Science.gov

Sample records for abscess gas formation

  1. Acute bacterial prostatitis and abscess formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Sup; Choe, Hyun-Sop; Kim, Hee Youn; Kim, Sun Wook; Bae, Sang Rak; Yoon, Byung Il; Lee, Seung-Ju

    2016-07-07

    The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for abscess formation in acute bacterial prostatitis, and to compare treatment outcomes between abscess group and non-abscess group. This is a multicenter, retrospective cohort study. All patients suspected of having an acute prostatic infection underwent computed tomography or transrectal ultrasonography to discriminate acute prostatic abscesses from acute prostatitis without abscess formation. A total of 31 prostate abscesses were reviewed among 142 patients with acute prostatitis. Univariate analysis revealed that symptom duration, diabetes mellitus and voiding disturbance were predisposing factors for abscess formation in acute prostatitis. However, diabetes mellitus was not related to prostate abscess in multivariate analysis. Patients with abscesses <20 mm in size did not undergo surgery and were cured without any complications. In contrast, patients with abscesses >20 mm who underwent transurethral resection had a shorter duration of antibiotic treatment than did those who did not have surgery. Regardless of surgical treatment, both the length of hospital stay and antibiotic treatment were longer in patients with prostatic abscesses than they were in those without abscesses. However, the incidence of septic shock was not different between the two groups. A wide spectrum of microorganisms was responsible for prostate abscesses. In contrast, Escherichia coli was the predominant organism responsible for acute prostatitis without abscess. Imaging studies should be considered when patients with acute prostatitis have delayed treatment and signs of voiding disturbance. Early diagnosis is beneficial because prostatic abscesses require prolonged treatment protocols, or even require surgical drainage. Surgical drainage procedures such as transurethral resection of the prostate were not necessary in all patients with prostate abscesses. However, surgical intervention may have potential merits that reduce the

  2. Bone formation within a breast abscess

    PubMed Central

    Mannu, Gurdeep Singh; Ahmed, Farid; Cunnick, Giles; Mungalsingh, Naren

    2014-01-01

    We present a rare case of osseous metaplasia in a poorly healing breast abscess. An 87-year-old woman was referred to the breast surgery clinic with a painful lump in her right breast. Initial imaging and core biopsy suggested a breast abscess. Despite several courses of antibiotics and repeated attempts at aspiration the painful lesion persisted. It was eventually surgically excised in its entirety and final histopathology showed the presence of bone formation within the abscess. The patient's symptoms subsequently resolved. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature, of osseous metaplasia within a breast abscess in the absence of malignancy. PMID:25246453

  3. Bone formation within a breast abscess.

    PubMed

    Mannu, Gurdeep Singh; Ahmed, Farid; Cunnick, Giles; Mungalsingh, Naren

    2014-09-22

    We present a rare case of osseous metaplasia in a poorly healing breast abscess. An 87-year-old woman was referred to the breast surgery clinic with a painful lump in her right breast. Initial imaging and core biopsy suggested a breast abscess. Despite several courses of antibiotics and repeated attempts at aspiration the painful lesion persisted. It was eventually surgically excised in its entirety and final histopathology showed the presence of bone formation within the abscess. The patient's symptoms subsequently resolved. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature, of osseous metaplasia within a breast abscess in the absence of malignancy. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  4. Corticosteroids and peritonsillar abscess formation in infectious mononucleosis.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Brendan C; McMullan, Ronan; Hall, Samuel J

    2004-06-01

    Peritonsillar abscess formation is an uncommon complication of infectious mononucleosis (IM). Early case reports implicated corticosteroids in the development of such abscesses, however, subsequent studies suggested that these drugs do not promote the formation of abscesses at several sites outside the central nervous system. It has recently been demonstrated that zwitterionic polysaccharides, in bacterial capsules, form complexes with CD4(+) T lymphocytes leading to abscess formation. A patient is presented who developed peritonsillar abscess a few days after initiation of corticosteroid therapy for IM; the medical literature was reviewed in respect of this subject. It appears that the occurrence of these abscesses in IM is not strongly linked to corticosteroid treatment. The authors, therefore, recommend that steroids should not be withheld from patients with severe IM on the basis that they may precipitate the development of peritonsillar abscess.

  5. A case of gas-forming liver abscess with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tatsuta, Tetsuya; Wada, Toyohito; Chinda, Daisuke; Tsushima, Kiyoto; Sasaki, Yoshio; Shimoyama, Tadashi; Fukuda, Shinsaku

    2011-01-01

    A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with right hypochondriac and epigastric pain. An abdominal radiograph showed a large niveau in the right subphrenic space. An abdominal CT scan demonstrated a large liver abscess (diameter, 13 cm) with gas formation. Klebsiella pneumoniae cells were isolated from the abscess, and the patient was treated with antibiotics and percutaneous drainage. It is very important to treat gas-forming liver abscess immediately, because subsequent bacteremia and septic shock are frequently noted, and the associated mortality rate is high.

  6. Liver Abscess Formation Following Transarterial Chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei-Fu; Lu, Dong; He, Yu-Sheng; Xiao, Jing-Kun; Zhou, Chun-Ze; Cheng, De-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the clinical features, risk factors, and bacterial spectrum of liver abscess following transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and evaluate the therapeutic effect of percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) on the abscesses. A retrospective review of patient charts was performed in 3613 patients who suffered from liver malignancies (2832 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and 781 with metastatic hepatic tumor) and had undergone 11,054 TACE procedures from January 2005 to October 2013. Liver abscesses were found in 21 patients. PCD was performed in all abscess patients. The clinical features, risk factors, and bacterial spectrum of liver abscess following TACE were investigated and the therapeutic effect of PCD was evaluated. The incidence of liver abscess was 0.58% per patient and 0.19% per procedure. Approximately 57.1% of the patients had a medical history of bilioenteric anastomosis or biliary stent implantation. On computed tomography scans, the abscesses appeared as low-attenuation lesions and high-density iodinate oil scattered in the abscesses. The ultrasound showed the well defined, heterogeneously hypoechoic lesions. Positive microbiological isolates were obtained in all pus cultures and in 47.6% of blood cultures. The most common bacterium was Escherichia coli (52.4%). Twenty patients (95.2%) were cured from abscesses by using PCD, and 1 died of sepsis. Patients with predisposing factors are prone to an increased risk of liver abscess following TACE. Bacterial culture and antibiotic sensitivity tests on pus and blood help on the antibiotics selection. PCD combined with aggressive antibiotics can be recommended as the first-line therapeutic regimen. PMID:27124055

  7. Thoracic intradural Aspergillus abscess formation following epidural steroid injection.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Gaurav; Donovan Post, M Judith; Kozic, Dusko

    2004-04-01

    We report an extremely unusual iatrogenic infection of the spinal canal with Aspergillus fumigatus that resulted in intradural abscess formation following epidural steroid injection in an immunocompetent young individual. Although the imaging findings of the infection were relatively nonspecific, MR imaging not only allowed for a prompt diagnosis, but also helped in surgical localization to the intradural compartment. Complications from the use of these injections are briefly discussed.

  8. An intradural-extramedullary gas-forming spinal abscess in a patient with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Trimurti; Shah, Abhidha; Kansal, Ritesh; Goel, Atul

    2010-02-01

    Spinal infections are commonly reported to be located in the extradural or intramedullary spaces. Infection involving the intradural-extramedullary space are uncommon. We report a patient with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and an infected foot ulcer who presented with a cervical cord abscess and intradural gas. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment are necessary for a favourable outcome in gas-forming intradural spinal abscesses. To our knowledge, a gas-forming intradural spinal abscess has not been reported previously and we discuss the relevant literature. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Lung cancer mimicking lung abscess formation on CT images.

    PubMed

    Taira, Naohiro; Kawabata, Tsutomu; Gabe, Atsushi; Ichi, Takaharu; Kushi, Kazuaki; Yohena, Tomofumi; Kawasaki, Hidenori; Yamashiro, Toshimitsu; Ishikawa, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Male, 64 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Lung pleomorphic carcinoma Symptoms: Cough • fever - Clinical Procedure: - Specialty: Oncology. Unusual clinical course. The diagnosis of lung cancer is often made based on computed tomography (CT) image findings if it cannot be confirmed on pathological examinations, such as bronchoscopy. However, the CT image findings of cancerous lesions are similar to those of abscesses.We herein report a case of lung cancer that resembled a lung abscess on CT. We herein describe the case of 64-year-old male who was diagnosed with lung cancer using surgery. In this case, it was quite difficult to distinguish between the lung cancer and a lung abscess on CT images, and a lung abscess was initially suspected due to symptoms, such as fever and coughing, contrast-enhanced CT image findings showing a ring-enhancing mass in the right upper lobe and the patient's laboratory test results. However, a pathological diagnosis of lung cancer was confirmed according to the results of a rapid frozen section biopsy of the lesion. This case suggests that physicians should not suspect both a lung abscesses and malignancy in cases involving masses presenting as ring-enhancing lesions on contrast-enhanced CT.

  10. Emergency surgery for lung cancer with abscess formation after transbronchial biopsy.

    PubMed

    Takanashi, Yusuke; Miyashita, Koichi; Tajima, Shogo; Hayakawa, Takamitsu; Neyatani, Hiroshi; Funai, Kazuhito

    2017-03-01

    Abscess formation in lung cancer after transbronchial biopsy (TBB) is a rare complication with no standard consensus on a coping strategy or prophylaxis. We describe an instructive case of lung cancer which developed into an abscess after TBB. An 80-year-old man with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus underwent TBB for diagnosing a mass lesion in the left upper lobe. The TBB specimen confirmed a diagnosis of lung cancer, and he was scheduled for radical surgery. However, the tumour was revealed to have progressed into an enlarged abscess 24 days after TBB. Prompt use of meropenem failed to relieve the infection, hence we performed emergency left upper lobectomy. Poorly controlled diabetes mellitus was considered to be a risk for the formation of a tumour abscess after TBB. It was difficult to control the infection with conservative treatment using antibiotics; emergency surgical resection was considered to be the safest strategy for recovery.

  11. Skin abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Abscess - skin; Cutaneous abscess; Subcutaneous abscess; MRSA - abscess; Staph infection - abscess ... Skin abscesses are common and affect people of all ages. They occur when an infection causes pus ...

  12. Ectopic lobe of right lung with abscess formation in children: a visual diagnosis case.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chyi-Sen; Wan, Kong-Sang

    2013-08-01

    We report a 9-year-old boy who had chest pain of 3 weeks' duration caused by ectopic lobe of the right lung with abscess formation. The diagnosis was supported by chest computed tomography and video-assisted thoracoscopy. The child responded well to the operation and fully recovered.

  13. [A case of intragastric wall abscess formation during bevacizumab combined chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mori, Ayano; Kogawa, Takahiro; Arihara, Youhei; Abe, Masakazu; Tamura, Fumito; Abe, Seiichirou; Kukitsu, Takehiro; Ihara, Hideyuki; Sumiyoshi, Tetsuya; Yoshizaki, Naoto; Kondou, Hitoshi; Tsuji, Yasushi

    2013-05-01

    A 38-year-old man was given a diagnosis of as sigmoid colon cancer and underwent sigmoid colectomy. Post-operative pathological staging was stage IIIb. He then underwent adjuvant chemotherapy. One year and 4 months after the surgery, CT scans revealed multiple liver and lung metastases. He was given mFOLFOX6+bevacizumab, which was changed later to FOLFIRI+bevacizumab. After these chemotherapies, he was admitted to the hospital due to sudden abdominal pain and high grade fever. Obstructive jaundice was initially diagnosed, but detailed study of initial CT revealed intragastric wall abscess. After the drainage of the abscess, his conditions improved. We speculated that the abscess formation was caused by mucosal damage due to bevacizumab.

  14. Anorectal abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Anal abscess; Rectal abscess; Perirectal abscess; Perianal abscess; Gland abscess; Abscess - anorectal ... of anorectal abscess include: Blocked glands in the anal area Infection of an anal fissure Sexually transmitted ...

  15. Vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess caused by gas gangrene presenting with complete paraplegia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Manabu; Kobayashi, Takashi; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Abe, Eiji; Abe, Toshiki; Kikuchi, Kazuma; Shimada, Yoichi

    2015-04-11

    Gas gangrene is most often caused by Clostridium perfringens infection. Gas gangrene is a medical emergency that develops suddenly. The mortality rate is higher with trunk involvement than with involvement of the extremities, which carries a better prognosis. With respect to vertebral involvement, there are few reports in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to report a very rare case of vertebral osteomyelitis caused by gas gangrene. A 78-year-old Japanese woman with diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital with the chief complaints of back pain, dysuria, and complete paralysis of both legs. A computed tomography scan showed soft tissue swelling anterolaterally at intervertebral disc level T11/12 and a gas-containing epidural abscess that compressed her spinal cord. Cultures later grew Clostridium perfringens and Escherichia coli. Hemilaminectomy was done from T10 to T12, and an epidural abscess was removed. She went on to have fusion surgery 6 weeks after the initial operation and subsequently experienced complete pain relief. She was discharged 2 months later, at which time she was able to walk with a cane. Examination 18 months after surgery showed normal gait without a cane. Discitis caused by gas gangrene infection was successfully treated by immediate debridement and subsequent fusion surgery.

  16. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1-Regulated Lysyl Oxidase Is Involved in Staphylococcus aureus Abscess Formation

    PubMed Central

    Beerlage, Christiane; Greb, Jessica; Kretschmer, Dorothee; Assaggaf, Mohammad; Trackman, Philip C.; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Bonin, Michael; Eble, Johannes A.; Peschel, Andreas; Brüne, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is the key transcription factor involved in the adaptation of mammals to hypoxia and plays a crucial role in cancer angiogenesis. Recent evidence suggests a leading role for HIF-1 in various inflammatory and infectious diseases. Here we describe the role of HIF-1 in Staphylococcus aureus infections by investigating the HIF-1-dependent host cell response. For this purpose, transcriptional profiling of HIF-1α-deficient HepG2 and control cells, both infected with Staphylococcus aureus, was performed. Four hours after infection, the expression of 190 genes, 24 of which were regulated via HIF-1, was influenced. LOX (encoding lysyl oxidase) was one of the upregulated genes with a potential impact on the course of S. aureus infection. LOX is an amine oxidase required for biosynthetic cross-linking of extracellular matrix components. LOX was upregulated in vitro in different cell cultures infected with S. aureus and also in vivo, in kidney abscesses of mice intravenously infected with S. aureus and in clinical skin samples from patients with S. aureus infections. Inhibition of LOX by β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) did not affect the bacterial load in kidneys or blood but significantly influenced abscess morphology and collagenization. Our data provide evidence for a crucial role of HIF-1-regulated LOX in abscess formation. PMID:23649089

  17. Use of Prophylactic Antibiotics to Prevent Abscess Formation Following Hepatic Ablation in Patients with Prior Enterobiliary Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Michael; Aloia, Thomas A.; Conrad, Claudius; Ahrar, Kamran; Gupta, Sanjay; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Huang, Steven Y.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prior enterobiliary manipulation confers a high risk for liver abscess formation after hepatic ablation. We aimed to determine if prophylactic antibiotics could prevent post-ablation abscess in patients with a history of hepaticojejunostomy. Materials and Methods This single-institution retrospective study identified 262 patients who underwent 307 percutaneous liver ablation sessions between January 2010 and August 2014. Twelve (4.6%) patients with prior hepaticojejunostomy were included in this analysis. Ten (83>%) had received an aggressive prophylactic antibiotic regimen consisting of levofloxacin, metronidazole, neomycin, and erythromycin base. Two (16.6%) had received other antibiotic regimens. Clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings were used to identify abscess formation and antibiotic-related side effects. Results Twelve ablation sessions were performed during the period studied. During a mean follow-up period of 440 days (range, 77–1784 days), post-ablation abscesses had developed in 2 (16.6 %) patients, who both received the alternative antibiotic regimens. None of the 10 patients who received the aggressive prophylactic antibiotic regimen developed liver abscess. One of the 10 patients who received the aggressive prophylactic antibiotic regimen developed grade 2 antibiotic-related diarrhea and arthralgia. Conclusion An aggressive regimen of prophylactic antibiotics may be effective in preventing liver abscess formation after liver ablation in patients with prior hepaticojejunostomy. PMID:26984694

  18. Use of Prophylactic Antibiotics to Prevent Abscess Formation Following Hepatic Ablation in Patients with Prior Enterobiliary Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Odisio, Bruno C; Richter, Michael; Aloia, Thomas A; Conrad, Claudius; Ahrar, Kamran; Gupta, Sanjay; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Huang, Steven Y

    2016-08-01

    Prior enterobiliary manipulation confers a high risk for liver abscess formation after hepatic ablation. We aimed to determine if prophylactic antibiotics could prevent post-ablation abscess in patients with a history of hepaticojejunostomy. This single-institution retrospective study identified 262 patients who underwent 307 percutaneous liver ablation sessions between January 2010 and August 2014. Twelve (4.6 %) patients with prior hepaticojejunostomy were included in this analysis. Ten (83> %) had received an aggressive prophylactic antibiotic regimen consisting of levofloxacin, metronidazole, neomycin, and erythromycin base. Two (16.6 %) had received other antibiotic regimens. Clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings were used to identify abscess formation and antibiotic-related side effects. Twelve ablation sessions were performed during the period studied. During a mean follow-up period of 440 days (range, 77-1784 days), post-ablation abscesses had developed in 2 (16.6 %) patients, who both received the alternative antibiotic regimens. None of the 10 patients who received the aggressive prophylactic antibiotic regimen developed liver abscess. One of the 10 patients who received the aggressive prophylactic antibiotic regimen developed grade 2 antibiotic-related diarrhea and arthralgia. An aggressive regimen of prophylactic antibiotics may be effective in preventing liver abscess formation after liver ablation in patients with prior hepaticojejunostomy.

  19. Brain Abscess.

    PubMed

    Davis; Baldwin

    1999-05-01

    Optimal treatment of a brain abscess requires early clinical suspicion, and the diagnosis is usually made by identification of the abscess on contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The immediate first step is to reduce the potentially life-threatening brain mass (abscess and surrounding cerebral edema) and secure the diagnosis with culture specimens. This is usually accomplished by reducing the increased intracranial pressure (ICP) through surgical aspiration with or without drainage of the abscess pus. The surgical procedure chosen depends on several factors, including the location and type of abscess, multiplicity, and the medical condition of the patient. In addition, dexamethasone and hyperventilation may be required if brain herniation is imminent. The dexamethasone dose should be reduced as soon as the ICP is reduced because steroid administration may retard abscess capsule formation and decrease antibiotic concentrations within the abscess cavity. Antibiotic therapy should be started as soon as the diagnosis is made. Penicillin G or third-generation cephalosporins plus metronidazole are commonly given to treat both anaerobic and aerobic bacteria. The initial choice of antibiotic will vary on the basis of the suspected source of the brain organisms, which is most often either contiguous spread from a sinus or mastoid infection or hematogenous spread from a pulmonary, gastrointestinal, cardiac, or dental infection. Isolation and determination of the antibiotic sensitivities of the organism from abscess pus allow definitive antibiotic therapy. Patients should be managed in an intensive care unit. Phenytoin is often given to prevent seizures, which could further elevate the ICP. The duration of antimicrobial treatment is 4 to 8 weeks, during which time the patient should be monitored clinically and with repeated neuroimaging studies to ensure abscess resolution.

  20. Porphyromonas gingivalis hydrogen sulfide enhances methyl mercaptan-induced pathogenicity in mouse abscess formation.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Suguru; Shioya, Koki; Hiraoka, B Yukihiro; Suzuki, Nao; Hoshino, Tomonori; Fujiwara, Taku; Yoshinari, Nobuo; Ansai, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Akihiro

    2018-04-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis produces hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from l-cysteine. However, the role of H2S produced by P. gingivalis in periodontal inflammation is unclear. In this study, we identified the enzyme that catalyses H2S production from l-cysteine and analysed the role of H2S using a mouse abscess model. The enzyme identified was identical to methionine γ-lyase (PG0343), which produces methyl mercaptan (CH3SH) from l-methionine. Therefore, we analysed H2S and CH3SH production by P. gingivalis W83 and a PG0343-deletion mutant (ΔPG0343) with/without l-cysteine and/or l-methionine. The results indicated that CH3SH is produced constitutively irrespective of the presence of l-methionine, while H2S was greatly increased by both P. gingivalis W83 and ΔPG0343 in the presence of l-cysteine. In contrast, CH3SH production by ΔPG0343 was absent irrespective of the presence of l-methionine, and H2S production was eliminated in the absence of l-cysteine. Thus, CH3SH and H2S production involves different substrates, l-methionine or l-cysteine, respectively. Based on these characteristics, we analysed the roles of CH3SH and H2S in abscess formation in mice by P. gingivalis W83 and ΔPG0343. Abscess formation by P. gingivalis W83, but not ΔPG0343, differed significantly in the presence and absence of l-cysteine. In addition, the presence of l-methionine did not affect the size of abscesses generated by P. gingivalis W83 and ΔPG0343. Therefore, we conclude that H2S produced by P. gingivalis does not induce inflammation; however, H2S enhances inflammation caused by CH3SH. Thus, these results suggest the H2S produced by P. gingivalis plays a supportive role in inflammation caused by methionine γ-lyase.

  1. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  2. A possible mechanism of maxillofacial abscess formation: involvement of Porphyromonas endodontalis lipopolysaccharide via the expression of inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Y; Hanazawa, S; Tanaka, S; Iwahashi, H; Yamamoto, Y; Fujisawa, S

    2001-12-01

    In a previous study, we developed a specific monoclonal antibody against Porphyromonas endodontalis lipopolysaccharide, and demonstrated that this lipopolysaccharide was detected in bacterially infected root canal fluid. We suggest here that P. endodontalis lipopolysaccharide in the infectious materials plays a stimulatory role in maxillofacial abscess formation via the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Our epidemiological study showed that this lipopolysaccharide was detected in significant levels the infectious material of patients with periapical periodontitis and odontogenic abscesses. Interestingly, infectious material-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, or neutrophil chemoattractant KC genes in mouse macrophages, was significantly neutralized by monoclonal antibody against the lipopolysaccharide. In addition, we also detected a significant amount of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the infectious material. These results suggest that P. endodontalis lipopolysaccharide plays an important role in the pathogenic mechanism of maxillofacial abscess formation via the expression of inflammatory cytokines.

  3. Hematoma and abscess formation caused by Mycoplasma hominis following cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Koshiba, Hisato; Koshiba, Akemi; Daimon, Yasushi; Noguchi, Toshifumi; Iwasaku, Kazuhiro; Kitawaki, Jo

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma species cannot be identified by routine bacteriological culture methods and are resistant to common antimicrobial agents. Mycoplasma hominis usually colonizes the lower urogenital tract and causes pyelonephritis, pelvic inflammatory disease, chorioamnionitis, rupture of fetal membranes, preterm labor, postpartum fever, postabortal fever, and neonatal infection. This organism is highly prevalent in cervicovaginal cultures of sexually active women. M. hominis, M. genitalis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, and U. parvum may invade and infect placental and fetal tissues, leading to adverse pregnancy outcomes. M. hominis occasionally causes nongenitourinary infection of the blood, wounds, central nervous system, joints, or respiratory tract. We present a case of a 27-year-old woman who developed abdominal wound hematoma and abscess after cesarean section. The wound was drained, but her high fever persisted, in spite of antibiotic treatment using flomoxef sodium and imipenem·cilastatin sodium. Because the exudate exhibited M. hominis growth in an anaerobic environment, we administered the quinolone ciprofloxacin. This therapy resolved her fever, and her white blood cell count and C-reactive protein level diminished to the normal ranges. To our knowledge, there are four published articles regarding the isolation of M. hominis from postcesarean incisions. Based on the current study and the literature, infection by this pathogen may cause hematoma formation with or without abscess after cesarean section or in immunosuppressed postoperative patients. In such cases, physicians may need to suspect Mycoplasma infection and initiate appropriate antibacterial treatment as soon as possible in order to avoid persistent fever. PMID:21339933

  4. Bacterial Pathogens Induce Abscess Formation by CD4+ T-Cell Activation via the CD28–B7-2 Costimulatory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tzianabos, Arthur O.; Chandraker, Anil; Kalka-Moll, Wiltrud; Stingele, Francesca; Dong, Victor M.; Finberg, Robert W.; Peach, Robert; Sayegh, Mohamed H.

    2000-01-01

    Abscesses are a classic host response to infection by many pathogenic bacteria. The immunopathogenesis of this tissue response to infection has not been fully elucidated. Previous studies have suggested that T cells are involved in the pathologic process, but the role of these cells remains unclear. To delineate the mechanism by which T cells mediate abscess formation associated with intra-abdominal sepsis, the role of T-cell activation and the contribution of antigen-presenting cells via CD28-B7 costimulation were investigated. T cells activated in vitro by zwitterionic bacterial polysaccharides (Zps) known to induce abscess formation required CD28-B7 costimulation and, when adoptively transferred to the peritoneal cavity of naïve rats, promoted abscess formation. Blockade of T-cell activation via the CD28-B7 pathway in animals with CTLA4Ig prevented abscess formation following challenge with different bacterial pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus, Bacteroides fragilis, and a combination of Enterococcus faecium and Bacteroides distasonis. In contrast, these animals had an increased abscess rate following in vivo T-cell activation via CD28 signaling. Abscess formation in vivo and T-cell activation in vitro required costimulation by B7-2 but not B7-1. These results demonstrate that abscess formation by pathogenic bacteria is under the control of a common effector mechanism that requires T-cell activation via the CD28–B7-2 pathway. PMID:11083777

  5. Subareolar abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Abscess - areolar gland; Areolar gland abscess; Breast abscess - subareolar ... an ultrasound or other imaging test of the breast is recommended. A blood count and a culture of the abscess, if drained, may be ordered.

  6. Enterobius vermicularis: Can it be a possible pathogen in Bartholin gland abscess formation?

    PubMed

    Dönmez, Melahat Emine; Özlü, Tülay; Yılmaz, Fahri; Ayaz, Erol

    2014-01-01

    The most frequent disorders of the Bartholin glands are cysts or abscesses. Bartholin gland abscesses occur generally as a result of polymicrobial infections or agents that cause sexually transmitted diseases. But as far as we know, no parasite has been previously reported among the infectious agents that are detected from the abscesses of the Bartholin gland. Here, we report a 45-year-old woman, in the Bartholin abscess aspirate of whom Enterobius vermicularis eggs were detected in between the inflammatory infiltrate by cytological examination. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. Synergistic Effect of Combined Hollow Viscus Injuries on Intra-Abdominal Abscess Formation.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Elena M; Croce, Martin A; Shahan, Charles P; Zarzaur, Ben L; Sharpe, John P; Dileepan, Amirtha; Boyd, Brandon S; Fabian, Timothy C

    2015-07-01

    The strong association between penetrating colon injuries and intra-abdominal abscess (IAA) formation is well established and attributed to high colon bacterial counts. Since trauma patients are rarely fasting at injury, stomach and small bowel colony counts are also elevated. We hypothesized that there is a synergistic effect of increased IAA formation with concomitant stomach and/or colon injuries when compared to small bowel injuries alone. Consecutive patients at a level one trauma center with penetrating small bowel (SB), stomach (S), and/or colon (C) injuries from 1996 to 2012 were reviewed. Logistic regression determined associations with IAA, adjusting for age, gender, Injury Severity Score (ISS), admission Glasgow Coma Score, transfusions, and concurrent pancreas or liver injury. A total of 1518 patients (91% male, ISS = 15.9 ± 8.4) were identified: 496 (33%) SB, 231 (15%) S, 288 (19%) C, 40 (3%) S + SB, 69 (5%) S + C, 338 (22%) C + SB, and 56 (4%) S + C + SB. 148 (10%) patients developed IAA: 4 per cent SB, 9 per cent S, 10 per cent C, 5 per cent S + SB, 22 per cent S + C, 13 per cent C + SB, and 25 per cent S + C + SB. Multiple logistic regression demonstrated that ISS, 24 hour blood transfusions, and concomitant pancreatic or liver injuries were associated with IAA. Compared with reference SB, S or S + SB injuries were no more likely to develop IAA. However, S + C, SB + C, and S + C + SB injuries were significantly more likely to have IAA. In conclusion, combined stomach + colon, small bowel + colon, and stomach, colon, + small bowel injuries have a synergistic effect leading to increased IAA formation after penetrating injuries. Heightened clinical suspicion for IAA formation is necessary in these combined hollow viscus injury patients.

  8. Impact of Type III Secretion Effectors and of Phenoxyacetamide Inhibitors of Type III Secretion on Abscess Formation in a Mouse Model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection

    PubMed Central

    Berube, Bryan J.; Murphy, Katherine R.; Torhan, Matthew C.; Bowlin, Nicholas O.; Williams, John D.; Bowlin, Terry L.; Moir, Donald T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of intra-abdominal infections, wound infections, and community-acquired folliculitis, each of which may involve macro- or microabscess formation. The rising incidence of multidrug resistance among P. aeruginosa isolates has increased both the economic burden and the morbidity and mortality associated with P. aeruginosa disease and necessitates a search for novel therapeutics. Previous work from our group detailed novel phenoxyacetamide inhibitors that block type III secretion and injection into host cells in vitro. In this study, we used a mouse model of P. aeruginosa abscess formation to test the in vivo efficacy of these compounds against the P. aeruginosa type III secretion system (T3SS). Bacteria used the T3SS to intoxicate infiltrating neutrophils to establish abscesses. Despite this antagonism, sufficient numbers of functioning neutrophils remained for proper containment of the abscesses, as neutrophil depletion resulted in an increased abscess size, the formation of dermonecrotic lesions on the skin, and the dissemination of P. aeruginosa to internal organs. Consistent with the specificity of the T3SS-neutrophil interaction, P. aeruginosa bacteria lacking a functional T3SS were fully capable of causing abscesses in a neutropenic host. Phenoxyacetamide inhibitors attenuated abscess formation and aided in the immune clearance of the bacteria. Finally, a P. aeruginosa strain resistant to the phenoxyacetamide compound was fully capable of causing abscess formation even in the presence of the T3SS inhibitors. Together, our results further define the role of type III secretion in murine abscess formation and demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of phenoxyacetamide inhibitors in P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:28807906

  9. Natural mutations in a Staphylococcus aureus virulence regulator attenuate cytotoxicity but permit bacteremia and abscess formation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sudip; Lindemann, Claudia; Young, Bernadette C.; Muller, Julius; Österreich, Babett; Ternette, Nicola; Winkler, Ann-Cathrin; Paprotka, Kerstin; Reinhardt, Richard; Allen, Elizabeth; Flaxman, Amy; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Rollier, Christine S.; van Diemen, Pauline; Blättner, Sebastian; Remmele, Christian W.; Selle, Martina; Dittrich, Marcus; Müller, Tobias; Vogel, Jörg; Ohlsen, Knut; Crook, Derrick W.; Massey, Ruth; Wilson, Daniel J.; Rudel, Thomas; Wyllie, David H.; Fraunholz, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major bacterial pathogen, which causes severe blood and tissue infections that frequently emerge by autoinfection with asymptomatically carried nose and skin populations. However, recent studies report that bloodstream isolates differ systematically from those found in the nose and skin, exhibiting reduced toxicity toward leukocytes. In two patients, an attenuated toxicity bloodstream infection evolved from an asymptomatically carried high-toxicity nasal strain by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcription factor repressor of surface proteins (rsp). Here, we report that rsp knockout mutants lead to global transcriptional and proteomic reprofiling, and they exhibit the greatest signal in a genome-wide screen for genes influencing S. aureus survival in human cells. This effect is likely to be mediated in part via SSR42, a long-noncoding RNA. We show that rsp controls SSR42 expression, is induced by hydrogen peroxide, and is required for normal cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity. Rsp inactivation in laboratory- and bacteremia-derived mutants attenuates toxin production, but up-regulates other immune subversion proteins and reduces lethality during experimental infection. Crucially, inactivation of rsp preserves bacterial dissemination, because it affects neither formation of deep abscesses in mice nor survival in human blood. Thus, we have identified a spontaneously evolving, attenuated-cytotoxicity, nonhemolytic S. aureus phenotype, controlled by a pleiotropic transcriptional regulator/noncoding RNA virulence regulatory system, capable of causing S. aureus bloodstream infections. Such a phenotype could promote deep infection with limited early clinical manifestations, raising concerns that bacterial evolution within the human body may contribute to severe infection. PMID:27185949

  10. Gas hydrate suspensions formation and transportation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulkov, A. N.; Gulkova, S.; Zemenkov, Yu D.; Lapshin, V. D.

    2018-05-01

    An experimental unit for studying the formation of gas hydrate suspensions and their transport properties is considered. The scheme of installation and the basic processes, which can be studied, are described. The results of studies of gas hydrates and a gas hydrate suspension’ formation in an adiabatic process in a stream of seawater are given. The adiabatic method of obtaining gas hydrates and forming gas hydrate suspensions is offered to use. Directions for further research are outlined.

  11. Thoracic osteomyelitis and epidural abscess formation due to cat scratch disease: case report.

    PubMed

    Dornbos, David; Morin, Jocelyn; Watson, Joshua R; Pindrik, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    Osteomyelitis of the spine with associated spinal epidural abscess represents an uncommon entity in the pediatric population, requiring prompt evaluation and diagnosis to prevent neurological compromise. Cat scratch disease, caused by the pathogen Bartonella henselae, encompasses a wide spectrum of clinical presentations; however, an association with osteomyelitis and epidural abscess has been reported in only 4 other instances in the literature. The authors report a rare case of multifocal thoracic osteomyelitis with an epidural abscess in a patient with a biopsy-proven pathogen of cat scratch disease. A 5-year-old girl, who initially presented with vague constitutional symptoms, was diagnosed with cat scratch disease following biopsy of an inguinal lymph node. Despite appropriate antibiotics, she presented several weeks later with recurrent symptoms and back pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed 2 foci of osteomyelitis at T-8 and T-11 with an associated anterior epidural abscess from T-9 to T-12. Percutaneous image-guided vertebral biopsy revealed B. henselae by polymerase chain reaction analysis, and she was treated conservatively with doxycycline and rifampin with favorable clinical outcome.

  12. Risk of Liver Abscess Formation in Patients with Prior Biliary Intervention Following Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Cholapranee, Aurada; Houten, Diana van; Deitrick, Ginna

    PurposePatients without a competent sphincter of Oddi due to prior surgical or endoscopic therapy are at high risk for liver abscess following chemoembolization despite aggressive antimicrobial prophylaxis. We examined a cohort of such patients undergoing Y-90 resin radioembolization and compared them to a cohort of chemoembolized patients.MethodsReview of our quality-assurance database identified 24 radioembolizations performed in 16 patients with prior biliary intervention. An aggressive prophylactic regimen of oral levofloxacin and metronidazole 2 days pre-procedure continuing for 14 days after, oral neomycin/erythromycin bowel prep the day before, and IV levofloxacin/metronidazole the day of treatment was prescribed. Patients underwent resin microsphere radioembolization dosed accordingmore » to the BSA method. Patients had clinical, imaging, and laboratory assessment 1 month after each treatment, and then every 3 months. The chemoembolization cohort consisted of 13 patients with prior biliary intervention who had undergone 24 chemoembolization procedures.ResultsNo radioembolization patient developed an abscess. In the cohort of chemoembolized patients who received the same prophylaxis, liver abscess occurred following 3 of 24 (12.5 %) procedures in 3 of 13 (23 %) patients, one fatal.ConclusionsThis preliminary experience suggests that the risk of liver abscess among patients with prior biliary intervention may be lower following radioembolization than chemoembolization, which could potentially expand treatment options in this high-risk population.« less

  13. An atypical cause of rapidly progressing breast lump with abscess formation: Pure squamous cell carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Cilekar, Murat; Erkasap, Serdar; Oner, Ulku; Akici, Murat; Ciftci, Evrim; Dizen, Hayrettin; Turel, Serkan; Kavak, Ozgu I; Yilmaz, Sezgin

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a rare type of breast malignancy and little is known about long-term outcome. In the present report, the clinical features, histopathologic findings and postoperative course of a patient with squamous cell carcinoma are described. We have treated a 47-years-old woman who admitted for right breast mass without any discharge, bleeding and pain. The tumor was, 3 × 2 × 1.5 cm in size with central abscess formation. The result of surgical biopsy revealed large cell keratinizing type of SCC. The metastatic work-up studies ruled out any other probable sources of primary tumor. The patient was performed modified radical mastectomy and axillary dissection and received two cycles of chemotherapy. Squamous cell carcinoma of the breast (SCCB) is a rare entity and should be considered in patients with rapidly progressing breast mass. It should also be considered in breast lesions with abscess formation. The initial therapeutic approach should be surgical excision after histopathological diagnosis.

  14. Peritonsillar Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... tonsils). But they can also be caused by mononucleosis (also called mono), or tooth and gum infections. ... Family Health, Kids and Teens, Men, WomenTags: abscess, mononucleosis, peritonsillar abscess, pharyngitis, Throat Pain, tonsilitis, tonsils September ...

  15. Brain abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Tunkel AR. Brain abscess. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 92. Tunkel AR, Winn HR, Scheld WM. Brain abscess. In: Winn ...

  16. Lesion Formation and Antibody Response Induced by Papillomatous Digital Dermatitis-Associated Spirochetes in a Murine Abscess Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Margaret K.; Alt, David P.; Zuerner, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    Papillomatous digital dermatitis (PDD), also known as hairy heel wart, is a growing cause of lameness of cows in the U.S. dairy industry. Farms with PDD-afflicted cows experience economic loss due to treatment costs, decreased milk production, lower reproductive efficiency, and premature culling. While the exact cause of PDD is unknown, lesion development is associated with the presence of anaerobic spirochetes. This study was undertaken to investigate the virulence and antigenic relatedness of four previously isolated Treponema phagedenis-like spirochetes (1A, 3A, 4A, and 5B) by using a mouse abscess model with subcutaneous inoculation of 109, 1010, and 1011 spirochetes. Each of the PDD isolates induced abscess formation, with strain 3A causing cutaneous ulceration. Lesion development and antibody responses were dose dependent and differed significantly from those seen with the nonpathogenic human T. phagedenis strain. Strains 3A, 4A, and 5B showed two-way cross-reactivity with each other and a one-way cross-reaction with T. phagedenis. Strain 5B showed one-way cross-reactivity with 1A. None of the isolates showed cross-reactivity with T. denticola. In addition, distinct differences in immunoglobulin G subclass elicitation occurred between the PDD strains and T. phagedenis. From these data, we conclude that spirochetes isolated from PDD lesions have differential virulence and antigenic traits in vivo. Continuing investigation of these properties is important for the elucidation of virulence mechanisms and antigenic targets for vaccine development. PMID:17591787

  17. Formation of soap bubbles by gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Maolei; Li, Min; Chen, Zhiyuan; Han, Jifeng; Liu, Dong

    2017-12-01

    Soap bubbles can be easily generated by various methods, while their formation process is complicated and still worth studying. A model about the bubble formation process was proposed in the study by Salkin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 077801 (2016)] recently, and it was reported that the bubbles were formed when the gas blowing velocity was above one threshold. However, after a detailed study of these experiments, we found that the bubbles could be generated in two velocity ranges which corresponded to the laminar and turbulent gas jet, respectively, and the predicted threshold was only effective for turbulent gas flow. The study revealed that the bubble formation was greatly influenced by the aerodynamics of the gas jet blowing to the film, and these results will help to further understand the formation mechanism of the soap bubble as well as the interaction between the gas jet and the thin liquid film.

  18. Gas Accretion and Star Formation Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Almeida, Jorge

    Cosmological numerical simulations of galaxy evolution show that accretion of metal-poor gas from the cosmic web drives the star formation in galaxy disks. Unfortunately, the observational support for this theoretical prediction is still indirect, and modeling and analysis are required to identify hints as actual signs of star formation feeding from metal-poor gas accretion. Thus, a meticulous interpretation of the observations is crucial, and this observational review begins with a simple theoretical description of the physical process and the key ingredients it involves, including the properties of the accreted gas and of the star formation that it induces. A number of observations pointing out the connection between metal-poor gas accretion and star formation are analyzed, specifically, the short gas-consumption time-scale compared to the age of the stellar populations, the fundamental metallicity relationship, the relationship between disk morphology and gas metallicity, the existence of metallicity drops in starbursts of star-forming galaxies, the so-called G dwarf problem, the existence of a minimum metallicity for the star-forming gas in the local universe, the origin of the α-enhanced gas forming stars in the local universe, the metallicity of the quiescent BCDs, and the direct measurements of gas accretion onto galaxies. A final section discusses intrinsic difficulties to obtain direct observational evidence, and points out alternative observational pathways to further consolidate the current ideas.

  19. Breast Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Ajao, Oluwole G.; Ajao, Adebola O.

    1979-01-01

    Breast abscess is a relatively important disease in the tropics, and yet this condition has received little attention in the literature. Breast abscess encourages artificial feeding, which in many instances may be responsible for gastroenteritis in infants. This occurs when foods are not properly prepared by mothers of low socioeconomic class with inadequate sanitation. Breast abscess occurs primarily in the lactating breast and is most commonly located in the upper half of the breast. The organism most commonly present in the pus is Staphylococcus aureus. When the abscess is localized, it may present with all the clinical features of a breast carcinoma. PMID:522185

  20. Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 35 NIST/EPA Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format (PC database for purchase)   This data collection contains 5,228 infrared spectra in the JCAMP-DX (Joint Committee for Atomic and Molecular Physical Data "Data Exchange") format.

  1. Blockade of nitric oxide formation enhances thermal and behavioral responses in rats during turpentine abscess.

    PubMed

    Soszynski, D

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) during the development of fever and other symptoms of sickness behavior (i.e. anorexia, cachexia) in response to localized tissue inflammation caused by injection of turpentine in freely moving biotelemetered rats. To determine the role of NO in turpentine-induced fever, we injected the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) intraperitoneally simultaneously or 5 h after turpentine injection. Rats responded with fever to intramuscular injection of 20 microl of turpentine that commenced 6 h after injection and reached peak values 11 h after injection. Although turpentine did not significantly alter food and water intake, it caused a drop in body weight. Rats injected with turpentine and treated with L-NAME responded with a substantial rise in fever, independently of the time of L-NAME injection. The rise in body temperature (T(b)) due to turpentine injection began slightly sooner and reached the maximal T(b) value faster in rats treated with L-NAME than in the ones treated with saline (control for L-NAME). The enhanced decrease in food and water intake in rats treated with a combination of L-NAME and turpentine was also observed. As a result, L-NAME-injected rats responded with a profound drop in body mass due to turpentine, independently of the time of L-NAME injection. L-NAME alone did not affect food and water intake, but slightly suppressed the gain of body mass. These results indirectly indicate that NO is involved in pyrogenic and behavioral responses in rats during turpentine abscess. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Presacral abscess as a rare complication of sacral nerve stimulator implantation.

    PubMed

    Gumber, A; Ayyar, S; Varia, H; Pettit, S

    2017-03-01

    A 50-year-old man with intractable anal pain attributed to proctalgia fugax underwent insertion of a sacral nerve stimulator via the right S3 vertebral foramen for pain control with good symptomatic relief. Thirteen months later, he presented with signs of sepsis. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large presacral abscess. MRI demonstrated increased enhancement along the pathway of the stimulator electrode, indicating that the abscess was caused by infection introduced at the time of sacral nerve stimulator placement. The patient was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics, and the sacral nerve stimulator and electrode were removed. Attempts were made to drain the abscess transrectally using minimally invasive techniques but these were unsuccessful and CT guided transperineal drainage was then performed. Despite this, the presacral abscess progressed, developing enlarging gas locules and extending to the pelvic brim to involve the aortic bifurcation, causing hydronephrosis and radiological signs of impending sacral osteomyelitis. MRI showed communication between the rectum and abscess resulting from transrectal drainage. In view of the progressive presacral sepsis, a laparotomy was performed with drainage of the abscess, closure of the upper rectum and formation of a defunctioning end sigmoid colostomy. Following this, the presacral infection resolved. Presacral abscess formation secondary to an infected sacral nerve stimulator electrode has not been reported previously. Our experience suggests that in a similar situation, the optimal management is to perform laparotomy with drainage of the presacral abscess together with simultaneous removal of the sacral nerve stimulator and electrode.

  3. Presacral abscess as a rare complication of sacral nerve stimulator implantation

    PubMed Central

    Gumber, A; Ayyar, S; Varia, H

    2017-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with intractable anal pain attributed to proctalgia fugax underwent insertion of a sacral nerve stimulator via the right S3 vertebral foramen for pain control with good symptomatic relief. Thirteen months later, he presented with signs of sepsis. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large presacral abscess. MRI demonstrated increased enhancement along the pathway of the stimulator electrode, indicating that the abscess was caused by infection introduced at the time of sacral nerve stimulator placement. The patient was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics, and the sacral nerve stimulator and electrode were removed. Attempts were made to drain the abscess transrectally using minimally invasive techniques but these were unsuccessful and CT guided transperineal drainage was then performed. Despite this, the presacral abscess progressed, developing enlarging gas locules and extending to the pelvic brim to involve the aortic bifurcation, causing hydronephrosis and radiological signs of impending sacral osteomyelitis. MRI showed communication between the rectum and abscess resulting from transrectal drainage. In view of the progressive presacral sepsis, a laparotomy was performed with drainage of the abscess, closure of the upper rectum and formation of a defunctioning end sigmoid colostomy. Following this, the presacral infection resolved. Presacral abscess formation secondary to an infected sacral nerve stimulator electrode has not been reported previously. Our experience suggests that in a similar situation, the optimal management is to perform laparotomy with drainage of the presacral abscess together with simultaneous removal of the sacral nerve stimulator and electrode. PMID:28071947

  4. Perirenal abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection. Causes Most perirenal abscesses are caused by urinary tract infections that start in the bladder. They then spread ... develop: Abdominal pain Burning with urination Chills Fever Urinary tract infection Prevention If you have kidney stones, ask your ...

  5. Haloarchaea and the Formation of Gas Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Felicitas

    2015-01-01

    Halophilic Archaea (Haloarchaea) thrive in salterns containing sodium chloride concentrations up to saturation. Many Haloarchaea possess genes encoding gas vesicles, but only a few species, such as Halobacterium salinarum and Haloferax mediterranei, produce these gas-filled, proteinaceous nanocompartments. Gas vesicles increase the buoyancy of cells and enable them to migrate vertically in the water body to regions with optimal conditions. Their synthesis depends on environmental factors, such as light, oxygen supply, temperature and salt concentration. Fourteen gas vesicle protein (gvp) genes are involved in their formation, and regulation of gvp gene expression occurs at the level of transcription, including the two regulatory proteins, GvpD and GvpE, but also at the level of translation. The gas vesicle wall is solely formed of proteins with the two major components, GvpA and GvpC, and seven additional accessory proteins are also involved. Except for GvpI and GvpH, all of these are required to form the gas permeable wall. The applications of gas vesicles include their use as an antigen presenter for viral or pathogen proteins, but also as a stable ultrasonic reporter for biomedical purposes. PMID:25648404

  6. Tuberculous temporal brain abscess mimicking otogenic pyogenic abscess.

    PubMed

    Muzumdar, D; Balasubramaniam, S; Melkundi, S

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculous brain abscess is a rare manifestation of central nervous system tuberculosis. We report the case of a tuberculous temporal lobe abscess in a 14-year-old female child that mimicked an otogenic pyogenic brain abscess. The patient had no prior history of tuberculosis. She had chronic otitis media and presented with signs of raised intracranial tension. Radiological imaging was suggestive of an acute pyogenic left temporal lobe abscess. A left temporal craniotomy was performed and the abscess was completely excised. Histological examination was consistent with a chronic abscess, and bacterial cultures were negative. A left radical mastoidectomy was also carried out. However, she presented with repeated abscess formation at the same site over the next 8 weeks, which was refractory to surgical therapy and broad-spectrum antibiotic administration. Furthermore, the purulent exudate showed strong positivity in the PCR test for tubercular bacilli. After administration of antituberculous treatment, she showed gradual clinical and radiological improvement. At follow-up after 2 years, she is asymptomatic. CT imaging at 2 years showed total resolution of abscess. Tuberculous abscess in the temporal lobe following otogenic infection has not been reported in the pediatric population. Although rare, the possibility of tuberculous etiology should be borne in mind as a differential diagnosis of acute abscess of otogenic origin, especially in endemic areas where the incidence of chronic otitis media as well as tuberculosis is high. The pathogenesis and treatment of tuberculous brain abscess in children is reviewed in light of the current literature on the subject. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. 18 CFR 270.304 - Tight formation gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... determination that natural gas is tight formation gas must file with the jurisdictional agency an application... formation; (d) A complete copy of the well log, including the log heading identifying the designated tight...

  8. Bacteroides (Parabacteroides) distasonis splenic abscess in a sickle cell patient.

    PubMed

    Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A

    2008-01-01

    Splenic abscess is not an uncommon complication of patients with sickle-cell disease. Here we describe an 18 year-old boy with sickle cell disease and left upper quadrant abdominal pain. Computerized axial tomography revealed left sided free flowing pleural effusion and splenomegaly with liquefaction and possible gas formation. The splenic fluid grew an unusual organism known as Bacteroides distasonis. The patient received antimicrobial therapy and underwent a splenectomy with full recovery. The spleen was cystically infarcted and measured 22 x 16 x 5 cm. The capsule was thickened and covered by fibrinous exudate. Histopathologic examination of the spleen showed complete necrosis with reparative fibrosis. This case presents an unusual cause of splenic abscess due to Bacteroides distasonis with a subacute to chronic course. The presence of fever and left sided pleuritic chest pain in patients with sickle cell disease should raise the suspicion of splenic abscess.

  9. Life-threatening emphysematous liver abscess associated with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yuichi; Hayashi, Masafumi; Niiya, Fumitaka; Nakanishi, Toru; Hanamura, Shotaro; Asonuma, Kunio; Yamamura, Eiichi; Gomi, Kuniyo; Kuroki, Yuichiro; Maruoka, Naotaka; Inoue, Kazuaki; Nagahama, Masatsugu

    2017-03-06

    Emphysematous liver abscesses are defined as liver abscesses accompanied by gas formation. The fatality rate is extremely high at 27%, necessitating prompt intensive care. The patient was a 69-year-old Japanese man with type 2 diabetes. He visited the emergency outpatient department for fever and general malaise that had been ongoing for 2 weeks. Abdominal computed tomography revealed an abscess 5 cm in diameter accompanied by gas formation in the right hepatic lobe. Markedly impaired glucose tolerance was observed with a blood sugar level of 571 mg/dL and a glycated hemoglobin level of 14.6%. The patient underwent emergency percutaneous abscess drainage, and intensive care was subsequently initiated. Klebsiella pneumoniae was detected in both the abscess cavity and blood cultures. The drain was removed 3 weeks later, and the patient was discharged. Emphysematous liver abscesses are often observed in patients with poorly controlled diabetes, and the fatality rate is extremely high. Fever and malaise occasionally mask life-threatening infections in diabetic patients, necessitating careful examination.

  10. Pyogenic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Liver abscess; Bacterial liver abscess ... There are many possible causes of liver abscesses, including: Abdominal infection, such as appendicitis , diverticulitis , or a perforated bowel Infection in the blood Infection of the bile draining tubes ...

  11. Amebic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... abscess URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000211.htm Amebic liver abscess To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amebic liver abscess is a collection of pus ...

  12. Lung abscess: update on microbiology and management.

    PubMed

    Yazbeck, Moussa F; Dahdel, Maher; Kalra, Ankur; Browne, Alexander S; Pratter, Melvin R

    2014-01-01

    A lung abscess is a circumscribed collection of pus in the lung as a result of a microbial infection, which leads to cavity formation and often a radiographic finding of an air fluid level. Patients with lung abscesses commonly present to their primary care physician or to the emergency department with "nonresolving pneumonia." Although, the incidence of lung abscess has declined since the introduction of antibiotic treatment, it still carries a mortality of up to 10%-20%. This article discusses in detail the up-to-date microbiology and the management of lung abscesses.

  13. Creating and maintaining a gas cap in tar sands formations

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael; Dinkoruk, Deniz Sumnu; Wellington, Scott Lee

    2010-03-16

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are disclosed herein. Methods for treating a tar sands formation may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. Pressure may be allowed to increase in an upper portion of the formation to provide a gas cap in the upper portion. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from a lower portion of the formation.

  14. Severe Pain Due to Paraspinal Abscess Formation in Two Patients with Squamous-Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck after Multimodal Treatment Including Cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Christina; Pretzell, Ina; Lieberknecht, Elisabeth; Mattyasovszky, Stefan; Weber, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Patients with squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) on palliative therapy usually have a bad prognosis and suffer from various symptoms. With increasing use of targeted agents in cancer patients at the end of life, the correct assignment of therapy-related symptoms becomes increasingly difficult as cancer-related symptoms usually increase as well. We report on 2 cases of patients with SCCHN who received multimodal treatment including palliative therapy with cetuximab. Both patients developed severe thoracic and cervicothoracic pain following treatment. In both cases, extensive paraspinal abscess formation proved to be the underlying cause. One patient was treated conservatively; the other one had to undergo surgical intervention. Awareness of multifaceted therapy-related complications is mandatory when patients receive multimodal treatment including targeted therapies. Unexplained pain syndromes in this context should raise suspicions concerning possible infectious complications and should lead to early use of magnetic resonance imaging. © 2018 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  15. Percutaneous transhepatic drainage of lung abscess through a diaphragmatic fistula caused by a penetrating liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masako; Morita, Satoru; Ueno, Eiko; Hayashi, Mitsutoshi; Ishikawa, Motonao; Mae, Masahiro

    2011-11-01

    Liver abscesses occurring just below the diaphragm can penetrate or perforate the thoracic cavity, resulting in lung abscess or pyothorax. Although surgical or percutaneous transpleural drainage is often required in such cases, the latter approach has some risks, including hemothorax and bronchopleural fistula formation when the cavity is surrounded by normal lung parenchyma. The present report describes a treatment technique of percutaneous transhepatic drainage through the diaphragmatic fistula to avoid the risks of a transpulmonary approach in a case of lung abscess caused by a penetrating liver abscess.

  16. Kinetics of formation and dissociation of gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manakov, A. Yu; Penkov, N. V.; Rodionova, T. V.; Nesterov, A. N.; Fesenko, E. E., Jr.

    2017-09-01

    The review covers a wide range of issues related to the nucleation, growth and dissociation of gas hydrates. The attention is focused on publications of the last 10-15 years. Along with the mathematical models used to describe these processes, the results of relevant experimental studies are surveyed. Particular sections are devoted to the gas hydrate self-preservation effect, the water memory effect in the hydrate formation, development of catalysts for hydrate formation and the effect of substances dissolved in the aqueous phase on the formation of hydrates. The main experimental techniques used to study gas hydrates are briefly considered. The bibliography includes 230 references.

  17. Bartholin cyst or abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... is very rare. Any vaginal discharge or fluid drainage will be sent to a lab for testing. ... and closes quickly. Therefore, the abscess often returns. DRAINAGE OF THE ABSCESS A small surgical cut can ...

  18. Bilateral breast abscess: a rare complication of enteric fever.

    PubMed

    Singh, S; Pandya, Y; Rathod, J; Trivedi, S

    2009-01-01

    Breast abscess is usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus in pregnant or lactating females. Salmonella spp. is occasionally associated with abscess formation in various organs, but breast abscess is a very rare complication. In enteric fever dissemination to multiple organ systems following bacteraemia can lead to localized abscess. We report a case of bilateral breast abscess due to Salmonella Typhi in an unmarried 35-year-old female without any predisposing conditions. She presented with fever and painful swelling of both the breasts. S. typhi was isolated from both breasts. Such rare cause must be suspected in females without any evident predisposing factors for effective management.

  19. Computation on free gas seepage and associated seabed pockmark formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Cathles, Lawrence M.; Chen, D. F.; Wu, N. Y.

    2010-03-01

    Seabed pockmarks formed by seepage of subsurface fluids are very commonly located in areas where gas is present in near-surface sediments. Especially, they are widely observed on the seafloor at hydrate regions around the world. In this paper we consider that capillary sealing is the crucial mechanism for gas entrapment, gas escape, and pockmark formation. In the hydrate system, free gas is trapped beneath the hydrate layer. The gas overpressure increases as the gas accumulates beneath the hydrate. the hydrate layer is a capillary seal. Capillary seals have the property that they fail completely when the gas pressure reaches the point that they are invaded by gas. The release of gas is thus episodic and sudden. We imagine in our model that when it occurs the venting gas will push the overlying water upward at increasingly higher velocities as the gas pipe approaches the seafloor. As the water velocity increases, the near surface sediments will become quick at a depth that is a function of the thickness of free gas column under the hydrate seal and the depth of hydrate seal, leaving a pockmark on the seafloor. The model shows that at least a 22-m-thick free gas layer beneath the hydrate at Blake Ridge is needed to form the 4-m-deep pockmark at the seabed.

  20. Modeling biogenic gas bubbles formation and migration in coarse sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.

    2011-12-01

    Shujun Ye Department of Hydrosciences, School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China; sjye@nju.edu.cn Brent E. Sleep Department of Civil Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A4 CANADA; sleep@ecf.utoronto.ca Methane gas generation in porous media was investigated in an anaerobic two-dimensional sand-filled cell. Inoculation of the lower portion of the cell with a methanogenic culture and addition of methanol to the bottom of the cell led to biomass growth and formation of a gas phase. The formation, migration, distribution and saturation of gases in the cell were visualized by the charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Gas generated at the bottom of the cell in the biologically active zone moved upwards in discrete fingers, so that gas phase saturations (gas-filled fraction of void space) in the biologically active zone at the bottom of the cell did not exceed 40-50%, while gas accumulation at the top of the cell produced gas phase saturations as high as 80%. Macroscopic invasion percolation (MIP) at near pore scale[Glass, et al., 2001; Kueper and McWhorter, 1992]was used to model gas bubbles growth in porous media. The nonwetting phase migration pathway can be yielded directly by MIP. MIP was adopted to simulate the expansion, fragmentation, and mobilization of gas clusters in the cell. The production of gas, and gas phash saturations were simulated by a continuum model - compositional simulator (COMPSIM) [Sleep and Sykes, 1993]. So a combination of a continuum model and a MIP model was used to simulate the formation, fragmentation and migration of biogenic gas bubbles. Key words: biogenic gas; two dimensional; porous media; MIP; COMPSIM

  1. Ice-gas interactions during planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, Karin I.

    2016-10-01

    Planets form in disks around young stars. In these disks, condensation fronts or snowlines of water, CO2, CO and other abundant molecules regulate the outcome of planet formation. Snowline locations determine how the elemental and molecular compositions of the gaseous and solid building blocks of planets evolve with distance from the central star. Snowlines may also locally increase the planet formation efficiency. Observations of snowlines have only become possible in the past couple of years. This proceeding reviews these observations as well as the theory on the physical and chemical processes in disks that affect snowline locations.

  2. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member.

  3. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D. [Livermore, CA

    1980-02-26

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member.

  4. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1980-02-26

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets are disclosed. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member. 4 figs.

  5. Natural gas storage in bedded salt formations

    SciTech Connect

    Macha, G.

