; Andrews, John T.

    2016-04-01

    The climate of the Holocene, the current interglacial covering the past 11,700 years, has been relatively stable compared to previous periods. Nevertheless, repeating occurrence of rapid natural climate changes that challenged human society are seen in proxy reconstructions. Ocean sediment cores for example display prominent peaks of enhanced ice rafted debris (IRD) during the Holocene with a multi-decadal to millennial scale periodicity. Different mechanisms were proposed that caused these enhanced IRD events, for example variations in the incoming total solar irradiance (TSI), volcanic eruptions and the combination of internal climate variability and external forcings. We investigate the probable mechanisms causing the occurrence of IRD-events over the past 6000 years using a fully coupled climate - ice-sheet - iceberg model (iLOVECLIM). We performed 19 experiments that differ in the applied forcings (TSI, volcanic) and the initial atmospheric conditions. To explore internal ice sheet variability one further experiment was done with fixed climate conditions. All the model runs displayed prominent peaks of enhanced iceberg melt flux (IMF), independent of the chosen experimental set-up. The spectral analysis of the experiments with the ice-sheet - climate model coupled displays significant peaks at 2000, 1000 years in all the experiments and at 500 years in most runs. The experiment with fixed climate conditions displays one significant peak of about 1500 years related to internal ice sheet variability. This frequency is modulated to 2000 and 1000 years in all the experiments with a coupled climate - ice sheet due to interactions between the climate components. We further investigate the impact of minimum TSI events on the timing and occurrence of enhanced IMF. In the experimental set-up that was forced with idealized sinusoidal TSI variations (±4 Wm-2), we find a significant occurrence of an increased iceberg melt flux about 60 years after the minimum TSI value

  2. "What Controls the Structure and Stability of the Ocean Meridional Overturning Circulation: Implications for Abrupt Climate Change?"

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Alexey

    2013-11-23

    The central goal of this research project is to understand the properties of the ocean meridional overturning circulation (MOC) – a topic critical for understanding climate variability and stability on a variety of timescales (from decadal to centennial and longer). Specifically, we have explored various factors that control the MOC stability and decadal variability in the Atlantic and the ocean thermal structure in general, including the possibility abrupt climate change. We have also continued efforts on improving the performance of coupled ocean-atmosphere GCMs.

  3. Millennial-scale oscillations between sea ice and convective deep water formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Raj

    2015-11-01

    During the last ice age there were several quasiperiodic abrupt warming events. The climatic effects of the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest and most abrupt temperature anomalies. Similar but weaker oscillations also took place during the interglacial period. This paper proposes an auto-oscillatory mechanism between sea ice and convective deep water formation in the North Atlantic as the source of the persistent cycles. A simple dynamical model is constructed by coupling and slightly modifying two existing models of ocean circulation and sea ice. The model exhibits mixed mode oscillations, consisting of decadal-scale small-amplitude oscillations and a large-amplitude relaxation fluctuation. The decadal oscillations occur due to the insulating effect of sea ice and leads to periodic ventilation of heat from the polar ocean. Gradually, an instability builds up in the polar column and results in an abrupt initiation of convection and polar warming. The unstable convective state relaxes back to the small-amplitude oscillations from where the process repeats in a self-sustained manner. Freshwater pulses mimicking Heinrich events cause the oscillations to be grouped into packets of progressively weaker fluctuations, as observed in proxy records. Modulation of this stable oscillation mechanism by freshwater and insolation variations could account for the distribution and pacing of D-O and Bond events. Physical aspects of the system such as sea ice extent and oceanic advective flow rates could determine the characteristic 1500 year time scale of D-O events. The model results with respect to the structure of the water column in the Nordic seas during stadial and interstadial phases are in agreement with paleoproxy observations.

  4. Millennial-scale versus long-term dynamics in the surface and subsurface of the western North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre during Marine Isotope Stage 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, André; Nürnberg, Dirk; Karas, Cyrus; Grützner, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Subtropical Gyres are an important constituent of the ocean-atmosphere system due to their capacity to store vast amounts of warm and saline waters. Here we decipher the sensitivity of the (sub)surface North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre with respect to orbital and millennial scale climate variability between ~ 140 and 70 ka, Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5. Using (isotope) geochemical proxy data from surface and thermocline dwelling foraminifers from Blake Ridge off the west coast of North America (ODP Site 1058) we show that the oceanographic development at subsurface (thermocline) level is substantially different from the surface ocean. Most notably, surface temperatures and salinities peak during the penultimate deglaciation (Termination II) and early MIS 5e, implying that subtropical surface ocean heat and salt accumulation might have resulted from a sluggish northward heat transport. In contrast, maximum thermocline temperatures are reached during late MIS 5e when surface temperatures are already declining. We argue that the subsurface warming originated from intensified Ekman downwelling in the Subtropical Gyre due to enhanced wind stress. During MIS 5a-d a tight interplay of the subtropical upper ocean hydrography to high latitude millennial-scale cold events can be observed. At Blake Ridge, the most pronounced of these high latitude cold events are related to surface warming and salt accumulation in the (sub)surface. Similar to Termination II, heat accumulated in the Subtropical Gyre probably due to a reduced Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Additionally, a southward shift and intensification of the subtropical wind belts lead to a decrease of on-site precipitation and enhanced evaporation, coupled to intensified gyre circulation. Subsequently, the northward advection of this warm and saline water likely contributed to the fast resumption of the overturning circulation at the end of these high latitude cold events.

  5. Simulating the vegetation response to abrupt climate changes under glacial conditions with the ORCHIDEE/IPSL models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woillez, M.-N.; Kageyama, M.; Combourieu-Nebout, N.; Krinner, G.

    2012-09-01

    The last glacial period has been punctuated by two types of abrupt climatic events, the Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) and Heinrich (HE) events. These events, recorded in Greenland ice and in marine sediments, involved changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and led to major changes in the terrestrial biosphere. Here we use the dynamical global vegetation model ORCHIDEE to simulate the response of vegetation to abrupt changes in the AMOC strength. To do so, we force ORCHIDEE off-line with outputs from the IPSL_CM4 general circulation model, in which we have forced the AMOC to change by adding freshwater fluxes in the North Atlantic. We investigate the impact of a collapse and recovery of the AMOC, at different rates, and focus on Western Europe, where many pollen records are available to compare with. The impact of an AMOC collapse on the European mean temperatures and precipitations simulated by the GCM is relatively small but sufficient to drive an important regression of forests and expansion of grasses in ORCHIDEE, in qualitative agreement with pollen data for an HE event. On the contrary, a run with a rapid shift of the AMOC to an hyperactive state of 30 Sv, mimicking the warming phase of a DO event, does not exhibit a strong impact on the European vegetation compared to the glacial control state. For our model, simulating the impact of an HE event thus appears easier than simulating the abrupt transition towards the interstadial phase of a DO. For both a collapse or a recovery of the AMOC the vegetation starts to respond to climatic changes immediately but reaches equilibrium about 200 yr after the climate equilibrates, suggesting a possible bias in the climatic reconstructions based on pollen records, which assume equilibrium between climate and vegetation. However, our study does not take into account vegetation feedbacks on the atmosphere.

  6. Transient Adjustment of the global climate to an abrupt Northern North Atlantic cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, G.; Chang, P.; Panetta, R.; Saravanan, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Thermohaline Circulation (THC) is thought to play a key role in abrupt changes in Earth climate. In cold periods such as the Younger Dryas, the THC was much weaker than today. In an experiment with a fully coupled CCSM3 model an artificial freshwater flux is added to the Northern North Atlantic Ocean surface, which weakens the THC. The North Atlantic Ocean surface cools almost instantly after the freshwater flux onset. This cooling is subsequently spread throughout the Northern Hemisphere, resulting in the ITCZ moving southward. In the weakening THC, heat carried by the THC from Southern Hemisphere to the Northern Hemisphere is reduced, resulting in a cooler Northern Hemisphere. It is still questioned what role the atmosphere plays in this process. There are two possible ways the atmosphere may change the ocean surface temperature. One is that the wind changes the ocean surface wind-driven circulation, leading to a change to the ocean heat budget. Another is that the atmosphere changes the ocean-atmosphere heat flux directly. Here we look into the second possibility by comparing the effects of freshwater flux in a fully coupled model to the effects of the same flux in a model constructed by coupling an atmospheric general circulation model (CAM3) to a thermodynamic slab ocean model. With use of appropriate Q-fluxes, the coupled model with the slab ocean has the same climatology as the fully coupled CCSM3 model. Perturbation Q-fluxes are constructed for the fresh water flux experiments using a restoring technique. We find that the atmosphere interacting with a thermodynamic slab ocean can spread the cooling from the Northern North Atlantic and cause the ITCZ to move southward, and that there is a cooling front propagating southward with a speed depending on the mixed layer depth: a deeper mixed layer depth results in a slower propagation. By applying the Q-flux perturbation only in the Northern North Atlantic Ocean, the effect of the ocean circulation change on

  7. A Generalized Stability Analysis of the AMOC in Earth System Models: Implication for Decadal Variability and Abrupt Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Alexey V.; Fedorov, Alexey

    2015-01-14

    The central goal of this research project was to understand the mechanisms of decadal and multi-decadal variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) as related to climate variability and abrupt climate change within a hierarchy of climate models ranging from realistic ocean models to comprehensive Earth system models. Generalized Stability Analysis, a method that quantifies the transient and asymptotic growth of perturbations in the system, is one of the main approaches used throughout this project. The topics we have explored range from physical mechanisms that control AMOC variability to the factors that determine AMOC predictability in the Earth system models, to the stability and variability of the AMOC in past climates.

  8. Synchronous interhemispheric Holocene climate trends in the tropical Andes

    PubMed Central

    Polissar, Pratigya J.; Abbott, Mark B.; Wolfe, Alexander P.; Vuille, Mathias; Bezada, Maximiliano

    2013-01-01

    Holocene variations of tropical moisture balance have been ascribed to orbitally forced changes in solar insolation. If this model is correct, millennial-scale climate evolution should be antiphased between the northern and southern hemispheres, producing humid intervals in one hemisphere matched to aridity in the other. Here we show that Holocene climate trends were largely synchronous and in the same direction in the northern and southern hemisphere outer-tropical Andes, providing little support for the dominant role of insolation forcing in these regions. Today, sea-surface temperatures in the equatorial Pacific Ocean modulate rainfall variability in the outer tropical Andes of both hemispheres, and we suggest that this mechanism was pervasive throughout the Holocene. Our findings imply that oceanic forcing plays a larger role in regional South American climate than previously suspected, and that Pacific sea-surface temperatures have the capacity to induce abrupt and sustained shifts in Andean climate. PMID:23959896

  9. Synchronous interhemispheric Holocene climate trends in the tropical Andes.

    PubMed

    Polissar, Pratigya J; Abbott, Mark B; Wolfe, Alexander P; Vuille, Mathias; Bezada, Maximiliano

    2013-09-01

    Holocene variations of tropical moisture balance have been ascribed to orbitally forced changes in solar insolation. If this model is correct, millennial-scale climate evolution should be antiphased between the northern and southern hemispheres, producing humid intervals in one hemisphere matched to aridity in the other. Here we show that Holocene climate trends were largely synchronous and in the same direction in the northern and southern hemisphere outer-tropical Andes, providing little support for the dominant role of insolation forcing in these regions. Today, sea-surface temperatures in the equatorial Pacific Ocean modulate rainfall variability in the outer tropical Andes of both hemispheres, and we suggest that this mechanism was pervasive throughout the Holocene. Our findings imply that oceanic forcing plays a larger role in regional South American climate than previously suspected, and that Pacific sea-surface temperatures have the capacity to induce abrupt and sustained shifts in Andean climate. PMID:23959896

  10. Millennial-scale projection of oceanic oxygen change due to global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Akitomo; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Shigemitsu, Masahito; Oka, Akira; Takahashi, Kunio; Ohgaito, Rumi; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Global warming is expected to globally decrease ocean oxygen concentrations by sea surface warming and ocean circulation change. Oxygen reduction is expected to persist for a thousand years or more, even after atmospheric carbon dioxide stops rising. However, long-term changes in ocean oxygen and circulation are still unclear. Here we simulate multimillennium changes in ocean circulation and oxygen under doubling and quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide, using GCM (MIROC) and an offline biogeochemical model. In the first 500 years, global oxygen concentration decreases, consistent with previous studies. Thereafter, however, the oxygen concentration in the deep ocean globally recovers and overshoots at the end of the simulations, despite surface oxygen decrease and weaker AMOC. This is because, after the initial cessation, the recovery and overshooting of deep ocean convection in the Weddell Sea enhance ventilation and supply oxygen-rich surface waters to deep ocean. Another contributor to deep ocean oxygenation is seawater warming, which reduces the export production and shifts the organic matter remineralization to the upper water column. Our results indicate that the change in ocean circulation in the Southern Ocean potentially drives millennial-scale oxygenation in deep ocean, which is opposite to the centennial-scale global oxygen reduction and general expectation.

  11. Holocene Millennial-scale Surface and Bottom Water Variability, Feni Drift, NE Atlantic Ocean: Foraminiferal Assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassen, S. J.; Richter, T. O.; de Stigter, H. C.; van Weering, T. C. E.; de Haas, H.

    A high-resolution sediment core from Feni Drift (ENAM9606, 56N 14W, 2543 m wa- ter depth) was investigated for planktonic and benthic foraminiferal assemblages dur- ing the last 12,000 years. During the Preboreal, peak abundances of T.quinqueloba indicate the passage of the Arctic front over the core site. Holocene planktonic foraminiferal assemblages indicate a gradual warming trend of surface water masses punctuated by a major cooling (8,200ky event s.l.), and possibly a slight cooling dur- ing the last 3,000 years. The interval from 10 to 5kyrs shows higher and fluctuating abundances of T.quinqueloba and G.bulloides, which suggest proximity of the subarc- tic front and enhanced spring blooms compared to the upper Holocene. Abundance peaks of N.pachyderma(s) and/or T.quinqueloba indicate a series of millennial-scale cooling events during the entire Holocene, which can be correlated to similar episodes previously described from other locations in the North Atlantic and Norwegian- Greenland Sea. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages indicate a gradual transition from seasonal, spring-bloom related food supply in the Lower Holocene (dominance of the phytodetritus species E.exigua) to possibly lower, but more sustained food supply in the Upper Holocene (dominance of C.obtusa and C.laevigata).

  12. Millennial-scale ocean acidification and late Quaternary decline of cryptic bacterial crusts in tropical reefs.

    PubMed

    Riding, R; Liang, L; Braga, J C

    2014-09-01

    Ocean acidification by atmospheric carbon dioxide has increased almost continuously since the last glacial maximum (LGM), 21,000 years ago. It is expected to impair tropical reef development, but effects on reefs at the present day and in the recent past have proved difficult to evaluate. We present evidence that acidification has already significantly reduced the formation of calcified bacterial crusts in tropical reefs. Unlike major reef builders such as coralline algae and corals that more closely control their calcification, bacterial calcification is very sensitive to ambient changes in carbonate chemistry. Bacterial crusts in reef cavities have declined in thickness over the past 14,000 years with largest reduction occurring 12,000-10,000 years ago. We interpret this as an early effect of deglacial ocean acidification on reef calcification and infer that similar crusts were likely to have been thicker when seawater carbonate saturation was increased during earlier glacial intervals, and thinner during interglacials. These changes in crust thickness could have substantially affected reef development over glacial cycles, as rigid crusts significantly strengthen framework and their reduction would have increased the susceptibility of reefs to biological and physical erosion. Bacterial crust decline reveals previously unrecognized millennial-scale acidification effects on tropical reefs. This directs attention to the role of crusts in reef formation and the ability of bioinduced calcification to reflect changes in seawater chemistry. It also provides a long-term context for assessing anticipated anthropogenic effects. PMID:25040070

  13. Relative timing of deglacial climate events in Antarctica and Greenland.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Vin; Delmotte, Marc; van Ommen, Tas; Jouzel, Jean; Chappellaz, Jérôme; Woon, Suenor; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Raynaud, Dominique

    2002-09-13

    The last deglaciation was marked by large, hemispheric, millennial-scale climate variations: the Bølling-Allerød and Younger Dryas periods in the north, and the Antarctic Cold Reversal in the south. A chronology from the high-accumulation Law Dome East Antarctic ice core constrains the relative timing of these two events and provides strong evidence that the cooling at the start of the Antarctic Cold Reversal did not follow the abrupt warming during the northern Bølling transition around 14,500 years ago. This result suggests that southern changes are not a direct response to abrupt changes in North Atlantic thermohaline circulation, as is assumed in the conventional picture of a hemispheric temperature seesaw. PMID:12228715

  14. A Collaborative Proposal: Simulating and Understanding Abrupt Climate-Ecosystem Changes During Holocene with NCAR-CCSM3.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhengyu Liu, Bette Otto-Bliesner

    2013-02-01

    We have made significant progress in our proposed work in the last 4 years (3 years plus 1 year of no cost extension). In anticipation of the next phase of study, we have spent time on the abrupt changes since the last glacial maximum. First, we have performed further model-data comparison based on our baseline TRACE-21 simulation and made important progress towards the understanding of several major climate transitions. Second, we have made a significant effort in processing the model output of TRACE-21 and have put this output on a website for access by the community. Third, we have completed many additional sensitivity experiments. In addition, we have organized synthesis workshops to facilitate and promote transient model-data comparison for the international community. Finally, we have identified new areas of interest for Holocene climate changes.

  15. Abrupt climate variability in the North Atlantic region: Did the icebergs do it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, S.; Chen, J.; Gong, X.; Jonkers, L.; Knorr, G.; Thornalley, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    We present high resolution records of temperature and ice rafted debris over the last ~440Kyr from a sediment core retrieved from the NE Atlantic. Our records reveal that episodes of ice rafting typically occurred after abrupt cooling at the site. Because the site is sensitive to the earliest phases of ice rafting as recorded by other sites across the wider Atlantic, this suggests that icebergs were not the trigger for North Atlantic cold events. Moreover we find a different relationship between cooling and the arrival of rafted ice at a site ~750km to the SE of ours. We suggest that asynchronous cooling between these locations can be explained by the more gradual southward migration of the North Atlantic polar front. We describe a mechanism that can explain the occurrence of abrupt stadial events over Greenland as a non-linear response as regional cooling continues beyond the threshold necessary for sustaining ocean circulation in its 'warm' mode with active convection north of Iceland. Thus while the freshwater derived from melting icebergs may provide a positive feedback for enhancing and prolonging stadial conditions, it is probably not the trigger for northern stadial events.

  16. A high-resolution record of Holocene millennial-scale oscillations of surface water, foraminiferal paleoecology and sediment redox chemistry in the SE Brazilian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, B. B.; Barbosa, C. F.; Albuquerque, A. L.; Piotrowski, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Holocene millennial-scale oscillations and Bond Events (Bond et al. 1997) are well reported in the North Atlantic as consequence of fresh water input and weaking of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). It has been hypothesized that the effect of weaking of AMOC would lead to warming in the South Atlantic due to "heat piracy", causing surface waters to warm and a reorganization of surface circulation. There are few reconstructions of AMOC strength in the South Atlantic, and none with a high resolution Holocene record of changes of productivity and the biological pump. We reconstruct past changes in the surface water mass hydrography, productivity, and sediment redox changes in high-resolution in the core KCF10-01B, located 128 mbsl water depth off Cabo Frio, Brazil, a location where upwelling is strongly linked to surface ocean hydrography. We use Benthic Foraminiferal Accumulation Rate (BFAR) to reconstruct productivity, which reveals a 1.3kyr cyclicity during the mid- and late-Holocene. The geochemistry of trace and rare earth elements on foraminiferal Fe-Mn oxide coatings show changes in redox-sensitive elements indicating that during periods of high productivity there were more reducing conditions in sediment porewaters, producing a Ce anomaly and reduction and re-precipitation of Mn oxides. Bond events 1-7 were identified by a productivity increase along with reducing sediment conditions which was likely caused by Brazil Current displacement offshore allowing upwelling of the nutritive bottom water South Atlantic Central Waters (SACW) to the euphotic zone and a stronger local biological pump. In a global context, correlation with other records show that this occurred during weakened AMOC and southward displacement of the ITCZ. We conclude that Bond climatic events and millennial-scale variability of AMOC caused sea surface hydrographic changes off the Brazilian Margin leading to biological and geochemical changes recorded in coastal records

  17. Abrupt Climate Change in the Arctic (and Beyond): An Update (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alley, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of future Arctic change is informed by the history of past changes, which often have been both large and abrupt. The well-known ice-age events such as the Younger Dryas show how sea-ice changes can amplify forcing to produce very large responses, with wintertime sea ice especially important. These changes are increasingly seen to have played a central role in the ice-age cycling through their global impact on CO2 storage in the deep ocean. The Heinrich events reveal processes of ice-sheet/ocean interaction, some of which are being played out in Greenland and Antarctica now, and which may have large future effects on sea-level rise. The paleoclimatic record plus physical understanding greatly reduce the worst worries about instabilities from methane stored in cold places, but tend to support a role in amplifying future warming. Overall, the very large impacts of past Arctic changes, and the likelihood that future changes under business-as-usual fossil-fuel emissions will be unprecedented in combined size and speed, raise important questions.

  18. Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Schlosser, Courtney Adam; Walter-Anthony, Katey; Zhuang, Qianlai; Melillo, Jerry

    2013-04-26

    Our overall goal was to quantify the potential for threshold changes in natural emission rates of trace gases, particularly methane and carbon dioxide, from pan-arctic terrestrial systems under the spectrum of anthropogenically forced climate warming, and the extent to which these emissions provide a strong feedback mechanism to global climate warming. This goal is motivated under the premise that polar amplification of global climate warming will induce widespread thaw and degradation of the permafrost, and would thus cause substantial changes in the extent of wetlands and lakes, especially thermokarst (thaw) lakes, over the Arctic. Through a coordinated effort of field measurements, model development, and numerical experimentation with an integrated assessment model framework, we have investigated the following hypothesis: There exists a climate-warming threshold beyond which permafrost degradation becomes widespread and thus instigates strong and/or sharp increases in methane emissions (via thermokarst lakes and wetland expansion). These would outweigh any increased uptake of carbon (e.g. from peatlands) and would result in a strong, positive feedback to global climate warming.

  19. Revisiting Lake Hämelsee: reconstructing abrupt Lateglacial climate transitions using state- of-the-art palaeoclimatological proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, Stefan; Hoek, Wim; Lane, Christine; Sachse, Dirk; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike

    2015-04-01

    Lake Hämelsee (Germany) is one of the northernmost sites in NW Europe that has varved sediments throughout large parts of its Lateglacial and Early Holocene sediment sequence. Previous research on this site has shown its potential, in terms of chronological resolution and palaeoecological reconstructions, for reconstructing the abrupt transitions into and out of the Younger Dryas, the last cold period of the last glacial. The site was revisited during a 1-week summer school for Early Stage Researchers (2013), within the INTIMATE Example training and research project, supported by EU Cost Action ES0907. Two overlapping sediment sequences were retrieved from the centre of the lake during the summer school. These sediments have since formed the basis for follow-up research projects, which have sparked the collaboration of around 30 researchers in 12 laboratories across Europe. A chronological framework for the core has been composed from a combination of varve counting, radiocarbon dating and tephrochronology. Tephrostratigraphic correlations allow direct correlation and precise comparison of the record to marine and ice core records from the North Atlantic region, and other terrestrial European archives. Furthermore, the core is has been subjected to multiple sedimentological (e.g. XRF, loss-on-ignition), geochemical (e.g. lipid biomarkers, GDGTs) and palaeoecological (e.g. pollen, chironomids) proxy-based reconstructions of past environmental and climatic conditions. The results provide important insights into the nature of the abrupt climate transitions of the Lateglacial and Early Holocene, both locally and on a continental scale. The INTIMATE Example participants: Illaria Baneschi, Achim Brauer, Christopher Bronk Ramsey, Renee de Bruijn, Siwan Davies, Aritina Haliuc, Katalin Hubay, Gwydion Jones, Meike Müller, Johanna Menges, Josef Merkt, Tom Peters, Francien Peterse, Anneke ter Schure, Kathrin Schuetrumpf, Richard Staff, Falko Turner, Valerie van den Bos.

  20. Millennial scale oscillations in bulk δ15N and δ13C over the Mid- to Late Holocene seen in proteinaceous corals from the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glynn, D. S.; Mccarthy, M. D.; McMahon, K.; Guilderson, T. P.

    2014-12-01

    The North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG) is the largest continuous ecosystem on this planet and is an important regulator of biogeochemical cycling and carbon sequestration. With evidence of its expansion in a warming climate, it is necessary to develop a more complete understanding of the variability in productivity and nutrient dynamics in this important ecosystem through time. We constructed a long-term, high resolution record of bulk record of stable nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon isotopes (δ13C) from multiple proteinaceous deep sea corals around Hawaii extending back ~5300 years with few gaps. Our data confirms the decreasing trend in δ15N since the Little Ice Age (1850s), which matches previously published results in part attributed to anthropogenic climate change (e.g. Sherwood et al. 2014). However, while the rate of change since the Little Ice Age (δ15N declines ~1‰ over ~150yrs) remains by far the most rapid throughout the longer record, there also appear to be longer-term (near-millennial scale) climatic oscillations of even greater magnitude (δ15N shifts ~1.5-2‰ over ~1000yrs). After removal of the Seuss Effect, δ13C values also declined ~1.5‰ since the Little Ice Age. Furthermore, there also appear to be oscillations in δ13C of ~1-2‰ over millennial timescales. These results reveal the existence of previously unrecognized long-term oscillations in NPSG biogeochemical cycles, which are likely linked to changes in phytoplankton species composition, food web dynamics, and/or variability in source nutrients and productivity possibly caused by changes in climate. This study provides insight into nutrient dynamics in the NPSG over the past five millennia, and offers a historical baseline to better analyze the effects of current anthropogenic climate forcing.

  1. Iceberg discharges and oceanic circulation changes during glacial abrupt climate changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Solas, Jorge; Robinson, Alexander; Banderas, Rubén; Montoya, Marisa

    2015-04-01

    Proxy data reveal the existence of episodes of increased deposition of ice-rafted debris in the North Atlantic Ocean during the last glacial period. These are interpreted as massive iceberg discharges mainly from the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Although these have long been attributed to self-sustained ice sheet oscillations, growing evidence points to an active role of the oceanic circulation. Here we will present simulations of the last glacial period carried out with a hybrid ice sheet-ice shelf model. Two mechanisms producing iceberg discharges are compared. First, we reproduce the classic binge-purge by which the iceberg surges are produced thanks to the existence of an internal thermo-mechanical feedback that allows the ice sheet to behave under an oscillatory regime. Second, our ice-sheet model is forced by an oceanic warming index derived from proxy data that accounts for the impact of past ocean circulation changes on ocean temperatures. In this case, the model generates a time series of iceberg calving that agrees with ice-rafted debris records over the past 80 ka. We compare the two theories and discuss their advantages and weaknesses in terms of both the robustness of the physics on which they are based and their comparison with proxies. This comparison highlights the importance of considering past oceanic circulation changes in order to understand the ice-sheet dynamics. However, the ultimate processes determining abrupt changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) remain elusive. Therefore we will also analyze several proposed mechanisms that aims to explain such AMOC reorganizations, focusing on those that do not require freshwater flux forcing.

  2. Orbital- and Millennial-Scale Changes in the Australasian Monsoon over the Last 470,000 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagan, M. K.; Ayliffe, L.; Drysdale, R.; Zhao, J.; Griffiths, M. L.; Hellstrom, J.; Dunbar, G.; Hantoro, W.; Edwards, R.; Cheng, H.; Suwargadi, B.

    2011-12-01

    Speleothem 18O/16O records from China have revealed changes in East Asian monsoon rainfall over the last ~390,000 years (e.g. Wang et al. 2008, Cheng et al. 2010), yet little is known about orbital- and millennial-scale climate change in the 'southern half' of the Australasian monsoon domain. To fill this gap, we aim to build speleothem 18O/16O records for the seasonal monsoon rainfall belt of south-central Indonesia. Between 2006 and 2009, we sampled speleothems in Flores and southwest Sulawesi (latitudes 5-9 S) with U-series ages extending to ~90,000 yBP and ~470,000 yBP, respectively. Development of the 18O/16O records for Sulawesi is in progress, but the basal ages of the speleothems (onset of stalagmite growth) are intriguing because they cluster around glacial terminations, when the East Asian monsoon is known to have been weak (Cheng et al. 2010). There is clear antiphasing of the Flores and China speleothem 18O/16O records on precession time-scales over the last ~90,000 years. A distinct maximum in monsoon rainfall in Flores occurred ~21,000 yBP, suggesting the ITCZ moved south during the Last Glacial Maximum in response to the southern hemisphere summer insolation maximum. This important finding indicates that ITCZ positioning in tropical Australasia, through its influence on large-scale oceanic-atmospheric circulation, could have played a key role in the rapid rise of atmospheric CO2 and global warming that ultimately led to the demise of the ice age, as summarised by Denton et al. (2010) and others. The new Flores speleothem 18O/16O records also show that climate change in the North Atlantic region and Australasian monsoon rainfall are inextricably linked on millennial timescales (Griffiths et al. 2009, Lewis et al. 2011). For example, rapid warming in the North Atlantic region during Dansgaard-Oeschger Event 21 (~86,000 yBP) was linked to a synchronous northward shift of the Australasian ITCZ, marking the final demise of MIS 5b. In contrast, cooling in

  3. Combined effect of soil erosion and climate change induces abrupt changes in soil and vegetation properties in semiarid Mediterranean shrublands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochet, Esther; García-Fayos, Patricio

    2013-04-01

    Semiarid Mediterranean ecosystems are experiencing major alterations as a result of the complex interactions between climatic fluctuations and disturbances caused by human activities. Future scenarios of global change forecast a rapid degradation of these ecosystems, with a reduction of their functionality, as a result of changes in relevant vegetation and soil properties. Some theoretical models indicate that these ecosystems respond non-linearly to regular variations in the external conditions, with an abrupt shift when conditions approach a certain critical level or threshold. Considering these predictions, there is an urgent need to know the effects that these alterations might have on semi-arid ecosystems and their components. In this study, we aim at analyzing the consequences of climate change and increasing soil erosion on soil and vegetation properties and the functional dynamics of semiarid Mediterranean shrublands. We predict that the combined effect of both drivers will be additive or synergistic, increasing the negative effects of each one. We compared vegetation and soil properties of flat areas (low erosion) and steep hillslopes (high erosion) in two climatic areas (484 mm and 10.3°C, and 368mm and 11.9°C, respectively) that reproduce the predicted climate change in temperature and precipitation for the next 40 years. Species richness, vegetal cover, plant life-form composition were determined in 20 m2 plots and soil was sampled in the same plots to determine bulk density, aggregate stability, fertility and water holding capacity. All soil and vegetation properties were negatively affected by soil erosion and climate change. However, contrary to our hypothesis, the joined effect of both drivers on all soil and vegetation properties was antagonistic, except for the vegetal cover that showed an additive response to their interaction. Our results evidence that soil erosion affects more negatively the soil and vegetation properties in the cooler and

  4. Synchronous climate changes in Antarctica and the North Atlantic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steig, E.J.; Brook, E.J.; White, J.W.C.; Sucher, C.M.; Bender, M.L.; Lehman, S.J.; Morse, D.L.; Waddington, E.D.; Clow, G.D.

    1998-01-01

    Central Greenland ice cores provide evidence of abrupt changes in climate over the past 100,000 years. Many of these changes have also been identified in sedimentary and geochemical signatures in deep-sea sediment cores from the North Atlantic, confirming the link between millennial-scale climate variability and ocean thermohaline circulation. It is shown here that two of the most prominent North Atlantic events - the rapid warming that makes the end of the last glacial period and the Bolling/Allerod-Younger Dryas oscillation - are also recorded in an ice core from Taylor Dome, in the western Ross Sea sector of Antarctica. This result contrasts with evidence from ice cores in other regions of Antarctica, which show an asynchronous response between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

  5. Synchronous climate changes in antarctica and the north atlantic

    PubMed

    Steig; Brook; White; Sucher; Bender; Lehman; Morse; Waddington; Clow

    1998-10-01

    Central Greenland ice cores provide evidence of abrupt changes in climate over the past 100,000 years. Many of these changes have also been identified in sedimentary and geochemical signatures in deep-sea sediment cores from the North Atlantic, confirming the link between millennial-scale climate variability and ocean thermohaline circulation. It is shown here that two of the most prominent North Atlantic events-the rapid warming that marks the end of the last glacial period and the Bolling/Allerod-Younger Dryas oscillation-are also recorded in an ice core from Taylor Dome, in the western Ross Sea sector of Antarctica. This result contrasts with evidence from ice cores in other regions of Antarctica, which show an asynchronous response between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. PMID:9756484

  6. Evidence of Abrupt Climatic Variability Across Heinrich Events from Multiple Bahamian Stalagmites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arienzo, M. M.; Swart, P. K.; Pourmand, A.; Broad, K.; Clement, A. C.; Murphy, L.; Kakuk, B.

    2013-12-01

    Various types of paleoclimate data support the global nature and scale of Heinrich events. While a comprehensive picture of climate across Heinrich events is emerging for the North Atlantic, very few studies have been conducted in the subtropical western Atlantic, which may be an important area for investigating the global propagation of these events. In this study, we have attempted to further understand sub-tropical climate using geochemical records from multiple speleothems from a flooded cave in the Bahamas. These Bahamian stalagmites demonstrate increased aridity and temperature decrease associated with Heinrich events. Speleothems collected at depths ranging from 10-40 meters below modern sea level were dated using U-Th geochronometry with MC-ICP-MS at the Neptune Isotope Laboratory of University of Miami. Stable carbon and oxygen isotopes were measured at a resolution of 1 mm. In the subtropics, it has been demonstrated that higher volume rainfall events generally lead to a depleted δ18O signal, whereas heavier δ18O values are attributed to lower amounts of rainfall. Interpreting the δ18O of a carbonate is inherently difficult because the δ18O of a carbonate is dependent on both the variations in temperature and the δ18O of the cave water. In order to solve for the second unknown, an additional proxy is needed to provide information on one of the two unknowns. Fluid inclusion isotopic analysis provides information on the isotopic ratio of the formation water that can therefore be used to calculate paleo-temperature. Preliminary U-Th age results from multiple speleothems from Dan's Cave, Abaco Island, Bahamas demonstrate the stalagmite samples were forming from ~13 to 65 ka. The carbonate δ18O and δ13C results reveal significant isotopic excursions associated with Heinrich events. More positive carbon and oxygen isotopic values are observed leading into the Heinrich events, followed by more negative values at the terminations. In contrast to increased

  7. Development of Middle Stone Age innovation linked to rapid climate change

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Martin; Simon, Margit H.; Hall, Ian R.; Barker, Stephen; Stringer, Chris; Zahn, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    The development of modernity in early human populations has been linked to pulsed phases of technological and behavioural innovation within the Middle Stone Age of South Africa. However, the trigger for these intermittent pulses of technological innovation is an enigma. Here we show that, contrary to some previous studies, the occurrence of innovation was tightly linked to abrupt climate change. Major innovational pulses occurred at times when South African climate changed rapidly towards more humid conditions, while northern sub-Saharan Africa experienced widespread droughts, as the Northern Hemisphere entered phases of extreme cooling. These millennial-scale teleconnections resulted from the bipolar seesaw behaviour of the Atlantic Ocean related to changes in the ocean circulation. These conditions led to humid pulses in South Africa and potentially to the creation of favourable environmental conditions. This strongly implies that innovational pulses of early modern human behaviour were climatically influenced and linked to the adoption of refugia. PMID:23695699

  8. Eolian sediment responses to late Quaternary climate changes: Temporal and spatial patterns in the Sahara

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swezey, C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a compilation of eolian-based records of late Quaternary climate changes in the Sahara. Although the data are relatively sparse, when viewed as a whole, they reveal a general pattern of widespread eolian sediment mobilization prior to 11,000 cal. years BP, eolian sediment stabilization from 11,000 to 5000 cal. years BP, and a return to widespread eolian sediment mobilization after 5000 cal. years BP. Furthermore, an eolian-based record from southern Tunisia reveals the existence of millennial-scale changes in eolian sediment behavior. These millennial-scale variations provide examples of eolian sediment responses to climate changes at a scale intermediate between seasonal and orbital ('Milankovitch') changes, and they are also coincident with abrupt atmospheric and oceanic changes. The general synchroneity of the eolian stratigraphic records and their coincidence with various oceanic and atmospheric changes suggest that global forcing mechanisms have influenced late Quaternary eolian sediment behavior in the Sahara. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  9. Modeling dust emission variations in Eastern Europe related to North-Atlantic abrupt climate changes of the last glacial period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sima, A.; Kageyama, M.; Rousseau, D.; Ramstein, G.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Antoine, P.; Dulac, F.; Hatte, C.; Lagroix, F.; Gerasimenko, N.

    2010-12-01

    The European loess sequences of the last glacial period (~ 100-15 kyr BP) show periods of strong dust accumulation alternating with episodes of reduced (or no) sedimentation, allowing soil development. For the main loess sedimentation period (~ 40 - 15 kyr BP), data indicate a correlation between these variations and the North Atlantic rapid climate changes: the Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) and Heinrich (H) events. We use numerical modeling to investigate the relationship between the North-Atlantic abrupt changes and the sedimentation variations in Europe. A first study (Sima et al, QSR, 2009) focused on western Europe, and addressed the impact on dust emission of North-Atlantic SST changes as those associated to DO and H events. It proposed that vegetation played a key role in modulating dust emission variations in western European source areas. Here we focus on eastern Europe, especially on the areas north and north-east of the Carpathian Mountains, where loess deposits have recorded DO and H events (Rousseau et al. Clim. Past D, 2010). As in the previous study, we use the LMDZ AGCM and the SECHIBA land-surface models to simulate a reference glacial state (“stadial”), a cold (“HE”) and a warm (“DO interstadial”) perturbation, all corresponding to Marine Isotope Stage 3 conditions. We follow the same protocol as for the study on the west-European sector to analyze the impact of the climate factors and surface conditions on dust emission. The simulated most active emission areas are compatible with the loess deposit distribution, and the key role of vegetation in stadial-interstadial dust emission variations is confirmed.

  10. Climate and Antartic Intermediate Water Covariations on Centennial-Millennial Timescales during MIS 3—Constraining the Role of the "Oceanic Tunnel" in Abrupt Climate Change.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiven, H. F.; Ninnemann, U.

    2014-12-01

    The equatorward ventilation of Southern Hemisphere extratropical water masses to the low latitude thermocline has been proposed as a window through which the high latitude ocean can modulate tropical climate on anything from decadal to orbital timescales. This hypothesis is founded largely on the observation that tropical thermocline waters originate mostly in the Southern Hemisphere and that computer simulations suggest property anomalies in these source regions can advect through the intermediate ocean, "the ocean tunnel" to influence tropical SST. However, few observational records of extratropical ocean changes are available to assess their impacts on multi-decadal and longer timescales. Here we add to the observational record using new decadally resolved planktonic and benthic foraminiferal isotopic records spanning MIS 3 (20-50 ka) from the Chilean slope ODP Site 1233 that is located on the northern margin of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and its seafloor lies in the core of Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW). Thus the site is ideally situated to reconstruct both near surface and AAIW variability in the high southern latitudes. On centennial to millennial timescales, changes in intermediate water properties track those in the near surface albeit with a reduced amplitude—confirming the idea that changes in the extratropical ocean effect the oceanic tunnel on these timescales. The new benthic and plantic foraminiferal isotope results demonstrate that variations in intermediate ocean properties and climate of the southeast Pacific closely align with those recorded in the EPICA ice core from Dronning Maud Land. Such abrupt, synoptic scale changes in Antarctic climate and dynamics will have potentially widespread climatic and biogeochemical consequences along the downstream flowpath of AAIW. The broad coherence of the observed Antarctic signal supports the concept of hemispheric thermal asynchrony on millennial timescales, and the extension of this climate

  11. The Enigma of Millennial-scale Rainfall Variations in the Southeast African Tropics: a Breakdown of the ITCZ Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, J.; Russell, J.; Huang, Y.; Sinninghe Damste, J.; Hopmans, E.; Cohen, A.

    2008-12-01

    A high-resolution, continuous, compound-specific D/H isotope and TEX86 record from Lake Tanganyika spanning the last 60 ka affords us a definitive look at past rainfall and temperature variations in the southeast African tropics. From this record, it is evident that this region experienced abrupt and dramatic episodes of aridity co-eval with known high-latitude millennial climate coolings, such as the Younger Dryas and Heinrich Events 1 and 4. Yet lithogenic and biological proxy evidence from Southeast Africa suggests that the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) shifted south and northerly winds intensified during these events, per predictions from General Circulation Model experiments. A southward shift in the ITCZ should make the southern tropics, including Lake Tanganyika, wet, so why then is southeast Africa dry, and thus in- phase with the Northern Hemisphere? The explanation behind this "breakdown" in the ITCZ paradigm likely involves Indian Ocean dynamics, including SST variability, monsoon dynamics, and zonal reconfigurations of Walker circulation in the Indian Ocean basin - all of which modulate the amount of moisture transported into continental Africa and the strength of convergence within the ITCZ itself. These Indian Ocean dynamics may be teleconnected to the North Atlantic, thus serving as a conduit for the transmission of high-latitude abrupt climate change to continental Africa.

  12. Microbial Community Dynamics from Permafrost Across the Pleistocene-Holocene Boundary and Response to Abrupt Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammad, A.; Mahony, M.; Froese, D. G.; Lanoil, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Earth is currently undergoing rapid warming similar to that observed about 10,000 years ago at the end of the Pleistocene. We know a considerable amount about the adaptations and extinctions of mammals and plants at the Pleistocene/Holocene (P/H) boundary, but relatively little about changes at the microbial level. Due to permafrost soils' freezing anoxic conditions, they act as microbial diversity archives allowing us to determine how microbial communities adapted to the abrupt warming at the end of P. Since microbial community composition only helps differentiate viable and extant microorganisms in frozen permafrost, microbial activity in thawing permafrost must be investigated to provide a clear understanding of microbial response to climate change. Current increased temperatures will result in warming and potential thaw of permafrost and release of stored organic carbon, freeing it for microbial utilization; turning permafrost into a carbon source. Studying permafrost viable microbial communities' diversity and activity will provide a better understanding of how these microorganisms respond to soil edaphic variability due to climate change across the P/H boundary, providing insight into the changes that the soil community is currently undergoing in this modern era of rapid climate change. Modern soil, H and P permafrost cores were collected from Lucky Lady II site outside Dawson City, Yukon. 16S rRNA high throughput sequencing of permafrost DNA showed the same trends for total and viable community richness and diversity with both decreasing with permafrost depth and only the richness increasing in mid and early P. The modern, H and P soils had 50.9, 33.9, and 27.3% unique viable species and only 14% of the total number of viable species were shared by all soils. Gas flux measurements of thawed permafrost showed metabolic activity in modern and permafrost soils, aerobic CH­­4 consumption in modern, some H and P soils, and anaerobic CH­­4 production in one H

  13. Linkages between rapid climate variability and deep-sea benthic foraminifera in the deep Subantarctic South Atlantic during the last 95 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diz, Paula; Barker, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    We present a high-resolution record of benthic foraminifera fauna from a sediment core retrieved from the South Cape Basin (Subantarctic South Atlantic) spanning the last glacial cycle (95 kyr). Information provided by benthic foraminiferal assemblages together with paleoclimate proxies from the same core allow us to interpret changes in the style of primary production (episodic versus sustained) in relation to abrupt climate oscillations. Our results indicate that fluctuations in the abundance of the phytodetritus-related species, Epistominella exigua, are concomitant with millennial-scale high-latitude climate perturbations. Episodic phytoplankton blooms increased during a negative mode of the bipolar seesaw, irrespective of the magnitude of the perturbation (i.e., Heinrich stadial versus non-Heinrich stadial events). We provide a hypothesis linking the frequency and intensity of these events to atmospheric perturbations, interhemispheric climate variability, and millennial-scale changes in atmospheric CO2. A notable exception to the overall pattern is the generally high abundance of E. exigua across the globally synchronous onset of glacial marine oxygen isotope stage (MIS) 4, a period generally characterized by increased dustiness and low-quality organic carbon as inferred by the percentage of the nonphytodetritus species. This highlights the special characteristics governing the onset of MIS 4 in the Subantarctic.

  14. Northern Hemisphere Controls on Tropical Southeast African Climate During the Past 60,000 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, Jessica E.; Russell, James M.; Huang, Yongsong; Damsté, Jaap S. Sinninghe; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Cohen, Andrew S.

    2008-10-01

    The processes that control climate in the tropics are poorly understood. We applied compound-specific hydrogen isotopes (δD) and the TEX86 (tetraether index of 86 carbon atoms) temperature proxy to sediment cores from Lake Tanganyika to independently reconstruct precipitation and temperature variations during the past 60,000 years. Tanganyika temperatures follow Northern Hemisphere insolation and indicate that warming in tropical southeast Africa during the last glacial termination began to increase ~3000 years before atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. δD data show that this region experienced abrupt changes in hydrology coeval with orbital and millennial-scale events recorded in Northern Hemisphere monsoonal climate records. This implies that precipitation in tropical southeast Africa is more strongly controlled by changes in Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures and the winter Indian monsoon than by migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone.

  15. Abrupt climatic events during OIS-3 recorded in terrestrial sediments in the Netherlands: a multi-proxy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, J. A. A.; Bohncke, S. J. P.; Kasse, C.; van Huissteden, J.; Schokker, J.; Bunnik, F. P. M.; Wallinga, J.

    2009-04-01

    Abrupt climatic changes during Oxygen Isotope Stage 3 (OIS-3 or Weichselian Middle Pleniglacial) are revealed in the oxygen isotope records of the Greenland ice cores and in the North Atlantic marine cores. In the Greenland ice cores, these so-called D/O cycles start with a rapid warming of 5-10˚C within a few decades, followed by a phase of gradual cooling over several hundred to more than a thousand years and often end with a final reduction in temperature back to cold, stadial conditions. On the adjacent European continent, however, climatic variability during this time interval is poorly known. High-resolution terrestrial records are scarce and the discontinuous nature of sedimentation and repeated erosion on the continent combined with poor dating control often hampers a detailed study of the vegetation and climate. In this contribution, a Middle Weichselian sequence with shallow lacustrine deposits, intercalated by fluvial sediments with permafrost features, is presented from the Netherlands. Within this Middle Weichselian sequence, rapid warming events are assumed to have given rise to thawlake formation and/or deposition of organic-rich lacustrine sediments, while the extreme cooling events of the D/O cycles are probably represented in the sequences by clastic intervals during which periglacial features developed. In the sixties of the last century, two warming events or "interstadials" were first recognized and described from terrestrial Middle Weichselian sequences from the Hengelo basin in the Netherlands, the Hengelo- and Denekamp interstadials, respectively. The shift from a polar desert to shrub tundra (i.e. Hengelo interstadial) and tundra to shrub tundra (i.e. Denekamp interstadial), visible in the pollen diagrams of this area, was interpreted as a temporary amelioration of the climate and were therefore given the names of interstadials. In time the Hengelo- and Denekamp interstadials were also correlated with D/O cycles 12 respectively 8 in the

  16. Orbital and Millennial-scale Variability Reflected on Continental-scale Vegetation Changes in the Southern Subtropics between MIS 6 and 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrego, D. H.; Sanchez Goni, M.; Daniau, A.; Martinez, P.

    2011-12-01

    While our understanding of the effects of orbital and millennial-scale variability on the vegetation has grown during the past decades, empirical data from some climatically important periods and regions are still lacking. Scarce data exist for instance for deep-time glacial-interglacial cycles that could provide suitable analogs for current climate-change. Recent global-scale reconstructions of vegetation responses to rapid events during the last glacial cycle have been useful, however, these global compilations clearly show that some regions, namely the southern tropics and subtropics, remain understudied. Here we present results from one of the few available continental-scale vegetation records from southwestern Africa spanning the last glacial-interglacial cycle. We have conducted multiproxy analyses of marine core MD96 2098 (25°36'S, 12°38'E), retrieved from the Lüderitz slope off the coast of Namibia. Preservation of pollen and other terrestrial microfossils is facilitated at this site by the Benguela upwelling system and the proximity to the Orange River mouth. Chronological control has been derived from radiocarbon dates and marine isotope stratigraphy. We have used pollen analyses, benthic foraminifer d18O (1), X-ray Fluorescence, geochemistry (2), foraminifer assemblages and microcharcoal quantification (3) to reconstruct the terrestrial vegetation and climatic history of the southwestern part of Africa and offshore between 190 and 30 ka. We find that MIS 6 and 4 are characterized by expanding Semidesert and Fynbos vegetation, while expanding grasslands characterized MIS 5. The termination of MIS 5 is also punctuated by an expansion of humid forests. At millennial timescales, variations in grasslands are generally coupled with stadials and interstadials. The expansion of semidesert is associated with decreased continental humidity caused by the strengthening of the Benguela upwelling during MIS 6 and 4. The expansion of grasslands during the

  17. Abrupt Climate Change and the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation: sensitivity and non-linear response to Arctic/sub-Arctic freshwater pulses. Collaborative research. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher

    2015-06-15

    This project investigated possible mechanisms by which melt-water pulses can induce abrupt change in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) magnitude. AMOC magnitude is an important ingredient in present day climate. Previous studies have hypothesized abrupt reduction in AMOC magnitude in response to influxes of glacial melt water into the North Atlantic. Notable fresh-water influxes are associated with the terminus of the last ice age. During this period large volumes of melt water accumulated behind retreating ice sheets and subsequently drained rapidly when the ice weakened sufficiently. Rapid draining of glacial lakes into the North Atlantic is a possible origin of a number of paleo-record abrupt climate shifts. These include the Younger-Dryas cooling event and the 8,200 year cooling event. The studies undertaken focused on whether the mechanistic sequence by which glacial melt-water impacts AMOC, which then impacts Northern Hemisphere global mean surface temperature, is dynamically plausible. The work has implications for better understanding past climate stability. The work also has relevance for today’s environment, in which high-latitude ice melting in Greenland appears to be driving fresh water outflows at an accelerating pace.

  18. An 8700 Year Record of Holocene Climate Variability from the Yucatan Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, D.; Byrne, R.; Anderson, L.

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of Holocene climate change in the Maya lowlands of Central America has improved significantly during the last several decades thanks to the development of proxy climate records from lake cores and speleothems. One important finding is that longer-term climate changes (i.e., millennial scale) were driven primarily by precessional forcing; less clear, however, are the causes of abrupt shifts and higher frequency (centennial to decadal) change recognized in many Holocene climate reconstructions. The mechanisms driving climate change on these time scales have been difficult to identify in the region, in part because the Yucatan peninsula is influenced by climatic conditions linked to both the tropical Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Additional complications arise from the development of dense human populations following the initial introduction of agriculture ~5000 cal yr BP, which had significant impact on the environment as a whole. Here we present the results of analyses (stable isotope, pollen, magnetic susceptibility, and physical properties) of a 7.25 m sediment core from Lago Puerto Arturo, a closed basin lake in the northern Peten, Guatemala. An age-depth model, based on 6 AMS radiocarbon determinations and created using CLAM, indicates the record extends to 8700 cal yr BP. Proxy data suggest that, similar to other low latitude sites, millennial scale climate at Lago Puerto Arturo was driven by changes in insolation. Higher frequency variability is associated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) dynamics, reflecting latitudinal shifts in the Intertropical Convergence Zone in both the tropical North Atlantic and North Pacific. Solar forcing may also play a role in short-term climate change. The pollen and isotope records show that the entire period of prehispanic settlement and agricultural activity, i.e. ~5000-1000 cal yr B.P., was characterized by relatively dry conditions compared to before or after.

  19. Centennial to millennial-scale changes in oxygenation and productivity in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific during the last 25,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvatteci, R.; Gutierrez, D.; Sifeddine, A.; Ortlieb, L.; Druffel, E.; Boussafir, M.; Schneider, R.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) have expanded in all tropical oceans during the last 50 years resulting in habitat contraction and considerable changes in marine biogeochemistry. However, for a better understanding of the OMZ dynamics under the current climate change, two questions are relevant: 1) how do the magnitude and temporal changes in oceanic dissolved oxygen of the last few decades compare to the natural variability on longer timescales, and 2) what were the local and remote factors driving OMZ changes in the past. In the present study we use a stacked record covering the last 25 kyr from the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) OMZ to reconstruct changes in oxygenation and productivity. We use a suite of proxies including the presence of laminations, redox sensitive metals (U, Mo, Re, Ni and Cu), total organic carbon and δ15N measurements. Water column denitrification and sediment redox conditions show pronounced centennial to millennial-scale variability during the last 25 kyr, with oxygenation levels as low as at present. Global cold periods at different timescales such as the Last Glacial Maximum (23-19 kyr BP) and the Little Ice Age (1500-1850 AD) were associated with a weak OMZ and low export production, while warm intervals such as the deglaciation, part of the Medieval Climate Anomaly and the last 100 years are associated with a stronger OMZ and high export production. Water column denitrification and sediment redox conditions were strongly coupled during the last 25 kyr BP apart from one remarkable exception: during the Antarctic Cold Reversal, sediments were less reducing but the water column denitrification was high resulting in a strong but shallow OMZ. This may have been produced by an enhanced Antarctic Intermediate Water flow. Contrary to our expectations and modeling predictions for the next few decades, we observe a weak ETSP-OMZ during the warm mid-Holocene, which may have been the result of a stronger Walker Circulation that brought oxygen

  20. Speed and Magnitude of Abrupt Climate Change at 8,200 yrs B.P. from the Greenland Ice Core (GISP2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobashi, T.; Severinghaus, J. P.; Brook, E. J.; Grachev, A.

    2003-12-01

    At ˜8,200 years before present, an abrupt climate change occurred, which is believed to be the largest in the past 10,000 years. The scale of the event was probably global, as seen in reduced atmospheric methane concentration and paleoclimatic evidence around the globe indicating drying and cooling trends. The timing of the climate change also coincides with widespread abandonment of villages in southwestern Asia, which marks the end of the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB) interval. Owing to the similarity between the warm early-Holocene and the projected warmer future climate, the 8.2 k event provides us an invaluable test case for a future potential abrupt climate change. We reconstructed the speed and magnitude of temperature change at the event, using argon and nitrogen isotopes in trapped air from the Greenland ice core coupled with the oxygen isotope record of ice. This method makes use of two isotopic fractionations, gravitational and thermal, which occur within the firn layer (snow layer above the air bubble close-off depth). The analyses of argon and nitrogen isotopes can separate the two effects, and allows us to directly retrieve temperature information (Severinghaus et al., Nature, v. 391, 141, 1998). The magnitude of temperature change in central Greenland at 8.2kyr B.P. is preliminarily estimated to be 5 +/- 2 ° C for the decadal average with the experimentally determined thermal diffusion constants (Grachev and Severinghaus, Geochim. et Cosmochim. Acta, v.67, 345, 2003; J. Phys. Chem., v.107, 4636, 2003), implying an oxygen isotope-temperature coefficient, α , of ˜0.4 permil/° C. Using oxygen isotope record of ice and α , we estimate that the abrupt cooling took place within ˜5 years with an 'instantaneous' magnitude of ˜8° C, and climate was locked in the cold phase for ˜60 years. In addition, we plan to measure methane concentration in trapped air, which will constrain the mechanisms of the abrupt climate change.

  1. Millennial-scale plankton regime shifts in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Kelton W.; McCarthy, Matthew D.; Sherwood, Owen A.; Larsen, Thomas; Guilderson, Thomas P.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is predicted to alter marine phytoplankton communities and affect productivity, biogeochemistry, and the efficacy of the biological pump. We reconstructed high-resolution records of changing plankton community composition in the North Pacific Ocean over the past millennium. Amino acid-specific δ13C records preserved in long-lived deep-sea corals revealed three major plankton regimes corresponding to Northern Hemisphere climate periods. Non-dinitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria dominated during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (950-1250 Common Era) before giving way to a new regime in which eukaryotic microalgae contributed nearly half of all export production during the Little Ice Age (~1400-1850 Common Era). The third regime, unprecedented in the past millennium, began in the industrial era and is characterized by increasing production by dinitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. This picoplankton community shift may provide a negative feedback to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations.

  2. Millennial-scale plankton regime shifts in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Kelton W; McCarthy, Matthew D; Sherwood, Owen A; Larsen, Thomas; Guilderson, Thomas P

    2015-12-18

    Climate change is predicted to alter marine phytoplankton communities and affect productivity, biogeochemistry, and the efficacy of the biological pump. We reconstructed high-resolution records of changing plankton community composition in the North Pacific Ocean over the past millennium. Amino acid-specific δ(13)C records preserved in long-lived deep-sea corals revealed three major plankton regimes corresponding to Northern Hemisphere climate periods. Non-dinitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria dominated during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (950-1250 Common Era) before giving way to a new regime in which eukaryotic microalgae contributed nearly half of all export production during the Little Ice Age (~1400-1850 Common Era). The third regime, unprecedented in the past millennium, began in the industrial era and is characterized by increasing production by dinitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. This picoplankton community shift may provide a negative feedback to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. PMID:26612834

  3. Abrupt climate change: Past, present and the search for precursors as an aid to predicting events in the future (Hans Oeschger Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayewski, Paul Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The demonstration using Greenland ice cores that abrupt shifts in climate, Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events, existed during the last glacial period has had a transformational impact on our understanding of climate change in the naturally forced world. The demonstration that D-O events are globally distributed and that they operated during previous glacial periods has led to extensive research into the relative hemispheric timing and causes of these events. The emergence of civilization during our current interglacial, the Holocene, has been attributed to the "relative climate quiescence" of this period relative to the massive, abrupt shifts in climate that characterized glacial periods in the form of D-O events. But, everything is relative and climate change is no exception. The demise of past civilizations, (eg., Mesopatamian, Mayan and Norse) is integrally tied to abrupt climate change (ACC) events operating at regional scales. Regionally to globally distributed ACC events have punctuated the Holocene and extreme events have always posed significant challenges to humans and ecosystems. Current warming of the Arctic, in terms of length of the summer season, is as abrupt and massive, albeit not as extensive, as the transition from the last major D-O event, the Younger Dryas into the Holocene (Mayewski et al., 2013). Tropospheric source greenhouse gas rise and ozone depletion in the stratosphere over Antarctica are triggers for the modern advent of human emission instigated ACCs. Arctic warming and Antarctic ozone depletion have resulted in significance changes to the atmospheric circulation systems that transport heat, moisture, and pollutants in both hemispheres. Climate models offer a critical tool for assessing trends, but they cannot as yet predict ACC events, as evidenced by the inability of these models to predict the rapid onset of Arctic warming and resulting changes in atmospheric circulation; and in the model vs past analog differences in projections for

  4. Millennial-scale sustainability of the Chesapeake Bay Native American oyster fishery.

    PubMed

    Rick, Torben C; Reeder-Myers, Leslie A; Hofman, Courtney A; Breitburg, Denise; Lockwood, Rowan; Henkes, Gregory; Kellogg, Lisa; Lowery, Darrin; Luckenbach, Mark W; Mann, Roger; Ogburn, Matthew B; Southworth, Melissa; Wah, John; Wesson, James; Hines, Anson H

    2016-06-01

    Estuaries around the world are in a state of decline following decades or more of overfishing, pollution, and climate change. Oysters (Ostreidae), ecosystem engineers in many estuaries, influence water quality, construct habitat, and provide food for humans and wildlife. In North America's Chesapeake Bay, once-thriving eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) populations have declined dramatically, making their restoration and conservation extremely challenging. Here we present data on oyster size and human harvest from Chesapeake Bay archaeological sites spanning ∼3,500 y of Native American, colonial, and historical occupation. We compare oysters from archaeological sites with Pleistocene oyster reefs that existed before human harvest, modern oyster reefs, and other records of human oyster harvest from around the world. Native American fisheries were focused on nearshore oysters and were likely harvested at a rate that was sustainable over centuries to millennia, despite changing Holocene climatic conditions and sea-level rise. These data document resilience in oyster populations under long-term Native American harvest, sea-level rise, and climate change; provide context for managing modern oyster fisheries in the Chesapeake Bay and elsewhere around the world; and demonstrate an interdisciplinary approach that can be applied broadly to other fisheries. PMID:27217572

  5. Climate-driven shifts in continental net primary production implicated as a driver of a recent abrupt increase in the land carbon sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buermann, Wolfgang; Beaulieu, Claudie; Parida, Bikash; Medvigy, David; Collatz, George J.; Sheffield, Justin; Sarmiento, Jorge L.

    2016-03-01

    The world's ocean and land ecosystems act as sinks for anthropogenic CO2, and over the last half century their combined sink strength grew steadily with increasing CO2 emissions. Recent analyses of the global carbon budget, however, have uncovered an abrupt, substantial ( ˜ 1 PgC yr-1) and sustained increase in the land sink in the late 1980s whose origin remains unclear. In the absence of this prominent shift in the land sink, increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations since the late 1980s would have been ˜ 30 % larger than observed (or ˜ 12 ppm above current levels). Global data analyses are limited in regards to attributing causes to changes in the land sink because different regions are likely responding to different drivers. Here, we address this challenge by using terrestrial biosphere models constrained by observations to determine if there is independent evidence for the abrupt strengthening of the land sink. We find that net primary production significantly increased in the late 1980s (more so than heterotrophic respiration), consistent with the inferred increase in the global land sink, and that large-scale climate anomalies are responsible for this shift. We identify two key regions in which climatic constraints on plant growth have eased: northern Eurasia experienced warming, and northern Africa received increased precipitation. Whether these changes in continental climates are connected is uncertain, but North Atlantic climate variability is important. Our findings suggest that improved understanding of climate variability in the North Atlantic may be essential for more credible projections of the land sink under climate change.

  6. A New Holocene Lake Sediment Archive from Samoa (Tropical South Pacific) Reveals Millennial Scale Changes in Hydroclimate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sear, D. A.; Hassall, J. D.; Langdon, P. G.; Croudace, I. W. C.; Maloney, A. E.; Sachs, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the strongest source of interannual climate variability on the planet. Its behaviour leads to major hydro-climate impacts around the world, including flooding, drought, and altering cyclone frequency. Simulating ENSO behaviour is difficult using climate models, as it is a complex non-linear system, and hence predicting its future variability under changing climate is challenging. Using palaeoclimate data thus allows an insight into long-term ENSO behaviour against a range of different forcings throughout the Holocene. To date long, coherent, high resolution records from lake sediment archives have been limited to the Pacific Rim. We present new data from the closed crater Lake Lanoto'o, on Upolu Island, Samoa, located within the tropical South Pacific. The lake sediment record extends back into the early Holocene with an average sedimentation rate 0.4mm a-1. We demonstrate a strong correspondence between precipitation at the study site and measures of the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI)1. We compare geochemical proxies of precipitation to a long-term reconstruction of the SOI2. The resulting proxy SOI record extends over the last 9000 years, revealing scales of change in ENSO that match those recorded from sites located on the Pacific rim3,4. A major period of La-Nina dominance occurs around 4.5ka BP before abruptly switching to El-Nino dominance around 3.2ka. Thereafter, phases of El-Nino - La Nina dominance, alternate every c. 400yrs. The results point to prolonged phases of enhanced or reduced precipitation - conditions that may influence future population resilience to climate change, and may also have been triggers for the colonisation of more remote eastern Polynesia. 1. http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/cas/catalog/climind/SOI.signal.annstd.ascii. 2. Yan, H. et al. (2011) Nature Geoscience, 4, p.611. 3. Conroy J. L. et al. (2008) Quaternary Science Reviews, 27, p.1166 4. Moy, C. M. et al. (2002) Nature, 420, p.162

  7. Millennial-scale variability in Antarctic ice-sheet discharge during the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M. E.; Clark, P. U.; Kuhn, G.; Timmermann, A.; Sprenk, D.; Gladstone, R.; Zhang, X.; Lohmann, G.; Menviel, L.; Chikamoto, M. O.; Friedrich, T.; Ohlwein, C.

    2014-06-01

    Our understanding of the deglacial evolution of the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) following the Last Glacial Maximum (26,000-19,000 years ago) is based largely on a few well-dated but temporally and geographically restricted terrestrial and shallow-marine sequences. This sparseness limits our understanding of the dominant feedbacks between the AIS, Southern Hemisphere climate and global sea level. Marine records of iceberg-rafted debris (IBRD) provide a nearly continuous signal of ice-sheet dynamics and variability. IBRD records from the North Atlantic Ocean have been widely used to reconstruct variability in Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, but comparable records from the Southern Ocean of the AIS are lacking because of the low resolution and large dating uncertainties in existing sediment cores. Here we present two well-dated, high-resolution IBRD records that capture a spatially integrated signal of AIS variability during the last deglaciation. We document eight events of increased iceberg flux from various parts of the AIS between 20,000 and 9,000 years ago, in marked contrast to previous scenarios which identified the main AIS retreat as occurring after meltwater pulse 1A and continuing into the late Holocene epoch. The highest IBRD flux occurred 14,600 years ago, providing the first direct evidence for an Antarctic contribution to meltwater pulse 1A. Climate model simulations with AIS freshwater forcing identify a positive feedback between poleward transport of Circumpolar Deep Water, subsurface warming and AIS melt, suggesting that small perturbations to the ice sheet can be substantially enhanced, providing a possible mechanism for rapid sea-level rise.

  8. Millennial-scale variability in Antarctic ice-sheet discharge during the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Weber, M E; Clark, P U; Kuhn, G; Timmermann, A; Sprenk, D; Gladstone, R; Zhang, X; Lohmann, G; Menviel, L; Chikamoto, M O; Friedrich, T; Ohlwein, C

    2014-06-01

    Our understanding of the deglacial evolution of the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) following the Last Glacial Maximum (26,000-19,000 years ago) is based largely on a few well-dated but temporally and geographically restricted terrestrial and shallow-marine sequences. This sparseness limits our understanding of the dominant feedbacks between the AIS, Southern Hemisphere climate and global sea level. Marine records of iceberg-rafted debris (IBRD) provide a nearly continuous signal of ice-sheet dynamics and variability. IBRD records from the North Atlantic Ocean have been widely used to reconstruct variability in Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, but comparable records from the Southern Ocean of the AIS are lacking because of the low resolution and large dating uncertainties in existing sediment cores. Here we present two well-dated, high-resolution IBRD records that capture a spatially integrated signal of AIS variability during the last deglaciation. We document eight events of increased iceberg flux from various parts of the AIS between 20,000 and 9,000 years ago, in marked contrast to previous scenarios which identified the main AIS retreat as occurring after meltwater pulse 1A and continuing into the late Holocene epoch. The highest IBRD flux occurred 14,600 years ago, providing the first direct evidence for an Antarctic contribution to meltwater pulse 1A. Climate model simulations with AIS freshwater forcing identify a positive feedback between poleward transport of Circumpolar Deep Water, subsurface warming and AIS melt, suggesting that small perturbations to the ice sheet can be substantially enhanced, providing a possible mechanism for rapid sea-level rise. PMID:24870232

  9. What controls millennial-scale denudation rates across the Central Andes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilinger, Gerold; Korup, Oliver; Schlunegger, Fritz; Kober, Florian

    2015-04-01

    Sustainable planning of erosion control measures in the Central Andes requires robust knowledge about natural denudation rates. We explore a large dataset combining new and published 10Be (and 26Al) catchment-wide denudation rates from a swath at 17 to 19° S spanning the Western Cordillera that rises from sea level to 5500 m elevation; the Altiplano at ~4000 m; the Eastern Cordillera with elevations up to 6500 m; the Interandean Zone; the Subandean Zone; and the Chaco Plain at 300 m. The selected catchments span a large spread regarding morphometric and climate properties where mean slope angles range from 1 to 31°, and mean precipitation from 100 to 3900 mm/a. The denudation rates (0.0036 to 1.93 mm/a) are averaged over millennia, and reveal two to three magnitudes difference across the Central Andes. The regional distribution of denudation rates clearly demonstrates a more complex interaction of geomorphological, geological and meteorological parameters with the dominant geomorphological processes. In order to elucidate the key controls on denudation, we use multivariate statistics such as principal component analysis in order to remove potentially redundant predictors of denudation in the studied catchments. These predictors include catchment elevation, topographic relief, hillslope inclination, mean precipitation, tree cover, specific stream power, channel steepness indices, sinuosity, drainage density and hypsometric index that we derived from the SRTM 90 m Digital Elevation Database, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data, and the Terra MODIS Vegetation Continuous Fields dataset. Additionally, the rock strength index (PLI) was estimated based on geological units. Preliminary results allow distinguishing five different longitudinal domains of denudation on the basis of climatic regime, hillslope steepness, and the degree of accumulated crustal deformation. We find that the pattern of 10Be catchment-wide denudation rates in the Central Andes

  10. Work More? The 8.2 kaBP Abrupt Climate Change Event and the Origins of Irrigation Agriculture and Surplus Agro-Production in Mesopotamia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, H.

    2003-12-01

    The West Asian archaeological record is of sufficient transparency and resolution to permit observation of the social responses to the major Holocene abrupt climate change events at 8.2, 5.2 and 4.2 kaBP. The 8.2kaBP abrupt climate change event in West Asia was a three hundred year aridification and cooling episode. During this period rain-fed agriculture, established for over a millennium in northern Mesopotamia, suddenly collapsed. Irrigation agriculture, pastoral nomadism, or migration were the only subsistence alternatives for populations previously supported by cereal dry-farming. Irrigation agriculture was not, however, possible along the northern alluvial plains of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers, where incised riverbeds were several meters below plain level. Exploitable plain-level levees were only accessible in southern-most alluvial plain, at the head of the present-day Persian Gulf. The archaeological data from this region documents the first irrigation agriculture settlement of the plain during the 8.2 kaBP event. Irrigation agriculture provides about twice the yield of dry-farming in Mesopotamia, but at considerable labor costs relative to dry-farming. With irrigation agriculture surplus production was now available for deployment. But why work more? The 8.2 kaBP event provided the natural force for Mesopotamian irrigation agriculture and surplus production that were essential for the earliest class-formation and urban life.

  11. The abrupt climate change near 4,400 yr BP on the cultural transition in Yuchisi, China and its global linkage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianjun; Sun, Liguang; Chen, Liqi; Xu, Libin; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Xinming

    2016-01-01

    Extreme climatic events have profound impacts on human society. Here we present the results of a study of organic biomarkers within a sedimentary section at the archaeological site of Yuchisi, eastern China, in order to reconstruct climatic variability during the Dawenkou (5,050–4,400 yr BP) and Longshan (4,400–4,000 yr BP) cultures. At ~4,400 yr BP, within the cultural transition horizon, abrupt changes in biomarkers, such as the fatty acid ratio C18:2/C18:0, 2C31/(C27 + C29), n-C18-ol and n-C30-ol, indicate the occurrence of local climate changes over the course of a few decades. These changes occurred during the transition from the Holocene warm period to a subsequent cold period which lasted for the following 600 years. This climatic shift has been recorded at numerous sites worldwide, and it is likely to have been the main cause of the widespread collapse of many isolated cultures at that time. The palaeoclimatic and archaeological data from the Yuchisi sediments may provide new insights into the relationship between climate change and prehistoric cultural transitions. PMID:27283832

  12. The abrupt climate change near 4,400 yr BP on the cultural transition in Yuchisi, China and its global linkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianjun; Sun, Liguang; Chen, Liqi; Xu, Libin; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Xinming

    2016-01-01

    Extreme climatic events have profound impacts on human society. Here we present the results of a study of organic biomarkers within a sedimentary section at the archaeological site of Yuchisi, eastern China, in order to reconstruct climatic variability during the Dawenkou (5,050-4,400 yr BP) and Longshan (4,400-4,000 yr BP) cultures. At ~4,400 yr BP, within the cultural transition horizon, abrupt changes in biomarkers, such as the fatty acid ratio C18:2/C18:0, 2C31/(C27 + C29), n-C18-ol and n-C30-ol, indicate the occurrence of local climate changes over the course of a few decades. These changes occurred during the transition from the Holocene warm period to a subsequent cold period which lasted for the following 600 years. This climatic shift has been recorded at numerous sites worldwide, and it is likely to have been the main cause of the widespread collapse of many isolated cultures at that time. The palaeoclimatic and archaeological data from the Yuchisi sediments may provide new insights into the relationship between climate change and prehistoric cultural transitions. PMID:27283832

  13. The abrupt climate change near 4,400 yr BP on the cultural transition in Yuchisi, China and its global linkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianjun; Sun, Liguang; Chen, Liqi; Xu, Libin; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Xinming

    2016-06-01

    Extreme climatic events have profound impacts on human society. Here we present the results of a study of organic biomarkers within a sedimentary section at the archaeological site of Yuchisi, eastern China, in order to reconstruct climatic variability during the Dawenkou (5,050–4,400 yr BP) and Longshan (4,400–4,000 yr BP) cultures. At ~4,400 yr BP, within the cultural transition horizon, abrupt changes in biomarkers, such as the fatty acid ratio C18:2/C18:0, 2C31/(C27 + C29), n-C18-ol and n-C30-ol, indicate the occurrence of local climate changes over the course of a few decades. These changes occurred during the transition from the Holocene warm period to a subsequent cold period which lasted for the following 600 years. This climatic shift has been recorded at numerous sites worldwide, and it is likely to have been the main cause of the widespread collapse of many isolated cultures at that time. The palaeoclimatic and archaeological data from the Yuchisi sediments may provide new insights into the relationship between climate change and prehistoric cultural transitions.

  14. 100,000-year-long terrestrial record of millennial-scale linkage between eastern North American mid-latitude paleovegetation shifts and Greenland ice-core oxygen isotope trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litwin, Ronald J.; Smoot, Joseph P.; Pavich, Milan J.; Markewich, Helaine W.; Brook, George; Durika, Nancy J.

    2013-09-01

    We document frequent, rapid, strong, millennial-scale paleovegetation shifts throughout the late Pleistocene, within a 100,000+ yr interval (~ 115-15 ka) of terrestrial sediments from the mid-Atlantic Region (MAR) of North America. High-resolution analyses of fossil pollen from one core locality revealed a continuously shifting sequence of thermally dependent forest assemblages, ranging between two endmembers: subtropical oak-tupelo-bald cypress-gum forest and high boreal spruce-pine forest. Sedimentary textural evidence indicates fluvial, paludal, and loess deposition, and paleosol formation, representing sequential freshwater to subaerial environments in which this record was deposited. Its total age-depth model, based on radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence ages, ranges from terrestrial oxygen isotope stages (OIS) 6 to 1. The particular core sub-interval presented here is correlative in trend and timing to that portion of the oxygen isotope sequence common among several Greenland ice cores: interstades GI2 to GI24 (≈ OIS2-5 d). This site thus provides the first evidence for an essentially complete series of 'Dansgaard-Oeschger' climate events in the MAR. These data reveal that the ~ 100,000 yr preceding the Late Glacial and Holocene in the MAR of North America were characterized by frequently and dynamically changing climate states, and by vegetation shifts that closely tracked the Greenland paleoclimate sequence.

  15. Interhemispheric Anti-phased Climate Changes During the Last Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Auler, A. S.; Edwards, R. L.; Cheng, H.; Ito, E.; Solheid, M.

    2005-12-01

    We have obtained a high-resolution oxygen isotopic record of cave calcite from Gruta Do Padre (PAD), central Brazil. The chronology was determined by 20 U-Th ages from 2 stalagmites. Tests for equilibrium conditions show that oxygen isotopic variations are primarily caused by climate change. We interpreted the PAD record, spanning the last 16 thousand years, in terms of meteoric precipitation changes at this low-latitude location. The oxygen isotopic profile shows clear abrupt millennial-scale variations with amplitudes as large as 3 per mil. Using independent age scales, we compare the record to contemporaneous records from caves in eastern China and high latitude ice cores. During the last deglaciation, PAD calcite δ18O anti-correlates remarkably with δ18O in the Hulu Cave (Wang et al., 2001, Science), indicating that precipitation histories at the two sites are anti-phased, similar to our previous observations from southern Brazil speleothems. As Greenland temperature has been shown to correlate with Hulu precipitation, PAD precipitation anti-correlates with Greenland temperature. The timing of the main transition at PAD is synchronous within error with the Hulu and Greenland records. For instance, the rapid PAD transitions into a dry "Bolling-Allerod", and the beginning and the end of a wet "Younger Dryas", occur at about 14620±60 yr B.P., 12750±60 yr B.P., and 11600±100 yr B.P., respectively. Such anti-correlations support the bipolar see-saw mechanism through the last glacial-interglacial transition. However, the millennial-scale climate variability probably involves both ocean thermohaline and atmospheric circulation changes.

  16. Redefining deuterium excess in ice cores: Antarctic-wide evidence for ITCZ and polar jet variability during abrupt climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markle, B. R.; Steig, E. J.; Schoenemann, S. W.; Sowers, T. A.; Buizert, C.; Ding, Q.; Fudge, T. J.; White, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    We examine a new, high-resolution ice core record of water isotopes (δ18O and deuterium excess) and atmospheric methane from West Antarctica, focusing on the millennial events of the most recent glacial period. High temporal resolution and a small gas-age/ice-age difference enable unprecedented precision in the analysis of phasing between these records. Our analysis reveals large amplitude millennial variability in the deuterium excess, a proxy for moisture source conditions and atmospheric circulation, which is out of phase with local site temperatures. On the other hand, this variability is in phase with atmospheric methane, which likely records changes in tropical hydrology and co-varies with Greenland temperatures during abrupt millennial Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events. Using a logarithmic definition of the deuterium excess, we show that these changes were probably near symmetric around Antarctica; the historical (linear) definition of the parameter appears to misrepresent millennial to multi-millennial variability at high East Antarctic ice core sites. Modeling experiments show that asymmetric warming of the hemispheres, a defining characteristic of these millennial events, should shift the position of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and in turn the Southern sub-polar jet. Postulated ITCZ shifts can, in principle, help to explain the rapid rise in methane that accompanies abrupt Northern Hemisphere warming events by varying tropical rainfall patterns. Our observations are the first to show that these tropical changes may have directly influenced moisture sources and atmospheric circulation in the high southern latitudes, as recorded by the deuterium excess. We support these paleoclimate observations with isotope tracing atmospheric modeling experiments.

  17. Abrupt State Change in Spatially-Patterned Subalpine Forests in Northern Colorado During the Medieval Climate Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calder, W. J.; Shuman, B. N.

    2014-12-01

    Spatial patterns in many ecosystems arise from feedbacks associated with the potential for critical transitions and multiple stable states. Such systems may be susceptible to abrupt change, which could be indicated by early-warning signals, such as critical slowing down (increasingly long recovery from perturbation as a threshold approaches). Paleoecological data from ribbon forests, a type of subalpine parkland found in the Rocky Mountains, offer an opportunity to test these hypotheses. The forests consist of alternating strips of forest and meadow that form because bands of Picea and Abies trees act as snow fences with large snowdrifts forming on their lee sides. Drifts provide moisture for the adjacent trees, but also increase seedling mortality and shorten the growing season where drifts accumulate. The feedbacks between forest growth and snow accumulation maintain the ribbon forest-meadow pattern, and raise the potential for abrupt change if the feedbacks breakdown in response to factors like drought or fire. Our fossil pollen data from Summit Lake, located on the Continental Divide in the Park Range, northern Colorado, indicate that a closed forest transitioned rapidly to a ribbon forest state at ca. 1000 BP. Artemisia pollen increased (20 to 35%) and Picea and Abies pollen decreased (25 to 15%) within a century or less after a pair of charcoal peaks. Decreased charcoal influx (from 0.6 to 0.4 pieces/cm2/yr) and fire frequency (from 4.5 to 1.5 fires/ka) coincided with the pollen assemblage changes, and is consistent with decreased landscape biomass and fuel connectivity. Initial analyses show evidence of critical slowing down before the state change. After eight of eleven fires recorded by peaks in charcoal accumulation, Artemisia pollen percentages rise to a peak consistent with brief opening of the initially forested landscape. After 2000 BP, the magnitude and duration of the post-fire changes increases until no recovery is recorded after the shift at 1000

  18. The fluvial system response to abrupt climate change during the last cold stage: the Upper Pleistocene River Thames fluvial succession at Ashton Keynes, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, S. G.; Maddy, D.; Scaife, R. G.

    2001-02-01

    The last interglacial-glacial cycle (125-10 ka BP) is characterised by numerous rapid shifts in global climate on sub-Milankovitch timescales, recorded in the ocean and ice core records. These climatic fluctuations are clearly recorded in those European terrestrial sedimentary sequences that span this time period without interruption. In the UK, only fragmentary Upper Pleistocene sequences exist, mainly within the fluvial archive of the major river systems such as the Thames. The response of the upper River Thames to abrupt fluctuations in climate is documented in the fluvial sediments beneath the Floodplain Terrace (Northmoor Member of the Upper Thames Formation) at Ashton Keynes, Wiltshire. A number of criteria are set out by which significant changes in the fluvial system may be established from the sedimentological, palaeoecological and geochronological information contained within the succession. The sedimentary succession is divisible into four facies associations, on the basis of their sedimentology and bounding surface characteristics. These represent distinct phases of fluvial activity at the site and allow changes in fluvial style to be inferred. Palaeoecological reconstructions from pollen analysis of peats within the sequence provides an indication of the nature and direction of Late Glacial environmental change and optically stimulated luminescence and radiocarbon dating methods provide chronological control on the sequence. These data suggest that major changes in fluvial style are recorded within the succession, which can be related to the climatic fluctuations that took place on the oxygen isotope stage 5a/4 transition (approximately 70 ka BP) and the Devensian Late Glacial climatic warm-cold-warm oscillation (13-11 ka BP). The changes in fluvial style are a result of variations in sediment supply to the river resulting from changes in slope stability, vegetation cover and cold-climate mass movement processes and variations in discharge regime

  19. Abrupt change of the mid-summer climate in central east China by the influence of atmospheric pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qun

    Following the great flooding of summer 1998, the mid-lower Yangtze Basin further suffered from another large flooding in summer 1999. Successive droughts through 3 recent summers (1997-1999) appeared in north China in addition, leading to an abnormal summer climate pattern of "north drought with south flooding". Such southward move of the summer monsoon rainy belt in east China started in the late 1970s-early 1980s. Its main cause may not be a purely natural climate change, but the acceleration of industrialization in east China could play a major role by emitting large volumes of SO 2, especially from the rapidly growing rural factories of east China. The annual release of SO 2 in China exceeded 20 Tg during 1992-1998, so dense sulfate aerosols covered the central east China which significantly reduced the sunlight. Although present estimates for the changes of clear sky global solar radiation may include some error, they show that the negative radiative forcing of sulfate aerosols in central east China by far exceeds the effect of greenhouse warming in summer. Hence the mid-summer monsoon rainy belt of east China has a trend moving southward in 21 recent years (1979-1999), showing the very sensitive characteristic of the summer monsoon system to the change in heat equilibrium of the land surface. The occurrence rate of summer climate pattern of "north drought with south flooding" in east China during 21 recent years is the largest since AD 950; such anomalous climate has brought large losses to China. The only possible way to reverse this southward trend of summer monsoon rainy belt is to significantly reduce air pollution by using more clean energy. Recently, the PRC has paid serious attention to this problem by adopting a series of countermeasures.