    1996-09-01

    In 1990 Western Resources Inc. (WRI) identified the need for additional natural gas storage capacity for its intrastate natural gas system operated in the state of Kansas. Western Resources primary need was identified as peak day deliverability with annual storage balancing a secondary objective. Consequently, an underground bedded salt storage facility, Yaggy Storage Field, was developed and placed in operation in November 1993. The current working capacity of the new field is 2.1 BCF. Seventy individual caverns are in service on the 300 acre site. The caverns vary in size from 310,000 CF to 2,600,000 CF. Additional capacity can bemore » added on the existing acreage by increasing the size of some of the smaller existing caverns by further solution mining and by development of an additional 30 potential well sites on the property.« less

  6. Shale Gas Well, Hydraulic Fracturing, and Formation Data to Support Modeling of Gas and Water Flow in Shale Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Ryan W. J.; Celia, Michael A.

    2018-04-01

    The potential for shale gas development and hydraulic fracturing to cause subsurface water contamination has prompted a number of modeling studies to assess the risk. A significant impediment for conducting robust modeling is the lack of comprehensive publicly available information and data about the properties of shale formations, shale wells, the process of hydraulic fracturing, and properties of the hydraulic fractures. We have collated a substantial amount of these data that are relevant for modeling multiphase flow of water and gas in shale gas formations. We summarize these data and their sources in tabulated form.

  7. Simulations of Early Structure Formation: Primordial Gas Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Naoki; Abel, Tom; Hernquist, Lars; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2003-08-01

    We use cosmological simulations to study the origin of primordial star-forming clouds in a ΛCDM universe, by following the formation of dark matter halos and the cooling of gas within them. To model the physics of chemically pristine gas, we employ a nonequilibrium treatment of the chemistry of nine species (e-, H, H+, He, He+, He++, H2, H+2, H-) and include cooling by molecular hydrogen. By considering cosmological volumes, we are able to study the statistical properties of primordial halos, and the high resolution of our simulations enables us to examine these objects in detail. In particular, we explore the hierarchical growth of bound structures forming at redshifts z~25-30 with total masses in the range ~105-106Msolar. We find that when the amount of molecular hydrogen in these objects reaches a critical level, cooling by rotational line emission is efficient, and dense clumps of cold gas form. We identify these ``gas clouds'' as sites for primordial star formation. In our simulations, the threshold for gas cloud formation by molecular cooling corresponds to a critical halo mass of ~5×105h-1Msolar, in agreement with earlier estimates, but with a weak dependence on redshift in the range z>16. The complex interplay between the gravitational formation of dark halos and the thermodynamic and chemical evolution of the gas clouds compromises analytic estimates of the critical H2 fraction. Dynamical heating from mass accretion and mergers opposes relatively inefficient cooling by molecular hydrogen, delaying the production of star-forming clouds in rapidly growing halos. We also investigate the effect of photodissociating ultraviolet radiation on the formation of primordial gas clouds. We consider two extreme cases, first by including a uniform radiation field in the optically thin limit and second by accounting for the maximum effect of gas self-shielding in virialized regions. For radiation with Lyman-Werner band flux J>10-23 ergs s-1 cm-2 Hz-1 sr-1, hydrogen

  8. Neonatal orbital abscess

    PubMed Central

    Al-Salem, Khalil M; Alsarayra, Fawaz A; Somkawar, Areej R

    2014-01-01

    Orbital complications due to ethmoiditis are rare in neonates. A case of orbital abscess due to acute ethmoiditis in a 28-day-old girl is presented. A Successful outcome was achieved following antimicrobial therapy alone; spontaneous drainage of the abscess occurred from the lower lid without the need for surgery. From this case report, we intend to emphasize on eyelid retraction as a sign of neonatal orbital abscess, and to review all the available literature of similar cases. PMID:24008806

  9. Radiative Hydrodynamics and the Formation of Gas Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durisen, Richard H.

    2009-05-01

    Gas giant planets undoubtedly form from the orbiting gas and dust disks commonly observed around young stars, and there are two principal mechanisms proposed for how this may occur. The core accretion plus gas capture model argues that a solid core forms first and then accretes gas from the surrounding disk once the core becomes massive enough (about 10 Earth masses). The gas accumulation process is comparatively slow but becomes hydrodynamic at later times. The disk instability model alternatively suggests that gas giant planet formation is initiated by gas-phase gravitational instabilities (GIs) that fragment protoplanetary disks into bound gaseous protoplanets rapidly, on disk orbit period time scales. Solid cores then form more slowly by accretion of solid planetesimals and settling. The overall formation time scales for these two mechanisms can differ by orders of magnitude. Both involve multidimensional hydrodynamic flows at some phase, late in the process for core accretion and early on for disk instability. The ability of cores to accrete gas and the ability of GIs to produce bound clumps depend on how rapidly gas can lose energy by radiation. This regulatory process, while important for controlling the time scale for core accretion plus gas capture, turns out to be absolutely critical for disk instability to work at all. For this reason, I will focus in my talk on the use of radiation hydrodynamics simulations to determine whether and where disk instability can actually form gas giant planets in disks. Results remain controversial, but simulations by several different research groups support analytic arguments that disk instability leading to fragmentation probably cannot occur in disks around Sun-like stars at orbit radii of 10's of Earth-Sun distances or less. On the other hand, very recent simulations suggest that very young, rapidly accreting disks with much larger radii (100's of times the Sun-Earth distance) can indeed readily fragment by disk

  10. Formation of Structured Water and Gas Hydrate by the Use of Xenon Gas in Vegetable Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Hiroko; Suzuki, Toru; Kawagoe, Yoshinori; Makino, Yoshio; Oshita, Seiichi

    Freezing is a valuable technique for food preservation. However, vegetables are known to be softening remarkably after freezing and thawing process. It is expected to find alternative technique instead of freezing. Recently, the application of structured water and/or gas hydrate had been attempted to prolong the preservation of vegetable. In this study, the formation process of structure water and/or gas hydrate in pure water and carrot tissue was investigated by using NMR relaxation times, T1 and T2, of which applying condition was up to 0.4MPa and 0.8MPa at 5oC. Under the pressure of 0.4MPa, no gas hydrate was appeared, however, at 0.8MPa, formation of gas hydrate was recognized in both water and carrot tissue. Once the gas hydrate formation process in carrot tissue started, T1 and T2 increased remarkably. After that, as the gas hydrate developed, then T1 and T2 turned to decrease. Since this phenomenon was not observed in pure water, it is suggested that behavior of NMR relaxation time just after the formation of gas hydrate in carrot tissue may be peculiar to compartment system such as inter and intracellular spaces.

  11. 18 CFR 270.304 - Tight formation gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tight formation gas. 270.304 Section 270.304 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... before January 1, 1980; and (2) The applicant has no knowledge of any information not described in the...

  12. New hydrate formation methods in a liquid-gas medium.

    PubMed

    Chernov, A A; Pil'nik, A A; Elistratov, D S; Mezentsev, I V; Meleshkin, A V; Bartashevich, M V; Vlasenko, M G

    2017-01-18

    Conceptually new methods of hydrate formation are proposed. The first one is based on the shock wave impact on a water-bubble medium. It is shown that the hydrate formation rate in this process is typically very high. A gas hydrate of carbon dioxide was produced. The process was experimentally studied using various initial conditions, as well as different external action magnitudes. The obtained experimental data are in good agreement with the proposed model. Other methods are based on the process of boiling liquefied gas in an enclosed volume of water (explosive boiling of a hydrating agent and the organization of cyclic boiling-condensation process). The key features of the methods are the high hydrate formation rate combined with a comparatively low power consumption leading to a great expected efficiency of the technologies based on them. The set of experiments was carried out. Gas hydrates of refrigerant R134a, carbon dioxide and propane were produced. The investigation of decomposition of a generated gas hydrate sample was made. The criteria of intensification of the hydrate formation process are formulated.

  13. New hydrate formation methods in a liquid-gas medium

    PubMed Central

    Chernov, A. A.; Pil’nik, A. A.; Elistratov, D. S.; Mezentsev, I. V.; Meleshkin, A. V.; Bartashevich, M. V.; Vlasenko, M. G.

    2017-01-01

    Conceptually new methods of hydrate formation are proposed. The first one is based on the shock wave impact on a water-bubble medium. It is shown that the hydrate formation rate in this process is typically very high. A gas hydrate of carbon dioxide was produced. The process was experimentally studied using various initial conditions, as well as different external action magnitudes. The obtained experimental data are in good agreement with the proposed model. Other methods are based on the process of boiling liquefied gas in an enclosed volume of water (explosive boiling of a hydrating agent and the organization of cyclic boiling-condensation process). The key features of the methods are the high hydrate formation rate combined with a comparatively low power consumption leading to a great expected efficiency of the technologies based on them. The set of experiments was carried out. Gas hydrates of refrigerant R134a, carbon dioxide and propane were produced. The investigation of decomposition of a generated gas hydrate sample was made. The criteria of intensification of the hydrate formation process are formulated. PMID:28098194

  14. New hydrate formation methods in a liquid-gas medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, A. A.; Pil'Nik, A. A.; Elistratov, D. S.; Mezentsev, I. V.; Meleshkin, A. V.; Bartashevich, M. V.; Vlasenko, M. G.

    2017-01-01

    Conceptually new methods of hydrate formation are proposed. The first one is based on the shock wave impact on a water-bubble medium. It is shown that the hydrate formation rate in this process is typically very high. A gas hydrate of carbon dioxide was produced. The process was experimentally studied using various initial conditions, as well as different external action magnitudes. The obtained experimental data are in good agreement with the proposed model. Other methods are based on the process of boiling liquefied gas in an enclosed volume of water (explosive boiling of a hydrating agent and the organization of cyclic boiling-condensation process). The key features of the methods are the high hydrate formation rate combined with a comparatively low power consumption leading to a great expected efficiency of the technologies based on them. The set of experiments was carried out. Gas hydrates of refrigerant R134a, carbon dioxide and propane were produced. The investigation of decomposition of a generated gas hydrate sample was made. The criteria of intensification of the hydrate formation process are formulated.

  15. A hybrid scenario for gas giant planet formation in rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durisen, Richard H.; Cai, Kai; Mejía, Annie C.; Pickett, Megan K.

    2005-02-01

    The core-accretion mechanism for gas giant formation may be too slow to create all observed gas giant planets during reasonable gas disk lifetimes, but it has yet to be firmly established that the disk instability model can produce permanent bound gaseous protoplanets under realistic conditions. Based on our recent simulations of gravitational instabilities in disks around young stars, we suggest that, even if instabilities due to disk self-gravity do not produce gaseous protoplanets directly, they may create persistent dense rings that are conducive to accelerated growth of gas giants through core accretion. The rings occur at and near the boundary between stable and unstable regions of the disk and appear to be produced by resonances with discrete spiral modes on the unstable side.

  16. Peritonsillar Abscess (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health ... Educators Search English Español Peritonsillar Abscess KidsHealth / For Teens / Peritonsillar Abscess Print en español Abscesos periamigdalinos What's ...

  17. Abscess - abdomen or pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk for an abdominal abscess if you have: Trauma Perforated ulcer disease Surgery in your belly area Weakened immune system Germs may pass through your blood to an organ in your belly. Sometimes, no reason can be found for an abscess.

  18. Novel fastidious, partially acid-fast, anaerobic Gram-positive bacillus associated with abscess formation and recovered from multiple medical centers.

    PubMed

    Harrington, S M; Bell, M; Bernard, K; Lagacé-Wiens, P; Schuetz, A N; Hartman, B; McQuiston, J R; Wilson, D; Lasalvia, M; Ng, B; Richter, S; Taege, A

    2013-11-01

    We report a novel anaerobe causing abscess in four patients at three hospitals. In the clinical specimen, bacilli were branching, Gram positive, and acid fast. The organism grew slowly and was not identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. Our findings support the description of a new genus and species of the suborder Corynebacterineae.

  19. Rapid gas hydrate formation processes: Will they work?

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bernardo, Mark P.

    2010-06-07

    Researchers at DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETL’s 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. The results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuousmore » formation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve.« less

  20. Gravitational star formation thresholds and gas density in three galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oey, M. S.; Kennicutt, R. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    It has long been held that the star formation rate (SFR) may be described as a power law of the gas density, p(exp n), as given by Schmidt (1959). However, this relation has as yet remained poorly defined and is likewise poorly understood. In particular, most studies have been investigations of global gas and star formation properties of galaxies, due to lack of adequate high-resolution data for detailed studies of individual galaxies. The three spiral galaxies in this study have published maps of both H2 (as traced by CO), and HI, thereby enabling the authors to investigate the relationship between total gas surface density and SFR. The purpose of the present investigation is the comparison of spatially-resolved total surface gas density in three galaxies (NGC 6946, M51, and M83) to sigma sub c as given by the above model. CO, HI and H alpha data for NGC 6946 were taken from Tacconi-Garman (1988), and for M51 and M83 from Lord (1987). The authors used a CO-H2 conversion of N(H2)/I sub CO(exp cos i = 2.8 x 10(exp 20) atoms cm(-2)/(K kms(-1), and summed the H2 and HI data for each galaxy to obtain the total hydrogen gas density. This total was then multiplied by a factor of 1.36 to include the contribution of helium to the total surface gas density. The authors assumed distances to NGC 6946, M51, and M83 to be 6.0, 9.6, and 8.9 Mpc respectively, with inclination angles of 30, 20, and 26 degrees. H alpha flux was used as the measure of SFR for NGC 6946, and SFR for the remaining two galaxies was taken directly from Lord as computed from H alpha measurements. The results of these full-disk studies thus show a remarkable correlation between the total gas density and the threshold densities given by the gravitational stability criterion. In particular, the threshold density appears to mark a lower boundary to the range of gas densities in these galaxies, which may have consequence in determining appropriate models for star formation and gas dynamics. More evidence is

  1. Breast abscess after intravenous methamphetamine injection into the breast.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Amanda; Ajkay, Nicolas

    2018-05-01

    Intravenous drug use is a problem plaguing our society. We present a case of a young female who injected methamphetamine into her mammary vein, resulting in the formation of a breast abscess. This case demonstrates a rare but dangerous complication of intravenous drug use and a possible differential diagnosis in a patient presenting with a breast abscess. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. [Management of Lung Abscess].

    PubMed

    Marra, A; Hillejan, L; Ukena, D

    2015-10-01

    A lung abscess is an infectious pulmonary disease characterised by the presence of a pus-filled cavity within the lung parenchyma. The content of an abscess often drains into the airways spontaneously, leading to an air-fluid level visible on chest X-rays and CT scans. Primary lung abscesses occur in patients who are prone to aspiration or in otherwise healthy individuals; secondary lung abscesses typically develop in association with a stenosing lung neoplasm or a systemic disease that compromises immune defences, such as AIDS, or after organ transplantation. The organisms found in abscesses caused by aspiration pneumonia reflect the resident flora of the oropharynx. The most commonly isolated organisms are anaerobic bacteria (Prevotella, Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Peptostreptococcus) or streptococci; in alcoholics with poor oral hygiene, the spectrum of pathogens includes Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Actinomyces. Chest radiography and computed tomography (CT) are mandatory procedures in the diagnostic algorithm. Standard treatment for a lung abscess consists of systemic antibiotic therapy, which is based on the anticipated or proven bacterial spectrum of the abscess. In most cases, primary abscesses are successfully treated by calculated empiric antibiotic therapy, with an estimated lethality rate of less than 10 %. Secondary abscesses, despite targeted antimicrobial therapy, are associated with a poor prognosis, which depends on the patient's general condition and underlying disease; lethality is as high as 75 %. Negative prognostic factors are old age, severe comorbidities, immunosuppression, bronchial obstruction, and neoplasms. Surgical intervention due to failure of conservative treatment is required in only 10 % of patients, with a success rate of up to 90 % and postoperative mortality rates ranging between 0 and 33 %. Treatment success after endoscopic or percutaneous drainage is achieved in 73 to 100 % of cases, with an

  3. A GAS-PHASE FORMATION ROUTE TO INTERSTELLAR TRANS-METHYL FORMATE

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Callie A.; Wehres, Nadine; Yang Zhibo

    2012-07-20

    The abundance of methyl formate in the interstellar medium has previously been underpredicted by chemical models. Additionally, grain surface chemistry cannot account for the relative abundance of the cis- and trans-conformers of methyl formate, and the trans-conformer is not even formed at detectable abundance on these surfaces. This highlights the importance of studying formation pathways to methyl formate in the gas phase. The rate constant and branching fractions are reported for the gas-phase reaction between protonated methanol and formic acid to form protonated trans-methyl formate and water as well as adduct ion: Rate constants were experimentally determined using a flowingmore » afterglow-selected ion flow tube apparatus at 300 K and a pressure of 530 mTorr helium. The results indicate a moderate overall rate constant of (3.19 {+-} 0.39) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} ({+-} 1{sigma}) and an average branching fraction of 0.05 {+-} 0.04 for protonated trans-methyl formate and 0.95 {+-} 0.04 for the adduct ion. These experimental results are reinforced by ab initio calculations at the MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory to examine the reaction coordinate and complement previous density functional theory calculations. This study underscores the need for continued observational studies of trans-methyl formate and for the exploration of other gas-phase formation routes to complex organic molecules.« less

  4. STAR FORMATION LAWS: THE EFFECTS OF GAS CLOUD SAMPLING

    SciTech Connect

    Calzetti, D.; Liu, G.; Koda, J., E-mail: calzetti@astro.umass.edu

    Recent observational results indicate that the functional shape of the spatially resolved star formation-molecular gas density relation depends on the spatial scale considered. These results may indicate a fundamental role of sampling effects on scales that are typically only a few times larger than those of the largest molecular clouds. To investigate the impact of this effect, we construct simple models for the distribution of molecular clouds in a typical star-forming spiral galaxy and, assuming a power-law relation between star formation rate (SFR) and cloud mass, explore a range of input parameters. We confirm that the slope and the scattermore » of the simulated SFR-molecular gas surface density relation depend on the size of the sub-galactic region considered, due to stochastic sampling of the molecular cloud mass function, and the effect is larger for steeper relations between SFR and molecular gas. There is a general trend for all slope values to tend to {approx}unity for region sizes larger than 1-2 kpc, irrespective of the input SFR-cloud relation. The region size of 1-2 kpc corresponds to the area where the cloud mass function becomes fully sampled. We quantify the effects of selection biases in data tracing the SFR, either as thresholds (i.e., clouds smaller than a given mass value do not form stars) or as backgrounds (e.g., diffuse emission unrelated to current star formation is counted toward the SFR). Apparently discordant observational results are brought into agreement via this simple model, and the comparison of our simulations with data for a few galaxies supports a steep (>1) power-law index between SFR and molecular gas.« less

  5. [Acute periproctal abscesses].

    PubMed

    Slauf, P; Antoš, F; Marx, J

    2014-04-01

    Periproctal inflammations related to the anus are characterized by the rapid spread of the infection to the surrounding tissue, which is determined by the anatomical characteristics and infectious agents. Inflammation, which starts as a phlegmon, quickly forms boundaries and an abscess develops in most cases. Up to 80-90% of anorectal abscesses develop according to the crypto-glandular theory on the basis of infection of the anal glands, spilling into the Morgagni crypts in the anal canal. Up to two-thirds of such abscesses are associated with the emergence of anorectal fistulas. Anorectal abscesses can be divided into marginal and subcutaneous perianal abscesses, submucosal, intersphincteric, ischiorectal and supralevator abscesses. Their diagnosis is based on thorough physical examination, sometimes also with the help of imaging methods such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and endoanal ultrasound. What is decisive for the successful treatment of anorectal abscessess is their early and adequate surgical drainage. Adjuvant antibiotic therapy is necessary only when the overall signs of sepsis are present and for patients with a comorbidity such as diabetes, valvular heart disease, or immunodeficiency.

  6. Retroperitoneal abscess shortly after chemotherapy for lung cancer: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Gen; Kondo, Tadashi; Kagohashi, Katsunori; Watanabe, Hiroko; Kawaguchi, Mio; Kurishima, Koichi; Satoh, Hiroaki; Hizawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-03-01

    To the best of our knowledge, the formation of a retroperitoneal abscess due to acute appendicitis shortly after administration of chemotherapy for lung cancer has not been previously reported. This is the case report of a 59-year-old male who was admitted to the Mito Medical Center (Mito, Japan) and diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma with pleuritis carcinomatosis. Although no distant metastasis was identified, combination chemotherapy with cisplatin and pemetrexed was administered. Nine days after initiating chemotherapy, the patient developed right lower quadrant abdominal pain and high fever. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis revealed the collection of gas and fluid in the retroperitoneum adjacent to the cecum. The abscess was locally drained; however, the infection continued to spread, with subsequent development of a scrotal abscess. Consequently, appendectomy was performed. The patient recovered well and the lung adenocarcinoma was treated with additional courses of chemotherapy following the remission of the local inflammation. Retroperitoneal abscess due to acute appendicitis is an unusual finding; however, this rare complication should be considered during or shortly after chemotherapy in patients with lung cancer.

  7. Scaling Relations between Gas and Star Formation in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigiel, Frank; Leroy, Adam; Walter, Fabian

    2011-04-01

    High resolution, multi-wavelength maps of a sizeable set of nearby galaxies have made it possible to study how the surface densities of H i, H2 and star formation rate (ΣHI, ΣH2, ΣSFR) relate on scales of a few hundred parsecs. At these scales, individual galaxy disks are comfortably resolved, making it possible to assess gas-SFR relations with respect to environment within galaxies. ΣH2, traced by CO intensity, shows a strong correlation with ΣSFR and the ratio between these two quantities, the molecular gas depletion time, appears to be constant at about 2 Gyr in large spiral galaxies. Within the star-forming disks of galaxies, ΣSFR shows almost no correlation with ΣHI. In the outer parts of galaxies, however, ΣSFR does scale with ΣHI, though with large scatter. Combining data from these different environments yields a distribution with multiple regimes in Σgas - ΣSFR space. If the underlying assumptions to convert observables to physical quantities are matched, even combined datasets based on different SFR tracers, methodologies and spatial scales occupy a well define locus in Σgas - ΣSFR space.

  8. Surfactant process for promoting gas hydrate formation and application of the same

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Rudy E.; Zhong, Yu

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of storing gas using gas hydrates comprising forming gas hydrates in the presence of a water-surfactant solution that comprises water and surfactant. The addition of minor amounts of surfactant increases the gas hydrate formation rate, increases packing density of the solid hydrate mass and simplifies the formation-storage-decomposition process of gas hydrates. The minor amounts of surfactant also enhance the potential of gas hydrates for industrial storage applications.

  9. Gas, Stars, and Star Formation in Alfalfa Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Neff, Susan G.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and Hi components of 229 low H i mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H i masses <10(sup 7.7) solar mass and Hi line widths <80 kilometers per second. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data are combined with photometric properties derived from Galaxy Evolution Explorer to derive stellar masses (M*) and star formation rates (SFRs) by fitting their UV-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In optical images, many of the ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M* obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M* approximately less than10(exp 8)M(sub 0) is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper Hi mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M* than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H i depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that Hi disks are more extended than stellar ones.

  10. GAS, STARS, AND STAR FORMATION IN ALFALFA DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo

    2012-06-15

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and H I components of 229 low H I mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H I masses <10{sup 7.7} M{sub Sun} and H I line widths <80 km s{sup -1}. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data are combined with photometric properties derived from Galaxy Evolution Explorer to derive stellar masses (M{sub *}) and star formation rates (SFRs) by fitting their UV-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In optical images, many of the ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; onlymore » 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M{sub *} obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M{sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper H I mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M{sub *} than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H I depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that H I disks are more extended than stellar ones.« less

  11. Comparison Simulations of Gas Giant Planet Formation via Disk Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickett, Megan K.; Cai, K.; Durisen, R.; Milne, M.

    2011-01-01

    There has been disagreement about whether cooling in protoplanetary disks can be sufficiently fast to induce the formation of gas giant protoplanets via gravitational instabilities. Simulations by our own group and others indicate that this method of planet formation does not work for disks around young, low-mass stars inside several tens of AU, while simulations by other groups show fragmentation into protoplanetary clumps in this region. To allow direct comparison in hopes of isolating the cause of the differences, we here present a comparison high-resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulation of a protoplanetary disk,using an improved version of one of our own radiative schemes. We find that the disk does not fragment in our code but instead quickly settles into a state with only low amplitude nonaxisymmetric structure, which persists for at least several outer disk rotations. Further, we see no rapid radiative or convective cooling.

  12. Crizotinib-induced Rectal Perforation with Abscess.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Asako; Hayama, Noriko; Amano, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Makoto; Hirano, Satoshi; Nakamura, Sukeyuki; Tabeta, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    An 86-year-old Japanese man was diagnosed with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma. The patient was treated with crizotinib after echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement was detected from his pleural effusion. He subsequently developed abdominal pain and rebound tenderness in the right lower abdomen. Contrast-enhanced abdominal CT showed a low-density area in the abdominal cavity. The size of the abscess was decreased by drainage and the administration of antibiotics. Fistulography revealed a fistula from the rectum to the abscess, and a diagnosis of lower intestinal tract perforation with abscess formation was made. Crizotinib was discontinued and treatment with alectinib was initiated. The patient remains under treatment as an outpatient at our department without adverse effects.

  13. Crizotinib-induced Rectal Perforation with Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, Asako; Hayama, Noriko; Amano, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Makoto; Hirano, Satoshi; Nakamura, Sukeyuki; Tabeta, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    An 86-year-old Japanese man was diagnosed with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma. The patient was treated with crizotinib after echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement was detected from his pleural effusion. He subsequently developed abdominal pain and rebound tenderness in the right lower abdomen. Contrast-enhanced abdominal CT showed a low-density area in the abdominal cavity. The size of the abscess was decreased by drainage and the administration of antibiotics. Fistulography revealed a fistula from the rectum to the abscess, and a diagnosis of lower intestinal tract perforation with abscess formation was made. Crizotinib was discontinued and treatment with alectinib was initiated. The patient remains under treatment as an outpatient at our department without adverse effects. PMID:29021430

  14. Project ARGO: Gas phase formation in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Michael R.; Waligora, James M.; Norfleet, William T.; Kumar, K. Vasantha

    1993-01-01

    The ARGO study investigated the reduced incidence of joint pain decompression sickness (DCS) encountered in microgravity as compared with an expected incidence of joint pain DCS experienced by test subjects in Earth-based laboratories (unit gravity) with similar protocols. Individuals who are decompressed from saturated conditions usually acquire joint pain DCS in the lower extremities. Our hypothesis is that the incidence of joint pain DCS can be limited by a significant reduction in the tissue gas micronuclei formed by stress-assisted nucleation. Reductions in dynamic and kinetic stresses in vivo are linked to hypokinetic and adynamic conditions of individuals in zero g. We employed the Doppler ultrasound bubble detection technique in simulated microgravity studies to determine quantitatively the degree of gas phase formation in the upper and lower extremities of test subjects during decompression. We found no evidence of right-to-left shunting through pulmonary vasculature. The volume of gas bubble following decompression was examined and compared with the number following saline contrast injection. From this, we predict a reduced incidence of DCS on orbit, although the incidence of predicted mild DCS still remains larger than that encountered on orbit.

  15. Neisseria gonorrhoeae paravertebral abscess.

    PubMed

    Low, Sharon Y Y; Ong, Catherine W M; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Tambyah, Paul Ananth; Yeo, Tseng Tsai

    2012-07-01

    The authors present the case of an isolated gonococcal paravertebral abscess with an epidural component in a 42-year-old man. A primary epidural abscess of the spine is a rare condition and is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus. In this report, the authors present their therapeutic decisions and review the relevant literature on disseminated gonococcal infection in a patient presenting with an epidural abscess. A 42-year-old Indonesian man was admitted with symptoms of neck and upper back pain and bilateral lower-limb weakness. Clinical examination was unremarkable apart from tenderness over the lower cervical spine. Postgadolinium T1-weighted MRI of the cervical and thoracic spine demonstrated an enhancing lesion in the right paraspinal and epidural soft tissue at C-6 to T1-2, in keeping with a spinal epidural abscess. The patient underwent laminectomy of C-7 and T-1 with abscess drainage. Tissue cultures subsequently grew Neisseria gonorrhoeae that was resistant to quinolones by genotyping. Upon further questioning, the patient admitted to unprotected sexual intercourse with commercial sex workers. Further investigations showed that he was negative for other sexually transmitted infections. Postoperatively, he received a course of beta-lactam antibiotics with good recovery. Clinicians should be aware of this unusual disseminated gonococcal infection manifested in any patient with the relevant risk factors.

  16. [Abscess of the spleen].

    PubMed

    Grubor, Nikica; Colović, Radoje; Colović, Natasa; Radak, Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    Splenic abscess is a rare disease but with increasing frequency. The authors present 9 patients with splenic abscess treated at the Institute of Digestive System Diseases, Clinical Centre of Serbia, in a period from January 1, 1986 to May 15, 2004. Splenic abscess was the complication of septic endocarditis in 4, trauma in 2, dental infection in 1, while in 2 cases it was the complication of chemotherapy in myeloproliferative disorders. All 9 patients had fever, 7 - abdominal pain, 4 - left shoulder pain, and 1 patient had nausea and vomiting. Higher white blood count was found in 6 patients, pleural effusion in 4, elevated left hemidiaphragm in 1 and basal pneumonia in 1 patient as well. Ultrasonography and CT were the most reliable diagnostic procedures. CT was superior in diagnosis of multiple small abscesses. Culture of the pus recovered the Enterococcus in 3 cases, Streptococcus a hemolyticus in 1, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans in 1, Staphylococcus aureus, E. Coil and Candida albicans in 1, Staphylococcus aureus i Salmonella enteritidis in 1 case. Eight patients underwent splenectomy and 1 was cured by combined antibiotics in high doses. One patient died postoperatively due to septic endocarditis that had been present before surgery. The authors believe that splenectomy and antibiotics administered according to drug susceptibility test as well as management of underlying disease are the method of choice for splenic abscess treatment. Conservative antibiotic treatment is indicated in selected cases only.

  17. Lingual abscesses in three dogs.

    PubMed

    von Doernberg, M C; Peeters, M E; ter Haar, G; Kirpensteijn, J

    2008-08-01

    Lingual abscessation is a rare condition in dogs. Very little information is available on the diagnosis and treatment of lingual abscesses in the major surgical textbooks and current veterinary literature. The common clinical signs of lingual abscesses are macroglossia, hypersalivation and a reluctance to open the mouth, but these can vary depending on the time course of the disease and the location of the abscess. This article presents three cases of tongue abscess in the dog outlining treatment and outcomes. A thorough diagnostic work up, consisting of anamnesis, clinical and haematological examinations, oral inspection under sedation and the use of diagnostic imaging techniques should be mandatory before surgical exploration of the abscess. Surgery is followed by drainage and systemic antibiotics, complemented by systemic fluid support and pain management. Conservative management of lingual abscesses can be fatal. Sharp trauma from an unknown object is suspected to be the underlying cause for the abscesses in the present cases.

  18. Post-menopausal breast abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Raju, G. C.; Naraynsingh, V.; Jankey, N.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty post-menopausal women with breast abscess were treated at Port of Spain General Hospital, Trinidad, between 1976 and 1980. In this age group, breast abscess can be confused with cancer due to a lack of inflammatory features. History and physical examination are often not helpful in differentiating an abscess from carcinoma. Although the usual treatment of an abscess is incision and drainage, in post-menopausal women, excision of the lesion is helpful for accurate histological diagnosis. PMID:3628144

  19. Multifocal Renal Fungal Abscesses.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eric Y; Kaplan, Joshua R; Mamone, Linda; Mydlo, Jack H; Reese, Adam C

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of multiple fungal renal abscesses in a 36-year-old woman with a history of diabetes and intravenous substance use disorder. The patient presented with fever and hematuria, and was found to be bacteremic and fungemic. She was initially managed with broad-spectrum antibiotics and antifungals. She remained febrile and imaging on treatment day 14 showed no improvement of the renal abscesses. Thus, a nephrectomy was performed, after which the patient defervesced and follow-up blood cultures were negative. There is a paucity of literature regarding management of multifocal fungal renal abscesses that fail to respond to medical management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR FORMATION IN NEARBY DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, Adam K.; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Walter, Fabian

    2013-08-01

    We compare molecular gas traced by {sup 12}CO (2-1) maps from the HERACLES survey, with tracers of the recent star formation rate (SFR) across 30 nearby disk galaxies. We demonstrate a first-order linear correspondence between {Sigma}{sub mol} and {Sigma}{sub SFR} but also find important second-order systematic variations in the apparent molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol}={Sigma}{sub mol}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}. At the 1 kpc common resolution of HERACLES, CO emission correlates closely with many tracers of the recent SFR. Weighting each line of sight equally, using a fixed {alpha}{sub CO} equivalent to the Milky Way value, our data yield a molecularmore » gas depletion time, {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol}={Sigma}{sub mol}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}{approx}2.2 Gyr with 0.3 dex 1{sigma} scatter, in very good agreement with recent literature data. We apply a forward-modeling approach to constrain the power-law index, N, that relates the SFR surface density and the molecular gas surface density, {Sigma}{sub SFR}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub mol}{sup N}. We find N = 1 {+-} 0.15 for our full data set with some scatter from galaxy to galaxy. This also agrees with recent work, but we caution that a power-law treatment oversimplifies the topic given that we observe correlations between {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} and other local and global quantities. The strongest of these are a decreased {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} in low-mass, low-metallicity galaxies and a correlation of the kpc-scale {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} with dust-to-gas ratio, D/G. These correlations can be explained by a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor ({alpha}{sub CO}) that depends on dust shielding, and thus D/G, in the theoretically expected way. This is not a unique interpretation, but external evidence of conversion factor variations makes this the most conservative explanation of the strongest observed {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} trends. After applying a D/G-dependent {alpha}{sub CO}, some weak correlations between {tau

  1. Brain abscess in children.

    PubMed

    Atiq, Mehnaz; Ahmed, Umair Syed; Allana, Salman Saleem; Chishti, Khalid N

    2006-05-01

    Brain abscess is a serious life-threatening complication of several diseases. The objective of this study was to look at the clinical profile of patients, predisposing conditions, microbiology and outcome of children suffering from brain abscess. Thirty children aged less than 15 years were reviewed. There were 15 males and 15 females. The mean age of presentation was 5.6+/-4.4 years. The duration of illness at the time of admission was 17.6+/-24.6 days. Typically patients presented with fever, vomiting, headache and seizures. The predisposing conditions found were cyanotic congenital heart disease in 11 (37%) of children, meningitis in 6 (20%), septicemia in 7 (23%) and no underlying cause was found in 5 (17%) children. The most common microbe in children with cyanotic congenital heart disease was of the Streptococcus milleri group (52%). Computerized tomography confirmed the diagnosis and the most common location of the abscess was the parietal lobe of the cerebral hemisphere. All abscesses were large, more than 2 cm in diameter and were aspirated surgically. Excision was performed in 6 children. Five children expired, one due to a intracranial bleeding and the others due to severe cerebral edema and tentorial herniation. Complications were seen in 20 children and 16 had sequelae, hemiparesis in 11 and seizure disorder in 5. Brain abscess is a serious infection with poor outcome if diagnosed late. Delayed surgical drainage has high morbidity and mortality. The threshold for diagnosis should be low, particularly in children with a predisposing condition like cyanotic congenital heart disease.

  2. Inhomogeneous Oxygen Vacancy Distribution in Semiconductor Gas Sensors: Formation, Migration and Determination on Gas Sensing Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianqiao; Gao, Yinglin; Wu, Xu; Jin, Guohua; Zhai, Zhaoxia; Liu, Huan

    2017-01-01

    The density of oxygen vacancies in semiconductor gas sensors was often assumed to be identical throughout the grain in the numerical discussion of the gas-sensing mechanism of the devices. In contrast, the actual devices had grains with inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen vacancy under non-ideal conditions. This conflict between reality and discussion drove us to study the formation and migration of the oxygen defects in semiconductor grains. A model of the gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy was proposed based on the effects of cooling rate and re-annealing on semiconductive thin films. The model established the diffusion equations of oxygen vacancy according to the defect kinetics of diffusion and exclusion. We described that the steady-state and transient-state oxygen vacancy distributions, which were used to calculate the gas-sensing characteristics of the sensor resistance and response to reducing gases under two different conditions. The gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy model had the applications in simulating the sensor performances, such as the power law, the grain size effect and the effect of depletion layer width. PMID:28796167

  3. Inhomogeneous Oxygen Vacancy Distribution in Semiconductor Gas Sensors: Formation, Migration and Determination on Gas Sensing Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianqiao; Gao, Yinglin; Wu, Xu; Jin, Guohua; Zhai, Zhaoxia; Liu, Huan

    2017-08-10

    The density of oxygen vacancies in semiconductor gas sensors was often assumed to be identical throughout the grain in the numerical discussion of the gas-sensing mechanism of the devices. In contrast, the actual devices had grains with inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen vacancy under non-ideal conditions. This conflict between reality and discussion drove us to study the formation and migration of the oxygen defects in semiconductor grains. A model of the gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy was proposed based on the effects of cooling rate and re-annealing on semiconductive thin films. The model established the diffusion equations of oxygen vacancy according to the defect kinetics of diffusion and exclusion. We described that the steady-state and transient-state oxygen vacancy distributions, which were used to calculate the gas-sensing characteristics of the sensor resistance and response to reducing gases under two different conditions. The gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy model had the applications in simulating the sensor performances, such as the power law, the grain size effect and the effect of depletion layer width.

  4. Brucellar breast abscess.

    PubMed

    Erdem, G; Karakas, H M; Yetkin, F; Alkan, A; Firat, A K; Kahraman, B

    2006-08-01

    Brucellosis is an endemic disease seen in many countries. It may affect different organ systems. Brucellar breast abscess is a rare entity. We report the radiological findings of breast abscess due to brucella. A 63-year-old female was investigated with mammography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). A mass measuring 25 x 20 x 15 mm was detected in the left breast on mammography and ultrasonography. The mass was homogenously hyperintense on T1- and T2-weighted MRI images. On contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, peripheral capsular enhancement was found. MR spectroscopic analysis of the mass revealed elevated lipid and acetate peaks. The diagnosis was provided by fine needle aspiration biopsy and specimen culture. The lesion had diminished in size after 12 months' treatment with combined tetracycline and rifampicine.

  5. [Multiple actinomycosis brain abscesses].

    PubMed

    Liotier, J; Venet, C; Chambonnière, M-L; Fournier, C; Fotso, M-J; Ewencsyk, I; Barral, F-G; Carricajo, A; Robert, F; Lucht, F; Mosnier, J-F; Zéni, F

    2004-03-13

    Actinomycosis is a subacute or chronic bacterial infection, which can affect immunocompetent or immunodeficient subjects. It most often occurs in cervico-facial or thoracic-abdominal locations. Central nervous system infection is rare but of severe prognosis. A 56 year-old woman with no history of immunodepression was admitted with unexplained fever, inappropriate behaviour, and spatial and temporal disorientation. The progressive worsening of the neurological signs let to coma and mechanical ventilation was required. Brain imaging showed multilocation cerebral abscesses. Stereotaxial biopsy permitted diagnosis of actinomycosis. Patient's outcome was favourable following appropriate dual antibiotherapy without surgical exeresis. When lacking bacteriologic identification, diagnosis of cerebral actinomycosis is performed by pathologic findings. Dual antibiotherapy allows full recover, even in the case of multilocation cerebral abscesses.

  6. Tubercular thyroid abscess

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Awanish; Pahwa, Harvinder Singh; Srivastava, Rohit; Khan, Khursheed Alam

    2013-01-01

    We encountered a patient who presented with neck swelling, difficulty in swallowing, voice change along with systemic features such as evening rise of temperature, chronic cough and weight loss. Ultrasonography of the thyroid gland revealed two cystic swellings. An ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology was suggestive of tubercular abscess. The patient responded well to antigravity aspiration of the swellings and antitubercular treatment. PMID:23814203

  7. Pediatric pyogenic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Israeli, Rafi; Jule, Jose Ernesto; Hom, Jeffrey

    2009-02-01

    Pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) is a rare pediatric disease. Typically, PLA is found in adults with biliary disease. There are no typical physical findings or symptoms. Often, pathogenic organisms are not recovered for identification. This case illustrates a teenager presenting with prolonged episodes of fever and vomiting. With percutaneous drainage and month-long antibiotic therapy, the PLA resolved. This case illustrates that a high index of suspicion is needed for diagnosis.

  8. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P K; Mahapatra, A K; Gaind, R; Bhandari, S; Musa, M M; Lad, S D

    2001-07-01

    Spinal abscess due to Aspergillus is rare. A young boy with chronic granulomatous disease and aspergillosis of the rib had been treated with antifungal treatment 3 months earlier. The patient presented with a brief history of progressive paraparesis. Imaging showed D9--11 vertebral involvement and destruction of the D10 vertebral body with angulation and a large dorsally placed, multiloculated epidural abscess extending from D6 to L2. There was also extensive granulation anterior to and on either side of the vertebrae. The patient underwent extensive laminectomy and decompression of all the loculi and partial removal of the granulation tissue. Aggressive medical treatment was started. The authors recommend an aggressive surgical and medical approach in such cases of disseminated invasive aspergillosis, even though the result may not be very satisfactory. This report discusses the full clinical profile and management of Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess and emphasizes the need to follow up these cases to detect recurrence and new lesions, even if the patients are on adequate medical treatment. In spite of all efforts, high morbidity and mortality is common in such patients. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Modeling of Hydrate Formation Mode in Raw Natural Gas Air Coolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherbinin, S. V.; Prakhova, M. Yu; Krasnov, A. N.; Khoroshavina, E. A.

    2018-05-01

    Air cooling units (ACU) are used at all the gas fields for cooling natural gas after compressing. When using ACUs on raw (wet) gas in a low temperature condition, there is a danger of hydrate plug formation in the heat exchanging tubes of the ACU. To predict possible hydrate formation, a mathematical model of the air cooler thermal behavior used in the control system shall adequately calculate not only gas temperature at the cooler's outlet, but also a dew point value, a temperature at which condensation, as well as the gas hydrate formation point, onsets. This paper proposes a mathematical model allowing one to determine the pressure in the air cooler which makes hydrate formation for a given gas composition possible.

  10. MICA*A4 protects against ulcerative colitis, whereas MICA*A5.1 is associated with abscess formation and age of onset.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Chamorro, A; Moreno, A; Gómez-García, M; Cabello, M J; Martin, J; Lopez-Nevot, M Á

    2016-06-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is one of the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease, the aetiology of which remains unknown. Several studies have demonstrated the genetic basis of disease, identifying more than 130 susceptibility loci. The major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) is a useful candidate to be involved in UC pathogenesis, because it could be important in recognizing the integrity of the epithelial cell and its response to stress. The aim of this study was to analyse the relationship between polymorphisms in the transmembrane domain of MICA and susceptibility to develop UC. A total of 340 patients with UC and 636 healthy controls were genotyped for MICA transmembrane polymorphism using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) combined with fluorescent technology. Different MICA alleles were determined depending on the PCR product size. The allele MICA*A4 was less frequent in patients than in controls (P = 0·003; OR = 0·643), and this protective role is higher when it forms haplotype with B*27 (P = 0·002; OR = 0·294). The haplotype HLA-B*52/MICA*A6 was also associated with UC [P = 0·001; odds ratio (OR) = 2·914]. No other alleles, genotypes or haplotypes were related with UC risk. Moreover, MICA*A5.1 is associated independently with abscesses (P = 0·002; OR = 3·096) and its frequency is lower in patients diagnosed between ages 17 and 40 years (P = 0·007; OR = 0·633), meaning an extreme age on onset. No association with location, extra-intestinal manifestations or need for surgery was found. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  11. Distinguishing the Source of Natural Gas Accumulations with a Combined Gas and Co-produced Formation Water Geochemical Approach: a Case Study from the Appalachian Basin

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this study is to discuss the use of gas and co-produced formation water geochemistry for identifying the source of natural gas and present gas geochemistry for the northern Appalachian Basin.

  12. Thyroidal abscesses in third and fourth branchial anomalies: not only a paediatric diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kruijff, Schelto; Sywak, Mark S; Sidhu, Stan B; Shun, Albert; Novakovic, Daniel; Lee, James C; Delbridge, Leigh W

    2015-01-01

    Acute suppurative thyroiditis and recurrent abscess formation due to third and fourth branchial anomalies typically present in children. However, thyroid abscesses in branchial anomalies may occur in adulthood as well. Failure to recognize and delayed drainage of a neck abscess may lead to a fulminant life-threatening outcome. This is a retrospective case series. The study group comprised all patients presenting over a 12-month period from January to December 2012 with thyroid abscesses and a branchial cleft anomaly in two centres, one adult and the other paediatric. Patient demographics, clinical presentation, imaging, surgical management, definitive histology and outcomes were documented. Five patients were identified with a history of thyroid abscesses. Only one was a child (aged 9 years) with the other four being adults (aged 20, 34, 37 and 41 years). All patients had third or fourth left branchial cleft anomalies, presenting as suppurative thyroiditis with a left-sided thyroid abscess. Management options ranged from abscess drainage on initial presentation, primary thyroid lobectomy or delayed thyroid lobectomy following abscess drainage. Acute suppurative thyroidits and thyroid abscesses is not just a paediatric diagnosis but may present at any age. In both children and adults, a thyroid abscess almost always arises from branchial cleft anomalies. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  13. Flexible LNG supply, storage and price formation in a global natural gas market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Mark Hanley

    The body of work included in this dissertation explores the interaction of the growing, flexible liquefied natural gas (LNG) trade with the fundamentals of pipeline gas supply, gas storage, and gas consumption. By nature of its uses---largely for residential heating and electric power generation---the consumption of natural gas is highly variable both seasonally and on less predictable daily and weekly timescales. Flexible LNG trade will interconnect previously isolated regional gas markets, each with non-correlated variability in gas demand, differing gas storage costs, and heterogeneous institutional structures. The dissertation employs a series of analytical models to address key issues that will affect the expansion of the LNG trade and the implications for gas prices, investment and energy policy. First, I employ an optimization model to evaluate the fundamentals of seasonal LNG swing between markets with non-correlated gas demand (the U.S. and Europe). The model provides insights about the interaction of LNG trade with gas storage and price formation in interconnected regional markets. I then explore how random (stochastic) variability in gas demand will drive spot cargo movements and covariation in regional gas prices. Finally, I analyze the different institutional structures of the gas markets in the U.S. and Europe and consider how managed gas markets in Europe---without a competitive wholesale gas market---may effectively "export" supply and price volatility to countries with more competitive gas markets, such as the U.S.

  14. Formation of chlorinated lipids post-chlorine gas exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ford, David A.; Honavar, Jaideep; Albert, Carolyn J.; Duerr, Mark A.; Oh, Joo Yeun; Doran, Stephen; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to chlorine (Cl2) gas can occur during accidents and intentional release scenarios. However, biomarkers that specifically indicate Cl2 exposure and Cl2-derived products that mediate postexposure toxicity remain unclear. We hypothesized that chlorinated lipids (Cl-lipids) formed by direct reactions between Cl2 gas and plasmalogens serve as both biomarkers and mediators of post-Cl2 gas exposure toxicities. The 2-chloropalmitaldehyde (2-Cl-Pald), 2-chlorostearaldehyde (2-Cl-Sald), and their oxidized products, free- and esterified 2-chloropalmitic acid (2-Cl-PA) and 2-chlorostearic acid were detected in the lungs and plasma of mouse and rat models of Cl2 gas exposure. Levels of Cl-lipids were highest immediately post-Cl2 gas exposure, and then declined over 72 h with levels remaining 20- to 30-fold higher at 24 h compared with baseline. Glutathione adducts of 2-Cl-Pald and 2-Cl-Sald also increased with levels peaking at 4 h in plasma. Notably, 3-chlorotyrosine also increased after Cl2 gas exposure, but returned to baseline within 24 h. Intranasal administration of 2-Cl-PA or 2-Cl-Pald at doses similar to those formed in the lung after Cl2 gas exposure led to increased distal lung permeability and inflammation and systemic endothelial dysfunction characterized by loss of eNOS-dependent vasodilation. These data suggest that Cl-lipids could serve as biomarkers and mediators for Cl2 gas exposure and toxicity. PMID:27324796

  15. Curvularia brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Gadgil, Nisha; Kupferman, Michael; Smitherman, Sheila; Fuller, Gregory N; Rao, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Curvularia is a ubiquitous dematiaceous fungus that is a very rare but often fatal cause of infection in the central nervous system (CNS). In this report, we describe a patient with chronic sinusitis who presented with a Curvularia abscess of the skull base extending into the left frontal lobe. She was successfully treated with aggressive surgical resection and antibiotic therapy. In the published literature, this patient to our knowledge represents the longest period of disease-free follow-up in those afflicted with CNS Curvularia infection, indicating the importance of proper diagnosis and aggressive surgical debridement for a successful outcome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of surfactants on gas-hydrate formation' kinetics in water-oil emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemenkov, Yu D.; Shirshova, A. V.; Arinstein, E. A.; Shuvaev, A. N.

    2018-05-01

    The kinetics of gas hydrate formation of propane in a water-oil emulsion is experimentally studied when three types of surfactants (SAA (surface acting agent)) - anionic type emulsifiers - are added to the aqueous phase. It is shown that all three types of surfactants decelerate the growth of the gas-hydrate in the emulsion and can be considered as anti-agglutinating and kinetic low-dose inhibitors. The most effective inhibitor of hydrate formation in water-oil emulsion of SV-102 surfactant was revealed. For comparison, experimental studies of gas-hydrate formation under the same conditions for bulk water have been carried out. It is shown that in bulk water, all the surfactants investigated act as promoters (accelerators) of hydrate formation. A qualitative explanation of the action mechanisms of emulsifiers in the process of gas-hydrate formation in water-oil emulsion is given.

  17. Gas bubble formation in the cytoplasm of a fermenting yeast.

    PubMed

    Swart, Chantel W; Dithebe, Khumisho; Pohl, Carolina H; Swart, Hendrik C; Coetsee, Elizabeth; van Wyk, Pieter W J; Swarts, Jannie C; Lodolo, Elizabeth J; Kock, Johan L F

    2012-11-01

    Current paradigms assume that gas bubbles cannot be formed within yeasts although these workhorses of the baking and brewing industries vigorously produce and release CO(2) gas. We show that yeasts produce gas bubbles that fill a significant part of the cell. The missing link between intracellular CO(2) production by glycolysis and eventual CO(2) release from cells has therefore been resolved. Yeasts may serve as model to study CO(2) behavior under pressurized conditions that may impact on fermentation biotechnology. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of Nanoscale Gas Transport in Shale Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, D.; Li, X.

    2017-12-01

    Non-Darcy flow behavior can be commonly observed in nano-sized pores of matrix. Most existing gas flow models characterize non-Darcy flow by empirical or semi-empirical methods without considering the real gas effect. In this paper, a novel layered model with physical meanings is proposed for both ideal and real gas transports in nanopores. It can be further coupled with hydraulic fracturing models and consequently benefit the storage evaluation and production prediction for shale gas recovery. It is hypothesized that a nanotube can be divided into a central circular zone where the viscous flow behavior mainly exists due to dominant intermolecular collisions and an outer annular zone where the Knudsen diffusion mainly exists because of dominant collisions between molecules and the wall. The flux is derived based on integration of two zones by applying the virtual boundary. Subsequently, the model is modified by incorporating slip effect, real gas effect, porosity distribution, and tortuosity. Meanwhile, a multi-objective optimization method (MOP) is applied to assist the validation of analytical model to search fitting parameters which are highly localized and contain significant uncertainties. The apparent permeability is finally derived and analyzed with various impact factors. The developed nanoscale gas transport model is well validated by the flux data collected from both laboratory experiments and molecular simulations over the entire spectrum of flow regimes. It has a decrease of as much as 43.8% in total molar flux when the real gas effect is considered in the model. Such an effect is found to be more significant as pore size shrinks. Knudsen diffusion accounts for more than 60% of the total gas flux when pressure is lower than 0.2 MPa and pore size is smaller than 50 nm. Overall, the apparent permeability is found to decrease with pressure, though it rarely changes when pressure is higher than 5.0 MPa and pore size is larger than 50 nm.

  19. Formation of chlorinated lipids post-chlorine gas exposure.

    PubMed

    Ford, David A; Honavar, Jaideep; Albert, Carolyn J; Duerr, Mark A; Oh, Joo Yeun; Doran, Stephen; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to chlorine (Cl2) gas can occur during accidents and intentional release scenarios. However, biomarkers that specifically indicate Cl2 exposure and Cl2-derived products that mediate postexposure toxicity remain unclear. We hypothesized that chlorinated lipids (Cl-lipids) formed by direct reactions between Cl2 gas and plasmalogens serve as both biomarkers and mediators of post-Cl2 gas exposure toxicities. The 2-chloropalmitaldehyde (2-Cl-Pald), 2-chlorostearaldehyde (2-Cl-Sald), and their oxidized products, free- and esterified 2-chloropalmitic acid (2-Cl-PA) and 2-chlorostearic acid were detected in the lungs and plasma of mouse and rat models of Cl2 gas exposure. Levels of Cl-lipids were highest immediately post-Cl2 gas exposure, and then declined over 72 h with levels remaining 20- to 30-fold higher at 24 h compared with baseline. Glutathione adducts of 2-Cl-Pald and 2-Cl-Sald also increased with levels peaking at 4 h in plasma. Notably, 3-chlorotyrosine also increased after Cl2 gas exposure, but returned to baseline within 24 h. Intranasal administration of 2-Cl-PA or 2-Cl-Pald at doses similar to those formed in the lung after Cl2 gas exposure led to increased distal lung permeability and inflammation and systemic endothelial dysfunction characterized by loss of eNOS-dependent vasodilation. These data suggest that Cl-lipids could serve as biomarkers and mediators for Cl2 gas exposure and toxicity. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Penile abscess and necrotizing fasciitis secondary to neglected false penile fracture

    PubMed Central

    Al-Reshaid, Reshaid Abdullah; Madbouly, Khaled; Al-Jasser, Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    Penile infection and abscess formation have been described in association with priapism, cavernosography, intracavernosal injection therapy, trauma and penile prosthesis. We report a case of penile abscess and necrotizing fasciitis of penile skin in a 37-year-old male, presented 3 weeks after neglected false penile fracture. PMID:20882163

  1. A fundamental study of gas formation and migration during leakage of stored carbon dioxide in subsurface formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, T.; Plampin, M. R.; Lassen, R. N.; Pawar, R. J.; Komatsu, M.; Jensen, K. H.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2 has received significant attention as a potential method for reducing the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Potential risk of leakage of the stored CO2 to the shallow zones of the subsurface is one of the critical issues that is needed to be addressed to design effective field storage systems. If a leak occurs, gaseous CO2 reaching shallow zones of the subsurface can potentially impact the surface and groundwater sources and vegetation. With a goal of developing models that can predict these impacts, a research study is underway to improve our understanding of the fundamental processes of gas-phase formation and multi-phase flow dynamics during CO2 migration in shallow porous media. The approach involves conducting a series of highly controlled experiments in soil columns and tanks to study the effects of soil properties, temperature, pressure gradients and heterogeneities on gas formation and migration. This paper presents the results from a set of column studies. A 3.6m long column was instrumented with 16 soil moisture sensors, 15 of which were capable of measuring electrical conductivity (EC) and temperature, eight water pressure, and two gas pressure sensors. The column was filled with test sands with known hydraulic and retention characteristics with predetermined packing configurations. Deionized water saturated with CO2 under ~0.3 kPa (roughly the same as the hydrostatic pressure at the bottom of the column) was injected at the bottom of the column using a peristaltic pump. Water and gas outflow at the top of the column were monitored continuously. The results, in general, showed that 1) gas phase formation can be triggered by multiple factors such as water pressure drop, temperature rise, and heterogeneity, 2) transition to gas phase tends to occur rather within a short period of time, 3) gas phase fraction was as high as ~40% so that gas flow was not via individual bubble movement but two-phase flow, 4) water

  2. Maxillary Teeth Abscesses Result in Atypical Liver Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vritti; Vivekanandan, Renuga; Gorby, Gary

    2018-01-01

    Hepatic liver abscesses are often misdiagnosed on initial presentation because pyogenic liver lesions are a rare occurrence in the United States. This leads to a delay in proper treatment and results in increasing morbidity and mortality. Our case report demonstrates the atypical presentation of a hepatic liver abscess in the elderly. The source of infection was found to be periapical abscesses of the teeth, which subsequently seeded the portal blood stream of our patient. Our findings validate the potential hazard of Viridans streptococci and illustrate how untreated dental infections can serve as a reservoir for a systemic infection. PMID:29796365

  3. Measurements of gas hydrate formation probability distributions on a quasi-free water droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Nobuo

    2014-06-01

    A High Pressure Automated Lag Time Apparatus (HP-ALTA) can measure gas hydrate formation probability distributions from water in a glass sample cell. In an HP-ALTA gas hydrate formation originates near the edges of the sample cell and gas hydrate films subsequently grow across the water-guest gas interface. It would ideally be desirable to be able to measure gas hydrate formation probability distributions of a single water droplet or mist that is freely levitating in a guest gas, but this is technically challenging. The next best option is to let a water droplet sit on top of a denser, immiscible, inert, and wall-wetting hydrophobic liquid to avoid contact of a water droplet with the solid walls. Here we report the development of a second generation HP-ALTA which can measure gas hydrate formation probability distributions of a water droplet which sits on a perfluorocarbon oil in a container that is coated with 1H,1H,2H,2H-Perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane. It was found that the gas hydrate formation probability distributions of such a quasi-free water droplet were significantly lower than those of water in a glass sample cell.

  4. Gas hydrate formation in the deep sea: In situ experiments with controlled release of methane, natural gas, and carbon dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewer, P.G.; Orr, F.M.; Friederich, G.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Orange, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    We have utilized a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to initiate a program of research into gas hydrate formation in the deep sea by controlled release of hydrocarbon gases and liquid CO2 into natural sea water and marine sediments. Our objectives were to investigate the formation rates and growth patterns of gas hydrates in natural systems and to assess the geochemical stability of the reaction products over time. The novel experimental procedures used the carrying capacity, imaging capability, and control mechanisms of the ROV to transport gas cylinders to depth and to open valves selectively under desired P-T conditions to release the gas either into contained natural sea water or into sediments. In experiments in Monterey Bay, California, at 910 m depth and 3.9??C water temperature we find hydrate formation to be nearly instantaneous for a variety of gases. In sediments the pattern of hydrate formation is dependent on the pore size, with flooding of the pore spaces in a coarse sand yielding a hydrate cemented mass, and gas channeling in a fine-grained mud creating a veined hydrate structure. In experiments with liquid CO2 the released globules appeared to form a hydrate skin as they slowly rose in the apparatus. An initial attempt to leave the experimental material on the sea floor for an extended period was partially successful; we observed an apparent complete dissolution of the liquid CO2 mass, and an apparent consolidation of the CH4 hydrate, over a period of about 85 days.

  5. Nosocomial cutaneous abscesses in septic infants.

    PubMed

    Mandel, D; Littner, Y; Mimouni, F B; Dollberg, S

    2004-03-01

    To retrospectively study the epidemiology of nosocomial cutaneous abscesses in 46 consecutive septic infants. Ten infants had one abscess or more. Surviving infants with abscesses had a longer duration of bacteraemia, which disappeared within 24 hours of drainage. Infants with persistent bacteraemia should be examined regularly for the presence of abscesses.

  6. The Formation and Physical Origin of Highly Ionized Cooling Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoloi, Rongmon; Wagner, Alexander Y.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Norman, Colin A.