  20. Lateglacial/early Holocene fluvial reactions of the Jeetzel river (Elbe valley, northern Germany) to abrupt climatic and environmental changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Falko; Tolksdorf, Johann Friedrich; Viehberg, Finn; Schwalb, Antje; Kaiser, Knut; Bittmann, Felix; von Bramann, Ullrich; Pott, Richard; Staesche, Ulrich; Breest, Klaus; Veil, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of climatic control on river system development are still only partially known. Palaeohydrological investigations from river valleys often lack a precise chronological control of climatic processes and fluvial dynamics, which is why their specific forces remain unclear. In this multidisciplinary case study from the middle Elbe river valley (northern Germany) multiple dating of sites (palynostratigraphy, radiocarbon- and OSL-dating) and high-resolution analyses of environmental and climatological proxies (pollen, plant macro-remains and ostracods) reveal a continuous record of the environmental and fluvial history from the Lateglacial to the early Holocene. Biostratigraphical correlation to northwest European key sites shows that river system development was partially out of phase with the main climatic shifts. The transition from a braided to an incised channel system predated the main phase of Lateglacial warming (˜14.6 ka BP), and the meandering river did not change its drainage pattern during the cooling of the Younger-Dryas period. Environmental reconstructions suggest that river dynamics were largely affected by vegetation cover, as a vegetation cover consisting of herbs, dwarf-shrubs and a few larger shrubs seems to have developed before the onset of the main Lateglacial warming, and pine forests appear to have persisted in the river valley during the Younger Dryas. In addition, two phases of high fluvial activity and new channel incision during the middle part of the Younger Dryas and during the Boreal were correlated with changes from dry towards wet climatic conditions, as indicated by evident lake level rises. Lateglacial human occupation in the river valley, which is shown by numerous Palaeolithic sites, forming one of the largest settlement areas of that period known in the European Plain, is assigned to the specific fluvial and environmental conditions of the early Allerød.

  1. The Nonlinear Response of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean-Atmosphere System to Periodic Variations in Insolation and its Association with the Abrupt Climate Transitions during the Quaternary.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    The evidences of climate changes during the Quaternary are abundant but the physical mechanisms behind the climate transitions are controversial. The theory of Milankovitch takes into account the periodic orbital variations and the solar radiation received by the Earth as the main explanation for the glacial-interglacial cycles. However, some gaps in the theory still remain. In this study, we propose elucidating some of these gaps by approaching the Equatorial Pacific Ocean as a large oscillator, capable of triggering climate changes in different temporal scales. A mathematical model representing El Ninõ-like phenomena, based on Duffing equation and modulated by the astronomical cycle of 100 ka, was used to simulate the variability of the equatorial Pacific climate system over the last 2 Ma. The physical configuration of the Pacific Ocean, expressed in the equation, explains the temporal limit of the glacial-interglacial cycles. According to the simulation results, consistent with paleoclimate records, the amplification of the effects of the gradual variation of the Earth's orbit eccentricity - another unclear question - is due to the feedback mechanism of the Pacific ocean-atmosphere system, which responds non-linearly to small variations in insolation forcing and determines the ENSO-like phase (warm or cold) at different time scales and different intensities. The approach proposed here takes into account that the abrupt transitions between the ENSO-like phases, and the consequent changes in the sea surface temperature (SST) along the Equatorial Pacific Ocean, produce reactions that act as secondary causes of the temperature fluctuations that result in a glaciation (or deglaciation) - as the drastic change on the rate of evaporation/precipitation around the globe, and the increase (or decrease) of the atmospheric CO2 absorption by the phytoplankton. The transitional behavior between the warm and the cold phases, according to the presented model, is enhanced as

  2. Millennial-scale records of North American Monsoon in time and space during the last glacial period: reconstructions from arid northern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, P.; Quiroz-Jiménez, D.; Charles-Polo, M.; Lozano-Santacruz, R.

    2013-05-01

    The arid northern Mexico is part of the Sonora and Chihuahua Deserts and both the deserts belong to the North American Desert system. The North American Monsoon (NAM) or Mexican Monsoon refers to the system that brings summer precipitation to arid northern Mexico and southwestern USA. It contributes ca. 70-80% of total annual precipitation along the western slopes of the Sierra Madre Occidental (northern Mexico) and ca. 40-50% of total precipitation in Arizona and New Mexico (southwest USA). High-resolution geochemical data from lacustrine deposits located between 23°N and 31°N (paleolakes La Salada, Babicora and San Felipe) provide spatio-temporal and millennial-scale paleohydrological records related to the dynamics of summer precipitation as well as westerly winter storms over the last glacial period. The inverse relationship between proxy records of runoff into lacustrine basins of northern Mexico and winter precipitation over the southwestern USA indicate that the westerly winter storms had minimal influence south of 30°N and the paleohydrological changes are mainly summer precipitation controlled. The variation in summer season precipitation between 20 and 60 cal. kyr BP was driven by long term changes in summer insolation. During an interval of lower summer insolation (i.e. >60 cal. kyr BP), the higher summer precipitation could be related to the NAM expansion as a result of reduced north hemisphere ice sheets. On a millennial-scale, the region received more than average precipitation during the warm interstadials and vice versa.

  3. Consistently dated records from three Greenland ice cores reveal regional millennial-scale isotope gradients with possible Heinrich Event imprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seierstad, Inger K.; Rasmussen, Sune O.

    2014-05-01

    We here present records from the NGRIP, GRIP and GISP2 ice cores tied to the same chronology for the past 104 ka at an unprecedented time resolution. The three ice cores have been linked by matching distinct peaks in volcanic proxy records and other impurity records from the three ice cores, assuming that these layers of elevated impurity content represent the same, instantaneous event in the past at all three sites. In total there are more than 900 identified marker horizons between the three cores including previously published match points, of which we introduce a minor revision. Our matching is independently confirmed by new and existing volcanic ash layers (tephra). The depth-depth relationship from the detailed matching is used to transfer the most recent and widely used Greenland ice core chronology, the GICC05modelext timescale, to the two Summit cores, GRIP and GISP2. Furthermore, we provide gas chronologies for the Summit cores that are consistent with the GICC05modelext timescale by utilizing both existing and new unpublished gas data. A comparison of the GICC05modelext and the former GISP2 timescale reveals major discrepancies in short time intervals during the glacial section. We detect a pronounced change in the relative annual layer thickness between the two Summit sites and NGRIP across the Last Glacial termination and early-to-mid Holocene, which can be explained by a relative accumulation increase at NGRIP compared to the Summit region as response to the onset of the Holocene and the climatic optimum. Between stadials and interstadials we infer that the accumulation contrast typically was nearly 10% greater at Summit compared to at NGRIP. The δ18O temperature-proxy records from NGRIP, GRIP and GISP2 are generally very similar and display a synchronous behavior at climate transitions, but the δ18O differences between Summit and NGRIP is slowly changing over the last glacial-interglacial cycle superimposed by abrupt millennial-to centennial scale

  4. The complex behavior of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet and mountain glaciers to abrupt climate change during the latest Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menounos, Brian; Goehring, Brent; Osborn, Gerald; Clarke, Garry K. C.; Ward, Brent; Margold, Martin; Bond, Jeff; Clague, John J.; Lakeman, Tom; Schaefer, Joerg; Koch, Joe; Gosse, John; Stroeven, Arjen P.; Seguinot, Julien; Heyman, Jakob; Fulton, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Surficial mapping and more than 70 radiometric ages 10Be, 14C] constrain the evolution of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet (CIS) and associated mountain glaciers in western Canada during the latest Pleistocene. Our data suggest that: i) there is widespread evidence for the Younger Dryas (YD) throughout the mountains of western Canada; ii) late Pleistocene climate reconstructions based solely on alpine moraines may be misleading in regions with decaying ice sheets; iii) extensive interfluves in some mountain regions were ice-free between 16 ka and 13 ka (kilo calibrated yrs BP). Initial decay of the CIS from its maximum extent around 16 ka was likely due to a combination of climatic (surface melting) and dynamical factors. Climate amelioration during the Bølling-Allerød Warm Period [14.7-12.9 ka], likely the cause for the major phase of CIS decay, resulted in ice sheet equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) ranging from 2500 m asl in southern BC to around 2000 m asl along the BC-Yukon border. Hence, before the onset of the Younger Dryas (YD) Cold Period [12.9-11.7 ka], the ice sheet shrank and became a labyrinth of individual and coalescing valley glaciers fed by major accumulation zones centered on the Coast Mountains and other high ranges of NW Canada. The response of remnant ice and cirque glaciers to the YD climate deterioration was highly variable. In some cases, small glaciers (0.5-2 km2) built YD moraines that were only hundreds of meters beyond those constructed during the Little Ice Age (LIA) [0.30-0.15 ka]. Our dating also reveals that much larger glaciers persisted in nearby valleys that lie hundreds of meters below the cirques. Hence, we infer that many cirques were completely deglaciated prior the YD, in contrast to low-lying valleys where ice sheet remnants persisted. Glaciers also advanced in north-central British Columbia during the YD, but here glaciers constructed large terminal and lateral moraines. In the Cassiar and northern Coast mountains, for example

  5. A stratigraphic framework for abrupt climatic changes during the Last Glacial period based on three synchronized Greenland ice-core records: refining and extending the INTIMATE event stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Sune O.; Bigler, Matthias; Blockley, Simon P.; Blunier, Thomas; Buchardt, Susanne L.; Clausen, Henrik B.; Cvijanovic, Ivana; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Johnsen, Sigfus J.; Fischer, Hubertus; Gkinis, Vasileios; Guillevic, Myriam; Hoek, Wim Z.; Lowe, J. John; Pedro, Joel B.; Popp, Trevor; Seierstad, Inger K.; Steffensen, Jørgen Peder; Svensson, Anders M.; Vallelonga, Paul; Vinther, Bo M.; Walker, Mike J. C.; Wheatley, Joe J.; Winstrup, Mai

    2014-12-01

    Due to their outstanding resolution and well-constrained chronologies, Greenland ice-core records provide a master record of past climatic changes throughout the Last Interglacial-Glacial cycle in the North Atlantic region. As part of the INTIMATE (INTegration of Ice-core, MArine and TErrestrial records) project, protocols have been proposed to ensure consistent and robust correlation between different records of past climate. A key element of these protocols has been the formal definition and ordinal numbering of the sequence of Greenland Stadials (GS) and Greenland Interstadials (GI) within the most recent glacial period. The GS and GI periods are the Greenland expressions of the characteristic Dansgaard-Oeschger events that represent cold and warm phases of the North Atlantic region, respectively. We present here a more detailed and extended GS/GI template for the whole of the Last Glacial period. It is based on a synchronization of the NGRIP, GRIP, and GISP2 ice-core records that allows the parallel analysis of all three records on a common time scale. The boundaries of the GS and GI periods are defined based on a combination of stable-oxygen isotope ratios of the ice (δ18O, reflecting mainly local temperature) and calcium ion concentrations (reflecting mainly atmospheric dust loading) measured in the ice. The data not only resolve the well-known sequence of Dansgaard-Oeschger events that were first defined and numbered in the ice-core records more than two decades ago, but also better resolve a number of short-lived climatic oscillations, some defined here for the first time. Using this revised scheme, we propose a consistent approach for discriminating and naming all the significant abrupt climatic events of the Last Glacial period that are represented in the Greenland ice records. The final product constitutes an extended and better resolved Greenland stratotype sequence, against which other proxy records can be compared and correlated. It also provides a

  6. Mid-Holocene erosive episodes in tufa deposits from Trabaque Canyon, central Spain, as a result of abrupt arid climate transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-Villar, David; Vázquez-Navarro, Juan A.; Carrasco, Rosa M.

    2012-08-01

    During the Holocene a series of tufa sediments were deposited from a karstic spring along the Trabaque Canyon, central Spain. A long-term lowering of the water table caused the location of the spring to be displaced from the upper sector of the canyon during the early Holocene to the lower sector in the late Holocene. This progressive shift was in response to decreased precipitation in the region. The depositional environments and their geomorphologic relationships were characterized. Thus, five morphosedimentary units (MSUs) were identified within the Holocene tufa deposits. Erosive episodes were recognized between MSUs and, as most of the MSUs partially overlap, the older ones are perched in relation to the younger ones. The chronology of the MSUs is based on 14C dates, and stable isotopes and total organic carbon content provided environmental information during the period of tufa sedimentation. The successive dissection episodes in the Trabaque Canyon tufa deposits took place during transitioning climate conditions from the relatively wet early Holocene to the more arid late Holocene. During this transitional period in the mid-Holocene, wet phases alternated with more arid conditions, causing the largest hydrological regime gradients in the Holocene. Thus, the four erosive episodes causing tufa dissection in Trabaque during the Holocene are interpreted as the result of abrupt transitional periods towards arid conditions.

  7. Strong hemispheric coupling of glacial climate through freshwater discharge and ocean circulation.

    PubMed

    Knutti, R; Flückiger, J; Stocker, T F; Timmermann, A

    2004-08-19

    The climate of the last glacial period was extremely variable, characterized by abrupt warming events in the Northern Hemisphere, accompanied by slower temperature changes in Antarctica and variations of global sea level. It is generally accepted that this millennial-scale climate variability was caused by abrupt changes in the ocean thermohaline circulation. Here we use a coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea ice model to show that freshwater discharge into the North Atlantic Ocean, in addition to a reduction of the thermohaline circulation, has a direct effect on Southern Ocean temperature. The related anomalous oceanic southward heat transport arises from a zonal density gradient in the subtropical North Atlantic caused by a fast wave-adjustment process. We present an extended and quantitative bipolar seesaw concept that explains the timing and amplitude of Greenland and Antarctic temperature changes, the slow changes in Antarctic temperature and its similarity to sea level, as well as a possible time lag of sea level with respect to Antarctic temperature during Marine Isotope Stage 3. PMID:15318212

  8. North Atlantic forcing of tropical Indian Ocean climate.

    PubMed

    Mohtadi, Mahyar; Prange, Matthias; Oppo, Delia W; De Pol-Holz, Ricardo; Merkel, Ute; Zhang, Xiao; Steinke, Stephan; Lückge, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The response of the tropical climate in the Indian Ocean realm to abrupt climate change events in the North Atlantic Ocean is contentious. Repositioning of the intertropical convergence zone is thought to have been responsible for changes in tropical hydroclimate during North Atlantic cold spells, but the dearth of high-resolution records outside the monsoon realm in the Indian Ocean precludes a full understanding of this remote relationship and its underlying mechanisms. Here we show that slowdowns of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation during Heinrich stadials and the Younger Dryas stadial affected the tropical Indian Ocean hydroclimate through changes to the Hadley circulation including a southward shift in the rising branch (the intertropical convergence zone) and an overall weakening over the southern Indian Ocean. Our results are based on new, high-resolution sea surface temperature and seawater oxygen isotope records of well-dated sedimentary archives from the tropical eastern Indian Ocean for the past 45,000 years, combined with climate model simulations of Atlantic circulation slowdown under Marine Isotope Stages 2 and 3 boundary conditions. Similar conditions in the east and west of the basin rule out a zonal dipole structure as the dominant forcing of the tropical Indian Ocean hydroclimate of millennial-scale events. Results from our simulations and proxy data suggest dry conditions in the northern Indian Ocean realm and wet and warm conditions in the southern realm during North Atlantic cold spells. PMID:24784218

  9. Sensitivity of the North Atlantic Ocean Circulation to an abrupt change in the Nordic Sea overflow in a high resolution global coupled climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rong; Delworth, Thomas L.; Rosati, Anthony; Anderson, Whit G.; Dixon, Keith W.; Lee, Hyun-Chul; Zeng, Fanrong

    2011-12-01

    The sensitivity of the North Atlantic Ocean Circulation to an abrupt change in the Nordic Sea overflow is investigated for the first time using a high resolution eddy-permitting global coupled ocean-atmosphere model (GFDL CM2.5). The Nordic Sea overflow is perturbed through the change of the bathymetry in GFDL CM2.5. We analyze the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) adjustment process and the downstream oceanic response to the perturbation. The results suggest that north of 34°N, AMOC changes induced by changes in the Nordic Sea overflow propagate on the slow tracer advection timescale, instead of the fast Kelvin wave timescale, resulting in a time lead of several years between subpolar and subtropical AMOC changes. The results also show that a stronger and deeper-penetrating Nordic Sea overflow leads to stronger and deeper AMOC, stronger northward ocean heat transport, reduced Labrador Sea deep convection, stronger cyclonic Northern Recirculation Gyre (NRG), westward shift of the North Atlantic Current (NAC) and southward shift of the Gulf Stream, warmer sea surface temperature (SST) east of Newfoundland and colder SST south of the Grand Banks, stronger and deeper NAC and Gulf Stream, and stronger oceanic eddy activities along the NAC and the Gulf Stream paths. A stronger/weaker Nordic Sea overflow also leads to a contracted/expanded subpolar gyre (SPG). This sensitivity study points to the important role of the Nordic Sea overflow in the large scale North Atlantic ocean circulation, and it is crucial for climate models to have a correct representation of the Nordic Sea overflow.

  10. Fluvial system response to abrupt climate change: sedimentary record example of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in the South-Pyrenean foreland basin, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Castelltort, Sebastien; Foreman, Brady; Hassenruck-Gudipati, Hima J.

    2015-04-01

    The "Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum" (PETM), is understood to be an extreme and short-lived (ca.150-220kya) global warming event that occurred 55.8 million years ago and during which global annual temperatures are estimated to have increased by ca. 5-8°C, with respect to sea surface temperatures and ca. 4-5°C, with respect to the deep sea. A remaining outstanding question is: in addition to the global increase in temperature, how was precipitation perturbed during the event, and how did fluvial surface processes respond to the perturbation? In the southern Spanish Pyrenees, the Paleocene succession of the Tremp-Graus Basin is made up of the Talarn (Danian) and Esplugafreda (Thanetian) red bed formations. The Esplugafreda section is composed of approximately 250m of reddish paleosols and contains numerous lenticular bodies of calcareous conglomerates, which are interpreted as braided channels. The Esplugafreda Formation is overlain by the Claret Conglomerate -- an extensive sheet-like unit which ranges in thickness between 1m and 4m of clast-supported calcareous conglomerate and pebbly calcarenites and is interpreted as marking the fluvial response to a dramatic climate change, in the form of the transformation of a braided river and floodplain system into an enormous conglomeratic braided plain (formed over at least 2000km2 conservatively) due to dramatic change in the hydrologic cycle. The conglomerate unit ends abruptly and is overlaid by fine-grained yellowish soils which are mainly made up of silty mudstones with abundant small size carbonate nodules suggesting another shift in the hydrological cycle after the PETM. Here we present paleo-channel geometry and grain size data collected in the southern Pyrenees (Tremp, Aren, and Serraduy sections) that we invert to reconstruct paleoflow conditions during the Paleocene and during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Event. We confront paleohydraulic results with sea level, isotope and lithological records in order to

  11. A 400-kyr record of millennial-scale carbonate preservation events in the Southern Ocean: Implications for Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodell, D. A.; Vautravers, M. J.; Barker, S.; Charles, C.; Crowhurst, S.

    2014-12-01

    Hodell et al. (2001) suggested that carbonate preservation in the deep Cape Basin represented a qualitative, high-resolution record of the temporal evolution of the carbonate saturation state of the deep sea. The carbonate signal reflects both transient events in the redistribution of alkalinity and DIC in the deep ocean and steady-state mass balance processes. Here we re-analyzed the carbonate records of Sites 1089/TN057-21 using an Avaatech XRF core scanner and measured elemental variations at 2.5-mm resolution for the past 400 kyrs. Log Ca/Ti is highly correlated to weight percent carbonate content and other dissolution proxies and resolves millennial-scale events in carbonate preservation. A high-pass filter removes the low-frequency (orbital) variability in carbonate preservation, which is attributed mainly to steady-state mass balance processes. The high-frequency (suborbital) component reflects transient responses to the redistribution of carbonate ion that is related mainly to changing deep-water circulation. During the last glacial period, distinct millennial-scale increases in carbonate preservation in piston core TN057-21 occurred during times of enhanced Atlantic Meridional Overtunring Circulation (AMOC) (Barker et al., 2010; Barker and Diz, 2014), as supported by increases in benthic δ13C and less radiogenic ɛNd values. Carbonate preservation peaked particularly during long, warm interstadials in Greenland when a deep water mass with high carbonate ion concentration was formed in the North Atlantic. Export of NADW may have been greater than the Holocene during some of these events ("overshoots") and/or preformed carbonate ion concentrations in North Atlantic source areas may have been higher owing to lower atmospheric CO2 and less carbonate production in surface water. Each South Atlantic carbonate peak is associated with the start of Antarctic cooling and declining or leveling of atmospheric CO2, reflecting the signature of a thermal bipolar seesaw

  12. Annual proxy data from Lago Grande di Monticchio (southern Italy) contributing to chronological constraints and abrupt climatic oscillations between 76 and 112 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Puertas, C.; Brauer, A.; Wulf, S.; Ott, F.; Lauterbach, S.; Dulski, P.

    2014-06-01

    We present annual sedimentological proxies and sub-annual element scanner data from the Lago Grande di Monticchio (MON) sediment record for the sequence 76-112 ka, which, combined with the decadal to centennial resolved pollen assemblage, allow a comprehensive reconstruction of six major abrupt cold and relatively humid spells (MON 1-6) in the central Mediterranean during early phase of the last glaciation. These climatic oscillations are defined by intervals of thicker varves and high Ti-counts and coincide with episodes of forest depletion interpreted as cold and wet oscillations. Based on the independent and slightly revised MON-2014 varve chronology (76-112 ka), a detailed comparison with the Greenland ice-core δ18O record (NGRIP) and northern Alps speleothem δ18O data (NALPS) is presented. Based on visual inspection of major changes in the proxy data, MON 2-6 are suggested to correlate with GS 25-20. MON 1 (Woillard event), the first and shortest cooling spell in the Mediterranean after a long phase of stable interglacial conditions, has no counterpart in the Greenland ice core, but coincides with the lowest isotope values at the end of the gradual decrease in δ18O in NGRIP during the second half of the GI 25. MON 3 is the least pronounced cold spell and shows gradual transitions, whereas its NGRIP counterpart GS 24 is characterized by sharp changes in the isotope records. MON 2 and MON 4 are the longest most pronounced oscillations in the MON sediments in good agreement with their counterparts in the ice and spelethem records. The length of MON 4 (correlating with GS 22) support the duration of this stadial proposed by the NALPS timescales and suggests ca. 500 yr longer duration than calculated by GICC05 and AICC2012, which would confirm a~possible underestimation in the ice-core. Absolute dating of the cold spells occurring from 112 to 100 ka (MON 1-3) in the MON-2014 chronology is in good agreement with the GICC05 and NALPS timescales but the younger

  13. Annual proxy data from Lago Grande di Monticchio (southern Italy) between 76 and 112 ka: new chronological constraints and insights on abrupt climatic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Puertas, C.; Brauer, A.; Wulf, S.; Ott, F.; Lauterbach, S.; Dulski, P.

    2014-12-01

    We present new annual sedimentological proxies and sub-annual element scanner data from the Lago Grande di Monticchio (MON) sediment record for the sequence 76-112 thousand years before present (ka). They are combined with the previously published decadal to centennial resolved pollen assemblage in order to provide a comprehensive reconstruction of six major abrupt stadial spells (MON 1-6) in the central Mediterranean during the early phase of the last glaciation. These climatic oscillations are defined by intervals of thicker varves and high Ti-counts and coincide with episodes of forest depletion interpreted as Mediterranean stadial conditions (cold winter/dry summer). Our chronology, labelled as MON-2014, has been updated for the study interval by tephrochronology and repeated and more precise varve counts and is independent from ice-core and speleothem chronologies. The high-resolution Monticchio data then have been compared in detail with the Greenland ice-core δ18O record (NorthGRIP) and the northern Alps speleothem δ18Ocalcite data (NALPS). Based on visual inspection of major changes in the proxy data, MON 2-6 are suggested to correlate with Greenland stadials (GS) 25-20. MON 1 (Woillard event), the first and shortest cooling spell in the Mediterranean after a long phase of stable interglacial conditions, has no counterpart in the Greenland ice core, but coincides with the lowest isotope values at the end of the gradual decrease in δ18Oice in NorthGRIP during the second half of the Greenland interstadial (GI) 25. MON 3 is the least pronounced cold spell and shows gradual transitions, whereas its NorthGRIP counterpart GS 24 is characterized by sharp changes in the isotope records. MON 2 and MON 4 are the longest and most pronounced oscillations in the MON sediments in good agreement with their counterparts identified in the ice and spelethem records. The length of MON 4 (correlating with GS 22) supports the duration of stadial proposed by the NALPS

  14. Pregnancy Complications: Placental Abruption

    MedlinePlus

    ... page It's been added to your dashboard . The placenta attaches to the wall of the uterus (womb) ... abruption is a serious condition in which the placenta separates from the wall of the uterus before ...

  15. Neanderthal and Anatomically Modern Human interaction with Abrupt Late Pleistocene Environments - the data is finally good enough to talk about climate change!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blockley, Simon; Schreve, Danielle

    2015-04-01

    The timing and nature of the appearance of Anatomically Modern Humans (AMH) in Europe, their interaction with, and eventual morphological replacement of Neanderthals (despite some shared genetic heritage) has been a matter of intense debate within archaeology for a generation. This period, often termed the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition occurs in the latter part of Marine Isotope Stage Three and in recent decades archaeological interest has been complemented by the input of palaeoclimate scientists, over the role of abrupt climate change in this process. This was due to the recognition from ice core and marine proxy archives, in particular, of periods if intense cooling, correlated to the marine record of Heinrich ice rafted debris layers from the Atlantic. As a result of these collaborations between the archaeological and palaeoenvironmental communities various drivers have been proposed for the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic Transition that include: (1) resource competition between two species occupying similar niches; (2) the impact of repeated cycles of Heinrich event cooling, leading to the decline and eventual disappearance of the Neanderthal populations, leaving a new region open for AMH exploitation; and (3) catastrophic impacts of large volcanic eruptions on Neanderthal populations. Attempts to address the above hypotheses have been dogged by the chronological precision available for a number of key archives. The accuracy of many of the radiocarbon ages that underpin the chronology for both Neanderthal and AMH archaeological sites has been questioned1. This has been exacerbated by uncertainties over the influence of variability in the radiocarbon marine reservoir effect on marine palaeoclimate records and a marine dominated radiocarbon calibration curve. Additionally, the counting uncertainties of the master Greenland palaeoclimate archives are also large by this time, meaning palaeoclimate interpretation can be equivocal. However, several research

  16. Centennial- to millennial-scale variability of surface ocean temperature and salinity in the Northern Gulf of Mexico during the late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirumalai, K.; Quinn, T. M.; Reynolds, C.; Flannery, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    We investigated centennial- to millennial- scale variability of sea-surface temperature (SST) and sea-surface salinity (SSS) in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) during the Late Holocene using foraminiferal geochemical records developed from a suite of multi-cores collected in the Garrison Basin (26.43N, 93.55W) in the summer 2010. A radiocarbon-derived chronology from these cores spanning ~4500 years revealed a sediment accumulation rate of 15 to 17 cm per kyr. We generated time series of paired Mg/Ca (SST proxy) and δ18O (SST and SSS proxy) variations in the white variety of the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber. Recent sediment trap studies indicate that G. ruber (white) is generally present throughout the year in the northern GOM. The geochemical records were replicated in three multi-cores to assess heterogeneity of the environmental signal. Initial stable isotopic results indicate that multi-cores from the Garrison Basin contain well-replicated, coherent, centennial- to millennial variability in δ18O. Our initial results compare well with published results from the Pigmy Basin, GOM. In addition, paired Mg/Ca and δ18O analyses of G. Ruber (white), collected from a sediment trap located ~350 km from the multi-core site lend confidence that down-core variations are robustly correlated with surface ocean temperature and salinity variability.

  17. Millennial scale Record of Terrestrial Pliocene-Pleistocene warmth from Lake El'gygytgyn, NE Russia: What does it mean for Greenland's Ice Sheet history?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigham-Grette, J.; Melles, M.; Minyuk, P.; DeConto, R.; Koenig, S. J.; Andreev, A.; Tarasov, P.; Nowaczyk, N.; Wennrich, V.; Cook, T.; Snyder, J. A.; Gebhardt, C.; Coletti, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Pliocene-Pleistocene climate evolution of the Arctic must have modulated the glacial history of Greenland. Yet what is known from the terrestrial stratigraphy of Arctic climate change comes from sites that are spatially and temporally fragmented. In 2009, International Continental Deep drilling at Lake El'gygytgyn (67o30' N, 172 o 05' E) recovered lacustrine sediments dating back to 3.58 Ma that now provide the first time-continuous Pliocene-Pleistocene Arctic paleoclimate record of alternating glacial-interglacial change. The warmest and wettest Pliocene interval of the lake record occurs from ~3.58-3.34 Ma and is dominated by exceptional tree pollen implying July temperatures nearly 7-8o C warmer than today with nearly ~3 times the annual precipitation. Atmospheric CO2 levels are estimated to have been 360 to 400 ppm implying exceptionally high climate sensitivity and polar amplification. In fact, pollen spectra and modern analog analysis show an unbroken persistence of summers much warmer and wetter than the last interglacial, MIS 5e until nearly 2.2 Ma with abrupt changes in boreal forest composition at 2.715-2.695, 2.56 ad 2.53 Ma punctuated by an abrupt change in precipitation at 2.94-2.91 Ma. Modeling sensitivity experiments using 300 and 400 ppm CO2 are consistent with sustained forests at Lake El'gygytgyn during this interval and restricted glacial ice over Greenland in both cold and warm boreal summer orbits especially for the PRISM interval. Extreme warmth in the Mid Pliocene Arctic occurs at the same time ANDRILL results suggest the West Antarctic Ice Sheet was non-existent. The Lake El'gygytgyn record includes a strong M2 cooling event in a number of proxies at ~3.3 Ma, with conditions comparable to the early Holocene Thermal Maximum, but not glacial climates. Our reconstructions do not preclude the existence of a Greenland Ice sheet during M2 but are unfavorable for the initiation of ice over parts of North America until after 3.0 Ma. This has

  18. A Millennial-Scale Reduction in Ventilation of the Deep South Atlantic During the Last Interglacial Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, C. T.; Martinez-Garcia, A.; Hasenfratz, A. P.; Jaccard, S.; Hodell, D. A.; Sigman, D. M.; Haug, G. H.; Anderson, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    During the last interglacial period, global temperatures were ~2°C warmer than present and sea level was 6-8 m higher. Southern Ocean sediments from ODP Site 1094 reveal a spike in authigenic uranium 127,000 years ago, within the last interglacial, reflecting decreased oxygenation of deep water by Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). Increased deep storage of respired carbon due to this circulation event may explain an observed decline in atmospheric CO2 at this time. Unlike ice age reductions in AABW, the interglacial stagnation event appears decoupled from open ocean conditions and may have resulted from coastal freshening due to mass loss from the Antarctic ice sheet. AABW reduction coincided with increased North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation, and the subsequent reinvigoration in AABW coincided with reduced NADW formation. Alternation of deep water formation between the Antarctic and the North Atlantic, believed to characterize ice ages, apparently also occurs in warm climates.

  19. Tracking millennial-scale Holocene glacial advance and retreat using osmium isotopes: Insights from the Greenland ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Alan D.; Selby, David; Lloyd, Jeremy M.; Roberts, David H.; Lückge, Andreas; Sageman, Bradley B.; Prouty, Nancy G.

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution Os isotope stratigraphy can aid in reconstructing Pleistocene ice sheet fluctuation and elucidating the role of local and regional weathering fluxes on the marine Os residence time. This paper presents new Os isotope data from ocean cores adjacent to the West Greenland ice sheet that have excellent chronological controls. Cores MSM-520 and DA00-06 represent distal to proximal sites adjacent to two West Greenland ice streams. Core MSM-520 has a steadily decreasing Os signal over the last 10 kyr (187Os/188Os = 1.35-0.81). In contrast, Os isotopes from core DA00-06 (proximal to the calving front of Jakobshavn Isbræ) highlight four stages of ice stream retreat and advance over the past 10 kyr (187Os/188Os = 2.31; 1.68; 2.09; 1.47). Our high-resolution chemostratigraphic records provide vital benchmarks for ice-sheet modelers as we attempt to better constrain the future response of major ice sheets to climate change. Variations in Os isotope composition from sediment and macro-algae (seaweed) sourced from regional and global settings serve to emphasize the overwhelming effect weathering sources have on seawater Os isotope composition. Further, these findings demonstrate that the residence time of Os is shorter than previous estimates of ∼104 yr.

  20. Tracking millennial-scale Holocene glacial advance and retreat using Osmium isotopes: Insights from the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Alan; Selby, David; Lloyd, Jeremy; Roberts, David; Lückge, Andreas; Sageman, Bradley; Prouty, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    Using new high-resolution osmium (Os) isotope stratigraphy from cores adjacent to the Greenland ice sheet we highlight the potential for chemostratigraphy to contribute to our understanding of ice sheet dynamics. This study utilizes sediment cores that have excellent chronological controls and demonstrates the role of local and regional weathering fluxes on the marine Os residence time. Distal to the Greenland ice streams core MSM-520 displays a steady lowering of the Os isotope composition during the Holocene. In contrast, proximal to the calving front of Jakobshavn Isbræ (core DA00-06), the Os isotope stratigraphy highlights four stages of ice stream retreat and advance. Our chemostratigraphic records provide vital benchmarks as we attempt to better constrain the future response of major ice sheets to climate change. Variations in Os isotope composition from sediment and macro-algae (seaweed) sourced from both near-field and far-field settings emphasize the overwhelming effect local weathering sources have on seawater Os isotope composition.

  1. Tracking millennial-scale Holocene glacial advance and retreat using osmium isotopes: Insights from the Greenland ice sheet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rooney, Alan D.; Selby, David; Llyod, Jeremy M.; Roberts, David H.; Luckge, Andreas; Sageman, Bradley B.; Prouty, Nancy G.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution Os isotope stratigraphy can aid in reconstructing Pleistocene ice sheet fluctuation and elucidating the role of local and regional weathering fluxes on the marine Os residence time. This paper presents new Os isotope data from ocean cores adjacent to the West Greenland ice sheet that have excellent chronological controls. Cores MSM-520 and DA00-06 represent distal to proximal sites adjacent to two West Greenland ice streams. Core MSM-520 has a steadily decreasing Os signal over the last 10 kyr (187Os/188Os = 1.35–0.81). In contrast, Os isotopes from core DA00-06 (proximal to the calving front of Jakobshavn Isbræ) highlight four stages of ice stream retreat and advance over the past 10 kyr (187Os/188Os = 2.31; 1.68; 2.09; 1.47). Our high-resolution chemostratigraphic records provide vital benchmarks for ice-sheet modelers as we attempt to better constrain the future response of major ice sheets to climate change. Variations in Os isotope composition from sediment and macro-algae (seaweed) sourced from regional and global settings serve to emphasize the overwhelming effect weathering sources have on seawater Os isotope composition. Further, these findings demonstrate that the residence time of Os is shorter than previous estimates of ∼104 yr.

  2. A 2400-year record of abrupt climate change from Almalou Crate Lake in NW Iran: Investigating the potential influence of solar variability on the climate of West Asia during late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, A.; Pourmand, A.; Canuel, E. A.; Naderi Beni, A.; Lahijani, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Mediterranean climate of northwest Iran is influenced by mid-latitude Westerlies and the winter expansion of the Siberian Anticyclone. Given the significance of this region in development of human civilizations, high-resolution reconstructions of abrupt climate change are of particular interest during the Holocene. Almalou Crater Lake sustains the growth of plants inside the crater of a dormant volcanic cone on the eastern flank of the Sahand volcanic district in NW Iran. At an elevation of 2491 m.a.s.l., the crater is exclusively fed by rainfall during the spring and fall and snowfall during the winter. Preservation of organic matter within the crater can potentially record changes in atmospheric deposition and paleo-environmental conditions over this region. To reconstruct changes in atmospheric aeolian input, we present a high-resolution (sub-decadal) multi-proxy record of climate variability during the last 2400 years from a 3-m peat core recovered from the crater peat bog. Radiocarbon dates of eight samples along the core show a nearly constant rate of accumulation (7.7 mm yr-1, R2=0.98) since 2404×25 cal yr BP. Downcore X-ray fluorescence measurements of selected conservative lithogenic elements (e.g., Al, Si, and Ti) as well as redox-sensitive elements (e.g., Fe and Rb) at 10 mm intervals reveal several periods of elevated abundances related to enhanced atmospheric dust deposition. The co-variations between relative abundances of conservative and redox-sensitive elements as a function of time show significant agreement and attest to the ombrotrophic nature of the entire record. Intervals of enhanced dust deposition inferred from XRF data reveal three short episodes (~ 150-y) at 450-600, 1150-1300, and 1400-1550 cal yr BP, and one prolonged period (500 y) of dust accumulation from 1600 to 2070 cal yr BP. These intervals of high atmospheric dust coincide with historical records of drought and famine in Iran since 2000 BP. Wavelet analysis conducted on the

  3. Late Holocene subalpine lake sediments record a multi-proxy shift to increased aridity at 3.65 kyr BP, following a millennial-scale neopluvial interval in the Lake Tahoe watershed and western Great Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Paula; Zimmerman, Susan; Ball, Ian; Adams, Kenneth; Maloney, Jillian; Smith, Shane

    2016-04-01

    A mid Holocene dry period has been reported from lake records in the Great Basin and Sierra Nevada, yet the spatial and temporal extent of this interval is not well understood. We present evidence for a millennial-scale interval of high winter precipitation (neopluvial) at the end of the mid Holocene in the Lake Tahoe-Pyramid Lake watershed in the northern Sierra Nevada that reached its peak ˜3.7 kcal yr BP. A transect of 4 cores recovered from Fallen Leaf Lake in the Tahoe Basin were dated using AMS14C on plant macrofossils, and analyzed using scanning XRF, C and N elemental and stable isotope measurements, and diatoms as paleoclimate proxies. Fallen Leaf Lake is a deep glacially-derived lake situated in the Glen Alpine Valley at an elevation of 1942m, ˜45 m above the level of Lake Tahoe. In Fallen Leaf Lake, the end of the neopluvial is dated at 3.65 ± 0.09 kcal yr BP, and is the largest post-glacial signal in the cores. The neopluvial interval is interpreted to be a period of increased snowpack in the upper watershed, supported by depleted g δ13Corg (-27.5) values, negative baseline shifts in TOC and TN, lower C:N, and high abundances of Aulacoseira subarctica, a winter-early spring diatom. Collectively, these proxies indicate cooler temperatures, enhanced mixing, and/or shortened summer stratification resulting in increased algal productivity relative to terrestrial inputs. The neopluvial interval ends abruptly at 3.65 ka, with a change from mottled darker opaline clay to a homogeneous olive clay with decreased A. subarctica and opal, and followed by a 50% reduction in accumulation rates. After this transition δ13Corg becomes enriched by 2‰ and TOC, TN, and C:N all show the start of positive trends that continue through the Holocene. Pyramid Lake is an endorheic basin situated at the terminal end of the watershed, and inflow arrives from the Lake Tahoe basin via the Truckee River. At Pyramid Lake, existing ages on paleo-shorelines indicate a significant

  4. Orbital and millennial-scale environmental changes between 64 and 25 ka BP recorded in Black Sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumilovskikh, L. S.; Fleitmann, D.; Nowaczyk, N. R.; Behling, H.; Marret, F.; Wegwerth, A.; Arz, H. W.

    2013-09-01

    High-resolution pollen and dinoflagellate cyst records from marine sediment core 25-GC1 were used to reconstruct vegetation dynamics in Northern Anatolia and surface conditions of the Black Sea between 64 and 25 ka BP. During this period, the dominance of Artemisia in the pollen record indicates a steppe landscape and arid climate conditions. However, the presence of temperate and warm-temperate arboreal pollen suggests the existence of glacial refugia in Northern Anatolia. A general cooling trend towards 25 ka BP is evidenced by the decrease of Quercus and increase of Pinus. There is evidence of orbital-driven vegetation dynamics in Northern Anatolia during 64-25 ka BP with spread of steppe during precession minima (insolation maxima) and development of forests during precession maxima (insolation minima). Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events are characterized by a marked increase in temperate tree pollen, indicating a spread of forests due to warm and wet conditions in Northern Anatolia. The dominance of Pyxidinopsis psilata and Spiniferites cruciformis in the dinocyst record indicates a rather brackish Black Sea during the last glacial period. The decrease of marine indicators (marine dinocysts, acritachs) at ~ 54 ka BP and increase of freshwater algae (Pediastrum, Botryococcus) from 32 to 25 ka BP reveals freshening of the Black Sea surface water, related to orbital-driven arid/humid phases in the region, influencing hydrology and level changes of the Black Sea. D-O interstadials are characterized by high dinocyst concentrations and calcium carbonate content, as a result of an increase in primary productivity in the Black Sea. Heinrich events show a similar impact on the environment in Northern Anatolia/Black Sea region as D-O stadials.

  5. Contribution of enhanced Antarctic Bottom Water formation to Antarctic warm events and millennial-scale atmospheric CO2 increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menviel, L.; Spence, P.; England, M. H.

    2015-03-01

    During Marine Isotope Stage 3, the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) weakened significantly on a millennial time-scale leading to Greenland stadials. Ice core records reveal that each Greenland stadial is associated with a warming over Antarctica, so-called Antarctic Isotope Maximum (AIM), and that atmospheric CO2 increases with Antarctic temperature during the long Greenland stadials. Here we perform transient simulations spanning the period 50-34 ka B.P. with two Earth System Models (LOVECLIM and the UVic ESCM) to understand the possible link between changes in the AMOC, changes in high latitude Southern Hemispheric climate and evolution of atmospheric CO2. We find that oceanic carbon releases due to the AMOC resumption during stadial/interstadial transitions lead to an atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the atmospheric CO2 increases observed during the first parts of AIM12 (∼47.6 ka B.P.) and AIM8 (∼39.8 ka B.P.) occur during periods of weak AMOC (HS5 and HS4 respectively) and could instead be explained by enhanced Antarctic Bottom Water transport. Enhanced Antarctic Bottom Water formation is shown to effectively ventilate the deep Pacific carbon and lead to CO2 outgassing into the atmosphere. In addition, changes in the AMOC alone are not sufficient to explain the largest Antarctic Isotope Maxima (namely AIM12 and AIM8). Stronger formation of Antarctic Bottom Water during AIM12 and AIM8 would enhance the southern high latitude warming and lead to a better agreement with high southern latitude paleoproxy records. The robustness of this southern warming response is tested using an eddy-permitting coupled ocean sea-ice model. We show that stronger Antarctic Bottom Water formation contributes to Southern Ocean surface warming by increasing the Southern Ocean meridional heat transport.

  6. Orbital- and millennial-scale environmental changes between 64 and 20 ka BP recorded in Black Sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumilovskikh, L. S.; Fleitmann, D.; Nowaczyk, N. R.; Behling, H.; Marret, F.; Wegwerth, A.; Arz, H. W.

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution pollen and dinoflagellate cyst records from sediment core M72/5-25-GC1 were used to reconstruct vegetation dynamics in northern Anatolia and surface conditions of the Black Sea between 64 and 20 ka BP. During this period, the dominance of Artemisia in the pollen record indicates a steppe landscape and arid climate conditions. However, the concomitant presence of temperate arboreal pollen suggests the existence of glacial refugia in northern Anatolia. Long-term glacial vegetation dynamics reveal two major arid phases ~64-55 and 40-32 ka BP, and two major humid phases ~54-45 and 28-20 ka BP, correlating with higher and lower summer insolation, respectively. Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) cycles are clearly indicated by the 25-GC1 pollen record. Greenland interstadials are characterized by a marked increase in temperate tree pollen, indicating a spread of forests due to warm/wet conditions in northern Anatolia, whereas Greenland stadials reveal cold and arid conditions as indicated by spread of xerophytic biomes. There is evidence for a phase lag of ~500 to 1500 yr between initial warming and forest expansion, possibly due to successive changes in atmospheric circulation in the North Atlantic sector. The dominance of Pyxidinopsis psilata and Spiniferites cruciformis in the dinocyst record indicates brackish Black Sea conditions during the entire glacial period. The decrease of marine indicators (marine dinocysts, acritarchs) at ~54 ka BP and increase of freshwater algae (Pediastrum, Botryococcus) from 32 to 25 ka BP reveals freshening of the Black Sea surface water. This freshening is possibly related to humid phases in the region, to connection between Caspian Sea and Black Sea, to seasonal freshening by floating ice, and/or to closer position of river mouths due to low sea level. In the southern Black Sea, Greenland interstadials are clearly indicated by high dinocyst concentrations and calcium carbonate content, as a result of an increase in primary

  7. Contribution of enhanced Antarctic Bottom Water formation to Antarctic warm events and millennial-scale atmospheric CO2 increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menviel, L.; Spence, P.; England, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    During Marine Isotope Stage 3, the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) weakened significantly on a millennial time-scale leading to Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) and Heinrich stadials. Ice core records reveal that each Northern Hemisphere stadial is associated with a warming over Antarctica, so-called Antarctic Isotope Maximum (AIM), and that atmospheric CO2 varies in phase with Antarctic temperature. Here we perform transient simulations spanning the period 50-34 ka B.P. with two Earth System Models (LOVECLIM and the UVic ESCM) to understand the link between changes in the AMOC, changes in high latitude Southern Hemispheric climate and evolution of atmospheric CO2. Given the latest Antarctic ice core chronology, we find that part of the atmospheric CO2 increase occurring during AIM12 (DO12, ~48 ka B.P.) and at the end of AIM8 (DO8, 38 ka B.P.) can be attributed to the AMOC resumption. In contrast, the atmospheric CO2 increase observed at the beginning of AIM8 (~39.6 ka B.P.) occurs during a period of weak AMOC and can instead be explained by enhanced Antarctic Bottom Water production. Enhanced Antarctic Bottom Water formation is shown to effectively ventilate the deep Pacific carbon and thus lead to CO2 outgassing into the atmosphere. In addition, changes in the AMOC alone are not sufficient to explain the largest Antarctic Isotope Maxima (namely AIM12 and AIM8). Stronger formation of Antarctic Bottom Water during AIM12 and AIM8 enhances the southern high latitude warming and leads to a better agreement with high southern latitude paleoproxy records. The robustness of this southern warming response is tested using an eddy-permitting coupled ocean sea-ice model. We show that stronger Antarctic Bottom Water formation contributes to Southern Ocean surface warming by increasing the Southern Ocean meridional heat transport. Finally, our simulations also suggest that the Antarctic cooling should be in phase, or lag by a maximum of ~200 years, the North Atlantic

  8. Comparison of the timings between abrupt climate changes in Greenland, Antarctica, China and Japan based on robust correlation using Lake Suigetsu as a template.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, T.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution pollen-derived climate records from Lake Suigetsu varved sediment core were compared with climate archives from other regions and revealed a particular spatio-temporal structure of the monsoon climate change during so-called D-O events. Leads and lags of the climate change between different regions hold the key to understand the climate system. However, robust assessment of the relative timing of the climate change is often very challenging because correlation of the climatic archives from different regions often has inevitable uncertainties. Greenland and Cariaco basin, for example, provide two of the most frequently sited palaeoclimatic proxy data representative of the high- and low-latitudinal Atlantic regions. However, robust correlation of the records from those regions is difficult because of the uncertainties in layer countings, lack of the radiocarbon age control from ice cores, marine reservoir age of the Cariaco sediments, and the absence of the tephra layers shared by both cites. Similarly, Speleothem and ice core records are not robustly correlated to each other, either for the dead carbon fraction in the speleothems and lack of reliable correlation markers. The generally accepted hypothesis of synchronous climate change between China and the Greenland is, therefore, essentially hypothetical. Lake Suigetsu provides solution to this problem. The lake Suigetsu chronology is supposed to be coherent to the speleothems' U-Th age scale. Suigetsu's semi-continuous radiocarbon dataset, which constitutes major component of the IntCal13 radiocarbon calibration model, also provides opportunity to correlate lake Suigetsu and the Greenland and Antarctic ice cores using cosmogenic isotopes as the correlation key. Results of the correlation and timing comparison, which cast new lights to the mechanism of the monsoon change, will be presented.

  9. Understanding Abrupt, Natural Climate Variability Post-Industrial Revolution from the Subtropical Eastern Pacific: A Novel High Resolution Alkenone-derived Sea Surface Temperature Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, C. S.; O'Mara, N. A.; Herbert, T.; Abella-Gutiérrez, J. L.; Herguera, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the ocean's importance in global biogeochemical feedbacks and heat storage, there is still a paucity of decadally-resolved sea surface temperature (SST) records to complement lacustrine and dendrological records of recent paleoclimate. Natural climate variability on multidecadal timescales is dominated by internal ocean circulation dynamics and feedbacks, and it is therefore imperative to employ marine proxies to reconstruct high resolution climate change. The timescales of this ocean-induced natural climate variability can be broken down into a few characteristic climate modes. Pressing questions about these modes include their stationarity in frequency and amplitude over time, in addition to the hypothesis that anthropogenic climate change has altered their behavior in comparison to natural variability. To pursue these questions, we must discern and analyze suitable climate archives in regions where modes of interest dominate modern climate variability. The region of Baja California, Mexico exhibits exceptional teleconnection to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Local, dramatic effects of ENSO and PDO on the marine biology and economy underline the importance of regional paleoclimate records from the Baja peninsula. Here, we present a high-resolution alkenone-derived SST reconstruction from the Industrial Revolution through the year 2000 by analysis of laminated box and Kasten sediment cores at Site PCM 00-78 (25.18°N, 112.66°W) in the subtropical eastern Pacific at a depth of 540 meters. Our SST record corresponds with NOAA extended reconstructed sea surface temperature, providing a robust basis for organic geochemical marine climatic reconstructions on timescales usually accessible only through speleothems, coral density bands, tree rings, and the like. Accordingly, based on this comparison to the historical data we expect our SST record may provide a more robust record of inter and multidecadal

  10. Heat waves connect abrupt polar climate changes during the past 67ka: evidence from sediment core GeoB3912-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Rial, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    According to the hypothesis of polar synchronization, climate variations of Earth's poles are connected with a persistent phase lock of π/2 throughout the last glacial period. However, it is not clear yet how the Earth's two poles communicate with each other, the Thermohaline circulation (THC) being a possible candidate for signal carrier. Here we present a possible way of climate variation propagation through the Atlantic Ocean - likely in the form of heat or thermal wave (Cattaneo's solution) - based on lagged correlation between an organic carbon climate proxy record from the tropical Atlantic and the south-north polar temperature gradient. We further demonstrate that the speed of such propagation is frequency dependent, of which the wave of the longest period travels the fastest at the speed of ~32 km/year consistent with the estimated speed of the THC. The observed speed - frequency relationship can be successfully modeled as resulting from a propagating dispersive thermal wave initiated by the polar temperature gradient maximum. We show that such heat wave propagation is a potential mechanism to couple and synchronize the polar climates during the last glacial period and to force the occurrence of Heinrich events. To summarize, the polar temperature gradient anomalies are consequence of the π/2 phase lock between the polar climates, which is caused by polar synchronization maintained by the coupling, which is, as the data suggest, in the form of thermal waves. The spikes in organic carbon and the Fe/Ca ratio records in the core GeoB3912-1 can be thought of as snapshots of the passage of strong meteorological wavefronts through the equatorial region. The results strongly suggest that each peak in the organic carbon recorded a half-hemisphere-delayed passage of a wave-like disturbance through the equator carrying the south-north temperature gradient maxima. And each of these occurs within timing error of the Heinrich events H0-H6.

  11. Abrupt climate variability since the last deglaciation based on a high-resolution, multi-proxy peat record from NW Iran: The hand that rocked the Cradle of Civilization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Arash; Pourmand, Ali; Canuel, Elizabeth A.; Ferer-Tyler, Erin; Peterson, Larry C.; Aichner, Bernhard; Feakins, Sarah J.; Daryaee, Touraj; Djamali, Morteza; Beni, Abdolmajid Naderi; Lahijani, Hamid A. K.; Swart, Peter K.

    2015-09-01

    We present a high-resolution (sub-decadal to centennial), multi-proxy reconstruction of aeolian input and changes in palaeohydrological conditions based on a 13000 Yr record from Neor Lake's peripheral peat in NW Iran. Variations in relative abundances of refractory (Al, Zr, Ti, and Si), redox sensitive (Fe) and mobile (K and Rb) elements, total organic carbon (TOC), δ13CTOC, compound-specific leaf wax hydrogen isotopes (δD), carbon accumulation rates and dust fluxes presented here fill a large gap in the existing terrestrial paleoclimate records from the interior of West Asia. Our results suggest that a transition occurred from dry and dusty conditions during the Younger Dryas (YD) to a relatively wetter period with higher carbon accumulation rates and low aeolian input during the early Holocene (9000-6000 Yr BP). This period was followed by relatively drier and dustier conditions during middle to late Holocene, which is consistent with orbital changes in insolation that affected much of the northern hemisphere. Numerous episodes of high aeolian input spanning a few decades to millennia are prevalent during the middle to late Holocene. Wavelet analysis of variations in Ti abundances as a proxy for aeolian input revealed notable periodicities at 230, 320, and 470 years with significant periodicities centered around 820, 1550, and 3110 years over the last 13000 years. Comparison with palaeoclimate archives from West Asia, the North Atlantic and African lakes point to a teleconnection between North Atlantic climate and the interior of West Asia during the last glacial termination and the Holocene epoch. We further assess the potential role of abrupt climate change on early human societies by comparing our record of palaeoclimate variability with historical, geological and archaeological archives from this region. The terrestrial record from this study confirms previous evidence from marine sediments of the Arabian Sea that suggested climate change influenced the

  12. Abrupt changes in rainfall during the twentieth century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narisma, G.; Foley, J.; Licker, R.; Ramankutty, N.

    2007-12-01

    A sudden change in climate is brought about by complex interactions in the climate system, including interactions between land and atmosphere, that can give rise to strong positive feedback mechanisms. Paleoclimatic studies have shown that abrupt climate changes have happened in the geologic past. Studies of future climate change under global warming scenarios indicate the possibility of the sudden collapse of the thermohaline circulation, which will have major implications for the climate of Europe. However, abrupt climatic changes are not events of the geologic past or a computer-simulated future: they have occurred in recent history and have had serious consequences on society and the environment. The prolonged Sahel drought in the late 1960s and the Dust Bowl of the 1930s are examples of abrupt climatic changes of the twentieth century. Apart from these events, however, there has been no systematic survey of recent climate history to determine the prevalence of abrupt climatic changes. Given the potential cost of these abrupt changes, there is a need to investigate historical records for evidence of other sudden climatic changes in the more recent past. Here we analyze the Climate Research Unit global historical rainfall observations (covering the years 1901-2000) using wavelet analysis to detect regions that have undergone large, sudden decreases in rainfall. We show that in the twentieth century, aside from the Sahel and the US midwest, at least 30 regions in the world have experienced sudden climatic changes. These events are statistically significant at the 99 percent level, are persistent for at least ten years, and most have magnitudes of change that are 10 percent lower than the climatological normal (1901-2000 rainfall average). We also illustrate some of the potential consequences of these abrupt changes and show that these events had major impacts on social and environmental conditions. Interestingly, these regions of abrupt precipitation changes are

  13. Examining Risks, Extreme Events, and Abrupt Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, Julia; Keller, Klaus; Edwards, Tamsin

    2013-08-01

    Climate change research in Japan has shifted focus significantly in the past 2 years, with a greater emphasis on risks, extreme events, and abrupt changes. Two new national government-funded 5-year projects, Integrated Climate Assessment—Risks, Uncertainty and Society (ICA-RUS) and Program for Risk Information on Climate Change (SOUSEI) will focus on climate-induced risks and hazards and the possibility of fast climate changes. In light of the devastating Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and consequent nuclear accident that occurred 2 years ago in Japan, there is also an increased interest in looking again at risks previously thought to be highly unlikely and in searching for potential risks that have not been considered.

  14. Multiple abrupt climate changes in the western hemisphere during the past 50,000 years, and their implications concerning the response of vegetation to changing atmospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, G.L. Jr.; Grimm, E.C.

    1995-06-01

    Independent evidence spanning the last 50,000 years from ice cores, ocean sediments, and detailed glacial-geologic investigations implies multiple. large warm/cool oscillations with a frequency of ca. 3000 years through much of the Western Hemisphere. Paleoecological studies at sites in North America and the west coast of South America reveal major, synchronous changes in vegetation corresponding to many of these high-frequency changes in climate. Sequences on both sides of the equator culminate in substantial warming at 14 ka BP and a brief cooling at ca. 11 ka BP just prior to the final onset of Holocene warming. The high-frequency climate oscillations are not explained by {open_quotes}Milankovitch{close_quotes} cycles in solar insolation or by changes in thermohaline ocean circulation. Rather, these changes in climate and the attendant synchronous, broad-scale responses of vegetation indicate a global atmospheric forcing. However, that forcing is apparently also distinct from changing concentrations of atmospheric CO2 (as represented in the Vostok ice-core data). High-resolution CO2 data, such as that from the new Greenland ice cores, will be required before critical assessments of plant-physiological responses to past atmospheric changes can be carried out.

  15. A stratigraphic framework for naming and robust correlation of abrupt climatic changes during the last glacial period based on three synchronized Greenland ice core records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Sune O.

    2014-05-01

    Due to their outstanding resolution and well-constrained chronologies, Greenland ice core records have long been used as a master record of past climatic changes during the last interglacial-glacial cycle in the North Atlantic region. As part of the INTIMATE (INtegration of Ice-core, MArine and TErrestrial records) project, protocols have been proposed to ensure consistent and robust correlation between different records of past climate. A key element of these protocols has been the formal definition of numbered Greenland Stadials (GS) and Greenland Interstadials (GI) within the past glacial period as the Greenland expressions of the characteristic Dansgaard-Oeschger events that represent cold and warm phases of the North Atlantic region, respectively. Using a recent synchronization of the NGRIP, GRIP, and GISP2 ice cores that allows the parallel analysis of all three records on a common time scale, we here present an extension of the GS/GI stratigraphic template to the entire glacial period. This is based on a combination of isotope ratios (δ18O, reflecting mainly local temperature) and calcium concentrations (reflecting mainly atmospheric dust loading). In addition to the well-known sequence of Dansgaard-Oeschger events that were first defined and numbered in the ice core records more than two decades ago, a number of short-lived climatic oscillations have been identified in the three synchronized records. Some of these events have been observed in other studies, but we here propose a consistent scheme for discriminating and naming all the significant climatic events of the last glacial period that are represented in the Greenland ice cores. This is a key step aimed at promoting unambiguous comparison and correlation between different proxy records, as well as a more secure basis for investigating the dynamics and fundamental causes of these climatic perturbations. The work presented is under review for publication in Quaternary Science Reviews. Author team: S

  16. Abrupt changes in rainfall during the twentieth century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narisma, Gemma T.; Foley, Jonathan A.; Licker, Rachel; Ramankutty, Navin

    2007-03-01

    Complex interactions in the climate system can give rise to strong positive feedback mechanisms that may lead to sudden climatic changes. The prolonged Sahel drought and the Dust Bowl are examples of 20th century abrupt climatic changes that had serious effects on ecosystems and societies. Here we analyze global historical rainfall observations to detect regions that have undergone large, sudden decreases in rainfall. Our results show that in the 20th century about 30 regions in the world have experienced such changes. These events are statistically significant at the 99% level, are persistent for at least ten years, and most have magnitudes of change that are 10% lower than the climatological normal (1901-2000 rainfall average). This analysis illustrates the extent and magnitude of abrupt climate changes across the globe during the 20th century and may be used for studying the dynamics of and the mechanisms behind these abrupt changes.

  17. Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution Project (RICE): A 65 Kyr ice core record of black carbon aerosol deposition to the Ross Ice Shelf, West Antarctica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Ross; Bertler, Nancy; Tuohy, Andrea; Neff, Peter; Proemse, Bernedette; Feiteng, Wang; Goodwin, Ian; Hogan, Chad

    2015-04-01

    Emitted by fires, black carbon aerosols (rBC) perturb the atmosphere's physical and chemical properties and are climatically active. Sedimentary charcoal and other paleo-fire records suggest that rBC emissions have varied significantly in the past due to human activity and climate variability. However, few paleo rBC records exist to constrain reconstructions of the past rBC atmospheric distribution and its climate interaction. As part of the international Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution (RICE) project, we have developed an Antarctic rBC ice core record spanning the past ~65 Kyr. The RICE deep ice core was drilled from the Roosevelt Island ice dome in West Antarctica from 2011 to 2013. The high depth resolution (~ 1 cm) record was developed using a single particle intracavity laser-induced incandescence soot photometer (SP2) coupled to an ice core melter system. The rBC record displays sub-annual variability consistent with both austral dry-season and summer biomass burning. The record exhibits significant decadal to millennial-scale variability consistent with known changes in climate. Glacial rBC concentrations were much lower than Holocene concentrations with the exception of several periods of abrupt increases in rBC. The transition from glacial to interglacial rBC concentrations occurred over a much longer time relative to other ice core climate proxies such as water isotopes and suggests . The protracted increase in rBC during the transition may reflected Southern hemisphere ecosystem / fire regime changes in response to hydroclimate and human activity.

  18. RESTORING COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS: ABRUPT CLIMATE CHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Consensus exists that U.S. coastal ecosystems are severely degraded due to a variety of human-factors requiring large financial expenditures to restore and manage. Yet, even as controversy surrounds human factors in ecosystem degradation in the Gulf of Mexico, Chesapeake Bay, an...

  19. Abrupt Climate Change Research Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Collins, Susan M. [R-ME

    2009-09-14

    09/14/2009 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (text of measure as introduced: CR S9330) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. A 60,000-yr record of climate in Southeast Tropical Africa: Preliminary results from Lake Tanganyika

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, J.; Russell, J.

    2006-12-01

    Few paleoclimate records exist that record high-frequency climate variability within tropical Africa, particularly during Marine Isotope Stage 3 (30-60,000 years BP). Thus very little is known about the potential role or response the region may have with regards to high-latitude abrupt climate change. However, climate variability in tropical East Africa is linked to large-scale changes in the convective intensity and location of the inter- tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and the strength of the seasonal monsoonal winds from both the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Understanding tropical African climate history may illuminate the causes and amplifying mechanisms of global climate change. We present here a multiproxy record of 60,000 years of climate variability from the sediments of Lake Tanganyika, southeast tropical Africa, which addresses outstanding questions regarding the role of East Africa in the context of abrupt climate change. Continuously accumulating hemipelagic sediments recovered from 650 m water depth from the southern half of Lake Tanganyika record hydrologic variability, terrestrial paleoenvironments, and changes in wind-driven upwelling intensity. Major element variations in Tanganyika sediments measured at 1 mm resolution by scanning XRF resolve changes in sediment geochemistry over decadal to centennial timescales, shedding light on the amplitude and frequency of short-term climate variability in this region. Additionally, records of bulk stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N), compound- specific δD, and biogenic silica indicate rapid, dramatic changes in lake productivity, vegetation, and rainfall over millennial time-scales from Marine Isotope Stage 3 to present, including the Younger Dryas. In the case of the latter, the Younger Dryas is manifest in Lake Tanganyika as a sedimentary sequence of low diatom content, indicating reductions in southerly monsoonal windspeed and lake upwelling, and hydrogen isotope data over this interval indicate significant

  1. Sonographic spectrum of placental abruption.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, D A; Cyr, D R; Mack, L A; Wilson, D A; Shuman, W P

    1987-01-01

    Fifty-seven cases of placental abruption detected by sonography were retrospectively reviewed. The location of hemorrhage was subchorionic in 46 cases (81%), retroplacental in nine cases (16%), and preplacental in two cases (4%). Subchorionic hematomas were more frequently shown in the 33 patients presenting before 20 menstrual weeks (91%) than in the 24 patients presenting after 20 weeks (67%). The echogenicity of hemorrhage depended on the time the sonogram was performed relative to the onset of symptoms: Acute hemorrhage was hyperechoic to isoechoic compared with the placenta, while resolving hematomas became hypoechoic within 1 week and sonolucent within 2 weeks. Acute hemorrhage was occasionally difficult to distinguish from the adjacent placenta. This occurred in five retroplacental hematomas that showed only an abnormally thick and heterogeneous placenta. Nine cases of placental abruption were initially confused with other mass lesions. Placental abruption causes a wide spectrum of sonographic findings that may be overlooked or misdiagnosed. PMID:3538831

  2. Orbital and suborbital-scale sedimentary rhythms in the Middle Miocene Onnagawa Formation, Northeastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, S.; Tada, R.; Takahashi, S.; Itaki, T.; Kubota, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Late Quaternary climate is characterized by millennial-scale abrupt climatic changes namely Dansgaard-Oeschger Cycles. Such millennial-scale changes are faithfully recorded in the Japan Sea sediments as alternation of dark and light colored silty clay, and the relationship between the millennial-scale variability and orbitally-driven changes in ice volume has been explored. On the other hand, presence of similar millennial-scale changes was reported from the Middle Miocene alternations of dark and light colored siliceous rocks in the Onnnagawa Formation, Northeastern Japan. Because large, unstable ice sheet was present during the Late Quaternary and the Middle Miocene, it is suggested that such millennial-scale variability and waxing and waning of unstable ice sheet could be interrelated. Thus, it is important to specify the cyclicity and the amplitude variability of millennial-scale cycles during the Middle Miocene to understand the underlying mechanism and the ultimate cause. The Middle Miocene Onnagawa Formation is known as bedded siliceous rocks equivalent to the Monterey Formation, California. Tada (1991) demonstrated that its cm-scale dark-light colored alternations reflected millennial-scale variability. However, the timing, periodicity, and duration of the millennial-scale variability are not fully understood. Thus, we aim to clarify when the millennial-scale variability became distinct and faded out, and examine its possible association with ice volume changes. We conducted a field survey in the Yashima area, Akita, Northeastern Japan to reconstruct a continuous sedimentary record throughout the Middle Miocene, and constructed the age model based on biostratigraphy. In addition, we identified cyclic changes in lithology, and applied cyclostratigraphy to produce the high-resolution age model. Based on this age model, we attempt correlation with δ18O curve to examine the relationship between cyclicity of δ18O changes and occurrence of millennial-scale

  3. Glacier response to North Atlantic climate variability during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balascio, N. L.; D'Andrea, W. J.; Bradley, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    Small glaciers and ice caps respond rapidly to climate variations, and records of their past extent provide information on the natural envelope of past climate variability. Millennial-scale trends in Holocene glacier size are well documented and correspond with changes in Northern Hemisphere summer insolation. However, there is only sparse and fragmentary evidence for higher-frequency variations in glacier size because in many Northern Hemisphere regions glacier advances of the past few hundred years were the most extensive and destroyed the geomorphic evidence of ice growth and retreat during the past several thousand years. Thus, most glacier records have been of limited use for investigating centennial-scale climate forcing and feedback mechanisms. Here we report a continuous record of glacier activity for the last 9.5 ka from southeast Greenland derived from high-resolution measurements on a proglacial lake sediment sequence. Physical and geochemical parameters show that the glaciers responded to previously documented Northern Hemisphere climatic excursions, including the "8.2 ka" cooling event, the Holocene Thermal Maximum, Neoglacial cooling, and 20th century warming. In addition, the sediments indicate centennial-scale oscillations in glacier size during the late Holocene. Beginning at 4.1 ka, a series of abrupt glacier advances occurred, each lasting ~100 years and followed by a period of retreat, that were superimposed on a gradual trend toward larger glacier size. Thus, while declining summer insolation caused long-term cooling and glacier expansion during the late Holocene, climate system dynamics resulted in repeated episodes of glacier expansion and retreat on multi-decadal to centennial timescales. These episodes coincided with ice rafting events in the North Atlantic Ocean and periods of regional ice cap expansion, which confirms their regional significance and indicates that considerable glacier activity on these timescales is a normal feature of

  4. Abrupt shifts in Horn of Africa hydroclimate since the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Jessica E; deMenocal, Peter B

    2013-11-15

    The timing and abruptness of the initiation and termination of the Early Holocene African Humid Period are subjects of ongoing debate, with direct consequences for our understanding of abrupt climate change, paleoenvironments, and early human cultural development. Here, we provide proxy evidence from the Horn of Africa region that documents abrupt transitions into and out of the African Humid Period in northeast Africa. Similar and generally synchronous abrupt transitions at other East African sites suggest that rapid shifts in hydroclimate are a regionally coherent feature. Our analysis suggests that the termination of the African Humid Period in the Horn of Africa occurred within centuries, underscoring the nonlinearity of the region's hydroclimate. PMID:24114782

  5. Millennial-scale Variability in Antarctic Ice-Sheet Discharge Throughout the Last Deglaciation From Scotia Sea Records of Iceberg-Rafted Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, P. U.; Weber, M. E.; Timmermann, A.; Lohmann, G.; Menviel, L.; Gladstone, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    The deglacial evolution of the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 26,000 - 19,000 years ago) is based largely on a few well-dated but temporally and geographically restricted terrestrial and shallow-marine sequences. This sparseness limits our understanding of the dominant feedbacks between the AIS, Southern Hemisphere climate, and global sea level. Marine records of iceberg-rafted debris (IBRD) provide a nearly continuous signal of ice-sheet dynamics and variability. IBRD records from the North Atlantic Ocean have been widely used to reconstruct variability in Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, but comparable records from the Southern Ocean of the AIS are lacking due to the low resolution and large dating uncertainties in existing sediment cores. Here we present two well-dated, high-resolution IBRD records that capture a spatially integrated signal of AIS variability during the last deglaciation. We document eight events of increased iceberg flux from various parts of the AIS between 19,000 and 9,000 years ago, in marked contrast to previous scenarios which identified the main AIS retreat as occurring after Meltwater Pulse 1A (MWP-1A) and continuing into the late Holocene. The highest IBRD flux occurred 14,600 years ago, providing the first direct evidence for an Antarctic contribution to MWP-1A. Climate model simulations with AIS freshwater forcing identify a positive feedback between poleward transport of Circumpolar Deep Water, subsurface warming and AIS melt, suggesting that small perturbations to the ice sheet can be substantially enhanced and providing a possible mechanism for rapid sea-level rise.

  6. Changes in biomass burning mark the onset of an ENSO-influenced climate regime at 42°S in southwest Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Michael-Shawn; Benson, Alexa; Heijnis, Hendrik; Gadd, Patricia S.; Cwynar, Les C.; Rees, Andrew B. H.

    2015-08-01

    We use macroscopic charcoal and sediment geochemistry analysis of two proximal upper montane lakes located at 42°S in southwest Tasmania, Australia, to test the role of the southern hemisphere westerly winds (SWW) and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in governing the climate of this sector of the southern mid-to high-latitudes. Inter-annual climate anomalies in the study area are driven by changes in both ENSO and the Southern Annular Mode (SAM - an index that describes seasonal to decadal shifts in the SWW), making it an ideal location to test assumptions about the varying influence of the SWW and ENSO, two important components of the global climate system, through time. We find multi-millennial scale trends in fire activity that are remarkably consistent with trends in hydroclimate reconstructed at the same latitude in southern South America, providing empirical support for the notion of zonally symmetric changes in the SWW governing the climate at this latitude in the Southern Hemisphere between 12 and 5 cal ka BP. A transition from multi-millennial scale to sub-millennial scale trends in fire activity occurs after ca 5 cal ka BP in concert with the onset of high frequency and amplitude ENSO variability in the tropical Pacific Ocean region. We conclude that the onset of sub-millennial scale trends in ENSO drove changes in fire activity in our study region over the last ca 5 cal ka. Geochemical data reveals divergent local impacts at the two study sites in response to these major climate transitions that are related to local topography and geography.

  7. Drivers of Millennial-Scale Change in the 3.6 Myr record from Lake El'gygytgyn, Western Beringia (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigham-Grette, J.; Melles, M.; Minyuk, P. S.; Castaneda, I. S.; Deconto, R. M.; Burns, S. J.; Wei, J.; Finkelstein, D. B.; Nowaczyk, N. R.

    2013-12-01

    In 2009, International Continental Deep drilling at Lake El'gygytgyn (67o30' N, 172 o 05' E) recovered lacustrine sediments dating back to 3.58 Ma that provide the first time-continuous Pliocene-Pleistocene Arctic paleoclimate record of alternating glacial-interglacial change. The warmest/wettest Pliocene interval of the lake record occurs from ~3.58-3.34 Ma and is dominated by exceptional tree pollen implying July temperatures nearly 7-8o C warmer than today with nearly ~3 times the annual precipitation. Atmospheric CO2 levels are estimated to have been 360 to 400 ppm implying exceptionally high climate sensitivity and polar amplification. In fact, pollen spectra and modern analog analysis show an unbroken persistence of summers much warmer and wetter than the last interglacial, MIS 5e until nearly 2.2 Ma. Extreme warmth in the Mid Pliocene Arctic occurs at the same time ANDRILL results suggest the West Antarctic Ice Sheet was non-existent. Modeling sensitivity experiments using 300 and 400 ppm CO2 are consistent with sustained forests at Lake El'gygytgyn during this interval and restricted glacial ice over Greenland in both cold and warm boreal summer orbits especially for the PRISM interval. This has implications for reinterpreting the M2 isotopic shift in the North Atlantic suggesting that most of the ice advance at that time was in Antarctica. Using physical, chemical, and biological proxies we find pronounced glacial episodes commenced ~2.6 Ma ago, but the full range of typical Pleistocene glacial/interglacial change wasn't established until ~1.8 Ma ago. Numerous 'super interglacials' during the Quaternary record, with maximum summer temperatures and annual precipitation, especially during MIS 9,11 and 31, at Lake El'gygytgyn exceed that documented for MIS 5e. Evaluation of the color spectra from parts of the middle Pleistocene suggests that hue can be used as a proxy for wet and dry cycles and there is a suggestion that precession cycles may be found within

  8. Lithologic expressions of glacial/interglacial and millennial-scale variability in the Pacific sub-Arctic record during the Pleistocene (Bering Sea, IODP Exp. 323)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, M.; Aiello, I. W.

    2012-12-01

    Diatom-rich, Pleistocene sediments collected in the Bering Sea during IODP Exp. 323 in the Bering Slope (Sites U1339 and U1344) and at the Bowers Ridge (Site U1340) show prominent variability of physical properties (e.g. bulk density), lithology and in the preservation of diatom valves. Using the shipboard physical property data in combination with newly generated smear slide counts and laser particle size (LPS) analyses we were able to quantify the sedimentary components for statistical analysis. Our data confirm that bulk density is negatively correlated with mean grain size (~30%) and abundance of diatoms (~40%) while it positively correlates with clay size particles (~20%) and silt-size siliciclastic particles (~20%). However, clay size particles and silt-size siliciclastic show no significant correlation, suggesting independent sources. We also found that diatom valve integrity is correlated with the abundance of diatoms (~40%) suggesting that diatom preservation increases with increasing opal fluxes. Finally, we found a surprisingly low correlation (only ~30%) between abundance of clay minerals (from smear slide counts) and percent clay-sized particles (LPS); SEM analysis supports the interpretation that a significant portion of clay-sized particles could derive from the dissolution/fragmentation of diatom biosilica. In conclusion, more than 40% of lithologic variability in the Bering Sea sediments reflects changes in the abundance of diatoms and siliciclastic particles: glacial/stadial (interglacial/interstadial) conditions were characterized by lower (higher) primary productivity, higher (lower) terrigenous input, and diatom valve dissolution and formation of clay-size biosilica particles (higher diatom valve preservation). Our approach offers new insights on the links between changes in sedimentation and oceanography at different scales of climate variability in the Bering Sea and potentially in other similar high latitude basins.

  9. The influence of mantle viscosity structure and past decadal to millennial-scale ice mass changes on present-day land motion in Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Matthew; Wake, Leanne; Milne, Glenn; Huybrechts, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    We show predictions of present-day vertical land motion in Greenland using a recently developed Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) model, calibrated using both relative sea-level observations and geomorphological contraints on ice extent (Simpson et al., 2009). Predictions from our GIA model are in good agreement to the relatively small number of GPS measurements of absolute vertical motion from south and southwest Greenland. This suggests that our model of ice sheet evolution over the Holocene period is reasonably accurate. The uplift predictions are highly sensitive to variations of upper mantle viscosity; depending on the Earth model adopted different periods of ice loading change dominate the present-day response in particular regions of Greenland. We shall present a suite of results to demonstrate this sensitivity. We also consider the possible influence of more recent changes in the ice sheet by applying a second ice model; specifically, a surface mass balance (SMB) model (Wake et al., 2009), which covers the period 1866 to 2005. Predictions from this model suggest that decadal-scale SMB changes over the last c. 140 years play only a small role in determining the present-day viscous response. However, high rates of peripheral thinning from 1995 to 2005 in the SMB model produce large elastic uplift rates in west and southwest Greenland. Using the same SMB model, we extend our study period to cover the last thousand years (for which there is less accurate climate data) and constrain ice mass changes over this time using new high resolution records of relative sea-level change. Our preliminary findings suggest that century-scale ice mass variation over the last thousand years may contribute significantly to the present-day viscous response. Simpson, M.J.R, Milne, G.A., Huybrechts, P., Long, A.J., 2009. Calibrating a glaciological model of the Greenland ice sheet from the last glacial maximum to present-day using field observations of relative sea level and ice

  10. Orbital and millennial-scale variability in the southernmost reaches of the South American summer monsoon during the last 50 ka BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiessi, C. M.; Govin, A.; Mulitza, S.; Campos, M. D.

    2013-05-01

    The South American summer monsoon (SASM) and its related features (e.g., the South Atlantic Convergence Zone) deliver most of the precipitation for the Amazon and La Plata basins, the two largest drainage systems in South America. Marine, cave and lake records mainly from equatorial and tropical South America show that the strength of the SASM fluctuated on orbital and millennial time-scales, with a strong SASM during periods of high austral summer insolation. On millennial time-scales, precipitation in tropical South America to the south of the equator was increased during periods of a weak Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Nevertheless, there is an almost complete lack of information about changes in precipitation in the subtropics and mid-latitudes of South America. This area comprises the transition from the southernmost reaches of the SASM to the semi-arid northern Patagonia, and is highly sensitive to changes in precipitation because: (i) it mainly receives precipitation during austral summer (related to the SASM); and (ii) it shows a steep gradient in total annual precipitation (going from ca. 1000 mm/yr around 30oS to ca. 200 mm/yr around 40oS). Here we present recently acquired data from the terrigenous fraction of marine sediment core GeoB6308-3 (39.30oS / 53.97oW / 3620 m water depth / 793 cm long) collected off southeastern South America. Our age model is based on 18 14C AMS ages while information about changes in continental climate comes from bulk sediment major element (i.e., Ca, Fe, Al, Si, Ti, K) proportions and Nd isotopes. The core recorded the last ca. 50 ka BP and its terrigenous sediment fraction shows a typical Central-West Argentinean / Patagonian isotopic signature. Through X-ray fluorescence scanning we were able to produce a record with mean temporal resolution of 35 yr. In our presentation, we will discuss changes in the southernmost reaches of the SASM and compare it to other records from South and Central America with the

  11. Towards Greenland Glaciation: cumulative or abrupt transition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ning; Dumas, Christophe; Ladant, Jean-Baptiste; Ramstein, Gilles; Contoux, Camille

    2016-04-01

    During the mid-Pliocene warming period (3-3.3 Ma BP), global annual mean temperature is warmer by 2-3 degree than pre-industrial. Greenland ice sheet volume is supposed to be a 50% reduction compared to nowadays [Haywood et al. 2010]. Around 2.7-2.6 Ma BP, just ~ 500 kyr after the warming peak of mid-Pliocene, there is already full Greenland Glaciation [Lunt et al. 2008]. How does Greenland ice sheet evolve from a half size to a glaciation level during 3 Ma - 2.5 Ma? Data show that there is a decreasing trend of atmospheric CO2 concentration from 3 Ma to 2.5 Ma [Seki et al.2010; Bartoli et al. 2011; Martinez et al. 2015]. However, a recent study [Contoux et al. 2015] suggests that a lowering of CO2 is not sufficient to initiate a perennial glaciation on Greenland and must be combined to low summer insolation, to preserve the ice sheet during insolation maximum, suggesting a cumulative process. In order to diagnose whether the ice sheet build-up is an abrupt event or a cumulative process, we carry on, for the first time, a transient simulation of climate and ice sheet evolutions from 3 Ma to 2.5 Ma. This strategy enables to investigate waxing and waning of the ice sheet during several orbital cycles. To reach this goal, we use a tri-dimensional interpolation method designed by Ladant et al. (2014) which combines the evolution of CO2 concentration, orbital parameters and Greenland ice sheet sizes in an off-line way by interpolating snapshots simulations. Thanks to this new method, we can build a transient like simulation through asynchronous coupling between GCM and ice sheet model. With this method, we may consistently answer the question of the build-up of Greenland: abrupt or cumulative process.