    2017-10-01

    We present a simple model that explains the origin of warm, diffuse gas seen primarily as highly ionized absorption-line systems in the spectra of background sources. We predict the observed column densities of several highly ionized transitions such as O VI, O vii, Ne viii, N v, and Mg x, and we present a unified comparison of the model predictions with absorption lines seen in the Milky Way disk, Milky Way halo, starburst galaxies, the circumgalactic medium, and the intergalactic medium at low and high redshifts. We show that diffuse gas seen in such diverse environments can be simultaneously explained by a simple model of radiatively cooling gas. We show that most such absorption-line systems are consistent with being collisionally ionized, and we estimate the maximum-likelihood temperature of the gas in each observation. This model satisfactorily explains why O VI is regularly observed around star-forming low-z L* galaxies, and why N v is rarely seen around the same galaxies. We further present some consequences of this model in quantifying the dynamics of the cooling gas around galaxies and predict the shock velocities associated with such flows. A unique strength of this model is that while it has only one free (but physically well-constrained) parameter, it nevertheless successfully reproduces the available data on O VI absorbers in the interstellar, circumgalactic, intragroup, and intergalactic media, as well as the available data on other absorption lines from highly ionized species.

  7. The Formation and Physical Origin of Highly Ionized Cooling Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bordoloi, Rongmon; Wagner, Alexander Y.; Heckman, Timothy M.

    We present a simple model that explains the origin of warm, diffuse gas seen primarily as highly ionized absorption-line systems in the spectra of background sources. We predict the observed column densities of several highly ionized transitions such as O vi, O vii, Ne viii, N v, and Mg x, and we present a unified comparison of the model predictions with absorption lines seen in the Milky Way disk, Milky Way halo, starburst galaxies, the circumgalactic medium, and the intergalactic medium at low and high redshifts. We show that diffuse gas seen in such diverse environments can be simultaneously explainedmore » by a simple model of radiatively cooling gas. We show that most such absorption-line systems are consistent with being collisionally ionized, and we estimate the maximum-likelihood temperature of the gas in each observation. This model satisfactorily explains why O vi is regularly observed around star-forming low- z L* galaxies, and why N v is rarely seen around the same galaxies. We further present some consequences of this model in quantifying the dynamics of the cooling gas around galaxies and predict the shock velocities associated with such flows. A unique strength of this model is that while it has only one free (but physically well-constrained) parameter, it nevertheless successfully reproduces the available data on O vi absorbers in the interstellar, circumgalactic, intragroup, and intergalactic media, as well as the available data on other absorption lines from highly ionized species.« less

  8. Supersonic gas streams enhance the formation of massive black holes in the early universe.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Shingo; Hosokawa, Takashi; Yoshida, Naoki; Kuiper, Rolf

    2017-09-29

    The origin of super-massive black holes in the early universe remains poorly understood. Gravitational collapse of a massive primordial gas cloud is a promising initial process, but theoretical studies have difficulty growing the black hole fast enough. We report numerical simulations of early black hole formation starting from realistic cosmological conditions. Supersonic gas motions left over from the Big Bang prevent early gas cloud formation until rapid gas condensation is triggered in a protogalactic halo. A protostar is formed in the dense, turbulent gas cloud, and it grows by sporadic mass accretion until it acquires 34,000 solar masses. The massive star ends its life with a catastrophic collapse to leave a black hole-a promising seed for the formation of a monstrous black hole. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  9. Pizza or Pancake? Formation Models of Gas Escape Biosignatures in Terrestrial and Martian Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorsi, R.; Fairen, A. G.; Baker, L.; McKay, C. P.; Willson, D.

    2016-05-01

    Fine-grained sedimentary hollowed structures were imaged in Gale Crater, but no biomarkers identified to support biology. Our observation-based (gas escape) terrestrial model could inform on possible martian paleoenvironments at time of formation.

  10. How Does Dense Molecular Gas Contribute to Star Formation in the Starburst Galaxy NGC 2146?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wofford, Alia

    2017-01-01

    The starburst galaxy NGC 2146 is believed to have been formed approximately 800 Myr ago, when two galaxies collided with each other possibly leading to a burst of star formation. NGC 2146 is known as a starburst galaxy for the high frequency of star formation going on in its molecular clouds. These clouds serve as nurseries for star formation to occur. Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) and Carbon monoxide (CO) are molecules found in molecular gas clouds. HCN molecules are tracers for high density star forming gas. Whereas, CO molecules are tracers for low density star forming gas. In this project, we are observing these two molecules and their proximity to where the stars are forming in the galaxy to determine if the star formation is occurring in the same area as the high and low density molecular gas areas in starburst galaxy NGC 2146.

  11. [Lung abscess: changes in treatment?].

    PubMed

    Clottu, E; Nicod, L P

    2015-11-18

    Lung abscess occurs in very pleomorphic according to germs initially involved. The mechanism commonly found is an aspiration of the oropharyngeal flora in patients with disorders of consciousness or swallowing. The infection is polymicrobial, with presence of anaerobic germs in 2/3 of the cases. The support consists of a prolonged antibiotic treatment, as well as anaerobic until resolution or stability of the radiological image. In case of prolonged toxic state, drainage of the abscess is to be discussed especially if there is no airways drainage. Surgical sanctions is rarely needed regardless of the size of the abscess, unless underlying carcinoma is present.

  12. [Nasal septal abscess].

    PubMed

    Barril, María F; Ferolla, Fausto M; José, Pablo; Echave, Cecilia; Tomezzoli, Silvana; Fiorini, Sandra; López, Eduardo Luis

    2008-12-01

    A nasal septal abscess (NA) is defined as a collection of pus between the cartilage or bony septum and its normally applied mucoperichondrium or mucoperiostium. It is an uncommon disease which should be suspected in a patient with acute onset of nasal obstruction and recent history of nasal trauma, periodontal infection or an inflammatory process of the rhinosinusal region. We report a case of an 8-year-old boy with bilateral NA caused by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MR-CO) in order to emphasize the importance of prompt diagnosis and adequate treatment to prevent the potentially dangerous spread of infection and the development of severe functional and cosmetic sequelae.

  13. An Introverted Starburst: Gas and SSC Formation in NGC 5253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, J. L.; Beck, S. C.

    2004-06-01

    High resolution Brackett line spectroscopy with the Keck Telescope reveals relatively narrow recombination lines toward the embedded young super star cluster nebula in NGC 5253. The gas within this nebula is almost certainly gravitationally bound by the massive and compact young star cluster.

  14. A method to predict equilibrium conditions of gas hydrate formation in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, M.A.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Bishnoi, P.R.

    1999-06-01

    In the petroleum industry, it is desirable to avoid the formation of gas hydrates. When gas hydrates form, they tend to agglomerate and block pipelines and process equipment. However, naturally occurring gas hydrates that form in the permafrost region or in deep oceans represent a vast untouched natural gas reserve. Although the exact amount of gas in the hydrate form is not known, it is believed to be comparable to the known amount of gas in the free state. Numerous methods for the recovery of natural gas from hydrate fields have been proposed. These techniques include thermal decomposition, depressurization, andmore » chemical injection. To fully exploit hydrate reserves, it will be necessary to know the decomposition/formation conditions of the gas hydrate in porous media. A predictive model has been developed to determine the incipient hydrate formation conditions in porous media. The only additional information that is needed to determine the incipient hydrate formation conditions is the pore radius, surface energy per unit area, and wetting angle. It was found that the model performed well in predicting the experimental data of Handa and Stupin.« less

  15. Gas formation and biological effects of biodegradable magnesium in a preclinical and clinical observation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang-Bok; Bode, Ken; Kwon, Tae-Young; Jeon, Moo Heon

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Magnesium alloys are biodegradable metals receiving increasing attention, but the clinical applications of these materials are delayed by concerns over the rapid corrosion rate and gas formation. Unlike corrosion, which weakens mechanical properties, the gas formation issue has received little attention. Therefore, we evaluated the gas formation and biological effects for Mg implants through preclinical (immersed in Earle’s balanced salt solution and in vivo) and clinical studies. The immersion test examined the gas volume and composition. The in vivo study also examined gas volume and histological analysis. The clinical study examined the gas volume and safety after Mg screw metatarsal fixation. Gas was mainly composed of H2, CO and CO2. Maximum volumes of gas formed after 5 days for in vivo and 7 days in clinical study. Within the clinical examination, two superficial wound complications healed with local wound care. Osteolytic lesions in the surrounding metaphysis of the Mg screw insertion developed in all cases and union occurred at 3 months. Mg implants released gas with variable volumes and composition (H2, CO, and CO2), with no long-term toxic effects on the surrounding tissue. The implants enabled bone healing, although complications of wound breakdown and osteolytic lesions developed. PMID:29707071

  16. Direct formation of supermassive black holes via multi-scale gas inflows in galaxy mergers.

    PubMed

    Mayer, L; Kazantzidis, S; Escala, A; Callegari, S

    2010-08-26

    Observations of distant quasars indicate that supermassive black holes of billions of solar masses already existed less than a billion years after the Big Bang. Models in which the 'seeds' of such black holes form by the collapse of primordial metal-free stars cannot explain the rapid appearance of these supermassive black holes because gas accretion is not sufficiently efficient. Alternatively, these black holes may form by direct collapse of gas within isolated protogalaxies, but current models require idealized conditions, such as metal-free gas, to prevent cooling and star formation from consuming the gas reservoir. Here we report simulations showing that mergers between massive protogalaxies naturally produce the conditions for direct collapse into a supermassive black hole with no need to suppress cooling and star formation. Merger-driven gas inflows give rise to an unstable, massive nuclear gas disk of a few billion solar masses, which funnels more than 10(8) solar masses of gas to a sub-parsec-scale gas cloud in only 100,000 years. The cloud undergoes gravitational collapse, which eventually leads to the formation of a massive black hole. The black hole can subsequently grow to a billion solar masses on timescales of about 10(8) years by accreting gas from the surrounding disk.

  17. Formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattice in UMo metal fuels: Phase-field modeling investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shenyang; Burkes, Douglas E.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2016-07-08

    Nano-gas bubble superlattices are often observed in irradiated UMo nuclear fuels. However, the for- mation mechanism of gas bubble superlattices is not well understood. A number of physical processes may affect the gas bubble nucleation and growth; hence, the morphology of gas bubble microstructures including size and spatial distributions. In this work, a phase-field model integrating a first-passage Monte Carlo method to investigate the formation mechanism of gas bubble superlattices was devel- oped. Six physical processes are taken into account in the model: 1) heterogeneous generation of gas atoms, vacancies, and interstitials informed from atomistic simulations; 2) one-dimensional (1-D) migration of interstitials; 3) irradiation-induced dissolution of gas atoms; 4) recombination between vacancies and interstitials; 5) elastic interaction; and 6) heterogeneous nucleation of gas bubbles. We found that the elastic interaction doesn’t cause the gas bubble alignment, and fast 1-D migration of interstitials alongmore » $$\\langle$$110$$\\rangle$$ directions in the body-centered cubic U matrix causes the gas bubble alignment along $$\\langle$$110$$\\rangle$$ directions. It implies that 1-D interstitial migration along [110] direction should be the primary mechanism of a fcc gas bubble superlattice which is observed in bcc UMo alloys. Simulations also show that fission rates, saturated gas concentration, and elastic interaction all affect the morphology of gas bubble microstructures.« less

  18. [Prostatic abscess: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Franco, A; Menéndez, V; Luque, M P; Ribal, M J; Mallafre, J M; Alcover, J; Vilana, R; Carretero, P

    1996-02-01

    Prostatic abscesses are an infrequent pathology, probably due to a better and early management of prostatic infections. Predisposing factors in this pathology are diabetes mellitus, urethral catheterism or manipulation, and immunodepressed states like AIDS. Nowadays, ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic method of this pathology, and serves as a guidance of directed drainage. We present five cases in which the size of the abscess was determining in relation to the therapeutic attitude. Abscesses of less than 2 cm, measured by transrectal ultrasonography, can be evacuated by directed puncture, followed by antibiotic treatment. When the diameter of the abscess is greater than 2 cm, we realize a perineal drainage with a catheter placed with transrectal ultrasonography. Currently, TUR and other methods seems to be overcome.

  19. Peritonsillar abscess: clinical aspects of microbiology, risk factors, and the association with parapharyngeal abscess.

    PubMed

    Klug, Tejs Ehlers

    2017-03-01

    transportation of appropriate specimens, choice of methodology for detection and quantification of microorganisms, current or recent antibiotic treatment of patients, potential shift in significant pathogens during the course of infection, and factors associated with increased risk of PTA development.  The trend towards de-escalated surgical intervention and increasing reliance on antibiotic treatment, require studies defining the significant pathogens in PTA in order to determine optimal antibiotic regimens. Complications secondary to PTA may be avoided or better controlled with improved knowledge concerning the significant pathogens in PTA. Furthermore, identification of pathogens other than GAS, may lead the way for earlier bacterial diagnosis and timely intervention before abscess formation in sore throat patients. The identification and quantification of risk factors for PTA development constitutes another approach to reduce the incidence of PTA. As clinicians, we noticed that FN was recovered from PTA patients with increasing frequency and that patients infected with Fusobacterium necrophorum (FN) seemed to be more severely affected than patients infected with other bacteria. Furthermore, we occationally observed concomitant PPA in addition to a PTA, which made us hypothesize that PPA and PTA is often closely related and may share significant pathogens. Hence, our aims were: 1. To explore the microbiology of PTA with a special attention to Fusobacterium necrophorum (FN). 2. To elucidate whether smoking, age, gender, and seasons are risk factors for the development of PTA. 3. To characterize patients with PPA, explore the relationship between PPA and PTA, identify the pathogens associated with PPA, and review our management of PPA. In a retrospective study on all 847 PTA patients admitted to the ENT department at Aarhus University Hospital (AUH) from 2001 to 2006, we found that FN was the most prevalent (23%) bacterial strain in pus specimens. FN-positive patients

  20. Potential for deep basin-centered gas accumulation in Travis Peak (Hosston) Formation, Gulf Coastal Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartberger, Charles E.; Dyman, Thaddeus S.; Condon, Steven M.

    2003-01-01

    The potential of Lower Cretaceous sandstones of the Travis Peak Formation in the northern Gulf Coast Basin to harbor a basin-centered gas accumulation was evaluated by examining (1) the depositional and diagenetic history and reservoir properties of Travis Peak sandstones, (2) the presence and quality of source rocks for generating gas, (3) the burial and thermal history of source rocks and time of gas generation and migration relative to tectonic development of Travis Peak traps, (4) gas and water recoveries from drill-stem and formation tests, (5) the distribution of abnormal pressures based on shut-in-pressure data, and (6) the presence or absence of gas-water contacts associated with gas accumulations in Travis Peak sandstones. The Travis Peak Formation (and correlative Hosston Formation) is a basinward-thickening wedge of terrigenous clastic sedimentary rocks that underlies the northern Gulf Coast Basin from eastern Texas across northern Louisiana to southern Mississippi. Clastic infl ux was focused in two main fl uvial-deltaic depocenters?one located in northeastern Texas and the other in southeastern Mississippi and northeastern Louisiana. Across the main hydrocarbon-productive trend in eastern Texas and northern Louisiana, the Travis Peak Formation is about 2,000 ft thick. Most Travis Peak hydrocarbon production in eastern Texas comes from drilling depths between 6,000 and 10,000 ft. Signifi cant decrease in porosity and permeability occurs through that depth interval. Above 8,000-ft drilling depth in eastern Texas, Travis Peak sandstone matrix permeabilities often are signifi cantly higher than the 0.1-millidarcy (mD) cutoff that characterizes tight-gas reservoirs. Below 8,000 ft, matrix permeability of Travis Peak sandstones is low because of pervasive quartz cementation, but abundant natural fractures impart signifi cant fracture permeability. Although pressure data within the middle and lower Travis Peak Formation are limited in eastern Texas

  1. Surfactants from the gas phase may promote cloud droplet formation.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Schwier, Allison N; Lathem, Terry L; Nenes, Athanasios; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-02-19

    Clouds, a key component of the climate system, form when water vapor condenses upon atmospheric particulates termed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Variations in CCN concentrations can profoundly impact cloud properties, with important effects on local and global climate. Organic matter constitutes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol mass, and can influence CCN activity by depressing surface tension, contributing solute, and influencing droplet activation kinetics by forming a barrier to water uptake. We present direct evidence that two ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases, methylglyoxal (MG) and acetaldehyde, known to be surface-active, can enhance aerosol CCN activity upon uptake. This effect is demonstrated by exposing acidified ammonium sulfate particles to 250 parts per billion (ppb) or 8 ppb gas-phase MG and/or acetaldehyde in an aerosol reaction chamber for up to 5 h. For the more atmospherically relevant experiments, i.e., the 8-ppb organic precursor concentrations, significant enhancements in CCN activity, up to 7.5% reduction in critical dry diameter for activation, are observed over a timescale of hours, without any detectable limitation in activation kinetics. This reduction in critical diameter enhances the apparent particle hygroscopicity up to 26%, which for ambient aerosol would lead to cloud droplet number concentration increases of 8-10% on average. The observed enhancements exceed what would be expected based on Köhler theory and bulk properties. Therefore, the effect may be attributed to the adsorption of MG and acetaldehyde to the gas-aerosol interface, leading to surface tension depression of the aerosol. We conclude that gas-phase surfactants may enhance CCN activity in the atmosphere.

  2. Numerical modeling of experimental observations on gas formation and multi-phase flow of carbon dioxide in subsurface formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, R.; Dash, Z.; Sakaki, T.; Plampin, M. R.; Lassen, R. N.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Zyvoloski, G.

    2011-12-01

    One of the concerns related to geologic CO2 sequestration is potential leakage of CO2 and its subsequent migration to shallow groundwater resources leading to geochemical impacts. Developing approaches to monitor CO2 migration in shallow aquifer and mitigate leakage impacts will require improving our understanding of gas phase formation and multi-phase flow subsequent to CO2 leakage in shallow aquifers. We are utilizing an integrated approach combining laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to characterize the multi-phase flow of CO2 in shallow aquifers. The laboratory experiments involve a series of highly controlled experiments in which CO2 dissolved water is injected in homogeneous and heterogeneous soil columns and tanks. The experimental results are used to study the effects of soil properties, temperature, pressure gradients and heterogeneities on gas formation and migration. We utilize the Finite Element Heat and Mass (FEHM) simulator (Zyvoloski et al, 2010) to numerically model the experimental results. The numerical models capture the physics of CO2 exsolution, multi-phase fluid flow as well as sand heterogeneity. Experimental observations of pressure, temperature and gas saturations are used to develop and constrain conceptual models for CO2 gas-phase formation and multi-phase CO2 flow in porous media. This talk will provide details of development of conceptual models based on experimental observation, development of numerical models for laboratory experiments and modelling results.

  3. A study of the gas-star formation relation over cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L. J.; Gracia-Carpio, J.; Sternberg, A.; Cooper, M. C.; Shapiro, K.; Bolatto, A.; Bouché, N.; Bournaud, F.; Burkert, A.; Combes, F.; Comerford, J.; Cox, P.; Davis, M.; Schreiber, N. M. Förster; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Lutz, D.; Naab, T.; Neri, R.; Omont, A.; Shapley, A.; Weiner, B.

    2010-10-01

    We use the first systematic data sets of CO molecular line emission in z ~ 1-3 normal star-forming galaxies (SFGs) for a comparison of the dependence of galaxy-averaged star formation rates on molecular gas masses at low and high redshifts, and in different galactic environments. Although the current high-z samples are still small and biased towards the luminous and massive tail of the actively star-forming `main-sequence', a fairly clear picture is emerging. Independent of whether galaxy-integrated quantities or surface densities are considered, low- and high-z SFG populations appear to follow similar molecular gas-star formation relations with slopes 1.1 to 1.2, over three orders of magnitude in gas mass or surface density. The gas-depletion time-scale in these SFGs grows from 0.5 Gyr at z ~ 2 to 1.5 Gyr at z ~ 0. The average corresponds to a fairly low star formation efficiency of 2 per cent per dynamical time. Because star formation depletion times are significantly smaller than the Hubble time at all redshifts sampled, star formation rates and gas fractions are set by the balance between gas accretion from the halo and stellar feedback. In contrast, very luminous and ultraluminous, gas-rich major mergers at both low and high z produce on average four to 10 times more far-infrared luminosity per unit gas mass. We show that only some fraction of this difference can be explained by uncertainties in gas mass or luminosity estimators; much of it must be intrinsic. A possible explanation is a top-heavy stellar mass function in the merging systems but the most likely interpretation is that the star formation relation is driven by global dynamical effects. For a given mass, the more compact merger systems produce stars more rapidly because their gas clouds are more compressed with shorter dynamical times, so that they churn more quickly through the available gas reservoir than the typical normal disc galaxies. When the dependence on galactic dynamical time-scale is

  4. Legionella pneumophila lung abscess associated with immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Guy, S D; Worth, L J; Thursky, K A; Francis, P A; Slavin, M A

    2011-10-01

    Legionella species are a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia, infrequently complicated by cavitary disease. We describe Legionella pneumophila pneumonia and abscess formation in an immunosuppressed patient receiving corticosteroid therapy for metastatic breast carcinoma. The predisposing role of corticosteroids is discussed and the management of this complication is reviewed. © 2011 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  5. Gas in Debris Disks and the Volatiles of Terrestrial Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Debris disks are a kind of protoplanetary disk that likely corresponds to the epoch of terrestrial planet and outer planet formation. Previously pictured to be gas-free, some debris disks are now revealing gas components, sometimes with strikingly non-solar abundance patterns. Understanding the nature and distribution of this gas may eventually help us understand the origin of volatiles on the Earth, the carbon depletion of the asteroids, and even the origin of life. I'll describe what we know about these systems observationally, some of the leading hypotheses about the sources and sinks of the gas, and how these new astronomical discoveries may bear on solar-system science.

  6. Pilonidal abscess in the breast: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, Rashmi; Mullen, Russell; Ashton, Mark A.; Abbott, Nick C.; Pollock, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    Pilonidal sinus is a common entity, most often occurring in the natal cleft. Pilonidal sinus with abscess formation has also been described in hairdressers in the interdigital space. We report a case of pilonidal abscess of the breast in a hairdresser, a rarely reported site, which requires awareness on the clinician's part of this occupational risk, for appropriate management and post-surgery advice on prevention. It is particularly important to impart such information to the reporting pathologist who is key to making this histological diagnosis. PMID:24950682

  7. [Immunological status of patients with amebic hepatic abscess].

    PubMed

    Canto Solís, A; Miranda Feria, A J; Medina Martinez, J; Teran Ortíz, L A; Suárez Sánchez, F

    1975-01-01

    The authors studied 10 cases of amoebic hepatic abscess documented by clinical evidence and confirmed by laboratory tests, liver scan and a good response to treatment. The immunological state of the patients was determined by protein electrophoresis, immunoelectrophoresis, counter-immunoelectrophoresis, radial immunodiffusion and roset formation for T and B lymphocytes. It is concluded that the alterations of cellular and humoral immunity is evident in cases of amoebic hepatic abscess; this alterations are more clear in the acute form of the illness and the immunological deficiency is more significant in the celular immunity.

  8. Splenic abscess owing to cancer at the splenic flexure

    PubMed Central

    Awotar, Gavish K.; Luo, Fuwen; Zhao, Zhengdong; Guan, Guoxin; Ning, Shili; Ren, Jinshuai; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Guangzhi; Liu, Pixu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The cancer of the splenic flexure of the colon is a rare medical entity with severe morbidity because of its insidious onset. Methods: We present the case of a 59-year-old male patient with dull left upper quadrant pain, leukocytosis, and anemia. A splenic abscess described as an air-fluid level with splenocolic fistula was found on CT scan imaging. Surgery was done for splenic pus drainage. He was again admitted 2 months later for intestinal obstruction. Results: An exploratory laparotomy showed multiple hard, gray liver nodules as well as a hard mass in the small bowel. Owing to extensive adhesions and a late stage of cancer involvement, the splenic flexure tumor was not resected. A loop transverse colostomy was done and a ColoplastTM Colostomy bag placed. We also reviewed the literature-linking colon cancer and splenic abscess with specific attention to the carcinoma of the splenic flexure. As the latter invades through the spleen matter, there is the creation of a splenocolic fistula, which allows the migration of normal gut flora into the spleen. This leads to the formation of the splenic abscess. Conclusion: This is the 13th case report pertaining to invading colonic cancer causing a splenic abscess. Although the treatment for splenic abscesses is shifting from splenectomy to image-guided percutaneous pus drainage, the few reported cases make the proper management of such complication still unclear. PMID:27661050

  9. Etiopathogenesis of Mandibulofacial and Maxillofacial Abscesses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The etiologic agent of mandibulofacial and maxillofacial abscesses in mice is reportedly coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus. Although suggested to be through the oral cavity, the exact route of entry has not been documented. Among the clinical cases of mandibulofacial and maxillofacial abscess we report here, each case that was cultured yielded coagulase-positive S. aureus. Histologically, all of the abscesses examined were directly associated with intralesional hair shafts, both vibrissae and pelage, that were introduced into the submucosa via the maxillary or mandibular molar gingival sulci. Grossly, a variable amount of hair was imbedded in the lingual, buccal, or mesial gingival sulci of the maxillary or mandibular molars or both. Computed tomography revealed that the presence of the hair resulted in inflammation and resorption of alveolar bone. With these findings, we propose that mandibulofacial and maxillofacial abscesses are induced by the mastication and fragmentation of hair ingested during the barbering process. From the resulting foreign body periodontitis, abscess formation originates at the maxillary lingual, buccal, or mesial gingival sulci, resulting in infection of the maxillary molar tooth roots with swelling or rupture through the skin inferior to the eye, or at the mandibular lingual, buccal, and or mesial gingival sulci, resulting in infection of the mandibular molar tooth roots and osteomyelitis with drainage through the skin of the ventral mandible. PMID:20579435

  10. [Primitive lung abscess: an unusual situation in children].

    PubMed

    Bouyahia, O; Jlidi, S; Sammoud, A

    2014-12-01

    Lung abscess is a localized area of non tuberculosis suppurative necrosis of the parenchyma lung, resulting in formation of a cavity containing purulent material. This pathology is uncommon in childhood. A 3-year-6 month-old boy was admitted with prolonged fever and dyspnea. Chest X-ray showed a non systemized, well limited, thick walled, hydric, and excavated opacity containing an air-fluid level. Chest ultrasound examination showed a collection of 6. 8 cm of diameter in the right pulmonary field with an air-fluid level. Hemoculture showed Staphylococcus aureus. The patient received large spectrum antibiotherapy. Three days after, he presented a septic shock and surgical drainage was indicated. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of lung abscess. Any underlying condition such as inoculation site, local cause or immune deficiency, was noted and diagnosis of primary abscess was made. The patient demonstrated complete recovery. He is asymptomatic with normal chest X-ray and pulmonary function after 3 years of evolution. Lung abscess represent a rare cause of prolonged fever in childhood. An underlying condition must be excluded to eliminate secondary abscess. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Fast Simulations of Gas Sloshing and Cold Front Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roediger, E.; ZuHone, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a simplified and fast method for simulating minor mergers between galaxy clusters. Instead of following the evolution of the dark matter halos directly by the N-body method, we employ a rigid potential approximation for both clusters. The simulations are run in the rest frame of the more massive cluster and account for the resulting inertial accelerations in an optimised way. We test the reliability of this method for studies of minor merger induced gas sloshing by performing a one-to-one comparison between our simulations and hydro+N-body ones. We find that the rigid potential approximation reproduces the sloshing-related features well except for two artefacts: the temperature just outside the cold fronts is slightly over-predicted, and the outward motion of the cold fronts is delayed by typically 200 Myr. We discuss reasons for both artefacts.

  12. Fast Simulations of Gas Sloshing and Cold Front Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roediger, E.; ZuHone, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a simplified and fast method for simulating minor mergers between galaxy clusters. Instead of following the evolution of the dark matter halos directly by the N-body method, we employ a rigid potential approximation for both clusters. The simulations are run in the rest frame of the more massive cluster and account for the resulting inertial accelerations in an optimised way. We test the reliability of this method for studies of minor merger induced gas sloshing by performing a one-to-one comparison between our simulations and hydro+N-body ones. We find that the rigid potential approximation reproduces the sloshing-related features well except for two artifacts: the temperature just outside the cold fronts is slightly over-predicted, and the outward motion of the cold fronts is delayed by typically 200 Myr. We discuss reasons for both artifacts.

  13. Extremely large breast abscess in a breastfeeding mother.

    PubMed

    Martic, Krešimir; Vasilj, Oliver

    2012-11-01

    Puerperal mastitis often occurs in younger primiparous women. Most cases occur between 3 and 8 weeks postpartum. If mastitis results in the formation of a breast abscess, surgical drainage or needle aspiration is most commonly performed. We report a case of an extremely large breast abscess in a primiparous 20-year-old woman, which presented 6 weeks postpartum. Surgical incision and evacuation of 2 liters of exudate were performed, and intravenous antibiotics therapy was administered. On the sixth day after incision, we secondarily closed the wound. Examination after 3 months showed symmetrical breasts with a small scar in the incision area of the right breast. A high degree of suspicion and adequate diagnostic procedures are essential to avoid delay in the treatment of mastitis and breast abscess and thereby prevent unnecessary surgical treatment.

  14. A Case of Orbital Abscess following Porous Orbital Implant Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seung Woo; Paik, Ji-Sun; Kim, So-Youl

    2006-01-01

    Purpose We present a case of orbital abscess following porous orbital implant infection in a 73-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods Just one month after a seemingly uncomplicated enucleation and porous polyethylene (Medpor®) orbital implant surgery, implant exposure developed with profuse pus discharge. The patient was unresponsive to implant removal and MRI confirmed the presence of an orbital pus pocket. Despite extirpation of the four rectus muscles, inflammatory granulation debridement and abscess drainage, another new pus pocket developed. Results After partial orbital exenteration, the wound finally healed well without any additional abscess formation. Conclusions A patient who has risk factors for delayed wound healing must be examined thoroughly and extreme care such as exenteration must be taken if there is persistent infection. PMID:17302210

  15. The Cold Side of Galaxy Formation: Dense Gas Through Cosmic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Dominik A.; ngVLA Galaxy Assembly through Cosmic Time Science Working Group, ngVLA Galaxy Ecosystems Science Working Group

    2018-01-01

    The processes that lead to the formation and evolution of galaxies throughout the history of the Universe involve the complex interplay between hierarchical merging of dark matter halos, accretion of primordial and recycled gas, transport of gas within galaxy disks, accretion onto central super-massive black holes, and the formation of molecular clouds which subsequently collapse and fragment. The resulting star formation and black hole accretion provide large sources of energy and momentum that light up galaxies and lead to feedback. The ngVLA will be key to further understand how gas is accreted onto galaxies, and the processes that regulate the growth of galaxies through cosmic history. It will reveal how and on which timescales star formation and black hole accretion impact the gas in galaxies, and how the physical properties and chemical state of the gas change as gas cycles between different phases for different galaxy populations over a broad range in redshifts. The ngVLA will have the capability to carry out unbiased, large cosmic volume surveys at virtually any redshift down to an order of magnitude lower gas masses than currently possible in the critical low-level CO lines, thus exposing the evolution of gaseous reservoirs from the earliest epochs to the peak of the cosmic history of star formation. It will also image routinely and systematically the sub-kiloparsec scale distribution and kinematic structure of molecular gas in both normal main-sequence galaxies and large starbursts. The ngVLA thus is poised to revolutionize our understanding of galaxy evolution through cosmic time.

  16. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas-phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-04-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas-phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm ( ≳ 30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain-surface and gas-phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas-phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthesized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairly well the observations towards L1544. It also explains, in a natural way, the observed correlation between DME and MF. We conclude that gas-phase reactions are major actors in the formation of MF, DME and methoxy in cold gas. This challenges the exclusive role of grain-surface chemistry and favours a combined grain-gas chemistry.

  17. Dense Gas, Dynamical Equilibrium Pressure, and Star Formation in Nearby Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Molly J.; Leroy, Adam K.; Bigiel, Frank; Cormier, Diane; Jiménez-Donaire, María J.; Ostriker, Eve; Usero, Antonio; Bolatto, Alberto D.; García-Burillo, Santiago; Hughes, Annie; Kepley, Amanda A.; Krumholz, Mark; Meidt, Sharon E.; Meier, David S.; Murphy, Eric J.; Pety, Jérôme; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schinnerer, Eva; Schruba, Andreas; Walter, Fabian

    2018-05-01

    We use new ALMA observations to investigate the connection between dense gas fraction, star formation rate (SFR), and local environment across the inner region of four local galaxies showing a wide range of molecular gas depletion times. We map HCN (1–0), HCO+ (1–0), CS (2–1), 13CO (1–0), and C18O (1–0) across the inner few kiloparsecs of each target. We combine these data with short-spacing information from the IRAM large program EMPIRE, archival CO maps, tracers of stellar structure and recent star formation, and recent HCN surveys by Bigiel et al. and Usero et al. We test the degree to which changes in the dense gas fraction drive changes in the SFR. {I}HCN}/{I}CO} (tracing the dense gas fraction) correlates strongly with I CO (tracing molecular gas surface density), stellar surface density, and dynamical equilibrium pressure, P DE. Therefore, {I}HCN}/{I}CO} becomes very low and HCN becomes very faint at large galactocentric radii, where ratios as low as {I}HCN}/{I}CO}∼ 0.01 become common. The apparent ability of dense gas to form stars, {{{Σ }}}SFR}/{{{Σ }}}dense} (where Σdense is traced by the HCN intensity and the star formation rate is traced by a combination of Hα and 24 μm emission), also depends on environment. {{{Σ }}}SFR}/{{{Σ }}}dense} decreases in regions of high gas surface density, high stellar surface density, and high P DE. Statistically, these correlations between environment and both {{{Σ }}}SFR}/{{{Σ }}}dense} and {I}HCN}/{I}CO} are stronger than that between apparent dense gas fraction ({I}HCN}/{I}CO}) and the apparent molecular gas star formation efficiency {{{Σ }}}SFR}/{{{Σ }}}mol}. We show that these results are not specific to HCN.

  18. Formation of Gas-Phase Formate in Thermal Reactions of Carbon Dioxide with Diatomic Iron Hydride Anions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li-Xue; Zhao, Chongyang; Li, Xiao-Na; Chen, Hui; He, Sheng-Gui

    2017-04-03

    The hydrogenation of carbon dioxide involves the activation of the thermodynamically very stable molecule CO 2 and formation of a C-H bond. Herein, we report that HCO 2 - and CO can be formed in the thermal reaction of CO 2 with a diatomic metal hydride species, FeH - . The FeH - anions were produced by laser ablation, and the reaction with CO 2 was analyzed by mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical calculations. Gas-phase HCO 2 - was observed directly as a product, and its formation was predicted to proceed by facile hydride transfer. The mechanism of CO 2 hydrogenation in this gas-phase study parallels similar behavior of a condensed-phase iron catalyst. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Numerical analysis of wellbore instability in gas hydrate formation during deep-water drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huaiwen; Cheng, Yuanfang; Li, Qingchao; Yan, Chuanliang; Han, Xiuting

    2018-02-01

    Gas hydrate formation may be encountered during deep-water drilling because of the large amount and wide distribution of gas hydrates under the shallow seabed of the South China Sea. Hydrates are extremely sensitive to temperature and pressure changes, and drilling through gas hydrate formation may cause dissociation of hydrates, accompanied by changes in wellbore temperatures, pore pressures, and stress states, thereby leading to wellbore plastic yield and wellbore instability. Considering the coupling effect of seepage of drilling fluid into gas hydrate formation, heat conduction between drilling fluid and formation, hydrate dissociation, and transformation of the formation framework, this study established a multi-field coupling mathematical model of the wellbore in the hydrate formation. Furthermore, the influences of drilling fluid temperatures, densities, and soaking time on the instability of hydrate formation were calculated and analyzed. Results show that the greater the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and hydrate formation is, the faster the hydrate dissociates, the wider the plastic dissociation range is, and the greater the failure width becomes. When the temperature difference is greater than 7°C, the maximum rate of plastic deformation around the wellbore is more than 10%, which is along the direction of the minimum horizontal in-situ stress and associated with instability and damage on the surrounding rock. The hydrate dissociation is insensitive to the variation of drilling fluid density, thereby implying that the change of the density of drilling fluids has a minimal effect on the hydrate dissociation. Drilling fluids that are absorbed into the hydrate formation result in fast dissociation at the initial stage. As time elapses, the hydrate dissociation slows down, but the risk of wellbore instability is aggravated due to the prolonged submersion in drilling fluids. For the sake of the stability of the wellbore in deep

  20. Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William B.

    1997-01-01

    Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation.

  1. Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present

    DOEpatents

    Vail, W.B. III

    1997-05-27

    Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie`s Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. 7 figs.

  2. Gas bubble formation in fused silica generated by ultra-short laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Cvecek, Kristian; Miyamoto, Isamu; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-06-30

    During processing of glass using ultra-fast lasers the formation of bubble-like structures can be observed in several glass types such as fused silica. Their formation can be exploited to generate periodic gratings in glasses but for other glass processing techniques such as waveguide-writing or glass welding by ultra-fast lasers the bubble formation proves often detrimental. In this work we present experiments and their results in order to gain understanding of the origins and on the underlying formation and transportation mechanisms of the gas bubbles.

  3. Gas, Water, and Oil Production from the Wasatch Formation, Greater Natural Buttes Field, Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.; Hoffman, Eric L.

    2009-01-01

    Gas, oil, and water production data were compiled from 38 wells with production commencing during the 1980s from the Wasatch Formation in the Greater Natural Buttes field, Uinta Basin, Utah. This study is one of a series of reports examining fluid production from tight gas reservoirs, which are characterized by low permeability, low porosity, and the presence of clay minerals in pore space. The general ranges of production rates after 2 years are 100-1,000 mscf/day for gas, 0.35-3.4 barrel per day for oil, and less than 1 barrel per day for water. The water:gas ratio ranges from 0.1 to10 barrel per million standard cubic feet, indicating that free water is produced along with water dissolved in gas in the reservoir. The oil:gas ratios are typical of a wet gas system. Neither gas nor water rates show dependence upon the number of perforations, although for low gas-flow rates there is some dependence upon the number of sandstone intervals that were perforated. Over a 5-year time span, gas and water may either increase or decrease in a given well, but the changes in production rate do not exhibit any dependence upon well proximity or well location.

  4. Approaches to subperiosteal orbital abscesses.

    PubMed

    Ketenci, Ibrahim; Unlü, Yaşar; Vural, Alperen; Doğan, Hakkı; Sahin, Mehmet Ilhan; Tuncer, Erkun

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the epidemiology, clinical features, management and complications of subperiosteal orbital abscesses (SPOA)-a serious complication of rhinosinusitis. Retrospective data of 36 patients with SPOA secondary to acute rhinosinusitis from January 1998 to December 2011 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of age, gender, clinical features, CT findings, surgical procedures, microbiology, and complications. Twenty-three males and 13 females aged from 3 to 76 were evaluated. Nine patients-seven of which were under the age of 10-with small medial SPOA were treated only with medical management. Of the 13 with medial SPOA, transnasal endoscopic approach was performed for 10 and external approach for 3 to drain the abscess. As for the 12 patients with superior SPOA, 8 were treated via combined approach and 4 via external approach. The most common microorganisms were streptococci in children and anaerobes in adults. Total loss of vision developed in two adults with diabetes mellitus (DM). One patient with superior SPOA died due to frontal lobe abscess. Young children with small medial SPOA without significant ocular signs may successfully be managed medically. Surgical drainage is indicated for nonmedial abscesses, large medial abscesses with severe visual loss and with insufficient response to medical management. The risk of blindness from SPOA is higher in patients with DM.

  5. Performance of (UNS 8028) production tubing material in sour service environment of Khuff gas formation

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Maslamani, M.

    Khuff gas formation is one of the largest reservoirs of non-associated gas in the world. Recent developments in exploration and production from Khuff gas formation at the Qatar North Field required materials of construction with long periods of production without work over and chemical inhibition. Gas produced contains corrosive constituents such as 1% H{sub 2}S, 4% CO{sub 2} and brine at pressures exceeding 300 barg (CITHP). For operational reasons, two of the 16 wells drilled were needed to work over after 2 years of service and showed evidence of crevice pitting corrosion and thread galling on the Corrosion Resistance Alloymore » (CRA) tubing material. Full inspection and analysis of the problem are addressed in this paper.« less

  6. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments 1. Conceptual model of gas hydrate growth conditioned by host sediment properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clennell, M.B.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Henry, P.; Winters, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    The stability of submarine gas hydrates is largely dictated by pressure and temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of deep marine sediments may also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our conceptual model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in a freezing soil. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments by a combination of reduced pore water activity in the vicinity of hydrophilic mineral surfaces, and the excess internal energy of small crystals confined in pores. The excess energy can be thought of as a "capillary pressure" in the hydrate crystal, related to the pore size distribution and the state of stress in the sediment framework. The base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature (nearer to the seabed) than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. Capillary effects or a build up of salt in the system can expand the phase boundary between hydrate and free gas into a divariant field extending over a finite depth range dictated by total methane content and pore-size distribution. Hysteresis between the temperatures of crystallization and dissociation of the clathrate is also predicted. Growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, and lenses in muds; cements in sands) can largely be explained by capillary effects, but kinetics of nucleation and growth are also important. The formation of concentrated gas hydrates in a partially closed system with respect to material transport, or where gas can flush through the system, may lead to water depletion in the host sediment. This "freeze-drying" may be detectable through physical changes to the sediment (low water content and overconsolidation) and/or chemical anomalies in the pore waters and metastable

  7. Bar formation as driver of gas inflows in isolated disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanali, R.; Dotti, M.; Fiacconi, D.; Haardt, F.

    2015-12-01

    Stellar bars are a common feature in massive disc galaxies. On a theoretical ground, the response of gas to a bar is generally thought to cause nuclear starbursts and, possibly, AGN activity once the perturbed gas reaches the central supermassive black hole. By means of high-resolution numerical simulations, we detail the purely dynamical effects that a forming bar exerts on the gas of an isolated disc galaxy. The galaxy is initially unstable to the formation of non-axisymmetric structures, and within ˜1 Gyr it develops spiral arms that eventually evolve into a central stellar bar on kpc scale. A first major episode of gas inflow occurs during the formation of the spiral arms while at later times, when the stellar bar is establishing, a low-density region is carved between the bar corotational and inner Lindblad resonance radii. The development of such `dead zone' inhibits further massive gas inflows. Indeed, the gas inflow reaches its maximum during the relatively fast bar-formation phase and not, as often assumed, when the bar is fully formed. We conclude that the low efficiency of long-lived, evolved bars in driving gas towards galactic nuclei is the reason why observational studies have failed to establish an indisputable link between bars and AGNs. On the other hand, the high efficiency in driving strong gas inflows of the intrinsically transient process of bar formation suggests that the importance of bars as drivers of AGN activity in disc galaxies has been overlooked so far. We finally prove that our conclusions are robust against different numerical implementations of the hydrodynamics routinely used in galaxy evolution studies.

  8. Pituitary abscess following transsphenoidal surgery: the experience of 12 cases from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Yao, Yong; Feng, Feng; Deng, Kan; Lian, Wei; Li, Guilin; Wang, Renzhi; Xing, Bing

    2014-09-01

    To explore possible reasons for the incidence of a pituitary abscess following transsphenoidal surgery and determine the most effective treatment. A series of 12 patients who had undergone transsphenoidal surgery in other hospitals before being treated at Peking Union Medical College Hospital were reviewed. The presence of a pituitary abscess was confirmed when pus was intraoperatively observed within the sella turcica. All patients were treated with debridement of the abscess, nine among whom through a transsphenoidal approach and the other three via a craniotomy, followed by antibiotic treatment and hormone replacement therapy. The mean follow-up time was 27.0 months (range from 3.0 to 79.0 months). Headache (92%), panhypopituitarism (58%) and visual disturbance (50%) were the most common clinical indicators of a pituitary abscess. Imaging tests demonstrated a pituitary mass in all patients, with seven (58%) manifested with typical magnetic resonance features of an abscess. Ten patients (83%) were correctly diagnosed preoperatively. During surgical exploration, six presented with severe inflammation or an abscess within the sphenoidal sinus. Causative organisms were identified in five patients (42%). After surgical and antibiotic therapies, all patients fully recovered except for two presenting with severe visual impairment. Six patients (50%) required hormone replacement therapy. Retrograde infection from the sphenoid sinus may be a vital mechanism underlying the formation of a pituitary abscess following transsphenoidal surgery. Debridement of the abscess through surgical approaches combined with antibiotic treatment has been found to yield positive outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Microbiology of liver abscesses and the predictive value of abscess gram stain and associated blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Chemaly, Roy F; Hall, Gerri S; Keys, Thomas F; Procop, Gary W

    2003-08-01

    Although rare, pyogenic liver abscesses are potentially fatal. We evaluated the predictive value of Gram stain of liver abscess aspirates and temporally associated blood cultures. Gram stains detected bacteria in 79% of the liver abscesses tested. The sensitivity and specificity of Gram stain of the liver abscesses were 90% and 100% for Gram-positive cocci (GPC) and 52% and 94% for Gram-negative bacilli (GNB). The sensitivities of the blood cultures for any GPC and GNB present in the liver abscess were 30% and 39%, respectively. Although, Gram stains and blood cultures offer incomplete detection of the microbial contents of pyogenic liver abscesses, both tests should always accompany liver abscess cultures.

  10. A dynamical model for the formation of gas rings and episodic starbursts near galactic centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik

    2015-10-01

    We develop a simple dynamical model for the evolution of gas in the centres of barred spiral galaxies, using the Milky Way's Central Molecular Zone (CMZ, i.e. the central few hundred pc) as a case study. We show that, in the presence of a galactic bar, gas in a disc in the central regions of a galaxy will be driven inwards by angular momentum transport induced by acoustic instabilities within the bar's inner Lindblad resonance. This transport process drives turbulence within the gas that temporarily keeps it strongly gravitationally stable and prevents the onset of rapid star formation. However, at some point the rotation curve must transition from approximately flat to approximately solid body, and the resulting reduction in shear reduces the transport rates and causes gas to build up, eventually producing a gravitationally unstable region that is subject to rapid and violent star formation. For the observed rotation curve of the Milky Way, the accumulation happens ˜100 pc from the centre of the Galaxy, in good agreement with the observed location of gas clouds and young star clusters in the CMZ. The characteristic time-scale for gas accumulation and star formation is of the order of 10-20 Myr. We argue that similar phenomena should be ubiquitous in other barred spiral galaxies.

  11. Gas cluster ion beam assisted NiPt germano-silicide formation on SiGe

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, Ahmet S., E-mail: asozcan@us.ibm.com; Lavoie, Christian; Jordan-Sweet, Jean

    We report the formation of very uniform and smooth Ni(Pt)Si on epitaxially grown SiGe using Si gas cluster ion beam treatment after metal-rich silicide formation. The gas cluster ion implantation process was optimized to infuse Si into the metal-rich silicide layer and lowered the NiSi nucleation temperature significantly according to in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. This novel method which leads to more uniform films can also be used to control silicide depth in ultra-shallow junctions, especially for high Ge containing devices, where silicidation is problematic as it leads to much rougher interfaces.

  12. The Importance of Ammonia for Winter Haze Formation in Two Oil and Gas Production Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, J. L., Jr.; Li, Y.; Evanoski-Cole, A. R.; Sullivan, A.; Day, D.; Archuleta, C.; Tigges, M.; Sewell, H. J.; Prenni, A. J.; Schichtel, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Fine particle ammonium nitrate formation results from the atmospheric reaction of gaseous ammonia and nitric acid. This reaction is most important in winter when low temperatures thermodynamically enhance particle formation. Nitrogen oxides emissions from oil and gas operations partially react in the atmosphere to form nitric acid. The availability of atmospheric ammonia plays an important role in determining whether the nitric acid formed results in wintertime ammonium nitrate formation. Here we contrast situations in two important U.S. oil and gas production regions. Measurements of ammonia, nitric acid, ammonium nitrate and other species were made from 2007 to present near Boulder, Wyoming and in winters 2013 and 2014 in western North Dakota. The Boulder, Wyoming site is close to the large Jonah and Pinedale Anticline gas fields. Field sites at the north unit of Theodore Roosevelt National Park and Fort Union are situated in the large Bakken Formation oil and gas production region. Wintertime formation of nitric acid and ammonium nitrate, together comprising nitrogen in the +5 oxidation state (N(V)), was observed in both locations. Concentrations of N(V), however, are generally much lower at Boulder, WY than in the Bakken. An even bigger difference is seen in fine particle ammonium nitrate concentrations; limited regional ammonia is available in western Wyoming to react with nitric acid, leaving a portion of the nitric acid trapped in the gas phase. Higher concentrations of ammonia are observed in the Bakken where they support formation of much higher concentrations of ammonium nitrate. Comparison of these two regions clearly indicates the importance of understanding both local NOx emissions and regional concentrations of ammonia in predicting source impacts on formation of fine particles and haze.

  13. The periodontal abscess: a review.

    PubMed

    Herrera, D; Roldán, S; Sanz, M

    2000-06-01

    The periodontal abscess is a frequent periodontal condition in which periodontal tissues may be rapidly destroyed. Its importance is based on the possible need of urgent care, the affectation of tooth prognosis, and the possibility of infection spreading. There is scant information in the scientific literature regarding this condition and most of it has been published as case reports and text books, where conclusions are not evidence-based, but rather empirical observations made by recognised clinicians. The aim of this review was to critically analyse all available information on this subject in the dental and medical literature, including information on its prevalence, proposed etiologies and pathogenesis, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment alternatives. The periodontal abscess is the 3rd most frequent dental emergency, and it is specially prevalent among untreated periodontal patients and periodontal patients during maintenance. Different etiologies have been proposed, and 2 main groups can be distinguished, depending on its relation with periodontal pockets. In the case of a periodontitis-related abscess, the condition may appear as an exacerbation of a non-treated periodontitis or during the course of periodontal therapy. In non-periodontitis related abscesses, impaction of foreign objects, and radicular abnormalities are the 2 main causes. The abscess microflora seems to be similar to that of adult periodontitis, and it is dominated by gram-negative anaerobic rods, including well-known periodontal pathogens. Complications and consequences include tooth loss and the spread of the infection to other body sites. Diagnosis and treatment is mainly based on empiricism, since evidence-based data are not available. The role of systemic antibiotics, in the treatment of periodontal abscesses, is especially controversial.

  14. Holospinal epidural abscesses - Institutional experience.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Kelly J; Than, Khoi D

    2018-02-01

    The authors present a holospinal epidural abscesses (HEA) case series and a single institution's experience with varied surgical approaches and outcomes. Medical records were queried and reviewed (6 years) for patients with a spinal abscess diagnosis; HEA were selected. Medical history, comorbidities, blood and epidural pathogens, presentation symptoms, abscess location, presence of mass effect, surgical procedures, treatment regimens, and neurological outcomes were collected. Eight patients with HEA were treated; all underwent surgery. In the index procedure, one (12.5%) underwent laminectomy of the entire spinal column, four (50%) focal laminectomies at the area of mass effect, and three (37.5%) skip laminectomies. Of the four patients who initially had focal laminectomies, three (75%) required additional operations for abscess evacuation in other spine regions. Average number of laminectomies per patient was 8.6. Neurologically, 50% of patients improved, 37.5% remained stable, and 12.5% worsened. There was no difference in outcome between patients who underwent skip versus panspinal laminectomies. No differences in outcomes were noted in timing from presentation to surgery (median 5.3 h), location of mass effect, dorsal versus ventral abscesses, or initial symptoms. Of the four patients who had cervical laminectomy without fusion, two developed post-laminectomy kyphosis requiring fusion. Cervical instability occurred in half the patients who underwent cervical laminectomies without fusion, and there were no adverse outcomes in the patients who were fused in the setting of infection. For lower cervical abscess, upper thoracic laminectomy with catheter irrigation may be sufficient for decompression, minimizing risk of future instability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Star Formation and Gas Dynamics in Galactic Disks: Physical Processes and Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostriker, Eve C.

    2011-04-01

    Star formation depends on the available gaseous ``fuel'' as well as galactic environment, with higher specific star formation rates where gas is predominantly molecular and where stellar (and dark matter) densities are higher. The partition of gas into different thermal components must itself depend on the star formation rate, since a steady state distribution requires a balance between heating (largely from stellar UV for the atomic component) and cooling. In this presentation, I discuss a simple thermal and dynamical equilibrium model for the star formation rate in disk galaxies, where the basic inputs are the total surface density of gas and the volume density of stars and dark matter, averaged over ~kpc scales. Galactic environment is important because the vertical gravity of the stars and dark matter compress gas toward the midplane, helping to establish the pressure, and hence the cooling rate. In equilibrium, the star formation rate must evolve until the gas heating rate is high enough to balance this cooling rate and maintain the pressure imposed by the local gravitational field. In addition to discussing the formulation of this equilibrium model, I review the current status of numerical simulations of multiphase disks, focusing on measurements of quantities that characterize the mean properties of the diffuse ISM. Based on simulations, turbulence levels in the diffuse ISM appear relatively insensitive to local disk conditions and energetic driving rates, consistent with observations. It remains to be determined, both from observations and simulations, how mass exchange processes control the ratio of cold-to-warm gas in the atomic ISM.

  16. MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR-FORMATION PROPERTIES IN THE CENTRAL AND BAR REGIONS OF NGC 6946

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Hsi-An; Sorai, Kazuo; Kuno, Nario

    In this work, we investigate the molecular gas and star-formation properties in the barred spiral galaxy NGC 6946 using multiple molecular lines and star-formation tracers. A high-resolution image (100 pc) of {sup 13}CO (1–0) is created for the inner 2 kpc disk by the single-dish Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope and interferometer Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, including the central region (nuclear ring and bar) and the offset ridges of the primary bar. Single-dish HCN (1–0) observations were also made to constrain the amount of dense gas. The physical properties of molecular gas are inferred from (1)more » the large velocity gradient calculations using our observations and archival {sup 12}CO (1–0), {sup 12}CO(2–1) data, (2) the dense gas fraction suggested by the luminosity ratio of HCN to {sup 12}CO (1–0), and (3) the infrared color. The results show that the molecular gas in the central region is warmer and denser than that of the offset ridges. The dense gas fraction of the central region is similar to that of luminous infrared galaxies/ultraluminous infrared galaxies, whereas the offset ridges are close to the global average of normal galaxies. The coolest and least-dense region is found in a spiral-like structure, which was misunderstood to be part of the southern primary bar in previous low-resolution observations. The star-formation efficiency (SFE) changes by about five times in the inner disk. The variation of SFE agrees with the prediction in terms of star formation regulated by the galactic bar. We find a consistency between the star-forming region and the temperature inferred by the infrared color, suggesting that the distribution of subkiloparsec-scale temperature is driven by star formation.« less

  17. Numerical Modeling of Methane Leakage from a Faulty Natural Gas Well into Fractured Tight Formations.

    PubMed

    Moortgat, Joachim; Schwartz, Franklin W; Darrah, Thomas H

    2018-03-01

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have enabled hydrocarbon recovery from unconventional reservoirs, but led to natural gas contamination of shallow groundwaters. We describe and apply numerical models of gas-phase migration associated with leaking natural gas wells. Three leakage scenarios are simulated: (1) high-pressure natural gas pulse released into a fractured aquifer; (2) continuous slow leakage into a tilted fractured formation; and (3) continuous slow leakage into an unfractured aquifer with fluvial channels, to facilitate a generalized evaluation of natural gas transport from faulty natural gas wells. High-pressure pulses of gas leakage into sparsely fractured media are needed to produce the extensive and rapid lateral spreading of free gas previously observed in field studies. Transport in fractures explains how methane can travel vastly different distances and directions laterally away from a leaking well, which leads to variable levels of methane contamination in nearby groundwater wells. Lower rates of methane leakage (≤1 Mcf/day) produce shorter length scales of gas transport than determined by the high-pressure scenario or field studies, unless aquifers have low vertical permeabilities (≤1 millidarcy) and fractures and bedding planes have sufficient tilt (∼10°) to allow a lateral buoyancy component. Similarly, in fractured rock aquifers or where permeability is controlled by channelized fluvial deposits, lateral flow is not sufficiently developed to explain fast-developing gas contamination (0-3 months) or large length scales (∼1 km) documented in field studies. Thus, current efforts to evaluate the frequency, mechanism, and impacts of natural gas leakage from faulty natural gas wells likely underestimate contributions from small-volume, low-pressure leakage events. © 2018, National Ground Water Association.

  18. Equivalent formation strength as a proxy tool for exploring the existence and distribution of gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Y.; Yamada, Y.; Sanada, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Kido, Y. N.; Moe, K.

    2017-12-01

    Gas hydrates bearing layer can be normally identified by a basement simulating reflector (BSR) or well logging because of their high acoustic- and electric impedance compared to the surrounding formation. These characteristics of the gas hydrate can also represent contrast of in-situ formation strength. We here attempt to describe gas hydrate bearing layers based on the equivalent strength (EST). The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 02 was executed 2015 off the eastern margin of the Indian Peninsula to investigate distribution and occurrence of gas hydrates. From 25 drill sites, downhole logging data, cored samples, and drilling performance data were collected. Recorded drilling performance data was converted to the EST, which is a developed mechanical strength calculated only by drilling parameters (top drive torque, rotation per minute , rate of penetration , and drill bit diameter). At a representative site, site 23, the EST shows constant trend of 5 to 10 MPa, with some positive peaks at 0 - 270 mbsf interval, and sudden increase up to 50 MPa above BSR depth (270 - 290 mbsf). Below the BSR, the EST stays at 5-10 MPa down to the bottom of the hole (378 mbsf). Comparison of the EST with logging data and core sample description suggests that the depth profiles of the EST reflect formation lithology and gas hydrate content: the EST increase in the sand-rich layer and the gas hydrate bearing zone. Especially in the gas hydrate zone, the EST curve indicates approximately the same trend with that of P-wave velocity and resistivity measured by downhole logging. Cross plot of the increment of the EST and resistivity revealed the relation between them is roughly logarithmic, indicating the increase and decrease of the EST strongly depend on the saturation factor of gas hydrate. These results suggest that the EST, proxy of in-situ formation strength, can be an indicator of existence and amount of the gas-hydrate layer. Although the EST was calculated

  19. TOWARD A DETERMINISTIC MODEL OF PLANETARY FORMATION. VII. ECCENTRICITY DISTRIBUTION OF GAS GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ida, S.; Lin, D. N. C.; Nagasawa, M., E-mail: ida@geo.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: lin@ucolick.org, E-mail: nagasawa.m.ad@m.titech.ac.jp

    2013-09-20

    The ubiquity of planets and diversity of planetary systems reveal that planet formation encompasses many complex and competing processes. In this series of papers, we develop and upgrade a population synthesis model as a tool to identify the dominant physical effects and to calibrate the range of physical conditions. Recent planet searches have led to the discovery of many multiple-planet systems. Any theoretical models of their origins must take into account dynamical interactions between emerging protoplanets. Here, we introduce a prescription to approximate the close encounters between multiple planets. We apply this method to simulate the growth, migration, and dynamicalmore » interaction of planetary systems. Our models show that in relatively massive disks, several gas giants and rocky/icy planets emerge, migrate, and undergo dynamical instability. Secular perturbation between planets leads to orbital crossings, eccentricity excitation, and planetary ejection. In disks with modest masses, two or less gas giants form with multiple super-Earths. Orbital stability in these systems is generally maintained and they retain the kinematic structure after gas in their natal disks is depleted. These results reproduce the observed planetary mass-eccentricity and semimajor axis-eccentricity correlations. They also suggest that emerging gas giants can scatter residual cores to the outer disk regions. Subsequent in situ gas accretion onto these cores can lead to the formation of distant (∼> 30 AU) gas giants with nearly circular orbits.« less

  20. Idiopathic bilateral male breast abscess.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajan Kumar; Sinha, Mithilesh Kumar; Gaurav, Kumar; Kumar, Amar

    2014-03-10

    A 38-year-old man presented with bilateral breast swelling, along with pain and redness for 7 days. Bilateral axillary nodes were also palpable; which were multiple and discrete. A provisional diagnosis of bilateral breast abscess was made with suspicion of underlying malignancy. Incision and drainage through subareolar incision was performed and the adjoining tissue was excised and sent for histopathological examination.