  12. 40Ar/39Ar dated climatic and hydrological variability between MIS20 and MIS18 at Sulmona Basin (central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchetta, Giovanni; Giaccio, Biagio; Eleonora, Reagattieri; Nomade, Sebastien; Renne, Paul R.; Sprain, Courtney J.; Drysdale, Russell N.; Tzedakis, Polychronis C.; Messina, Paolo; Scardia, Giancarlo; Sposato, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Understanding spatial-temporal variability, magnitude and different expressions of Quaternary millennial-scale palaeoclimatic changes is one of the frontier challenges of modern palaeoclimatology. Addressing this issue requires the acquisition of regionally representative, and ideally independently-dated, records of climatic variability. Multiproxy record (stable isotopes, XRF, MS, %CaCO3) from lacustrine succession of Sulmona basin (central Italy), highlights climatic and hydrological variability at orbital to millennial scales between MIS20 and MIS18. The record highlights the presence of interesting millennial scale variability within MIS19, considered to be the best orbital analogue of the current interglacial. The presence of several tephra layers precisely dated by 40Ar/39Ar technique, allow placement of the record within a robust time frame. Assembling a high-resolution paleoclimatic record for MIS19 anchored to a high-precision 40Ar/39Ar chronology, it is possible to show that the MIS 19c interglacial started shortly before the boreal summer insolation and obliquity maximum/precession minimum at 790-788 ka, and ended 11.6 ± 2.3 kyr later, when orbital parameters assumed a configuration similar to the present one.

  13. Reconstruction of Holocene Climate Variability within the Central Mediterranean Using Lake Sediments from the Akrotiri Peninsula, Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magill, C. R.; Rosenmeier, M. F.; Cavallari, B. J.; Curtis, J. H.; Weiss, H.

    2005-12-01

    Middle and late Holocene geochemical records from the Limnes depression, a small sinkhole located within the Akrotiri Peninsula, Crete, document centennial and millennial-scale climate variability within the central Mediterranean region. The oldest sediments of the basin consist largely of fibrous plant macrofossils and organic matter and likely indicate lake filling and expansion of wetland vegetation beginning ~5700 radiocarbon years before present (14C-yrs B.P.) (4550 B.C.). The basal peat layers grade into predominantly open water and less shallow lacustrine deposits by 4500 14C-yrs B.P (3200 B.C.). Continuous open water sedimentation within the Limnes core is interrupted by a number of distinct lag deposits and peaty deposits centered at 3700, 1600, and 350 14C-yrs B.P (2100 B.C., 500 A.D., and 1500 A.D.) indicating periods of significantly lowered lake level or perhaps lake desiccation. These ages coincide roughly with oxygen isotope (δ18O) minima measured in biogenic carbonates (ostracod shells) and support the inference for low lake stage. Trace element (Ca, Mg, and Sr) concentrations in ostracod shells from the Limnes core parallel the oxygen isotope record, suggesting that the data reflect basin hydrology rather than changes in the isotopic composition of rainfall. Furthermore, covariance in both δ18O and Mg concentrations eliminate temperature as a control on the oxygen isotope record. Sediments from the basin also contain aragonite remains of the green alga Chara and isotope analysis of the calcite may record additional paleoenvironmental information. The paleoclimate history inferred from the Limnes record correlates temporally (albeit tenuously) to previous paleoenvironmental data that document abrupt onset of arid conditions in the eastern Mediterranean and western Asia ca. 2200 B.C. Moreover, stratigraphic and geochemical evidence of low lake level (drying) within the Limnes basin at 2100 B.C. may correspond to the termination of the Early Minoan

  14. A comparison of Holocene rapid climatic variability between the western and eastern parts of the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, W. J.; Valsecchi, V.; Sánchez Goñi, M. F.; Londeix, L.

    2009-12-01

    Direct correlation of terrestrial and marine climatic data for marine cores MD95-2043 (Alboran Sea, western Mediterranean) and MD01-2430 (Marmara Sea, eastern Mediterranean) provides evidence for millennial-scale climatic changes in western and eastern Mediterranean sectors during the Holocene. In the Alboran region, multi-centennial-scale oscillations in sea surface temperatures and forest development (temperate forest pollen anomalies of 5-20%) are detected throughout the Holocene. Early Holocene forest declines are detected at ca. 10.1, 9.3, 8.2 and 7.4 ka, in phase with early Holocene events of high-latitude cooling, meltwater pulses and N. Atlantic ice-rafting. Subsequent mid- and late- Holocene forest cover minima occurred at ca. 5.4, 3.4 and 1.6 ka. A significant periodicity centred at ~1750 yrs is detected in the mid- to late- Holocene forest record, which may reflect low frequency changes in the latitudinal position of the westerlies related to a NAO-like pattern. Pollen-based climate reconstructions suggest that forest declines reflect annual precipitation reductions of ~70 mm/yr. In the Marmara region, dinocyst and pollen analyses reveal several distinct climatic and hydrological Holocene phases. Repeated declines in temperate tree pollen frequencies (anomalies of 10-25%) reflect a succession of Holocene forest contractions in the Marmara borderlands. Within uncertainties in the current age model, several abrupt set-backs in the development of the early Holocene forest cover reflecting cool and/or dry episodes are detected at ca. 9.8, 9.4, 8.8 and 7.7 ka. An abrupt mid-Holocene forest decline (25% reduction in tree pollen) occurred at ca. 5.6 ka, and a suite of subsequent forest contractions marked by declines at ca. 2.6, 1.5 and 0.5 cal ka. Parallels between variability in forest cover and glaciochemical tracers (K+) suggest negative impacts of enhanced Siberian highs on forest cover during the mid- to late- Holocene. The comparison of the two records

  15. Analysis of abrupt transitions in ecological systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The occurrence and causes of abrupt transitions, thresholds, or regime shifts between ecosystem states are of great concern and the likelihood of such transitions is increasing for many ecological systems. General understanding of abrupt transitions has been advanced by theory, but hindered by the l...

  16. Temporal Variations of Dipole Teleconnections in the Southern Oceans and Their Climatic Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischmann, E.; Rial, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dipole behavior in ocean-atmosphere variability has been subject to extensive study due to their impacts on regional climates, such as that of the Indian Ocean Dipole. This study uses the results of a combined correlation coefficient and empirical orthogonal function analysis to study sea surface temperature anomaly dipoles with inter-annual periodicity, and explore seasonal variability. Previous work has shown that this dipole behavior has remained stable for at least the last century [Reischmann et al., 2014. Previous work has also shown that polar climate dipoles display a clear transfer function on a millennial scale for the last 80,000 years [Oh et al., 2014]. This transfer function has been rigorously tested, demonstrating the usefulness of the method of spectral deconvolution for linearly related climate systems. Here we present different time scales of dipole behavior, their impacts on local climates, and discuss what methods of connection can allow them to remain sustained on a centennial or millennial scale. Multiple climate proxies are necessary to study these time scales and their impacts, from weekly satellite observations which have been extended to a centennial scale via multiple models, to annual or multi-annual lake sediment and dendrochronology records with larger sampling rates and absolute dating uncertainty. Analysis techniques such as spectral deconvolution will make use of the linear nature of these dipole connections to study the energy transfer functions and their physical implications. The longest scale results of this study may be compared to the work establishing the synchronized nature of the polar climates on the millennial scale.

  17. Interglacial climate dynamics and advanced time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudelsee, Manfred; Bermejo, Miguel; Köhler, Peter; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2013-04-01

    , Fischer H, Joos F, Knutti R, Lohmann G, Masson-Delmotte V (2010) What caused Earth's temperature variations during the last 800,000 years? Data-based evidence on radiative forcing and constraints on climate sensitivity. Quaternary Science Reviews 29:129. Loulergue L, Schilt A, Spahni R, Masson-Delmotte V, Blunier T, Lemieux B, Barnola J-M, Raynaud D, Stocker TF, Chappellaz J (2008) Orbital and millennial-scale features of atmospheric CH4 over the past 800,000 years. Nature 453:383. L¨ü thi D, Le Floch M, Bereiter B, Blunier T, Barnola J-M, Siegenthaler U, Raynaud D, Jouzel J, Fischer H, Kawamura K, Stocker TF (2008) High-resolution carbon dioxide concentration record 650,000-800,000 years before present. Nature 453:379. Mudelsee M (2000) Ramp function regression: A tool for quantifying climate transitions. Computers and Geosciences 26:293. Mudelsee M (2002) TAUEST: A computer program for estimating persistence in unevenly spaced weather/climate time series. Computers and Geosciences 28:69. Mudelsee M (2010) Climate Time Series Analysis: Classical Statistical and Bootstrap Methods. Springer, Dordrecht, 474 pp. [www.manfredmudelsee.com/book] Siegenthaler U, Stocker TF, Monnin E, L¨ü thi D, Schwander J, Stauffer B, Raynaud D, Barnola J-M, Fischer H, Masson-Delmotte V, Jouzel J (2005) Stable carbon cycle-climate relationship during the late Pleistocene. Science 310:1313.

  18. Evidence for Oceanic/Continental Climate Linkages During Freshwater Inputs to the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, H. W.; Flower, B. P.; Hollander, D. J.; Quinn, T. M.

    2004-12-01

    Understanding the linkage between oceanic and continental responses to millennial-scale climate variability can provide insight into the mechanisms controlling abrupt global climate change, however there are few marine depositional systems where these linkages can be studied simultaneously. Here we present new evidence for freshwater input (Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) meltwater versus precipitation?) to the northern Gulf of Mexico from 28-45 ka (within Marine Isotope Stage 3), and draw linkages to continental climate using organic geochemical proxies. A 32-m laminated sediment core (MD02-2551) from the anaerobic Orca Basin was collected aboard the R/V Marion Dufresne in July 2002 as part of the IMAGES program. Radiocarbon dates suggest that the average sedimentation rate is >50 cm/1000 years during this interval, allowing for 40-year resolution sampling at 2-cm intervals. Paired δ 18O and Mg/Ca data on the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber are used to separate changes in Mg-derived sea-surface temperature (SST) and the oxygen isotopic composition of seawater, which can be interpreted in terms of salinity. Three large negative excursions in δ 18Osw (<0.5 \\permil), each lasting ~3 ka, exist in the record. Two of these excursions may correlate with Heinrich events 3 and 4, but show no clear relationship to Dansgaard-Oeschger warmings. δ 18Osw excursions have significant ramifications for Gulf of Mexico salinity, which can be constrained using two freshwater end members: the current Mississippi River (MR) value of -7 \\permil and an LIS value of -30 \\permil. Use of the MR end-member would require extraordinarily large floods and changes in salinity of 5-6 psu, whereas use of the LIS end-member results in a salinity decrease of 2-3 psu. Preliminary results of analyses of organic biomarkers preserved in the Orca Basin sediments suggest that the freshwater events are dominated by terrigenous organic matter, but are also associated with an increase in marine

  19. The abrupt onset of the modern South Asian Monsoon winds

    PubMed Central

    Betzler, Christian; Eberli, Gregor P.; Kroon, Dick; Wright, James D.; Swart, Peter K.; Nath, Bejugam Nagender; Alvarez-Zarikian, Carlos A.; Alonso-García, Montserrat; Bialik, Or M.; Blättler, Clara L.; Guo, Junhua Adam; Haffen, Sébastien; Horozal, Senay; Inoue, Mayuri; Jovane, Luigi; Lanci, Luca; Laya, Juan Carlos; Mee, Anna Ling Hui; Lüdmann, Thomas; Nakakuni, Masatoshi; Niino, Kaoru; Petruny, Loren M.; Pratiwi, Santi D.; Reijmer, John J. G.; Reolid, Jesús; Slagle, Angela L.; Sloss, Craig R.; Su, Xiang; Yao, Zhengquan; Young, Jeremy R.

    2016-01-01

    The South Asian Monson (SAM) is one of the most intense climatic elements yet its initiation and variations are not well established. Dating the deposits of SAM wind-driven currents in IODP cores from the Maldives yields an age of 12. 9 Ma indicating an abrupt SAM onset, over a short period of 300 kyrs. This coincided with the Indian Ocean Oxygen Minimum Zone expansion as revealed by geochemical tracers and the onset of upwelling reflected by the sediment’s content of particulate organic matter. A weaker ‘proto-monsoon’ existed between 12.9 and 25 Ma, as mirrored by the sedimentary signature of dust influx. Abrupt SAM initiation favors a strong influence of climate in addition to the tectonic control, and we propose that the post Miocene Climate Optimum cooling, together with increased continentalization and establishment of the bipolar ocean circulation, i.e. the beginning of the modern world, shifted the monsoon over a threshold towards the modern system. PMID:27436574

  20. The abrupt onset of the modern South Asian Monsoon winds.

    PubMed

    Betzler, Christian; Eberli, Gregor P; Kroon, Dick; Wright, James D; Swart, Peter K; Nath, Bejugam Nagender; Alvarez-Zarikian, Carlos A; Alonso-García, Montserrat; Bialik, Or M; Blättler, Clara L; Guo, Junhua Adam; Haffen, Sébastien; Horozal, Senay; Inoue, Mayuri; Jovane, Luigi; Lanci, Luca; Laya, Juan Carlos; Mee, Anna Ling Hui; Lüdmann, Thomas; Nakakuni, Masatoshi; Niino, Kaoru; Petruny, Loren M; Pratiwi, Santi D; Reijmer, John J G; Reolid, Jesús; Slagle, Angela L; Sloss, Craig R; Su, Xiang; Yao, Zhengquan; Young, Jeremy R

    2016-01-01

    The South Asian Monson (SAM) is one of the most intense climatic elements yet its initiation and variations are not well established. Dating the deposits of SAM wind-driven currents in IODP cores from the Maldives yields an age of 12. 9 Ma indicating an abrupt SAM onset, over a short period of 300 kyrs. This coincided with the Indian Ocean Oxygen Minimum Zone expansion as revealed by geochemical tracers and the onset of upwelling reflected by the sediment's content of particulate organic matter. A weaker 'proto-monsoon' existed between 12.9 and 25 Ma, as mirrored by the sedimentary signature of dust influx. Abrupt SAM initiation favors a strong influence of climate in addition to the tectonic control, and we propose that the post Miocene Climate Optimum cooling, together with increased continentalization and establishment of the bipolar ocean circulation, i.e. the beginning of the modern world, shifted the monsoon over a threshold towards the modern system. PMID:27436574

  1. The abrupt onset of the modern South Asian Monsoon winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betzler, Christian; Eberli, Gregor P.; Kroon, Dick; Wright, James D.; Swart, Peter K.; Nath, Bejugam Nagender; Alvarez-Zarikian, Carlos A.; Alonso-García, Montserrat; Bialik, Or M.; Blättler, Clara L.; Guo, Junhua Adam; Haffen, Sébastien; Horozal, Senay; Inoue, Mayuri; Jovane, Luigi; Lanci, Luca; Laya, Juan Carlos; Mee, Anna Ling Hui; Lüdmann, Thomas; Nakakuni, Masatoshi; Niino, Kaoru; Petruny, Loren M.; Pratiwi, Santi D.; Reijmer, John J. G.; Reolid, Jesús; Slagle, Angela L.; Sloss, Craig R.; Su, Xiang; Yao, Zhengquan; Young, Jeremy R.

    2016-07-01

    The South Asian Monson (SAM) is one of the most intense climatic elements yet its initiation and variations are not well established. Dating the deposits of SAM wind-driven currents in IODP cores from the Maldives yields an age of 12. 9 Ma indicating an abrupt SAM onset, over a short period of 300 kyrs. This coincided with the Indian Ocean Oxygen Minimum Zone expansion as revealed by geochemical tracers and the onset of upwelling reflected by the sediment’s content of particulate organic matter. A weaker ‘proto-monsoon’ existed between 12.9 and 25 Ma, as mirrored by the sedimentary signature of dust influx. Abrupt SAM initiation favors a strong influence of climate in addition to the tectonic control, and we propose that the post Miocene Climate Optimum cooling, together with increased continentalization and establishment of the bipolar ocean circulation, i.e. the beginning of the modern world, shifted the monsoon over a threshold towards the modern system.

  2. A Multi-Proxy Approach to Understanding Deglacial Gulf of Mexico Climate and Laurentide Ice Sheet Chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C.; Flower, B. P.; Hastings, D. W.; Brown, E. A.; Lowell, T. V.

    2011-12-01

    Northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) sediments document abrupt millennial-scale climate events that may be linked to significant changes in thermohaline circulation (THC) and Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) melting during the last deglaciation. Previous records exhibit episodic melting throughout the deglacial sequence until the Younger Dryas cold interval when meltwater input ceased ca. 12.9 ka. However, existing records lack the temporal resolution and age control to assess high-frequency changes in sea-surface temperature (SST) and LIS melting history. Here, we use a multi-proxy approach including foraminiferal (G. ruber) Ba/Ca, Mg/Ca and δ18O measurements to investigate the role of LIS meltwater in GOM climate and the relationship between melting episodes and southern ice sheet margin dynamics. High sedimentation rates (40 cm/1000 years) and 65 14C dates from core MD02-2550 from laminated Orca Basin in the northern GOM provide nearly decadal scale sampling resolution. Paired Mg/Ca-SST and δ18O data from G. ruber (white and pink varieties, separately) allow for the calculation of an ice-volume corrected δ18OSW record (termed δ18OGOM) that is strongly influenced by the highly negative δ18O value of LIS meltwater. Ba concentrations in the Mississippi River are elevated relative to the GOM and are negatively correlated to sea-surface salinity (SSS). Ba/Casw and SSS exhibit a nearly linear relationship for >20 psu, using modern data. Foraminiferal Ba/Ca exhibits a predictable relationship to Ba/Casw and may be used as a semi-quantitative tracer of SSS. δ18OGOM results reveal multiple negative excursions of >1% centered at ca. 23.4 ka, 21.2 ka, 16.6 ka, 15.1 ka and 13.4 ka, that confirm at least five melting episodes followed by a cessation of meltwater at the onset of the Younger Dryas (ca. 12.9). Preliminary Ba/Ca data exhibit large millennial-scale excursions suggesting significant Mississippi River input variability throughout the late glacial interval and deglaciation

  3. New evidence from the South China Sea for an abrupt termination of the last glacial period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broecker, W. S.; Klas, M.; Andree, M.; Bonani, G.; Wolfli, W.

    1988-01-01

    Results demonstrating an abrupt change in the rate and character of sedimentation in the South China Sea at the close of the last glacial period are presented. Radiocarbon dating and its position in the oxygen isotope shift suggest that this change may be coincident with the abrupt change in climatic conditions seen at high latitudes in the North Atlantic and the Antarctic at 13 kyr BP. These results support the contention that a major global climatic change occurred between 14 and 13 kyr BP.

  4. Prediction of fetal acidemia in placental abruption

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine the major predictive factors for fetal acidemia in placental abruption. Methods A retrospective review of pregnancies with placental abruption was performed using a logistic regression model. Fetal acidemia was defined as a pH of less than 7.0 in umbilical artery. The severe abruption score, which was derived from a linear discriminant function, was calculated to determine the probability of fetal acidemia. Results Fetal acidemia was seen in 43 survivors (43/222, 19%). A logistic regression model showed bradycardia (OR (odds ratio) 50.34, 95% CI 11.07 – 228.93), and late decelerations (OR 15.13, 3.05 – 74.97), but not abnormal ultrasonographic findings were to be associated with the occurrence of fetal acidemia. The severe abruption score was calculated for the occurrence of fetal acidemia, using 6 items including vaginal bleeding, gestational age, abdominal pain, abnormal ultrasonographic finding, late decelerations, and bradycardia. Conclusions An abnormal FHR pattern, especially bradycardia is the most significant risk factor in placental abruption predicting fetal acidemia, regardless of the presence of abnormal ultrasonographic findings or gestational age. PMID:23915223

  5. Autogenic incision and terrace formation resulting from abrupt late-glacial base-level fall, lower Chippewa River, Wisconsin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, Douglas J.; Larson, Phillip H.; Jol, Harry M.; Running, Garry L.; Loope, Henry M.; Goble, Ronald J.

    2016-08-01

    A paucity of research exists regarding the millennial-scale response of inland alluvial streams to abrupt base-level fall. Studies of modern systems indicate that, over short time scales, the response is a diffusion-like process of upstream-propagating incision. In contrast, evidence from the lower Chippewa River (LCR), located in the upper Midwest of the USA, suggests that autogenic controls operating over time scales of several millennia can overwhelm diffusion, resulting in incision that is prolonged and episodic. During the Last Glacial Maximum, the LCR drained the Chippewa Lobe of the Laurentide Ice Sheet to the glacial upper Mississippi River (UMR). As a meltwater stream, it aggraded and filled its valley with glacial outwash, as did its largest tributaries, which were also meltwater streams. Its nonglacial tributaries aggraded, too, filling their valleys with locally derived sediment. During deglaciation, the UMR incised at least twice, abruptly lowering the LCR's base level - ~ 15 m at 16 ka or earlier and an additional 40 m at ca. 13.4 ka. Each of these base-level falls initiated incision of the LCR, led by upstream migrating knickpoints. The propagation of incision has, however, been a lengthy process. The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages of terrace alluvium indicate that, by 13.5 ka, incision had advanced up the LCR only 15 km, and by 9 ka, only 55 km. The process has also been episodic, resulting in the formation of fill-cut terraces (inferred from GPR surveys and exposures of terrace alluvium) that are younger and more numerous in the upstream direction. Autogenic increases in sediment load and autogenic bed armoring, the result of periodic tributary-stream rejuvenation and preferential winnowing of fines by the incising river, may have periodically caused knickpoint migration and incision to slow and possibly stop, allowing lateral erosion and floodplain formation to dominate. A decline in sediment flux from stabilizing incised tributary

  6. Strong coupling of Asian Monsoon and Antarctic climates on sub-orbital timescales

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shitao; Wang, Yongjin; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Wang, Xianfeng; Kong, Xinggong; Liu, Dianbing

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that millennial-scale climate variability played an active role on orbital-scale climate changes, but the mechanism for this remains unclear. A 230Th-dated stalagmite δ18O record between 88 and 22 thousand years (ka) ago from Yongxing Cave in central China characterizes changes in Asian monsoon (AM) strength. After removing the 65°N insolation signal from our record, the δ18O residue is strongly anti-phased with Antarctic temperature variability on sub-orbital timescales during the Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3. Furthermore, once the ice volume signal from Antarctic ice core records were removed and extrapolated back to the last two glacial-interglacial cycles, we observe a linear relationship for both short- and long-duration events between Asian and Antarctic climate changes. This provides the robust evidence of a link between northern and southern hemisphere climates that operates through changes in atmospheric circulation. We find that the weakest monsoon closely associated with the warmest Antarctic event always occurred during the Terminations. This finding, along with similar shifts in the opal flux record, suggests that millennial-scale events play a key role in driving the deglaciation through positive feedbacks associated with enhanced upwelling and increasing CO2. PMID:27605015

  7. Strong coupling of Asian Monsoon and Antarctic climates on sub-orbital timescales.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shitao; Wang, Yongjin; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R Lawrence; Wang, Xianfeng; Kong, Xinggong; Liu, Dianbing

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that millennial-scale climate variability played an active role on orbital-scale climate changes, but the mechanism for this remains unclear. A (230)Th-dated stalagmite δ(18)O record between 88 and 22 thousand years (ka) ago from Yongxing Cave in central China characterizes changes in Asian monsoon (AM) strength. After removing the 65°N insolation signal from our record, the δ(18)O residue is strongly anti-phased with Antarctic temperature variability on sub-orbital timescales during the Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3. Furthermore, once the ice volume signal from Antarctic ice core records were removed and extrapolated back to the last two glacial-interglacial cycles, we observe a linear relationship for both short- and long-duration events between Asian and Antarctic climate changes. This provides the robust evidence of a link between northern and southern hemisphere climates that operates through changes in atmospheric circulation. We find that the weakest monsoon closely associated with the warmest Antarctic event always occurred during the Terminations. This finding, along with similar shifts in the opal flux record, suggests that millennial-scale events play a key role in driving the deglaciation through positive feedbacks associated with enhanced upwelling and increasing CO2. PMID:27605015

  8. Detection of abrupt changes in dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willsky, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the basic ideas associated with the detection of abrupt changes in dynamic systems are presented. Multiple filter-based techniques and residual-based method and the multiple model and generalized likelihood ratio methods are considered. Issues such as the effect of unknown onset time on algorithm complexity and structure and robustness to model uncertainty are discussed.

  9. Marine Sediments Remotely Unveil Long-Term Climatic Variability Over Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taricco, Carla; Alessio, Silvia; Rubinetti, Sara; Zanchettin, Davide; Cosoli, Simone; Gačić, Miroslav; Mancuso, Salvatore; Rubino, Angelo

    2015-07-01

    A deep understanding of natural decadal variability is pivotal to discuss recently observed climate trends. Paleoclimate proxies allow reconstructing natural variations before the instrumental period. Typically, regional-scale reconstructions depend on factors like dating, multi-proxy weighting and calibration, which may lead to non-robust reconstructions. Riverine records inherently integrate information about regional climate variability, partly overcoming the above mentioned limitation. The Po River provides major freshwater input to Eastern Mediterranean, as its catchment encompasses a large part of Northern Italy. Here, using historical discharge data and oceanographic measurements, we show that Po River discharge undergo robust decadal fluctuations that reach the Ionian Sea, ~1,000 km South of Po River delta, through propagating salinity anomalies. Based on this propagation, we use a high-resolution foraminiferal δ18O record from a sediment core in the Ionian Sea to reconstruct North Italian hydrological variability on millennial-scale for the first time. The reconstruction reveals highly significant decadal variability that persists over the last 2,000 years. Many reconstructed extremes correspond to documented catastrophic events. Our study provides the first millennial-scale reconstruction of the strength of decadal hydrological variability over Northern Italy. It paves the way to assess the persistence of large-scale circulation fingerprints on the North Italian climate.

  10. Marine Sediments Remotely Unveil Long-Term Climatic Variability Over Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Taricco, Carla; Alessio, Silvia; Rubinetti, Sara; Zanchettin, Davide; Cosoli, Simone; Gačić, Miroslav; Mancuso, Salvatore; Rubino, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    A deep understanding of natural decadal variability is pivotal to discuss recently observed climate trends. Paleoclimate proxies allow reconstructing natural variations before the instrumental period. Typically, regional-scale reconstructions depend on factors like dating, multi-proxy weighting and calibration, which may lead to non-robust reconstructions. Riverine records inherently integrate information about regional climate variability, partly overcoming the above mentioned limitation. The Po River provides major freshwater input to Eastern Mediterranean, as its catchment encompasses a large part of Northern Italy. Here, using historical discharge data and oceanographic measurements, we show that Po River discharge undergo robust decadal fluctuations that reach the Ionian Sea, ~1,000 km South of Po River delta, through propagating salinity anomalies. Based on this propagation, we use a high-resolution foraminiferal δ(18)O record from a sediment core in the Ionian Sea to reconstruct North Italian hydrological variability on millennial-scale for the first time. The reconstruction reveals highly significant decadal variability that persists over the last 2,000 years. Many reconstructed extremes correspond to documented catastrophic events. Our study provides the first millennial-scale reconstruction of the strength of decadal hydrological variability over Northern Italy. It paves the way to assess the persistence of large-scale circulation fingerprints on the North Italian climate. PMID:26227092

  11. Tropically-driven climate shifts in southwestern Europe during MIS 19, a low eccentricity interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Goñi, M. F.; Rodrigues, T.; Hodell, D. A.; Polanco-Martínez, J. M.; Alonso-García, M.; Hernández-Almeida, I.; Desprat, S.; Ferretti, P.

    2016-08-01

    The relative roles of high- versus low-latitude forcing of millennial-scale climate variability are still not well understood. Here we present terrestrial-marine climate profiles from the southwestern Iberian margin, a region particularly affected by precession, that show millennial climate oscillations related to a nonlinear response to the Earth's precession cycle during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 19. MIS 19 has been considered the best analogue to our present interglacial from an astronomical point of view due to the reduced eccentricity centred at 785 ka. In our records, seven millennial-scale forest contractions punctuated MIS 19 superimposed to two orbitally-driven Mediterranean forest expansions. In contrast to our present interglacial, we evidence for the first time low latitude-driven 5000-yr cycles of drying and cooling in the western Mediterranean region, along with warmth in the subtropical gyre related to the fourth harmonic of precession. These cycles indicate repeated intensification of North Atlantic meridional moisture transport that along with decrease in boreal summer insolation triggered ice growth and may have contributed to the glacial inception, at ∼774 ka. The freshwater fluxes during MIS 19ab amplified the cooling events in the North Atlantic promoting further cooling and leading to MIS 18 glaciation. The discrepancy between the dominant cyclicity observed during MIS 1, 2500-yr, and that of MIS 19, 5000-yr, challenges the similar duration of the Holocene and MIS 19c interglacials under natural boundary conditions.

  12. Marine Sediments Remotely Unveil Long-Term Climatic Variability Over Northern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Taricco, Carla; Alessio, Silvia; Rubinetti, Sara; Zanchettin, Davide; Cosoli, Simone; Gačić, Miroslav; Mancuso, Salvatore; Rubino, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    A deep understanding of natural decadal variability is pivotal to discuss recently observed climate trends. Paleoclimate proxies allow reconstructing natural variations before the instrumental period. Typically, regional-scale reconstructions depend on factors like dating, multi-proxy weighting and calibration, which may lead to non-robust reconstructions. Riverine records inherently integrate information about regional climate variability, partly overcoming the above mentioned limitation. The Po River provides major freshwater input to Eastern Mediterranean, as its catchment encompasses a large part of Northern Italy. Here, using historical discharge data and oceanographic measurements, we show that Po River discharge undergo robust decadal fluctuations that reach the Ionian Sea, ~1,000 km South of Po River delta, through propagating salinity anomalies. Based on this propagation, we use a high-resolution foraminiferal δ18O record from a sediment core in the Ionian Sea to reconstruct North Italian hydrological variability on millennial-scale for the first time. The reconstruction reveals highly significant decadal variability that persists over the last 2,000 years. Many reconstructed extremes correspond to documented catastrophic events. Our study provides the first millennial-scale reconstruction of the strength of decadal hydrological variability over Northern Italy. It paves the way to assess the persistence of large-scale circulation fingerprints on the North Italian climate. PMID:26227092

  13. Abruptness of Cascade Failures in Power Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahwa, Sakshi; Scoglio, Caterina; Scala, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Electric power-systems are one of the most important critical infrastructures. In recent years, they have been exposed to extreme stress due to the increasing demand, the introduction of distributed renewable energy sources, and the development of extensive interconnections. We investigate the phenomenon of abrupt breakdown of an electric power-system under two scenarios: load growth (mimicking the ever-increasing customer demand) and power fluctuations (mimicking the effects of renewable sources). Our results on real, realistic and synthetic networks indicate that increasing the system size causes breakdowns to become more abrupt; in fact, mapping the system to a solvable statistical-physics model indicates the occurrence of a first order transition in the large size limit. Such an enhancement for the systemic risk failures (black-outs) with increasing network size is an effect that should be considered in the current projects aiming to integrate national power-grids into ``super-grids''.

  14. Abruptness of cascade failures in power grids.

    PubMed

    Pahwa, Sakshi; Scoglio, Caterina; Scala, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Electric power-systems are one of the most important critical infrastructures. In recent years, they have been exposed to extreme stress due to the increasing demand, the introduction of distributed renewable energy sources, and the development of extensive interconnections. We investigate the phenomenon of abrupt breakdown of an electric power-system under two scenarios: load growth (mimicking the ever-increasing customer demand) and power fluctuations (mimicking the effects of renewable sources). Our results on real, realistic and synthetic networks indicate that increasing the system size causes breakdowns to become more abrupt; in fact, mapping the system to a solvable statistical-physics model indicates the occurrence of a first order transition in the large size limit. Such an enhancement for the systemic risk failures (black-outs) with increasing network size is an effect that should be considered in the current projects aiming to integrate national power-grids into "super-grids". PMID:24424239

  15. Abrupt percolation in small equilibrated networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsoukas, Themis

    2015-05-01

    Networks can exhibit an abrupt transition in the form of a spontaneous self-organization of a sizable fraction of the population into a giant component of connected members. This behavior has been demonstrated in random graphs under suppressive rules that passively or actively attempt to delay the formation of the giant cluster. We show that suppressive rules are not a necessary condition for a sharp transition at the percolation threshold. Rather, a finite system with aggressive tendency to form a giant cluster may exhibit an instability at the percolation threshold that is relieved through an abrupt and discontinuous transition to the stable branch. We develop the theory for a class of equilibrated networks that produce this behavior and find that the discontinuous jump is especially pronounced in small networks but disappears when the size of the system is infinite.

  16. Subsurface warming in the subpolar North Atlantic during rapid climate events in the Early and Mid-Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Almeida, Iván; Sierro, Francisco; Cacho, Isabel; Abel Flores, José

    2014-05-01

    A new high-resolution reconstruction of the temperature and salinity of the subsurface waters using paired Mg/Ca-δ18O measurements on the planktonic foraminifera Neogloboquadrina pachyderma sinistrorsa (sin.) was conducted on a deep-sea sediment core in the subpolar North Atlantic (Site U1314). This study aims to reconstruct millennial-scale subsurface hydrography variations during the Early and Mid-Pleistocene (MIS 31-19). These rapid climate events are characterized by abrupt shifts between warm/cold conditions, and ice-sheet oscillations, as evidenced by major ice rafting events recorded in the North Atlantic sediments (Hernández-Almeida et al., 2012), similar to those found during the Last Glacial period (Marcott et al, 2011). The Mg/Ca derived paleotemperature and salinity oscillations prior and during IRD discharges at Site U1314 are related to changes in intermediate circulation. The increases in Mg/Ca paleotemperatures and salinities during the IRD event are preceded by short episodes of cooling and freshening of subsurface waters. The response of the AMOC to this perturbation is an increased of warm and salty water coming from the south, transported to high latitudes in the North Atlantic beneath the thermocline. This process is accompanied by a southward shift in the convection cell from the Nordic Seas to the subpolar North Atlantic and better ventilation of the North Atlantic at mid-depths. Poleward transport of warm and salty subsurface subtropical waters causes intense basal melting and thinning of marine ice-shelves, that culminates in large-scale instability of the ice sheets, retreat of the grounding line and iceberg discharge. The mechanism proposed involves the coupling of the AMOC with ice-sheet dynamics, and would explain the presence of these fluctuations before the establishment of high-amplitude 100-kyr glacial cycles. Hernández-Almeida, I., Sierro, F.J., Cacho, I., Flores, J.A., 2012. Impact of suborbital climate changes in the North

  17. Gulf of Mexico Climate, Laurentide Ice Sheet History, and Global Sea Level Change During the Last Glacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, B. P.; Williams, C.; Brown, E. A.; Hastings, D. W.; Hill, H.; Adams, S.; Hendrix, J.; Martin, E. E.; Biller, N. B.; Goddard, E.

    2011-12-01

    The interactions between low-latitude Atlantic climate and high-latitude ice sheet variability represent an important issue in past abrupt climate change. Specifically, Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) meltwater input seems to be decoupled at the millennial scale from Gulf of Mexico sea-surface temperature (SST), as well as Greenland air temperature, during the last glacial cycle. Indeed, comparison to Greenland ice core records indicate significant meltwater input during some North Atlantic cool episodes, including Heinrich Stadials 4, 3, and 1. Here we present published and new Mg/Ca and δ18O data on the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber from northern Gulf of Mexico sediment cores that provide detailed records of SST, δ18O of seawater (δ18Osw), and inferred salinity for the 48-10 ka interval. Age control for Orca Basin cores MD02-2550 and -2551 is based on AMS 14C dates on G. ruber and documents continuous sedimentation at rates >35 cm/kyr. Significant meltwater input is inferred from δ18Osw data during Antarctic Isotope Maxima (AIM) events and reaches a peak during the Bølling/Allerød, consistent with bipolar warming and a high sensitivity to greenhouse forcing. Furthermore, bulk sediment δ18O data show a brief spike reaching -5.5% ca. 14.5 ka during an interval barren of foraminifera. We speculate that this excursion represents fine carbonate sediment from Canadian Paleozoic marine carbonates, analogous to detrital carbonate in the North Atlantic that has a δ18O value of -5%. Radiogenic isotope data (Nd and Pb) also reach peak values at this interval, indicative of older continental material sourced from Canada vs. younger material from the Mississippi River drainage basin. Inferred major meltwater flow appears to have been associated with meltwater pulse 1a within the Bølling warm interval, consistent with a significant contribution by the LIS to rapid global sea level rise. Overall, the relations between Gulf of Mexico meltwater input, Heinrich

  18. Diagnosis of Placental Abruption: Relationship between Clinical and Histopathological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Elsasser, Denise A.; Ananth, Cande V.; Prasad, Vinay; Vintzileos, Anthony M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the extent to which histologic lesions bearing a diagnosis of abruption conform to a diagnosis based on established clinical criteria. We further examined the profile of chronic and acute histologic lesions associated with clinical abruption. Methods Data from the New Jersey-Placental Abruption Study – a multi-center, case-control study – were utilized to compare the clinical and histologic criteria for abruption. The study was based on 162 women with clinically diagnosed abruption and 173 controls. We examined the concordance between clinical indicators for abruption with those of a histopathological diagnosis. The clinical criteria for a diagnosis of abruption included (i) evidence of retroplacental clot(s); (ii) abruption diagnosed on prenatal ultrasound; or (iii) vaginal bleeding accompanied by nonreassuring fetal status or uterine hypertonicity. The pathological criteria for abruption diagnosis included hematoma, fibrin deposition, compressed villi, and hemosiderin-laden histiocytes in cases with older hematomas. Acute lesions included chorioamnionitis, funisitis, acute deciduitis, meconium stained membranes, villous stromal hemorrhage, and villous edema. Chronic lesions included chronic deciduitis, decidual necrosis, decidual vasculopathy, placental infarctions, villous maldevelopment (delayed or accelerated maturation), hemosiderin deposition, intervillous thrombus, and chronic villitis. Results Of clinically diagnosed cases, the sensitivity and specificity for a histologic confirmation of abruption were 30.2% and 100%, respectively. Presence of retroplacental clots remained the single most common finding (77.1%) among clinically diagnosed cases. Among the acute lesions, chorioamnionitis and funisitis were associated with abruption. The only chronic histologic lesion associated with abruption was placental infarctions. Conclusions The concordance between clinical and pathologic criteria for abruption diagnosis is poor. The criteria

  19. Abrupt plate accelerations shape rifted continental margins.

    PubMed

    Brune, Sascha; Williams, Simon E; Butterworth, Nathaniel P; Müller, R Dietmar

    2016-08-11

    Rifted margins are formed by persistent stretching of continental lithosphere until breakup is achieved. It is well known that strain-rate-dependent processes control rift evolution, yet quantified extension histories of Earth's major passive margins have become available only recently. Here we investigate rift kinematics globally by applying a new geotectonic analysis technique to revised global plate reconstructions. We find that rifted margins feature an initial, slow rift phase (less than ten millimetres per year, full rate) and that an abrupt increase of plate divergence introduces a fast rift phase. Plate acceleration takes place before continental rupture and considerable margin area is created during each phase. We reproduce the rapid transition from slow to fast extension using analytical and numerical modelling with constant force boundary conditions. The extension models suggest that the two-phase velocity behaviour is caused by a rift-intrinsic strength--velocity feedback, which can be robustly inferred for diverse lithosphere configurations and rheologies. Our results explain differences between proximal and distal margin areas and demonstrate that abrupt plate acceleration during continental rifting is controlled by the nonlinear decay of the resistive rift strength force. This mechanism provides an explanation for several previously unexplained rapid absolute plate motion changes, offering new insights into the balance of plate driving forces through time. PMID:27437571

  20. Abrupt drainage cycles of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Soulet, Guillaume; Ménot, Guillemette; Bayon, Germain; Rostek, Frauke; Ponzevera, Emmanuel; Toucanne, Samuel; Lericolais, Gilles; Bard, Edouard

    2013-04-23

    Continental ice sheets are a key component of the Earth's climate system, but their internal dynamics need to be further studied. Since the last deglaciation, the northern Eurasian Fennoscandian Ice Sheet (FIS) has been connected to the Black Sea (BS) watershed, making this basin a suitable location to investigate former ice-sheet dynamics. Here, from a core retrieved in the BS, we combine the use of neodymium isotopes, high-resolution elemental analysis, and biomarkers to trace changes in sediment provenance and river runoff. We reveal cyclic releases of meltwater originating from Lake Disna, a proglacial lake linked to the FIS during Heinrich Stadial 1. Regional interactions within the climate-lake-FIS system, linked to changes in the availability of subglacial water, led to abrupt drainage cycles of the FIS into the BS watershed. This phenomenon raised the BS water level by ∼100 m until the sill of the Bosphorus Strait was reached, flooding the vast northwestern BS shelf and deeply affecting the hydrology and circulation of the BS and, probably, of the Marmara and Aegean Seas. PMID:23569264

  1. Panic anxiety after abrupt discontinuation of mianserin.

    PubMed

    Kuniyoshi, M; Arikawa, K; Miura, C; Inanaga, K

    1989-06-01

    We observed a case of withdrawal after abrupt discontinuation of mianserin. A 41-year-old woman was treated according to a diagnosis of depression, which was her 6th episode. Mianserin 30 mg/day, etizolam 1 mg/day and flunitrazepam 1 mg/day were administered. When the patient discontinued taking the drugs by herself because of subsiding of these symptoms, severe panic anxiety appeared. This panic anxiety was not relieved by taking etizolam and flunitrazepam again, but subsided rapidly by the re-administration of mianserin 30 mg/day, and because of that the depressive symptom also disappeared. From these experiences panic anxiety seemed to be a withdrawal symptom, and involvement of the noradrenergic system in panic anxiety as well as serotonergic system was suggested. PMID:2796025

  2. Comparison of glacial periods reveals systematic cold climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, Henning

    2013-04-01

    On a global scale, major variations in Pleistocene temperatures correlate well with glacial-interglacial changes of northern hemisphere ice sheet sizes. While a discharge of icebergs from the ice sheets surrounding the polar North Atlantic region directly reflects the rates of growth and decay of the ice sheet margins at sea level, it is also the result of a rapidly changing climate which affected both the meridional overturning in the ocean and the pattern in ocean-atmosphere circulation. Ice cores and many deep-sea sediment records from this region have demonstrated such complex interrelations between these main environmental processes for the last glaciation (Weichselian). In ice cores, the millennial-scale climate variabilities of the Weichselian are recognized in both hemispheres, albeit with apparently a significant time lag between the southern and northern pole regions. Comparing records of iceberg discharge from the polar and subpolar North Atlantic now reveals a very similar millennial-scale variability between the Weichselian and the penultimate glaciation (Saalian) during which warmer, interstadial times alternated with rather cold polar conditions. Because cold conditions in the polar North were also time-coeval with enhanced aridity and atmospheric dust content (e.g. at least over northern Africa due to changes in the monsoon system), the glacial dust records of Antarctica, which extend back in time much farther than Greenland ice records, could be used to also make an interhemispheric climate comparison. For the last two glaciations such a comparison would indeed indicate a strong linkage between iceberg discharge events in the polar North and increased dust content in the atmosphere.