  1. [Congenital cardiopathy and cerebral abscess].

    PubMed

    Paixão, A; de Andrade, F F; Sampayo, F

    1989-01-01

    During 1986 the authors came across two cases of brain abscess among children with congenital heart disease followed at the Pediatric Cardiology Service and decided to evaluate their global experience on the subject. In a retrospective study of 860 infants and children with cyanotic congenital heart disease and final diagnosis, there were four cases complicated with brain abscess. The following items were evaluated: prevalence of the complication, type of congenital heart disease, date and age at the diagnosis of brain abscess, diagnostic methods, neurosurgical treatment and results. The main findings were: all patients were above two years of age and had noncorrected cyanotic congenital heart disease belonging to the classic high risk group; the first two cases had been treated in other institutions and only scanty information was available; two recent cases had early diagnosis on CAT scan followed by neurosurgical treatment. All children survived. brain abscess is a rare but severe complication occurring in patients with noncorrected cyanotic congenital heart disease above two years of age; whenever prevention turns impossible, early diagnosis and treatment provide good short term and long term results. A multidisciplinar approach with full cooperation is advocated.

  2. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome complicating a peritonsillar abscess.

    PubMed

    Aalling, Mathilde; Klug, Tejs Ehlers

    2015-02-01

    A 68-year-old man was admitted to hospital in an acute confusional state with a 2-week history of fever, influenza-like illness and sore throat. He quickly developed coagulation disturbances, hypotension and renal function impairment. Despite broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, he deteriorated. Group A streptococcus (GAS) was recovered from blood cultures, which gave the diagnosis streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). A computed tomography scan showed a right-sided peritonsillar abscess (PTA). Acute tonsillectomy was carried out and the patient recovered. STSS complicating PTA has not previously been described in the literature, but GAS is a common pathogen in PTA. Clinicians should be aware that STSS can develop secondary to tonsillar infections and that abscess development should be suspected in STSS patients who do not respond to antibiotic treatment.

  3. Breast abscess due to Salmonella paratyphi A : Case reports with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sonu; Yadav, Vishwanath Singh; Srivastava, Anurag; Kapil, Arti; Dhawan, Benu

    2018-01-01

    Summary Salmonella paratyphi A causes paratyphoid fever which is characterized by acute onset of fever, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting. Localized disease can occur following both overt and silent bacteremia followed by seeding of bacteria at distant sites. Salmonella species though associated with abscess formation in various organs,are rarely associated with breast abscess. We report 2 cases of breast abscess due to Salmonella enterica serotype paratyphi A. Appropriate sampling, surgery supplemented by a comprehensive microbiological work up aided in pathogen identification and appropriate antibiotic administration for a successful outcome of these patients. PMID:29862156

  4. Breast abscess due to Salmonella paratyphi A : Case reports with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sonu; Yadav, Vishwanath Singh; Srivastava, Anurag; Kapil, Arti; Dhawan, Benu

    2018-05-01

    Salmonella paratyphi A causes paratyphoid fever which is characterized by acute onset of fever, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting. Localized disease can occur following both overt and silent bacteremia followed by seeding of bacteria at distant sites. Salmonella species though associated with abscess formation in various organs,are rarely associated with breast abscess. We report 2 cases of breast abscess due to Salmonella enterica serotype paratyphi A. Appropriate sampling, surgery supplemented by a comprehensive microbiological work up aided in pathogen identification and appropriate antibiotic administration for a successful outcome of these patients.

  5. Gas Hydrate Formation Probability Distributions: The Effect of Shear and Comparisons with Nucleation Theory.

    PubMed

    May, Eric F; Lim, Vincent W; Metaxas, Peter J; Du, Jianwei; Stanwix, Paul L; Rowland, Darren; Johns, Michael L; Haandrikman, Gert; Crosby, Daniel; Aman, Zachary M

    2018-03-13

    Gas hydrate formation is a stochastic phenomenon of considerable significance for any risk-based approach to flow assurance in the oil and gas industry. In principle, well-established results from nucleation theory offer the prospect of predictive models for hydrate formation probability in industrial production systems. In practice, however, heuristics are relied on when estimating formation risk for a given flowline subcooling or when quantifying kinetic hydrate inhibitor (KHI) performance. Here, we present statistically significant measurements of formation probability distributions for natural gas hydrate systems under shear, which are quantitatively compared with theoretical predictions. Distributions with over 100 points were generated using low-mass, Peltier-cooled pressure cells, cycled in temperature between 40 and -5 °C at up to 2 K·min -1 and analyzed with robust algorithms that automatically identify hydrate formation and initial growth rates from dynamic pressure data. The application of shear had a significant influence on the measured distributions: at 700 rpm mass-transfer limitations were minimal, as demonstrated by the kinetic growth rates observed. The formation probability distributions measured at this shear rate had mean subcoolings consistent with theoretical predictions and steel-hydrate-water contact angles of 14-26°. However, the experimental distributions were substantially wider than predicted, suggesting that phenomena acting on macroscopic length scales are responsible for much of the observed stochastic formation. Performance tests of a KHI provided new insights into how such chemicals can reduce the risk of hydrate blockage in flowlines. Our data demonstrate that the KHI not only reduces the probability of formation (by both shifting and sharpening the distribution) but also reduces hydrate growth rates by a factor of 2.

  6. [A lung abscess caused by bad teeth].

    PubMed

    van Brummelen, S E; Melles, D; van der Eerden, M

    2017-01-01

    An odontogenic cause of a lung abscess can easily be overlooked. A 61-year-old man presented at the emergency department with a productive cough and dyspnoea. He was admitted to the pulmonary ward with a suspected odontogenic lung abscess. A thorax CT scan confirmed the diagnosis 'lung abscess', following which the dental surgeon confirmed that the lung abscess probably had an odontogenic cause. The patient made a full recovery following a 6-week course of antibiotics, and he received extensive dental treatment. Poor oral hygiene can be a cause of a lung abscess. A patient with a lung abscess can be treated successfully with a 6-week course of antibiotics; however, if the odontogenic cause is not recognised the abscess can recur.

  7. Self-Assembled Gold Nano-Ripple Formation by Gas Cluster Ion Beam Bombardment.

    PubMed

    Tilakaratne, Buddhi P; Chen, Quark Y; Chu, Wei-Kan

    2017-09-08

    In this study, we used a 30 keV argon cluster ion beam bombardment to investigate the dynamic processes during nano-ripple formation on gold surfaces. Atomic force microscope analysis shows that the gold surface has maximum roughness at an incident angle of 60° from the surface normal; moreover, at this angle, and for an applied fluence of 3 × 10 16 clusters/cm², the aspect ratio of the nano-ripple pattern is in the range of ~50%. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analysis reveals a formation of a surface gradient due to prolonged gas cluster ion bombardment, although the surface roughness remains consistent throughout the bombarded surface area. As a result, significant mass redistribution is triggered by gas cluster ion beam bombardment at room temperature. Where mass redistribution is responsible for nano-ripple formation, the surface erosion process refines the formed nano-ripple structures.

  8. A Gas-poor Planetesimal Feeding Model for the Formation of Giant Planet Satellite Systems: Disk Size and Formation Timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, P. R.; Mosqueira, I.

    2003-05-01

    Mosqueira and Estrada (2003a) argue that following giant planet accretion a largely quiescent circumplanetary disk may form with most of the mass inside a radius located outside, but perhaps close to, the centrifugal radius rc = RH/48, where the specific angular momentum of the collapsing giant planet gaseous envelope achieves centrifugal balance, and extending as far as the irregular satellites at RH/5 due to the high specific angular momentum of parcels of gas accreted from distances several times RH during the final stages of planetary growth (Lubow et al. 1999). Provided that allowances are made for the capture of Triton from heliocentric orbit, this picture fits well with the primordial satellite systems of all four giant planets. Because strong gas turbulence would smooth out the gas surface density of the disk, this description can only apply if the turbulence subsides as planetary accretion ceases. Although the viability of a hydrodynamic shear instability in Keplerian disks that can sustain significant post-accretion turbulence and drive evolution of the gas disk is in serious doubt (see Mosqueira et al. this conference), the possibility has not yet been totally ruled out. This leads us to consider gas-poor scenarios that might produce a close-in regular satellite system. To this end, we re-examine the ideas of Safronov et al. (1986) to see whether a gas-free (or nearly gas-free) model can be made consistent with the extent of the regular satellites of the giant planets. In this model, planetesimals containing most of the mass of solids (Mizuno et al. 1978; Weidenschilling 1997) that are de-coupled from the gas and whose dynamics must be followed independently are collisionally captured and form a swarm of circumplanetary objects lasting for perhaps ˜ 106 years. While such a swarm might occupy a significant fraction of the Hill radius of the planet, the small net angular momentum of the swarm might lead to the formation of close-in prograde satellites as

  9. Formation of the Giant Planets by Concurrent Accretion of Solids and Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubickyj, Olenka

    1997-01-01

    Models were developed to simulate planet formation. Three major phases are characterized in the simulations: (1) planetesimal accretion rate, which dominates that of gas, rapidly increases owing to runaway accretion, then decreases as the planet's feeding zone is depleted; (2) occurs when both solid and gas accretion rates are small and nearly independent of time; and (3) starts when the solid and gas masses are about equal and is marked by runaway gas accretion. The models applicability to planets in our Solar System are judged using two basic "yardsticks". The results suggest that the solar nebula dissipated while Uranus and Neptune were in the second phase, during which, for a relatively long time, the masses of their gaseous envelopes were small but not negligible compared to the total masses. Background information, results and a published article are included in the report.

  10. Probing Gas Stripping with Resolved Star-Formation Maps of Virgo Filament Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collova, Natasha

    2018-01-01

    We are conducting a multi-wavelength study of the gas in galaxies at a variety of positions in the cosmic web surrounding the Virgo cluster, one of the best studied regions of high density in the Universe. Galaxies are very likely pre-processed in filaments before falling into clusters, and our goal is to understand how galaxies are altered as they move through the cosmic web and enter the densest regions. We present spatially-resolved H-alpha imaging results from the KPNO 0.9-m and INT 2.54-m telescopes for a preliminary sample of 30 galaxies. We will combine the star-formation maps with observations of molecular and atomic gas to calculate gas consumption timescales, characterize multiple phases of the galactic gas, and look for signatures of environmentally-driven depletion. This work is supported in part by NSF grant AST-1716657.

  11. GEOMETRIC OFFSETS ACROSS SPIRAL ARMS IN M51: NATURE OF GAS AND STAR FORMATION TRACERS

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, Melissa; Koda, Jin; Egusa, Fumi, E-mail: melissa.louie@stonybrook.edu

    We report measurements of geometric offsets between gas spiral arms and associated star-forming regions in the grand-design spiral galaxy M51. These offsets are a suggested measure of the star formation timescale after the compression of gas at spiral arm entry. A surprising discrepancy, by an order of magnitude, has been reported in recent offset measurements in nearby spiral galaxies. Measurements using CO and H{alpha} emission find large and ordered offsets in M51. On the contrary, small or non-ordered offsets have been found using the H I 21 cm and 24 {mu}m emissions, possible evidence against gas flow through spiral arms,more » and thus against the conventional density-wave theory with a stationary spiral pattern. The goal of this paper is to understand the cause of this discrepancy. We investigate potential causes by repeating those previous measurements using equivalent data, methods, and parameters. We find offsets consistent with the previous measurements and conclude that the difference of gas tracers, i.e., H I versus CO, is the primary cause. The H I emission is contaminated significantly by the gas photodissociated by recently formed stars and does not necessarily trace the compressed gas, the precursor of star formation. The H I gas and star-forming regions coincide spatially and tend to show small offsets. We find mostly positive offsets with substantial scatter between CO and H{alpha}, suggesting that gas flow through spiral arms (i.e., density wave) though the spiral pattern may not necessarily be stationary.« less

  12. Quantifying Hydrate Formation in Gas-rich Environments Using the Method of Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K.; Flemings, P. B.; DiCarlo, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Methane hydrates hold a vast amount of methane globally, and have huge energy potential. Methane hydrates in gas-rich environments are the most promising production targets. We develop a one-dimensional analytical solution based on the method of characteristics to explore hydrate formation in such environments (Figure 1). Our solution shows that hydrate saturation is constant with time and space in a homogeneous system. Hydrate saturation is controlled by the initial thermodynamic condition of the system, and changed by the gas fractional flow. Hydrate saturation increases with the initial distance from the hydrate phase boundary. Different gas fractional flows behind the hydrate solidification front lead to different gas saturations at the hydrate solidification front. The higher the gas saturation at the front, the less the volume available to be filled by hydrate, and hence the lower the hydrate saturation. The gas fractional flow depends on the relative permeability curves, and the forces that drive the flow. Viscous forces (the drive for flow induced from liquid pressure gradient) dominate the flow, and hydrate saturation is independent on the gas supply rates and the flow directions at high gas supply rates. Hydrate saturation can be estimated as one minus the ratio of the initial to equilibrium salinity. Gravity forces (the drive for flow induced from the gravity) dominate the flow, and hydrate saturation depends on the flow rates and the flow directions at low gas supply rates. Hydrate saturation is highest for upward flow, and lowest for downward flow. Hydrate saturation decreases with the flow rate for upward flow, and increases with the flow rate for downward flow. This analytical solution illuminates how hydrate is formed by gas (methane, CO2, ethane, propane) flowing into brine-saturated sediments at both the laboratory and geological scales (Figure 1). It provides an approach to generalize the understanding of hydrate solidification in gas

  13. Experimental evidence of nitrous acid formation in the electron beam treatment of flue gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mätzing, H.; Namba, H.; Tokunaga, O.

    1994-03-01

    In the Electron Beam Dry Scrubbing (EBDS) process, flue gas from fossil fuel burning power plants is irradiated with accelerated (300-800 keV) electrons. Thereby, nitrogen oxide (NO x) and sulfur dioxide (SO 2) traces are transformed into nitric and sulfuric acids, respectively, which are converted into particulate ammonium nitrate and sulfate upon the addition of ammonia. The powdery can be filtered from the main gas stream and can be sold as agricultural fertilizer. A lot of experimental investigations have been performed on the EBDS process and computer models have been developed to interpret the experimental results and to predict economic improvements. According to the model calculations, substantial amounts of intermediate nitrous acid (HNO 2) are formed in the electron beam treatment of flue gas. However, no corresponding experimental information is available so far. Therefore, we have undertaken the first experimental investigation about the formation of nitrous acid in an irradiated mixture of NO in synthetic air. Under these conditions, aerosol formation is avoided. UV spectra of the irradiated gas were recorded in the wavelength range λ = 345-375 nm. Both NO 2 and HNO 2 have characteristic absorption bands in this wavelength range. Calibration spectra of NO 2 were subtracted from the sample spectra. The remaining absorption bands can clearly be assigned to nitrous acid. The concentration of nitrous acid was determined by differential optical absorption. It was found lower than the model prediction. The importance of nitrous acid formation in the EBDS process needs to be clarified.

  14. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia patient presenting with brain abscess due to silent pulmonary arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Themistocleous, Marios; Giakoumettis, Dimitrios; Mitsios, Andreas; Anagnostopoulos, Christos; Kalyvas, Aristoteles; Koutsarnakis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disease that is usually complicated by visceral vascular malformations. Patients harboring such malformations are at increased risk of brain abscess formation, which despite advances in diagnostic and surgical methods remains a life threatening medical emergency with high mortality and morbidity rates. In the present report we describe a case of cerebral abscess due to silent pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in a young patient previously undiagnosed for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome (HHT).

  15. Gas-phase spectra of MgO molecules: a possible connection from gas-phase molecules to planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloska, Katherine A.; Fortenberry, Ryan C.

    2018-02-01

    A more fine-tuned method for probing planet-forming regions, such as protoplanetary discs, could be rovibrational molecular spectroscopy observation of particular premineral molecules instead of more common but ultimately less related volatile organic compounds. Planets are created when grains aggregate, but how molecules form grains is an ongoing topic of discussion in astrophysics and planetary science. Using the spectroscopic data of molecules specifically involved in mineral formation could help to map regions where planet formation is believed to be occurring in order to examine the interplay between gas and dust. Four atoms are frequently associated with planetary formation: Fe, Si, Mg and O. Magnesium, in particular, has been shown to be in higher relative abundance in planet-hosting stars. Magnesium oxide crystals comprise the mineral periclase making it the chemically simplest magnesium-bearing mineral and a natural choice for analysis. The monomer, dimer and trimer forms of (MgO)n with n = 1-3 are analysed in this work using high-level quantum chemical computations known to produce accurate results. Strong vibrational transitions at 12.5, 15.0 and 16.5 μm are indicative of magnesium oxide monomer, dimer and trimer making these wavelengths of particular interest for the observation of protoplanetary discs and even potentially planet-forming regions around stars. If such transitions are observed in emission from the accretion discs or absorptions from stellar spectra, the beginning stages of mineral and, subsequently, rocky body formation could be indicated.

  16. Local anticorrelation between star formation rate and gas-phase metallicity in disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Caon, N.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Filho, M.; Cerviño, M.

    2018-06-01

    Using a representative sample of 14 star-forming dwarf galaxies in the local Universe, we show the existence of a spaxel-to-spaxel anticorrelation between the index N2 ≡ log ([N II]λ 6583/H α ) and the H α flux. These two quantities are commonly employed as proxies for gas-phase metallicity and star formation rate (SFR), respectively. Thus, the observed N2 to H α relation may reflect the existence of an anticorrelation between the metallicity of the gas forming stars and the SFR it induces. Such an anticorrelation is to be expected if variable external metal-poor gas fuels the star-formation process. Alternatively, it can result from the contamination of the star-forming gas by stellar winds and SNe, provided that intense outflows drive most of the metals out of the star-forming regions. We also explore the possibility that the observed anticorrelation is due to variations in the physical conditions of the emitting gas, other than metallicity. Using alternative methods to compute metallicity, as well as previous observations of H II regions and photoionization models, we conclude that this possibility is unlikely. The radial gradient of metallicity characterizing disc galaxies does not produce the correlation either.

  17. Lung abscess-etiology, diagnostic and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Tsavlis, Drosos; Kioumis, Ioannis; Kosmidis, Christoforos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andrew; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Baloukas, Dimitris; Kuhajda, Danijela

    2015-08-01

    Lung abscess is a type of liquefactive necrosis of the lung tissue and formation of cavities (more than 2 cm) containing necrotic debris or fluid caused by microbial infection. It can be caused by aspiration, which may occur during altered consciousness and it usually causes a pus-filled cavity. Moreover, alcoholism is the most common condition predisposing to lung abscesses. Lung abscess is considered primary (60%) when it results from existing lung parenchymal process and is termed secondary when it complicates another process, e.g., vascular emboli or follows rupture of extrapulmonary abscess into lung. There are several imaging techniques which can identify the material inside the thorax such as computerized tomography (CT) scan of the thorax and ultrasound of the thorax. Broad spectrum antibiotic to cover mixed flora is the mainstay of treatment. Pulmonary physiotherapy and postural drainage are also important. Surgical procedures are required in selective patients for drainage or pulmonary resection. In the current review we will present all current information from diagnosis to treatment.

  18. Lung abscess-etiology, diagnostic and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Tsavlis, Drosos; Kioumis, Ioannis; Kosmidis, Christoforos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andrew; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Baloukas, Dimitris; Kuhajda, Danijela

    2015-01-01

    Lung abscess is a type of liquefactive necrosis of the lung tissue and formation of cavities (more than 2 cm) containing necrotic debris or fluid caused by microbial infection. It can be caused by aspiration, which may occur during altered consciousness and it usually causes a pus-filled cavity. Moreover, alcoholism is the most common condition predisposing to lung abscesses. Lung abscess is considered primary (60%) when it results from existing lung parenchymal process and is termed secondary when it complicates another process, e.g., vascular emboli or follows rupture of extrapulmonary abscess into lung. There are several imaging techniques which can identify the material inside the thorax such as computerized tomography (CT) scan of the thorax and ultrasound of the thorax. Broad spectrum antibiotic to cover mixed flora is the mainstay of treatment. Pulmonary physiotherapy and postural drainage are also important. Surgical procedures are required in selective patients for drainage or pulmonary resection. In the current review we will present all current information from diagnosis to treatment. PMID:26366400

  19. STAR FORMATION SUPPRESSION DUE TO JET FEEDBACK IN RADIO GALAXIES WITH SHOCKED WARM MOLECULAR GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Lanz, Lauranne; Ogle, Patrick M.; Appleton, Philip N.

    2016-07-20

    We present Herschel observations of 22 radio galaxies, selected for the presence of shocked, warm molecular hydrogen emission. We measured and modeled spectral energy distributions in 33 bands from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared to investigate the impact of jet feedback on star formation activity. These galaxies are massive, early-type galaxies with normal gas-to-dust ratios, covering a range of optical and infrared colors. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) is suppressed by a factor of ∼3–6, depending on how molecular gas mass is estimated. We suggest that this suppression is due to the shocks driven by the radiomore » jets injecting turbulence into the interstellar medium (ISM), which also powers the luminous warm H{sub 2} line emission. Approximately 25% of the sample shows suppression by more than a factor of 10. However, the degree of SFR suppression does not correlate with indicators of jet feedback including jet power, diffuse X-ray emission, or intensity of warm molecular H{sub 2} emission, suggesting that while injected turbulence likely impacts star formation, the process is not purely parameterized by the amount of mechanical energy dissipated into the ISM. Radio galaxies with shocked warm molecular gas cover a wide range in SFR–stellar mass space, indicating that these galaxies are in a variety of evolutionary states, from actively star-forming and gas-rich to quiescent and gas-poor. SFR suppression appears to have the largest impact on the evolution of galaxies that are moderately gas-rich.« less

  20. Dense gas and star formation in individual Giant Molecular Clouds in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viaene, S.; Forbrich, J.; Fritz, J.

    2018-04-01

    Studies both of entire galaxies and of local Galactic star formation indicate a dependency of a molecular cloud's star formation rate (SFR) on its dense gas mass. In external galaxies, such measurements are derived from HCN(1-0) observations, usually encompassing many Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) at once. The Andromeda galaxy (M31) is a unique laboratory to study the relation of the SFR and HCN emission down to GMC scales at solar-like metallicities. In this work, we correlate our composite SFR determinations with archival HCN, HCO+, and CO observations, resulting in a sample of nine reasonably representative GMCs. We find that, at the scale of individual clouds, it is important to take into account both obscured and unobscured star formation to determine the SFR. When correlated against the dense-gas mass from HCN, we find that the SFR is low, in spite of these refinements. We nevertheless retrieve an SFR-dense-gas mass correlation, confirming that these SFR tracers are still meaningful on GMC scales. The correlation improves markedly when we consider the HCN/CO ratio instead of HCN by itself. This nominally indicates a dependency of the SFR on the dense-gas fraction, in contradiction to local studies. However, we hypothesize that this partly reflects the limited dynamic range in dense-gas mass, and partly that the ratio of single-pointing HCN and CO measurements may be less prone to systematics like sidelobes. In this case, the HCN/CO ratio would importantly be a better empirical measure of the dense-gas content itself.

  1. Gas hydrate formation rates from dissolved-phase methane in porous laboratory specimens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, William F.; Spangenberg, E.K.

    2013-01-01

    Marine sands highly saturated with gas hydrates are potential energy resources, likely forming from methane dissolved in pore water. Laboratory fabrication of gas hydrate-bearing sands formed from dissolved-phase methane usually requires 1–2 months to attain the high hydrate saturations characteristic of naturally occurring energy resource targets. A series of gas hydrate formation tests, in which methane-supersaturated water circulates through 100, 240, and 200,000 cm3 vessels containing glass beads or unconsolidated sand, show that the rate-limiting step is dissolving gaseous-phase methane into the circulating water to form methane-supersaturated fluid. This implies that laboratory and natural hydrate formation rates are primarily limited by methane availability. Developing effective techniques for dissolving gaseous methane into water will increase formation rates above our observed (1 ± 0.5) × 10−7 mol of methane consumed for hydrate formation per minute per cubic centimeter of pore space, which corresponds to a hydrate saturation increase of 2 ± 1% per day, regardless of specimen size.

  2. Systematic Search for Chemical Reactions in Gas Phase Contributing to Methanol Formation in Interstellar Space.

    PubMed

    Gamez-Garcia, Victoria G; Galano, Annia

    2017-10-05

    A massive search for chemical routes leading to methanol formation in gas phase has been conducted using computational chemistry, at the CBS-QB3 level of theory. The calculations were performed at five different temperatures (100, 80, 50, 20, and 10 K) and at three pressures (0.1, 0.01, and 0.001 atm) for each temperature. The search was focused on identifying reactions with the necessary features to be viable in the interstellar medium (ISM). A searching strategy was applied to that purpose, which allowed to reduce an initial set of 678 possible reactions to a subset of 11 chemical routes that are recommended, for the first time, as potential candidates for contributing to methanol formation in the gas phase of the ISM. They are all barrier-less, and thus they are expected to take place at collision rates. Hopefully, including these reactions in the currently available models, for the gas-phase methanol formation in the ISM, would help improving the predicted fractional abundance of this molecule in dark clouds. Further investigations, especially those dealing with grain chemistry and electronic excited states, would be crucial to get a complete picture of the methanol formation in the ISM.

  3. Study of Hind Limb Tissue Gas Phase Formation in Response to Suspended Adynamia and Hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Bruce D.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that reduced joint/muscle activity (hypo kinesia) as well as reduced or null loading of limbs (adynamia) in gravity would result in reduced decompression-induced gas phase and symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS). Finding a correlation between the two phenomena would correspond to the proposed reduction in tissue gas phase formation in astronauts undergoing decompression during extravehicular activity (EVA) in microgravity. The observation may further explain the reported low incidence of DCS in space.

  4. LLAMA: normal star formation efficiencies of molecular gas in the centres of luminous Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario, D. J.; Burtscher, L.; Davies, R. I.; Koss, M.; Ricci, C.; Lutz, D.; Riffel, R.; Alexander, D. M.; Genzel, R.; Hicks, E. H.; Lin, M.-Y.; Maciejewski, W.; Müller-Sánchez, F.; Orban de Xivry, G.; Riffel, R. A.; Schartmann, M.; Schawinski, K.; Schnorr-Müller, A.; Saintonge, A.; Shimizu, T.; Sternberg, A.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L.; Treister, E.; Veilleux, S.

    2018-02-01

    Using new Atacama Pathfinder Experiment and James Clerk Maxwell Telescope spectroscopy of the CO 2→1 line, we undertake a controlled study of cold molecular gas in moderately luminous (Lbol = 1043-44.5 erg s-1) active galactic nuclei (AGN) and inactive galaxies from the Luminous Local AGN with Matched Analogs (LLAMA) survey. We use spatially resolved infrared photometry of the LLAMA galaxies from 2MASS, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer the Infrared Astronomical Satellite and the Herschel Space Observatory (Herschel), corrected for nuclear emission using multicomponent spectral energy distribution fits, to examine the dust-reprocessed star formation rates, molecular gas fractions and star formation efficiencies (SFEs) over their central 1-3 kpc. We find that the gas fractions and central SFEs of both active and inactive galaxies are similar when controlling for host stellar mass and morphology (Hubble type). The equivalent central molecular gas depletion times are consistent with the discs of normal spiral galaxies in the local Universe. Despite energetic arguments that the AGN in LLAMA should be capable of disrupting the observable cold molecular gas in their central environments, our results indicate that nuclear radiation only couples weakly with this phase. We find a mild preference for obscured AGN to contain higher amounts of central molecular gas, which suggests connection between AGN obscuration and the gaseous environment of the nucleus. Systems with depressed SFEs are not found among the LLAMA AGN. We speculate that the processes that sustain the collapse of molecular gas into dense pre-stellar cores may also be a prerequisite for the inflow of material on to AGN accretion discs.

  5. Spatially Resolved Dust, Gas, and Star Formation in the Dwarf Magellanic Irregular NGC 4449

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetti, D.; Wilson, G. W.; Draine, B. T.; Roussel, H.; Johnson, K. E.; Heyer, M. H.; Wall, W. F.; Grasha, K.; Battisti, A.; Andrews, J. E.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Rosa González, D.; Vega, O.; Puschnig, J.; Yun, M.; Östlin, G.; Evans, A. S.; Tang, Y.; Lowenthal, J.; Sánchez-Arguelles, D.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the relation between gas and star formation in subgalactic regions, ∼360 pc to ∼1.5 kpc in size, within the nearby starburst dwarf NGC 4449, in order to separate the underlying relation from the effects of sampling at varying spatial scales. Dust and gas mass surface densities are derived by combining new observations at 1.1 mm, obtained with the AzTEC instrument on the Large Millimeter Telescope, with archival infrared images in the range 8–500 μm from the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Herschel Space Observatory. We extend the dynamic range of our millimeter (and dust) maps at the faint end, using a correlation between the far-infrared/millimeter colors F(70)/F(1100) (and F(160)/F(1100)) and the mid-infrared color F(8)/F(24) that we establish for the first time for this and other galaxies. Supplementing our data with maps of the extinction-corrected star formation rate (SFR) surface density, we measure both the SFR–molecular gas and the SFR–total gas relations in NGC 4449. We find that the SFR–molecular gas relation is described by a power law with an exponent that decreases from ∼1.5 to ∼1.2 for increasing region size, while the exponent of the SFR–total gas relation remains constant with a value of ∼1.5 independent of region size. We attribute the molecular law behavior to the increasingly better sampling of the molecular cloud mass function at larger region sizes; conversely, the total gas law behavior likely results from the balance between the atomic and molecular gas phases achieved in regions of active star formation. Our results indicate a nonlinear relation between SFR and gas surface density in NGC 4449, similar to what is observed for galaxy samples. Based on observations obtained with the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano—a binational collaboration between INAOE (Mexico) and the University of Massachusetts–Amherst (USA).

  6. In-situ Micro-structural Studies of Gas Hydrate Formation in Sedimentary Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhs, Werner F.; Chaouachi, Marwen; Falenty, Andrzej; Sell, Kathleen; Schwarz, Jens-Oliver; Wolf, Martin; Enzmann, Frieder; Kersten, Michael; Haberthür, David

    2015-04-01

    The formation process of gas hydrates in sedimentary matrices is of crucial importance for the physical and transport properties of the resulting aggregates. This process has never been observed in-situ with sub-micron resolution. Here, we report on synchrotron-based micro-tomographic studies by which the nucleation and growth processes of gas hydrate were observed in different sedimentary matrices (natural quartz, glass beds with different surface properties, with and without admixtures of kaolinite and montmorillonite) at varying water saturation. The nucleation sites can be easily identified and the growth pattern is clearly established. In under-saturated sediments the nucleation starts at the water-gas interface and proceeds from there to form predominantly isometric single crystals of 10-20μm size. Using a newly developed synchrotron-based method we have determined the crystallite size distributions (CSD) of the gas hydrate in the sedimentary matrix confirming in a quantitative and statistically relevant manner the impressions from the tomographic reconstructions. It is noteworthy that the CSDs from synthetic hydrates are distinctly smaller than those of natural gas hydrates [1], which suggest that coarsening processes take place in the sedimentary matrix after the initial hydrate formation. Understanding the processes of formation and coarsening may eventually permit the determination of the age of gas hydrates in sedimentary matrices [2], which are largely unknown at present. Furthermore, the full micro-structural picture and its evolution will enable quantitative digital rock physics modeling to reveal poroelastic properties and in this way to support the exploration and exploitation of gas hydrate resources in the future. [1] Klapp S.A., Hemes S., Klein H., Bohrmann G., McDonald I., Kuhs W.F. Grain size measurements of natural gas hydrates. Marine Geology 2010; 274(1-4):85-94. [2] Klapp S.A., Klein H, Kuhs W.F. First determination of gas hydrate

  7. Hydrate Formation in Gas-Rich Marine Sediments: A Grain-Scale Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtzman, R.; Juanes, R.

    2009-12-01

    We present a grain-scale model of marine sediment, which couples solid- and multiphase fluid-mechanics together with hydrate kinetics. The model is applied to investigate the spatial distribution of the different methane phases - gas and hydrate - within the hydrate stability zone. Sediment samples are generated from three-dimensional packs of spherical grains, mapping the void space into a pore network by tessellation. Gas invasion into the water-saturated sample is simulated by invasion-percolation, coupled with a discrete element method that resolves the grain mechanics. The coupled model accounts for forces exerted by the fluids, including cohesion associated with gas-brine surface tension. Hydrate growth is represented by a hydrate film along the gas-brine interface, which increases sediment cohesion by cementing the grain contacts. Our model of hydrate growth includes the possible rupture of the hydrate layer, which leads to the creation of new gas-water interface. In previous work, we have shown that fine-grained sediments (FGS) exhibit greater tendency to fracture, whereas capillary invasion is the preferred mode of methane gas transport in coarse-grained sediments (CGS). The gas invasion pattern has profound consequences on the hydrate distribution: a larger area-to-volume ratio of the gas cluster leads to a larger drop in gas pressure inside the growing hydrate shell, causing it to rupture. Repeated cycles of imbibition and hydrate growth accompanied by trapping of gas allow us to determine the distribution of hydrate and gas within the sediment as a function of time. Our pore-scale model suggests that, even when film rupture takes place, the conversion of gas to hydrate is slow. This explains two common field observations: the coexistence of gas and hydrate within the hydrate stability zone in CGS, and the high methane fluxes through fracture conduits in FGS. These results demonstrate the importance of accounting for the strong coupling among multiphase

  8. Evaluation of shale gas potential based on organic matter characteristics and gas concentration in the Devonian Horn River Formation, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jiyoung; Hong, Sung Kyung; Lee, Hyun Suk

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we investigate organic matter characteristics from the analysis of Rock-Eval6 and biomarker, and estimate methane concentration from headspace method in the Devonian Horn River Formation, which is one of the largest shale reservoir in western Canada. The Horn River Formation consists of the Evie, Otterpark and Muskwa members in ascending stratigraphic order. Total Organic Carbon (TOC) ranges from 0.34 to 7.57 wt%, with an average of 2.78 wt%. The Evie, middle Otterpark and Muskwa members have an average TOC of more than 3%, whereas those of the lower and upper Otterpark Member are less than 2%. Based on Pristane/n-C17 (0.2 0.6) and Phytane/n-C18 (0.3 0.9) ratios, the organic matter in the Evie, middle Otterpark and Muskwa members mainly consists of type II kerogen which are formed in reducing marine environment. Thermal maturity were examined through the use of the distributions of Phenanthrene (P) and Methylphenantrenes (MP) based on m/z 178 and 192 mass chromatograms, respectively (Radke et al., 1982). The methylphenanthrene index (MPI-1) are calculated as follows : MPI-1 = 1.5 × (2MP+3MP)/(P+1MP+9MP), and Ro are calculated as follows : Ro = -0.6 × MPI-1 + 2.3. Estimated Ro ranges between 1.88 and 1.93%, which indicates the last stage of wet gas generation. The methane concentrations in headspace range from 15 to 914 ppmv, with an average of 73.5 ppmv. The methane concentrations in the Evie, middle Otterpark and Muskwa members (up to 914 ppmv) are higher than those of the lower and upper Otterpark Member (up to 75 ppmv). Considering the organic geochemical characteristics and gas concentrations, the shale gas potentials of the Evie, middle Otterpark and Muskwa members are higher than those of other members.

  9. Characterization of Biogenic Gas and Mineral Formation Process by Denitrification in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C. A.; Kim, D.; Mahabadi, N.; van Paassen, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    Biologically mediated processes have been regarded and developed as an alternative approach to traditional ground improvement techniques. Denitrification has been investigated as a potential ground improvement process towards liquefaction hazard mitigation. During denitrification, microorganisms reduce nitrate to dinitrogen gas and facilitate calcium carbonate precipitation as a by-product under adequate environmental conditions. The formation of dinitrogen gas desaturates soils and allows for potential pore pressure dampening during earthquake events. While, precipitation of calcium carbonate can improve the mechanical properties by filling the voids and cementing soil particles. As a result of small changes in gas and mineral phases, the mechanical properties of soils can be significantly affected. Prior research has primarily focused on quantitative analysis of overall residual calcium carbonate mineral and biogenic gas products in lab-scale porous media. However, the distribution of these products at the pore-scale has not been well-investigated. In this research, denitrification is activated in a microfluidic chip simulating a homogenous pore structure. The denitrification process is monitored by sequential image capture, where gas and mineral phase changes are evaluated by image processing. Analysis of these images correspond with previous findings, which demonstrate that biogenic gas behaviour at the pore scale is affected by the balance between reaction, diffusion, and convection rates.

  10. Plasma based formation and deposition of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles using a gas aggregation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonskyi, Oleksandr; Ahadi, Amir Mohammad; Peter, Tilo; Fujioka, Kenji; Abraham, Jan Willem; Vasiliauskaite, Egle; Hinz, Alexander; Strunskus, Thomas; Wolf, Sebastian; Bonitz, Michael; Kersten, Holger; Faupel, Franz

    2018-05-01

    Metal clusters and nanoparticles (NPs) have been studied intensively due to their unique chemical, physical, electrical, and optical properties, resulting from their dimensions, which provided host of applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology. Formation of new materials by embedding NPs into various matrices (i.e. formation of nanocomposites) further expands the horizon of possible application of such nanomaterials. In the last few decades, the focus was put on the formation of metallic and metal oxide NPs via a so-called gas aggregation nanoparticle source employing magnetron sputtering (i.e. Haberland concept). In this paper, an overview is given of the recent progress in formation and deposition of NPs by the gas aggregation method. Examples range from noble metals (Ag, Au) through reactive metals (Al, Ti) to Si and the respective oxides. Emphasis is placed on the mechanism of nanoparticle growth and the resulting properties. Moreover, kinetic Monte Carlo simulations were developed to explain the growth mechanism and dynamics of nanoparticle formation depending on the experimental conditions. In addition, the role of trace amounts of reactive gases and of pulsed operation of the plasma on the nucleation process is addressed. Finally, the treatment of the NPs in the plasma environment resulting in nanoparticle charging, morphological and chemical modifications is discussed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Fundamentals of Complex Plasmas", edited by Jürgen Meichsner, Michael Bonitz, Holger Fehske, Alexander Piel.

  11. Formation of new stellar populations from gas accreted by massive young star clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengyuan; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Licai; Geller, Aaron M; Xin, Yu; Hu, Yi; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2016-01-28

    Stars in clusters are thought to form in a single burst from a common progenitor cloud of molecular gas. However, massive, old 'globular' clusters--those with ages greater than ten billion years and masses several hundred thousand times that of the Sun--often harbour multiple stellar populations, indicating that more than one star-forming event occurred during their lifetimes. Colliding stellar winds from late-stage, asymptotic-giant-branch stars are often suggested to be triggers of second-generation star formation. For this to occur, the initial cluster masses need to be greater than a few million solar masses. Here we report observations of three massive relatively young star clusters (1-2 billion years old) in the Magellanic Clouds that show clear evidence of burst-like star formation that occurred a few hundred million years after their initial formation era. We show that such clusters could have accreted sufficient gas to form new stars if they had orbited in their host galaxies' gaseous disks throughout the period between their initial formation and the more recent bursts of star formation. This process may eventually give rise to the ubiquitous multiple stellar populations in globular clusters.

  12. The formation of chondrules at high gas pressures in the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Galy, A; Young, E D; Ash, R D; O'Nions, R K

    2000-12-01

    High-precision magnesium isotope measurements of whole chondrules from the Allende carbonaceous chondrite meteorite show that some aluminum-rich Allende chondrules formed at or near the time of formation of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions and that some others formed later and incorporated precursors previously enriched in magnesium-26. Chondrule magnesium-25/magnesium-24 correlates with [magnesium]/[aluminum] and size, the aluminum-rich, smaller chondrules being the most enriched in the heavy isotopes of magnesium. These relations imply that high gas pressures prevailed during chondrule formation in the solar nebula.

  13. Retroperitoneal abscesses in seven dogs.

    PubMed

    Marvel, Sarah J; MacPhail, Catriona M

    2013-01-01

    Retroperitoneal abscesses, although uncommon, are clinically important. Medical records of seven dogs with naturally occurring retroperitoneal infections from 1999 to 2011 were reviewed to document historical, examination, clinicopathologic, imaging, and surgical findings; etiologic agents; and outcome. Middle-aged sporting dogs were most commonly affected. Dogs were febrile with evidence of either abdominal or lumbar pain. Although traditional radiography can aid in diagnosis, ultrasound appeared to be a more sensitive indicator of disease within the retroperitoneal space. Numerous bacteria were isolated from the abscesses, with anaerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria being the most commonly isolated. Etiology was largely unknown, but migrating plant material was often suspected. Resolution of the infection required surgical intervention as well as prolonged antibiotic therapy. Although recurrence is possible, outcome can be favorable with no long-term sequela.

  14. Idiopathic bilateral male breast abscess

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rajan Kumar; Sinha, Mithilesh Kumar; Gaurav, Kumar; Kumar, Amar

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old man presented with bilateral breast swelling, along with pain and redness for 7 days. Bilateral axillary nodes were also palpable; which were multiple and discrete. A provisional diagnosis of bilateral breast abscess was made with suspicion of underlying malignancy. Incision and drainage through subareolar incision was performed and the adjoining tissue was excised and sent for histopathological examination. PMID:24614823

  15. Tongue metastasis mimicking an abscess.

    PubMed

    Mavili, Ertuğrul; Oztürk, Mustafa; Yücel, Tuba; Yüce, Imdat; Cağli, Sedat

    2010-03-01

    Primary tumors metastasizing to the oral cavity are extremely rare. Lung is one of the most common primary sources of metastases to the tongue. Although the incidence of lung cancer is increasing, tongue metastasis as the initial presentation of the tumor remains uncommon. Due to the rarity of tongue metastasis, little is known about its imaging findings. Herein we report the magnetic resonance imaging and clinical findings of a lingual metastasis, mimicking an abscess, from a primary lung cancer.

  16. Regimes of Micro-bubble Formation Using Gas Injection into Ladle Shroud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sheng; Cao, Xiangkun; Zou, Zongshu

    2018-03-01

    Gas injection into a ladle shroud is a practical approach to produce micro-bubbles in tundishes, to promote inclusion removal from liquid steel. A semi-empirical model was established to characterize the bubble formation considering the effect of shearing action combined with the non-fully bubble break-up by turbulence. The model shows a good accuracy in predicting the size of bubbles formed in complex flow within the ladle shroud.

  17. Microbial consortia controlling biogenic gas formation in the Qaidam Basin of western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, Yanhua; Zhang, Shuichang; Grasby, Stephen E.; Hou, Weiguo; Chen, Zhuoheng; Huang, Ling; Kui, Mingqing; Xu, Yirui; Wang, Yang

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge of what controls the activity of subsurface microbial communities is critical for assessing and managing biogenic methane resources. In this study, 19 formation waters and five gas samples were collected at depths of 800 to 1900 m from Quaternary biogenic gas fields of the Qaidam Basin, China. The formation waters were brines with chloride (Cl) concentrations from 1200 to 2700 mM. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies ranged from 3.75 × 104 to 2.23 × 106 copies mL-1 of water, and those of archaea ranged from 2.44 × 103 to 4.66 × 107 copies mL-1 of water. Both bacterial and archaea 16 s rRNA gene copies were negatively correlated with Cl concentration. The microbial community structure differed significantly depending on Cl concentrations. At high Cl waters (>1800 mM), the microbial community showed a halophilic signature made up of several abundant taxonomic groups within Firmicules, γ-Proteobacteria, and methylotrophic Methanosarcinales. At low Cl, Firmicules and hydrogenotrophic methanogens were dominant members. The proportion of inferred hydrogenotrophic methanogens decreased from 89% to 14% of total archaeal reads with increasing Cl concentration; in contrast, methylotrophic species increased from 11% to 85%. Given that the proportion of hydrogenotrophic species was positively correlated with the archaeal gene abundances, we suggest that Cl concentrations primarily constrain the activity of archaea catalyzing H2 reduction of CO2. Our results show that dilution of formation waters is critical in the process of biogenic gas formation, suggesting that an engineered decrease in Cl concentrations may induce methanogenesis as a potential method to increase gas reserves in such areas in the future.

  18. Regimes of Micro-bubble Formation Using Gas Injection into Ladle Shroud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sheng; Cao, Xiangkun; Zou, Zongshu

    2018-06-01

    Gas injection into a ladle shroud is a practical approach to produce micro-bubbles in tundishes, to promote inclusion removal from liquid steel. A semi-empirical model was established to characterize the bubble formation considering the effect of shearing action combined with the non-fully bubble break-up by turbulence. The model shows a good accuracy in predicting the size of bubbles formed in complex flow within the ladle shroud.

  19. Hydrophobic amino acids as a new class of kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Lee, Bo Ram; Park, Da-Hye; Han, Kunwoo; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    As the foundation of energy industry moves towards gas, flow assurance technology preventing pipelines from hydrate blockages becomes increasingly significant. However, the principle of hydrate inhibition is still poorly understood. Here, we examined natural hydrophobic amino acids as novel kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs), and investigated hydrate inhibition phenomena by using them as a model system. Amino acids with lower hydrophobicity were found to be better KHIs to delay nucleation and retard growth, working by disrupting the water hydrogen bond network, while those with higher hydrophobicity strengthened the local water structure. It was found that perturbation of the water structure around KHIs plays a critical role in hydrate inhibition. This suggestion of a new class of KHIs will aid development of KHIs with enhanced biodegradability, and the present findings will accelerate the improved control of hydrate formation for natural gas exploitation and the utilization of hydrates as next-generation gas capture media. PMID:23938301

  20. Rapid formation of supermassive black hole binaries in galaxy mergers with gas.

    PubMed

    Mayer, L; Kazantzidis, S; Madau, P; Colpi, M; Quinn, T; Wadsley, J

    2007-06-29

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are a ubiquitous component of the nuclei of galaxies. It is normally assumed that after the merger of two massive galaxies, a SMBH binary will form, shrink because of stellar or gas dynamical processes, and ultimately coalesce by emitting a burst of gravitational waves. However, so far it has not been possible to show how two SMBHs bind during a galaxy merger with gas because of the difficulty of modeling a wide range of spatial scales. Here we report hydrodynamical simulations that track the formation of a SMBH binary down to scales of a few light years after the collision between two spiral galaxies. A massive, turbulent, nuclear gaseous disk arises as a result of the galaxy merger. The black holes form an eccentric binary in the disk in less than 1 million years as a result of the gravitational drag from the gas rather than from the stars.

  1. Formation of Sclerotic Hydrate Deposits in a Pipe for Extraction of a Gas from a Dome Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urazov, R. R.; Chiglinstev, I. A.; Nasyrov, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    The theory of formation of hydrate deposits on the walls of a pipe for extraction of a gas from a dome separator designed for the accident-related collection of hydrocarbons on the ocean floor is considered. A mathematical model has been constructed for definition of a steady movement of a gas in such a pipe with gas-hydrate deposition under the conditions of changes in the velocity, temperature, pressure, and moisture content of the gas flow.

  2. Traumatic lenticular abscess: clinical description and outcome.

    PubMed

    Rajaraman, Revathi; Lalitha, Prajna; Raghavan, Anita; Palanisamy, Manikandan; Prajna, Namperumalsamy Venkatesh

    2007-07-01

    To analyze cases with posttraumatic lenticular abscess and study the etiology, clinical presentation, management, and outcome. Retrospective case series. Seventeen eyes of 17 patients with traumatic lenticular abscesses were managed with extracapsular cataract extraction after aspirating the abscess. The mean age of the patients was 40.3 years, and males constituted 82%. The mean time to presentation after injury was 14.35 days (range, one to 60 days), and the patients had a mean follow-up of 125.94 days (range, 21 to 300 days). Culture of the lenticular abscess revealed bacterial growth in eight cases (47%) and fungi in four cases (23.5%). In five (29.4%) cases, culture was negative. Staphylococcus epidermidis grew in seven cases (41%). Thirteen eyes (77%) had best-corrected visual acuity better than 20/120. Surgical removal of the abscess, with systemic and local antimicrobial treatment is effective in cases of posttraumatic intralenticular abscess.

  3. Collapse of primordial gas clouds and the formation of quasar black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, Abraham; Rasio, Frederic A.

    1994-01-01

    The formation of quasar black holes during the hydrodynamic collapse of protogalactic gas clouds is discussed. The dissipational collapse and long-term dynamical evolution of these systems is analyzed using three-dimensional numerical simulations. The calculations focus on the final collapse stages of the inner baryonic component and therefore ignore the presence of dark matter. Two types of initial conditions are considered: uniformly rotating spherical clouds, and iirotational ellipsoidal clouds. In both cases the clouds are initially cold, homogeneous, and not far from rotational support (T/(absolute value of W) approximately equals 0.1). Although the details of the dynamical evolution depend sensitively on the initial conditions, the qualitative features of the final configurations do not. Most of the gas is found to fragment into small dense clumps, that eventually make up a spheroidal component resembling a galactic bulge. About 5% of the initial mass remains in the form of a smooth disk of gas supported by rotation in the gravitational potential potential well of the outer spheroid. If a central seed black hole of mass approximately greater than 10(exp 6) solar mass forms, it can grow by steady accretion from the disk and reach a typical quasar black hole mass approximately 10(exp 8) solar mass in less than 5 x 10(exp 8) yr. In the absence of a sufficiently massive seed, dynamical instabilities in a strongly self-gravitating inner region of the disk will inhibit steady accretion of gas and may prevent the immediate formation of quasar.

  4. Fiber optic sensing technology for detecting gas hydrate formation and decomposition.

    PubMed

    Rawn, C J; Leeman, J R; Ulrich, S M; Alford, J E; Phelps, T J; Madden, M E

    2011-02-01

    A fiber optic-based distributed sensing system (DSS) has been integrated with a large volume (72 l) pressure vessel providing high spatial resolution, time-resolved, 3D measurement of hybrid temperature-strain (TS) values within experimental sediment-gas hydrate systems. Areas of gas hydrate formation (exothermic) and decomposition (endothermic) can be characterized through this proxy by time series analysis of discrete data points collected along the length of optical fibers placed within a sediment system. Data are visualized as an animation of TS values along the length of each fiber over time. Experiments conducted in the Seafloor Process Simulator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory clearly indicate hydrate formation and dissociation events at expected pressure-temperature conditions given the thermodynamics of the CH(4)-H(2)O system. The high spatial resolution achieved with fiber optic technology makes the DSS a useful tool for visualizing time-resolved formation and dissociation of gas hydrates in large-scale sediment experiments.

  5. Fiber optic sensing technology for detecting gas hydrate formation and decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawn, C. J.; Leeman, J. R.; Ulrich, S. M.; Alford, J. E.; Phelps, T. J.; Madden, M. E.

    2011-02-01

    A fiber optic-based distributed sensing system (DSS) has been integrated with a large volume (72 l) pressure vessel providing high spatial resolution, time-resolved, 3D measurement of hybrid temperature-strain (TS) values within experimental sediment-gas hydrate systems. Areas of gas hydrate formation (exothermic) and decomposition (endothermic) can be characterized through this proxy by time series analysis of discrete data points collected along the length of optical fibers placed within a sediment system. Data are visualized as an animation of TS values along the length of each fiber over time. Experiments conducted in the Seafloor Process Simulator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory clearly indicate hydrate formation and dissociation events at expected pressure-temperature conditions given the thermodynamics of the CH4-H2O system. The high spatial resolution achieved with fiber optic technology makes the DSS a useful tool for visualizing time-resolved formation and dissociation of gas hydrates in large-scale sediment experiments.

  6. [A case of Bezold's abscess associated with cholesteatoma].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, K; Arai, E; Kobayashi, T; Takasaka, T

    1992-12-01

    Since the advent of antibiotics, otogenic complications have decreased considerably. However, incomplete antibiotic therapy has altered the clinical course of middle ear disease so as to be more insidious. This paper reports a case of Bezold's abscess associated with cholesteatoma. A 48-year-old man visited our hospital presenting with a 4-day history of right otorrhea and a tender swelling in the right neck. Physical examination showed a febrile patient (38.8 degrees C) with right facial paresis and trismus. A hyperemic, hard and tender swelling was observed in his right neck from the lateral cervical to the mental region. The tympanic membrane was invisible because of granulation and swelling of the posterior wall of the external auditory canal. Intravenous clindamycin and ceftazidime therapy was started immediately. A CT-scan revealed a diffuse shadow with bony destruction in the right mastoid cortex. Extensive abscess formation was also found in the right sternocleidomastoid muscle, in the anterior neck and in the posterior neck. He was diagnosed as having Bezold's abscess associated with cholesteatoma. Radical mastoidectomy and drainage of the neck abscess was performed on the third day under general anesthesia. The mastoid cavity was found to be filled with pus and cholesteatoma debris. A small area of defective bone was found at the mastoid tip, through which there were communications between the mastoid cavity and the abscesses in the neck. Bony destruction was also found in the horizontal and vertical portion of the facial canal. Bacteroides and three kinds of gram-negative rods were cultured from the mastoid cavity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Gas, dust, stars, star formation, and their evolution in M 33 at giant molecular cloud scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komugi, Shinya; Miura, Rie E.; Kuno, Nario; Tosaki, Tomoka

    2018-06-01

    We report on a multi-parameter analysis of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the nearby spiral galaxy M 33. A catalog of GMCs identifed in 12CO(J = 3-2) was used to compile associated 12CO(J = 1-0), dust, stellar mass, and star formation rate. Each of the 58 GMCs are categorized by their evolutionary stage. Applying the principal component analysis on these parameters, we construct two principal components, PC1 and PC2, which retain 75% of the information from the original data set. PC1 is interpreted as expressing the total interstellar matter content, and PC2 as the total activity of star formation. Young (< 10 Myr) GMCs occupy a distinct region in the PC1-PC2 plane, with lower interstellar medium (ISM) content and star formation activity compared to intermediate-age and older clouds. Comparison of average cloud properties in different evolutionary stages imply that GMCs may be heated or grow denser and more massive via aggregation of diffuse material in their first ˜ 10 Myr. The PCA also objectively identified a set of tight relations between ISM and star formation. The ratio of the two CO lines is nearly constant, but weakly modulated by massive star formation. Dust is more strongly correlated with the star formation rate than the CO lines, supporting recent findings that dust may trace molecular gas better than CO. Stellar mass contributes weakly to the star formation rate, reminiscent of an extended form of the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation with the molecular gas term substituted by dust.

  8. Gas, dust, stars, star formation, and their evolution in M 33 at giant molecular cloud scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komugi, Shinya; Miura, Rie E.; Kuno, Nario; Tosaki, Tomoka

    2018-04-01

    We report on a multi-parameter analysis of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the nearby spiral galaxy M 33. A catalog of GMCs identifed in 12CO(J = 3-2) was used to compile associated 12CO(J = 1-0), dust, stellar mass, and star formation rate. Each of the 58 GMCs are categorized by their evolutionary stage. Applying the principal component analysis on these parameters, we construct two principal components, PC1 and PC2, which retain 75% of the information from the original data set. PC1 is interpreted as expressing the total interstellar matter content, and PC2 as the total activity of star formation. Young (< 10 Myr) GMCs occupy a distinct region in the PC1-PC2 plane, with lower interstellar medium (ISM) content and star formation activity compared to intermediate-age and older clouds. Comparison of average cloud properties in different evolutionary stages imply that GMCs may be heated or grow denser and more massive via aggregation of diffuse material in their first ˜ 10 Myr. The PCA also objectively identified a set of tight relations between ISM and star formation. The ratio of the two CO lines is nearly constant, but weakly modulated by massive star formation. Dust is more strongly correlated with the star formation rate than the CO lines, supporting recent findings that dust may trace molecular gas better than CO. Stellar mass contributes weakly to the star formation rate, reminiscent of an extended form of the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation with the molecular gas term substituted by dust.

  9. Uvula Abscess in a Newborn Infant.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Erkun; Ors, Rahmi

    2018-05-01

    Abscesses can be found in several places in the oral cavity, most commonly occurring in peritonsillar and periodontal regions. In this report, the authors described a uvula abscess in a 1-month-old term newborn who was brought to the pediatric outpatient clinic with the complaints of difficulty in sucking-swallowing and refusal to suck at the breast. To the best of the authors' knowledge this is the first report of a uvula abscess in the literature.

  10. Testing the universality of the star-formation efficiency in dense molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimajiri, Y.; André, Ph.; Braine, J.; Könyves, V.; Schneider, N.; Bontemps, S.; Ladjelate, B.; Roy, A.; Gao, Y.; Chen, H.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Recent studies with, for example, Spitzer and Herschel have suggested that star formation in dense molecular gas may be governed by essentially the same "law" in Galactic clouds and external galaxies. This conclusion remains controversial, however, in large part because different tracers have been used to probe the mass of dense molecular gas in Galactic and extragalactic studies. Aims: We aimed to calibrate the HCN and HCO+ lines commonly used as dense gas tracers in extragalactic studies and to test the possible universality of the star-formation efficiency in dense gas (≳104 cm-3), SFEdense. Methods: We conducted wide-field mapping of the Aquila, Ophiuchus, and Orion B clouds at 0.04 pc resolution in the J = 1 - 0 transition of HCN, HCO+, and their isotopomers. For each cloud, we derived a reference estimate of the dense gas mass MHerschelAV > 8, as well as the strength of the local far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation field, using Herschel Gould Belt survey data products, and estimated the star-formation rate from direct counting of the number of Spitzer young stellar objects. Results: The H13CO+(1-0) and H13CN(1-0) lines were observed to be good tracers of the dense star-forming filaments detected with Herschel. Comparing the luminosities LHCN and LHCO+ measured in the HCN and HCO+ lines with the reference masses MHerschelAV > 8, the empirical conversion factors αHerschel - HCN (=MHerschelAV > 8/LHCN) and αHerschel - HCO+ (=MHerschelAV > 8/LHCO+) were found to be significantly anti-correlated with the local FUV strength. In agreement with a recent independent study of Orion B by Pety et al., the HCN and HCO+ lines were found to trace gas down to AV ≳ 2. As a result, published extragalactic HCN studies must be tracing all of the moderate density gas down to nH2 ≲ 103 cm-3. Estimating the contribution of this moderate density gas from the typical column density probability distribution functions in nearby clouds, we obtained the following G0

  11. Intracranial abscess secondary to dental infection.

    PubMed

    Brady, Paul; Bergin, Sarah; Cryan, Bartley; Flanagan, Oisin

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) bacteraemia and secondary brain abscess in a patient where periodontal disease was implicated as the probable source.