  3. Abrupt Atmospheric Methane Increases Associated With Hudson Strait Heinrich Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, R.; Brook, E.; Chiang, J. C. H.; Blunier, T.; Maselli, O. J.; McConnell, J. R.; Romanini, D.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The drivers of abrupt climate change during the Last Glacial Period are not well understood. While Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) cycles are thought to be linked to variations in the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Ocean Circulation (AMOC), it is not clear how or if Heinrich Events—extensive influxes of icebergs into the North Atlantic Ocean that impacted global climate and biogeochemistry—are related. An enduring problem is the difficultly in dating iceberg rafted debris deposits that typically lack foraminifera. Here we present an ultra-high resolution record of methane from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide ice core at unprecedented, continuous temporal resolution from 67.2-9.8 ka BP, which we propose constrains the timing of Heinrich events. Our methane record essentially mirrors Greenland ice core stable isotope variability across D-O events, except during Heinrich stadials 1, 2, 4 and 5. Partway through these stadials only, methane increases abruptly and rapidly, as at the onset of a D-O event but Greenland temperature exhibits no equivalent response. Speleothem records exhibit signatures of drought in the Northern extra-tropics and intensified monsoonal activity over South America at these times. We use a simple heuristic model to propose that cold air temperatures and extensive sea ice in the North, resulting from Heinrich events, caused extreme reorganization of tropical hydroclimate. This involved curtailment of the seasonal northerly migration of tropical rain belts, leading to intensification of rainfall over Southern Hemisphere tropical wetlands, thus allowing production of excess methane relative to a 'normal' Greenland stadial. We note that this mechanism can operate if AMOC is already in a slowed state when a Heinrich event occurs, as paleo-evidence suggests it was. Heinrich events and associated sea ice cover would therefore act to prolong the duration of this AMOC state. Our findings place the big four Heinrich events of Hudson Strait origin

  4. Cesarean Delivery for a Life-threatening Preterm Placental Abruption

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, II; Ugwu, EO

    2015-01-01

    Placental abruption is one of the major life-threatening obstetric conditions. The fetomaternal outcome of a severe placental abruption depends largely on prompt maternal resuscitation and delivery. A case of severe preterm placental abruption with intrauterine fetal death. Following a failed induction of labor with a deteriorating maternal condition despite resuscitation, emergency cesarean delivery was offered with good maternal outcome. Cesarean delivery could avert further disease progression and possible maternal death in cases of severe preterm placental abruption where vaginal delivery is not imminent. However, further studies are necessary before this could be recommended for routine clinical practice. PMID:27057388

  5. A GCM study on the mechanism of seasonal abrupt changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huijun; Zeng, Qingcun

    1994-02-01

    In this paper the observational studies and some related dynamical and numerical researches on seasonal abrupt changes were reviewed first. Then a speculation that the seasonal variation of insolation and the nonlinear dynamic interaction account for the abrupt changes was put forward and was asserted by a set of GCM sensitivity experiments. The results show that the abrupt changes would exist in case that all the earth surface was grass land and there was no topography. However, many factors may have influences on the abrupt changes. Hence this phenomenon is quite complicated and needs further investigations.

  6. Precise Interhemispheric Phasing of the Bipolar Seesaw during Abrupt Dansgaard-Oeschger Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buizert, C.; Baggenstos, D.; Brook, E.; Cuffey, K. M.; Fudge, T. J.; Markle, B. R.; McConnell, J. R.; Rhodes, R.; Severinghaus, J. P.; Sowers, T. A.; Steig, E. J.; Taylor, K.

    2014-12-01

    Late Pleistocene glacial periods exhibit abrupt Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) climatic oscillations, evidence of which is preserved in a variety of northern hemisphere (NH) palaeoclimatic archives. Ice cores show Antarctica is cooling during the warm phases of the Greenland DO cycle and vice versa, suggesting an interhemispheric redistribution of heat through a mechanism dubbed the bipolar seesaw. While it is generally accepted that variations in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) strength play an important role, great uncertainty remains regarding the dynamics and trigger of the abrupt events. Key information is contained in the relative phasing of hemispheric climate variations, yet the large and poorly constrained ice age-gas age difference (Dage) in Antarctic ice cores has precluded methane-based synchronization at the required sub-centennial precision. Here we present a new high accumulation deep Antarctic ice core, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS)-Divide core, that is used to resolve the timing of the bipolar seesaw at unprecedented temporal resolution. We find that the abrupt Greenland warming phase leads the corresponding Antarctic cooling by 195 ± 59 years for DO-events, including the Bølling period; Greenland cooling leads the corresponding Antarctic warming by 179 ± 61 years. The centennial NH lead time shows that the abrupt phases of the DO cycle are initiated in the NH, after which the temperature anomaly is propagated to the southern hemisphere (SH) high latitudes via an oceanic teleconnection. The similar phasing of warming and cooling events suggests that to first order the transfer time of the climatic signal is independent of the AMOC background state. Our findings confirm the central role ocean circulation plays in the seesaw, and provide a clear criterion for testing hypotheses and model simulations of DO dynamics.

  7. The Effect of Maternal Thrombophilia on Placental Abruption: Histologic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Kinzler, Wendy L.; Prasad, Vinay; Ananth, Cande V.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine if the histology of placental abruption differs by maternal thrombophilia status. Study design This was a multicenter, case-control study of women with abruption and delivering at ≥20 weeks’ gestation, collected as part of the ongoing New Jersey-Placental Abruption Study. Women were identified by clinical criteria of abruption. Maternal blood was collected postpartum and tested for anticardiolipin antibodies, and mutations in the Factor V Leiden and prothrombin genes. Cases were comprised of women with an abruption and a positive thrombophilia screen. Controls were comprised of women with an abruption and a negative thrombophilia screen. All placental histology was systematically reviewed by two perinatal pathologists, blinded to the abruption status. Results A total of 135 women with placental abruption were identified, of which 63.0% (n=85) had at least one diagnosed maternal thrombophilia. There were increases in the rates of meconium-stained membranes (7.9% versus 2.1%, P=0.015) and decidual necrosis (4.5% versus 2.1%, P=0.023) when a maternal thrombophilia was diagnosed. Although there was no difference in the overall presence of infarcts between the 2 groups (27.0% versus 38.3%, P=0.064), the presence of an old infarct was more common among women with a positive thrombophilia screen (83.3% versus 44.4%, P=0.003). Conclusion Placental abruption with a positive maternal thrombophilia screen is associated with higher rates of old placental infarcts and decidual necrosis compared with abruption when thrombophilia is not diagnosed. These lesions suggest a chronic etiology of placental abruption in the presence of a maternal thrombophilia. PMID:19330709

  8. A 50-ky record of climate, ecosystem, and erosion rate change in the Oregon Coast Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. A.; Roering, J. J.; Granger, D. E.; Gavin, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    In unglaciated landscapes, quantifying landscape response to millennial-scale climate fluctuations is often restricted to temporally and spatially limited archives such as terrace deposits. In addition, mechanistic explanations for landscape response to climate change are lacking. Specifically it is unclear how climate controls the vigor and rate of soil production and transport, as processes in modern ecosystems (e.g. bioturbation such as tree throw) tend to bias our interpretations of landscape evolution. Here, we present results coupling a 50-ky paleo-environmental record with cosmogenic 10Be-derived paleo-erosion rates spanning non-glacial, glacial, and inter-glacial intervals from a 63m sediment archive in the Oregon Coast Range (OCR). At Little Lake, our landslide-dammed lake study site, we refined previous records of paleo-climate to better constrain paleo-temperature and thus the likelihood of frost-driven vs. biotic erosional processes prior to the Holocene. The presence of Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) and Abies lasiocarpa (subalpine fir) in the core during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) imply mean annual temperatures of ~ 1 °C and January mean temperatures of ~ -7 °C. This contrasts sharply with modern temperatures of 11 °C and 5 °C respectively. Using 14C (n=21) and OSL (n=3), we constructed a chronology for our sediment archives that spans the non-glacial (50-26 ka) and glacial intervals (26- 16 ka) and the late Holocene (3 ka to present). Our depth-age model shows that sediment accumulation rates increased 5x from the non-glacial to the glacial interval, coincident with a transition from finely laminated clays and sands to coarse blue-grey sands. We extracted 25 samples for 10Be analysis from the core over an average interval of 1500 years. Preliminary 10Be-derived erosion rates show increasing erosion rates from 0.06 × 0.02 mm/yr (48 ka) to 0.18 × 0.02 mm/yr (28 ka) during the non-glacial interval as temperatures cooled and the forest

  9. Abrupt drainage cycles of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Soulet, Guillaume; Ménot, Guillemette; Bayon, Germain; Rostek, Frauke; Ponzevera, Emmanuel; Toucanne, Samuel; Lericolais, Gilles; Bard, Edouard

    2013-01-01

    Continental ice sheets are a key component of the Earth’s climate system, but their internal dynamics need to be further studied. Since the last deglaciation, the northern Eurasian Fennoscandian Ice Sheet (FIS) has been connected to the Black Sea (BS) watershed, making this basin a suitable location to investigate former ice-sheet dynamics. Here, from a core retrieved in the BS, we combine the use of neodymium isotopes, high-resolution elemental analysis, and biomarkers to trace changes in sediment provenance and river runoff. We reveal cyclic releases of meltwater originating from Lake Disna, a proglacial lake linked to the FIS during Heinrich Stadial 1. Regional interactions within the climate–lake–FIS system, linked to changes in the availability of subglacial water, led to abrupt drainage cycles of the FIS into the BS watershed. This phenomenon raised the BS water level by ∼100 m until the sill of the Bosphorus Strait was reached, flooding the vast northwestern BS shelf and deeply affecting the hydrology and circulation of the BS and, probably, of the Marmara and Aegean Seas. PMID:23569264

  10. Going, Going, Gone: Localizing Abrupt Offsets of Moving Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maus, Gerrit W.; Nijhawan, Romi

    2009-01-01

    When a moving object abruptly disappears, this profoundly influences its localization by the visual system. In Experiment 1, 2 aligned objects moved across the screen, and 1 of them abruptly disappeared. Observers reported seeing the objects misaligned at the time of the offset, with the continuing object leading. Experiment 2 showed that the…

  11. An abrupt change in the African monsoon at the end of the Younger Dryas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, Michael R.; Filippi, Maria Letizia; Jensen, Niels Bo; Tiercelin, Jean-Jacques

    2007-03-01

    High-resolution studies of variations in the elemental and stable carbon- and nitrogen-isotope composition of organic matter in cores from Lakes Malawi, Tanganyika, and Bosumtwi (tropical Africa) indicate an abrupt change in the wind-driven circulation of these lakes that, within the limits of available chronologies, was contemporaneous with the end of the Younger Dryas in the northern hemisphere. The change was also coincident with shifts in surface winds recorded in cores from off the west and northeast coasts of Africa. A range of other proxies indicate that these changes in wind regime were accompanied by a marked increase in precipitation in the northern tropics. Africa south of ˜5°-10°S, on the other hand, initially suffered drought conditions. Together, the evidence suggests an abrupt northward translation of the African monsoon system at circa 11.5 ± 0.25 ka B.P. The data assembled here contribute to a growing body of work showing that the Younger Dryas was a major climatic excursion in tropical Africa. Furthermore, they add substance to recent suggestions that climatic events in the southern hemisphere may have played a significant role in the abrupt demise of the Younger Dryas.

  12. Characteristics of the deep ocean carbon system during the past 150,000 years: ΣCO2 distributions, deep water flow patterns, and abrupt climate change

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Edward A.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of carbon isotopes and cadmium in bottom-dwelling foraminifera from ocean sediment cores have advanced our knowledge of ocean chemical distributions during the late Pleistocene. Last Glacial Maximum data are consistent with a persistent high-ΣCO2 state for eastern Pacific deep water. Both tracers indicate that the mid-depth North and tropical Atlantic Ocean almost always has lower ΣCO2 levels than those in the Pacific. Upper waters of the Last Glacial Maximum Atlantic are more ΣCO2-depleted and deep waters are ΣCO2-enriched compared with the waters of the present. In the northern Indian Ocean, δ13C and Cd data are consistent with upper water ΣCO2 depletion relative to the present. There is no evident proximate source of this ΣCO2-depleted water, so I suggest that ΣCO2-depleted North Atlantic intermediate/deep water turns northward around the southern tip of Africa and moves toward the equator as a western boundary current. At long periods (>15,000 years), Milankovitch cycle variability is evident in paleochemical time series. But rapid millennial-scale variability can be seen in cores from high accumulation rate series. Atlantic deep water chemical properties are seen to change in as little as a few hundred years or less. An extraordinary new 52.7-m-long core from the Bermuda Rise contains a faithful record of climate variability with century-scale resolution. Sediment composition can be linked in detail with the isotope stage 3 interstadials recorded in Greenland ice cores. This new record shows at least 12 major climate fluctuations within marine isotope stage 5 (about 70,000–130,000 years before the present). PMID:11607737

  13. Similar millennial climate variability on the Iberian margin during two early Pleistocene glacials and MIS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birner, B.; Hodell, D. A.; Tzedakis, P. C.; Skinner, L. C.

    2016-01-01

    Although millennial-scale climate variability (<10 ka) has been well studied during the last glacial cycles, little is known about this important aspect of climate in the early Pleistocene, prior to the Middle Pleistocene Transition. Here we present an early Pleistocene climate record at centennial resolution for two representative glacials (marine isotope stages (MIS) 37-41 from approximately 1235 to 1320 ka) during the "41 ka world" at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1385 (the "Shackleton Site") on the southwest Iberian margin. Millennial-scale climate variability was suppressed during interglacial periods (MIS 37, MIS 39, and MIS 41) and activated during glacial inceptions when benthic δ18O exceeded 3.2‰. Millennial variability during glacials MIS 38 and MIS 40 closely resembled Dansgaard-Oeschger events from the last glacial (MIS 3) in amplitude, shape, and pacing. The phasing of oxygen and carbon isotope variability is consistent with an active oceanic thermal bipolar see-saw between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres during most of the prominent stadials. Surface cooling was associated with systematic decreases in benthic carbon isotopes, indicating concomitant changes in the meridional overturning circulation. A comparison to other North Atlantic records of ice rafting during the early Pleistocene suggests that freshwater forcing, as proposed for the late Pleistocene, was involved in triggering or amplifying perturbations of the North Atlantic circulation that elicited a bipolar see-saw response. Our findings support similarities in the operation of the climate system occurring on millennial time scales before and after the Middle Pleistocene Transition despite the increases in global ice volume and duration of the glacial cycles.

  14. Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bay, R.C.; Bramall, N.E.; Price, P.B.; Clow, G.D.; Hawley, R.L.; Udisti, R.; Castellano, E.

    2006-01-01

    We perform a Monte Carlo pattern recognition analysis of the coincidence between three regional volcanic histories from ice coring of Greenland and Antarctica over the period 2 to 45 ka, using SO4 anomalies in Greenland and East Antarctica determined by continuous core chemistry, together with West Antarctic volcanic ash layers determined by remote optical borehole logging and core assays. We find that the Antarctic record of volcanism correlates with Glacial abrupt climate change at a 95% to >99.8% (???3??) significance level and that volcanic depositions at the three locations match at levels exceeding 3??, likely indicating that many common horizons represent single eruptive events which dispersed material world wide. These globally coincident volcanics were associated with abrupt cooling, often simultaneous with onsets or sudden intensifications of millennial cold periods. The striking agreement between sites implies that the consistency of current timescales obtained by isotopic and glaciological dating methods is better than estimated. Copyright 2006 by the American Geogphysical Union.

  15. A study of the early warning signals of abrupt change in the Pacific decadal oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Hou, Wei; Yan, Peng-Cheng; Zhang, Zhi-Sen; Wang, Kuo

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, the phenomenon of a critical slowing down has demonstrated its major potential in discovering whether a complex dynamic system tends to abruptly change at critical points. This research on the Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO) index has been made on the basis of the critical slowing down principle in order to analyze its early warning signal of abrupt change. The chaotic characteristics of the PDO index sequence at different times are determined by using the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE). The relationship between the regional sea surface temperature (SST) background field and the early warning signal of the PDO abrupt change is further studied through calculating the variance of the SST in the PDO region and the spatial distribution of the autocorrelation coefficient, thereby providing the experimental foundation for the extensive application of the method of the critical slowing down phenomenon. Our results show that the phenomenon of critical slowing down, such as the increase of the variance and autocorrelation coefficient, will continue for six years before the abrupt change of the PDO index. This phenomenon of the critical slowing down can be regarded as one of the early warning signals of an abrupt change. Through calculating the LLE of the PDO index during different times, it is also found that the strongest chaotic characteristics of the system occurred between 1971 and 1975 in the early stages of an abrupt change (1976), and the system was at the stage of a critical slowing down, which proves the reliability of the early warning signal of abrupt change discovered in 1970 from the mechanism. In addition, the variance of the SST, along with the spatial distribution of the autocorrelation coefficient in the corresponding PDO region, also demonstrates the corresponding relationship between the change of the background field of the SST and the change of the PDO. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos

  16. A mid-european decadal isotope-climate record from 15,500 to 5000 years B.P

    PubMed

    von Grafenstein U; Erlenkeuser; Brauer; Jouzel; Johnsen

    1999-06-01

    Oxygen-isotope ratios of precipitation (delta18OP) inferred from deep-lake ostracods from the Ammersee (southern Germany) provide a climate record with decadal resolution. The record in detail shows many of the rapid climate shifts seen in central Greenland ice cores between 15,000 and 5000 years before the present (B.P.). Negative excursions in the estimated delta18OP from both of these records likely reflect short weakenings of the thermohaline circulation caused by episodic discharges of continental freshwater into the North Atlantic. Deviating millennial-scale trends, however, indicate that climate gradients between Europe and Greenland changed systematically, reflecting a gradual rearrangement of North Atlantic circulation during deglaciation. PMID:10356392

  17. Enhanced marine productivity off western North America during warm climate intervals of the past 52 k.y

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, J.D.; O'Connell, S. B.; DelViscio, J.; Dean, W.; Carriquiry, J.D.; Marchitto, T.; Zheng, Yen; VanGeen, A.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of the Santa Barbara Basin off the coast of California have linked changes in its bottom-water oxygen content to millennial-scale climate changes as recorded by the oxygen isotope composition of Greenland ice. Through the use of detailed records from a sediment core collected off the Magdalena Margin of Baja California, Mexico, we demonstrate that this teleconnection predominantly arose from changes in marine productivity, rather than changes in ventilation of the North Pacific, as was originally proposed. One possible interpretation is that the modern balance of El Nin??o-La Nin??a conditions that favors a shallow nutricline and high productivity today and during warm climate intervals of the past 52 k.y. was altered toward more frequent, deep nutricline, low productivity, El Nin??o-like conditions during cool climate intervals. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  18. Holocene climate change in Newfoundland reconstructed using oxygen isotope analysis of lake sediment cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkenbinder, Matthew S.; Abbott, Mark B.; Steinman, Byron A.

    2016-08-01

    Carbonate minerals that precipitate from open-basin lakes can provide archives of past variations in the oxygen isotopic composition of precipitation (δ18Oppt). Holocene δ18Oppt records from the circum- North Atlantic region exhibit large fluctuations during times of rapid ice sheet deglaciation, followed by more stable conditions when interglacial boundary conditions were achieved. However, the timing, magnitude, and climatic controls on century to millennial-scale variations in δ18Oppt in northeastern North America are unclear principally because of a dearth of paleo-proxy data. Here we present a lacustrine sediment oxygen isotope (δ18O) record spanning 10,200 to 1200 calendar years before present (cal yr BP) from Cheeseman Lake, a small, alkaline, hydrologically open lake basin located in west-central Newfoundland, Canada. Stable isotope data from regional lakes, rivers, and precipitation indicate that Cheeseman Lake water δ18O values are consistent with the isotopic composition of inflowing meteoric water. In light of the open-basin hydrology and relatively short water residence time of the lake, we interpret down-core variations in calcite oxygen isotope (δ18Ocal) values to primarily reflect changes in δ18Oppt and atmospheric temperature, although other factors such as changes in the seasonality of precipitation may be a minor influence. We conducted a series of climate sensitivity simulations with a lake hydrologic and isotope mass balance model to investigate theoretical lake water δ18O responses to climate change. Results from these experiments suggest that Cheeseman Lake δ18O values are primarily controlled by temperature and to a much lesser extent, the seasonality of precipitation. Increasing and more positive δ18Ocal values between 10,200 and 8000 cal yr BP are interpreted to reflect the waning influence of the Laurentide Ice Sheet on atmospheric circulation, warming temperatures, and rapidly changing surface ocean δ18O from the input of

  19. Dust fluxes and iron fertilization in Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Fabrice; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Shaffer, Gary; Lamy, Frank; Winckler, Gisela; Farias, Laura; Gallardo, Laura; De Pol-Holz, Ricardo

    2015-07-01

    Mineral dust aerosols play a major role in present and past climates. To date, we rely on climate models for estimates of dust fluxes to calculate the impact of airborne micronutrients on biogeochemical cycles. Here we provide a new global dust flux data set for Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) conditions based on observational data. A comparison with dust flux simulations highlights regional differences between observations and models. By forcing a biogeochemical model with our new data set and using this model's results to guide a millennial-scale Earth System Model simulation, we calculate the impact of enhanced glacial oceanic iron deposition on the LGM-Holocene carbon cycle. On centennial timescales, the higher LGM dust deposition results in a weak reduction of <10 ppm in atmospheric CO2 due to enhanced efficiency of the biological pump. This is followed by a further ~10 ppm reduction over millennial timescales due to greater carbon burial and carbonate compensation.

  20. Gradual and abrupt changes during the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Heather L.; Sosdian, Sindia M.; Rosenthal, Yair; Raymo, Maureen E.

    2016-09-01

    During the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT), the dominant glacial-interglacial cyclicity as inferred from the marine δ18O records of benthic foraminifera (δ18Obenthic) changed from 41 kyr to 100 kyr years in the absence of a comparable change in orbital forcing. Currently, only two Mg/Ca-derived, high-resolution bottom water temperature (BWT) records exist that can be used with δ18Obenthic records to separate temperature and ice volume signals over the Pleistocene. However, these two BWT records suggest a different pattern of climate change occurred over the MPT-a record from North Atlantic DSDP Site 607 suggests BWT decreased with no long-term trend in ice volume over the MPT, while South Pacific ODP Site 1123 suggests that BWT has been relatively stable over the last 1.5 Myr but that there was an abrupt increase in ice volume at ∼900 kyr. In this paper we attempt to reconcile these two views of climate change across the MPT. Specifically, we investigated the suggestion that the secular BWT trend obtained from Mg/Ca measurements on Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi and Oridorsalis umbonatus species from N. Atlantic Site 607 is biased by the possible influence of Δ[CO32-] on Mg/Ca values in these species by generating a low-resolution BWT record using Uvigerina spp., a genus whose Mg/Ca values are not thought to be influenced by Δ[CO32-]. We find a long-term BWT cooling of ∼2-3°C occurred from 1500 to ∼500 kyr in the N. Atlantic, consistent with the previously generated C. wuellerstorfi and O. umbonatus BWT record. We also find that changes in ocean circulation likely influenced δ18Obenthic, BWT, and δ18Oseawater records across the MPT. N. Atlantic BWT cooling starting at ∼1.2 Ma, presumably driven by high-latitude cooling, may have been a necessary precursor to a threshold response in climate-ice sheet behavior at ∼900 ka. At that point, a modest increase in ice volume and thermohaline reorganization may have caused enhanced sensitivity to the 100 kyr

  1. Paleoecological evidence for abrupt cold reversals during peak Holocene warmth on Baffin Island, Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axford, Yarrow; Briner, Jason P.; Miller, Gifford H.; Francis, Donna R.

    2009-03-01

    A continuous record of insect (Chironomidae) remains preserved in lake sediments is used to infer temperature changes at a small lake in Arctic Canada through the Holocene. Early Holocene summers at the study site were characterized by more thermophilous assemblages and warmer inferred temperatures than today, presumably in response to the positive anomaly in Northern Hemisphere summer insolation. Peak early Holocene warmth was interrupted by two cold reversals between 9.5 and 8 cal ka BP, during which multiple cold-stenothermous chironomid taxa appeared in the lake. The earlier reversal appears to correlate with widespread climate anomalies around 9.2 cal ka BP; the age of the younger reversal is equivocal but it may correlate with the 8.2 cal ka BP cold event documented elsewhere. Widespread, abrupt climate shifts in the early Holocene illustrate the susceptibility of the climate system to perturbations, even during periods of enhanced warmth in the Northern Hemisphere.

  2. Climate oscillations reflected in the Arabian Sea subseafloor microbiome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi, William; Coolen, Marco; He, Lijun; Wuchter, Cornelia; Irigoien, Xabier; Chust, Guillem; Johnson, Carl; Hemingway, Jordon; Lee, Mitchell; Galy, Valier; Giosan, Liviu

    2016-04-01

    Marine sediment contains a vast microbial biosphere that influences global biogeochemical cycles over geological timescales. However, the environmental factors controlling the stratigraphy of subseafloor microbial communities are poorly understood. We studied a sediment core directly underlying the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), which exhibits organic carbon rich sapropelic laminae deposited under low oxygen conditions. Consistent with several other cores from the same location, age dating revealed the sapropelic layers coincide with warm North Atlantic millennial-scale Dansgaard-Oeschger events, indicating a direct link between the strength of the OMZ and paleoclimate. A total of 214 samples spanning 13 m and 52 Kyr of deposition were selected for geochemical analyses and paleoclimate proxy measurements, as well as high-throughput metagenomic DNA sequencing of bacteria and archaea. A novel DNA extraction protocol was developed that allowed for direct (unamplified) metagenomic sequencing of DNA from each sample. This dataset represents the highest resolved sedimentary metagenomic sampling profile to date. Analysis of these data together with multiple paleoceanographic proxies show that millennial-scale paleoenvironmental conditions correlate with the metabolism and diversity of bacteria and archaea over the last glacial-interglacial cycle in the Arabian Sea. The metabolic potential for bacterial denitrification correlates with climate-driven OMZ strength and concomitant nitrogen stable isotope fractionation, whereas catabolic potential reflects changing marine organic matter sources across the Last Glacial Maximum. These results indicate that the subsisting microbial communities had been stratified to a large extent by paleoceanographic conditions at the time of deposition. Paleoenvironmental conditions should thus be considered as a mechanism that can help explain microbiome stratigraphy in marine sediment.

  3. Arctic climate tipping points.

    PubMed

    Lenton, Timothy M

    2012-02-01

    There is widespread concern that anthropogenic global warming will trigger Arctic climate tipping points. The Arctic has a long history of natural, abrupt climate changes, which together with current observations and model projections, can help us to identify which parts of the Arctic climate system might pass future tipping points. Here the climate tipping points are defined, noting that not all of them involve bifurcations leading to irreversible change. Past abrupt climate changes in the Arctic are briefly reviewed. Then, the current behaviour of a range of Arctic systems is summarised. Looking ahead, a range of potential tipping phenomena are described. This leads to a revised and expanded list of potential Arctic climate tipping elements, whose likelihood is assessed, in terms of how much warming will be required to tip them. Finally, the available responses are considered, especially the prospects for avoiding Arctic climate tipping points. PMID:22270703

  4. Millennial scale variability in high magnitude flooding across Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, N.

    2014-09-01

    The last decade has witnessed severe flooding across much of the globe, but have these floods really been exceptional? Globally, relatively few instrumental river flow series extend beyond 50 years, with short records presenting significant challenges in determining flood risk from high-magnitude floods. A perceived increase in extreme floods in recent years has decreased public confidence in conventional flood risk estimates; the results affect society (insurance costs), individuals (personal vulnerability) and companies (e.g. water resource managers - flood/drought risk). Here we show how historical records from Britain have improved understanding of high magnitude floods, by examining past spatial and temporal variability. The findings identify that whilst recent floods are notable, several comparable periods of increased flooding are identifiable historically, with periods of greater frequency (flood-rich periods) or/and larger floods. The use of historical records identifies that the largest floods often transcend single catchments affecting regions and that the current flood rich period is not exceptional.

  5. Status Cataplecticus Precipitated by Abrupt Withdrawal of Venlafaxine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Janice; Greenberg, Harly

    2013-01-01

    Status cataplecticus is a rare manifestation of narcolepsy with cataplexy episodes recurring for hours or days, without a refractory period, in the absence of emotional triggers. This case highlights a narcoleptic patient who developed status cataplecticus after abrupt withdrawal of venlafaxine. Citation: Wang J; Greenberg H. Status cataplecticus precipitated by abrupt withdrawal of venlafaxine. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(7):715-716. PMID:23853567

  6. Climate change patterns in Amazonia and biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hai; Sinha, Ashish; Cruz, Francisco W.; Wang, Xianfeng; Edwards, R. Lawrence; D'Horta, Fernando M.; Ribas, Camila C.; Vuille, Mathias; Stott, Lowell D.; Auler, Augusto S.

    2013-01-01

    Precise characterization of hydroclimate variability in Amazonia on various timescales is critical to understanding the link between climate change and biodiversity. Here we present absolute-dated speleothem oxygen isotope records that characterize hydroclimate variation in western and eastern Amazonia over the past 250 and 20 ka, respectively. Although our records demonstrate the coherent millennial-scale precipitation variability across tropical-subtropical South America, the orbital-scale precipitation variability between western and eastern Amazonia exhibits a quasi-dipole pattern. During the last glacial period, our records imply a modest increase in precipitation amount in western Amazonia but a significant drying in eastern Amazonia, suggesting that higher biodiversity in western Amazonia, contrary to ‘Refugia Hypothesis’, is maintained under relatively stable climatic conditions. In contrast, the glacial-interglacial climatic perturbations might have been instances of loss rather than gain in biodiversity in eastern Amazonia, where forests may have been more susceptible to fragmentation in response to larger swings in hydroclimate.

  7. Analysis of Connected Climate Systems via Deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemzadeh-Atoufi, M. B.; Reischmann, E.; Rial, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Deconvolution is a technique most often used in signal and image processing to remove the effects of a system's impulse response and recreate the input signal from a given output. In the context of paleoclimate, deconvolution by spectral division has been used to recover the climate system's impulse response, also known as its transfer function, given the δ18O time series record of the north pole as the input and the south as the output (or vice versa). The working hypothesis of polar synchronization justifies the use of deconvolution methods. Various regularization approaches and spectral analysis show a clear connection of millennial scale periodicity linking the polar climates over the past 100,000 years. Tests of spectral peak consistency across regularization factors and of peak validity indicate that the connection is a result of the data and is not an artifact of the method used. Deconvolution can be applied to other linearly connected climate systems including teleconnected systems. Sea surface temperature dipoles found in the North Atlantic Ocean basin, for example, also display potentially geographically linked features, and correlation between the dipoles themselves suggests synchronization of adjacent dipoles. Having identified this system of synchronized variations with linear phase relations, deconvolution methods can be used to investigate potential transfer functions across different scales.

  8. Modeling Abrupt Change in Global Sea Level Arising from Ocean - Ice-Sheet Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, David M

    2011-09-24

    It is proposed to develop, validate, and apply a coupled ocean ice-sheet model to simulate possible, abrupt future change in global sea level. This research is to be carried out collaboratively between an academic institute and a Department of Energy Laboratory (DOE), namely, the PI and a graduate student at New York University (NYU) and climate model researchers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The NYU contribution is mainly in the area of incorporating new physical processes into the model, while the LANL efforts are focused on improved numerics and overall model development. NYU and LANL will work together on applying the model to a variety of modeling scenarios of recent past and possible near-future abrupt change to the configuration of the periphery of the major ice sheets. The project's ultimate goal is to provide a robust, accurate prediction of future global sea level change, a feat that no fully-coupled climate model is currently capable of producing. This proposal seeks to advance that ultimate goal by developing, validating, and applying a regional model that can simulate the detailed processes involved in sea-level change due to ocean ice-sheet interaction. Directly modeling ocean ice-sheet processes in a fully-coupled global climate model is not a feasible activity at present given the near-complete absence of development of any such causal mechanism in these models to date.

  9. Abrupt shifts in Horn of Africa hydroclimate and the influence of the Indian Ocean (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, J. E.; deMenocal, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    The timing and abruptness with which Northeast Africa transitioned into and out of the Early Holocene African Humid Period is a subject of ongoing debate, with direct consequences for our understanding of climate stability and paleoenvironments. Here we present a new proxy record of regional hydroclimate, based on the hydrogen isotopic composition of leaf waxes, from a marine core in the Gulf of Aden that documents rapid, century-scale transitions into and out of the African Humid Period across the Horn of Africa. The Gulf of Aden record also documents large drying events during the last deglacial, synchronous with Heinrich Event 1 and the Younger Dryas. Similar and generally synchronous abrupt transitions at other East African sites suggest that rapid shifts in hydroclimate are regionally coherent. In addition, the termination of the African Humid Period in East Africa is synchronous with the termination along the western Saharan margin. A probabilistic analysis of the abruptness of the transitions in East Africa suggests that they likely occurred within centuries, underscoring the sensitivity of northeast African hydroclimate to external forcings. We speculate that the non-linear behavior of hydroclimate in the Horn of Africa is related to convection thresholds in the western Indian Ocean, and test this hypothesis with preliminary SST proxy data.

  10. Abrupt variations of Indian and East Asian summer monsoons during the last deglacial stadial and interstadial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Bing; Hong, Yetang; Uchida, Masao; Shibata, Yasuyuki; Cai, Cheng; Peng, Haijun; Zhu, Yongxuan; Wang, Yu; Yuan, Linggui

    2014-08-01

    The phase relationship between the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) and the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) during the last deglaciation remains controversial. Here, we reconstruct a 15,000-year plant cellulose δ13C proxy record for the ISM from the Yuexi peat bog in southwestern China. The record shows that the ISM abruptly decreases during the Younger Dryas (YD) stadial and abruptly increases during the Bølling-Allerød (BA) interstadial. A comparison of the Yuexi record with other related proxy climate records reveals two types of phenomena. First, the strengths of the two Asian monsoons are inversely related during the YD stadial, i.e., the ISM strength decreases and the EASM increases. During this period, the southern Chinese mainland consisted of a wide arid zone while the northern Chinese mainland was much wetter. The arid zone in southern China resulted from two different types of monsoon processes: the abnormal northward extension of the EASM rain belt, leading to less rainfall in southeast China, or an illusion that the EASM weakened. The other process is a real weakening of the ISM. Second, during the BA interstadial, the strengths of both the ISM and EASM clearly increased. However, the maximum strengths appear to have occurred in the Allerød period. During this period, the entire Chinese mainland, both northern and southern, experienced wet conditions. The abnormal climate pattern of wet in the north and dry in the south during the YD stadial occurs because of the combined effects of the strengthened EASM, intensified westerlies, and weakened ISM, which could be attributed to the response to the abrupt cooling in the high northern latitudes and to the El Niño-like activity in the equatorial Pacific. The widespread wet climate during the BA interstadial may be related to an abrupt increase in the greenhouse gases (GHGs) concentrations in the atmosphere and to the La Niña-like activity in the equatorial Pacific. These results contribute to a better

  11. Controls on the abruptness of gravel-sand transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venditti, J. G.; Church, M. A.; Lamb, M. P.; Domarad, N.; Rennie, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    As gravel-bedded rivers fine downstream, they characteristically exhibit an abrupt transition from gravel- to sand-bed. This is the only abrupt transition in grain-size that occurs in the fluvial system and has attracted considerable attention. A number of competing theories have been proposed to account for the abruptness of the transition, including base-level control, attrition of ~10mm gravel to produce sand, and sediment sorting processes. The prevailing theory for the emergence of abrupt transitions is size selective sorting of bimodal sediment wherein gravel deposits due to downstream declining shear stress, fining the bedload until a sand-bed emerges. We explored this hypothesis by examining grain-size, shear stress, gravel mobility and sand suspension thresholds through the gravel-sand transition (GST) of the Fraser River, British Columbia. The Fraser GST is an arrested gravel wedge with patches of gravel downstream of the wedge forming a diffuse extension. There is an abrupt change in bed slope through the transition that leads to an abrupt change in shear stress. The GST, bed-slope change and backwater caused by the ocean are all coincident spatially, which enhances the sharpness of the GST. Interestingly, the bimodal reach of the river occurs downstream of the GST and exhibits no downstream gradients in shear stress, suspended sediment flux, gravel mobility or sand suspension thresholds. This calls into question the prevailing theory for the emergence of an abrupt GST by size selective sorting. We provide evidence, both empirical and theoretical, that suggests the emergence of an abrupt GST is caused by rapid deposition of sand when fine gravel deposits. We argue that the emergence of gravel-sand transitions is a consequence of gravel-bedded rivers adopting a steeper slope than sand-bedded rivers. The abruptness arises because the bed slope required to convey the gravel load fixes the distal location of a terminal gravel wedge, and once the river has

  12. A high-resolution lake sediment record of glacier activity from SE Greenland defines abrupt Holocene cooling events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balascio, N. L.; Bradley, R. S.; D'Andrea, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    Orbital driven changes in high latitude summer insolation during the Holocene are responsible for the primary millennial-scale climate trends in the Arctic. Following deglaciation, maximum summer temperatures generally occurred during the early to mid-Holocene and declined through the late Holocene. Superimposed on this gradual cooling trend are centennial- and decadal-scale intervals that indicate more rapid perturbations of the arctic climate system. Highly resolved sedimentary records from terrestrial and marine sites help to better characterize climate system dynamics during the Holocene and investigate forcing and feedback mechanism that operate on different timescales. Reconstructing glacial activity can provide valuable paleoclimate information about trends in summer temperature and/or winter precipitation. Proglacial lakes contain sediment archives of meltwater input from glaciers and typically have high sedimentation rates preserving detailed information on glacial activity. However, interpreting proglacial sedimentary records can be difficult because 1) there may be significant input of sediment from non-glacial sources, 2) there is often a lack of organic material for radiocarbon dating, and 3) not all glaciers are sensitive to rapid climatic changes. Here we present a c. 10 cal ka BP record of glacier activity from Kulusuk Lake (65.6°N, 37.1°W; 202 m a.s.l.), a proglacial lake in southeast Greenland that is well constrained by radiocarbon dates and shows a clear signal of changes in glacial input throughout the Holocene. Kulusuk Lake is presently fed by meltwater from two cirque glaciers. It has a small catchment and no other significant source of sediment input. A 3.5 m sediment core contains distinct lithologic changes defined by grain size, magnetic susceptibility, organic content, and scanning XRF data. During the early Holocene, an overall decrease in meltwater input from 8.7-7.7 ka indicates the retreat of the glaciers in response to regional

  13. An Abrupt Change in the African Monsoon at the end of the Younger Dryas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, M. R.; Filippi, M. L.; Jensen, N. B.; Tiercelin, J.

    2005-12-01

    A variety of proxy palaeoclimatic records from tropical Africa and the adjacent oceans suggest that a climatic event equivalent to the Younger Dryas (YD) also affected this region. To date however, little attention has been directed towards the end of the YD in Africa, even though it has been identified as a period of particularly rapid and profound climatic change in the circum-North Atlantic region. High-resolution studies of variations in the elemental and stable carbon- and nitrogen-isotope composition of organic matter in cores from Lakes Malawi, Tanganyika and Bosumtwi (tropical Africa) indicate an abrupt change in the wind-driven circulation of these lakes that, within the limits of available chronologies, was contemporaneous with the end of the YD in the northern hemisphere. The change was apparently coincident with the transition to humid conditions in the central Sahara, with shifts in surface winds recorded in cores from off the coasts of East and West Africa, and possibly also with the onset of the last phase of ice accumulation on Mt. Kilimanjaro. Together, the evidence suggests an abrupt northward translation of the African monsoon system at ca. 11.5 +/- 0.3 cal. ka BP.