  12. Spinal epidural abscess: Report on 27 cases

    PubMed Central

    Khursheed, Nayil; Dar, Sultan; Ramzan, Altaf; Fomda, Bashir; Humam, Nisar; Abrar, Wani; Singh, Sarbjit; Sajad, Arif; Mahek, Masood; Yawar, Shoaib

    2017-01-01

    Background: Spinal epidural abscess, although an uncommon disease, often correlates with a high morbidity owing to significant delay in diagnosis. Methods: In a prospective 5-year study, the clinical and magnetic resonance (MR) findings, treatment protocols, microbiology, and neurological outcomes were analyzed for 27 patients with spinal epidural abscess. Results: Patients were typically middle-aged with underlying diabetes and presented with lumbar abscesses. Those undergoing surgical intervention >36 h after the onset of symptoms had poor neurological outcomes. Conclusion: Early recognition and timely evacuation of spinal abscesses minimized neurological morbidity and potential mortality. PMID:29026676

  13. Spinal epidural abscess: Report on 27 cases.

    PubMed

    Khursheed, Nayil; Dar, Sultan; Ramzan, Altaf; Fomda, Bashir; Humam, Nisar; Abrar, Wani; Singh, Sarbjit; Sajad, Arif; Mahek, Masood; Yawar, Shoaib

    2017-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess, although an uncommon disease, often correlates with a high morbidity owing to significant delay in diagnosis. In a prospective 5-year study, the clinical and magnetic resonance (MR) findings, treatment protocols, microbiology, and neurological outcomes were analyzed for 27 patients with spinal epidural abscess. Patients were typically middle-aged with underlying diabetes and presented with lumbar abscesses. Those undergoing surgical intervention >36 h after the onset of symptoms had poor neurological outcomes. Early recognition and timely evacuation of spinal abscesses minimized neurological morbidity and potential mortality.

  14. Pyogenic brain abscess, a 15 year survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Brain abscess is a potentially fatal disease. This study assesses clinical aspects of brain abscess in a large hospital cohort. Methods Retrospective review of adult patients with pyogenic brain abscess at Rigshospitalet University Hospital, Denmark between 1994 and 2009. Prognostic factors associated with Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) (death, severe disability or vegetative state) were assessed by logistic regression. Results 102 patients were included. On admission, only 20% of patients had a triad of fever, headache and nausea, 39% had no fever, 26% had normal CRP and 49% had no leucocytosis. Median delay from symptom onset to antibiotic treatment was 7 days (range 0–97 days). Source of infection was contiguous in 36%, haematogenous in 28%, surgical or traumatic in 9% and unknown in 27% of cases. Abscess location did not accurately predict the portal of entry. 67% were treated by burr hole aspiration, 20% by craniotomy and 13% by antibiotics alone. Median duration of antibiotic treatment was 62 days. No cases of recurrent abscess were observed. At discharge 23% had GOS ≤3. The 1-, 3- and 12-month mortality was 11%, 17% and 19%. Adverse outcome was associated with a low GCS at admission, presence of comorbidities and intraventricular rupture of abscess. Conclusions The clinical signs of brain abscess are unspecific, many patients presented without clear signs of infection and diagnosis and treatment were often delayed. Decreased GCS, presence of comorbidities and intraventricular rupture of brain abscess were associated with poor outcome. Brain abscess remains associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. PMID:23193986

  15. Complex Organic Molecules Formation in Space Through Gas Phase Reactions: A Theoretical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    Chemistry in the interstellar medium (ISM) is capable of producing complex organic molecules (COMs) of great importance to astrobiology. Gas phase and grain surface chemistry almost certainly both contribute to COM formation. Amino acids as building blocks of proteins are some of the most interesting COMs. The simplest one, glycine, has been characterized in meteorites and comets and, its conclusive detection in the ISM seems to be highly plausible. In this work, we analyze the gas phase reaction of glycine and {{{CH}}5}+ to establish the role of this process in the formation of alanine or other COMs in the ISM. Formation of protonated α- and β-alanine in spite of being exothermic processes is not viable under interstellar conditions because the different paths leading to these isomers present net activation energies. Nevertheless, glycine can evolve to protonated 1-imide-2, 2-propanediol, protonated amino acetone, protonated hydroxyacetone, and protonated propionic acid. However, formation of acetic acid and protonated methylamine is also a favorable process and therefore will be a competitive channel with the evolution of glycine to COMs.

  16. Correlation between Gas Bubble Formation and Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Kinetics at Nanoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qianjin; Luo, Long

    2018-04-17

    We report the correlation between H 2 gas bubble formation potential and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) activity for Au and Pt nanodisk electrodes (NEs). Microkinetic models were formulated to obtain the HER kinetic information for individual Au and Pt NEs. We found that the rate-determining steps for the HER at Au and Pt NEs were the Volmer step and the Heyrovsky step, respectively. More interestingly, the standard rate constant ( k 0 ) of the rate-determining step was found to vary over 2 orders of magnitude for the same type of NEs. The observed variations indicate the HER activity heterogeneity at the nanoscale. Furthermore, we discovered a linear relationship between bubble formation potential ( E bubble ) and log( k 0 ) with a slope of 125 mV/decade for both Au and Pt NEs. As log ( k 0 ) increases, E bubble shifts linearly to more positive potentials, meaning NEs with higher HER activities form H 2 bubbles at less negative potentials. Our theoretical model suggests that such linear relationship is caused by the similar critical bubble formation condition for Au and Pt NEs with varied sizes. Our results have potential implications for using gas bubble formation to evaluate the HER activity distribution of nanoparticles in an ensemble.

  17. Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William Banning

    2000-01-01

    Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. Resistivity measurements are obtained from within the cased well by conducting A.C. current from within the cased well to a remote electrode at a frequency that is within the frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 20 Hz.

  18. Formation and coalescence of nanobubbles under controlled gas concentration and species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chenliang; Zhang, A.-Man; Wang, Shiping; Cui, Pu

    2018-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, the effects of gas concentration and species on the coalescence and growth of nanobubbles were systematically investigated. With increasing gas concentration, not only surface nanobubbles but also bulk nanobubbles are formed. The bulk nanobubble in water is less explored so far. Here, its coalescence, stability, movement trajectory and velocity are discussed. A comparison of the motion and coalescence of the bulk nanobubble to the surface nanobubble, directly demonstrates that the three-phase contact line plays a crucial role for surface nanobubble stability. Compared with the bubble size, the distance between surface nanobubbles is a more important factor to decide the merging order among three nanobubbles. The study also shows that three factors including the oversaturated gas concentration, the distance between surface nanobubbles, and the stronger solid-gas interactions influence the formation of the gas-enrichment layer at the solid-liquid interface. The result has an important significance to enhancing the boundary slip due to the presence of nanobubbles.

  19. Investigating the role of gas bubble formation and entrapment in contaminated aquifers: Reactive transport modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, Richard T.; Ulrich Mayer, K.

    2006-09-01

    In many natural and contaminated aquifers, geochemical processes result in the production or consumption of dissolved gases. In cases where methanogenesis or denitrification occurs, the production of gases may result in the formation and growth of gas bubbles below the water table. Near the water table, entrapment of atmospheric gases during water table rise may provide a significant source of O 2 to waters otherwise depleted in O 2. Furthermore, the presence of bubbles will affect the hydraulic conductivity of an aquifer, resulting in changes to the groundwater flow regime. The interactions between physical transport, biogeochemical processes, and gas bubble formation, entrapment and release is complex and requires suitable analysis tools. The objective of the present work is the development of a numerical model capable of quantitatively assessing these processes. The multicomponent reactive transport code MIN3P has been enhanced to simulate bubble growth and contraction due to in-situ gas production or consumption, bubble entrapment due to water table rise and subsequent re-equilibration of the bubble with ambient groundwater, and permeability changes due to trapped gas phase saturation. The resulting formulation allows for the investigation of complex geochemical systems where microbially mediated redox reactions both produce and consume gases as well as affect solution chemistry, alkalinity, and pH. The enhanced model has been used to simulate processes in a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated aquifer where methanogenesis is an important redox process. The simulations are constrained by data from a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, MN. Our results suggest that permeability reduction in the methanogenic zone due to in-situ formation of gas bubbles, and dissolution of entrapped atmospheric bubbles near the water table, both work to attenuate the dissolved gas plume emanating from the source zone. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that under the given

  20. Investigating the role of gas bubble formation and entrapment in contaminated aquifers: Reactive transport modelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amos, Richard T.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    In many natural and contaminated aquifers, geochemical processes result in the production or consumption of dissolved gases. In cases where methanogenesis or denitrification occurs, the production of gases may result in the formation and growth of gas bubbles below the water table. Near the water table, entrapment of atmospheric gases during water table rise may provide a significant source of O2 to waters otherwise depleted in O2. Furthermore, the presence of bubbles will affect the hydraulic conductivity of an aquifer, resulting in changes to the groundwater flow regime. The interactions between physical transport, biogeochemical processes, and gas bubble formation, entrapment and release is complex and requires suitable analysis tools. The objective of the present work is the development of a numerical model capable of quantitatively assessing these processes. The multicomponent reactive transport code MIN3P has been enhanced to simulate bubble growth and contraction due to in-situ gas production or consumption, bubble entrapment due to water table rise and subsequent re-equilibration of the bubble with ambient groundwater, and permeability changes due to trapped gas phase saturation. The resulting formulation allows for the investigation of complex geochemical systems where microbially mediated redox reactions both produce and consume gases as well as affect solution chemistry, alkalinity, and pH. The enhanced model has been used to simulate processes in a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated aquifer where methanogenesis is an important redox process. The simulations are constrained by data from a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, MN. Our results suggest that permeability reduction in the methanogenic zone due to in-situ formation of gas bubbles, and dissolution of entrapped atmospheric bubbles near the water table, both work to attenuate the dissolved gas plume emanating from the source zone. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that under the given

  1. Formation of Gas Traps in the Martian Soil and Implications for Methane Variability on Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A.; Davis, J.; Redwing, E.; Trainer, M. G.; Johnson, C.

    2017-12-01

    Several independent groups have reported on the detection of methane in the Martian atmosphere. Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) methane observations display rapid increase of the atmospheric methane abundance from 1 ppb to 7 ppb levels followed by an abrupt disappearance suggest the possibility of small, local, near-surface sources of methane. Such sources may take the form of shallow subsurface cemented soil caps which can trap gases and are readily activated by either motion of the MSL rover itself, by impacts of small meteorites, or even annual climate oscillations. We have simulated the formation of such soil caps in the shallow subsurface Martian-like condition. We show that the initially uniform sample of icy soil (JSC-Mars-1A) with Mg perchlorate exhibit quick stratification on the scale of several cm under Martian pressures over the period of several days. Briny water migrates towards the top of the sample resulting in the enhanced abundance of perchlorates in the top few cm. As water evaporates and ice sublimates from the top of the sample, perchlorate remains in the top layer of soil causing soil cementation and formation of the cap. The observed caps were solid, ice-free and effectively shut off sublimation of ice from underneath the cap. We tested whether similar soil caps can trap various gases (including methane) in the shallow subsurface of Mars. We injected neon gas at the bottom of the soil sample and monitored neon gas permeability through the soil sample by measuring gas pressure differential above and below the soil sample. We found that a mixture of JSC-Mars-1A and 5% of Mg perchlorate produce gas impermeable soil cap capable of withstanding an excess of 5 mbars of neon under the cap at the soil temperatures +0.5 C - +9 C. The cap remained gas impermeable after subsequent cooling of the sample soil sample to the subzero temperatures. Gas permeability of the soil caps under various temperatures and atmospheric pressures will be reported. Our

  2. Method for reducing sulfate formation during regeneration of hot-gas desulfurization sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Bissett, Larry A.; Strickland, Larry D.; Rockey, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The regeneration of sulfur sorbents having sulfate forming tendencies and used for desulfurizing hot product gas streams such as provided by coal gasification is provided by employing a two-stage regeneration method. Air containing a sub-stoichiometric quantity of oxygen is used in the first stage for substantially fully regenerating the sorbent without sulfate formation and then regeneration of the resulting partially regenerated sorbent is completed in the second stage with air containing a quantity of oxygen slightly greater than the stoichiometric amount adequate to essentially fully regenerate the sorbent. Sulfate formation occurs in only the second stage with the extent of sulfate formation being limited only to the portion of the sulfur species contained by the sorbent after substantially all of the sulfur species have been removed therefrom in the first stage.

  3. Increasing Gas Hydrate Formation Temperature for Desalination of High Salinity Produced Water with Secondary Guests

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Jong-Ho; Seol, Yongkoo

    We suggest a new gas hydrate-based desalination process using water-immiscible hydrate formers; cyclopentane (CP) and cyclohexane (CH) as secondary hydrate guests to alleviate temperature requirements for hydrate formation. The hydrate formation reactions were carried out in an isobaric condition of 3.1 MPa to find the upper temperature limit of CO2 hydrate formation. Simulated produced water (8.95 wt % salinity) mixed with the hydrate formers shows an increased upper temperature limit from -2 °C for simple CO2 hydrate to 16 and 7 °C for double (CO2 + CP) and (CO2 + CH) hydrates, respectively. The resulting conversion rate to double hydratemore » turned out to be similar to that with simple CO2 hydrate at the upper temperature limit. Hydrate formation rates (Rf) for the double hydrates with CP and CH are shown to be 22 and 16 times higher, respectively, than that of the simple CO2 hydrate at the upper temperature limit. Such mild hydrate formation temperature and fast formation kinetics indicate increased energy efficiency of the double hydrate system for the desalination process. Dissociated water from the hydrates shows greater than 90% salt removal efficiency for the hydrates with the secondary guests, which is also improved from about 70% salt removal efficiency for the simple hydrates.« less

  4. Crackling sound generation during the formation of liquid bridges: A lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Alexandre B.; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Alencar, Adriano M.

    2013-08-01

    Due to abnormal mechanical instabilities, liquid bridges may form in the small airways blocking airflow. Liquid bridge ruptures during inhalation are the major cause of the crackling adventitious lung sound, which can be heard using a simple stethoscope. Recently, Vyshedskiy and colleagues (2009) [1] described and characterized a crackle sound originated during expiration. However, the mechanism and origin of the expiratory crackle are still controversial. Thus, in this paper, we propose a mechanism for expiratory crackles. We hypothesize that the expiratory crackle sound is a result of the energy released in the form of acoustic waves during the formation of the liquid bridge. The magnitude of the energy released is proportional to the difference in free energy prior and after the bridge formation. We use a lattice gas model to describe the liquid bridge formation between two parallel planes. Specifically, we determine the surface free energy and the conditions of the liquid bridge formation between two parallel planes separated by a distance 2h by a liquid droplet of volume Ω and contact angle Θ, using both Monte Carlo simulation of a lattice gas model and variational calculus based on minimization of the surface area with the volume and the contact angle constrained. We numerically and analytically determine the phase diagram of the system as a function of the dimensionless parameter hΩ and Θ. We can distinguish two different phases: one droplet and one liquid bridge. We observe a hysteresis curve for the energy changes between these two states, and a finite size effect in the bridge formation. We compute the release of free energy during the formation of the liquid bridge and discuss the results in terms of system size. We also calculate the force exerted from liquid bridge on the planes by studying the dependence of the free energy on the separation between the planes 2h. The simulation results are in agreement with the analytical solution.

  5. Mud volcano venting induced gas hydrate formation at the upper slope accretionary wedge, offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Saulwood; Tseng, Yi-Ting; Cheng, Wan-Yen; Chou, Cheng-Tien; Chen, NeiChen; Hsieh, I.-Chih

    2016-04-01

    chloride indicated gas hydrate formation in sediments away from the mud volcano cone.

  6. The Genealogical Tree of Ethanol: Gas-phase Formation of Glycolaldehyde, Acetic Acid, and Formic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skouteris, Dimitrios; Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Vazart, Fanny; Puzzarini, Cristina; Barone, Vincenzo; Codella, Claudio; Lefloch, Bertrand

    2018-02-01

    Despite the harsh conditions of the interstellar medium, chemistry thrives in it, especially in star-forming regions where several interstellar complex organic molecules (iCOMs) have been detected. Yet, how these species are synthesized is a mystery. The majority of current models claim that this happens on interstellar grain surfaces. Nevertheless, evidence is mounting that neutral gas-phase chemistry plays an important role. In this paper, we propose a new scheme for the gas-phase synthesis of glycolaldehyde, a species with a prebiotic potential and for which no gas-phase formation route was previously known. In the proposed scheme, the ancestor is ethanol and the glycolaldehyde sister species are acetic acid (another iCOM with unknown gas-phase formation routes) and formic acid. For the reactions of the new scheme with no available data, we have performed electronic structure and kinetics calculations deriving rate coefficients and branching ratios. Furthermore, after a careful review of the chemistry literature, we revised the available chemical networks, adding and correcting several reactions related to glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, and formic acid. The new chemical network has been used in an astrochemical model to predict the abundance of glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, and formic acid. The predicted abundance of glycolaldehyde depends on the ethanol abundance in the gas phase and is in excellent agreement with the measured one in hot corinos and shock sites. Our new model overpredicts the abundance of acetic acid and formic acid by about a factor of 10, which might imply a yet incomplete reaction network.

  7. DENSE GAS FRACTION AND STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY VARIATIONS IN THE ANTENNAE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bigiel, F.; Leroy, A. K.; Blitz, L.

    2015-12-20

    We use the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) millimeter interferometer to map the Antennae Galaxies (NGC 4038/39), tracing the bulk of the molecular gas via the {sup 12}CO(1–0) line and denser molecular gas via the high density transitions HCN(1–0), HCO{sup +}(1–0), CS(2–1), and HNC(1–0). We detect bright emission from all tracers in both the two nuclei and three locales in the overlap region between the two nuclei. These three overlap region peaks correspond to previously identified “supergiant molecular clouds.” We combine the CARMA data with Herschel infrared (IR) data to compare observational indicators of the star formationmore » efficiency (star formation rate/H{sub 2} ∝ IR/CO), dense gas fraction (HCN/CO), and dense gas star formation efficiency (IR/HCN). Regions within the Antennae show ratios consistent with those seen for entire galaxies, but these ratios vary by up to a factor of six within the galaxy. The five detected regions vary strongly in both their integrated intensities and these ratios. The northern nucleus is the brightest region in millimeter-wave line emission, while the overlap region is the brightest part of the system in the IR. We combine the CARMA and Herschel data with ALMA CO data to report line ratio patterns for each bright point. CO shows a declining spectral line energy distribution, consistent with previous studies. HCO{sup +} (1–0) emission is stronger than HCN (1–0) emission, perhaps indicating either more gas at moderate densities or higher optical depth than is commonly seen in more advanced mergers.« less

  8. A dynamical model for gas flows, star formation and nuclear winds in galactic centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Crocker, Roland M.

    2017-04-01

    We present a dynamical model for gas transport, star formation and winds in the nuclear regions of galaxies, focusing on the Milky Way's Central Molecular Zone (CMZ). In our model angular momentum and mass are transported by a combination of gravitational and bar-driven acoustic instabilities. In gravitationally unstable regions the gas can form stars, and the resulting feedback drives both turbulence and a wind that ejects mass from the CMZ. We show that the CMZ is in a quasi-steady state where mass deposited at large radii by the bar is transported inwards to a star-forming, ring-shaped region at ˜100 pc from the Galactic Centre, where the shear reaches a minimum. This ring undergoes episodic starbursts, with bursts lasting ˜5-10 Myr occurring at ˜20-40 Myr intervals. During quiescence the gas in the ring is not fully cleared, but is driven out of a self-gravitating state by the momentum injected by expanding supernova remnants. Starbursts also drive a wind off the star-forming ring, with a time-averaged mass flux comparable to the star formation rate. We show that our model agrees well with the observed properties of the CMZ, and places it near a star formation minimum within the evolutionary cycle. We argue that such cycles of bursty star formation and winds should be ubiquitous in the nuclei of barred spiral galaxies, and show that the resulting distribution of galactic nuclei on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation is in good agreement with that observed in nearby galaxies.

  9. The formation of submillimetre-bright galaxies from gas infall over a billion years.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Desika; Turk, Matthew; Feldmann, Robert; Robitaille, Thomas; Hopkins, Philip; Thompson, Robert; Hayward, Christopher; Ball, David; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Kereš, Dušan

    2015-09-24

    Submillimetre-bright galaxies at high redshift are the most luminous, heavily star-forming galaxies in the Universe and are characterized by prodigious emission in the far-infrared, with a flux of at least five millijanskys at a wavelength of 850 micrometres. They reside in haloes with masses about 10(13) times that of the Sun, have low gas fractions compared to main-sequence disks at a comparable redshift, trace complex environments and are not easily observable at optical wavelengths. Their physical origin remains unclear. Simulations have been able to form galaxies with the requisite luminosities, but have otherwise been unable to simultaneously match the stellar masses, star formation rates, gas fractions and environments. Here we report a cosmological hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulation that is able to form a submillimetre galaxy that simultaneously satisfies the broad range of observed physical constraints. We find that groups of galaxies residing in massive dark matter haloes have increasing rates of star formation that peak at collective rates of about 500-1,000 solar masses per year at redshifts of two to three, by which time the interstellar medium is sufficiently enriched with metals that the region may be observed as a submillimetre-selected system. The intense star formation rates are fuelled in part by the infall of a reservoir gas supply enabled by stellar feedback at earlier times, not through major mergers. With a lifetime of nearly a billion years, our simulations show that the submillimetre-bright phase of high-redshift galaxies is prolonged and associated with significant mass buildup in early-Universe proto-clusters, and that many submillimetre-bright galaxies are composed of numerous unresolved components (for which there is some observational evidence).

  10. Enhanced formation of disinfection byproducts in shale gas wastewater-impacted drinking water supplies.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kimberly M; Zeng, Teng; Harkness, Jennifer; Vengosh, Avner; Mitch, William A

    2014-10-07

    The disposal and leaks of hydraulic fracturing wastewater (HFW) to the environment pose human health risks. Since HFW is typically characterized by elevated salinity, concerns have been raised whether the high bromide and iodide in HFW may promote the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and alter their speciation to more toxic brominated and iodinated analogues. This study evaluated the minimum volume percentage of two Marcellus Shale and one Fayetteville Shale HFWs diluted by fresh water collected from the Ohio and Allegheny Rivers that would generate and/or alter the formation and speciation of DBPs following chlorination, chloramination, and ozonation treatments of the blended solutions. During chlorination, dilutions as low as 0.01% HFW altered the speciation toward formation of brominated and iodinated trihalomethanes (THMs) and brominated haloacetonitriles (HANs), and dilutions as low as 0.03% increased the overall formation of both compound classes. The increase in bromide concentration associated with 0.01-0.03% contribution of Marcellus HFW (a range of 70-200 μg/L for HFW with bromide = 600 mg/L) mimics the increased bromide levels observed in western Pennsylvanian surface waters following the Marcellus Shale gas production boom. Chloramination reduced HAN and regulated THM formation; however, iodinated trihalomethane formation was observed at lower pH. For municipal wastewater-impacted river water, the presence of 0.1% HFW increased the formation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) during chloramination, particularly for the high iodide (54 ppm) Fayetteville Shale HFW. Finally, ozonation of 0.01-0.03% HFW-impacted river water resulted in significant increases in bromate formation. The results suggest that total elimination of HFW discharge and/or installation of halide-specific removal techniques in centralized brine treatment facilities may be a better strategy to mitigate impacts on downstream drinking water treatment plants than altering

  11. Unexpected inhibition of CO 2 gas hydrate formation in dilute TBAB solutions and the critical role of interfacial water structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ngoc N.; Nguyen, Anh V.; Nguyen, Khoi T.

    Gas hydrates formed under moderated conditions open up novel approaches to tackling issues related to energy supply, gas separation, and CO 2 sequestration. Several additives like tetra-n-butylammonium bromide (TBAB) have been empirically developed and used to promote gas hydrate formation. Here we report unexpected experimental results which show that TBAB inhibits CO 2 gas hydrate formation when used at minuscule concentration. We also used spectroscopic techniques and molecular dynamics simulation to gain further insights and explain the experimental results. They have revealed the critical role of water alignment at the gas-water interface induced by surface adsorption of tetra-n-butylammonium cation (TBAmore » +) which gives rise to the unexpected inhibition of dilute TBAB solution. The water perturbation by TBA + in the bulk is attributed to the promotion effect of high TBAB concentration on gas hydrate formation. We explain our finding using the concept of activation energy of gas hydrate formation. Our results provide a step toward to mastering the control of gas hydrate formation.« less

  12. Universal stability curve for pattern formation in pulsed gas-solid fluidized beds of sandlike particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Martín, Lilian; Ottevanger, Coen; van Ommen, J. Ruud; Coppens, Marc-Olivier

    2018-03-01

    A granular layer can form regular patterns, such as squares, stripes, and hexagons, when it is fluidized with a pulsating gas flow. These structures are reminiscent of the well-known patterns found in granular layers excited through vibration, but, contrarily to them, they have been hardly explored since they were first discovered. In this work, we investigate experimentally the conditions leading to pattern formation in pulsed fluidized beds and the dimensionless numbers governing the phenomenon. We show that the onset to the instability is universal for Geldart B (sandlike) particles and governed by the hydrodynamical parameters Γ =ua/(utϕ ¯) and f /fn , where ua and f are the amplitude and frequency of the gas velocity, respectively, ut is the terminal velocity of the particles, ϕ ¯ is the average solids fraction, and fn is the natural frequency of the bed. These findings suggest that patterns emerge as a result of a parametric resonance between the kinematic waves originating from the oscillating gas flow and the bulk dynamics. Particle friction plays virtually no role in the onset to pattern formation, but it is fundamental for pattern selection and stabilization.

  13. Star formation in M 33: the radial and local relations with the gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verley, S.; Corbelli, E.; Giovanardi, C.; Hunt, L. K.

    2010-02-01

    Aims: In the Local Group spiral galaxy M 33, we investigate the correlation between the star formation rate (SFR) surface density, Σ_SFR, and the gas density Σ_gas (molecular, atomic, and total). We also explore whether there are other physical quantities, such as the hydrostatic pressure and dust optical depth, which establish a good correlation with Σ_SFR. Methods: We use the Hα, far-ultraviolet (FUV), and bolometric emission maps to infer the SFR locally at different spatial scales, and in radial bins using azimuthally averaged values. Most of the local analysis is done using the highest spatial resolution allowed by gas surveys, 180 pc. The Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) law, Σ_SFR ∝ Σ_gas^n is analyzed by three statistical methods. Results: At all spatial scales, with Hα emission as a SFR tracer, the KS indices n are always steeper than those derived with the FUV and bolometric emissions. We attribute this to the lack of Hα emission in low luminosity regions where most stars form in small clusters with an incomplete initial mass function at their high mass end. For azimuthally averaged values the depletion timescale for the molecular gas is constant, and the KS index is n_H_2=1.1 ±0.1. Locally, at a spatial resolution of 180 pc, the correlation between Σ_SFR and Σ_gas is generally poor, even though it is tighter with the molecular and total gas than with the atomic gas alone. Considering only positions where the CO J=1-0 line is above the 2-σ detection threshold and taking into account uncertainties in Σ_H_2 and Σ_SFR, we obtain a steeper KS index than obtained with radial averages: n_H_2=2.22 ±0.07 (for FUV and bolometric SFR tracers), flatter than that relative to the total gas (n_Htot=2.59 ±0.05). The gas depletion timescale is therefore larger in regions of lower Σ_SFR. Lower KS indices (n_H_2=1.46 ±0.34 and n_H_2=1.12) are found using different fitting techniques, which do not account for individual position uncertainties. At coarser spatial

  14. Direct observations of gas-hydrate formation in natural porous media on the micro-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaouachi, M.; Sell, K.; Falenty, A.; Enzmann, F.; Kersten, M.; Pinzer, B.; Saenger, E. H.; Kuhs, W. F.

    2013-12-01

    Gas hydrates (GH) are crystalline, inclusion compounds consisting of hydrogen-bonded water network encaging small gas molecules such as methane, ethane, CO2, etc (Sloan and Koh 2008). Natural gas hydrates are found worldwide in marine sediments and permafrost regions as a result of a reaction of biogenic or thermogenic gas with water under elevated pressure. Although a large amount of research on GH has been carried out over the years, the micro-structural aspects of GH growth, and in particular the contacts with the sedimentary matrix as well as the details of the distribution remain largely speculative. The present study was undertaken to shed light onto the well-established but not fully understood seismic anomalies, in particular the unusual attenuation of seismic waves in GH-bearing sediments, which may well be linked to micro-structural features. Observations of in-situ GH growth have been performed in a custom-build pressure cell (operating pressures up to several bar) mounted at the TOMCAT beam line of SLS/ PSI. In order to provide sufficient absorption contrast between phases and reduce pressure requirements for the cell we have used Xe instead of CH4. To the best of our knowledge this represents the first direct observation of GH growth in natural porous media with sub-micron spatial resolution and gives insight into the nucleation location and growth process of GH. The progress of the formation of sI Xe-hydrate in natural quartz sand was observed with a time-resolution of several minutes; the runs were conducted with an excess of a free-gas phase and show that the nucleation starts at the gas-water interface. Initially, a GH film is formed at this interface with a typical thickness of several μm; this film may well be permeable to gas as suggested in the past - which would explain the rapid transport of gas molecules for further conversion of water to hydrate, completed in less than 20 min. Clearly, initially the growth is directed mainly into the

  15. Gas clump formation via thermal instability in high-redshift dwarf galaxy mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arata, Shohei; Yajima, Hidenobu; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2018-04-01

    Star formation in high-redshift dwarf galaxies is a key to understand early galaxy evolution in the early Universe. Using the three-dimensional hydrodynamics code GIZMO, we study the formation mechanism of cold, high-density gas clouds in interacting dwarf galaxies with halo masses of ˜3 × 107 M⊙, which are likely to be the formation sites of early star clusters. Our simulations can resolve both the structure of interstellar medium on small scales of ≲ 0.1 pc and the galactic disc simultaneously. We find that the cold gas clouds form in the post-shock region via thermal instability due to metal-line cooling, when the cooling time is shorter than the galactic dynamical time. The mass function of cold clouds shows almost a power-law initially with an upper limit of thermally unstable scale. We find that some clouds merge into more massive ones with ≳104 M⊙ within ˜ 2 Myr. Only the massive cold clouds with ≳ 103 M⊙ can keep collapsing due to gravitational instability, resulting in the formation of star clusters. We find that the clump formation is more efficient in the prograde-prograde merger than the prograde-retrograde case due to the difference in the degree of shear flow. In addition, we investigate the dependence of cloud mass function on metallicity and H2 abundance, and show that the cases with low metallicities (≲10-2 Z⊙) or high H2 abundance (≳10-3) cannot form massive cold clouds with ≳103 M⊙.

  16. Formation of TiC-core, Graphitic-mantle Grains from CO Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate a new formation route for TiC-core, graphitic-mantle spherules that does not require c-atom addition and the very long timescales associated with such growth (Bernatowicz et al. 1996). Carbonaceous materials can also be formed from C2H2 and its derivatives, as well as from CO gas. In this paper, we will demonstrate that large cage structure carbon particles can be produced from CO gas by the Boudouard reaction. Since the sublimation temperature for such fullerenes is low, the large cages can be deposited onto previously-nucleated TiC and produce TiC-core, graphitic-mantle spherules. New constraints for the formation conditions and the timescale for the formation of TiC-core, graphitic-mantle spherules are suggested by the results of this study. In particular, TiC-core, graphitic-mantle grains found in primitive meteorites that have never experienced hydration could be mantled by fullerenes or carbon nanotubes rather than by graphite. In situ observations of these grains in primitive anhydrous meteoritic matrix could confirm or refute this prediction and would demonstrate that the graphitic mantle on such grains is a metamorphic feature due to interaction of the pre-solar fullerenes with water within the meteorite matrix.

  17. Formation of TiC core-graphitic mantle grains from CO gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A.; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2006-05-01

    We demonstrate a new formation route for TiC core-graphitic mantle spherules that does not require carbon-atom addition and the very long time scales associated with such growth (Bernatowicz et al. 1996). Carbonaceous materials can be formed from C2H2 and its derivatives, as well as from CO gas. In this paper, we will demonstrate that large-cage-structure carbon particles can be produced from CO gas by the Boudouard reaction. Since the sublimation temperature for such fullerenes is low, the large cages can be deposited onto previously nucleated TiC and produce TiC core-graphitic mantle spherules. New constraints for the formation conditions and the time scale for the formation of TiC core-graphitic mantle spherules are suggested by the results of this study. In particular, TiC core-graphitic mantle grains that are found in primitive meteorites that have never experienced hydration could be mantled by fullerenes or carbon nanotubes rather than by graphite. In situ observations of these grains in primitive anhydrous meteoritic matrix could confirm or refute this prediction and would demonstrate that the graphitic mantle on such grains is a metamorphic feature due to interaction of the presolar fullerenes with water within the meteorite matrix.

  18. Cast abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Kelly D; Goucher, Nicholas R

    2006-01-01

    This report describes a case in which a pediatric patient wounded his ankle when he stuck an object inside the cast while trying to scratch himself. The wound became infected and resulted in a limb-threatening abscess. Although most patients treated with casts do not have any significant problems, it is important to emphasize cast care instructions to young patients and their parents. In addition, it may be equally important to advise patients about safe methods to alleviate itching, such as blowing cool air under the cast. In this way, the risk of serious infectious complications can be minimized.

  19. Syringe test screening of microbial gas production activity: Cases denitrification and biogas formation.

    PubMed

    Østgaard, Kjetill; Kowarz, Viktoria; Shuai, Wang; Henry, Ingrid A; Sposob, Michal; Haugen, Hildegunn Hegna; Bakke, Rune

    2017-01-01

    Mass produced plastic syringes may be applied as vessels for cheap, simple and large scale batch culture testing. As illustrated for the cases of denitrification and of biogas formation, metabolic activity was monitored by direct reading of the piston movement due to the gas volume formed. Pressure buildup due to friction was shown to be moderate. A piston pull and slide back routine can be applied before recording gas volume to minimize experimental errors due to friction. Inoculum handling and activity may be conveniently standardized as illustrated by applying biofilm carriers. A robust set of positive as well as negative controls ("blanks") should be included to ensure quality of the actual testing. The denitrification test showed saturation response at increasing amounts of inoculum in the form of adapted moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) carriers, with well correlated nitrate consumption vs. gas volume formed. As shown, the denitrification test efficiently screened different inocula at standardized substrates. Also, different substrates were successfully screened and compared at standardized inocula. The biogas potential test showed efficient screening of different substrates with effects of relative amounts of carbohydrate, protein, fat. A second case with CO 2 capture reclaimer waste as substrate demonstrated successful use of co-feeding to support waste treatment and how temperature effects on kinetics and stoichiometry can be observed. In total, syringe test screening of microbial gas production seems highly efficient at a low cost when properly applied. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Doppler indices of gas phase formation in hypobaric environments: Time-intensity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    A semi-quantitative method to analyze decompression data is described. It possesses the advantage that it allows a graded response to decompression rather than the dichotomous response generally employed. A generalized critical volume (C-V), or stoichiometric time-dependent equilibrium model is examined that relates the constant of the equation P sub i equals m P sub f plus b to variable tissue supersaturation and gas washout terms. The effects of the tissue ratio on gas phase formation indicate that a decreased ratio yields fewer individuals with Doppler detectable gas bubbles, but those individuals still present with Spencer Grade 3 or 4. This might indicate a local collapse of tissue saturation. The individuals with Grade 3 or 4 could be at risk for type 2 decompression sickness by transpulmonic arterialization. The primary regulator of the problems of decompression sickness is the reduction of local supersaturation, presumably governed by the presence and number of gas micronuclei. It is postulated that a reduction in these nuclei will favor a low incidence of decompression sickness in microgravity secondary to hypokinesia and adynamia.

  1. Formation of Carbamate Anions by the Gas-phase Reaction of Anilide Ions with CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongming; Nishshanka, Upul; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2016-05-01

    The anilide anion ( m/z 92) generated directly from aniline, or indirectly as a fragmentation product of deprotonated acetanilide, captures CO2 readily to form the carbamate anion ( m/z 136) in the collision cell, when CO2 is used as the collision gas in a tandem-quadrupole mass spectrometer. The gas-phase affinity of the anilide ion to CO2 is significantly higher than that of the phenoxide anion ( m/z 93), which adds to CO2 only very sluggishly. Our results suggest that the efficacy of CO2 capture depends on the natural charge density on the nitrogen atom, and relative nucleophilicity of the anilide anion. Generally, conjugate bases generated from aniline derivatives with proton affinities (PA) less than 350 kcal/mol do not tend to add CO2 to form gaseous carbamate ions. For example, the anion generated from p-methoxyaniline (PA = 367 kcal/mol) reacts significantly faster than that obtained from p-nitroaniline (PA = 343 kcal/mol). Although deprotonated p-aminobenzoic acid adds very poorly because the negative charge is now located primarily on the carboxylate group, it reacts more efficiently with CO2 if the carboxyl group is esterified. Moreover, mixture of CO2 and He as the collision gas was found to afford more efficient adduct formation than CO2 alone, or as mixtures made with nitrogen or argon, because helium acts as an effective "cooling" gas and reduces the internal energy of reactant ions.

  2. Star formation and gas inflows in the OH Megamaser galaxy IRAS03056+2034

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hekatelyne, C.; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Sales, Dinalva; Robinson, Andrew; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Kharb, Preeti; Gallimore, Jack; Baum, Stefi; O'Dea, Christopher

    2018-06-01

    We have obtained observations of the OH Megamaser galaxy IRAS03056+0234 using Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) Integral Field Unit (IFU), Very Large Array (VLA) and Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HST data reveals spiral arms containing knots of emission associated to star forming regions. The GMOS-IFU data cover the spectral range of 4500 to 7500 Å at a velocity resolution of 90 km s-1 and spatial resolution of 506 pc. The emission-line flux distributions reveal a ring of star forming regions with radius of 786 pc centred at the nucleus of the galaxy, with an ionized gas mass of 1.2× 108M⊙, an ionizing photon luminosity of log Q[H+]=53.8 and a star formation rate of 4.9 M⊙ yr-1. The emission-line ratios and radio emission suggest that the gas at the nuclear region is excited by both starburst activity and an active galactic nucleus. The gas velocity fields are partially reproduced by rotation in the galactic plane, but show, in addition, excess redshifts to the east of the nucleus, consistent with gas inflows towards the nucleus, with velocity of ˜45 km s-1 and a mass inflow rate of ˜7.7 × 10-3 M⊙ yr-1.

  3. Orbital abscess caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum.

    PubMed

    Pitkäranta, Anne; Lindahl, Päivi; Raade, Merja; Puohiniemi, Ritvaleena

    2004-05-01

    We report the case of previously healthy boy with orbital abscess secondary to sinusitis. Fusobacterium necrophorum and Streptococcus anginosus was cultured both from the maxillary sinus and the orbital abscess. After surgical drainage and intravenous antibiotic treatment the boy recovered without complications.

  4. Microbiology and Treatment of Acute Apical Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416

  5. Cold tuberculous abscess identified by FDG PET.

    PubMed

    Yago, Yuzo; Yukihiro, Masashi; Kuroki, Hirofumi; Katsuragawa, Yuzo; Kubota, Kazuo

    2005-09-01

    We report FDG PET of two cases of cold abscess due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Case 1 had colon cancer; FDG PET showed high FDG uptake in the colon lesion and low uptake in the inguinal lesion. The latter was a tuberculous cold abscess confirmed by CT/MRI and biopsy. Case 2 received radiotherapy for lung cancer and presented with suspected vertebral metastasis. Further studies revealed tuberculosis of the vertebra and a tuberculous cold abscess in the iliopsoas muscle. FDG PET showed moderate uptake in the third lumbar spine and low uptake in the abscess center of iliopsoas lesion. Both tuberculous cold abscesses showed moderate FDG uptake in the capsule and low uptake in the center. These features are unique compared with non-tuberculous abscess and typical tuberculosis lesions, which are characterized by high FDG uptake. Pathologically, tuberculous cold abscess is not accompanied by active inflammatory reaction. Our findings suggested that the FDG uptake by tuberculous lesion varies according to the grade of inflammatory activity. The new diagnostic features of tuberculous cold abscess may be useful in the evaluation of such lesions by FDG PET.

  6. Association of gas hydrate formation in fluid discharges with anomalous hydrochemical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveeva, T.

    2009-04-01

    Numerous investigations worldwide have shown that active underwater fluid discharge produces specific structures on the seafloor such as submarine seepages, vents, pockmarks, and collapse depressions. Intensive fluxes of fluids, especially of those containing hydrocarbon gases, result in specific geochemical and physical conditions favorable for gas hydrate (GH) formation. GH accumulations associated with fluid discharge are usually controlled by fluid conduits such as mud volcanoes, diapirs or faults. During last decade, subaqueous GHs become the subject of the fuel in the nearest future. However, the expediency of their commercial development can be proved solely by revealing conditions and mechanisms of GH formation. Kinetic of GH growth (although it is incompletely understood) is one of the important parameters controlling their formation among with gas solubility, pressure, temperature, gas quantity and others. Original large dataset on hydrate-related interstitial fluids obtained from different fluid discharge areas at the Sea of Okhotsk, Black Sea, Gulf of Cadiz, Lake Baikal (Eastern Siberia) allow to suggest close relation of the subaqueous GH formation process to anomalous hydrochemical profiles. We have studied the chemical and isotopic composition of interstitial fluids from GH-bearing and GH-free sediments obtained at different GH accumulations. Most attention was paid to possible influence of the interstitial fluid chemistry on the kinetic of GH formation in a porous media. The influence of salts on methane solubility within hydrate stability zones was considered by Handa (1990), Zatsepina & Buffet (1998), and later by Davie et al. (2004) from a theoretical point of view. Our idea is based on the experimentally proved fact that fugacity coefficient of methane dissolved in saline gas-saturated water which is in equilibrium with hydrates, is higher than that in more fresh water though the solubility is lower. Therefore, if a gradient of water salinity

  7. Gas bubble formation and its pressure signature in T-junction of a microreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouya, Shahram; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr

    2013-11-01

    The segmented gas-liquid flow is of particular interest in microreactors used for high throughput material synthesis with enhanced mixing and more efficient reaction. A typical geometry to introduce gas plugs into the reactor is a T-junction where the dispersed liquid is squeezed and pinched by the continuous fluid in the main branch of the junction. We present experimental data of time resolved pressure along with synchronous imaging of the drop formation at the junction to show the transient behavior of the process. The stability of the slug regime and the regularity of the slug/plug pattern are investigated in this study. This work was supported by the CRC Program of the National Science Foundation, Grant Number CHE-0714028.

  8. Breast abscess: evidence based management recommendations.

    PubMed

    Lam, Elaine; Chan, Tiffany; Wiseman, Sam M

    2014-07-01

    Literature review was carried out and studies reporting on treatment of breast abscesses were critically appraised for quality and their level of evidence using the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy guidelines, and key recommendations were summarized. Needle aspiration either with or without ultrasound guidance should be employed as first line treatment of breast abscesses. This approach has the potential benefits of: superior cosmesis, shorter healing time, and avoidance of general anaesthesia. Multiple aspiration sessions may be required for cure. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous catheter placement may be considered as an alternative approach for treatment of larger abscesses (>3 cm). Surgical incision and drainage should be considered for first line therapy in large (>5 cm), multiloculated, or long standing abscesses, or if percutaneous drainage is unsuccessful. All patients should be treated concurrently with antibiotics. Patients with recurrent subareolar abscesses and fistulas should be referred for consideration of surgical treatment.

  9. Organic substances in produced and formation water from unconventional natural gas extraction in coal and shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, William H.; Tatu, Calin A.; Varonka, Matthew S.; Lerch, Harry E.; Bates, Anne L.; Engle, Mark A.; Crosby, Lynn M.; McIntosh, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Organic substances in produced and formation water from coalbed methane (CBM) and gas shale plays from across the USA were examined in this study. Disposal of produced waters from gas extraction in coal and shale is an important environmental issue because of the large volumes of water involved and the variable quality of this water. Organic substances in produced water may be environmentally relevant as pollutants, but have been little studied. Results from five CBM plays and two gas shale plays (including the Marcellus Shale) show a myriad of organic chemicals present in the produced and formation water. Organic compound classes present in produced and formation water in CBM plays include: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic compounds, alkyl phenols, aromatic amines, alkyl aromatics (alkyl benzenes, alkyl biphenyls), long-chain fatty acids, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Concentrations of individual compounds range from < 1 to 100 μg/L, but total PAHs (the dominant compound class for most CBM samples) range from 50 to 100 μg/L. Total dissolved organic carbon (TOC) in CBM produced water is generally in the 1–4 mg/L range. Excursions from this general pattern in produced waters from individual wells arise from contaminants introduced by production activities (oils, grease, adhesives, etc.). Organic substances in produced and formation water from gas shale unimpacted by production chemicals have a similar range of compound classes as CBM produced water, and TOC levels of about 8 mg/L. However, produced water from the Marcellus Shale using hydraulic fracturing has TOC levels as high as 5500 mg/L and a range of added organic chemicals including, solvents, biocides, scale inhibitors, and other organic chemicals at levels of 1000 s of μg/L for individual compounds. Levels of these hydraulic fracturing chemicals and TOC decrease rapidly over the first 20 days of water recovery and some level of residual organic contaminants remain up to 250 days after

  10. Investigation of the Intake of a Stationary Gas Turbine to Prevent Ice Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramposch, Andreas; Molnár, Vojtech; Ridzoň, František

    2011-12-01

    Repeated emergency shutdowns of a stationary gas turbine under conditions of sub-freezing temperatures and moist air have led to the suspicion that ice formation in the intake channel and compressor may be a contributing factor. To understand the reason, why the installed ice protection system is not effective, a numerical investigation of the intake channel with the installed hot air ice protection system has been performed. It is shown that mixing of hot air with cold outside air is incomplete, explaining the ice accretion.

  11. Incidence and Risk Factors for Liver Abscess After Thermal Ablation of Liver Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiu-Feng; Li, Na; Chen, Xu-Fang; Zhang, Lei; Yan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and microwave ablation (MWA) are the most frequently used thermal ablation methods for the treatment of liver cancer. Liver abscess is a common and severe complication of thermal ablation treatment. Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors of liver abscess formation after thermal ablation of liver cancer. Materials and Methods The clinical data of 423 patients who underwent 691 thermal ablation procedures for liver cancer were collected in order to retrospectively analyze the basic characteristics, incidence, and risk factors associated with liver abscess formation. Patients with multiple risk factors for liver abscess formation were enrolled in a risk factor group, and patients with no risk factors were enrolled in a control group. The chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to analyze the relationship between the occurrence of liver abscesses and potential risk factors. Results Two hundred and eight patients underwent 385 RFA procedures, and 185 patients underwent 306 MWA procedures. The total incidence of liver abscesses was 1.7%, while the rates in the RFA group (1.8%) and MWA groups (1.6%) were similar (P > 0.05). The rates of liver abscesses in patients who had child-pugh class B and class C cirrhosis (P = 0.0486), biliary tract disease (P = 0.0305), diabetes mellitus (P = 0.0344), and porta hepatis tumors (P = 0.0123) were 4.0%, 6.7%, 6.5%, and 13.0%, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between these four groups and the control group (all P < 0.05). The incidence of liver abscesses in the combined ablation and percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) group (P = 0.0026) was significantly lower than that of the ablation group (P < 0.05). Conclusions The incidence of liver abscesses after liver cancer thermal ablation is low. Child-Pugh Class B and Class C cirrhosis, biliary tract disease, diabetes mellitus, and porta hepatis

  12. Assessment of undiscovered continuous oil and gas resources in the Monterey Formation, Los Angeles Basin Province, California, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Pitman, Janet K.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Le, Phuong A.; Lillis, Paul G.; Marra, Kristen R.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2016-07-08

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey assessed technically recoverable mean resources of 13 million barrels of oil, 22 billion cubic feet of gas, and 1 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the Monterey Formation of the Los Angeles Basin Province, California.

  13. Predictors of Primary Breast Abscesses and Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Bharat, Ankit; Gao, Feng; Aft, Rebecca L.; Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background We investigated the patients and microbiological risk factors that predispose to the development of primary breast abscesses and subsequent recurrence. Methods Patients with a primary breast abscess requiring surgical therapy between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2006 were reviewed. Recurrent breast abscess was defined by the need for repeated drainage within 6 months. Patient characteristics were compared to the general population and between groups. Results A total of 89 patients with a primary breast abscess were identified; 12 (14%) were lactational and 77 (86%) were nonlactational. None of the lactational abscesses recurred, whereas 43 (57%) of the nonlactational abscesses did so (P < 0.01). Compared to the general population, patients with a primary breast abscess were predominantly African American (64% vs. 12%), had higher rates of obesity (body mass index > 30: 43% vs. 22%), and were tobacco smokers (45% vs, 23%) (P < 0.01 for all). The only factor significantly associated with recurrence in the multivariate logistic regression analysis was tobacco smoking (P = 0.003). Compared to patients who did not have a recurrence, patients with recurrent breast abscesses had a higher incidence of mixed bacteria (20.5% vs. 8.9%), anaerobes (4.5% vs. 0%), and Proteus (9.1% vs. 4.4%) but lower incidence of Staphylococcus (4.6% vs. 24.4%) (P < 0.05 for each). Conclusions Risk factors for developing a primary breast abscess include African American race, obesity, and tobacco smoking. Patients with recurrent breast abscesses are more likely to be smokers and have mixed bacterial and anaerobic infections. Broader antibiotic coverage should be considered for the higher risk groups. PMID:19669231

  14. Abscess incision and drainage in the emergency department--Part I.

    PubMed

    Halvorson, G D; Halvorson, J E; Iserson, K V

    1985-01-01

    Superficial abscesses are commonly seen in the emergency department. In most cases, they can be adequately treated by the emergency physician without hospital admission. Treatment consists of surgical drainage with the addition of antibiotics in selected cases. Incision is generally performed using local anesthesia, with intraoperative and postoperative systemic analgesia. Care must be taken to make a surgically appropriate incision that allows adequate drainage without injuring important structures. Postoperative care includes warm soaks, drains or wicks, analgesia, and close follow-up. Antibiotics are usually unnecessary. Complications of incision and drainage include damage to adjacent structures, bacteremic complications, misdiagnosis of such entities as mycotic aneurysms, and spread of infection owing to inadequate drainage. The infectious agents responsible for abscess formation are numerous and depend largely on the anatomic location of the abscess. Staphylococcus aureus accounts for less than half of all cutaneous abscesses. Anaerobic bacteria are common etiologic agents in the perineum and account for the majority of all cutaneous abscesses. Abscesses at specific locations involve special consideration for diagnosis and treatment and may require specialty consultation.

  15. Detailed modeling analysis for soot formation and radiation in microgravity gas jet diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jerry C.; Tong, LI; Greenberg, Paul S.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation heat transfer in combustion systems has been receiving increasing interest. In the case of hydrocarbon fuels, a significant portion of the radiation comes from soot particles, justifying the need for detailed soot formation model and radiation transfer calculations. For laminar gas jet diffusion flames, results from this project (4/1/91 8/22/95) and another NASA study show that flame shape, soot concentration, and radiation heat fluxes are substantially different under microgravity conditions. Our emphasis is on including detailed soot transport models and a detailed solution for radiation heat transfer, and on coupling them with the flame structure calculations. In this paper, we will discuss the following three specific areas: (1) Comparing two existing soot formation models, and identifying possible improvements; (2) A simple yet reasonably accurate approach to calculating total radiative properties and/or fluxes over the spectral range; and (3) Investigating the convergence of iterations between the flame structure solver and the radiation heat transfer solver.

  16. Chondroblastic osteosarcoma mimicking periapical abscess

    PubMed Central

    YAMAMOTO-SILVA, Fernanda Paula; SILVA, Brunno Santos de Freitas; BATISTA, Aline Carvalho; de MENDONÇA, Elismauro Francisco; PINTO-JÚNIOR, Décio dos Santos; ESTRELA, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lesions of non-endodontic origin may mimic periapical abscess. Osteosarcoma is a rare malignant lesion. Case report The present report describes a case of chondroblastic osteosarcoma in the periapical region of teeth #29, #30, and #31 of an 18-year-old male. Clinical history showed self-reported discomfort in the right posterior gingiva for over a month. Physical examination showed a small expansion and redness of the right mandibular buccal and lingual cortical plates, but no signs of pain or inflammation were observed. All the teeth responded positively to pulp sensibility. Periapical and panoramic radiographs showed slight periapical radiolucency in the roots of teeth #29 and #30, clear periodontal ligament space widening, and evident loss of lamina dura. Incisional biopsy was performed, and based on microscopic findings the diagnosis of chondroblastic osteosarcoma was confirmed. Conclusions Non-endodontic diseases associated with tooth root apex, such as chondroblastic osteosarcoma, should be included in differential diagnosis of jaw lesions that resemble periapical abscess. PMID:28877285

  17. Fuel composition and secondary organic aerosol formation: gas-turbine exhaust and alternative aviation fuels.

    PubMed

    Miracolo, Marissa A; Drozd, Greg T; Jathar, Shantanu H; Presto, Albert A; Lipsky, Eric M; Corporan, Edwin; Robinson, Allen L

    2012-08-07

    A series of smog chamber experiments were performed to investigate the effects of fuel composition on secondary particulate matter (PM) formation from dilute exhaust from a T63 gas-turbine engine. Tests were performed at idle and cruise loads with the engine fueled on conventional military jet fuel (JP-8), Fischer-Tropsch synthetic jet fuel (FT), and a 50/50 blend of the two fuels. Emissions were sampled into a portable smog chamber and exposed to sunlight or artificial UV light to initiate photo-oxidation. Similar to previous studies, neat FT fuel and a 50/50 FT/JP-8 blend reduced the primary particulate matter emissions compared to neat JP-8. After only one hour of photo-oxidation at typical atmospheric OH levels, the secondary PM production in dilute exhaust exceeded primary PM emissions, except when operating the engine at high load on FT fuel. Therefore, accounting for secondary PM production should be considered when assessing the contribution of gas-turbine engine emissions to ambient PM levels. FT fuel substantially reduced secondary PM formation in dilute exhaust compared to neat JP-8 at both idle and cruise loads. At idle load, the secondary PM formation was reduced by a factor of 20 with the use of neat FT fuel, and a factor of 2 with the use of the blend fuel. At cruise load, the use of FT fuel resulted in no measured formation of secondary PM. In every experiment, the secondary PM was dominated by organics with minor contributions from sulfate when the engine was operated on JP-8 fuel. At both loads, FT fuel produces less secondary organic aerosol than JP-8 because of differences in the composition of the fuels and the resultant emissions. This work indicates that fuel reformulation may be a viable strategy to reduce the contribution of emissions from combustion systems to secondary organic aerosol production and ultimately ambient PM levels.

  18. A MOLECULAR STAR FORMATION LAW IN THE ATOMIC-GAS-DOMINATED REGIME IN NEARBY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Schruba, Andreas; Walter, Fabian; Dumas, Gaelle

    2011-08-15

    We use the IRAM HERACLES survey to study CO emission from 33 nearby spiral galaxies down to very low intensities. Using 21 cm line atomic hydrogen (H I) data, mostly from THINGS, we predict the local mean CO velocity based on the mean H I velocity. By re-normalizing the CO velocity axis so that zero corresponds to the local mean H I velocity we are able to stack spectra coherently over large regions. This enables us to measure CO intensities with high significance as low as I{sub CO} {approx} 0.3 K km s{sup -1} ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}{approx}1 M{sub sun} pc{supmore » -2}), an improvement of about one order of magnitude over previous studies. We detect CO out to galactocentric radii r{sub gal} {approx} r{sub 25} and find the CO radial profile to follow a remarkably uniform exponential decline with a scale length of {approx}0.2 r{sub 25}. Here we focus on stacking as a function of radius, comparing our sensitive CO profiles to matched profiles of H I, H{alpha}, far-UV (FUV), and Infrared (IR) emission at 24 {mu}m and 70 {mu}m. We observe a tight, roughly linear relationship between CO and IR intensity that does not show any notable break between regions that are dominated by molecular gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}>{Sigma}{sub H{sub i}}) and those dominated by atomic gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}<{Sigma}{sub H{sub i}}). We use combinations of FUV+24 {mu}m and H{alpha}+24 {mu}m to estimate the recent star formation rate (SFR) surface density, {Sigma}{sub SFR}, and find approximately linear relations between {Sigma}{sub SFR} and {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}. We interpret this as evidence of stars forming in molecular gas with little dependence on the local total gas surface density. While galaxies display small internal variations in the SFR-to-H{sub 2} ratio, we do observe systematic galaxy-to-galaxy variations. These galaxy-to-galaxy variations dominate the scatter in relationships between CO and SFR tracers measured at large scales. The variations have the sense that less

  19. Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO(2) sink in natural gas fields.

    PubMed

    Gilfillan, Stuart M V; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Holland, Greg; Blagburn, Dave; Stevens, Scott; Schoell, Martin; Cassidy, Martin; Ding, Zhenju; Zhou, Zheng; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Ballentine, Chris J

    2009-04-02

    Injecting CO(2) into deep geological strata is proposed as a safe and economically favourable means of storing CO(2) captured from industrial point sources. It is difficult, however, to assess the long-term consequences of CO(2) flooding in the subsurface from decadal observations of existing disposal sites. Both the site design and long-term safety modelling critically depend on how and where CO(2) will be stored in the site over its lifetime. Within a geological storage site, the injected CO(2) can dissolve in solution or precipitate as carbonate minerals. Here we identify and quantify the principal mechanism of CO(2) fluid phase removal in nine natural gas fields in North America, China and Europe, using noble gas and carbon isotope tracers. The natural gas fields investigated in our study are dominated by a CO(2) phase and provide a natural analogue for assessing the geological storage of anthropogenic CO(2) over millennial timescales. We find that in seven gas fields with siliciclastic or carbonate-dominated reservoir lithologies, dissolution in formation water at a pH of 5-5.8 is the sole major sink for CO(2). In two fields with siliciclastic reservoir lithologies, some CO(2) loss through precipitation as carbonate minerals cannot be ruled out, but can account for a maximum of 18 per cent of the loss of emplaced CO(2). In view of our findings that geological mineral fixation is a minor CO(2) trapping mechanism in natural gas fields, we suggest that long-term anthropogenic CO(2) storage models in similar geological systems should focus on the potential mobility of CO(2) dissolved in water.

  20. Gas-phase hydrolysis of triplet SO2: A possible direct route to atmospheric acid formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, D. James; Kroll, Jay A.; Vaida, Veronica

    2016-07-01

    Sulfur chemistry is of great interest to the atmospheric chemistry of several planets. In the presence of water, oxidized sulfur can lead to new particle formation, influencing climate in significant ways. Observations of sulfur compounds in planetary atmospheres when compared with model results suggest that there are missing chemical mechanisms. Here we propose a novel mechanism for the formation of sulfurous acid, which may act as a seed for new particle formation. In this proposed mechanism, the lowest triplet state of SO2 (3B1), which may be accessed by near-UV solar excitation of SO2 to its excited 1B1 state followed by rapid intersystem crossing, reacts directly with water to form H2SO3 in the gas phase. For ground state SO2, this reaction is endothermic and has a very high activation barrier; our quantum chemical calculations point to a facile reaction being possible in the triplet state of SO2. This hygroscopic H2SO3 molecule may act as a condensation nucleus for water, giving rise to facile new particle formation (NPF).