  14. Antarctic lakes suggest millennial reorganizations of Southern Hemisphere atmospheric and oceanic circulation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Brenda L.; Denton, George H.; Fountain, Andrew G.; Hendy, Chris H.; Henderson, Gideon M.

    2010-01-01

    The phasing of millennial-scale oscillations in Antarctica relative to those elsewhere in the world is important for discriminating among models for abrupt climate change, particularly those involving the Southern Ocean. However, records of millennial-scale variability from Antarctica dating to the last glacial maximum are rare and rely heavily on data from widely spaced ice cores, some of which show little variability through that time. Here, we present new data from closed-basin lakes in the Dry Valleys region of East Antarctica that show high-magnitude, high-frequency oscillations in surface level during the late Pleistocene synchronous with climate fluctuations elsewhere in the Southern Hemisphere. These data suggest a coherent Southern Hemisphere pattern of climate change on millennial time scales, at least in the Pacific sector, and indicate that any hypothesis concerning the origin of these events must account for synchronous changes in both high and temperate latitudes. PMID:21115838

  15. Antarctic lakes suggest millennial reorganizations of Southern Hemisphere atmospheric and oceanic circulation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Brenda L; Denton, George H; Fountain, Andrew G; Hendy, Chris H; Henderson, Gideon M

    2010-12-14

    The phasing of millennial-scale oscillations in Antarctica relative to those elsewhere in the world is important for discriminating among models for abrupt climate change, particularly those involving the Southern Ocean. However, records of millennial-scale variability from Antarctica dating to the last glacial maximum are rare and rely heavily on data from widely spaced ice cores, some of which show little variability through that time. Here, we present new data from closed-basin lakes in the Dry Valleys region of East Antarctica that show high-magnitude, high-frequency oscillations in surface level during the late Pleistocene synchronous with climate fluctuations elsewhere in the Southern Hemisphere. These data suggest a coherent Southern Hemisphere pattern of climate change on millennial time scales, at least in the Pacific sector, and indicate that any hypothesis concerning the origin of these events must account for synchronous changes in both high and temperate latitudes. PMID:21115838

  16. Remote Detection and Modeling of Abrupt and Gradual Tree Mortality in the Southwestern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muss, J. D.; Xu, C.; McDowell, N. G.

    2014-12-01

    Current climate models predict a warming and drying trend that has a high probability of increasing the frequency and spatial extent of tree mortality events. Field surveys can be used to identify, date, and attribute a cause of mortality to specific trees, but monetary and time constraints prevent broad-scale surveys, which are necessary to establish regional or global trends in tree mortality. This is significant because widespread forest mortality will likely lead to radical changes in evapotranspiration and surface albedo, which could compound climate change. While understanding the causes and mechanisms of tree mortality events is crucial, it is equally important to be able to detect and monitor mortality and subsequent changes to the ecosystem at broad spatial- and temporal-scales. Over the past five years our ability to remotely detect abrupt forest mortality events has improved greatly, but gradual events—such as those caused by drought or certain types of insects—are still difficult to identify. Moreover, it is virtually impossible to quantify the amount of mortality that has occurred within a mixed pixel. We have developed a system that fuses climate and satellite-derived spectral data to identify both the date and the agent of forest mortality events. This system has been used with Landsat time series data to detect both abrupt and general trends in tree loss that have occurred during the past quarter-century in northern New Mexico. It has also been used with MODIS data to identify pixels with a high likelihood of drought-caused tree mortality in the Southwestern US. These candidate pixels were then fed to ED-FRT, a coupled forest dynamics-radiative transfer model, to generate estimates of drought-induced. We demonstrate a multi-scale approach that can produce results that will be instrumental in advancing our understanding of tree mortality-climate feedbacks, and improve our ability to predict what forests could look like in the future.

  17. Extreme temperatures, foundation species, and abrupt ecosystem change: an example from an iconic seagrass ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Jordan A; Burkholder, Derek A; Heithaus, Michael R; Fourqurean, James W; Fraser, Matthew W; Statton, John; Kendrick, Gary A

    2015-04-01

    Extreme climatic events can trigger abrupt and often lasting change in ecosystems via the reduction or elimination of foundation (i.e., habitat-forming) species. However, while the frequency/intensity of extreme events is predicted to increase under climate change, the impact of these events on many foundation species and the ecosystems they support remains poorly understood. Here, we use the iconic seagrass meadows of Shark Bay, Western Australia--a relatively pristine subtropical embayment whose dominant, canopy-forming seagrass, Amphibolis antarctica, is a temperate species growing near its low-latitude range limit--as a model system to investigate the impacts of extreme temperatures on ecosystems supported by thermally sensitive foundation species in a changing climate. Following an unprecedented marine heat wave in late summer 2010/11, A. antarctica experienced catastrophic (>90%) dieback in several regions of Shark Bay. Animal-borne video footage taken from the perspective of resident, seagrass-associated megafauna (sea turtles) revealed severe habitat degradation after the event compared with a decade earlier. This reduction in habitat quality corresponded with a decline in the health status of largely herbivorous green turtles (Chelonia mydas) in the 2 years following the heat wave, providing evidence of long-term, community-level impacts of the event. Based on these findings, and similar examples from diverse ecosystems, we argue that a generalized framework for assessing the vulnerability of ecosystems to abrupt change associated with the loss of foundation species is needed to accurately predict ecosystem trajectories in a changing climate. This includes seagrass meadows, which have received relatively little attention in this context. Novel research and monitoring methods, such as the analysis of habitat and environmental data from animal-borne video and data-logging systems, can make an important contribution to this framework. PMID:25145694

  18. Drivers and Dynamics of Ecological Responses to Abrupt Environmental Change on the Early Miocene Oregon Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belanger, C. L.

    2012-12-01

    We know that the biosphere responds to abrupt climate change, but know less about the dynamics of those changes and their proximal drivers. Studies of well-preserved fossil time-series spanning past climate events that utilize multiple environmental proxies and examine multiple taxonomic groups can provide critical insight into (a) the specific environmental factors to which the biota respond, (b) the rate and tempo of those responses, and (c) whether taxonomic groups respond similarly or differently to the same stresses. I examine the drivers and dynamics of ecological changes in continental shelf benthic foraminifera and molluscs from the Early Miocene Newport Member of the Astoria Formation in Oregon (20.3-16.3 mya), which spans a time of global warming leading into the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum. Stable isotope (δ18O) data from three species of benthic foraminifera from the Astoria sediments indicate that the region abruptly warmed by 2-4°C approximately 19 mya. In addition, δ13C values from epifaunal and infaunal foraminifera indicate an increase in productivity and organic carbon flux over time. Further, an increase in δ15N from bulk sediment and an increase in sedimentary laminations suggest oxygen levels declined. Multivariate analyses demonstrate a strong correlation between foraminiferal community metrics and δ15N suggesting that the foraminiferal community is tracking oxygenation levels while correlations to productivity changes appear indirect. Molluscan community metrics also have an approximately linear relationship to δ15N. Temperature itself had little direct influence on community composition. Changes in community composition and structure of both the foraminifera and the molluscs are abrupt relative to the duration of community states, but each group responds differently to the climate change. The foraminiferal community increases in the number of species and the evenness of species abundances while the molluscan community decreases in

  19. Abrupt Depletion Layer Approximation for the Metal Insulator Semiconductor Diode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kenneth

    1979-01-01

    Determines the excess surface change carrier density, surface potential, and relative capacitance of a metal insulator semiconductor diode as a function of the gate voltage, using the precise questions and the equations derived with the abrupt depletion layer approximation. (Author/GA)

  20. Abrupt changes in the dynamics of quantum disentanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Lastra, F.; Romero, G.; Lopez, C. E.; Retamal, J. C.; Franca Santos, M.

    2007-06-15

    The evolution of the lower bound of entanglement proposed by Chen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 210501 (2005)] in high-dimensional bipartite systems under dissipation is studied. Discontinuities for the time derivative of this bound are found depending on the initial conditions for entangled states. These abrupt changes along the evolution of the entanglement bound appear as precursors of sudden death.

  1. Abrupt increases in Amazonian tree mortality due to drought-fire interactions.

    PubMed

    Brando, Paulo Monteiro; Balch, Jennifer K; Nepstad, Daniel C; Morton, Douglas C; Putz, Francis E; Coe, Michael T; Silvério, Divino; Macedo, Marcia N; Davidson, Eric A; Nóbrega, Caroline C; Alencar, Ane; Soares-Filho, Britaldo S

    2014-04-29

    Interactions between climate and land-use change may drive widespread degradation of Amazonian forests. High-intensity fires associated with extreme weather events could accelerate this degradation by abruptly increasing tree mortality, but this process remains poorly understood. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first field-based evidence of a tipping point in Amazon forests due to altered fire regimes. Based on results of a large-scale, long-term experiment with annual and triennial burn regimes (B1yr and B3yr, respectively) in the Amazon, we found abrupt increases in fire-induced tree mortality (226 and 462%) during a severe drought event, when fuel loads and air temperatures were substantially higher and relative humidity was lower than long-term averages. This threshold mortality response had a cascading effect, causing sharp declines in canopy cover (23 and 31%) and aboveground live biomass (12 and 30%) and favoring widespread invasion by flammable grasses across the forest edge area (80 and 63%), where fires were most intense (e.g., 220 and 820 kW ⋅ m(-1)). During the droughts of 2007 and 2010, regional forest fires burned 12 and 5% of southeastern Amazon forests, respectively, compared with <1% in nondrought years. These results show that a few extreme drought events, coupled with forest fragmentation and anthropogenic ignition sources, are already causing widespread fire-induced tree mortality and forest degradation across southeastern Amazon forests. Future projections of vegetation responses to climate change across drier portions of the Amazon require more than simulation of global climate forcing alone and must also include interactions of extreme weather events, fire, and land-use change. PMID:24733937

  2. Abrupt increases in Amazonian tree mortality due to drought–fire interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brando, Paulo Monteiro; Balch, Jennifer K.; Nepstad, Daniel C.; Morton, Douglas C.; Putz, Francis E.; Coe, Michael T.; Silvério, Divino; Macedo, Marcia N.; Davidson, Eric A.; Nóbrega, Caroline C.; Alencar, Ane; Soares-Filho, Britaldo S.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between climate and land-use change may drive widespread degradation of Amazonian forests. High-intensity fires associated with extreme weather events could accelerate this degradation by abruptly increasing tree mortality, but this process remains poorly understood. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first field-based evidence of a tipping point in Amazon forests due to altered fire regimes. Based on results of a large-scale, long-term experiment with annual and triennial burn regimes (B1yr and B3yr, respectively) in the Amazon, we found abrupt increases in fire-induced tree mortality (226 and 462%) during a severe drought event, when fuel loads and air temperatures were substantially higher and relative humidity was lower than long-term averages. This threshold mortality response had a cascading effect, causing sharp declines in canopy cover (23 and 31%) and aboveground live biomass (12 and 30%) and favoring widespread invasion by flammable grasses across the forest edge area (80 and 63%), where fires were most intense (e.g., 220 and 820 kW⋅m−1). During the droughts of 2007 and 2010, regional forest fires burned 12 and 5% of southeastern Amazon forests, respectively, compared with <1% in nondrought years. These results show that a few extreme drought events, coupled with forest fragmentation and anthropogenic ignition sources, are already causing widespread fire-induced tree mortality and forest degradation across southeastern Amazon forests. Future projections of vegetation responses to climate change across drier portions of the Amazon require more than simulation of global climate forcing alone and must also include interactions of extreme weather events, fire, and land-use change. PMID:24733937

  3. Interhemispheric Atlantic seesaw response during the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Barker, Stephen; Diz, Paula; Vautravers, Maryline J; Pike, Jennifer; Knorr, Gregor; Hall, Ian R; Broecker, Wallace S

    2009-02-26

    The asynchronous relationship between millennial-scale temperature changes over Greenland and Antarctica during the last glacial period has led to the notion of a bipolar seesaw which acts to redistribute heat depending on the state of meridional overturning circulation within the Atlantic Ocean. Here we present new records from the South Atlantic that show rapid changes during the last deglaciation that were instantaneous (within dating uncertainty) and of opposite sign to those observed in the North Atlantic. Our results demonstrate a direct link between the abrupt changes associated with variations in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and the more gradual adjustments characteristic of the Southern Ocean. These results emphasize the importance of the Southern Ocean for the development and transmission of millennial-scale climate variability and highlight its role in deglacial climate change and the associated rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide. PMID:19242468

  4. Abrupt changes in early Holocene tropical sea surface temperature derived from coral records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, J. Warren; Récy, Jacques; Taylor, Fred; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Cabioch, Guy

    1997-02-01

    For many high-latitude regions of the globe, it is now clear that the transition to modern climate following the Last Glacial Maximum was punctuated by a number of rapid and substantial climate oscillations1,2. In contrast, relatively little is known about how the tropics responded to the deglaciation, because few high-resolution records are available from lower latitudes. Corals have recently been shown to provide an important source of tropical climate records because they can be easily and accurately dated, using either 14C or 230Th, and because past sea surface temperatures can be recovered from the Sr/Ca ratios in coral skeletons. Here we use this technique to derive several early Holocene sea surface temperature records from a coral drill core recovered from Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu in the tropical southwest Pacific Ocean. These records indicate that sea surface temperatures in this region were depressed by as much as 6.5 °C below modern values at ~ 10,350 calendar years BP, but rose very abruptly during the following 1,500 years. This temperature increase lags the post-Younger Dryas increase observed in a coral record from the tropical Atlantic Ocean3by about 3,000 years, an unexpected phase-shift that may ultimately shed light on the mechanisms of deglacial climate change.

  5. Abrupt decadal-to-centennial hydroclimate changes in the Mediterranean region since the mid-Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hsun-Ming; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Jiang, Xiuyang; Wang, Yongjin; Mii, Horng-Sheng; Michel, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    A series of severe drought events in the Mediterranean region over the past two decades has posed a threat on both human society and biosystem. Holocene hydrological dynamics can offer valuable clues for understanding future climate and making proper adaption strategy. Here, we present a decadal-resolved stalagmite record documenting various hydroclimatic fluctuations in the north central Mediterranean region since the middle Holocene. The stalagmite δ18O sequence shows dramatic instability, characterized by abrupt shifts between dry and wet conditions <50 years. The timing of regional culture demises, such as the Hittite Kingdom, Mycenaean Greece, Akkadian Empire, Egyptian Old Kingdom, and Uruk, occurred during the drought events, suggesting an important role of climate impact on human civilization. The unstable hydroclimate evolution is related to transferred North Atlantic Oscillation states. Rate of rapid transfer of precipitation patterns, which can be pin-pointed by our good chronology, improves the prediction to future climate changes in North Atlantic region. We also found that a strong correlation between this stalagmite δ18O and sea surface temperatures especially in Pacific Ocean. This agreement suggests a distant interregional climate teleconnection.

  6. A novel method for detecting abrupt dynamic change based on the changing Hurst exponent of spatial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wen-Ping; Liu, Qun-Qun; Gu, Bin; Zhao, Shan-Shan

    2016-01-01

    The climate system is a classical spatiotemporal evolutionary dynamic system with spatiotemporal correlation characteristics. Based on this, two-dimensional detrended fluctuation analysis (TD-DFA) is used to estimate the Hurst exponent of two-dimensional images. Then, we monitored the change of the Hurst exponent of the images to identify an abrupt dynamic change. We tested the performance of this method with a coupled spatiotemporal dynamic model and found that it works well. The changes in the Hurst exponents of the spatial images are stable when there is no dynamic change in the system, but there will be a clear non-stationary change of the Hurst exponents; for example, the abrupt mean values change if the dynamics of the system change. Thus, the TD-DFA method is suitable for detecting an abrupt dynamic change from natural and artificial images. The spatial images of the NCEP reanalysis of the daily average temperature exhibited fractality. Based on this, we found three non-stationary changes in the Hurst exponents for the NCEP reanalysis of the daily average temperature or for the annual average temperature in the region (60°S-60°N). It can be concluded that the climate system may have incurred three dynamic changes since 1961 on decadal timescales, i.e., in approximately the mid-1970s, the mid-1980s, and between the late 1990s and the early 2000s.

  7. Abrupt termination of the 2012 Pacific warming and its implication on ENSO prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jingzhi; Xiang, Baoqiang; Wang, Bin; Li, Tim

    2014-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, there was a clear signal of the developing El Niño over the equatorial Pacific, and many climate models forecasted the occurrence of El Niño with a peak phase in the subsequent winter. However, the warming was aborted abruptly in late fall. Here we show that the abrupt termination of the 2012 Pacific warming was largely attributed to the anomalous sea surface temperature (SST) cooling in the northeastern and southeastern subtropical Pacific. The anomalous SST cooling induced strong easterly and low-level divergence anomalies, suppressing the development of westerly and convection anomalies over the equatorial central Pacific. Thus, the surface warming over the equatorial Pacific was decoupled from the surface wind forcing and subsurface thermocline variability, inhibiting its further development into a mature El Niño in the winter of 2012-2013. This study highlights the importance of the SST anomaly in the subtropical Pacific in El Niño prediction.

  8. Impact of suborbital climate changes in the North Atlantic on ice sheet dynamics at the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HernáNdez-Almeida, I.; Sierro, F. J.; Cacho, I.; Flores, J. A.

    2012-09-01

    Early and Mid-Pleistocene climate, ocean hydrography and ice sheet dynamics have been reconstructed using a high-resolution data set (planktonic and benthicδ18O time series, faunal-based sea surface temperature (SST) reconstructions and ice-rafted debris (IRD)) record from a high-deposition-rate sedimentary succession recovered at the Gardar Drift formation in the subpolar North Atlantic (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Leg 306, Site U1314). Our sedimentary record spans from late in Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 31 to MIS 19 (1069-779 ka). Different trends of the benthic and planktonic oxygen isotopes, SST and IRD records before and after MIS 25 (˜940 ka) evidence the large increase in Northern Hemisphere ice-volume, linked to the cyclicity change from the 41-kyr to the 100-kyr that occurred during the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT). Beside longer glacial-interglacial (G-IG) variability, millennial-scale fluctuations were a pervasive feature across our study. Negative excursions in the benthicδ18O time series observed at the times of IRD events may be related to glacio-eustatic changes due to ice sheets retreats and/or to changes in deep hydrography. Time series analysis on surface water proxies (IRD, SST and planktonicδ18O) of the interval between MIS 31 to MIS 26 shows that the timing of these millennial-scale climate changes are related to half-precessional (10 kyr) components of the insolation forcing, which are interpreted as cross-equatorial heat transport toward high latitudes during both equinox insolation maxima at the equator.

  9. The last millennium climate reanalysis project: Framework and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakim, Gregory J.; Emile-Geay, Julien; Steig, Eric J.; Noone, David; Anderson, David M.; Tardif, Robert; Steiger, Nathan; Perkins, Walter A.

    2016-06-01

    An "offline" approach to DA is used, where static ensemble samples are drawn from existing CMIP climate-model simulations to serve as the prior estimate of climate variables. We use linear, univariate forward models ("proxy system models (PSMs)") that map climate variables to proxy measurements by fitting proxy data to 2 m air temperature from gridded instrumental temperature data; the linear PSMs are then used to predict proxy values from the prior estimate. Results for the LMR are compared against six gridded instrumental temperature data sets and 25% of the proxy records are withheld from assimilation for independent verification. Results show broad agreement with previous reconstructions of Northern Hemisphere mean 2 m air temperature, with millennial-scale cooling, a multicentennial warm period around 1000 C.E., and a cold period coincident with the Little Ice Age (circa 1450-1800 C.E.). Verification against gridded instrumental data sets during 1880-2000 C.E. reveals greatest skill in the tropics and lowest skill over Northern Hemisphere land areas. Verification against independent proxy records indicates substantial improvement relative to the model (prior) data without proxy assimilation. As an illustrative example, we present multivariate reconstructed fields for a singular event, the 1808/1809 "mystery" volcanic eruption, which reveal global cooling that is strongly enhanced locally due to the presence of the Pacific-North America wave pattern in the 500 hPa geopotential height field.

  10. Recommended Experimental Procedures for Evaluation of Abrupt Wing Stall Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F. J.; Hall, R. M.; Owens, D. B.; Lamar, J. E.; McMillin, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the experimental program under the Abrupt Wing Stall (AWS) Program. Candidate figures of merit from conventional static tunnel tests are summarized and correlated with data obtained in unique free-to-roll tests. Where possible, free-to-roll results are also correlated with flight data. Based on extensive studies of static experimental figures of merit in the Abrupt Wing Stall Program for four different aircraft configurations, no one specific figure of merit consistently flagged a warning of potential lateral activity when actual activity was seen to occur in the free-to-roll experiments. However, these studies pointed out the importance of measuring and recording the root mean square signals of the force balance.

  11. Abruptly autofocusing terahertz waves with meta-hologram.

    PubMed

    He, Jingwen; Wang, Sen; Xie, Zhenwei; Ye, Jiasheng; Wang, Xinke; Kan, Qiang; Zhang, Yan

    2016-06-15

    An abruptly autofocusing ring-Airy beam is demonstrated in the terahertz (THz) waveband with a meta-hologram. The designed meta-hologram is composed of gold C-shaped slot antennas, which can realize both phase and amplitude modulation of the incident THz wave. A THz holographic imaging system is utilized to measure the generated ring-Airy beam; an abrupt focus following a parabolic trajectory is subsequently observed. THz ring-Airy beams with different parameters are also generated and investigated. This method can be expanded to other wavebands, such as the visible band, for which the meta-hologram can replace traditional computer-generated holography to avoid undesirable multiple diffraction orders. PMID:27304289

  12. Complications of coronary intervention: abrupt closure, dissection, perforation

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Debabrata

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of drug-eluting stents (DESs) and superior anticoagulation has successfully improved the safety and patency rates of complex percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs). The evolving techniques of contemporary PCI have been unable to completely eliminate coronary injury and mechanical complications. Primary causes for abrupt closure include dissection, thrombus formation and acute stent thrombosis. Initial treatment for abrupt closure includes balloon redilatation, optimisation of activated clotting time (ACT) and deployment of stent to stabilise a dissection. Coronary perforation is one of the most challenging and feared complications of PCI. It is most frequently due to distal wire or balloon/stent oversizing and should be fixed with balloon occlusion. Covered stent may be needed for large perforation in major proximal vessels. Perforations in small or distal vessels not resolving with balloon occlusion may be managed by coil or Gelfoam embolisation. Referral to emergency coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) should be an option in case perforations do not seal.

  13. Ultra-wideband horn antenna with abrupt radiator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    An ultra-wideband horn antenna transmits and receives impulse waveforms for short-range radars and impulse time-of flight systems. The antenna reduces or eliminates various sources of close-in radar clutter, including pulse dispersion and ringing, sidelobe clutter, and feedline coupling into the antenna. Dispersion is minimized with an abrupt launch point radiator element; sidelobe and feedline coupling are minimized by recessing the radiator into a metallic horn. Low frequency cut-off associated with a horn is extended by configuring the radiator drive impedance to approach a short circuit at low frequencies. A tapered feed plate connects at one end to a feedline, and at the other end to a launcher plate which is mounted to an inside wall of the horn. The launcher plate and feed plate join at an abrupt edge which forms the single launch point of the antenna.

  14. Ultra-wideband horn antenna with abrupt radiator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-05-19

    An ultra-wideband horn antenna transmits and receives impulse waveforms for short-range radars and impulse time-of flight systems. The antenna reduces or eliminates various sources of close-in radar clutter, including pulse dispersion and ringing, sidelobe clutter, and feedline coupling into the antenna. Dispersion is minimized with an abrupt launch point radiator element; sidelobe and feedline coupling are minimized by recessing the radiator into a metallic horn. Low frequency cut-off associated with a horn is extended by configuring the radiator drive impedance to approach a short circuit at low frequencies. A tapered feed plate connects at one end to a feedline, and at the other end to a launcher plate which is mounted to an inside wall of the horn. The launcher plate and feed plate join at an abrupt edge which forms the single launch point of the antenna. 8 figs.

  15. A Rare Cause of Placental Abruption: Uterine Torsion

    PubMed Central

    Güneş, Muhammed Siraç; Kiran, Gürkan; Gülşen, Mehmet Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Uterine torsion is defined as a rotation on its long axis and it is a dangerous, unexpected obstetric emergency. We report a case of uterine torsion at 32 weeks of gestation in a singleton pregnancy. A 37-year-old woman with multiple prior cesarean deliveries referred to emergency unit of our hospital at 32 weeks of gestation with severe abdominal pain and mild vaginal bleeding. Ultrasonography showed a single fetus in vertex position, with a normal amniotic fluid. Fetal biometer was appropriate for 32 weeks of gestation. Placental location was anterior with a subchorionic hypoechogenic small area which was suspected to be a sign of placental abruption. An emergency cesarean section was performed under general anesthesia. The 180° uterine torsion was diagnosed and it was not possible to perform detorsion of the gravid uterus by exteriorization by pfannenstiel incision. Posterior hysterotomy was performed and a male baby of 1830 grams weight was delivered. The newborn was transported to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of another hospital and discharged within two weeks. Patient recovered well and was discharged on second postoperation day. Uterine torsion is a very rare and life threatening situation. In unexpected cases posterior low transuerse hysterotomy is generally performed and it is suggested as a safe choice when detorsion was not accomplished. It is not easy to keep in mind the possibility of uterine torsion in cases of abdominal pain during pregnancy. Because it generally causes abruption, management of abruption is vitally important to prevent fetal mortality. PMID:26894131

  16. Synchronous centennial abrupt events in the ocean and atmosphere during the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tianyu; Robinson, Laura F.; Burke, Andrea; Southon, John; Spooner, Peter; Morris, Paul J.; Ng, Hong Chin

    2015-09-01

    Antarctic ice-core data reveal that the atmosphere experienced abrupt centennial increases in CO2 concentration during the last deglaciation (~18 thousand to 11 thousand years ago). Establishing the role of ocean circulation in these changes requires high-resolution, accurately dated marine records. Here, we report radiocarbon data from uranium-thorium-dated deep-sea corals in the Equatorial Atlantic and Drake Passage over the past 25,000 years. Two major deglacial radiocarbon shifts occurred in phase with centennial atmospheric CO2 rises at 14.8 thousand and 11.7 thousand years ago. We interpret these radiocarbon-enriched signals to represent two short-lived (less than 500 years) “overshoot” events, with Atlantic meridional overturning stronger than that of the modern era. These results provide compelling evidence for a close coupling of ocean circulation and centennial climate events during the last deglaciation.

  17. Synchronous centennial abrupt events in the ocean and atmosphere during the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianyu; Robinson, Laura F; Burke, Andrea; Southon, John; Spooner, Peter; Morris, Paul J; Ng, Hong Chin

    2015-09-25

    Antarctic ice-core data reveal that the atmosphere experienced abrupt centennial increases in CO2 concentration during the last deglaciation (~18 thousand to 11 thousand years ago). Establishing the role of ocean circulation in these changes requires high-resolution, accurately dated marine records. Here, we report radiocarbon data from uranium-thorium-dated deep-sea corals in the Equatorial Atlantic and Drake Passage over the past 25,000 years. Two major deglacial radiocarbon shifts occurred in phase with centennial atmospheric CO2 rises at 14.8 thousand and 11.7 thousand years ago. We interpret these radiocarbon-enriched signals to represent two short-lived (less than 500 years) "overshoot" events, with Atlantic meridional overturning stronger than that of the modern era. These results provide compelling evidence for a close coupling of ocean circulation and centennial climate events during the last deglaciation. PMID:26404835

  18. Abrupt transitions to a cold North Atlantic in the late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geirsdóttir, Áslaug; Miller, Gifford; Larsen, Darren; Florian, Christopher; Pendleton, Simon

    2015-04-01

    The Holocene provides a time interval with boundary conditions similar to present, except for greenhouse gas concentrations. Recent high-resolution Northern Hemisphere records show general cooling related to orbital terms through the late Holocene, but also highly non-linear abrupt departures of centennial scale summer cold periods. These abrupt departures are evident within the last two millennia (the transitions between the Roman Warm Period (RWP, ~2,000 yr BP), the Dark Ages Cold Period (DACP, ~500-900 years AD), the Medieval Warm Period (MWP, 1000-1200 years AD) and the Little Ice Age (LIA, ~1300-1900 AD). A series of new, high-resolution and securely dated lake records from Iceland also show abrupt climate departures over the past 2 ka, characterized by shifts to persistent cold summers and an expanded cryosphere. Despite substantial differences in catchment-specific processes that dominate the lake records, the multi-proxy reconstructions are remarkably similar. After nearly a millennium with little evidence of significant climate shifts, the beginning of the first millennium AD is characterized by renewed summer cooling that leads to an expanding cryosphere. Slow summer cooling over the first five centuries is succeeded by widespread substantial cooling, with evidence for substantial expansion of glaciers and ice caps throughout our field areas between 530 and 900 AD, and an accompanying reduction in vegetation cover across much of Iceland that led to widespread landscape instability. These data suggest that the North Atlantic system began a transition into a new cold state early in the first millennium AD, which was amplified after 500 AD, until it was interrupted by warmer Medieval times between ~1000 and 1250 AD. Although severe soil erosion in Iceland is frequently associated with human settlement dated to 871 ±2 AD our reconstructions indicate that soil erosion began several centuries before settlement, during the DACP, whereas for several centuries

  19. Zooplankton patch dynamics: daily gap formation over abrupt topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genin, Amatzia; Greene, Charles; Haury, Loren; Wiebe, Peter; Gal, Gideon; Kaartvedt, Stein; Meir, Eli; Fey, Connie; Dawson, Jim

    1994-05-01

    Net tow and acoustic surveys of zooplankton distributions were made over and around Sixtymile Bank (110 km southwest of San Diego, California). Gaps devoid of vertically migrating zooplankton were formed every evening above the summit of the bank. Interactions between the migrating animals, their predators, physical advection and the local topography appear to determine the gap formation and dynamics. Gaps were transported downstream during the night and appeared to disintegrate slowly through vertical swimming behavior, current shear and mixing processes. Patch dynamics following gap formation, mediated by both ocean currents and animal behavior, should augment the spatial heterogeneity of zooplankton and affect marine food webs in areas where abrupt topography features are common.

  20. Shock wave interaction with an abrupt area change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, Manuel D.

    1991-01-01

    The wave patterns that occur when a shock wave interacts with an abrupt area changed are analyzed in terms of the incident shock wave Mach number and area-jump ratio. The solutions predicted by a semi-similar models are in good agreement with those obtained numerically from the quasi-one-dimensional time-dependent Euler equations. The entropy production for the wave system is defined and the principle of minimum entropy production is used to resolve a nonuniqueness problem of the self-similar model.

  1. Late Quaternary climatic and oceanographic changes in the Northeast Pacific as recorded by dinoflagellate cysts from Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Andrea M.; Mertens, Kenneth N.; Pospelova, Vera; Pedersen, Thomas F.; Ganeshram, Raja S.

    2013-01-01

    A high-resolution record of organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst production in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California (Mexico) reveals a complex paleoceanographic history over the last ~40 ka. Guaymas Basin is an excellent location to perform high resolution studies of changes in late Quaternary climate and paleo-productivity because it is characterized by high primary productivity, high sedimentation rates, and low oxygen bottom waters. These factors contribute to the deposition and preservation of laminated sediments throughout large portions of the core MD02-2515. In this study, we document dinoflagellate cyst production at a centennial to millennial scale throughout the late Quaternary. Based on the cyst assemblages, three dinoflagellate cyst zones were established and roughly correspond to Marine Isotope Stages (MISs) 1 to 3. MISs 1 and 3 are dominated by cysts of heterotrophic dinoflagellates, whereas MIS 2 is characterized by enhanced variability and a greater proportion of cysts produced by autotrophic taxa. The most dominant dinoflagellate cyst taxa found throughout the core were Brigantedinium spp. and Operculodinium centrocarpum. Dansgaard-Oeschger event 8 is observed in the dinoflagellate cyst record where it is characterized by an increase in warm taxa, such as Spiniferites pachydermus. Other intervals of interest are the Younger Dryas where warmer conditions are recorded and the Holocene which is characterized by the consistent presence of tropical species Stelladinium reidii, Tuberculodinidum vancampoae, Bitectatodinium spongium, and an increase in Quinquecuspis concreta. Changes in cyst assemblages, concentrations, and species diversity, along with geochemical data reflect major orbital to millennial-scale climatic and oceanographic changes.

  2. North Pacific deglacial hypoxic events linked to abrupt ocean warming.

    PubMed

    Praetorius, S K; Mix, A C; Walczak, M H; Wolhowe, M D; Addison, J A; Prahl, F G

    2015-11-19

    Marine sediments from the North Pacific document two episodes of expansion and strengthening of the subsurface oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) accompanied by seafloor hypoxia during the last deglacial transition. The mechanisms driving this hypoxia remain under debate. We present a new high-resolution alkenone palaeotemperature reconstruction from the Gulf of Alaska that reveals two abrupt warming events of 4-5 degrees Celsius at the onset of the Bølling and Holocene intervals that coincide with sudden shifts to hypoxia at intermediate depths. The presence of diatomaceous laminations and hypoxia-tolerant benthic foraminiferal species, peaks in redox-sensitive trace metals, and enhanced (15)N/(14)N ratio of organic matter, collectively suggest association with high export production. A decrease in (18)O/(16)O values of benthic foraminifera accompanying the most severe deoxygenation event indicates subsurface warming of up to about 2 degrees Celsius. We infer that abrupt warming triggered expansion of the North Pacific OMZ through reduced oxygen solubility and increased marine productivity via physiological effects; following initiation of hypoxia, remobilization of iron from hypoxic sediments could have provided a positive feedback on ocean deoxygenation through increased nutrient utilization and carbon export. Such a biogeochemical amplification process implies high sensitivity of OMZ expansion to warming. PMID:26581293

  3. Usage leading to an abrupt collapse of connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stäger, D. V.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2014-10-01

    Network infrastructures are essential for the distribution of resources such as electricity and water. Typical strategies to assess their resilience focus on the impact of a sequence of random or targeted failures of network nodes or links. Here we consider a more realistic scenario, where elements fail based on their usage. We propose a dynamic model of transport based on the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sandpile model where links fail after they have transported more than an amount μ (threshold) of the resource and we investigate it on the square lattice. As we deal with a new model, we provide insight on its fundamental behavior and dependence on parameters. We observe that, for low values of the threshold due to a positive feedback of link failure, an avalanche develops that leads to an abrupt collapse of the lattice. By contrast, for high thresholds the lattice breaks down in an uncorrelated fashion. We determine the critical threshold μ* separating these two regimes and show how it depends on the toppling threshold of the nodes and the mass increment added stepwise to the system. We find that the time of major disconnection is well described with a linear dependence on μ . Furthermore, we propose a lower bound for μ* by measuring the strength of the dynamics leading to abrupt collapses.

  4. Fluvial response to abrupt global warming at the Palaeocene/Eocene boundary.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Brady Z; Heller, Paul L; Clementz, Mark T

    2012-11-01

    Climate strongly affects the production of sediment from mountain catchments as well as its transport and deposition within adjacent sedimentary basins. However, identifying climatic influences on basin stratigraphy is complicated by nonlinearities, feedback loops, lag times, buffering and convergence among processes within the sediment routeing system. The Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) arguably represents the most abrupt and dramatic instance of global warming in the Cenozoic era and has been proposed to be a geologic analogue for anthropogenic climate change. Here we evaluate the fluvial response in western Colorado to the PETM. Concomitant with the carbon isotope excursion marking the PETM we document a basin-wide shift to thick, multistoried, sheets of sandstone characterized by variable channel dimensions, dominance of upper flow regime sedimentary structures, and prevalent crevasse splay deposits. This progradation of coarse-grained lithofacies matches model predictions for rapid increases in sediment flux and discharge, instigated by regional vegetation overturn and enhanced monsoon precipitation. Yet the change in fluvial deposition persisted long after the approximately 200,000-year-long PETM with its increased carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere, emphasizing the strong role the protracted transmission of catchment responses to distant depositional systems has in constructing large-scale basin stratigraphy. Our results, combined with evidence for increased dissolved loads and terrestrial clay export to world oceans, indicate that the transient hyper-greenhouse climate of the PETM may represent a major geomorphic 'system-clearing event', involving a global mobilization of dissolved and solid sediment loads on Earth's surface. PMID:23128230

  5. An abrupt weakening of the subpolar gyre as trigger of Little Ice Age-type episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Chamarro, Eduardo; Zanchettin, Davide; Lohmann, Katja; Jungclaus, Johann H.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the mechanism of a decadal-scale weakening shift in the strength of the subpolar gyre (SPG) that is found in one among three last millennium simulations with a state-of-the-art Earth system model. The SPG shift triggers multicentennial anomalies in the North Atlantic climate driven by long-lasting internal feedbacks relating anomalous oceanic and atmospheric circulation, sea ice extent, and upper-ocean salinity in the Labrador Sea. Yet changes throughout or after the shift are not associated with a persistent weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation or shifts in the North Atlantic Oscillation. The anomalous climate state of the North Atlantic simulated after the shift agrees well with climate reconstructions from within the area, which describe a transition between a stronger and weaker SPG during the relatively warm medieval climate and the cold Little Ice Age respectively. However, model and data differ in the timing of the onset. The simulated SPG shift is caused by a rapid increase in the freshwater export from the Arctic and associated freshening in the upper Labrador Sea. Such freshwater anomaly relates to prominent thickening of the Arctic sea ice, following the cluster of relatively small-magnitude volcanic eruptions by 1600 CE. Sensitivity experiments without volcanic forcing can nonetheless produce similar abrupt events; a necessary causal link between the volcanic cluster and the SPG shift can therefore be excluded. Instead, preconditioning by internal variability explains discrepancies in the timing between the simulated SPG shift and the reconstructed estimates for the Little Ice Age onset.

  6. Exploring the impact of climate variability during the Last Glacial Maximum on the pattern of human occupation of Iberia.

    PubMed

    Burke, Ariane; Levavasseur, Guillaume; James, Patrick M A; Guiducci, Dario; Izquierdo, Manuel Arturo; Bourgeon, Lauriane; Kageyama, Masa; Ramstein, Gilles; Vrac, Mathieu

    2014-08-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) was a global climate event, which had significant repercussions for the spatial distribution and demographic history of prehistoric populations. In Eurasia, the LGM coincides with a potential bottleneck for modern humans and may mark the divergence date for Asian and European populations (Keinan et al., 2007). In this research, the impact of climate variability on human populations in the Iberian Peninsula during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is examined with the aid of downscaled high-resolution (16 × 16 km) numerical climate experiments. Human sensitivity to short time-scale (inter-annual) climate variability during this key time period, which follows the initial modern human colonisation of Eurasia and the extinction of the Neanderthals, is tested using the spatial distribution of archaeological sites. Results indicate that anatomically modern human populations responded to small-scale spatial patterning in climate variability, specifically inter-annual variability in precipitation levels as measured by the standard precipitation index. Climate variability at less than millennial scale, therefore, is shown to be an important component of ecological risk, one that played a role in regulating the spatial behaviour of prehistoric human populations and consequently affected their social networks. PMID:25034085

  7. Stalagmite-inferred abrupt hydroclimate changes in the central Mediterranean over the past 6500 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H. M.; Shen, C. C.; Jiang, X.; Wang, Y.; Mii, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Mediterranean, as one of the global climate change "hot spots", was faced with severe drought over the recent decades. Investigation of regional paleo-hydroclimate evolution helps improve climate projection and adaption strategy. Here, we present a new decadal-resolved record documenting hydroclimate in the central Mediterranean from an Italian stalagmite since 6500 years ago. Eighty high-precision absolute U-Th dates with 2-sigma uncertainty better than ±20 years and 560 oxygen isotopic ratio data show several abrupt drying events with an average of 600 mm precipitation decrease in less than 80 years since the mid-Holocene. North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) could dominantly govern the centennial-scale hydroclimate variability, especially for a period of 4500 to 2000 years ago. Total solar irradiance (TSI) also partially affected this regional precipitation. The obscure relationship between stalagmite and global/local mean surface temperature sequences, in contradict to previous studies, implies complex internal feedback of global warming and atmospheric circulation in the Mediterranean. Our result suggests that the twenty-first century Mediterranean drying trend is significant but not unprecedented in the past six thousand years.

  8. Abrupt pre-Bølling-Allerød warming and circulation changes in the deep ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiagarajan, Nivedita; Subhas, Adam V.; Southon, John R.; Eiler, John M.; Adkins, Jess F.