  1. The big fat LARS - a LArge Reservoir Simulator for hydrate formation and gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeskow-Strauch, Bettina; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja; Priegnitz, Mike; Klump, Jens; Thaler, Jan; Abendroth, Sven

    2013-04-01

    Simulating natural scenarios on lab scale is a common technique to gain insight into geological processes with moderate effort and expenses. Due to the remote occurrence of gas hydrates, their behavior in sedimentary deposits is largely investigated on experimental set ups in the laboratory. In the framework of the submarine gas hydrate research project (SUGAR) a large reservoir simulator (LARS) with an internal volume of 425 liter has been designed, built and tested. To our knowledge this is presently a word-wide unique set up. Because of its large volume it is suitable for pilot plant scale tests on hydrate behavior in sediments. That includes not only the option of systematic tests on gas hydrate formation in various sedimentary settings but also the possibility to mimic scenarios for the hydrate decomposition and subsequent natural gas extraction. Based on these experimental results various numerical simulations can be realized. Here, we present the design and the experimental set up of LARS. The prerequisites for the simulation of a natural gas hydrate reservoir are porous sediments, methane, water, low temperature and high pressure. The reservoir is supplied by methane-saturated and pre-cooled water. For its preparation an external gas-water mixing stage is available. The methane-loaded water is continuously flushed into LARS as finely dispersed fluid via bottom-and-top-located sparger. The LARS is equipped with a mantle cooling system and can be kept at a chosen set temperature. The temperature distribution is monitored at 14 reasonable locations throughout the reservoir by Pt100 sensors. Pressure needs are realized using syringe pump stands. A tomographic system, consisting of a 375-electrode-configuration is attached to the mantle for the monitoring of hydrate distribution throughout the entire reservoir volume. Two sets of tubular polydimethylsiloxan-membranes are applied to determine gas-water ratio within the reservoir using the effect of permeability

  2. Laboratory investigations of Titan haze formation: In situ measurement of gas and particle composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörst, Sarah M.; Yoon, Y. Heidi; Ugelow, Melissa S.; Parker, Alex H.; Li, Rui; de Gouw, Joost A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2018-02-01

    Prior to the arrival of the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft, aerosol production in Titan's atmosphere was believed to begin in the stratosphere where chemical processes are predominantly initiated by far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation. However, measurements taken by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) indicate that haze formation initiates in the thermosphere where there is a greater flux of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons and energetic particles available to initiate chemical reactions, including the destruction of N2. The discovery of previously unpredicted nitrogen species in measurements of Titan's atmosphere by the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) indicates that nitrogen participates in the chemistry to a much greater extent than was appreciated before Cassini. The degree of nitrogen incorporation in the haze particles is important for understanding the diversity of molecules that may be present in Titan's atmosphere and on its surface. We have conducted a series of Titan atmosphere simulation experiments using either spark discharge (Tesla coil) or FUV photons (deuterium lamp) to initiate chemistry in CH4/N2 gas mixtures ranging from 0.01% CH4/99.99% N2 to 10% CH4/90% N2. We obtained in situ real-time measurements using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) to measure the particle composition as a function of particle size and a proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) to measure the composition of gas phase products. These two techniques allow us to investigate the effect of energy source and initial CH4 concentration on the degree of nitrogen incorporation in both the gas and solid phase products. The results presented here confirm that FUV photons produce not only solid phase nitrogen bearing products but also gas phase nitrogen species. We find that in both the gas and solid phase, nitrogen is found in nitriles rather than amines and that both the

  3. THE ROLE OF GAS-PHASE CL2 IN THE FORMATION OF PCDD/PCDF DURING WASTE COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of previous experiments investigating formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF) through low-temperature (300°C), fly-ash-catalyzed reactions are demonstrated to have occurred through intermediate formation of gas-phase Cl2 by deco...

  4. Formation of novel rare-gas-containing molecules by molecular photodissociation in clusters.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A; Niv, M Y; Gerber, R B

    2001-01-01

    Recent work by Räsänen and coworkers showed that photolysis of hydrides in rare-gas matrices results in part in formation of novel, rare-gas-containing molecules. Thus, photolysis of HCl in Xe and of H2O in Xe result respectively in formation of HXeCl and HXeOH in the Xe matrices. Ab initio calculations show that the compounds HRgY so formed are stable in isolation, and that by the strength and nature of the bonding these are molecules, very different from the corresponding weakly bound clusters Rg...HY. This paper presents a study of the formation mechanism of HRgY following the photolysis of HY in clusters Rgn(HY). Calculations are described for HXeCl, as a representative example. Potential energy surfaces that govern the formation of HXeCl in the photolysis of HCl in xenon clusters are obtained, and the dynamics on these surfaces is analyzed, partly with insight from trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations. The potential surfaces are obtained by a new variant of the DIM (diatomics in molecules) and DIIS (diatomics in ionic systems) models. Non-adiabatic couplings are also obtained. The main results are: (1) Properties of HXeCl predicted by the DIM-DIIS model are in reasonable accord with results of ab initio calculations. (2) The potential along the isomerization path HXeCl-->Xe...HCl predicted by DIM is in semiquantitative accord with the ab initio results. (3) Surface-hopping molecular dynamics simulations of the process in clusters, with "on the fly" calculations of the DIM-DIIS potentials and non-adiabatic couplings are computationally feasible. (4) Formation of HXeCl, following photolysis of HCl in Xe54(HCl), requires cage-exit of the H atom as a precondition. The H atom and the Cl can then attack the same Xe atom on opposite sides, leading to charge transfer and production of the ionic HXeCl. (5) Non-adiabatic processes play an important role, both in the reagent configurations, and at the charge-transfer stage. The results open the way to

  5. Prebreakdown phenomena and formation process of the glow discharge in low-pressure Ar gas

    SciTech Connect

    Hosokawa, Tatsuzo; Goto, Kazuhiro; Ohuchi, Mikio

    2001-06-01

    The prebreakdown phenomena and the formation process of the glow discharge in a low-pressure Ar gas were investigated under a uniform field gap. Prebreakdown phenomena were observed for 0.5Torrcm{le}pd{le}2Torrcm (where p is pressure, d the gap distance) in Ar gas under conditions of a slowly increasing voltage. It was observed that the prebreakdown phenomena formed pulse discharges up to the transition to the glow discharge. The amplitudes of the photon and current pulses due to the pulse discharge increased with time, and then decreased as soon as the transition to a steady glow discharge occurred. When the overvoltage or externalmore » series resistance was increased, the pulse amplitudes increased with the applied voltage and decreased with the resistance. The characteristics of the prebreakdown phenomena were changed by the shape of the electrodes. The formation mechanism of the glow discharge can be qualitatively explained by that of the streamer in a high-pressure discharge. The transient glow discharge was observed, and its duration increased with an increase in resistance. The instability of the glow discharge was controlled by three factors, namely, Kaufmann{close_quote}s criterion, the Child{endash}Langmuir law, and the density balance between the production and removal rates of electrons. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.« less

  6. Development and validation of a new soot formation model for gas turbine combustor simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Di Domenico, Massimiliano; Gerlinger, Peter; Aigner, Manfred

    2010-02-15

    In this paper a new soot formation model for gas turbine combustor simulations is presented. A sectional approach for the description of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and a two-equation model for soot particle dynamics are introduced. By including the PAH chemistry the formulation becomes more general in that the soot formation is neither directly linked to the fuel nor to C{sub 2}-like species, as it is the case in simpler soot models currently available for CFD applications. At the same time, the sectional approach for the PAHs keeps the required computational resources low if compared to models based on amore » detailed description of the PAH kinetics. These features of the new model allow an accurate yet affordable calculation of soot in complex gas turbine combustion chambers. A careful model validation will be presented for diffusion and partially premixed flames. Fuels ranging from methane to kerosene are investigated. Thus, flames with different sooting characteristics are covered. An excellent agreement with experimental data is achieved for all configurations investigated. A fundamental feature of the new model is that with a single set of constants it is able to accurately describe the soot dynamics of different fuels at different operating conditions. (author)« less

  7. Galaxy evolution in extreme environments: Molecular gas content star formation and AGN in isolated void galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mousumi; Iono, Daisuke; Saito, Toshiki; Subramanian, Smitha

    Since the early redshift surveys of the large scale structure of our universe, it has become clear that galaxies cluster along walls, sheet and filaments leaving large, empty regions called voids between them. Although voids represent the most under dense parts of our universe, they do contain a sparse but significant population of isolated galaxies that are generally low luminosity, late type disk galaxies. Recent studies show that most void galaxies have ongoing star formation and are in an early stage of evolution. We present radio, optical studies of the molecular gas content and star formation in a sample of void galaxies. Using SDSS data, we find that AGN are rare in these systems and are found only in the Bootes void; their black hole masses and radio properties are similar to bright spirals galaxies. Our studies suggest that close galaxy interactions and gas accretion are the main drivers of galaxy evolution in these systems despite their location in the underdense environment of the voids.

  8. Formation and Fragmentation Chemistry of Tripositive Ln(TMGA)33+ Complexes in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiuting; Li, Qingnuan; Gong, Yu

    2017-08-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) of LnCl 3 (Ln = La-Lu except Pm) and TMGA (tetramethyl glutaramide) mixtures resulted in the formation of gas-phase Ln(TMGA) 3 3+ complexes, where tripositive lanthanide cation was coordinated by three neutral TMGA ligands. Collision induced dissociation (CID) was employed to investigate the fragmentation chemistry of these tripositive complexes. Ln(TMGA) 2 (TMGA- 45) 3+ resulting from C carbonyl -N bond cleavage of TMGA and hydrogen transfer is the major CID product for all Ln(TMGA) 3 3+ except Eu(TMGA) 3 3+ which predominantly forms divalent Eu II (TMGA) 2 2+ complex via loss of TMGA + . Analogous Yb II (TMGA) 2 2+ and Sm II (TMGA) 2 2+ complexes arising from charge reduction were also observed, in competition with the formation of charge conserving Yb III (TMGA)(TMGA-H) 2+ and Sm III (TMGA)(TMGA-H) 2+ products. The yield of these charge reducing products follows their reduction potentials in condensed phase. In addition to Ln(TMGA) 3 3+ , tripositive ions such as Ln(TMGA) 4 3+ and Ln(TMGA) 2 3+ were experimentally identified as well. While the former was observed along with Ln(TMGA) 3 3+ during ESI, the latter was observed upon CID of Ln(TMGA) 3 3+ , suggesting two TMGA molecules can stabilize Ln 3+ in the gas phase. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... protect them from germs. Also, don't share clothing, towels, razors, or bed linens with anyone else. When these items get dirty, wash them separately in very hot water. Wash your hands well and often using plain soap and water for at least 20 seconds each time. It's OK to use alcohol-based ...

  10. Influence of the Substrate on the Formation of Metallic Glass Coatings by Cold Gas Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henao, John; Concustell, Amadeu; Dosta, Sergi; Cinca, Núria; Cano, Irene G.; Guilemany, Josep M.

    2016-06-01

    Cold gas spray technology has been used to build up coatings of Fe-base metallic glass onto different metallic substrates. In this work, the effect of the substrate properties on the viscoplastic response of metallic glass particles during their impact has been studied. Thick coatings with high deposition efficiencies have been built-up in conditions of homogeneous flow on substrates such as Mild Steel AISI 1040, Stainless Steel 316L, Inconel 625, Aluminum 7075-T6, and Copper (99.9%). Properties of the substrate have been identified to play an important role in the viscoplastic response of the metallic glass particles at impact. Depending on the process gas conditions, the impact morphologies show not only inhomogeneous deformation but also homogeneous plastic flow despite the high strain rates, 108 to 109 s-1, involved in the technique. Interestingly, homogenous deformation of metallic glass particles is promoted depending on the hardness and the thermal diffusivity of the substrate and it is not exclusively a function of the kinetic energy and the temperature of the particle at impact. Coating formation is discussed in terms of fundamentals of dynamics of undercooled liquids, viscoplastic flow mechanisms of metallic glasses, and substrate properties. The findings presented in this work have been used to build up a detailed scheme of the deposition mechanism of metallic glass coatings by the cold gas spraying technology.

  11. Possible Rapid Gas Giant Planet Formation in the Solar Nebula and Other Protoplanetary Disks.

    PubMed

    Boss

    2000-06-20

    Gas giant planets have been detected in orbit around an increasing number of nearby stars. Two theories have been advanced for the formation of such planets: core accretion and disk instability. Core accretion, the generally accepted mechanism, requires several million years or more to form a gas giant planet in a protoplanetary disk like the solar nebula. Disk instability, on the other hand, can form a gas giant protoplanet in a few hundred years. However, disk instability has previously been thought to be important only in relatively massive disks. New three-dimensional, "locally isothermal," hydrodynamical models without velocity damping show that a disk instability can form Jupiter-mass clumps, even in a disk with a mass (0.091 M middle dot in circle within 20 AU) low enough to be in the range inferred for the solar nebula. The clumps form with initially eccentric orbits, and their survival will depend on their ability to contract to higher densities before they can be tidally disrupted at successive periastrons. Because the disk mass in these models is comparable to that apparently required for the core accretion mechanism to operate, the models imply that disk instability could obviate the core accretion mechanism in the solar nebula and elsewhere.

  12. Atomistic-scale simulations of defect formation in graphene under noble gas ion irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Yoon, Kichul; Rahnamoun, Ali; Swett, Jacob L.; ...

    2016-08-17

    Despite the frequent use of noble gas ion irradiation of graphene, the atomistic-scale details, including the effects of dose, energy, and ion bombardment species on defect formation, and the associated dynamic processes involved in the irradiations and subsequent relaxation have not yet been thoroughly studied. Here, we simulated the irradiation of graphene with noble gas ions and the subsequent effects of annealing. Lattice defects, including nanopores, were generated after the annealing of the irradiated graphene, which was the result of structural relaxation that allowed the vacancy-type defects to coalesce into a larger defect. Larger nanopores were generated by irradiation withmore » a series of heavier noble gas ions, due to a larger collision cross section that led to more detrimental effects in the graphene, and by a higher ion dose that increased the chance of displacing the carbon atoms from graphene. Overall trends in the evolution of defects with respect to a dose, as well as the defect characteristics, were in good agreement with experimental results. In addition, the statistics in the defect types generated by different irradiating ions suggested that the most frequently observed defect types were Stone-Thrower-Wales (STW) defects for He + irradiation and monovacancy (MV) defects for all other ion irradiations.« less

  13. The Evolution of Gas Giant Entropy During Formation by Runaway Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berardo, David; Cumming, Andrew; Marleau, Gabriel-Dominique

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the evolution of gas giant planets during the runaway gas accretion phase of formation, to understand how the luminosity of young giant planets depends on the accretion conditions. We construct steady-state envelope models, and run time-dependent simulations of accreting planets with the code Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics. We show that the evolution of the internal entropy depends on the contrast between the internal adiabat and the entropy of the accreted material, parametrized by the shock temperature T 0 and pressure P 0. At low temperatures ({T}0≲ 300-1000 {{K}}, depending on model parameters), the accreted material has a lower entropy than the interior. The convection zone extends to the surface and can drive a high luminosity, leading to rapid cooling and cold starts. For higher temperatures, the accreted material has a higher entropy than the interior, giving a radiative zone that stalls cooling. For {T}0≳ 2000 {{K}}, the surface-interior entropy contrast cannot be accommodated by the radiative envelope, and the accreted matter accumulates with high entropy, forming a hot start. The final state of the planet depends on the shock temperature, accretion rate, and starting entropy at the onset of runaway accretion. Cold starts with L≲ 5× {10}-6 {L}⊙ require low accretion rates and starting entropy, and the temperature of the accreting material needs to be maintained close to the nebula temperature. If instead the temperature is near the value required to radiate the accretion luminosity, 4π {R}2σ {T}04˜ ({GM}\\dot{M}/R), as suggested by previous work on radiative shocks in the context of star formation, gas giant planets form in a hot start with L˜ {10}-4 {L}⊙ .

  14. Primary lung abscess caused by Staphylococcus lugdunensis.

    PubMed

    Chou, Deng-Wei; Lee, Chao-Tai

    2017-11-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis, a strain of coagulase-negative staphylococci, is part of the normal flora of human skin but can cause multiple infections at various sites. This microorganism has emerged as a major human pathogen. However, no study has reported primary lung abscess caused by S. lugdunensis. A 54-year-old alcoholic man without relevant past medical history was admitted because of primary lung abscesses. Empirical amoxicillin/clavulanate therapy was initially administered; however, the patient had persistent pleuritic chest pain and fever. He subsequently underwent resection of the lung abscess and removal of exudative pleural effusion on the fourth hospital day. Histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of lung abscess, and colonies of gram-positive bacteria were identified. The culture specimen from the abscess was positive for S. lugdunensis, which was susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, erythromycin, oxacillin, teicoplanin, tetracycline, and vancomycin. Following resection and 3 weeks of amoxicillin/clavulanate therapy, the patient eventually recovered well without relapse. This case report is the first to describe S. lugdunensis as a cause of primary lung abscess; this microorganism should be considered a potential monomicrobial pathogen in primary lung abscess. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular gas mass and star formation of 12 Virgo spiral galaxies along the ram pressure time sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Eun Jung; Kim, S.

    2014-01-01

    The ram pressure stripping is known as one of the most efficient mechanisms to deplete the ISM of a galaxy in the clusters of galaxies. As being affected continuously by ICM pressure, a galaxy may lose their gas that is the fuel of star formation, and consequently star formation rate would be changed. We select twelve Virgo spiral galaxies according to their stage of the ram pressure stripping event to probe possible consequences of star formation of spiral galaxies in the ram pressure and thus the evolution of galaxies in the Virgo cluster. We investigate the molecular gas properties, star formation activity, and gas depletion time along the time from the ram pressure peak. We also discussed the evolution of galaxies in the cluster.

  16. Relationships between HI Gas Mass, Stellar Mass and Star Formation Rate of HICAT+WISE Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkash, Vaishali; Brown, Michael J. I.

    2018-01-01

    Galaxies grow via a combination of star formation and mergers. In this thesis, I have studied what drives star formation in nearby galaxies. Using archival WISE, Galex, 21-cm data and new IFU observations, I examine the HI content, Hα emission, stellar kinematics, and gas kinematics of three sub-classes of galaxies: spiral galaxies, shell galaxies and HI galaxies with unusually low star formation rates (SFR). In this dissertation talk, I will focus on the scaling relations between atomic (HI) gas, stellar mass and SFR of spiral galaxies. Star formation is fuelled by HI and molecular hydrogen, therefore we expect correlations between HI mass, stellar mass and SFR. However, the measured scaling relationships vary in the prior literature due to sample selection or low completeness. I will discuss new scaling relationships determined using HI Parkes All Sky-Survey Catalogue (HICAT) and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The combination of the local HICAT survey with sensitive WISE mid-infrared imaging improves the stellar masses, SFRs and completeness relative to previous literature. Of the 3,513 HICAT sources, we find 3.4 μm counterparts for 2,824 sources (80%), and provide new WISE matched aperture photometry for these galaxies. For a stellar mass selected sample of z ≤ 0.01 spiral galaxies, we find HI detections for 94% of the galaxies, enabling us to accurately measure HI mass as a function of stellar mass. In contrast to HI-selected galaxy samples, we find that star formation efficiency of spiral galaxies is constant at 10-9.5 yr‑1 with a scatter of 0.5 dex for stellar masses above 109.5 solar masses. We find HI mass increases with stellar mass for spiral galaxies, but the scatter is 1.7 dex for all spiral galaxies and 0.6 dex for galaxies with the T-type 5 to 7. We find an upper limit on HI mass that depends on stellar mass, which is consistent with this limit being dictated by the halo spin parameter.

  17. Chondroblastic osteosarcoma mimicking periapical abscess.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Silva, Fernanda Paula; Silva, Brunno Santos de Freitas; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Mendonça, Elismauro Francisco de; Pinto-Júnior, Décio Dos Santos; Estrela, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The present report describes a case of chondroblastic osteosarcoma in the periapical region of teeth #29, #30, and #31 of an 18-year-old male. Clinical history showed self-reported discomfort in the right posterior gingiva for over a month. Physical examination showed a small expansion and redness of the right mandibular buccal and lingual cortical plates, but no signs of pain or inflammation were observed. All the teeth responded positively to pulp sensibility. Periapical and panoramic radiographs showed slight periapical radiolucency in the roots of teeth #29 and #30, clear periodontal ligament space widening, and evident loss of lamina dura. Incisional biopsy was performed, and based on microscopic findings the diagnosis of chondroblastic osteosarcoma was confirmed. Non-endodontic diseases associated with tooth root apex, such as chondroblastic osteosarcoma, should be included in differential diagnosis of jaw lesions that resemble periapical abscess.

  18. Kinetic modeling of secondary organic aerosol formation: effects of particle- and gas-phase reactions of semivolatile products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A. W. H.; Kroll, J. H.; Ng, N. L.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2007-08-01

    The distinguishing mechanism of formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is the partitioning of semivolatile hydrocarbon oxidation products between the gas and aerosol phases. While SOA formation is typically described in terms of partitioning only, the rate of formation and ultimate yield of SOA can also depend on the kinetics of both gas- and aerosol-phase processes. We present a general equilibrium/kinetic model of SOA formation that provides a framework for evaluating the extent to which the controlling mechanisms of SOA formation can be inferred from laboratory chamber data. With this model we examine the effect on SOA formation of gas-phase oxidation of first-generation products to either more or less volatile species, of particle-phase reaction (both first- and second-order kinetics), of the rate of parent hydrocarbon oxidation, and of the extent of reaction of the parent hydrocarbon. The effect of pre-existing organic aerosol mass on SOA yield, an issue of direct relevance to the translation of laboratory data to atmospheric applications, is examined. The importance of direct chemical measurements of gas- and particle-phase species is underscored in identifying SOA formation mechanisms.

  19. Kinetic modeling of Secondary Organic Aerosol formation: effects of particle- and gas-phase reactions of semivolatile products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A. W. H.; Kroll, J. H.; Ng, N. L.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2007-05-01

    The distinguishing mechanism of formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is the partitioning of semivolatile hydrocarbon oxidation products between the gas and aerosol phases. While SOA formation is typically described in terms of partitioning only, the rate of formation and ultimate yield of SOA can also depend on the kinetics of both gas- and aerosol-phase processes. We present a general equilibrium/kinetic model of SOA formation that provides a framework for evaluating the extent to which the controlling mechanisms of SOA formation can be inferred from laboratory chamber data. With this model we examine the effect on SOA formation of gas-phase oxidation of first-generation products to either more or less volatile species, of particle-phase reaction (both first- and second-order kinetics), of the rate of parent hydrocarbon oxidation, and of the extent of reaction of the parent hydrocarbon. The effect of pre-existing organic aerosol mass on SOA yield, an issue of direct relevance to the translation of laboratory data to atmospheric applications, is examined. The importance of direct chemical measurements of gas- and particle-phase species is underscored in identifying SOA formation mechanisms.

  20. Pathways through equilibrated states with coexisting phases for gas hydrate formation

    SciTech Connect

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    Under ambient conditions, water freezes to either hexagonal ice or a hexagonal/cubic composite ice. The presence of hydrophobic guest molecules introduces a competing pathway: gas hydrate formation, with the guests in clathrate cages. Here, the pathways of the phase transitions are sought as sequences of states with coexisting phases, using a generalized replica exchange algorithm designed to sample them in equilibrium, avoiding nonequilibrium processes. For a dilute solution of methane in water under 200 atm, initializing the simulation with the full set of replicas leads to methane trapped in hexagonal/cubic ice, while gradually adding replicas with decreasing enthalpy produces themore » initial steps of hydrate growth. Once a small amount of hydrate is formed, water rearranges to form empty cages, eventually transforming the remainder of the system to metastable β ice, a scaffolding for hydrates. It is suggested that configurations with empty cages are reaction intermediates in hydrate formation when more guest molecules are available. Furthermore, free energy profiles show that methane acts as a catalyst reducing the barrier for β ice versus hexagonal/cubic ice formation.« less

  1. Pathways through equilibrated states with coexisting phases for gas hydrate formation

    DOE PAGES

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Keyes, Tom

    2015-12-01

    Under ambient conditions, water freezes to either hexagonal ice or a hexagonal/cubic composite ice. The presence of hydrophobic guest molecules introduces a competing pathway: gas hydrate formation, with the guests in clathrate cages. Here, the pathways of the phase transitions are sought as sequences of states with coexisting phases, using a generalized replica exchange algorithm designed to sample them in equilibrium, avoiding nonequilibrium processes. For a dilute solution of methane in water under 200 atm, initializing the simulation with the full set of replicas leads to methane trapped in hexagonal/cubic ice, while gradually adding replicas with decreasing enthalpy produces themore » initial steps of hydrate growth. Once a small amount of hydrate is formed, water rearranges to form empty cages, eventually transforming the remainder of the system to metastable β ice, a scaffolding for hydrates. It is suggested that configurations with empty cages are reaction intermediates in hydrate formation when more guest molecules are available. Furthermore, free energy profiles show that methane acts as a catalyst reducing the barrier for β ice versus hexagonal/cubic ice formation.« less

  2. Cloud fluid models of gas dynamics and star formation in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struck-Marcell, Curtis; Scalo, John M.; Appleton, P. N.

    1987-01-01

    The large dynamic range of star formation in galaxies, and the apparently complex environmental influences involved in triggering or suppressing star formation, challenges the understanding. The key to this understanding may be the detailed study of simple physical models for the dominant nonlinear interactions in interstellar cloud systems. One such model is described, a generalized Oort model cloud fluid, and two simple applications of it are explored. The first of these is the relaxation of an isolated volume of cloud fluid following a disturbance. Though very idealized, this closed box study suggests a physical mechanism for starbursts, which is based on the approximate commensurability of massive cloud lifetimes and cloud collisional growth times. The second application is to the modeling of colliding ring galaxies. In this case, the driving processes operating on a dynamical timescale interact with the local cloud processes operating on the above timescale. The results is a variety of interesting nonequilibrium behaviors, including spatial variations of star formation that do not depend monotonically on gas density.

  3. Visualization of hump formation in high-speed gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. S.; Zhong, L. M.; Gao, J. Q.

    2009-11-01

    The hump bead is a typical weld defect observed in high-speed welding. Its occurrence limits the improvement of welding productivity. Visualization of hump formation during high-speed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is helpful in the better understanding of the humping phenomena so that effective measures can be taken to suppress or decrease the tendency of hump formation and achieve higher productivity welding. In this study, an experimental system was developed to implement vision-based observation of the weld pool behavior during high-speed GMAW. Considering the weld pool characteristics in high-speed welding, a narrow band-pass and neutral density filter was equipped for the CCD camera, the suitable exposure time was selected and side view orientation of the CCD camera was employed. The events that took place at the rear portion of the weld pools were imaged during the welding processes with and without hump bead formation, respectively. It was found that the variation of the weld pool surface height and the solid-liquid interface at the pool trailing with time shows some useful information to judge whether the humping phenomenon occurs or not.

  4. Theoretical study on bubble formation and flow condensation in downflow channel with horizontal gas injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kang; Li, Yanzhong; Wang, Jiaojiao; Ma, Yuan; Wang, Lei; Xie, Fushou

    2018-05-01

    Bubble formation and condensation in liquid pipes occur widely in industrial systems such as cryogenic propellant feeding system. In this paper, an integrated theoretical model is established to give a comprehensive description of the bubble formation, motion and condensation process. The model is validated by numerical simulations and bubble condensation experiments from references, and good agreements are achieved. The bubble departure diameter at the orifice and the flow condensation length in the liquid channel are predicted by the model, and effects of various influencing parameters on bubble behaviors are analyzed. Prediction results indicate that the orifice diameter, the gas feeding rate, and the liquid velocity are the primary influence factors on the bubble departure diameter. The interfacial heat transfer as well as the bubble departure diameter has a direct impact on the bubble flow condensation length, which increases by 2.5 times over a system pressure range of 0.1 0.4 MPa, and decreases by 85% over a liquid subcooling range of 5 30 K. This work could be beneficial to the prediction of bubble formation and flow condensation processes and the design of cryogenic transfer pipes.

  5. Role of surface defects on the formation of the 2-dimensional electron gas at polar interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artacho, Emilio; Aguado-Puente, Pablo

    2014-03-01

    The discovery of a 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the interface between two insulators, LaAlO3 and SrTiO3, has fuelled a great research activity on this and similar systems in the last years. The electronic reconstruction model, typically invoked to explain the formation of the 2DEG, while being intuitive and successful on predicting fundamental aspects of this phenomenon like the critical thickness of LaAlO3, fails to explain many other experimental observations. Oxygen vacancies, on the other hand, are known to dramatically affect the physical behaviour of this system, but their role at the atomic level is far from well understood. Here we perform ab initio simulations in order to assess whether the formation of oxygen vacancies at the surface of the polar material can account for various recent experimental results that defy the current theoretical understanding of these interfaces. We simulate SrTiO3/LaAlO3 slabs with various concentrations of surface oxygen vacancies and analyze the role of the defects on the formation of the metallic interface, their electrostatic coupling with the 2DEG and the interplay with the different instabilities of the materials involved. Financial support from Spanish MINECO under grant FIS2012-37549-C05-01. Computational resources provided by the Red Espñola de Supercomputación and DIPC.

  6. Formation of Micro-Scale Gas Pockets From Underwater Wall Orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Francisco A.; Gharib, Morteza

    2012-11-01

    Our experiments examine the formation of micro-scale gas pockets from orifices on walls with hydrophilic and hydrophobic wetting properties. Bubble injection is operated in a liquid at rest at constant flow rate and in a quasi-static regime, and the mechanism of bubble growth is investigated through high speed recordings. The growth dynamics is studied in terms of orifice size, surface wetting properties and buoyancy sign. The bubble formation is characterized by an explosive growth, with a pressure wave that causes the bubble to take highly transient shapes in its very initial stages, before stabilizing as a sphere and growing at a relatively slow rate. In case of positive buoyancy, the bubble elongates with the formation of a neck before detaching from the wall. When buoyancy acts towards the wall, the bubble attaches to the wall and expands laterally with a moving contact line. In presence of hydrophobic surfaces, the bubble attaches immediately to the wall irrespective of buoyancy direction and takes a hemispherical shape, expanding radially along the surface. A force balance is outlined to explain the different figures. The work was performed by FAP while on leave from CNR-INSEAN, and is supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR).

  7. THE GAS PHASE MASS METALLICITY RELATION FOR DWARF GALAXIES: DEPENDENCE ON STAR FORMATION RATE AND HI GAS MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Jimmy; Tran, Kim-Vy; Saintonge, Amélie

    Using a sample of dwarf galaxies observed using the VIMOS IFU on the Very Large Telescope, we investigate the mass–metallicity relation (MZR) as a function of star formation rate (FMR{sub SFR}) as well as HI-gas mass (FMR{sub HI}). We combine our IFU data with a subsample of galaxies from the ALFALFA HI survey crossmatched to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to study the FMR{sub SFR} and FMR{sub HI} across the stellar mass range 10{sup 6.6}–10{sup 8.8} M{sub ⊙}, with metallicities as low as 12 + log(O/H) = 7.67. We find the 1σ mean scatter in the MZR to bemore » 0.05 dex. The 1σ mean scatter in the FMR{sub SFR} (0.02 dex) is significantly lower than that of the MZR. The FMR{sub SFR} is not consistent between the IFU observed galaxies and the ALFALFA/SDSS galaxies for SFRs lower than 10{sup −2.4} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, however, this could be the result of limitations of our measurements in that regime. The lowest mean scatter (0.01 dex) is found in the FMR{sub HI}. We also find that the FMR{sub HI} is consistent between the IFU observed dwarf galaxies and the ALFALFA/SDSS crossmatched sample. We introduce the fundamental metallicity luminosity counterpart to the FMR, again characterized in terms of SFR (FML{sub SFR}) and HI-gas mass (FML{sub HI}). We find that the FML{sub HI} relation is consistent between the IFU observed dwarf galaxy sample and the larger ALFALFA/SDSS sample. However, the 1σ scatter for the FML{sub HI} relation is not improved over the FMR{sub HI} scenario. This leads us to conclude that the FMR{sub HI} is the best candidate for a physically motivated fundamental metallicity relation.« less

  8. Management of thyroid gland abscess.

    PubMed

    García Callejo, Javier; Redondo Martínez, Jaume; Civera, Miguel; Verdú Colomina, José; Pellicer Zoghbi, Verónica; Martínez Beneyto, M Paz

    2018-06-08

    Thyroid abscess or acute suppurative thyroiditis is an unusual clinical condition. We present our experience with cases attended over 41 years. A retrospective study was performed on these patients reviewing their epidemiological characteristics and the diagnostic and therapeutic manoeuvres chosen for them all, as well as their clinical outcome. A group of 9 males and 5 females was studied, with ages ranging from 19 to 68 (mean of 40.6±15.4). These patients suffered 22 acute episodes, and 2 patients each had 4 episodes. Suppurative thyroiditis comprised 0.29% of the neck abscesses. Fine needle aspiration was performed in 13 cases to evacuate the collection and isolate the aetiological agent. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus were the most frequently identified. Nine patients underwent ultrasound and 7 computed tomography imaging studies. Surgery was the option for 10 patients, including drainage for 7, thyroidectomy for 4 and hemithyroidectomy for the remaining 2. Systemic or intralesional antibiotics and sclerosis of the gland were also carried out. Although one case presented with hyperthyroidism and thyrotoxicosis in the acute phase, definitive hypothyroidism was observed in 5 patients at 6 months following discharge. The rate of success was 100%. Thyroid gland suppuration is a very infrequent circumstance in neck pathology, and the options for its treatment are varied, from conservative to invasive techniques according to the microbial and radiologic findings. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Experimental study of Gas Phase Formation and Evolution in Low fO2 Planetary Basalts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, M. J.; Wetzel, D. T.; Saal, A. E.; Hauri, E. H.

    2012-12-01

    The existence of a gas phase in planetary basaltic magmas is demonstrated by the ubiquitous presence of vesicles in returned lunar samples and meteorites as well as basalts from Earth and Mars. Additionally, formation of the fine-grained glass bead deposits during eruption of lunar picritic glasses required a large gas-bubble volume (> 90%) at the time of eruption/fragmentation. Up to 100-200 ppm levels of H, S, Cl and F still remain as diffusion-loss profiles in individual lunar glass beads SIMS (1), and higher volatile concentrations occur in olivine melt inclusions (2). The composition and origin of such volcanic gases were investigated by experiments on a volatile (C-O-H-S-Cl-F)-bearing picritic glass composition as a function of fO2 near iron-wustite (IW). The C-O-H species dissolved in gas-saturated basaltic melt above IW-0.5 are carbonate, OH and H2O with 100 to 10,000 ppm H2O in the sample; below IW-0.5, the C-species present (Raman and FTIR) are Fe(CO)5 (iron pentacarbonyl) and lesser CH4 [3]. The change in melt speciation in part reflects a change in calculated speciation in the coexisting gas [4]. The carbon solubility in these experimental melts increases linearly with increasing pressure; the more oxidized glasses contain 32-620 ppm C for pressures of 98 to 980 MPa, the reduced glasses contain 8-240 ppm C for pressures between 36 and 900 MPa. Thus, the C solubility of the more reduced Fe-carbonyl and CH4 is about one-half that of carbonate at the same pressure, and indicates the carrying capacity for C in reduced (i.e., lunar) magmas is much lower than it is in present day terrestrial magmas. Varioles up to 200 um in diameter formed in some experiments with higher dissolved water contents (1%); they have radiating crystalline textures (olivine, glass and poorly crystallized graphite) initiated at a central nucleation site. A sharp peak in the variole Ramen spectra indicates methane as well as CO is released during variole formation and a reaction such

  10. Formation Of the Giant Planets By Concurrent Accretion Of Solids And Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, James B.; Hubickyj, Olenka; Bodenheimer, Peter; Lissauer, Jack J.; Podolak, Morris; Greenzweig, Yuval; Cuzzi, Jeffery N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    New numerical simulations of the formation of the giant planets are presented, in which for the first time both the gas and planetesimal accretion rates are calculated in a self-consistent, interactive fashion. The simulations combine three elements: 1) three-body accretion cross-sections of solids onto an isolated planetary embryo, 2) a stellar evolution code for the planet's gaseous envelope, and 3) a planetesimal dissolution code within the envelope, used to evaluate the planet's effective capture radius and the energy deposition profile of accreted material. Major assumptions include: The planet is embedded in a disk of gas and small planetesimals with locally uniform initial surface mass density, and planetesimals are not allowed to migrate into or out of the planet's feeding zone. All simulations are characterized by three major phases. During the first phase, the planet's mass consists primarily of solid material. The planetesimal accretion rate, which dominates that of gas, rapidly increases owing to runaway accretion, then decreases as the planet's feeding zone is depleted. During the second phase, both solid and gas accretion rates are small and nearly independent of time. The third phase, marked by runaway gas accretion, starts when the solid and gas masses are about equal. It is engendered by a strong positive feedback on the gas accretion rates, driven by the rapid contraction of the gaseous envelope and the rapid expansion of the outer boundary, which depends on the planet's total mass. The overall evolutionary time scale is generally determined by the length of the second phase. The actual rates at which the giant planets accreted small planetesimals is probably intermediate between the constant rates assumed in most previous studies and the highly variable rates that we have used. Within the context, of the adopted model of planetesimal accretion, the joint constraints of the time scale for dissipation of the solar nebula and the current high

  11. Splenic abscess and multiple brain abscesses caused by Streptococcus intermedius in a young healthy man

    PubMed Central

    Caire, William; Nair, Rajasree; Bridges, Debbie

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of splenic abscess with multiple brain abscesses caused by Streptococcus intermedius in a healthy young man without any identifiable risk factors, which resolved with percutaneous drainage and antibiotics. Streptococcus intermedius, a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group, is a common commensal organism of the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract, and it is a known cause of deep-seated infections. Suppurative infections caused by Streptococcus anginosus group are sometimes associated with bacteremia, but hematogenous spread of infection from an occult source leading to concurrent splenic abscess and multiple brain abscesses has never been previously reported in a healthy young individual. PMID:21738290

  12. The effects of circumstellar gas on terrestrial planet formation: Theory and observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandell, Avram M.

    Our understanding of the evolution of circumstellar material from dust and gas to fully-formed planets has taken dramatic steps forward in the last decade, driven by rapid improvements in our ability to study gas- and dust-rich disks around young stars and the discovery of more than 200 extra-solar planetary systems around other stars. In addition, our ability to model the formation of both terrestrial and giant planets has improved significantly due to new computing techniques and the continued exponential increase in computing power. In this dissertation I expand on existing theories of terrestrial planet formation to include systems similar to those currently being detected around nearby stars, and I develop new observational techniques to probe the chemistry of gas-rich circumstellar disks where such planetary systems may be forming. One of the most significant characteristics of observed extrasolar planetary systems is the presence of giant planets located much closer to their parent star than was thought to be possible. The presence of "Hot Jupiters", Jovian-mass planets with very short orbital periods detected around nearby main sequence stars, has been proposed to be primarily due to the inward migration of planets formed in orbits initially much further from the parent star. Close-in giant planets are thought to have formed in the cold outer regions of planetary systems and migrated inward, passing through the orbital parameter space occupied by the terrestrial planets in our own Solar System; the migration of these planets would have profound effects on the evolution of inner terrestrial planets in these systems. I first explore this scenario with numerical simulations showing that a significant fraction of terrestrial planets could survive the migration process; damping forces could then eventually re-circularize the orbits at distances relatively close to their original positions. Calculations suggest that the final orbits of a significant fraction of

  13. Influence of Sodium Chloride on the Formation and Dissociation Behavior of CO2 Gas Hydrates

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We present an experimental study on the formation and dissociation characteristics of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas hydrates using Raman spectroscopy. The CO2 hydrates were formed from sodium chloride/water solutions with salinities of 0–10 wt %, which were pressurized with liquid CO2 in a stirred vessel at 6 MPa and a subcooling of 9.5 K. The formation of the CO2 hydrate resulted in a hydrate gel where the solid hydrate can be considered as the continuous phase that includes small amounts of a dispersed liquid water-rich phase that has not been converted to hydrate. During the hydrate formation process we quantified the fraction of solid hydrate, xH, and the fraction of the dispersed liquid water-rich phase, xL, from the signature of the hydroxyl (OH)-stretching vibration of the hydrate gel. We found that the fraction of hydrate xH contained in the hydrate gel linearly depends on the salinity of the initial liquid water-rich phase. In addition, the ratio of CO2 and water was analyzed in the liquid water-rich phase before hydrate formation, in the hydrate gel during growth and dissociation, and after its complete dissociation again in the liquid water-rich phase. We observed a supersaturation of CO2 in the water-rich phase after complete dissociation of the hydrate gel and were able to show that the excess CO2 exists as dispersed micro- or nanoscale liquid droplets in the liquid water-rich phase. These residual nano- and microdroplets could be a possible explanation for the so-called memory effect. PMID:28817275

  14. Influence of Sodium Chloride on the Formation and Dissociation Behavior of CO2 Gas Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Holzammer, Christine; Schicks, Judith M; Will, Stefan; Braeuer, Andreas S

    2017-09-07

    We present an experimental study on the formation and dissociation characteristics of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) gas hydrates using Raman spectroscopy. The CO 2 hydrates were formed from sodium chloride/water solutions with salinities of 0-10 wt %, which were pressurized with liquid CO 2 in a stirred vessel at 6 MPa and a subcooling of 9.5 K. The formation of the CO 2 hydrate resulted in a hydrate gel where the solid hydrate can be considered as the continuous phase that includes small amounts of a dispersed liquid water-rich phase that has not been converted to hydrate. During the hydrate formation process we quantified the fraction of solid hydrate, x H , and the fraction of the dispersed liquid water-rich phase, x L , from the signature of the hydroxyl (OH)-stretching vibration of the hydrate gel. We found that the fraction of hydrate x H contained in the hydrate gel linearly depends on the salinity of the initial liquid water-rich phase. In addition, the ratio of CO 2 and water was analyzed in the liquid water-rich phase before hydrate formation, in the hydrate gel during growth and dissociation, and after its complete dissociation again in the liquid water-rich phase. We observed a supersaturation of CO 2 in the water-rich phase after complete dissociation of the hydrate gel and were able to show that the excess CO 2 exists as dispersed micro- or nanoscale liquid droplets in the liquid water-rich phase. These residual nano- and microdroplets could be a possible explanation for the so-called memory effect.

  15. Fatal thalamic abscess secondary to dental infection.

    PubMed

    Basyuni, Shadi; Sharma, Valmiki; Santhanam, Vijay; Ferro, Ashley

    2015-12-17

    We present the case of poor neurological recovery and subsequent death secondary to a thalamic abscess in a 53-year-old man. This patient initially presented with sudden dysarthria and left hemiparesis while driving. Neuroimaging showed a multilobular abscess involving the right thalamus with oedema extending to the basal ganglionic region and brainstem. The source of the abscess was initially unknown and it required draining multiple times while the different causes were being explored. The patient's neurological state along with intubation made for a difficult and inconclusive oral examination. It was only after neuroimaging included tooth-bearing areas that it became evident that this patient had extensive periodontal disease with multiple areas of periapical radiolucencies. The patient underwent complete dental clearance alongside repeated drainage of the abscess. Despite initial postoperative improvement, the patient never recovered from the neurological damage and died 3 weeks later. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Non operative management of cerebral abscess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batubara, C. A.

    2018-03-01

    Cerebral abscess is a focal intracerebral infection that begins as a localized area of cerebritis and develops into a collection of pus surrounded by a well-vascularized capsule. Patients typically present with varying combinations of aheadache, progressive neurologic deficits, seizures, and evidence of infection. Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imagingare the most important diagnostic tools in diagnosing cerebral abscess. The treatment of cerebral abscess has been a challenge. Small cerebralabscesses (< 2.5 cm) have been treated empirically with antibiotics. Elevation of intracranial pressure and threatening herniation can be managed by the use of intravenous mannitol (or hypertonic saline) and dexamethasone. Acute seizures should be terminated with the administration of intravenous benzodiazepines or by intravenous fosphenytoin. Anticonvulsants prophylaxis must be initiated immediately and continued at least one year due to high risk in the cerebral abscesses. Easier detection of underlying conditions, monitoring of the therapeutic progress, and recognition of complications have probably contributed to the improved prognosis.

  17. Abscess inside craniopharyngioma: diagnostic and management implications.

    PubMed

    Bhaisora, Kamlesh Singh; Prasad, Surya Nandan; Das, Kuntal Kanti; Lal, Hira

    2018-02-03

    Abscess inside the pituitary fossa is very rare. Such abscess can be primary, occurring in an otherwise healthy pituitary gland, or secondary, developing inside a diseased gland (ie, harbouring craniopharyngioma, Rathke's cleft cyst, etc). Secondary pituitary abscess inside a craniopharyngioma remains an extremely rare occurrence. Our literature search revealed only six such cases reported so far. In this report, we present the seventh case of craniopharyngioma with abscess in a 38-year-old woman. We describe the uniqueness of the clinical presentation of our case, the radiological pointers to the possible diagnosis and the management issues in our patient. A review of literature is also included to provide a comprehensive picture of this rare condition to the readers. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Lung abscess caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Omae, Takashi; Matsubayashi, Tadashi

    2015-08-01

    A 10-year-old boy with West syndrome was referred to hospital because of high fever and cough. Chest X-ray and computed tomography showed consolidation with an abscess in the right upper lobe. Laboratory data indicated cytokine storm. Various antibacterial agents and additional corticosteroid were unable to control the hypercytokinemia, which was suppressed after cyclosporine A was started. The lung abscess remained, however, and right upper lobectomy was performed. Culture from the abscess showed no growth, while polymerase chain reaction assay indicated Mycoplasma pneumoniae DNA. Serum passive agglutinin titer for M. pneumoniae was significantly elevated in the convalescent phase. These findings are strong evidence that the lung abscess was caused by M. pneumoniae infection. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  19. Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess and endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Hamid, Ayeshah; Bailey, Sarah-Jane

    2013-01-01

    A 36-year-old man was referred to the general medical team with endophthalmitis. He was noted to have raised inflammatory markers and deranged liver function tests on admission. Subsequent abdominal ultrasound scan revealed a liver abscess requiring percutaneous drainage. A common human pathogen, Klebsiella pneumoniae, was cultured from multiple sites. K pneumoniae has virulent serotypes (K1 and K2) that can cause primary liver abscess with metastatic infections. Cases have previously been predominantly reported in Southeast Asia but are increasing in prevalence in Europe and North America. The main known risk factor for the disease is diabetes mellitus. Swift antibiotic therapy, ophthalmology review and percutaneous drainage of any liver abscess are essential. Early recognition of the syndrome, despite potentially few initial symptoms, can significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. The authors report the first recorded case of K pneumoniae liver abscess with endophthalmitis in the UK. PMID:23559652

  20. Variability in the primary emissions and secondary gas and particle formation from vehicles using bioethanol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gramsch, E; Papapostolou, V; Reyes, F; Vásquez, Y; Castillo, M; Oyola, P; López, G; Cádiz, A; Ferguson, S; Wolfson, M; Lawrence, J; Koutrakis, P

    2018-04-01

    Bioethanol for use in vehicles is becoming a substantial part of global energy infrastructure because it is renewable and some emissions are reduced. Carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and total hydrocarbons (THC) are reduced, but there is still controversy regarding emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x ), aldehydes, and ethanol; this may be a concern because all these compounds are precursors of ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The amount of emissions depends on the ethanol content, but it also may depend on the engine quality and ethanol origin. Thus, a photochemical chamber was used to study secondary gas and aerosol formation from two flex-fueled vehicles using different ethanol blends in gasoline. One vehicle and the fuel used were made in the United States, and the others were made in Brazil. Primary emissions of THC, CO, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) from both vehicles decreased as the amount of ethanol in gasoline increased. NO x emissions in the U.S. and Brazilian cars decreased with ethanol content. However, emissions of THC, CO, and NO x from the Brazilian car were markedly higher than those from the U.S. car, showing high variability between vehicle technologies. In the Brazilian car, formation of secondary nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) and ozone (O 3 ) was lower for higher ethanol content in the fuel. In the U.S. car, NO 2 and O 3 had a small increase. Secondary particle (particulate matter [PM]) formation in the chamber decreased for both vehicles as the fraction of ethanol in fuel increased, consistent with previous studies. Secondary to primary PM ratios for pure gasoline is 11, also consistent with previous studies. In addition, the time required to form secondary PM is longer for higher ethanol blends. These results indicate that using higher ethanol blends may have a positive impact on air quality. The use of bioethanol can significantly reduce petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Given the extent of

  1. Investigation of soot and carbon formation in small gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosfjord, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation of hardware configurations which attempt to minimize carbon and soot-production without sacrificing performance in small gas turbine combustors was conducted. Four fuel injectors, employing either airblast atomization, pressure atomization, or fuel vaporization techniques were combined with nozzle air swirlers and injector sheaths. Eight configurations were screened at sea-level takeoff and idle test conditions. Selected configurations were focused upon in an attempt to quantify the influence of combustor pressure, inlet temperature, primary zone operation, and combustor loading on soot and carbon formation. Cycle tests were also performed. It was found that smoke emission levels depended on the combustor fluid mechanics, the atomization quality of the injector and the fuel hydrogen content.

  2. Formation of tetragonal gas bubble superlattice in bulk molybdenum under helium ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Cheng; Sprouster, David J.; Hattar, K.

    In this paper, we report the formation of tetragonal gas bubble superlattice in bulk molybdenum under helium ion implantation at 573 K. The transmission electron microscopy study shows that the helium bubble lattice constant measured from the in-plane d-spacing is ~4.5 nm, while it is ~3.9 nm from the out-of-plane measurement. The results of synchrotron-based small-angle x-ray scattering agree well with the transmission electron microscopy results in terms of the measurement of bubble lattice constant and bubble size. The coupling of transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron high-energy X-ray scattering provides an effective approach to study defect superlattices in irradiated materials.

  3. Determination of some pure compound ideal-gas enthalpies of formation

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W. V.; Chirico, R. D.; Nguyen, A.

    1989-06-01

    The results of a study aimed at improvement of group-additivity methodology for estimation of thermodynamic properties of organic substances are reported. Specific weaknesses where ring corrections were unknown or next-nearest-neighbor interactions were only estimated because of lack of experimental data are addressed by experimental studies of enthalpies of combustion in the condensed- phase and vapor pressure measurements. Ideal-gas enthalpies of formation are reported for acrylamide, succinimide, ..gamma..-butyrolactone, 2-pyrrolidone, 2,3-dihydrofuran, 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyran, 1,3-cyclohexadiene, 1,4-cyclohexadiene, and 1-methyl-1-phenylhydrazine. Ring corrections, group terms, and next-nearest-neighbor interaction terms useful in the application of group additivity correlations are derived. 44 refs., 2 figs., 59 tabs.

  4. Formation of tetragonal gas bubble superlattice in bulk molybdenum under helium ion implantation

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Cheng; Sprouster, David J.; Hattar, K.; ...

    2018-02-09

    In this paper, we report the formation of tetragonal gas bubble superlattice in bulk molybdenum under helium ion implantation at 573 K. The transmission electron microscopy study shows that the helium bubble lattice constant measured from the in-plane d-spacing is ~4.5 nm, while it is ~3.9 nm from the out-of-plane measurement. The results of synchrotron-based small-angle x-ray scattering agree well with the transmission electron microscopy results in terms of the measurement of bubble lattice constant and bubble size. The coupling of transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron high-energy X-ray scattering provides an effective approach to study defect superlattices in irradiated materials.

  5. An ALMA view of star formation efficiency suppression in early-type galaxies after gas-rich minor mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Voort, Freeke; Davis, Timothy A.; Matsushita, Satoki; Rowlands, Kate; Shabala, Stanislav S.; Allison, James R.; Ting, Yuan-Sen; Sansom, Anne E.; van der Werf, Paul P.

    2018-05-01

    Gas-rich minor mergers contribute significantly to the gas reservoir of early-type galaxies (ETGs) at low redshift, yet the star formation efficiency (SFE; the star formation rate divided by the molecular gas mass) appears to be strongly suppressed following some of these events, in contrast to the more well-known merger-driven starbursts. We present observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) of six ETGs, which have each recently undergone a gas-rich minor merger, as evidenced by their disturbed stellar morphologies. These galaxies were selected because they exhibit extremely low SFEs. We use the resolving power of ALMA to study the morphology and kinematics of the molecular gas. The majority of our galaxies exhibit spatial and kinematical irregularities, such as detached gas clouds, warps, and other asymmetries. These asymmetries support the interpretation that the suppression of the SFE is caused by dynamical effects stabilizing the gas against gravitational collapse. Through kinematic modelling we derive high velocity dispersions and Toomre Q stability parameters for the gas, but caution that such measurements in edge-on galaxies suffer from degeneracies. We estimate merger ages to be about 100 Myr based on the observed disturbances in the gas distribution. Furthermore, we determine that these galaxies lie, on average, two orders of magnitude below the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation for star-forming galaxies as well as below the relation for relaxed ETGs. We discuss potential dynamical processes responsible for this strong suppression of star formation surface density at fixed molecular gas surface density.

  6. Gas Phase Reactions of Ions Derived from Anionic Uranyl Formate and Uranyl Acetate Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Evan; Hanley, Cassandra; Koehler, Stephen; Pestok, Jordan; Polonsky, Nevo; Van Stipdonk, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of uranium are topics of sustained interest because of their importance to the development of nuclear fuel processing methods, and a more complete understanding of the factors that govern the mobility and fate of the element in the environment. Tandem mass spectrometry can be used to examine the intrinsic reactivity (i.e., free from influence of solvent and other condensed phase effects) of a wide range of metal ion complexes in a species-specific fashion. Here, electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation, and gas-phase ion-molecule reactions were used to create and characterize ions derived from precursors composed of uranyl cation (UVIO2 2+) coordinated by formate or acetate ligands. Anionic complexes containing UVIO2 2+ and formate ligands fragment by decarboxylation and elimination of CH2=O, ultimately to produce an oxo-hydride species [UVIO2(O)(H)]-. Cationic species ultimately dissociate to make [UVIO2(OH)]+. Anionic complexes containing acetate ligands exhibit an initial loss of acetyloxyl radical, CH3CO2•, with associated reduction of uranyl to UVO2 +. Subsequent CID steps cause elimination of CO2 and CH4, ultimately to produce [UVO2(O)]-. Loss of CH4 occurs by an intra-complex H+ transfer process that leaves UVO2 + coordinated by acetate and acetate enolate ligands. A subsequent dissociation step causes elimination of CH2=C=O to leave [UVO2(O)]-. Elimination of CH4 is also observed as a result of hydrolysis caused by ion-molecule reaction with H2O. The reactions of other anionic species with gas-phase H2O create hydroxyl products, presumably through the elimination of H2.

  7. EXPLORING SYSTEMATIC EFFECTS IN THE RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS, GAS PHASE METALLICITY, AND STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Telford, O. Grace; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Skillman, Evan D.

    2016-08-10

    There is evidence that the well-established mass–metallicity relation in galaxies is correlated with a third parameter: star formation rate (SFR). The strength of this correlation may be used to disentangle the relative importance of different physical processes (e.g., infall of pristine gas, metal-enriched outflows) in governing chemical evolution. However, all three parameters are susceptible to biases that might affect the observed strength of the relation between them. We analyze possible sources of systematic error, including sample bias, application of signal-to-noise ratio cuts on emission lines, choice of metallicity calibration, uncertainty in stellar mass determination, aperture effects, and dust. We presentmore » the first analysis of the relation between stellar mass, gas phase metallicity, and SFR using strong line abundance diagnostics from Dopita et al. for ∼130,000 star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and provide a detailed comparison of these diagnostics in an appendix. Using these new abundance diagnostics yields a 30%–55% weaker anti-correlation between metallicity and SFR at fixed stellar mass than that reported by Mannucci et al. We find that, for all abundance diagnostics, the anti-correlation with SFR is stronger for the relatively few galaxies whose current SFRs are elevated above their past average SFRs. This is also true for the new abundance diagnostic of Dopita et al., which gives anti-correlation between Z and SFR only in the high specific star formation rate (sSFR) regime, in contrast to the recent results of Kashino et al. The poorly constrained strength of the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR must be carefully accounted for in theoretical studies of chemical evolution.« less

  8. Gas Phase Reactions of Ions Derived from Anionic Uranyl Formate and Uranyl Acetate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Perez, Evan; Hanley, Cassandra; Koehler, Stephen; Pestok, Jordan; Polonsky, Nevo; Van Stipdonk, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of uranium are topics of sustained interest because of their importance to the development of nuclear fuel processing methods, and a more complete understanding of the factors that govern the mobility and fate of the element in the environment. Tandem mass spectrometry can be used to examine the intrinsic reactivity (i.e., free from influence of solvent and other condensed phase effects) of a wide range of metal ion complexes in a species-specific fashion. Here, electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation, and gas-phase ion-molecule reactions were used to create and characterize ions derived from precursors composed of uranyl cation (U VI O 2 2+ ) coordinated by formate or acetate ligands. Anionic complexes containing U VI O 2 2+ and formate ligands fragment by decarboxylation and elimination of CH 2 =O, ultimately to produce an oxo-hydride species [U VI O 2 (O)(H)] - . Cationic species ultimately dissociate to make [U VI O 2 (OH)] + . Anionic complexes containing acetate ligands exhibit an initial loss of acetyloxyl radical, CH 3 CO 2 •, with associated reduction of uranyl to U V O 2 + . Subsequent CID steps cause elimination of CO 2 and CH 4 , ultimately to produce [U V O 2 (O)] - . Loss of CH 4 occurs by an intra-complex H + transfer process that leaves U V O 2 + coordinated by acetate and acetate enolate ligands. A subsequent dissociation step causes elimination of CH 2 =C=O to leave [U V O 2 (O)] - . Elimination of CH 4 is also observed as a result of hydrolysis caused by ion-molecule reaction with H 2 O. The reactions of other anionic species with gas-phase H 2 O create hydroxyl products, presumably through the elimination of H 2 . Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Planet traps and first planets: The critical metallicity for gas giant formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Hirashita, Hiroyuki, E-mail: yasu@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: hirashita@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-06-10

    The ubiquity of planets poses an interesting question: when are first planets formed in galaxies? We investigate this by adopting a theoretical model where planet traps are combined with the standard core accretion scenario in which the efficiency of forming planetary cores directly relates to the metallicity ([Fe/H]) in disks. Three characteristic exoplanetary populations are examined: hot Jupiters, exo-Jupiters around 1 AU, and low-mass planets in tight orbits, such as super-Earths. We statistically compute planet formation frequencies (PFFs), as well as the orbital radius (〈R{sub rapid}〉) within which gas accretion becomes efficient enough to form Jovian planets, as a functionmore » of metallicity (–2 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤–0.6). We show that the total PFFs for these three populations increase steadily with metallicity. This is the direct outcome of the core accretion picture. For the metallicity range considered here, the population of low-mass planets dominates Jovian planets. The Jovian planets contribute to the PFFs above [Fe/H] ≅ –1. We find that the hot Jupiters form more efficiently than the exo-Jupiters at [Fe/H] ≲ –0.7. This arises from the slower growth of planetary cores and their more efficient radial inward transport by the host traps in lower metallicity disks. We show that the critical metallicity for forming Jovian planets is [Fe/H] ≅ –1.2 by comparing 〈R{sub rapid}〉 of hot Jupiters and low-mass planets. The comparison intrinsically links to the different gas accretion efficiency between these two types of planets. Therefore, this study implies that important physical processes in planet formation may be tested by exoplanet observations around metal-poor stars.« less

  10. Geology of natural gas reservoir: Upper Travis Peak Formation, western flank of Sabine Uplift, east Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Fracasso, M.A.

    The Travis Peak Formation (Lower Cretaceous) in the eastern East Texas basin represents a sand-rich, fluvial-deltaic depositional system. This lobate, high-constructive deltaic system prograded radially to the southeast from an Upshur County locus. Regional studies of the Travis Peak established a threefold internal stratigraphic framework: a middle sand-rich fluvial and delta-plain sequence is gradationally overlain and underlain by a marine-influenced delta-fringe zone with a higher mud content. The entire Travis Peak succession thins over the Bethany dome on the western flank of the Sabine uplift. However, the delta-fringe sequences are relatively thicker over the structure because of a disproportionately greatermore » thinning of the middle sandy fluvial-deltaic sequence. Lesser sand deposition over the Bethany dome reflects an active structural control over facies distribution. Gas production in the Bethany field and surrounding area is concentrated in thin zones (5-15 ft) of the upper delta-fringe sequence. This distribution probably reflects the increased abundance of mudstone beds in the upper delta-fringe interval, which may have served as source rocks or barriers to upward gas migration, or as both. The predominant trapping mechanism in this region is stratigraphic sand pinch-out in a structurally updip direction on the flanks of major structures. Studies of core and closely spaced electric logs west of the Bethany dome help define the depositional systems in the upper delta-fringe producing interval. This sequence comprises a complex mosaic of continental and marine facies, and exhibits an overall upward trend of increasing marine influence that spans a gradual transition into transgressive carbonates of the Sligo Formation.« less

  11. Influence of laser wavelength and pulse duration on gas bubble formation in blood filled glass capillaries.

    PubMed

    Kimel, Sol; Choi, Bernard; Svaasand, Lars O; Lotfi, Justin; Viator, John A; Nelson, J Stuart

    2005-04-01

    Hypervascular skin lesions (HVSL) are treated with medical lasers characterized by a variety of parameters such as wavelength lambda, pulse duration t(p), and radiant exposure E that can be adjusted for different pathology and blood vessel size. Treatment parameters have been optimized assuming constant optical properties of blood during laser photocoagulation. However, recent studies suggest that this assumption may not always be true. Our objective was to quantify thermally induced changes in blood that occur during irradiation using standard laser parameters. Glass capillary tubes (diameter D = 100, 200, and 337 microm) filled with fresh or hemolyzed rabbit blood were irradiated once at lambda = 585, 595, or 600 nm, t(p) = 1.5 milliseconds; and also at lambda = 585 nm, t(p) = 0.45 milliseconds. E was increased until blood ablation caused formation of permanent gas bubbles. In a corroborative study, human blood was heated at 50 degrees C and absorbance spectra were measured as a function of time. Threshold radiant exposure, E(thresh), for gas bubble formation was found not to depend on lambda, which might be surprising in view of the 10-fold lower absorption coefficient at 600 nm as compared to 585 nm. The spectroscopic study revealed heat-induced changes in blood constituent composition of hemoglobins (Hb) from initially 100% oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) to deoxyhemoglobin (HHb) and, ultimately, methemoglobin (metHb) as the major constituent. Model calculations of E(thresh)(lambda,D) based on changing constituent blood composition during heating with milliseconds lasers were found to correlate with experimental results. For laser treatment of HVSL it appears that lambda is of secondary importance and that the choice of t(p) is a more important factor. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Experimental investigation of gas hydrate formation, plugging and transportability in partially dispersed and water continuous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayamohan, Prithvi

    As oil/gas subsea fields mature, the amount of water produced increases significantly due to the production methods employed to enhance the recovery of oil. This is true especially in the case of oil reservoirs. This increase in the water hold up increases the risk of hydrate plug formation in the pipelines, thereby resulting in higher inhibition cost strategies. A major industry concern is to reduce the severe safety risks associated with hydrate plug formation, and significantly extending subsea tieback distances by providing a cost effective flow assurance management/safety tool for mature fields. Developing fundamental understanding of the key mechanistic steps towards hydrate plug formation for different multiphase flow conditions is a key challenge to the flow assurance community. Such understanding can ultimately provide new insight and hydrate management guidelines to diminish the safety risks due to hydrate formation and accumulation in deepwater flowlines and facilities. The transportability of hydrates in pipelines is a function of the operating parameters, such as temperature, pressure, fluid mixture velocity, liquid loading, and fluid system characteristics. Specifically, the hydrate formation rate and plugging onset characteristics can be significantly different for water continuous, oil continuous, and partially dispersed systems. The latter is defined as a system containing oil/gas/water, where the water is present both as a free phase and partially dispersed in the oil phase (i.e., entrained water in the oil). Since hydrate formation from oil dispersed in water systems and partially dispersed water systems is an area which is poorly understood, this thesis aims to address some key questions in these systems. Selected experiments have been performed at the University of Tulsa flowloop to study the hydrate formation and plugging characteristics for the partially dispersed water/oil/gas systems as well as systems where the oil is completely dispersed

  13. A NEW HYBRID N-BODY-COAGULATION CODE FOR THE FORMATION OF GAS GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, Benjamin C.; Kenyon, Scott J., E-mail: bromley@physics.utah.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-04-20

    We describe an updated version of our hybrid N-body-coagulation code for planet formation. In addition to the features of our 2006-2008 code, our treatment now includes algorithms for the one-dimensional evolution of the viscous disk, the accretion of small particles in planetary atmospheres, gas accretion onto massive cores, and the response of N-bodies to the gravitational potential of the gaseous disk and the swarm of planetesimals. To validate the N-body portion of the algorithm, we use a battery of tests in planetary dynamics. As a first application of the complete code, we consider the evolution of Pluto-mass planetesimals in amore » swarm of 0.1-1 cm pebbles. In a typical evolution time of 1-3 Myr, our calculations transform 0.01-0.1 M{sub sun} disks of gas and dust into planetary systems containing super-Earths, Saturns, and Jupiters. Low-mass planets form more often than massive planets; disks with smaller {alpha} form more massive planets than disks with larger {alpha}. For Jupiter-mass planets, masses of solid cores are 10-100 M{sub +}.« less

  14. Probing Toluene and Ethylbenzene Stable Glass Formation using Inert Gas Permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; May, Robert A.; Kay, Bruce D.

    Inert gas permeation is used to investigate the formation of stable glasses of toluene and ethylbenzene. The effect of deposition temperature (Tdep) on the kinetic stability of the vapor deposited glasses is determined using Kr desorption spectra from within sandwich layers of either toluene or ethylbenzene. The results for toluene show that the most stable glass is formed at Tdep = 0.92 Tg, although glasses with a kinetic stability within 50% of the most stable glass were found with deposition temperatures from 0.85 to 0.95 Tg. Similar results were found for ethylbenzene, which formed its most stable glass at 0.91more » Tg and formed stable glasses from 0.81 to 0.96 Tg. These results are consistent with recent calorimetric studies and demonstrate that the inert gas permeation technique provides a direct method to observe the onset of molecular translation motion that accompanies the glass to supercooled liquid transition.« less

  15. Formation evaluation of gas hydrate-bearing marine sediments on the Blake Ridge with downhole geochemical log measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.; Wendlandt, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    The analyses of downhole log data from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) boreholes on the Blake Ridge at Sites 994, 995, and 997 indicate that the Schlumberger geochemical logging tool (GLT) may yield useful gas hydrate reservoir data. In neutron spectroscopy downhole logging, each element has a characteristic gamma ray that is emitted from a given neutron-element interaction. Specific elements can be identified by their characteristic gamma-ray signature, with the intensity of emission related to the atomic elemental concentration. By combining elemental yields from neutron spectroscopy logs, reservoir parameters including porosities, lithologies, formation fluid salinities, and hydrocarbon saturations (including gas hydrate) can be calculated. Carbon and oxygen elemental data from the GLT was used to determine gas hydrate saturations at all three sites (Sites 994, 995, and 997) drilled on the Blake Ridge during Leg 164. Detailed analyses of the carbon and oxygen content of various sediments and formation fluids were used to construct specialized carbon/oxygen ratio (COR) fan charts for a series of hypothetical gas hydrate accumulations. For more complex geologic systems, a modified version of the standard three-component COR hydrocarbon saturation equation was developed and used to calculate gas hydrate saturations on the Blake Ridge. The COR-calculated gas hydrate saturations (ranging from about 2% to 14% bulk volume gas hydrate) from the Blake Ridge compare favorably to the gas hydrate saturations derived from electrical resistivity log measurements.

  16. Energy Intensity and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Tight Oil Production in the Bakken Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Adam R.; Yeskoo, Tim; McNally, Michael S.

    The Bakken formation has contributed to the recent rapid increase in U.S. oil production, reaching a peak production of >1.2 × 106 barrels per day in early 2015. In this study, we estimate the energy intensity and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from 7271 Bakken wells drilled from 2006 to 2013. We model energy use and emissions using the Oil Production Greenhouse Gas Emissions Estimator (OPGEE) model, supplemented with an open-source drilling and fracturing model, GHGfrack. Overall well-to-refinery-gate (WTR) consumption of natural gas, diesel, and electricity represent 1.3%, 0.2%, and 0.005% of produced crude energy content, respectively. Fugitive emissions are modeledmore » for a “typical” Bakken well using previously published results of atmospheric measurements. Flaring is a key driver of emissions: wells that flared in 2013 had a mean flaring rate that was ≈500 standard cubic feet per barrel or ≈14% of the energy content of the produced crude oil. Resulting production-weighted mean GHG emissions in 2013 were 10.2 g of CO2 equivalent GHGs per megajoule (henceforth, gCO2eq/MJ) of crude. Between-well variability gives a 5–95% range of 2–28 gCO2eq/MJ. If flaring is completely controlled, Bakken crude compares favorably to conventional U.S. crude oil, with 2013 emissions of 3.5 gCO2eq/MJ for nonflaring wells, compared to the U.S. mean of ≈8 gCO2eq/MJ.« less

  17. Judith River Formation beneath Fort Peck Indian Reservation - proven high plains gas frontier in northeastern Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Monson, L.M.

    1988-07-01

    As one of the progradational sequences in the Late Cretaceous, the Claggett-Judith River cycle created potential reservoirs for shallow biogenic gas. From west to east across the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana, in a distance of 75 mi (121 km), the Judith River Formation changes from a 350-ft (107-m) accumulation of fine-grained nonmarine clastics, to a 130-ft (39-m) deposit of fine-grained sandstone. Three units are present in the subsurface of the central part of the reservation. A continuous basal sandstone, 30-130 ft (9-39 m) thick, formed in a coastal environment. This unit thickens in the direction of progradation, whichmore » may indicate the addition of sand bodies in a shelf environment. The middle unit is a 20 to 50-ft (6 to 15-m) sequence of shale and siltstone. Capping the Judith River is a sandstone 20-50 ft (6-15 m) thick, which formed either as a shore facies in the regressive cycle or as a shelf sandstone prior to the final Cretaceous transgression that deposited the overlying Bearpaw Shale. Stratigraphic traps exist in the upper and lower sandstone units due to variation in grain size and clay content associated with the progradational facies changes. In addition, Laramide structures associated with the Poplar dome and Wolf Creek nose have created local trapping mechanisms. Judith River gas has been produced for operational use since 1952 in the East Poplar field. Shows have been reported in central reservation wells, although high mud weights and deeper exploration targets have prevented adequate evaluation of the Judith River gas frontier.« less

  18. Simulating energy cascade of shock wave formation process in a resonator by gas kinetic scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Chengwu; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Feng, Heying

    2017-12-01

    The temporal-spatial evolution of gas oscillation was simulated by gas kinetic scheme (GKS) in a cylindrical resonator, driven by a piston at one end and rigidly closed at the other end. Periodic shock waves propagating back and forth were observed in the resonator under finite amplitude of gas oscillation. The studied results demonstrated that the acoustic pressure is a saw-tooth waveform and the oscillatory velocity is a square waveform at the central position of the resonant tube. Moreover, it was found by harmonic analysis that there was no presence of obvious feature for pressure node in such a typical standing wave resonator, and the distribution of acoustic fields displayed a one-dimensional feature for the acoustic pressure while a quasi-one-dimensional form for oscillatory velocity, which demonstrated the nonlinear effects. The simulation results for axial distribution of acoustic intensity showed a good consistency with the published experimental data in the open literature domain, which provides a verification for the effectiveness of the GKS model proposed. The influence of displacement amplitude of the driving piston on the formation of shock wave was numerically investigated, and the simulated results revealed the cascade process of harmonic wave energy from the fundamental wave to higher harmonics. In addition, this study found that the acoustic intensity at the driving end of the resonant tube would increase linearly with the displacement amplitude of the piston due to nonlinear effects, rather than the exponential variation by linear theory. This research demonstrates that the GKS model is strongly capable of simulating nonlinear acoustic problems.

  19. EFFECTS OF HOT HALO GAS ON STAR FORMATION AND MASS TRANSFER DURING DISTANT GALAXY–GALAXY ENCOUNTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jeong-Sun; Park, Changbom, E-mail: jshwang@kias.re.kr, E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr

    2015-06-01

    We use N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of encounters between an early-type galaxy (ETG) and a late-type galaxy (LTG) to study the effects of hot halo gas on the evolution for a case with the mass ratio of the ETG to LTG of 2:1 and the closest approach distance of ∼100 kpc. We find that the dynamics of the cold disk gas in the tidal bridge and the amount of the newly formed stars depend strongly on the existence of a gas halo. In the run of interacting galaxies not having a hot gas halo, the gas and stars accreted into themore » ETG do not include newly formed stars. However, in the run using the ETG with a gas halo and the LTG without a gas halo, a shock forms along the disk gas tidal bridge and induces star formation near the closest approach. The shock front is parallel to a channel along which the cold gas flows toward the center of the ETG. As a result, the ETG can accrete star-forming cold gas and newly born stars at and near its center. When both galaxies have hot gas halos, a shock is formed between the two gas halos somewhat before the closest approach. The shock hinders the growth of the cold gas bridge to the ETG and also ionizes it. Only some of the disk stars transfer through the stellar bridge. We conclude that the hot halo gas can give significant hydrodynamic effects during distant encounters.« less

  20. Efficacy of aspiration in amebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Jayant Kumar; Goyal, Sundeep Kumar; Behera, Manas Kumar; Tripathi, Manish Kumar; Dixit, Vinod Kumar; Jain, Ashok Kumar; Shukla, Ramchandra

    2015-01-01

    Amebic liver abscess (ALA) is a common and serious problem in our country. There are only a few controlled trials on the efficacy and advantages of combination therapy with percutaneous needle aspiration and pharmacotherapy, over pharmacotherapy alone for amebic liver abscess. This study was conducted to compare the efficacy of two different treatment modalities i.e. drug treatment alone vs. drug treatment and aspiration of abscess cavity in patients with small (up to 5 cm) and large (5 cm to 10 cm) size ALA. This is one of the largest single center, prospective, randomized studies comparing the efficacy of aspiration in ALA. (i) Mean body temperature, liver tenderness, total leukocyte count (TLC), serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and liver span were significantly decreased in the aspiration group on days 8 and 15 as compared to non-aspiration group especially in large abscess (5 cm to 10 cm). (ii) Abscess cavity maximum diameter decreased significantly in aspiration group on days 8 and 15, and 1 month & 3 months in large abscess (5cm to 10 cm). (i) Needle aspiration along with metronidazole hastens clinical improvement especially in large (5 cm up to 10 cm) cavities in patients with ALA. (ii) Aspiration is safe and no major complications occurred. (iii) Hence, combination therapy should be the first choice especially in large ALA (5 cm to 10 cm).

  1. Splenic abscess after splenic blunt injury angioembolization.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Dario; Galatioto, Christian; Lippolis, Piero Vincenzo; Modesti, Matteo; Gianardi, Desirée; Bertolucci, Andrea; Cucinotta, Monica; Zocco, Giuseppe; Seccia, Massimo

    2014-11-03

    Splenic Angioembolization (SAE), during Nonoperative Management (NOM) of Blunt Splenic Injury (BSI), is an effective therapy for hemodynamically stable patients with grade III, IV, and V OIS splenic injuries. We report a case of a patient with a blunt abdominal trauma due to an accidental fall, who presented splenic abscess a week after SAE and a review of the literature. A 38-year-old male arrived at Emergency after an accidental fall with contusion of the left upper quadrant of the abdomen. Abdominal CT scan revealed the fracture of the lower splenic pole with intraparenchymal pseudoaneurysms (OIS spleen injury scale IV). Considering the hemodynamic stability, NOM was undertaken and SAE was performed. After a week, the patient developed a splenic abscess confirmed by Abdominal CT; therefore, splenectomy was performed. There was no evidence of bacterial growing in the perisplenic hematoma cultures but the histological examination showed multiple abscess and hemorrhagic areas in the spleen. Splenic abscess after SAE during NOM of BSI is a rare major complication. The most frequently cultured organisms include Clostridium perfringens, Alpha-Hemoliticus Streptococcus, gram-positive Staphylococcus, gram-negative Salmonella, Candida, and Aspergillus. This case represents our first reported splenic abscess after SAE. SAE is a very useful tool for BSI managing; splenic abscess can occur in a short time, even if it is a rare major complication, so it may be useful to monitor patients undergoing SAE, focusing not only on the hemodynamic parameters but also on the inflammatory and infectious aspects.

  2. [Splenic abscesses: From diagnosis to therapy].

    PubMed

    Davido, B; Dinh, A; Rouveix, E; Crenn, P; Hanslik, T; Salomon, J

    2017-09-01

    Splenic abscess is septic collection which occurs after haematogenous spread or local dissemination. Splenic abscess is an uncommon and rare condition, more frequently affecting male and immunocompromised patients. There are no guidelines regarding its diagnosis and management. Computed tomography (CT) scan is highly sensitive and specific (95% and 92%, respectively) in the diagnosis of splenic abscess. Diagnosis is based on blood cultures which are positive in 24 to 80% of cases. Bacterial growth culture of abscess after drainage is more efficient (50-80%) and can be performed after surgery or percutaneous drainage under imaging, including CT scan. Microorganisms involved are frequently enterobacteriaceae, gram-positive cocci and anaerobes. This particular ecology leads to an empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, with a variable duration, from 10days to more than one month. Management remains very close to the one applied in case of liver abscesses. The role of splenectomy in the prevention of recurrence remains controversial. We reviewed the literature regarding splenic abscesses, from diagnosis to therapy. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Abdominal wall abscess secondary to spontaneous rupture of pyogenic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Zizzo, Maurizio; Zaghi, Claudia; Manenti, Antonio; Luppi, Davide; Ugoletti, Lara; Bonilauri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscess is a rare cause of hospitalization, related to a mortality rate ranging between 15% and 19%. Treatment of choice is represented by image-guided percutaneous drainage in combination with antibiotic therapy but, in some selected cases, surgical treatment is necessary. In extremely rare cases, spontaneous rupture of liver abscess may occur, free in the peritoneal cavity or in neighboring organs, an event which is generally considered a surgical emergency. A 95-years-old woman was hospitalized with fever, upper abdominal pain, mild dyspepsia and massive swelling of the anterior abdominal wall. Computed tomography revealed an oval mass located in the abdominal wall of 12cm×14cm×7cm, in continuity with an abscess of the left hepatic lobe. Because Proteus mirabilis was detected in both the liver abscess and the abdominal wall abscess, the patient was diagnosed with a ruptured pyogenic liver abscess. After spontaneous drainage to the exterior of the hepato-parietal abscess, she was successfully treated with antibiotics alone. Pyogenic liver abscess is a serious and life-threatening illness. Abscess rupture might occur. Many authors consider this complication a surgical emergency, but the site of abscess rupture changes the clinical history of the disease: in case of free rupture into the peritoneum, emergency surgery is mandatory, while a rupture localized in neighboring tissues or organs can be successfully treated by a combination of systemic antibiotics and fine needle aspiration and/or percutaneous drainage of the abscess. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess in diabetic patients: association of glycemic control with the clinical characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess (KPLA) has been reported with increasing frequency in East Asian countries in the past 3 decades, especially in Taiwan and Korea. Diabetes is a well-known risk factor for KPLA and highly associated with septic metastatic complications from KPLA. We investigated the association of glycemic control in diabetic patients with the clinical characteristics of KPLA in Taiwan. Methods Adult diabetic patients with KPLA were identified retrospectively in a medical center from January 2007 to January 2012. Clinical characteristics were compared among patients with different levels of current hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Risk factors for metastatic infection from KPLA were analyzed. Results Patients with uncontrolled glycemia (HbA1c ≥ 7%) were significantly younger than those with controlled glycemia (HbA1c < 7%). Patients with uncontrolled glycemia had the trend to have a higher rate of gas-forming liver abscess, cryptogenic liver abscess, and metastatic infection than those with controlled glycemia. Cryptogenic liver abscess and metastatic infection were more common in the poor glycemic control group (HbA1c value >; 10%) after adjustment with age. HbA1c level and abscess < 5 cm were independent risk factors for metastatic complications from KPLA. Conclusions Glycemic control in diabetic patients played an essential role in the clinical characteristics of KPLA, especially in metastatic complications from KPLA. PMID:23363608

  5. A Model for the Onset of Self-gravitation and Star Formation in Molecular Gas Governed by Galactic Forces. I. Cloud-scale Gas Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidt, Sharon E.; Leroy, Adam K.; Rosolowsky, Erik; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Schinnerer, Eva; Schruba, Andreas; Pety, Jerome; Blanc, Guillermo; Bigiel, Frank; Chevance, Melanie; Hughes, Annie; Querejeta, Miguel; Usero, Antonio

    2018-02-01

    Modern extragalactic molecular gas surveys now reach the scales of star-forming giant molecular clouds (GMCs; 20–50 pc). Systematic variations in GMC properties with galaxy environment imply that clouds are not universally self-gravitating objects, decoupled from their surroundings. Here we re-examine the coupling of clouds to their environment and develop a model for 3D gas motions generated by forces arising with the galaxy gravitational potential defined by the background disk of stars and dark matter. We show that these motions can resemble or even exceed the motions needed to support gas against its own self-gravity throughout typical galactic disks. The importance of the galactic potential in spiral arms and galactic centers suggests that the response to self-gravity does not always dominate the motions of gas at GMC scales, with implications for observed gas kinematics, virial equilibrium, and cloud morphology. We describe how a uniform treatment of gas motions in the plane and in the vertical direction synthesizes the two main mechanisms proposed to regulate star formation: vertical pressure equilibrium and shear/Coriolis forces as parameterized by Toomre Q ≈ 1. As the modeled motions are coherent and continually driven by the external potential, they represent support for the gas that is distinct from that conventionally attributed to turbulence, which decays rapidly and thus requires maintenance, e.g., via feedback from star formation. Thus, our model suggests that the galaxy itself can impose an important limit on star formation, as we explore in a second paper in this series.

  6. The Permian Whitehill Formation (Karoo Basin, South Africa): deciphering the complexity and potential of an unconventional gas resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, Annette E.

    2014-05-01

    A key energy policy objective of the South African government is to diversify its energy mix from coal which constitutes 85% of the current mix. Gas will play a key role in the future South African economy with demand coming from electricity generation and gas-to-liquids projects. A study on world shale reserves conducted by the Energy Information Agency (EIA) in 2011 concluded that there could be as much as 485 Tcf recoverable reserves of shale gas in the South African Karoo Basin. However, the true extent and commercial viability is still unknown, due to the lack of exploration drilling and modern 3D seismic. The present study compiles existing data from literature review and new data from outcrop analogue studies on the Permian Whitehill Formation, the main target formation for future shale gas production, including thickness, depth, maturity, TOC, lithologies, sedimentary and organic facies, and dolerite occurrence to provide a first reference dataset for further investigations and resource estimates.

  7. Effect of liquefied petroleum gas on ozone formation in Guadalajara and Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Jaimes-López, J Luis; Sandoval-Fernández, Julio; González-Ortíz, Emmanuel; Vázquez-García, Marcos; González-Macías, Uriel; Zambrano-García, Angel

    2005-06-01

    Leakages of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are suspected to contribute greatly to ozone (O3) formation in Mexico City. We tested such a hypothesis by outdoor captive-air irradiation (CAI) experiments in the two largest Mexican metropolitan areas: Guadalajara (GMA) in 1997 and Mexico City (MCMA) in 2000. O3 was monitored in each city for 20 days (8:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.) in smog chambers containing unaltered morning air or morning air enriched with either commercial LPG or LPG synthetic mixture 60/40 (propane and butane). Tested additions of both components were 35% (by volume) in GMA and 60% (by volume) in MCMA. The addition effects on O3 (max) were compared with effects from diluting LPG components or total nonmethane hydrocarbons (tNMHCs) by 50%. Diluting tNMHCs had the greatest absolute effect at both cities: it lowered O3 (max) by 24% in GMA and 55% in MCMA. Adding commercial LPG increased O3 (max) by 6% in GMA and 28% in MCMA; whereas adding LPG synthetic mixture 60/40 caused a similar increase in O3 (max), 4 and 21% in GMA and MCMA, respectively. Compared with dilution of tNMHCs, dilution of LPG-associated compounds had a smaller decreasing effect on O3 (max), only 4% in GMA and 15% in MCMA. These results show that commercial LPG and LPG synthetic mixture 60/40 affect O3 formation to a lesser extent than estimated previously.

  8. Diffuse gas properties and stellar metallicities in cosmological simulations of disc galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinacci, Federico; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Springel, Volker; Simpson, Christine M.

    2014-08-01

    We analyse the properties of the circumgalactic medium and the metal content of the stars comprising the central galaxy in eight hydrodynamical `zoom-in' simulations of disc galaxy formation. We use these properties as a benchmark for our model of galaxy formation physics implemented in the moving-mesh code AREPO, which succeeds in forming quite realistic late-type spirals in the set of `Aquarius' initial conditions of Milky-Way-sized haloes. Galactic winds significantly influence the morphology of the circumgalactic medium and induce bipolar features in the distribution of heavy elements. They also affect the thermodynamic properties of the circumgalactic gas by supplying an energy input that sustains its radiative losses. Although a significant fraction of the heavy elements are transferred from the central galaxy to the halo, and even beyond the virial radius, enough metals are retained by stars to yield a peak in their metallicity distributions at about Z⊙. All our default runs overestimate the stellar [O/Fe] ratio, an effect that we demonstrate can be rectified by an increase of the adopted Type Ia supernova rate. Nevertheless, the models have difficulty in producing stellar metallicity gradients of the same strength as observed in the Milky Way.

  9. Gas Cloud Accretion onto the SMBH SgrA* and Formation of Jet 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Shogo

    2015-06-01

    A dense gas cloud was detected to be rapidly approaching the Galactic supermassive black hole (SMBH) Sgr A*, and was 1,600 Schwarzschild radii from the SMBH at the pericenter of its eccentric orbit in Mar 2014. Ongoing tidal disruption has been observed, and cloud fragments are expected to accrete onto the SMBH on dynamical timescales, suggesting a jet formation in the following years. So we are carrying out daily monitoring observations of Sgr A* in near-infrared and radio wavelengths, and we propose quick follow-up observations with Subaru/Gemini. Br-gamma line emission maps obtained with Gemini/NIFS will be used to fine tune our 3D simulation to estimate how much mass accretes, and when the fragments accrete onto the SMBH. Polarimetric and astrometric signals from a jet taken with Subaru/HiCIAO and KaVA will be compared with the finely tuned simulation to understand the timescale of jet formation, and to investigate the correlation between the accreted mass of the cloud fragments and a luminosity of the newly-formed jet. Spectroscopic and imaging observations from 1.6 - 11 mum (Subaru/IRCS, COMICS) will also be conducted to understand processes responsible for near to mid-infrared emission during the accretion event.

  10. FORMATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND CARBONACEOUS SOLIDS IN GAS-PHASE CONDENSATION EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, C.; Huisken, F.; Henning, Th.

    2009-05-01

    Carbonaceous grains represent a major component of cosmic dust. In order to understand their formation pathways, they have been prepared in the laboratory by gas-phase condensation reactions such as laser pyrolysis and laser ablation. Our studies demonstrate that the temperature in the condensation zone determines the formation pathway of carbonaceous particles. At temperatures lower than 1700 K, the condensation by-products are mainly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are also the precursors or building blocks for the condensing soot grains. The low-temperature condensates contain PAH mixtures that are mainly composed of volatile three to five ring systems. At condensation temperatures highermore » than 3500 K, fullerene-like carbon grains and fullerene compounds are formed. Fullerene fragments or complete fullerenes equip the nucleating particles. Fullerenes can be identified as soluble components. Consequently, condensation products in cool and hot astrophysical environments such as cool and hot asymptotic giant branch stars or Wolf-Rayet stars should be different and should have distinct spectral properties.« less

  11. Determination of ideal-gas enthalpies of formation for key compounds:

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W.V.; Chirico, R.D.; Nguyen, A.

    1991-10-01

    The results of a study aimed at improvement of group-contribution methodology for estimation of thermodynamic properties of organic and organosilicon substances are reported. Specific weaknesses where particular group-contribution terms were unknown, or estimated because of lack of experimental data, are addressed by experimental studies of enthalpies of combustion in the condensed phase, vapor-pressure measurements, and differential scanning calorimetric (d.s.c.) heat-capacity measurements. Ideal-gas enthalpies of formation of ({plus minus})-butan-2-ol, tetradecan-1-ol, hexan-1,6-diol, methacrylamide, benzoyl formic acid, naphthalene-2,6-dicarboxylic acid dimethyl ester, and tetraethylsilane are reported. A crystalline-phase enthalpy of formation at 298.15 K was determined for naphthalene-2,6-dicarboxylic acid, which decomposed at 695 Kmore » before melting. The combustion calorimetry of tetraethylsilane used the proven fluorine-additivity methodology. Critical temperature and critical density were determined for tetraethylsilane with differential scanning calorimeter and the critical pressure was derived. Group-additivity parameters useful in the application of group- contribution correlations are derived. 112 refs., 13 figs., 19 tabs.« less

  12. Integral field spectroscopy of nearby quasi-stellar objects - II. Molecular gas content and conditions for star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husemann, B.; Davis, T. A.; Jahnke, K.; Dannerbauer, H.; Urrutia, T.; Hodge, J.

    2017-09-01

    We present single-dish 12CO(1-0) and 12CO(2-1) observations for 14 low-redshift quasi-stellar objects (QSOs). In combination with optical integral field spectroscopy, we study how the cold gas content relates to the star formation rate (SFR) and black hole accretion rate. 12CO(1-0) is detected in 8 of 14 targets and 12CO(2-1) is detected in 7 out of 11 cases. The majority of disc-dominated QSOs reveal gas fractions and depletion times matching normal star-forming systems. Two gas-rich major mergers show clear starburst signatures with higher than average gas fractions and shorter depletion times. Bulge-dominated QSO hosts are mainly undetected in 12CO(1-0), which corresponds, on average, to lower gas fractions than in disc-dominated counterparts. Their SFRs, however, imply shorter than average depletion times and higher star formation efficiencies. Negative QSO feedback through removal of cold gas seems to play a negligible role in our sample. We find a trend between black hole accretion rate and total molecular gas content for disc-dominated QSOs when combined with literature samples. We interpret this as an upper envelope for the nuclear activity and it is well represented by a scaling relation between the total and circumnuclear gas reservoir accessible for accretion. Bulge-dominated QSOs significantly differ from that scaling relation and appear uncorrelated with the total molecular gas content. This could be explained either by a more compact gas reservoir, blown out of the gas envelope through outflows, or a different interstellar medium phase composition.

  13. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: a new method to estimate molecular gas surface densities from star formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federrath, Christoph; Salim, Diane M.; Medling, Anne M.; Davies, Rebecca L.; Yuan, Tiantian; Bian, Fuyan; Groves, Brent A.; Ho, I.-Ting; Sharp, Robert; Kewley, Lisa J.; Sweet, Sarah M.; Richards, Samuel N.; Bryant, Julia J.; Brough, Sarah; Croom, Scott; Scott, Nicholas; Lawrence, Jon; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis; Goodwin, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Stars form in cold molecular clouds. However, molecular gas is difficult to observe because the most abundant molecule (H2) lacks a permanent dipole moment. Rotational transitions of CO are often used as a tracer of H2, but CO is much less abundant and the conversion from CO intensity to H2 mass is often highly uncertain. Here we present a new method for estimating the column density of cold molecular gasgas) using optical spectroscopy. We utilize the spatially resolved Hα maps of flux and velocity dispersion from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. We derive maps of Σgas by inverting the multi-freefall star formation relation, which connects the star formation rate surface density (ΣSFR) with Σgas and the turbulent Mach number (M). Based on the measured range of ΣSFR = 0.005-1.5 {M_{⊙} yr^{-1} kpc^{-2}} and M=18-130, we predict Σgas = 7-200 {M_{⊙} pc^{-2}} in the star-forming regions of our sample of 260 SAMI galaxies. These values are close to previously measured Σgas obtained directly with unresolved CO observations of similar galaxies at low redshift. We classify each galaxy in our sample as 'star-forming' (219) or 'composite/AGN/shock' (41), and find that in 'composite/AGN/shock' galaxies the average ΣSFR, M and Σgas are enhanced by factors of 2.0, 1.6 and 1.3, respectively, compared to star-forming galaxies. We compare our predictions of Σgas with those obtained by inverting the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation and find that our new method is a factor of 2 more accurate in predicting Σgas, with an average deviation of 32 per cent from the actual Σgas.

  14. Dark-ages Reionization and Galaxy Formation Simulation - XIV. Gas accretion, cooling, and star formation in dwarf galaxies at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yuxiang; Duffy, Alan R.; Mutch, Simon J.; Poole, Gregory B.; Geil, Paul M.; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.

    2018-06-01

    We study dwarf galaxy formation at high redshift (z ≥ 5) using a suite of high-resolution, cosmological hydrodynamic simulations and a semi-analytic model (SAM). We focus on gas accretion, cooling, and star formation in this work by isolating the relevant process from reionization and supernova feedback, which will be further discussed in a companion paper. We apply the SAM to halo merger trees constructed from a collisionless N-body simulation sharing identical initial conditions to the hydrodynamic suite, and calibrate the free parameters against the stellar mass function predicted by the hydrodynamic simulations at z = 5. By making comparisons of the star formation history and gas components calculated by the two modelling techniques, we find that semi-analytic prescriptions that are commonly adopted in the literature of low-redshift galaxy formation do not accurately represent dwarf galaxy properties in the hydrodynamic simulation at earlier times. We propose three modifications to SAMs that will provide more accurate high-redshift simulations. These include (1) the halo mass and baryon fraction which are overestimated by collisionless N-body simulations; (2) the star formation efficiency which follows a different cosmic evolutionary path from the hydrodynamic simulation; and (3) the cooling rate which is not well defined for dwarf galaxies at high redshift. Accurate semi-analytic modelling of dwarf galaxy formation informed by detailed hydrodynamical modelling will facilitate reliable semi-analytic predictions over the large volumes needed for the study of reionization.

  15. Gas-phase products and secondary organic aerosol formation from the ozonolysis and photooxidation of myrcene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böge, Olaf; Mutzel, Anke; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Kahnt, Ariane; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-11-01

    In this study, the ozone and OH-radical reactions of myrcene were investigated in an aerosol chamber (at 292-295 K and 50% relative humidity) to examine the gas-phase oxidation products and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. The ozone reaction studies were performed in the presence and absence of CO, which serves as an OH radical scavenger. In the photooxidation experiments OH radicals were generated by photolysis of methyl nitrite. The ozonolysis of myrcene in the presence of CO resulted in a substantial yield of 4-vinyl-4-pentenal (55.3%), measured as m/z 111 plus m/z 93 using proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and confirmed unambiguously as C7H10O by denuder measurements and HPLC/ESI-TOFMS analysis of its 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivative. Additionally, the formation of two different organic dicarbonyls with m/z 113 and a molecular formula of C6H8O2 were observed (2.1%). The yields of these dicarbonyls were higher in the ozonolysis experiments without an OH scavenger (5.4%) and even higher (13.8%) in the myrcene OH radical reaction. The formation of hydroxyacetone as a direct product of the myrcene reaction with ozone with a molar yield of 17.6% was also observed. The particle size distribution and volume concentrations were monitored and facilitated the calculation of SOA yields, which ranged from 0 to 0.01 (ozonolysis in the presence of CO) to 0.39 (myrcene OH radical reaction). Terpenylic acid was found in the SOA samples collected from the ozonolysis of myrcene in the absence of an OH scavenger and the OH radical-initiated reaction of myrcene but not in samples collected from the ozonolysis in the presence of CO as an OH radical scavenger, suggesting that terpenylic acid formation involves the reaction of myrcene with an OH radical. A reaction mechanism describing the formation of terpenylic acid is proposed.

  16. Prebiotic molecules formation through the gas-phase reaction between HNO and CH2CHOH2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Pilar; Martínez, Henar; Largo, Antonio; Barrientos, Carmen

    2017-07-01

    Context. Knowing how the molecules that are present in the ISM can evolve to more complex ones is an interesting topic in interstellar chemistry. The study of possible reactions between detected species can help to understand the evolution in complexity of the interstellar matter and also allows knowing the formation of new molecules which could be candidates to be detected. We focus our attention on two molecules detected in space, vinyl alcohol (CH2CHOH) and azanone (HNO). Aims: We aim to carry out a theoretical study of the ion-molecule reaction between protonated vinyl alcohol and azanone. The viability of formation of complex organic molecules (COMs) from these reactants is expected to provide some insight into the formation of prebiotic species through gas phase reactions. Methods: The reaction of protonated vinyl alcohol with azanone has been theoretically studied by using ab initio methods. Stationary points on the potential energy surface (PES) were characterized at the second-order Moller-Plesset level in conjunction with the aug-cc-pVTZ (correlation-consistent polarized valence triple-zeta) basis set. In addition, the electronic energies were refined by means of single-point calculations at the CCSD(T) level (coupled cluster single and double excitation model augmented with a non-iterative treatment of triple excitations) with the same basis set. Results: From a thermodynamic point of view, twelve products, composed of carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen which could be precursors in the formation of more complex biological molecules, can be obtained from this reaction. Among these, we focus especially on ionized glycine and two of its isomers. The analysis of the PES shows that only formation of cis- and trans-O-protonated imine acetaldehyde, CH2NHCOH+ and, CHNHCHOH+, are viable under interstellar conditions. Conclusions: The reaction of protonated vinyl alcohol with azanone can evolve in the interstellar medium to more complex organic molecules of

  17. Shocked and Scorched - Free-Floating Evaporating Gas Globules and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Morris, Mark R.; Claussen, Mark J.

    2014-07-01

    Massive stars have a strong feedback effect on their environment, via their winds, UV radiation, and ultimately, supernova blast waves, all of which can alter the likelihood for the formation of stars in nearby clouds and limit the accretion process of nearby protostars. Free-floating Evaporating Gaseous Globules, or frEGGs, are a newly recognized class of stellar nurseries embedded within the giant HII regions found in massive star-formation region (MSFRs). We recently discovered the prototype frEGG in the Cygnus MSFR with HST. Further investigation using the Spitzer and Herschel archives have revealed a much larger number (>50) in Cygnus and other MSFRs. Our molecular-line observations of these show the presence of dense clouds with total masses of cool molecular gas exceeding 0.5 to a few Msun associated with these objects, thereby disproving the initial hypothesis based on their morphology that these have an origin similar to the proplyds (cometary-shaped photoevaporating protoplanetary disks) found in Orion. We report the results of our molecular-line studies and detailed high-resolution optical (with HST) or near-IR (with AO at the Keck Observatory) imaging of a few frEGGs in Cygnus, Carina and the W5 MSFRs. The images show the presence of young stars with associated outflow cavities and/or jets in the heads of the tadpole-shaped frEGGs. These results support our hypothesis that frEGGs are density concentrations originating in giant molecular clouds, that, when subject to the compression by the strong winds and ionization from massive stars in these MSFRs, become active star-forming cores. In summary, by virtue of their distinct, isolated morphologies, frEGGs offer us a clean probe of triggered star formation on small scales in the vicinity of massive stars.

  18. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes. PMID:27526869

  19. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-16

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  20. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  1. Actinotignum schaalii subcutaneous abscesses in a patient with hidradenitis suppurativa: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Maraki, Sofia; Evangelou, George; Stafylaki, Dimitra; Scoulica, Efstathia

    2017-02-01

    Actinotignum schaalii (formerly Actinobaculum schaalii) is a Gram-positive, facultative anaerobic rod that is typically involved in urinary tract infections in elderly patients or those with underlying urological pathologies. In contrast, abscess formation caused by A. schaalii is very rare. We present a case of multiple abscesses in the perineal area in a young patient with hidradenitis suppurativa associated with A. schaalii and Prevotella melaninogenica and review the relevant literature on the topic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Applying of the Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) to Identify and Characterize Sweet Spots in Shale Gas Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskarczyk, Edyta

    2018-03-01

    The main goal of the study was to enhance and improve information about the Ordovician and Silurian gas-saturated shale formations. Author focused on: firstly, identification of the shale gas formations, especially the sweet spots horizons, secondly, classification and thirdly, the accurate characterization of divisional intervals. Data set comprised of standard well logs from the selected well. Shale formations are represented mainly by claystones, siltstones, and mudstones. The formations are also partially rich in organic matter. During the calculations, information about lithology of stratigraphy weren't taken into account. In the analysis, selforganizing neural network - Kohonen Algorithm (ANN) was used for sweet spots identification. Different networks and different software were tested and the best network was used for application and interpretation. As a results of Kohonen networks, groups corresponding to the gas-bearing intervals were found. The analysis showed diversification between gas-bearing formations and surrounding beds. It is also shown that internal diversification in sweet spots is present. Kohonen algorithm was also used for geological interpretation of well log data and electrofacies prediction. Reliable characteristic into groups shows that Ja Mb and Sa Fm which are usually treated as potential sweet spots only partially have good reservoir conditions. It is concluded that ANN appears to be useful and quick tool for preliminary classification of members and sweet spots identification.

  3. Invasive liver abscess syndrome predisposed by Klebsiella pneumoniae related prostate abscess in a nondiabetic patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen-Yi; Yang, Ya-Sung; Yeh, Yen-Cheng; Ben, Ren-Jy; Lee, Ching-Chang; Tsai, Chi-Chang; Wang, Chien-Yao; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Wang, Chih-Chiang

    2016-08-09

    Prostate abscess is usually a complication of acute urinary tract infection. Invasive liver abscess syndrome is characterized with Klebsiella pneumoniae related multiple organ metastasis. Concomitant pyogenic liver abscess and prostate abscess have rarely been reported. Recurrent episode of liver abscess is even rarer. We report a 71-year-old male with acute bacterial prostate abscess and urinary tract infection caused by K. pneumoniae associated with multiple liver abscess, psoas muscle abscess and osteomyelitis. Blood culture and urine culture yielded K. pneumoniae, which confirmed the diagnosis of invasive liver abscess syndrome caused by K. pneumoniae. The patient was successfully treated with empirical antibiotics for 6 weeks. This case emphasizes the importance of timely and accurate diagnosis followed by appropriate treatment in disseminated K. pneumoniae infection to prevent significant morbidity and mortality.

  4. Enterobius vermicularis in tubo-ovarian abscess: A rare and interesting incidental finding - A case Report.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Faryal; Malik, Faizan; Fatima, Saira

    2017-04-01

    Enterobius vermicularis is a common intestinal nematode; however, rare extraintestinal Enterobius infections have been reported from different parts of the world. Here, we present a case of tubo-ovarian abscess in an otherwise healthy young sexually active female with no known comorbids with history of on and off lower abdominal pain for one year and high grade fever for one month. On the basis of further workup and radiological evaluation, a preoperative diagnosis of right sided tubo-ovarian abscess was made and salpingo-oophorectomy was performed laproscopically in July 2015. Histopathology of the resected tissue revealed necrosis and in one area Enterobius vermicularis was identified surrounded by neutrophils and eosinophil rich abscess. A final diagnosis of severe acute and chronic salpingo-oophoritis with abscess formation, secondary to Enterobius vermicularis was made. Signs and symptoms of parasitic involvement in tubo-ovarian abscesses are not much different than usual presentations of pelvic inflammatory diseases and identification of a parasite in a tubo-ovarian tissue sample is a rare clinical finding. A high index of suspicion on the part of histopathologist as well as clinician is important for timely diagnosis and effective management of such cases.

  5. Dimension of subperiosteal orbital abscess as an indication for surgical management in children.

    PubMed

    Gavriel, Haim; Yeheskeli, Eyal; Aviram, Eliad; Yehoshua, Lior; Eviatar, Ephraim

    2011-11-01

    Eyelid edema in children is one of the signs of orbital complications secondary to acute rhinosinusitis, and identifying abscess formation is crucial for management decision. The objective of this study is to determine whether there are different computed tomography scan abscess dimensions and volumes in children requiring medical versus surgical management for subperiosteal orbital abscess (SPOA). Case series with chart review. The study was conducted at Assaf Harofeh Medical Center. Clinical and radiological parameters of 95 children admitted with eyelid edema between January 2005 and December 2007 were studied. Of 95 cases of orbital cellulitis, a total of 48 children with sinogenic orbital complications with a mean (SD) age of 4.03 (3.46) years were included. No significant difference was found between the surgically and medically treated SPOA groups regarding the use of preadmission antibiotic and clinical presentation. Statistically significant larger abscesses in the surgically treated group were noted (mean volume 1.389 vs 0.486 mL in the conservatively treated group; P = .013) and a longer mean anterior-posterior and medial-lateral dimension (P = .001 and .017, respectively). Children presenting with significant or progressing ocular findings or failure to improve after 48 hours of medical therapy, together with an abscess volume of more than 0.5 mL, a length greater than 17 mm, and a width greater than 4.5 mm, should be strongly considered to have surgical drainage.

  6. Intraabdominal abscess related fungaemia caused by Rhodotorula glutinis in a non-neutropenic cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Diktas, H; Gulec, B; Baylan, O; Oncul, O; Turhan, V; Acar, A; Gorenek, L

    2013-01-01

    Rhodotorula glutinis is a rare fungal infection that is especially observed in immune-compromised patients. It is common in the skin, faeces, nails, sputum, gastrointestinal system and adenoid tissue. However, the incidence of Rhodotorula glutinis is increased in both local and systemic infections in recent years. Presented here is a case of Rhodotorula glutinis fungaemia that isolated from subhepatic abscess formation and blood in a patient who was operated with Roux-en-Y technique due to gastric adenocarcinoma. Fungal sepsis is an important cause of fever resistant to antibiotic therapy that is often taken into marginal account. It should instead be particularly considered in patients with a history of intraabdominal surgery and non-neutropenic cancer patients. The case described illustrates an episode of systemic infection by Rhodotorula glutinis, correlated with the presence of intraabdominal abscess and without central venous catheters. This is the first case of fungaemia by Rhodotorula glutinis with an intraabdominal abscess source reported from Turkey.

  7. Understanding the Lung Abscess Microbiome: Outcomes of Percutaneous Lung Parenchymal Abscess Drainage with Microbiologic Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Christopher; Nadolski, Gregory J.; Gade, Terence

    IntroductionLung parenchymal abscesses represent an uncommon pathology with high mortality if untreated. Although most respond well to antibiotics, the optimal therapy for persistent abscesses is unknown. The purpose of this study was to review the outcomes of percutaneous lung parenchymal abscess catheter drainage after broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy failure and correlate with patient microbiologic samples.Materials and MethodsRetrospective review of patients who underwent percutaneous lung abscess drainage at a tertiary hospital system from 2005 to 2015 was performed. In total, 19 procedures were identified on 16 different patients; six females and ten males. Mean patient age was 55 years (range 22–81). Median follow-upmore » time was 7 months (range <1–78).ResultsTechnical success was 100%. There was one major complication, a pneumothorax. Follow-up was until tube removal or death in 100% of patients. Catheters were removed with resolution of the abscess cavity in 58% (11/19) or with non-draining abscess cavities in 21% (4/19) for a clinical success rate of 79%. Blood cultures demonstrated no growth in all cases, while 21% (4/19) of sputum or bronchoscopic cultures demonstrated growth. In comparison, the specimens from initial catheter placement isolated a causative organism in 95% (18/19) of case (p < 0.0001).ConclusionIn cases of persistent lung abscess after broad-spectrum antibiotics, percutaneous abscess drainage is highly sensitive for microbiologic sampling compared to sputum/bronchoscopic or blood cultures. Additionally, percutaneous drainage of lung parenchymal abscess cavities may promote resolution of the abscess with high rates of therapeutic success and low complications.« less

  8. Understanding the Lung Abscess Microbiome: Outcomes of Percutaneous Lung Parenchymal Abscess Drainage with Microbiologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Christopher; Nadolski, Gregory J; Gade, Terence; Hunt, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    Lung parenchymal abscesses represent an uncommon pathology with high mortality if untreated. Although most respond well to antibiotics, the optimal therapy for persistent abscesses is unknown. The purpose of this study was to review the outcomes of percutaneous lung parenchymal abscess catheter drainage after broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy failure and correlate with patient microbiologic samples. Retrospective review of patients who underwent percutaneous lung abscess drainage at a tertiary hospital system from 2005 to 2015 was performed. In total, 19 procedures were identified on 16 different patients; six females and ten males. Mean patient age was 55 years (range 22-81). Median follow-up time was 7 months (range <1-78). Technical success was 100%. There was one major complication, a pneumothorax. Follow-up was until tube removal or death in 100% of patients. Catheters were removed with resolution of the abscess cavity in 58% (11/19) or with non-draining abscess cavities in 21% (4/19) for a clinical success rate of 79%. Blood cultures demonstrated no growth in all cases, while 21% (4/19) of sputum or bronchoscopic cultures demonstrated growth. In comparison, the specimens from initial catheter placement isolated a causative organism in 95% (18/19) of case (p < 0.0001). In cases of persistent lung abscess after broad-spectrum antibiotics, percutaneous abscess drainage is highly sensitive for microbiologic sampling compared to sputum/bronchoscopic or blood cultures. Additionally, percutaneous drainage of lung parenchymal abscess cavities may promote resolution of the abscess with high rates of therapeutic success and low complications.

  9. Apparatus and methods for determining gas saturation and porosity of a formation penetrated by a gas filled or liquid filled borehole

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Robert D.

    2001-03-27

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for determining gas saturation, liquid saturation, porosity and density of earth formations penetrated by a well borehole. Determinations are made from measures of fast neutron and inelastic scatter gamma radiation induced by a pulsed, fast neutron source. The system preferably uses two detectors axially spaced from the neutron source. One detector is preferably a scintillation detector responsive to gamma radiation, and a second detector is preferably an organic scintillator responsive to both neutron and gamma radiation. The system can be operated in cased boreholes which are filled with either gas or liquid. Techniques for correcting all measurements for borehole conditions are disclosed.

  10. Gas kinematics in powerful radio galaxies at z 2: Energy supply from star formation, AGN, and radio jets⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Drouart, G.; De Breuck, C.; Best, P.; Seymour, N.; Vernet, J.

    2017-04-01

    We compare the kinetic energy and momentum injection rates from intense star formation, bolometric AGN radiation, and radio jets with the kinetic energy and momentum observed in the warm ionized gas in 24 powerful radio galaxies at z 2. These galaxies are among our best candidates for being massive galaxies near the end of their active formation period, when intense star formation, quasar activity, and powerful radio jets all co-exist. All galaxies have VLT/SINFONI imaging spectroscopy of the rest-frame optical line emission, showing extended emission-line regions with large velocity offsets (up to 1500 km s-1) and line widths (typically 800-1000 km s-1) consistent with very turbulent, often outflowing gas. As part of the HeRGÉ sample, they also have FIR estimates of the star formation and quasar activity obtained with Herschel/PACS and SPIRE, which enables us to measure the relative energy and momentum release from each of the three main sources of feedback in massive, star-forming AGN host galaxies during their most rapid formation phase. We find that star formation falls short by factors 10-1000 of providing the energy and momentum necessary to power the observed gas kinematics. The obscured quasars in the nuclei of these galaxies provide enough energy and momentum in about half of the sample, however, only if both are transferred to the gas relatively efficiently. We compare with theoretical and observational constraints on the efficiency of the energy and momentum transfer from jet and AGN radiation, which favors the radio jets as main drivers of the gas kinematics. Based on observations carried out with the Very Large Telescope of ESO under Program IDs 079.A-0617, 084.A-0324, 085.A-0897, and 090.A-0614.Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  11. Gas kinematics and star formation in the filamentary molecular cloud G47.06+0.26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin-Long; Xu, Ye; Zhang, Chuan-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Yu, Naiping; Ning, Chang-Chun; Ju, Bing-Gang

    2018-01-01

    Aims: We performed a multi-wavelength study toward the filamentary cloud G47.06+0.26 to investigate the gas kinematics and star formation. Methods: We present the 12CO (J = 1-0), 13CO (J = 1-0) and C18O (J = 1-0) observations of G47.06+0.26 obtained with the Purple Mountain Observation (PMO) 13.7 m radio telescope to investigate the detailed kinematics of the filament. Radio continuum and infrared archival data were obtained from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS), the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL), the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) survey, and the Multi-band Imaging Photometer Survey of the Galaxy (MIPSGAL). To trace massive clumps and extract young stellar objects in G47.06+0.26, we used the BGPS catalog v2.0 and the GLIMPSE I catalog, respectively. Results: The 12CO (J = 1-0) and 13CO (J = 1-0) emission of G47.06+0.26 appear to show a filamentary structure. The filament extends about 45' (58.1 pc) along the east-west direction. The mean width is about 6.8 pc, as traced by the 13CO (J = 1-0) emission. G47.06+0.26 has a linear mass density of 361.5 M⊙pc-1. The external pressure (due to neighboring bubbles and H II regions) may help preventing the filament from dispersing under the effects of turbulence. From the velocity-field map, we discern a velocity gradient perpendicular to G47.06+0.26. From the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) catalog, we found nine BGPS sources in G47.06+0.26, that appear to these sources have sufficient mass to form massive stars. We obtained that the clump formation efficiency (CFE) is 18% in the filament. Four infrared bubbles were found to be located in, and adjacent to, G47.06+0.26. Particularly, infrared bubble N98 shows a cometary structure. CO molecular gas adjacent to N98 also shows a very intense emission. H II regions associated with infrared bubbles can inject the energy to surrounding gas. We calculated the kinetic energy, ionization energy, and thermal energy

  12. New particle formation in the fresh flue-gas plume from a coal-fired power plant: effect of flue-gas cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylläri, Fanni; Asmi, Eija; Anttila, Tatu; Saukko, Erkka; Vakkari, Ville; Pirjola, Liisa; Hillamo, Risto; Laurila, Tuomas; Häyrinen, Anna; Rautiainen, Jani; Lihavainen, Heikki; O'Connor, Ewan; Niemelä, Ville; Keskinen, Jorma; Dal Maso, Miikka; Rönkkö, Topi

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric emissions, including particle number and size distribution, from a 726 MWth coal-fired power plant were studied experimentally from a power plant stack and flue-gas plume dispersing in the atmosphere. Experiments were conducted under two different flue-gas cleaning conditions. The results were utilized in a plume dispersion and dilution model taking into account particle formation precursor (H2SO4 resulted from the oxidation of emitted SO2) and assessment related to nucleation rates. The experiments showed that the primary emissions of particles and SO2 were effectively reduced by flue-gas desulfurization and fabric filters, especially the emissions of particles smaller than 200 nm in diameter. Primary pollutant concentrations reached background levels in 200-300 s. However, the atmospheric measurements indicated that new particles larger than 2.5 nm are formed in the flue-gas plume, even in the very early phases of atmospheric ageing. The effective number emission of nucleated particles were several orders of magnitude higher than the primary particle emission. Modelling studies indicate that regardless of continuing dilution of the flue gas, nucleation precursor (H2SO4 from SO2 oxidation) concentrations remain relatively constant. In addition, results indicate that flue-gas nucleation is more efficient than predicted by atmospheric aerosol modelling. In particular, the observation of the new particle formation with rather low flue-gas SO2 concentrations changes the current understanding of the air quality effects of coal combustion. The results can be used to evaluate optimal ways to achieve better air quality, particularly in polluted areas like India and China.

  13. Denitrification nitrogen gas formation and gene expression in alpine grassland soil as affected by climate change conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Wang, Changhui; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Schloter, Michael; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Dannenmann, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Due to methodological problems, reliable data on soil dinitrogen (N2) emission by denitrification are extremely scarce, and the impacts of climate change on nitrogen (N) gas formation by denitrification and N gas product ratios as well as the underlying microbial drivers remain unclear. We combined the helium-gas-flow-soil-core technique for simultaneously quantification of nitrous oxide (N2O) and N2 emission with the reverse transcript qPCR technology. Our goals were to characterize denitrification dynamics and N gas product ratios in alpine grassland soil as affected by climate change conditions and to evaluate relationships between denitrification gene expression and N gas emission. We used soils from the pre-alpine grassland Terrestrial Environmental Observatory (TERENO), exposed to ambient temperature and precipitation (control treatment), or three years of simulated climate change conditions (increased temperature, reduction of summer precipitation and reduced snow cover). Soils were amended with glucose and nitrate and incubated subsequently at 1) 5°C and 20% oxygen; 2) 5°C and 0% oxygen; 3) 20°C and 0% oxygen until stabilization of N gas emissions in each incubation step. After switching incubation conditions to 0% oxygen and 20°C, N2O emission peaked immediately and declined again, followed by a delayed peak in N2 emission. The dynamics of cnorB gene expression, encoding the reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to N2O, followed the N2O emission pattern, while nosZ gene expression, encoding N2O reduction to N2 followed the course of N2 emission. The mean N2O:N2 ratios were 1.31 + 0.10 and 1.56 + 0.16 for control and climate change treatment respectively, but the denitrification potential was overall lower in climate change treatment. Hence, simulated climate change promoted N2O but lessened N2 emission. This stimulation of N2O was in accordance with increased cnorB gene expression in soil of the climate change treatment. N mass balance calculations revealed

  14. Formation of Titanium Sulfide from Titanium Oxycarbonitride by CS2 Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Eltefat; Yashima, Yuta; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.; Rezan, Sheikh Abdul

    2018-05-01

    Previously this group reported that a good quality titanium metal powder can be produced from titanium sulfides by electrochemical OS process. In this study, the sulfurization procedure was examined to synthesize titanium sulfide from titanium oxycarbonitride by CS2 gas. The experiments were carried out in the temperature range of 1173 K to 1523 K (900 °C to 1250 °C) in a tube reactor with continuously flowing argon (Ar) as carrier gas of CS2. The formation of titanium sulfide phases from the commercial TiN, TiC, and TiO powders was studied as the initial step. Then, TiO0.02C0.13N0.85 coming from ilmenite was sulfurized to prepare single phase of titanium sulfide. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, and the morphology of the sulfides was rigorously investigated, and the sulfur, oxygen, and carbon contents in the products were analyzed. The process was remarkably dependent on the temperature and time. TiN and TiO0.02C0.13N0.85 powders could be fully converted to the single phase of Ti2.45S4 (Ti2+x S4) at 1473 K (1200 °C) in 3.6 ks. The maximum weight gain of TiN sample was 55.3 pct indicating a full conversion of TiN to Ti2S3 phase. The carbon and oxygen contents in this sulfide prepared from the oxycarbonitride were about 1.8 wt pct C and 1.4 wt pct O, respectively. Therefore, the titanium sulfide could be a promising feedstock for the production of commercial grade titanium powder.