    2014-07-01

    Several large and rapid changes in atmospheric temperature and the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere--probably linked to changes in deep ocean circulation--occurred during the last deglaciation. The abrupt temperature rise in the Northern Hemisphere and the restart of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation at the start of the Bølling-Allerød interstadial, 14,700 years ago, are among the most dramatic deglacial events, but their underlying physical causes are not known. Here we show that the release of heat from warm waters in the deep North Atlantic Ocean probably triggered the Bølling-Allerød warming and reinvigoration of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Our results are based on coupled radiocarbon and uranium-series dates, along with clumped isotope temperature estimates, from water column profiles of fossil deep-sea corals in a limited area of the western North Atlantic. We find that during Heinrich stadial 1 (the cool period immediately before the Bølling-Allerød interstadial), the deep ocean was about three degrees Celsius warmer than shallower waters above. This reversal of the ocean's usual thermal stratification pre-dates the Bølling-Allerød warming and must have been associated with increased salinity at depth to preserve the static stability of the water column. The depleted radiocarbon content of the warm and salty water mass implies a long-term disconnect from rapid surface exchanges, and, although uncertainties remain, is most consistent with a Southern Ocean source. The Heinrich stadial 1 ocean profile is distinct from the modern water column, that for the Last Glacial Maximum and that for the Younger Dryas, suggesting that the patterns we observe are a unique feature of the deglacial climate system. Our observations indicate that the deep ocean influenced dramatic Northern Hemisphere warming by storing heat at depth that preconditioned the system for a subsequent abrupt overturning event during the

  9. Global climate change

    PubMed Central

    Alley, Richard B.; Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    1999-01-01

    Most of the last 100,000 years or longer has been characterized by large, abrupt, regional-to-global climate changes. Agriculture and industry have developed during anomalously stable climatic conditions. New, high-resolution analyses of sediment cores using multiproxy and physically based transfer functions allow increasingly confident interpretation of these past changes as having been caused by “band jumps” between modes of operation of the climate system. Recurrence of such band jumps is possible and might be affected by human activities. PMID:10468545

  10. Global climate change.

    PubMed

    Alley, R B; Lynch-Stieglitz, J; Severinghaus, J P

    1999-08-31

    Most of the last 100,000 years or longer has been characterized by large, abrupt, regional-to-global climate changes. Agriculture and industry have developed during anomalously stable climatic conditions. New, high-resolution analyses of sediment cores using multiproxy and physically based transfer functions allow increasingly confident interpretation of these past changes as having been caused by "band jumps" between modes of operation of the climate system. Recurrence of such band jumps is possible and might be affected by human activities. PMID:10468545

  11. Gulf Coast hurricane activity and climate variability during the last half of the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, P.; Donnelly, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    The dominant timescales of variability in a 4500-year sediment-based storm chronology from the northeastern Gulf of Mexico are identified, and relationships between storm frequency and climate are explored. Changes in the frequency of large storm surge deposits in the record likely represent variability in the intensity distribution of hurricanes impacting the site during the late Holocene. Significant variability at approximately 200 and 1000-year timescales that was detected in the storm record is shared by numerous Holocene climate records including reconstructions of Loop Current penetration into the Gulf of Mexico. Intense storm landfalls were most frequent around 3.7 ka, between 2.7 and 2.4 ka, and around 0.7 ka when foraminiferal proxies of mixed layer depth indicate a more permanent residence of the Loop Current within the northeastern Gulf. Migrations of the Loop Current would exercise control over regional hurricane activity by changing the thermal structure of the upper ocean and influencing the role of storm-induced upwelling on hurricane intensification. Other factors that influenced regional and Atlantic basin-wide hurricane activity include the El Niño/Southern Oscillation and the position of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone. Many authors have suggested that bicentennial and millennial-scale climate variability may have been driven ultimately by changes in solar irradiance. Thus, low-frequency variability in Atlantic hurricane activity may be an expression of the climate system's response to exogenous forcing.

  12. Millennial- to century-scale variability in Gulf of Mexico Holocene climate records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poore, R.Z.; Dowsett, H.J.; Verardo, S.; Quinn, T.M.

    2003-01-01

    Proxy records from two piston cores in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) provide a detailed (50-100 year resolution) record of climate variability over the last 14,000 years. Long-term (millennial-scale) trends and changes are related to the transition from glacial to interglacial conditions and movement of the average position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) related to orbital forcing. The ??18O of the surface-dwelling planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber show negative excursions between 14 and 10.2 ka (radiocarbon years) that reflect influx of meltwater into the western GOM during melting of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. The relative abundance of the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides sacculifer is related to transport of Caribbean water into the GOM. Maximum transport of Caribbean surface waters and moisture into the GOM associated with a northward migration of the average position of the ITCZ occurs between about 6.5 and 4.5 ka. In addition, abundance variations of G. sacculifer show century-scale variability throughout most of the Holocene. The GOM record is consistent with records from other areas, suggesting that century-scale variability is a pervasive feature of Holocene climate. The frequency of several cycles in the climate records is similar to cycles identified in proxy records of solar variability, indicating that at least some of the century-scale climate variability during the Holocene is due to external (solar) forcing.

  13. A Holocene record of climate-driven shifts in coastal carbon sequestration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitra, Siddhartha; Zimmerman, A.R.; Hunsinger, G.B.; Willard, D.; Dunn, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    A sediment core collected in the mesohaline portion of Chesapeake Bay was found to contain periods of increased delivery of refractory black carbon (BC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The BC was most likely produced by biomass combustion during four centennialscale dry periods as indicated by the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI), beginning in the late Medieval Warm Period of 1100 CE. In contrast, wetter periods were associated with increased non-BC organic matter influx into the bay, likely due to greater runoff and associated nutrient delivery. In addition, an overall increase in both BC and non-BC organic matter deposition during the past millennium may reflect a shift in climate regime. The finding that carbon sequestration in the coastal zone responds to climate fluctuations at both centennial and millennial scales through fire occurrence and nutrient delivery has implications for past and future climate predictions. Drought-induced fires may lead, on longer timescales, to greater carbon sequestration and, therefore, represent a negative climate feedback. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. One-to-one coupling of glacial climate variability in Greenland and Antarctica.

    PubMed

    2006-11-01

    Precise knowledge of the phase relationship between climate changes in the two hemispheres is a key for understanding the Earth's climate dynamics. For the last glacial period, ice core studies have revealed strong coupling of the largest millennial-scale warm events in Antarctica with the longest Dansgaard-Oeschger events in Greenland through the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. It has been unclear, however, whether the shorter Dansgaard-Oeschger events have counterparts in the shorter and less prominent Antarctic temperature variations, and whether these events are linked by the same mechanism. Here we present a glacial climate record derived from an ice core from Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, which represents South Atlantic climate at a resolution comparable with the Greenland ice core records. After methane synchronization with an ice core from North Greenland, the oxygen isotope record from the Dronning Maud Land ice core shows a one-to-one coupling between all Antarctic warm events and Greenland Dansgaard-Oeschger events by the bipolar seesaw6. The amplitude of the Antarctic warm events is found to be linearly dependent on the duration of the concurrent stadial in the North, suggesting that they all result from a similar reduction in the meridional overturning circulation. PMID:17099953

  15. Calibration and application of lipid hydrogen isotopic ratios for quantitative reconstruction of new england climate variability over the past 15 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Juzhi

    2009-11-01

    precipitation deltaD variations, with particularly high fidelity in dry regions, although more studies in other regions will be important to further test this proxy. In Chapter 4, I present a centennial-scale record of climate change during the transition based on D/H ratios of C22 n-alkanoic acid (deltaDBA) from a sediment core in Blood Pond, Massachusetts. The abrupt climate events observed in Blood Pond records show remarkable similarity with Greenland ice core delta18O records during the Pleistocene. During the early Holocene, the northeastern North America deltaDBA record was more variable than Greenland, possibly due to the close proximity of the Laurentide ice sheet, and impact of freshwater outbursts as the ice sheet rapidly retreated. In Chapter 5, I present decadal-scale temperature records from Blood Pond, Massachusetts during the early Holocene which revealed two abrupt climate reversals. The isotopic records infer a cooling of 3˜4°C between 9.3 and 9.1 ka against the millennial scale climate background, mainly induced by changes in precipitation seasonality. In comparison, the 8.2 ka event displays smaller amplitude of temperature cooling of 1˜2°C at our southern New England site. The observed climatic reversal at ˜ 9.2 ka as representing increased proportion of winter precipitation in conjunction with a drier and cooler summer, triggered by slowdown in thermohaline circulation as a result of freshwater release from the proglacial lakes. The results suggest that the seasonality of the precipitation at the southern New England was highly sensitive to meltwater releases, especially prior to the final collapse of the LIS. In Chapter 6, I present decadal to centennial resolution temperature records from two lakes in the northeastern North America to investigate the relationship between solar activity and temperature changes during the late Pleistocene to early Holocene. The temperature reconstructions from the two lakes of 100 km apart in New England are highly

  16. Abrupt rise of new machine ecology beyond human response time

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Neil; Zhao, Guannan; Hunsader, Eric; Qi, Hong; Johnson, Nicholas; Meng, Jing; Tivnan, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Society's techno-social systems are becoming ever faster and more computer-orientated. However, far from simply generating faster versions of existing behaviour, we show that this speed-up can generate a new behavioural regime as humans lose the ability to intervene in real time. Analyzing millisecond-scale data for the world's largest and most powerful techno-social system, the global financial market, we uncover an abrupt transition to a new all-machine phase characterized by large numbers of subsecond extreme events. The proliferation of these subsecond events shows an intriguing correlation with the onset of the system-wide financial collapse in 2008. Our findings are consistent with an emerging ecology of competitive machines featuring ‘crowds' of predatory algorithms, and highlight the need for a new scientific theory of subsecond financial phenomena. PMID:24022120

  17. Intrusion detection robust to slow and abrupt lighting changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Aleksej; Vesin, Jean-Marc; Reymond, Florian

    1996-03-01

    In this communication we present an image based object detection algorithm which is applied to intrusion detection. The algorithm is based on the comparison of input edges and temporally filtered edges of the background. It is characterized by very low computational and memory loads, high sensitivity to the presence of physical intruders and high robustness to slow and abrupt lighting changes. The algorithm is implementable on a cheap digital signal processor. It was tested on a data base of about one thousand gray-level CIF-format frames representing static scenes with various contents (light sources, intruders, lighting changes), and neither false alarm nor detection failure occurred. The number of parameters involved by the algorithm is very low, and their values do not require a fine tuning. The same set of parameters performs equally well in different conditions: different scenes, various lighting changes, various object sizes.

  18. Abrupt tectonics and rapid slab detachment with grain damage.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Schubert, Gerald; Ricard, Yanick

    2015-02-01

    A simple model for necking and detachment of subducting slabs is developed to include the coupling between grain-sensitive rheology and grain-size evolution with damage. Necking is triggered by thickened buoyant crust entrained into a subduction zone, in which case grain damage accelerates necking and allows for relatively rapid slab detachment, i.e., within 1 My, depending on the size of the crustal plug. Thick continental crustal plugs can cause rapid necking while smaller plugs characteristic of ocean plateaux cause slower necking; oceanic lithosphere with normal or slightly thickened crust subducts without necking. The model potentially explains how large plateaux or continental crust drawn into subduction zones can cause slab loss and rapid changes in plate motion and/or induce abrupt continental rebound. PMID:25605890

  19. Abrupt tectonics and rapid slab detachment with grain damage

    PubMed Central

    Bercovici, David; Schubert, Gerald; Ricard, Yanick

    2015-01-01

    A simple model for necking and detachment of subducting slabs is developed to include the coupling between grain-sensitive rheology and grain-size evolution with damage. Necking is triggered by thickened buoyant crust entrained into a subduction zone, in which case grain damage accelerates necking and allows for relatively rapid slab detachment, i.e., within 1 My, depending on the size of the crustal plug. Thick continental crustal plugs can cause rapid necking while smaller plugs characteristic of ocean plateaux cause slower necking; oceanic lithosphere with normal or slightly thickened crust subducts without necking. The model potentially explains how large plateaux or continental crust drawn into subduction zones can cause slab loss and rapid changes in plate motion and/or induce abrupt continental rebound. PMID:25605890

  20. Climate and the collapse of civilization

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, T.

    1994-09-01

    This article looks at the archaeological debate over two important questions: whether abrupt climate changes caused or contributed to the collapse of ancient civilizations and, if the archaeological and paleoclimatological record yields evidence to that effect, what would it mean in a world that today debates whether industrial civilization is altering Earth's climate with uncertain consequences. Areas discussed include the following: climate hints from archaeological sites; hesitations about whether climate change caused civilizations to collapse; and the interdisciplinary checks on each side.

  1. PALEOECOLOGY. Abrupt warming events drove Late Pleistocene Holarctic megafaunal turnover.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Alan; Turney, Chris; Hughen, Konrad A; Brook, Barry W; McDonald, H Gregory; Bradshaw, Corey J A

    2015-08-01

    The mechanisms of Late Pleistocene megafauna extinctions remain fiercely contested, with human impact or climate change cited as principal drivers. We compared ancient DNA and radiocarbon data from 31 detailed time series of regional megafaunal extinctions and replacements over the past 56,000 years with standard and new combined records of Northern Hemisphere climate in the Late Pleistocene. Unexpectedly, rapid climate changes associated with interstadial warming events are strongly associated with the regional replacement or extinction of major genetic clades or species of megafauna. The presence of many cryptic biotic transitions before the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary revealed by ancient DNA confirms the importance of climate change in megafaunal population extinctions and suggests that metapopulation structures necessary to survive such repeated and rapid climatic shifts were susceptible to human impacts. PMID:26250679

  2. Response of atmospheric CO2 to the abrupt cooling event 8200 years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, J.; Brook, E.; Buizert, C.

    2013-12-01

    The abrupt cooling event 8200 years ago (8.2 ka event) is the most prominent centennial scale climate event during the Holocene and was likely caused by a reduction in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Atmospheric CO2 records for this event may help us understand climate-carbon cycle feedbacks under interglacial conditions, which are important for understanding future climate, but existing ice core records do not provide enough detail and natural smoothing of the CO2 time series by diffusion and gradual bubble close-off in the firn layer (unconsolidated snow layer in the top of ice sheets) limits their resolution. Studies of leaf stomata records suggest a CO2 decrease of up to ~25 ppm during the 8.2 ka event, but relatively large uncertainties in reconstructed CO2 levels from leaves and dating make firm conclusions difficult. Here we present a new CO2 record from the Siple Dome ice core, Antarctica, that covers 7.4-9.0 ka with 8- to 16-year resolution. The relatively high snow accumulation rate at Siple Dome results minimizes smoothing relative to other records and the timing of the 8.2 ka event is precisely constrained by a CH4 record from the same core. We observe a small, ~2 ppm, increase of atmospheric CO2 during the 8.2 ka event. The increase is not remarkable when compared to other centennial variations in the Holocene that are not linked to large temperature changes. Our results imply that the sensitivity of atmospheric CO2 to the primarily northern hemisphere cooling of the 8.2 ka event was limited.

  3. Northeast Greenland Caves Project: first results from a speleothem-derived record of climate change for the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, Gina; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Cheng, Hai; Lu, Yanbin; Spoetl, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Multiple lines of evidence currently exist that demonstrate the climate is changing across our planet, and that the Arctic in particular is highly sensitive to these changes, warming up twice as fast as the global average. Understanding how the climate in the Arctic will develop in the future and its subsequent effects is thus a major concern. In order to improve understanding of the climate system within the Arctic, we have collected a suite of calcite flowstone samples from solution-formed caves in the Ordovician-Silurian Centrum limestone of Kronprins Christian Land, Northeast Greenland. Under contemporary conditions, the region is arid, barren, and permanently frozen, however, the presence of these caves and thick flowstone deposits indicates a previous milder climate. During the summer of 2015, 26 caves were documented at 80.4 degrees north, and 16 speleothem samples collected. Here we present the results of the first U-Th dating and stable isotope analyses. U-Th ages show that the flowstone was deposited intermittently between 220 and 500 thousand years ago (ka) with additional smaller growth periods at c. 108 and 5.7 ka, thus indicating the presence of flowing water at these times. δ18O of the speleothem calcite varies between c. -12 and -16.5 ‰ and displays millennial-scale variability. Our initial results thus demonstrate the potential of these speleothem deposits for extending our knowledge of Greenland's climate beyond the limit of the Greenland ice cores.

  4. Abrupt termination of Marine Isotope Stage 16 (Termination VII) at 631.5 ka in Santa Barbara Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Walter E.; Kennett, James P.; Behl, Richard J.; Nicholson, Craig; Sorlien, Christopher C.

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Isotope Stage 16-15 boundary (Termination VII) is the first deglacial warming step of the late Quaternary following the mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT), when 41 kyr climatic cycles shifted to strong 100 kyr cycles. The detailed structure of this important climatic event has remained unknown until now. Core MV0508-19JPC from Santa Barbara Basin, California, contains a decadal-scale climatic and geochemical sediment record of 4000 years duration that includes the early part of this deglacial episode. This record reveals that the climatic shift during the early deglacial occurred rapidly (<700 years), in a progression of three abrupt warming steps. The onset of Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 15 was remarkably abrupt with 4-5°C sea surface warming in ~50 years. The deglacial sequence contains the well-dated Lava Creek tephra (631.3 ± 4 ka) from Yellowstone Caldera used to date the onset of Termination VII at 631.5 ka. The late MIS 16 and early MIS 15 interval exhibits multiple decadal-scale negative excursions in δ13C of planktic foraminifera, likely the result of repeated discharges of methane from methane hydrates associated with both ocean warming and low sea level. A warm interstadial that interrupts late MIS 16 is marked by elevated concentrations of redox-sensitive elements indicating sulfidic, oxygen-deficient bottom and pore-waters, and elevated concentrations of total organic carbon and Cd, reflecting increased surface productivity. Unlike younger sediments on the California margin, these indicators of increased productivity and low dissolved oxygen do not consistently correspond with each other or with preserved laminations, possibly reflecting instability of a still evolving ocean-atmosphere system following the MPT.

  5. An automatic abrupt information extraction method based on singular value decomposition and higher-order statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tian; Ye, Wu; Pan, Qiang; Liu, Xiandong

    2016-02-01

    One key aspect of local fault diagnosis is how to effectively extract abrupt features from the vibration signals. This paper proposes a method to automatically extract abrupt information based on singular value decomposition and higher-order statistics. In order to observe the distribution law of singular values, a numerical analysis to simulate the noise, periodic signal, abrupt signal and singular value distribution is conducted. Based on higher-order statistics and spectrum analysis, a method to automatically choose the upper and lower borders of the singular value interval reflecting the abrupt information is built. And the selected singular values derived from this method are used to reconstruct abrupt signals. It is proven that the method is able to obtain accurate results by processing the rub-impact fault signal measured from the experiments. The analytical and experimental results indicate that the proposed method is feasible for automatically extracting abrupt information caused by faults like the rotor-stator rub-impact.

  6. Imprint of Late Quaternary Climate Change on the Mid-Atlantic Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavich, M.; Markewich, H.; Newell, W. L.; Litwin, R.; Smoot, J.; Brook, G.

    2009-12-01

    Recent geomorphic, lithostratigraphic, palynologic and chronostratigraphic investigations of the mid-Atlantic region show that much of the modern landscape flanking the Chesapeake Bay and the Potomac River is developed on late Quaternary sediments. These deposits, dated by OSL and 14C, include transgressive marine and estuarine sediments deposited between 120ka and 32ka, and parabolic dunes formed between 32ka and 15ka. The stacked estuarine units were deposited in a subsiding basin as eustatic sea level fell from +7m to -60m. The estuarine units contain pollen that provides evidence for millennial scale climate fluctuations. The dunes formed during the period of rapid expansion of the Laurentide Ice Sheet as sea level fell to -120m. Permafrost features such as frost wedges and periglacial “pots” formed during cold intervals associated with marine oxygen isotope stages 4 and 2. This periglacial climate, along with glacioisostatic adjustments to growth and decay of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, affected landscape processes at least as far south as the Potomac River valley. While many of these features were recognized in earlier mapping and stratigraphic investigations, OSL dating has greatly extended the range of available dates and significantly improved our understanding of the impacts of highly variable periglacial climate on this region.

  7. Pollen-based reconstruction of Holocene vegetation and climate in southern Italy: the case of Lago Trifoglietti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joannin, S.; Brugiapaglia, E.; de Beaulieu, J.-L.; Bernardo, L.; Magny, M.; Peyron, O.; Goring, S.; Vannière, B.

    2012-12-01

    A high-resolution pollen record from Lago Trifoglietti in Calabria (southern Italy) provides new insights into the paleoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic changes which characterise the Holocene period in the southern Italy. The chronology is based on 11 AMS radiocarbon dates from terrestrial organic material. The Holocene history of the vegetation cover shows the persistence of an important and relatively stable Fagus forest present over that entire period, offering a rare example of a beech woodstand able to withstand climate changes for more than 11 000 yr. Probably in relation with early Holocene dry climate conditions which affected southern Italy, the Trifoglietti pollen record supports a southward delay in thermophyllous forest expansion dated to ca. 13 500 cal BP at Monticchio, ca. 11 000 cal BP at Trifoglietti, and finally ca. 9800 cal BP in Sicily. Regarding the human impact history, the Trifoglietti pollen record shows only poor imprints of agricultural activities and anthopogenic indicators, apart from those indicating pastoralism activities beneath forest cover. The selective exploitation of Abies appears to have been the strongest human impact on the Trifoglietti surroundings. On the basis of (1) a specific ratio between hygrophilous and terrestrial taxa, and (2) the Modern Analogue Technique, the pollen data collected at Lago Trifoglietti led to the establishment of two palaeoclimatic records tracing changes in (1) lake depth and (2) annual precipitation. On a millennial scale, these records give evidence of increasing moisture from ca. 11 000 to ca. 9400 cal BP and maximum humidity from ca. 9400 to ca. 6200 cal BP, prior to a general trend towards the drier climate conditions that have prevailed up to the present. In addition, several successive centennial-scale oscillations appear to have punctuated the entire Holocene. The identification of a cold dry event around 11 300 cal BP, responsible for a marked decline in timberline altitude and possibly

  8. Pollen-based reconstruction of Holocene vegetation and climate in Southern Italy: the case of Lago di Trifoglietti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joannin, S.; Brugiapaglia, E.; de Beaulieu, J.-L.; Bernardo, L.; Magny, M.; Peyron, O.; Vannière, B.

    2012-06-01

    A high-resolution pollen record from Lake Trifoglietti in Calabria (Southern Italy) provides new insights into the paleoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic changes which characterise the Holocene period in the Southern Italy. The chronology is based on 11 AMS radiocarbon dates from terrestrial macro-remains. The Holocene history of the vegetation cover shows the persistence of an important and relatively stable Fagus forest present over that entire period, offering a rare example of a woodstand able to withstand climate changes for more than 11 000 yr. Probably in relation with early Holocene dry climate conditions which affected Southern Italy, the Trifoglietti pollen record supports a southward delay in thermophilous forest expansion dated to ca. 13 500 cal. BP at Monticchio, ca. 11 000 cal. BP at Trifoglietti, and finally ca. 9800 cal. BP in Sicily. Regarding the human impact history, the Trifoglietti pollen record shows only poor imprints of agricultural activities and anthopogenic indicators, apart from those indicating pastoralism activities beneath forest cover. The selective exploitation of Abies appears to have been the strongest human impact on the Trifoglietti surroundings. On the basis of (1) a specific ratio between hygrophilous and terrestrial taxa, and (2) the modern analogue technique, the pollen data collected at Lake Trifoglietti led to the establishment of two palaeoclimatic records tracing changes in (1) lake depth and (2) annual precipitation. On a millennial scale, these records give evidence of increasing moisture from ca. 11 000 to ca. 9400 cal. BP and maximum humidity from ca. 9400 to ca. 6200 cal. BP, prior to a general trend towards the drier climate conditions that have prevailed up to the present. In addition, several successive centennial-scale oscillations appear to have punctuated the entire Holocene. The identification of a cold dry event around 11 300 cal. BP, responsible for a marked decline in timberline altitude and possibly

  9. VEGETATION MEDIATED THE IMPACTS OF POSTGLACIAL CLIMATIC CHANGE ON FIRE REGIMES IN THE SOUTHCENTRAL BROOKS RANGE, ALASKA

    SciTech Connect

    Higuera, P E; Brubaker, L B; Anderson, P M; Hu, F S; Brown, T A

    2008-10-28

    We examine direct and indirect impacts of millennial-scale climatic change on fire regimes in the southcentral Brooks Range, Alaska, using four lake-sediment records and existing paleoclimate interpretations. New techniques are introduced to identify charcoal peaks semi-objectively and detect statistical differences in fire regimes. Peaks in charcoal accumulation rates (CHARs) provide estimates of fire return intervals (FRIs) which are compared between vegetation zones described by fossil pollen and stomata. Climatic warming from ca 15-9 ka BP (calendar years before CE 1950) coincides with shifts in vegetation from herb tundra to shrub tundra to deciduous woodlands, all novel species assemblages relative to modern vegetation. Two sites cover this period and show increased CHARs and decreased FRIs with the transition from herb to shrub tundra ca 13.3-14.3 ka BP. Short FRIs in the Betula-dominated shrub tundra (mean [m] FRI 144 yr; 95% CI 119-170) primarily reflect the effects of flammable, continuous fuels on the fire regime. FRIs increased significantly with the transition to Populus-dominated deciduous woodlands ca 10.5 ka BP (mFRI 251 yr [158-352]), despite evidence of warmer- and drier-than-present summers. We attribute reduced fire activity under these conditions to low flammability of deciduous fuels. Three sites record the mid to late Holocene, when cooler and moister conditions allowed Picea glauca forest-tundra and P. mariana boreal forests to establish ca 8 and 5.5 ka BP. Forest-tundra FRIs did not differ significantly from the previous period (mFRIs range from 131-238 yr), but FRIs decreased with the transition to boreal forest (mFRI 145 yr [129-163]). Overall, fire-regime shifts in the study area showed greater correspondence with vegetation characteristics than with inferred climate, and we conclude that vegetation mediated the impacts of millennial-scale climatic change on fire regimes by modifying landscape flammability. Our findings emphasize the

  10. The Magnetospheric Response to Abrupt Variations in the IMF Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibeck, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    We run the University of Michigan's BATS-R-US global magnetohydrodynamic model at NASA/GSFC's CCMCto study the magnetospheric response to abrupt variations in the IMF orientation but constant solar wind plasmaparameters. IMF rotations from southward to duskward orientations diminish reconnection rates and the flow ofplasma to the dayside magnetopause, launch Alfven waves that carry strong duskward magnetic field perturbationsto the cusp ionosphere, introduce a weak duskward magnetic field perturbation to the outer dayside magnetosphere, twistthe magnetotail current sheet counterclockwise when viewed from the Sun, flatten the north/south dimensions of the distant magnetotail, andgenerate a broad slow-mode fan on the magnetotail flanks. Southward IMF turnings strengthen the Region 1 Birkelandcurrents, prominently depressing magnetic field strengths in the inner dayside magnetosphere and to a lesserdegree those in the outer magnetosphere, consistent with inward dayside magnetopause erosion. The daysidemagnetopause becomes blunter. As evidenced by enhanced magnetosheath thermal and magnetosphericmagnetic pressures, the magnetopause therefore becomes subject to a greater fraction of the incident solar winddynamic pressure at locations away from the subsolar point.

  11. Detecting and isolating abrupt changes in linear switching systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, Sohail; Zhao, Qing; Huang, Biao

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a novel fault detection and isolation (FDI) method for switching linear systems is developed. All input and output signals are assumed to be corrupted with measurement noises. In the proposed method, a 'lifted' linear model named as stochastic hybrid decoupling polynomial (SHDP) is introduced. The SHDP model governs the dynamics of the switching linear system with all different modes, and is independent of the switching sequence. The error-in-variable (EIV) representation of SHDP is derived, and is used for the fault residual generation and isolation following the well-adopted local approach. The proposed FDI method can detect and isolate the fault-induced abrupt changes in switching models' parameters without estimating the switching modes. Furthermore, in this paper, the analytical expressions of the gradient vector and Hessian matrix are obtained based on the EIV SHDP formulation, so that they can be used to implement the online fault detection scheme. The performance of the proposed method is then illustrated by simulation examples.

  12. Anticipating abrupt shifts in temporal evolution of probability of eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohmer, Jeremy; Loschetter, Annick

    2016-04-01

    Estimating the probability of eruption by jointly accounting for different sources of monitoring parameters over time is a key component for volcano risk management. In the present study, we are interested in the transition from a state of low-to-moderate probability value and to the one of high probability value: the latter value generally supports the call for evacuation. By using the data of MESIMEX exercise at the Vesuvius volcano, we investigated the potential for time-varying indicators related to the correlation structure or to the variability of the probability time series for detecting in advance this critical transition. We found that changes in the power spectra and in the standard deviation estimated over a rolling time window both present an abrupt increase, which marks the approaching shift. Our numerical experiments revealed that the transition from an eruption probability of 10-15% to >70% could be identified up 4 hours in advance, ~2.5 days before the evacuation call (decided for an eruption probability >80% during the MESIMEX exercise). This additional lead time could be useful to place different key services (e.g., emergency services for vulnerable groups, commandeering additional transportation means, etc.) on a higher level of alert before the actual call for evacuation.

  13. Abrupt Schottky Junctions in Al/Ge Nanowire Heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this Letter we report on the exploration of axial metal/semiconductor (Al/Ge) nanowire heterostructures with abrupt interfaces. The formation process is enabled by a thermal induced exchange reaction between the vapor–liquid–solid grown Ge nanowire and Al contact pads due to the substantially different diffusion behavior of Ge in Al and vice versa. Temperature-dependent I–V measurements revealed the metallic properties of the crystalline Al nanowire segments with a maximum current carrying capacity of about 0.8 MA/cm2. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization has confirmed both the composition and crystalline nature of the pure Al nanowire segments. A very sharp interface between the ⟨111⟩ oriented Ge nanowire and the reacted Al part was observed with a Schottky barrier height of 361 meV. To demonstrate the potential of this approach, a monolithic Al/Ge/Al heterostructure was used to fabricate a novel impact ionization device. PMID:26052733

  14. Anticipating abrupt shifts in temporal evolution of probability of eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohmer, J.; Loschetter, A.

    2016-04-01

    Estimating the probability of eruption by jointly accounting for different sources of monitoring parameters over time is a key component for volcano risk management. In the present study, we are interested in the transition from a state of low-to-moderate probability value to a state of high probability value. By using the data of MESIMEX exercise at the Vesuvius volcano, we investigated the potential for time-varying indicators related to the correlation structure or to the variability of the probability time series for detecting in advance this critical transition. We found that changes in the power spectra and in the standard deviation estimated over a rolling time window both present an abrupt increase, which marks the approaching shift. Our numerical experiments revealed that the transition from an eruption probability of 10-15% to > 70% could be identified up to 1-3 h in advance. This additional lead time could be useful to place different key services (e.g., emergency services for vulnerable groups, commandeering additional transportation means, etc.) on a higher level of alert before the actual call for evacuation.

  15. Abrupt onset and prolongation of aragonite undersaturation events in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauri, Claudine; Friedrich, Tobias; Timmermann, Axel

    2016-02-01

    Ocean acidification may lead to seasonal aragonite undersaturation in surface waters of the Southern Ocean as early as 2030 (ref. ). These conditions are harmful to key organisms such as pteropods, which contribute significantly to the pelagic foodweb and carbon export fluxes in this region. Although the severity of ocean acidification impacts is mainly determined by the duration, intensity and spatial extent of aragonite undersaturation events, little is known about the nature of these events, their evolving attributes and the timing of their onset in the Southern Ocean. Using an ensemble of ten Earth system models, we show that starting around 2030, aragonite undersaturation events will spread rapidly, affecting ~30% of Southern Ocean surface waters by 2060 and >70% by 2100, including the Patagonian Shelf. On their onset, the duration of these events will increase abruptly from 1 month to 6 months per year in less than 20 years in >75% of the area affected by end-of-century aragonite undersaturation. This is likely to decrease the ability of organisms to adapt to a quickly evolving environment. The rapid equatorward progression of surface aragonite undersaturation can be explained by the uptake of anthropogenic CO2, whereas climate-driven physical or biological changes will play a minor role.

  16. Temporal and spatial climatic controls on Holocene fire-related erosion and sedimentation, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitch, Erin P.; Meyer, Grant A.

    2016-01-01

    In the Jemez Mountains, tree-ring data indicate that low-severity fires characterized the 400 yr before Euro-American settlement, and that subsequent fire suppression promoted denser forests, recent severe fires, and erosion. Over longer timescales, climate change may alter fire regimes; thus, we used fire-related alluvial deposits to assess the timing of moderate- to high-severity fires, their geomorphic impact, and relation to climate over the last 4000 yr. Fire-related sedimentation does not clearly follow millennial-scale climatic changes, but probability peaks commonly correspond with severe drought, e.g., within the interval 1700-1400 cal yr BP, and ca. 650 and ca. 410 cal yr BP. The latter episodes were preceded by prolonged wet intervals that could promote dense stands. Estimated recurrence intervals for fire-related sedimentation are 250-400 yr. Climatic differences with aspect influenced Holocene post-fire response: fire-related deposits constitute 77% of fan sediments from north-facing basins but only 39% of deposits from drier southerly aspects. With sparser vegetation and exposed bedrock, south aspects can generate runoff and sediment when unburned, whereas soil-mantled north aspects produce minor sediment unless severely burned. Recent channel incision appears unprecedented over the last 2300 yr, suggesting that fuel loading and extreme drought produced an anomalously severe burn in 2002.

  17. Climate and the erosional efficiency of fluvial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, M. W.; Whipple, K. X.; Dibiase, R. A.; Heimsath, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    Climate is a key driver of surface processes on Earth. Nevertheless, quantifying the climatic control on erosion rates over mountain building timescales has proven to be a difficult problem to untangle. In fact, some recent attempts to address this problem using cosmogenic radionuclide-derived erosion rates suggest very little climatic control on erosion. If this result is robust, it would have serious implications on proposed feedbacks among climate and tectonics. Here, we address two factors that may be confounding detection of climatic controls on erosion rates: (1) difficulty isolating climate from other variables in natural settings (i.e. topography, rock strength); (2) choosing appropriate climate metrics for comparison (e.g. temperature, precipitation, runoff, variability). A recent study in the San Gabriel Mountains, CA (SGM) provides a template to account for the first-order, topographic control on erosion by measuring millennial-scale erosion rates (10Be in river sands) across a gradient in relief. Building off of this work, we report new data for two other landscapes, Sierra San Pedro Mártir, MX (SSPM) and Sierra Nombre de Dios, HN (SNdD), that show similar gradients of relief and similar lithologies (granitoids), but that lie in dramatically different climate regimes (desert to rainforest). By comparing the functional relationship between relief and erosion, we are able to quantify differences in erosional efficiency due to climate. By re-casting the question in terms of how climate controls erosional efficiency, we can also better evaluate our choice of appropriate climate metrics for comparison among landscapes. For instance, theory suggests that discharge variability may rival the importance of annual climate normals (e.g. mean annual precipitation, mean annual temperature) in setting erosional efficiency by affecting the distribution of extreme events. This requires the use of more sophisticated stream erosion models that account for at least the

  18. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of aeolian sand in the otindag dune field and holocene climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, Y.L.; Lu, H.Y.; Mason, J.; Miao, X.D.; Swinehart, J.; Goble, R.

    2008-01-01

    The dune system in Otindag sand field of northern China is sensitive to climate change, where effective moisture and related vegetation cover play a controlling role for dune activity and stability. Therefore, aeolian deposits may be an archive of past environmental changes, possibly at the millennial scale, but previous studies on this topic have rarely been reported. In this study, thirty-five optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages of ten representative sand-paleosol profiles in Otindag sand field are obtained, and these ages provide a relatively complete and well-dated chronology for wet and dry variations in Holocene. The results indicate that widespread dune mobilization occurred from 9.9 to 8.2 ka, suggesting a dry early Holocene climate. The dunes were mainly stabilized between 8.0 and 2.7 ka, implying a relatively wet climate, although there were short-term penetrations of dune activity during this wet period. After ???2.3 ka, the region became dry again, as inferred from widespread dune activity. The "8.2 ka" cold event and the Little Ice Age climatic deterioration are detected on the basis of the dune records and OSL ages. During the Medieval Warm Period and the Sui-Tang Warm Period (570-770 AD), climate in Otindag sand field was relatively humid and the vegetation was denser, and the sand dunes were stabilized again. These aeolian records may indicate climate changes at millennial time scale during Holocene, and these climatic changes may be the teleconnection to the climate changes elsewhere in the world. ?? Science in China Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2008.

  19. Regional projections of climate change using an Earth system model of intermediate complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobie, S. R.; Murdock, T. Q.

    2011-12-01

    Earth system models of intermediate complexity have been generally employed in experiments studying global temperature changes, carbon-cycle responses and millennial-scale climate variability. Their reduced computational demands mean many different greenhouse gas emissions scenarios can be examined, including exploring thresholds of dangerous climate change and geo-engineering schemes. In response to requests from users for more information on regional climate change under both more optimistic and more pessimistic emissions scenarios than the range provided by SRES, EMICs are able to produce additional climate change projections relatively rapidly. However, as a result of their parameterizations and reduced complexity, EMICs have been generally avoided when examining sub-global spatial scales in favour of GCMs or RCMs. To investigate these concerns, we compare responses to changes in radiative forcing from both the University of Victoria Earth system climate model and an ensemble of CMIP3 global climate models at a variety of sub-global spatial scales. Temperature trends and anomalies from commonly used intervals in the 20th and 21st centuries (e.g. 1961-1990, 2046-2065) are evaluated for both model types under standard emissions scenarios. Results indicate that the UVIC model produces statistically similar regional temperature responses as those of the ensemble average of the IPCC AR4 global climate models. Precipitation anomalies display fewer statistical matches with rainfall increases underestimated and snowfall decreases overestimated by the UVIC model. The results suggest regional consequences of more varied emissions scenarios could be examined in certain cases using the UVIC model (and potentially other EMICs) instead of GCMs or RCMs. A selection of regional climate change responses comparing the UVIC model to the AR4 ensemble average will be presented for a variety of areas.

  20. Abrupt Late Pleistocene Changes in Northern South American River Run-Off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, J.; Bahr, A.; Voigt, S.; Schönfeld, J.; Nuernberg, D.

    2014-12-01

    Paleoenvironmental studies as well as climate models demonstrate that fluvial run-off and moisture availability in the hinterland of the Caribbean react highly sensitively to climatic variations. Deglacial (Late Pleistocene) records document pronounced dry and wet spells over tropical South America which are mainly caused by shifts of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) coupled with South American monsoonal activity. Here we present a high-resolution foraminiferal Ba/Ca and δ18Oseawater record from a core located within the Orinoco outflow area, that give insights into abrupt changes of the hydrology of the Orinoco catchment area and, furthermore, enables us to reconstruct circulation patterns within the Caribbean during deglacial times. Our data, obtained from the surface-dwelling foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber (pink variety), show a distinct increase in Ba/Ca ratios during the Heinrich 1 (H1) interval, as well as during the Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles up to 36 kyr. Based on the multi-proxy evidence we largely attribute the Ba/Ca increase during H1 to enhanced Amazon river run-off, while Orinoco river discharge appears not to be significantly elevated. During Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles, the causal mechanism for enhanced Ba/Ca ratios is an insolation-driven shift of the ITCZ and/or enhanced South American summer monsoon activity. Interestingly, the H1 Ba/Ca shows strong similarities in shape and timing to published Ba/Ca data from Florida Straits.This leads us to the assumption that the South American run-off signal is transported directly into the Atlantic Ocean via Yukatan Strait and Florida Strait and therefore alter the salinity budget in the North Atlantic. The results point to immediate high to low latitude feedbacks which might help to re-inforce the weakening of the overturning circulation during Heinrich Events and Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles.

  1. Abrupt release of terrigenous organic carbon to the Laptev Sea at termination of the Younger Dryas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesi, T.; Muschitiello, F.; Smittenberg, R.; Jakobsson, M.; Vonk, J.; Hill, P.; Dudarev, O.; Semiletov, I. P.; Kirchner, N.; Noormets, R.; Andersson, A.; Gustafsson, O.

    2015-12-01

    Based on analysis of a piston core collected in 2014 from the Lena River paleo delta, now Laptev Sea, we show that rapid and massive organic carbon (OC) deposition took place into the marine system at the termination of the Younger Dryas when the Arctic region experienced a large and extremely fast climate change. The highly laminated strata with absence of bioturbation further confirm the rapid event-driven emplacement of this deposit which was largely dominated by terrigenous OC as indicated by depleted δ13C values and high concentrations of terrestrial fossil biomarkers (lignin phenols and cutin-derived products). Moreover, the hydrogen isotopic composition (δ2H) of HMW n-alkanes indicates that this terrestrially-derived translocated OC was produced in the watershed during a relatively cold period. The OC appears to be a few thousand years old at time of deposition (ca. 4-5000 radiocarbon years; reservoir age corrected), consistent with the radiocarbon age of pre-aged OC currently supplied by the Lena river. Altogether our results indicate that fast climate warming exerts first-order control on large-scale carbon redistribution. Because the Younger Dryas-Preboreal transition occurred within a few decades, we infer that the abrupt and large release of terrigenous OC was essentially driven by rapid