  15. Hot, metastable hydronium ion in the Galactic centre: formation pumping in X-ray-irradiated gas?

    PubMed

    Lis, Dariusz C; Schilke, Peter; Bergin, Edwin A; Emprechtinger, Martin

    2012-11-13

    With a 3.5 m diameter telescope passively cooled to approximately 80 K, and a science payload comprising two direct detection cameras/medium resolution imaging spectrometers (PACS and SPIRE) and a very high spectral resolution heterodyne spectrometer (HIFI), the Herschel Space Observatory is providing extraordinary observational opportunities in the 55-670 μm spectral range. HIFI has opened for the first time to high-resolution spectroscopy the submillimetre band that includes the fundamental rotational transitions of interstellar hydrides, the basic building blocks of astrochemistry. We discuss a recent HIFI discovery of metastable rotational transitions of the hydronium ion (protonated water, H(3)O(+)), with rotational level energies up to 1200 K above the ground state, in absorption towards Sagittarius B2(N) in the Galactic centre. Hydronium is an important molecular ion in the oxygen chemical network. Earlier HIFI observations have indicated a general deficiency of H(3)O(+) in the diffuse gas in the Galactic disc. The presence of hot H(3)O(+) towards Sagittarius B2(N) thus appears to be related to the unique physical conditions in the central molecular zone, manifested, for example, by the widespread presence of abundant H(3)(+). One intriguing theory for the high rotational temperature characterizing the population of the H(3)O(+) metastable levels may be formation pumping in molecular gas irradiated by X-rays emitted by the Galactic centre black hole. Alternatively, the pervasive presence of enhanced turbulence in the central molecular zone may give rise to shocks in the lower-density medium that is exposed to energetic radiation.

  16. Laboratory Investigations of Titan Haze Formation: Characterization of Gas Phase and Particle Phase Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, Sarah; Yoon, Heidi; Li, Rui; deGouw, Joost; Tolbert, Margaret

    2014-11-01

    Prior to the arrival of the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft, aerosol production in Titan’s atmosphere was believed to begin in the stratosphere where chemical processes are predominantly initiated by far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation. However, the discovery of very heavy ions, coupled with Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation measurements that show haze absorption up to 1000 km altitude (Liang et al., 2007), indicates that haze formation initiates in the thermosphere. The energy environment of the thermosphere is significantly different from the stratosphere; in particular there is a greater flux of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons and energetic particles available to initiate chemical reactions, including the destruction of N2, in the upper atmosphere. The discovery of previously unpredicted nitrogen species in measurements of Titan’s atmosphere by the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) indicates that nitrogen participates in the chemistry to a much greater extent than was appreciated before Cassini (Vuitton et al., 2007). Additionally, measurements obtained by the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyzer (ACP) carried by Huygens to Titan’s surface may indicate that Titan’s aerosols contain significant amounts of nitrogen (Israël et al., 2005, 2006). The degree of nitrogen incorporation in the haze particles is important for understanding the diversity of molecules that may be present in Titan’s atmosphere and on its surface. We have conducted a series of Titan atmosphere simulation experiments using either spark discharge (tesla coil) or FUV photons (deuterium lamp) to initiate chemistry in CH4/N2 gas mixtures ranging from 0.01% CH4/99.99% N2 to 10% CH4/90% N2. We obtained in situ measurements using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) to measure the particle composition as a function of particle size and a proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) to measure the composition of gas phase

  17. Geodynamical Nature of the Formation of Large Plates of Platforms, Jointed in North Caspian Oil and Gas Basin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seitov, Nassipkali; Tulegenova, Gulmira P.

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the problems of tectonic zoning and determination of geodynamical nature of the formation of jointed tectonic structures within the North Caspian oil and gas basin, represented by Caspian Depression of Russian platform of East European Pre-Cambrian Craton and plate ancient Precambrian Platform stabilization and Turan…

  18. The JCMT nearby galaxies legacy survey - X. Environmental effects on the molecular gas and star formation properties of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Angus; Wilson, C. D.; Golding, J.; Warren, B. E.; Israel, F. P.; Serjeant, S.; Knapen, J. H.; Sánchez-Gallego, J. R.; Barmby, P.; Bendo, G. J.; Rosolowsky, E.; van der Werf, P.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study of the molecular gas properties in a sample of 98 H I - flux selected spiral galaxies within ˜25 Mpc, using the CO J = 3 - 2 line observed with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. We use the technique of survival analysis to incorporate galaxies with CO upper limits into our results. Comparing the group and Virgo samples, we find a larger mean H2 mass in the Virgo galaxies, despite their lower mean H I mass. This leads to a significantly higher H2 to H I ratio for Virgo galaxies. Combining our data with complementary Hα star formation rate measurements, Virgo galaxies have longer molecular gas depletion times compared to group galaxies, due to their higher H2 masses and lower star formation rates. We suggest that the longer depletion times may be a result of heating processes in the cluster environment or differences in the turbulent pressure. From the full sample, we find that the molecular gas depletion time has a positive correlation with the stellar mass, indicative of differences in the star formation process between low- and high-mass galaxies, and a negative correlation between the molecular gas depletion time and the specific star formation rate.

  19. Accretion of clumpy cold gas onto massive black hole binaries: the challenging formation of extended circumbinary structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maureira-Fredes, Cristián; Goicovic, Felipe G.; Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Sesana, Alberto

    2018-05-01

    Massive black hole binaries (MBHBs) represent an unavoidable outcome of hierarchical galaxy formation, but their dynamical evolution at sub-parsec scales is poorly understood. In gas rich environments, an extended, steady circumbinary gaseous disc could play an important role in the MBHB evolution, facilitating its coalescence. However, how gas on galactic scales is transported to the nuclear region to form and maintain such a stable structure is unclear. In the aftermath of a galaxy merger, cold turbulent gas condenses into clumps and filaments that can be randomly scattered towards the nucleus. This provides a natural way of feeding the binary with intermittent pockets of gas. The aim of this work is to investigate the gaseous structures arising from this interaction. We employ a suite of smoothed-particle-hydrodynamic simulations to study the influence of the infall rate and angular momentum distribution of the incoming clouds on the formation and evolution of structures around the MBHB. We find that the continuous supply of discrete clouds is a double-edge sword, resulting in intermittent formation and disruption of circumbinary structures. Anisotropic cloud distributions featuring an excess of co-rotating events generate more prominent co-rotating circumbinary discs. Similar structures are seen when mostly counter-rotating clouds are fed to the binary, even though they are more compact and less stable. In general, our simulations do not show the formation of extended smooth and stable circumbinary discs, typically assumed in analytical and numerical investigations of the the long term evolution of MBHBs.

  20. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources in the downdip Paleogene formations, U.S. Gulf Coast, 2017

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buursink, Marc L.; Doolan, Colin A.; Enomoto, Catherine B.; Craddock, William H.; Coleman, James L.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Klett, Timothy R.; Le, Phuong A.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.; Marra, Kristen R.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Pearson, Ofori N.; Pitman, Janet K.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Whidden, Katherine J.; Woodall, Cheryl A.

    2018-05-25

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean undiscovered, technically recoverable conventional resources of 100 million barrels of oil and 16.5 trillion cubic feet of gas in the downdip Paleogene formations in onshore lands and State waters of the U.S. Gulf Coast region.

  1. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the Bossier Formation, U.S. Gulf Coast, 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Stanley T.; Pitman, Janet K.; Kinney, Scott A.; Gianoutsos, Nicholas J.; Pearson, Ofori N.; Whidden, Katherine J.; Dubiel, Russell F.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Burke, Lauri A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Haines, Seth S.; Varela, Brian A.; Le, Phuong A.; Finn, Thomas M.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Marra, Kristen R.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2017-04-13

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated undiscovered, technically recoverable mean resources of 2.9 billion barrels of conventional oil and 108.6 trillion cubic feet of natural gas in the Upper Jurassic Bossier Formation in onshore lands and State waters of the U.S. Gulf Coast region.

  2. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the Spraberry Formation of the Midland Basin, Permian Basin Province, Texas, 2017

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marra, Kristen R.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.; Klett, Timothy R.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Le, Phuong A.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Finn, Thomas M.; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Brownfield, Michael E.

    2017-05-15

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean resources of 4.2 billion barrels of oil and 3.1 trillion cubic feet of gas in the Spraberry Formation of the Midland Basin, Permian Basin Province, Texas.

  3. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the Haynesville Formation, U.S. Gulf Coast, 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Stanley T.; Pitman, Janet K.; Kinney, Scott A.; Gianoutsos, Nicholas J.; Pearson, Ofori N.; Whidden, Katherine J.; Dubiel, Russell F.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Burke, Lauri A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Haines, Seth S.; Varela, Brian A.; Le, Phuong A.; Finn, Thomas M.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Marra, Kristen R.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2017-04-13

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated undiscovered, technically recoverable mean resources of 1.1 billion barrels of conventional oil and 195.8 trillion cubic feet of gas in the Upper Jurassic Haynesville Formation in onshore lands and State waters of the U.S. Gulf Coast region.

  4. Assessment of continuous gas resources in the Phosphoria Formation of the Wyoming Thrust Belt Province, Wyoming, Idaho, and Utah, 2017

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Woodall, Cheryl A.; Finn, Thomas M.; Pitman, Janet K.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Marra, Kristen R.; Le, Phuong A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.

    2018-04-13

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean undiscovered, technically recoverable resources of 198 billion cubic feet of continuous gas in the Phosphoria Formation of the Wyoming Thrust Belt Province, Wyoming, Idaho, and Utah.

  5. [Solitary actinomycotic brain abscess: case report].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Hasegawa, Yoshihito; Nishimoto, Yo; Hayashi, Satoru; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Kuzume, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Keiko; Enzan, Hideaki

    2012-06-01

    Actinomycotic brain abscess is a rare condition with uncertain clinical features. Here we report the case of a 66-year-old immune-competent woman with an actinomycotic brain abscess who presented with sensory aphasia and mild right hemiparesis. She had no febrile episode or headache. Moreover, she did not have any periodontal or oto-rhino-laryngological disease, and the results of laboratory tests were normal. A computed tomography scan showed an irregular, low-density area in the left parietal lobe. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging showed low-signal intensity in a T1 weighted image, high-signal intensity in a T2 weighted image, and mixed intensity on a diffusion weighted image. Thallium-201 chloride scintigraphy showed definite accumulation of thallium in the lesion and the patient's condition gradually deteriorated. Ten days after gadolinium administration, a T1 weighted image showed a multi- lobulated irregular mass in the left parietal lobe. The patient subsequently underwent craniotomy and evacuation of the yellowish abscess. Gram staining of the tissue showed the presence of gram-positive filamentous rods, and abscess cultures were positive for Actinomyces and Prevotella disiens. The abscess resolved after treatment with a high dose of intravenous penicillin G (24 million units/day) for 8 weeks, followed by an oral dose of amoxicillin for 4 months. The patient was discharged with a rudimentary limitation of the visual field.

  6. Actinomyces meyeri brain abscess following dental extraction

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, U; Ronayne, A; Prentice, M B; Jackson, A

    2015-01-01

    We describe the rare occurrence of an Actinomyces meyeri cerebral abscess in a 55-year-old woman following a dental extraction. This patient presented with a 2-day history of hemisensory loss, hyper-reflexia and retro-orbital headache, 7 days following a dental extraction for apical peridonitis. Neuroimaging showed a large left parietal abscess with surrounding empyema. The patient underwent craniotomy and drainage of the abscess. A. meyeri was cultured. Actinomycosis is a rare cause of cerebral abscess. The A. meyeri subtype is particularly rare, accounting for less than 1% of specimens. This case describes an unusually brief course of the disease, which is usually insidious. Parietal lobe involvement is unusual as cerebral abscesses usually have a predilection for the frontal and temporal regions of the brain. Although there are no randomised trials to guide therapy, current consensus is to use a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics, followed by 6–12 months of oral therapy. PMID:25870213

  7. INFLAMMATORY INDEX AND TREATMENT OF BRAIN ABSCESS

    PubMed Central

    OYAMA, HIROFUMI; KITO, AKIRA; MAKI, HIDEKI; HATTORI, KENICHI; NODA, TOMOYUKI; WADA, KENTARO

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study retrospectively analyzed 12 patients with brain abscesses. Half of the patients were diagnosed inaccurately in the initial stage, and 7.2 days were required to achieve the final diagnosis of brain abscess. The patients presented only with a moderately elevated leukocyte count, serum CRP levels, or body temperatures during the initial stage. These markers changed, first with an increase in the leukocyte count, followed by the CRP and body temperature. The degree of elevation tended to be less prominent, and the time for each inflammatory index to reach its maximum value tended to be longer in the patients without ventriculitis than in those with it. The causative organisms of a brain abscess were detected in 10 cases. The primary causative organisms from dental caries were Streptococcus viridians or milleri, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Nocardia sp. or farcinica were common when the abscess was found in other regions. The primary causative organisms of unrecognized sources of infection were Streptococcus milleri and Prolionibacterium sp. Nocardia is resistant to many antibiotics. However, carbapenem, tetracycline and quinolone were effective for Nocardia as well as many other kinds of bacteria. In summary, the brain abscesses presented with only mildly elevated inflammatory markers of body temperature, leukocyte and CRP. These inflammatory markers were less obvious in the patients without ventriculitis and/or meningitis. The source of infection tended to suggest some specific primary causative organism. It was reasonable to initiate therapy with carbapenem. PMID:23092104

  8. Pyogenic Liver Abscess as Endemic Disease, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Feng-Chiao; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Chang, Luan-Yin

    2008-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscess has become a health problem in Taiwanese society. However, the extent of this problem has remained unclear because of the lack of a population-based study. We therefore performed a nationwide analysis of pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan from 1996 through 2004. We analyzed 29,703 cases from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database and 506 cases from National Taiwan University Hospital. Our analysis showed that the annual incidence of pyogenic liver abscess increased steadily from 11.15/100,000 population in 1996 to 17.59/100,000 in 2004. Diabetes, malignancy, renal disease, and pneumonia were associated with a higher risk for the disease. By contrast, death due to pyogenic liver abscess decreased over time, although population-based abscess-related death increased slightly. Renal disease, malignancy, pneumonia, and heart disease correlated with higher death rates; Klebsiella pneumoniae infection and therapeutic procedures were related to lower death rates. Diabetes did not significantly change death rates for the 506 patients from the hospital. PMID:18826824

  9. Inert-Gas Condensed Co-W Nanoclusters: Formation, Structure and Magnetic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkar-Fard, Farhad Reza

    Rare-earth permanent magnets are used extensively in numerous technical applications, e.g. wind turbines, audio speakers, and hybrid/electric vehicles. The demand and production of rare-earth permanent magnets in the world has in the past decades increased significantly. However, the decrease in export of rare-earth elements from China in recent time has led to a renewed interest in developing rare-earth free permanent magnets. Elements such as Fe and Co have potential, due to their high magnetization, to be used as hosts in rare-earth free permanent magnets but a major challenge is to increase their magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant, K1, which largely drives the coercivity. Theoretical calculations indicate that dissolving the 5d transition metal W in Fe or Co increases the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The challenge, though, is in creating a solid solution in hcp Co or bcc Fe, which under equilibrium conditions have negligible solubility. In this dissertation, the formation, structure, and magnetic properties of sub-10 nm Co-W clusters with W content ranging from 4 to 24 atomic percent were studied. Co-W alloy clusters with extended solubility of W in hcp Co were produced by inert gas condensation. The different processing conditions such as the cooling scheme and sputtering power were found to control the structural state of the as-deposited Co-W clusters. For clusters formed in the water-cooled formation chamber, the mean size and the fraction crystalline clusters increased with increasing power, while the fraction of crystalline clusters formed in the liquid nitrogen-cooled formation chamber was not as affected by the sputtering power. For the low W content clusters, the structural characterization revealed clusters predominantly single crystalline hcp Co(W) structure, a significant extension of W solubility when compared to the equilibrium solubility, but fcc Co(W) and Co3W structures were observed in very small and large clusters, respectively. At high

  10. A Comprehensive Model for Real Gas Transport in Shale Formations with Complex Non-planar Fracture Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruiyue; Huang, Zhongwei; Yu, Wei; Li, Gensheng; Ren, Wenxi; Zuo, Lihua; Tan, Xiaosi; Sepehrnoori, Kamy; Tian, Shouceng; Sheng, Mao

    2016-01-01

    A complex fracture network is generally generated during the hydraulic fracturing treatment in shale gas reservoirs. Numerous efforts have been made to model the flow behavior of such fracture networks. However, it is still challenging to predict the impacts of various gas transport mechanisms on well performance with arbitrary fracture geometry in a computationally efficient manner. We develop a robust and comprehensive model for real gas transport in shales with complex non-planar fracture network. Contributions of gas transport mechanisms and fracture complexity to well productivity and rate transient behavior are systematically analyzed. The major findings are: simple planar fracture can overestimate gas production than non-planar fracture due to less fracture interference. A “hump” that occurs in the transition period and formation linear flow with a slope less than 1/2 can infer the appearance of natural fractures. The sharpness of the “hump” can indicate the complexity and irregularity of the fracture networks. Gas flow mechanisms can extend the transition flow period. The gas desorption could make the “hump” more profound. The Knudsen diffusion and slippage effect play a dominant role in the later production time. Maximizing the fracture complexity through generating large connected networks is an effective way to increase shale gas production. PMID:27819349

  11. A Comprehensive Model for Real Gas Transport in Shale Formations with Complex Non-planar Fracture Networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruiyue; Huang, Zhongwei; Yu, Wei; Li, Gensheng; Ren, Wenxi; Zuo, Lihua; Tan, Xiaosi; Sepehrnoori, Kamy; Tian, Shouceng; Sheng, Mao

    2016-11-07

    A complex fracture network is generally generated during the hydraulic fracturing treatment in shale gas reservoirs. Numerous efforts have been made to model the flow behavior of such fracture networks. However, it is still challenging to predict the impacts of various gas transport mechanisms on well performance with arbitrary fracture geometry in a computationally efficient manner. We develop a robust and comprehensive model for real gas transport in shales with complex non-planar fracture network. Contributions of gas transport mechanisms and fracture complexity to well productivity and rate transient behavior are systematically analyzed. The major findings are: simple planar fracture can overestimate gas production than non-planar fracture due to less fracture interference. A "hump" that occurs in the transition period and formation linear flow with a slope less than 1/2 can infer the appearance of natural fractures. The sharpness of the "hump" can indicate the complexity and irregularity of the fracture networks. Gas flow mechanisms can extend the transition flow period. The gas desorption could make the "hump" more profound. The Knudsen diffusion and slippage effect play a dominant role in the later production time. Maximizing the fracture complexity through generating large connected networks is an effective way to increase shale gas production.

  12. Investigating gas-phase defect formation in late-stage solidification using a novel phase-field crystal alloy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Smith, Nathan; Provatas, Nikolas

    2017-09-01

    We study late-stage solidification and the associated formation of defects in alloy materials using a novel model based on the phase-field-crystal technique. It is shown that our model successfully captures several important physical phenomena that occur in the late stages of solidification, including solidification shrinkage, liquid cavitation and microsegregation, all in a single framework. By examining the interplay of solidification shrinkage and solute segregation, this model reveals that the formation of gas pore defects at the late stage of solidification can lead to nucleation of second phase solid particles due to solute enrichment in the eutectic liquid driven by gas-phase nucleation and growth. We also predict a modification of the Gulliver-Scheil equation in the presence of gas pockets in confined liquid pools.

  13. PHIBSS: MOLECULAR GAS, EXTINCTION, STAR FORMATION, AND KINEMATICS IN THE z = 1.5 STAR-FORMING GALAXY EGS13011166

    SciTech Connect

    Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L. J.; Kurk, J.

    We report matched resolution imaging spectroscopy of the CO 3-2 line (with the IRAM Plateau de Bure millimeter interferometer) and of the H{alpha} line (with LUCI at the Large Binocular Telescope) in the massive z = 1.53 main-sequence galaxy EGS 13011166, as part of the ''Plateau de Bure high-z, blue-sequence survey'' (PHIBSS: Tacconi et al.). We combine these data with Hubble Space Telescope V-I-J-H-band maps to derive spatially resolved distributions of stellar surface density, star formation rate, molecular gas surface density, optical extinction, and gas kinematics. The spatial distribution and kinematics of the ionized and molecular gas are remarkably similarmore » and are well modeled by a turbulent, globally Toomre unstable, rotating disk. The stellar surface density distribution is smoother than the clumpy rest-frame UV/optical light distribution and peaks in an obscured, star-forming massive bulge near the dynamical center. The molecular gas surface density and the effective optical screen extinction track each other and are well modeled by a ''mixed'' extinction model. The inferred slope of the spatially resolved molecular gas to star formation rate relation, N = dlog{Sigma}{sub starform}/dlog{Sigma}{sub molgas}, depends strongly on the adopted extinction model, and can vary from 0.8 to 1.7. For the preferred mixed dust-gas model, we find N = 1.14 {+-} 0.1.« less

  14. An evaluation of water quality in private drinking water wells near natural gas extraction sites in the Barnett Shale formation.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Brian E; Hunt, Laura R; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Carlton, Doug D; Oka, Hyppolite; Walton, Jayme L; Hopkins, Dan; Osorio, Alexandra; Bjorndal, Bryan; Hu, Qinhong H; Schug, Kevin A

    2013-09-03

    Natural gas has become a leading source of alternative energy with the advent of techniques to economically extract gas reserves from deep shale formations. Here, we present an assessment of private well water quality in aquifers overlying the Barnett Shale formation of North Texas. We evaluated samples from 100 private drinking water wells using analytical chemistry techniques. Analyses revealed that arsenic, selenium, strontium and total dissolved solids (TDS) exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency's Drinking Water Maximum Contaminant Limit (MCL) in some samples from private water wells located within 3 km of active natural gas wells. Lower levels of arsenic, selenium, strontium, and barium were detected at reference sites outside the Barnett Shale region as well as sites within the Barnett Shale region located more than 3 km from active natural gas wells. Methanol and ethanol were also detected in 29% of samples. Samples exceeding MCL levels were randomly distributed within areas of active natural gas extraction, and the spatial patterns in our data suggest that elevated constituent levels could be due to a variety of factors including mobilization of natural constituents, hydrogeochemical changes from lowering of the water table, or industrial accidents such as faulty gas well casings.

  15. Carbon Disulfide (CS2) Mechanisms in Formation of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Formation from Unconventional Shale Gas Extraction and Processing Operations and Global Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Rich, Alisa L; Patel, Jay T

    2015-01-01

    Carbon disulfide (CS2) has been historically associated with the production of rayon, cellophane, and carbon tetrachloride. This study identifies multiple mechanisms by which CS2 contributes to the formation of CO2 in the atmosphere. CS2 and other associated sulfide compounds were found by this study to be present in emissions from unconventional shale gas extraction and processing (E&P) operations. The breakdown products of CS2; carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon monoxide (CO), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are indirect greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to CO2 levels in the atmosphere. The heat-trapping nature of CO2 has been found to increase the surface temperature, resulting in regional and global climate change. The purpose of this study is to identify five mechanisms by which CS2 and the breakdown products of CS2 contribute to atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The five mechanisms of CO2 formation are as follows: Chemical Interaction of CS2 and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) present in natural gas at high temperatures, resulting in CO2 formation;Combustion of CS2 in the presence of oxygen producing SO2 and CO2;Photolysis of CS2 leading to the formation of COS, CO, and SO2, which are indirect contributors to CO2 formation;One-step hydrolysis of CS2, producing reactive intermediates and ultimately forming H2S and CO2;Two-step hydrolysis of CS2 forming the reactive COS intermediate that reacts with an additional water molecule, ultimately forming H2S and CO2. CS2 and COS additionally are implicated in the formation of SO2 in the stratosphere and/or troposphere. SO2 is an indirect contributor to CO2 formation and is implicated in global climate change.

  16. Pelvic abscess associated with a Lippes loop. An unusual case.

    PubMed

    Hochner-Celnikier, D; Milwidsky, A; Menashe, M; Ariel, I; Palti, Z

    1983-08-01

    An unusual case occurred of Lippes-Loop-associated pelvic abscess, characterized by a relatively mild clinical course and an unusual localization in the pelvis. This case emphasizes the importance of considering the association between intrauterine devices and pelvic abscess.

  17. Locked-in syndrome caused by a solitary pontine abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, M J; Brenton, D W; Aschenbrener, C A; Van Gilder, J C

    1979-01-01

    The clinical and pathological findings in a patient with locked-in syndrome caused by a solitary pontine abscess are reported for the first time. Successful treatment of brainstem abscess rests on early and accurate diagnosis. Images PMID:501372

  18. Formation of inorganic electride thin films via site-selective extrusion by energetic inert gas ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Masashi; Toda, Yoshitake; Hayashi, Katsuro; Hirano, Masahiro; Kamiya, Toshio; Matsunami, Noriaki; Hosono, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Inert gas ion implantation (acceleration voltage 300kV) into polycrystalline 12CaO.7Al2O3 (C12A7) films was investigated with fluences from 1×1016 to 1×1017cm-2 at elevated temperatures. Upon hot implantation at 600°C with fluences greater than 1×1017cm-2, the obtained films were colored and exhibited high electrical conductivity in the as-implanted state. The extrusion of O2- ions encaged in the crystallographic cages of C12A7 crystal, which leaves electrons in the cages at concentrations up to ˜1.4×1021cm-3, may cause the high electrical conductivity. On the other hand, when the fluence is less than 1×1017cm-2, the as-implanted films are optically transparent and electrically insulating. The conductivity is enhanced and the films become colored by irradiating with ultraviolet light due to the formation of F +-like centers. The electrons forming the F+-like centers are photo released from the encaged H- ions, which are presumably derived from the preexisting OH- groups. The induced electron concentration is proportional to the calculated displacements per atom, which suggests that nuclear collision effects of the implanted ions play a dominant role in forming the electron and H- ion in the films. The hot ion implantation technique provides a nonchemical process for preparing electronic conductive C12A7 films.

  19. Mathematical model of salt cavern leaching for gas storage in high-insoluble salt formations.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinlong; Shi, Xilin; Yang, Chunhe; Li, Yinping; Wang, Tongtao; Ma, Hongling

    2018-01-10

    A mathematical model is established to predict the salt cavern development during leaching in high-insoluble salt formations. The salt-brine mass transfer rate is introduced, and the effects of the insoluble sediments on the development of the cavern are included. Considering the salt mass conservation in the cavern, the couple equations of the cavern shape, brine concentration and brine velocity are derived. According to the falling and accumulating rules of the insoluble particles, the governing equations of the insoluble sediments are deduced. A computer program using VC++ language is developed to obtain the numerical solution of these equations. To verify the proposed model, the leaching processes of two salt caverns of Jintan underground gas storage are simulated by the program, using the actual geological and technological parameters. The same simulation is performed by the current mainstream leaching software in China. The simulation results of the two programs are compared with the available field data. It shows that the proposed software is more accurate on the shape prediction of the cavern bottom and roof, which demonstrates the reliability and applicability of the model.

  20. Shock formation in Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe on deuterium gas puff implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Narkis, J.; Rahman, H. U.; Ney, P.

    2016-12-29

    1- and 2-D simulations of 1-cm radius, gas-puff liners of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe imploding onto a deuterium target are conducted using the discharge parameters for the Zebra (1 MA, 130 ns) driver using the resistive MHD code MACH2. This is an implementation of the Staged Z-pinch concept, in which the target is driven to high-energy-density first by shock compression launched by a diffused azimuthal magnetic field (J×B force), and then by the adiabatic compression as the liner converges on axis. During the run-in phase, the initial shock heating preheats the deuterium plasma, with a subsequent stable, adiabatic compressionmore » heating the target to high energy density. Shock compression of the target coincides with the development of a J×B force at the target/liner interface. Stronger B-field transport and earlier shock compression increases with higher-Z liners, which results in an earlier shock arrival on axis. As a result, delayed shock formation in lower-Z liners yields a relative increase in shock heating, however, the 2-D simulations show an increased target isolation from magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability penetration, suggesting that an optimal balance between these two effects is reached in an Ar or Kr liner, rather than with Xe.« less

  1. Particle formation and characterization of mackerel reaction oil by gas saturated solution process.

    PubMed

    Tanbirul Haque, A S M; Chun, Byung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Most of the health benefits of fish oil can be attributed to the presence of omega-3 fatty acids like Docosahexenoic acid (DHA) and Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). There are few dietary sources of EPA and DHA other than oily fish. EPA and DHA have great potential effect on human health. In this research, Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) extracted mackerel oil was reacted by enzyme at different systems to improve the EPA and DHA. Different types of immobilize enzyme TL-IM, RM-IM, Novozyme 435 were assessed for improving PUFAs. Best result was found at non-pressurized system using TL-IM. Reacted oil particle were obtained with polyethylene glycol by gas saturated solution process (PGSS). Different parameters like temperature, pressure, agitation speed and nozzle size effect on particle formulation were observed. SEM and PSA analysis showed, small size non spherical particles were obtained. It was found that after particle formation poly unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) were present in particle as same in oil. PUFAs release from particle was almost linear against constant time duration. Oil quality in particle not change significantly, in this contrast this study will be helpful for food and pharmaceutical industry to provide high EPA and DHA containing powder.

  2. Connecting CO intensity mapping to molecular gas and star formation in the epoch of galaxy assembly

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Tony Y.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Devaraj, Kiruthika; ...

    2016-01-29

    Intensity mapping, which images a single spectral line from unresolved galaxies across cosmological volumes, is a promising technique for probing the early universe. Here we present predictions for the intensity map and power spectrum of the CO(1–0) line from galaxies atmore » $$z\\sim 2.4$$–2.8, based on a parameterized model for the galaxy–halo connection, and demonstrate the extent to which properties of high-redshift galaxies can be directly inferred from such observations. We find that our fiducial prediction should be detectable by a realistic experiment. Motivated by significant modeling uncertainties, we demonstrate the effect on the power spectrum of varying each parameter in our model. Using simulated observations, we infer constraints on our model parameter space with an MCMC procedure, and show corresponding constraints on the $${L}_{\\mathrm{IR}}$$–$${L}_{\\mathrm{CO}}$$ relation and the CO luminosity function. These constraints would be complementary to current high-redshift galaxy observations, which can detect the brightest galaxies but not complete samples from the faint end of the luminosity function. Furthermore, by probing these populations in aggregate, CO intensity mapping could be a valuable tool for probing molecular gas and its relation to star formation in high-redshift galaxies.« less

  3. Gas-Phase Anionic σ-Adduct (Trans)formations in Heteroaromatic Systems1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnicka, Magdalena; Danikiewicz, Witold

    2015-07-01

    Anions of nitroderivatives of thiophene and furan were subjected to the reactions with selected C-H acids in the gas phase. Various structures and reaction pathways were proposed for the observed ionic products. In general, the reactions of heteroaromatic anions with C-H acids may be divided into three groups, depending on the proton affinity difference between C-H acid's conjugate base and heteroaromatic anion (ΔPA). The proton transfer from C-H acid to heteroaromatic anion is a dominant process in the reactions for which ΔPA < 0 kcal mol-1, whereas the reactions with high ΔPA (ΔPA > 16 kcal mol-1) do not lead to any ionic products. The formation of σ-adducts and products of their further transformations according to the VNS, SNAr, cine, and tele substitution mechanisms have been proposed for reactions with moderate ΔPA. The other possible mechanisms as SN2 reaction, nucleophilic addition to the cyano group, ring-opening pathway, and halogenophilic reaction have also been discussed to contribute in the reactions between heteroaromatic anions and C-H acids.

  4. Molecular Gas Heating Mechanisms, and Star Formation Feedback in Merger/Starbursts: NGC 6240 and Arp 193 as Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Padelis P.; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Xilouris, E. M.; Weiss, Axel; van der Werf, Paul; Israel, F. P.; Greve, T. R.; Isaak, Kate G.; Gao, Y.

    2014-06-01

    We used the SPIRE/FTS instrument aboard the Herschel Space Observatory to obtain the Spectral Line Energy Distributions (SLEDs) of CO from J = 4-3 to J = 13-12 of Arp 193 and NGC 6240, two classical merger/starbursts selected from our molecular line survey of local Luminous Infrared Galaxies (L IR >= 1011 L ⊙). The high-J CO SLEDs are then combined with ground-based low-J CO, 13CO, HCN, HCO+, CS line data and used to probe the thermal and dynamical states of their large molecular gas reservoirs. We find the two CO SLEDs strongly diverging from J = 4-3 onward, with NGC 6240 having a much higher CO line excitation than Arp 193, despite their similar low-J CO SLEDs and L FIR/L CO, 1 - 0, L HCN/L CO (J = 1-0) ratios (proxies of star formation efficiency and dense gas mass fraction). In Arp 193, one of the three most extreme starbursts in the local universe, the molecular SLEDs indicate a small amount (~5%-15%) of dense gas (n >= 104 cm-3) unlike NGC 6240 where most of the molecular gas (~60%-70%) is dense (n ~ (104-105) cm-3). Strong star-formation feedback can drive this disparity in their dense gas mass fractions, and also induce extreme thermal and dynamical states for the molecular gas. In NGC 6240, and to a lesser degree in Arp 193, we find large molecular gas masses whose thermal states cannot be maintained by FUV photons from Photon-Dominated Regions. We argue that this may happen often in metal-rich merger/starbursts, strongly altering the initial conditions of star formation. ALMA can now directly probe these conditions across cosmic epoch, and even probe their deeply dust-enshrouded outcome, the stellar initial mass function averaged over galactic evolution.

  5. Numerical Modeling of Gas and Water Flow in Shale Gas Formations with a Focus on the Fate of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ryan W J; Doster, Florian; Celia, Michael A; Bandilla, Karl W

    2017-12-05

    Hydraulic fracturing in shale gas formations involves the injection of large volumes of aqueous fluid deep underground. Only a small proportion of the injected water volume is typically recovered, raising concerns that the remaining water may migrate upward and potentially contaminate groundwater aquifers. We implement a numerical model of two-phase water and gas flow in a shale gas formation to test the hypothesis that the remaining water is imbibed into the shale rock by capillary forces and retained there indefinitely. The model includes the essential physics of the system and uses the simplest justifiable geometrical structure. We apply the model to simulate wells from a specific well pad in the Horn River Basin, British Columbia, where there is sufficient available data to build and test the model. Our simulations match the water and gas production data from the wells remarkably closely and show that all the injected water can be accounted for within the shale system, with most imbibed into the shale rock matrix and retained there for the long term.

  6. Primary tubercular abscess of the breast – an unusual entity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, R; Singal, RP; Gupta, A; Singal, S; Shahi, SR; Singal, R

    2012-01-01

    Primary breast tuberculosis manifested as abscess is a rare entity. We are reporting a case of primary breast tuberculosis, which presented as breast abscess. Abscess was drained and tissue sent for histopathology. To our surprise, diagnosis came as breast tuberculosis. Aspiration cytology was not done, as it is not a routine test for abscess cases. Patient was put on anti- tubercular drugs. In the follow-up of 6 months, she was asymptomatic and advised to continue medicine. PMID:22574095

  7. Primary tubercular abscess of the breast--an unusual entity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R; Singal, R P; Gupta, A; Singal, S; Shahi, S R; Singal, R

    2012-02-22

    Primary breast tuberculosis manifested as abscess is a rare entity. We are reporting a case of primary breast tuberculosis, which presented as breast abscess. Abscess was drained and tissue sent for histopathology. To our surprise, diagnosis came as breast tuberculosis. Aspiration cytology was not done, as it is not a routine test for abscess cases. Patient was put on anti- tubercular drugs. In the follow-up of 6 months, she was asymptomatic and advised to continue medicine.

  8. [Treatment of orbital abscesses and phlegmon in dogs and cats].

    PubMed

    Rühli, M B; Spiess, B M

    1995-08-01

    A diagnosis of orbital cellulitis or abscess was made in 13 dogs and four cats over the past five years. A foreign body was found in three of these cases. In five cases pasteurella spp. was isolated. In 15 of these cases the abscess was drained surgically. One dog was permanently blind due to inadequate surgical drainage of the abscess. In the remaining cases healing was uneventful. The surgical and medical therapy of orbital abscesses is illustrated by an exemplary case.

  9. THE MANAGEMENT OF ABSCESS OF THE LUNG

    PubMed Central

    Byron, Francis X.

    1952-01-01

    A review of the literature raises considerable doubt as to the advisability of surgical drainage of lung abscess as a definitive procedure. The mortality rate with use of this procedure and other hazards associated with it, must now be viewed in the light of improved methods of conservative therapy — involving the use of penicillin, bronchoscopic treatment and postural drainage—by which cure can be obtained in more than 80 per cent of cases of acute abscess and in a smaller proportion of cases of chronic abscess. Another factor to be considered is the better chance for diagnosis and effective resection of associated carcinoma when conservative treatment is employed. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:14935878

  10. Bronchoscopic drainage of a malignant lung abscess.

    PubMed

    Katsenos, Stamatis; Psathakis, Konstantinos; Chatzivasiloglou, Fotini; Antonogiannaki, Elvira-Markela; Psara, Anthoula; Tsintiris, Konstantinos

    2015-04-01

    Bronchoscopic drainage of a pyogenic lung abscess is an established therapeutic approach in selected patients in whom conventional antibiotic therapy fails. This intervention has also been undertaken in patients with abscess owing to underlying lung cancer and prior combined radiochemotherapy. However, this procedure has rarely been performed in cavitary lesions of advanced tumor origin before initiating any chemotherapy/radiotherapy scheme. Herein, we describe a case of a 68-year-old woman with lung adenocarcinoma stage IIIB, who underwent bronchoscopic drainage of necrotizing tumor lesion, thus improving her initial poor clinical condition and rendering other treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy, more effective and beneficial. Bronchoscopic drainage of a symptomatic cancerous lung abscess should be considered as an alternative and palliative treatment approach in patients with advanced inoperable non-small cell lung cancer.

  11. Unusual case of a lung abscess.

    PubMed

    Musa, Duduzile; Godbole, Gauri; Chiodini, Peter L; Phillips, Russell

    2013-04-16

    A 56-year-old Caucasian lady presented with a short history of pleuritic chest pain on the background of a 2-month history of fever, chills, 10-kg weight loss and cough with brown sputum after a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. She had persistent eosinophilia and was diagnosed with a lung abscess as seen on chest x-ray. She did not respond to standard intravenous broad spectrum antibacterial medication and her chest CT scan showed a moderate pleural collection in continuity with the abscess. She also underwent bronchoscopy, the microscopy of the bronchial washings revealing eggs of the trematode Fasciola. The bacterial and fungal cultures of the washings were sterile. She had visited Turkey in the previous year but did not remember consuming any watercress or aquatic plants. She was successfully treated with two doses of the antiparasitic agent triclabendazole. Ectopic Fasciola can be a rare cause of a lung abscess.

  12. Sedimentary facies and gas accumulation model of Lower Shihezi Formation in Shenguhao area, northern Ordos basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Weibing; Chen, Lin; Lu, Yongchao; Zhao, Shuai

    2017-04-01

    The Lower Shihezi formation of lower Permian series in Shenguhao develops the highest gas abundance of upper Paleozoic in China, which has already commercially produced on a large scale. The structural location of Shenguhao belongs to the transition zone of Yimeng uplift and Yishan slope of northern Ordos basin, China. Based on the data of core, well logging and seismic, the sedimentary facies and gas accumulation model have been studied in this paper. Sedimentary facies analysis shows that the braided delta is the major facies type developed in this area during the period of Lower Shihezi formation. The braided delta can be further divided into two microfacies, distributary channel and flood plain. The distributary channel sandbody develops the characteristics of scour surface, trough cross beddings and normal grading sequences. Its seismic reflection structure is with the shape of flat top and concave bottom. Its gamma-ray logging curve is mainly in a box or bell shape. The flood plain is mainly composed of thick mudstones. Its seismic reflection structure is with the shape of parallel or sub-parallel sheet. Its gamma-ray logging curve is mainly in a linear tooth shape. On the whole, the distribution of sandbody is characterized by large thickness, wide area and good continuity. Based on the analysis of the sea level change and the restoration of the ancient landform in the period of Lower Shihezi formation, the sea level relative change and morphology of ancient landform have been considered as the main controlling factors for the development and distribution of sedimentary facies. The topography was with big topographic relief, and the sea level was relatively low in the early stage of Low Shihezi formation. The sandbody distributed chiefly along the landform depressions. The sandbody mainly developed in the pattern of multiple vertical superpositions with thick layer. In the later stage, landform gradually converted to be flat, and strata tended to be gentle

  13. [Periodontal abscess: etiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Vályi, Péter; Gorzó, István

    2004-08-01

    The periodontal abscess is an acute destructive process in the periodontium resulting in localized collections of pus communicating with the oral cavity through the gingival sulcus or other periodontal sites and not arising from the tooth pulp. The prevalence of periodontal abscess is relatively high and it affects the prognosis of the tooth. Periodontal abscesses can develop on the base of persisting periodontitis but can also occur in the absence of periodontitis. The cause of the development of periodontal abscess originating from chronic periodontitis is the marginal closure of a periodontal pocket, or the pocket lumen might be too tight to drain the increased suppuration due to changes in the composition of subgingival microflora, alteration of bacterial virulence or host defenses. Diagnosis of a periodontal abscess is based on medical and dental history as well as oral examination (pocket depth, swelling, suppuration, mobility, sensibility of the tooth). The most prevalent group of bacteria: P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, B. forsythus, F. nucleatum and P. micros. Previous studies have suggested that the complete therapy of the periodontitis patients with acute periodontal abscess has to do in two stages: the first stage is the management of acute lesions, then the second stage is the appropriate comprehensive treatment of the original and/or residual lesions. The management of acute lesions includes establishing drainage via pocket lumen, subgingival scaling and root planing, curettage of the lining pocket epithelia and seriously inflamed connective tissue, compressing pocket wall to underlying tooth and periodontal support, and maintaining tissue contact. Some authors recommend the incision or to establish drainage and irrigation, or a flap surgery, or even extraction of hopeless teeth. We recommend the use of systemic antibiotics as a preventive measure of systemic disease or in case of systemic symptoms.

  14. Evidence of Archaeal Methanogens in Brain Abscess.

    PubMed

    Drancourt, Michel; Nkamga, Vanessa Demonfort; Lakhe, Ndèye Aïssatou; Régis, Jean-Marie; Dufour, Henry; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Bechah, Yassina; Scheld, W Michael; Raoult, Didier

    2017-07-01

    Methanogens are antibiotic-resistant anaerobic archaea that escape routine detection in clinical microbiology. We hypothesized that methanogens are part of the anaerobic community that cause brain abscess. Methanogens were investigated in 1 index sample using specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing and culture. The pathogenesis of a methanogen isolate was assessed in a mouse model. Archaea-specific quantitative (q) PCR and metagenomics were used to detect specific archaeal sequences in brain abscess samples and controls. In 1 index sample, routine culture found Porphyromonas endodontalis and Streptococcus intermedius, and specific culture found Methanobrevibacter oralis susceptible to metronidazole and fusidic acid. Archaea-targeted PCR sequencing and metagenomics confirmed M. oralis along with 14 bacteria, including S. intermedius. Archaea-specific qPCR yielded archaea in 8/18 brain abscess specimens and 1/27 controls (P < .003), and metagenomics yielded archaea, mostly methanogens, in 28/32 brain abscess samples, and no archaea in 71 negative controls (P < 10-6). Infection of mice brains yielded no mortality in 14 controls and death in 17/22 M. oralis-inoculated mice (P < 10-6), 32/95 S. intermedius-inoculated mice (P < 10-6), and 75/104 mice inoculated with M. oralis mixed with S. intermedius (P < 10-6) 7 days post-inoculation. Methanogens belong to the anaerobic community responsible for brain abscess, and M. oralis may participate in the pathogenicity of this deadly infection. In mice, a synergy of M. oralis and S. intermedius was observed. Antibiotic treatment of brain abscess should contain anti-archaeal compounds such as imidazole derivatives in most cases. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments. Gas hydrate growth and stability conditioned by host sediment properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clennell, M.B.; Henry, P.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Thomas, M.

    2000-01-01

    The stability conditions of submarine gas hydrates (methane clathrates) are largely dictated by pressure, temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of the host sediments also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in the pores of a freezing soil, where capillary forces influence the energy balance. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments because of the excess internal phase pressure of small crystals with high surface curvature that coexist with liquid water in small pores. Therefore, the base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature, and so nearer to the seabed than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. The growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, sheets, and lenses in muds; cements in sand and ash layers) can be explained by a requirement to minimize the excess of mechanical and surface energy in the system.

  16. Medically Treated Diverticular Abscess Associated With High Risk of Recurrence and Disease Complications.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, Bikash; Liu, Wendy; Tatum, James; Cologne, Kyle; Kaiser, Andreas M

    2016-03-01

    The best management for diverticulitis with abscess formation remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the natural course and outcomes of patients with medically treated diverticular abscess. We conducted a retrospective review of all patients at our institution with diverticular abscess confirmed by CT from 2004 to 2014. This study was conducted in a tertiary referral hospital. A total of 1194 patients were treated for acute diverticulitis in 10 years; 210 patients with CT-documented diverticular abscess were analyzed (140 men (66.7%) and 70 women (33.3%); median age 45 years; range, 23-84 years). Overall recurrence and disease complication rates, as well as the need for subsequent operation after initial successful nonsurgical management, were measured, along with analysis of the whole cohort and the subgroup of patients with percutaneous drainage for diverticular abscess. During the initial presentation, 25 patients failed nonoperative management and required an urgent operation. A total of 185 patients were initially successfully managed without surgery and were discharged from the hospital. Of these, recurrent diverticulitis developed in 112 (60.5%) after an average time interval of 5.3 months (range, 0.8-20.0 months); 47 patients (42%) experienced more than 1 episode. The modified Hinchey stage at time of recurrence (compared with index stay) increased in 51 patients (45.6%). Seventy one (63%) of 112 recurrences showed local disease complications (recurrent abscess, fistula, stricture, or peritonitis). Fistula formation (colovesicular/colovaginal/colocutaneous) and recurrent abscess were the 2 most frequent complications. Twenty nine (26%) of 112 recurrences required an urgent operation; overall, 66 (59%) of 112 patients eventually underwent surgery at our institution. The original abscess size in patients who later developed recurrences was significantly larger than in patients who did not develop recurrence (5.3 vs 3.2 cm; p < 0

  17. Galaxy pairs in the SDSS - XIII. The connection between enhanced star formation and molecular gas properties in galaxy mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violino, Giulio; Ellison, Sara L.; Sargent, Mark; Coppin, Kristen E. K.; Scudder, Jillian M.; Mendel, Trevor J.; Saintonge, Amelie

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the connection between star formation and molecular gas properties in galaxy mergers at low redshift (z ≤ 0.06). The study we present is based on IRAM 30-m CO(1-0) observations of 11 galaxies with a close companion selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The pairs have mass ratios ≤4, projected separations rp ≤ 30 kpc and velocity separations ΔV ≤ 300 km s-1, and have been selected to exhibit enhanced specific star formation rates (sSFRs). We calculate molecular gas (H2) masses, assigning to each galaxy a physically motivated conversion factor αCO, and we derive molecular gas fractions and depletion times. We compare these quantities with those of isolated galaxies from the extended CO Legacy Data base for the GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey sample (xCOLDGASS; Saintonge et al.) with gas quantities computed in an identical way. Ours is the first study which directly compares the gas properties of galaxy pairs and those of a control sample of normal galaxies with rigorous control procedures and for which SFR and H2 masses have been estimated using the same method. We find that the galaxy pairs have shorter depletion times and an average molecular gas fraction enhancement of 0.4 dex compared to the mass matched control sample drawn from xCOLDGASS. However, the gas masses (and fractions) in galaxy pairs and their depletion times are consistent with those of non-mergers whose SFRs are similarly elevated. We conclude that both external interactions and internal processes may lead to molecular gas enhancement and decreased depletion times.

  18. Successful percutaneous transperineal drainage of a large prostatic abscess.

    PubMed

    Mason, Barry M; Hakimi, A Ari; Clerkin, Kevin J; Silva, Jose V

    2010-12-01

    We present a case of an 83-year-old man with septic shock secondary to an extremely large prostatic abscess. Antibiotics and transperineal percutaneous drainage with a suprapubic-type Malecot catheter successfully treated the abscess. Follow-up images reveal resolution of the abscess. Broad-spectrum antibiotics and drainage permitted a full recovery. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Giant lung abscess treated by tube thoracostomy.

    PubMed

    Mengoli, L

    1985-08-01

    Pulmonary resection is the recommended treatment for large lung abscesses that do not respond to medical management. Tube thoracostomy, effective in the past, has been used less and less in recent years. Personal experience with three patients and a review of the literature led me to the following conclusions: In the treatment of a lung abscess 8 cm or larger, tube thoracostomy is an effective form of drainage, is probably safer than pulmonary resection, and may yield a superior result. Rather than being reserved as a desperation measure for poor risk patients, tube thoracostomy should be considered early in the hospital course.

  20. Acute abdomen caused by brucellar hepatic abscess.

    PubMed

    Ibis, Cem; Sezer, Atakan; Batman, Ali K; Baydar, Serkan; Eker, Alper; Unlu, Ercument; Kuloglu, Figen; Cakir, Bilge; Coskun, Irfan

    2007-10-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic infection that is transmitted from animals to humans by ingestion of infected food products, direct contact with an infected animal, or aerosol inhalation. The disease is endemic in many countries, including the Mediterranean basin, the Middle East, India, Mexico, Central and South America and, central and southwest Asia. Human brucellosis is a systemic infection with a wide clinical spectrum. Although hepatic involvement is very common during the course of chronic brucellosis, hepatic abscess is a very rare complication of Brucella infection. We present a case of hepatic abscess caused by Brucella, which resembled the clinical presentation of surgical acute abdomen.

  1. Formation and characterization of asymmetric polyimide hollow fiber membranes for gas separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausi, Dominic Thomas

    Ultra-thin and virtually defect-free polyimide hollow fiber membranes were formed using a "dry/wet" type spinning solution. Fibers were spun from the commercially available polyimide, Matrimidsp{°ler}, using a dry-jet, wet quench spinning apparatus. Spin dopes were comprised of volatile and non-volatile solvents, polymer, and non-solvent. The influence of dope composition, spinning parameters, and dehydration procedures on the membrane morphology and performance was investigated. Without post-treatment, the fibers exhibited skin thicknesses less than 1000 A and Osb2/Nsb2 selectivities within 90% of those determined for dense, solution-cast films. The 250 mum O.D./125 mum I.D. fibers were spun at take-up rates comparable to those used in commercial processes and had macrovoid-free morphologies. A new characterization technique has also been developed where a permeating gas is held at constant transmembrane pressure while the average pressure in the porous support of an asymmetric membrane is varied. This alters the mean free path of gas molecules permeating through the substructure while maintaining a constant driving force for permeation. This technique characterizes the magnitude of the substructure resistance and its pressure dependence, thereby providing a means to compare the morphologies of different membrane samples. Well defined composite-laminate membranes were constructed to validate this technique, which was subsequently used to characterize the substructures of the hollow fiber membranes formed in this work. Two additional rapid characterization techniques have been developed for use before fiber dehydration (i.e., wet fibers). These techniques probe the membrane skin layer with aqueous solutions of disperse dyes and poly(ethylene glycol), respectively. Fiber skin integrity can be characterized using these techniques prior to lengthy downstream processing (i.e., solvent exchange, drying, and post-treatment), providing quick elucidation of membrane skin

  2. Influence of Stellar Multiplicity On Planet Formation. III. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Kepler Stars With Gas Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Horch, Elliott P.; Xie, Ji-Wei

    2015-06-01

    As hundreds of gas giant planets have been discovered, we study how these planets form and evolve in different stellar environments, specifically in multiple stellar systems. In such systems, stellar companions may have a profound influence on gas giant planet formation and evolution via several dynamical effects such as truncation and perturbation. We select 84 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) with gas giant planet candidates. We obtain high-angular resolution images using telescopes with adaptive optics (AO) systems. Together with the AO data, we use archival radial velocity data and dynamical analysis to constrain the presence of stellar companions. We detect 59 stellar companions around 40 KOIs for which we develop methods of testing their physical association. These methods are based on color information and galactic stellar population statistics. We find evidence of suppressive planet formation within 20 AU by comparing stellar multiplicity. The stellar multiplicity rate (MR) for planet host stars is {0}-0+5% within 20 AU. In comparison, the stellar MR is 18% ± 2% for the control sample, i.e., field stars in the solar neighborhood. The stellar MR for planet host stars is 34% ± 8% for separations between 20 and 200 AU, which is higher than the control sample at 12% ± 2%. Beyond 200 AU, stellar MRs are comparable between planet host stars and the control sample. We discuss the implications of the results on gas giant planet formation and evolution.

  3. A study of the microbiology of breast abscess in a teaching hospital in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Al Benwan, Khalifa; Al Mulla, Ahmed; Rotimi, Vincent O

    2011-01-01

    To determine the microbiological profile of breast abscess and assess the antibiotic susceptibility of the causative agents. Data obtained from cases of breast abscess over a period of 3.5 years, June 2006 to December 2009, were retrospectively analyzed. Specimens were cultured using optimal aerobic and anaerobic microbiological techniques. The antibiotic susceptibility test was carried out using the methods recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. One specimen per patient was analyzed. Of the 114 patients, 107 (93.8%) non-lactating and 7 (6.1%) lactating women were diagnosed with breast abscess during this period. Of the 114 specimens, 83 (73%) yielded bacterial growth. Of these, 115 pathogens were isolated with an average of 1.4 pathogens per abscess. Eighteen (22%) of the 83 specimens yielded mixed bacterial growth. There were more Gram-positive pathogens (60, 52%) than anaerobes (32, 28%) and Gram-negative pathogens (22, 19%). The predominant organisms were methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (37, 32%), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA; 11, 10%), Bacteroides spp. (16, 14%), anaerobic streptococci (14, 12%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (9, 8%). Of the 48 S. aureus, MRSA accounted for 11 (23%). All MRSA isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and vancomycin. S. aureus was the most common pathogenic organism isolated in breast abscesses at Al-Amiri Hospital, Kuwait, of which 23% were MRSA. Nearly a third of the cases were caused by anaerobes, particularly B. fragilis. The data present a basis for the formation of empirical antimicrobial therapeutic policy in the management of breast abscess. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Gas-blowout control by water injection through relief wells: a theoretical analysis. [Injection of water into the formation through relief wells

    SciTech Connect

    Lehner, F.; Williamson, A.S.

    1974-08-01

    Koninklijke/Shell Exploratie en Produktie Laboratorium in The Netherlands suggests bringing a gas blowout under control by injecting water into the formation through relief wells. By avoiding direct contact between relief well and blowout well, this technique reduces the inflow of gas by creating sufficient back pressure in the formation itself. The mechanics of the technique are considered.

  5. Heterogeneity-enhanced gas phase formation in shallow aquifers during leakage of CO2-saturated water from geologic sequestration sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plampin, Michael R.; Lassen, Rune N.; Sakaki, Toshihiro; Porter, Mark L.; Pawar, Rajesh J.; Jensen, Karsten H.; Illangasekare, Tissa H.

    2014-12-01

    A primary concern for geologic carbon storage is the potential for leakage of stored carbon dioxide (CO2) into the shallow subsurface where it could degrade the quality of groundwater and surface water. In order to predict and mitigate the potentially negative impacts of CO2 leakage, it is important to understand the physical processes that CO2 will undergo as it moves through naturally heterogeneous porous media formations. Previous studies have shown that heterogeneity can enhance the evolution of gas phase CO2 in some cases, but the conditions under which this occurs have not yet been quantitatively defined, nor tested through laboratory experiments. This study quantitatively investigates the effects of geologic heterogeneity on the process of gas phase CO2 evolution in shallow aquifers through an extensive set of experiments conducted in a column that was packed with layers of various test sands. Soil moisture sensors were utilized to observe the formation of gas phase near the porous media interfaces. Results indicate that the conditions under which heterogeneity controls gas phase evolution can be successfully predicted through analysis of simple parameters, including the dissolved CO2 concentration in the flowing water, the distance between the heterogeneity and the leakage location, and some fundamental properties of the porous media. Results also show that interfaces where a less permeable material overlies a more permeable material affect gas phase evolution more significantly than interfaces with the opposite layering.

  6. Formation of the ZnFe2O4 phase in an electric arc furnace off-gas treatment system.

    PubMed

    Suetens, T; Guo, M; Van Acker, K; Blanpain, B

    2015-04-28

    To better understand the phenomena of ZnFe2O4 spinel formation in electric arc furnace dust, the dust was characterized with particle size analysis, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA). Different ZnFe2O4 formation reaction extents were observed for iron oxide particles with different particle sizes. ZnO particles were present as both individual particles and aggregated on the surface of larger particles. Also, the slag particles found in the off-gas were shown not to react with the zinc vapor. After confirming the presence of a ZnFe2O4 formation reaction, the thermodynamic feasibility of in-process separation - a new electric arc furnace dust treatment technology - was reevaluated. The large air intake and the presence of iron oxide particles in the off-gas were included into the thermodynamic calculations. The formation of the stable ZnFe2O4 spinel phase was shown to be thermodynamically favorable in current electric arc furnace off-gas ducts conditions even before reaching the post combustion chamber. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. /sup 111/In desferal: a new radiopharmaceutical for abscess detection. [Distribution studies in normal and abscess-bearing laboratory animals

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, R.; Pierno, C.; Braunstein, P.

    1978-09-01

    Desferal was labeled with /sup 111/In and its distribution was studied in normal mice, rabbits bearing turpentine-induced abscesses, and rats bearing Staphyloccus aureus-induced abscesses. The results indicate that /sup 111/In Desferal may be used in abscess detection and localization.

  8. Effect of chemistry and turbulence on NO formation in oxygen-natural gas flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samaniego, J. -M.; Egolfopoulos, F. N.; Bowman, C. T.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of chemistry and turbulence on NO formation in oxygen-natural turbulent diffusion flames gas flames have been investigated. The chemistry of nitric oxides has been studied numerically in the counterflow configuration. Systematic calculations with the GRI 2.11 mechanism for combustion of methane and NO chemistry were conducted to provide a base case. It was shown that the 'simple' Zeldovich mechanism accounts for more than 75% of N2 consumption in the flame in a range of strain-rates varying between 10 and 1000 s-l. The main shortcomings of this mechanism are: 1) overestimation (15%) of the NO production rate at low strain-rates because it does not capture the reburn due to the hydrocarbon chemistry, and 2) underestimation (25%) of the NO production rate at high strainrates because it ignores NO production through the prompt mechanism. Reburn through the Zeldovich mechanism alone proves to be significant at low strain-rates. A one-step model based on the Zeldovich mechanism and including reburn has been developed. It shows good agreement with the GRI mechanism at low strain-rates but underestimates significantly N2 consumption (about 50%) at high strain-rates. The role of turbulence has been assessed by using an existing 3-D DNS data base of a diffusion flame in decaying turbulence. Two PDF closure models used in practical industrial codes for turbulent NO formation have been tested. A simpler version of the global one-step chemical scheme for NO compared to that developed in this study was used to test the closure assumptions of the PDF models, because the data base could not provide all the necessary ingredients. Despite this simplification, it was possible to demonstrate that the current PDF models for NO overestimate significantly the NO production rate due to the fact that they neglect the correlations between the fluctuations in oxygen concentration and temperature. A single scalar PDF model for temperature that accounts for such correlations based

  9. Novel methods for predicting gas-particle partitioning during the formation of secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wania, F.; Lei, Y. D.; Wang, C.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Goss, K.-U.

    2014-12-01

    Several methods have been presented in the literature to predict an organic chemical's equilibrium partitioning between the water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) component of aerosol and the gas phase, Ki,WIOM, as a function of temperature. They include (i) polyparameter linear free energy relationships calibrated with empirical aerosol sorption data, as well as (ii) the solvation models implemented in SPARC and (iii) the quantum-chemical software COSMOtherm, which predict solvation equilibria from molecular structure alone. We demonstrate that these methods can be used to predict Ki,WIOM for large numbers of individual molecules implicated in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, including those with multiple functional groups. Although very different in their theoretical foundations, these methods give remarkably consistent results for the products of the reaction of normal alkanes with OH, i.e. their partition coefficients Ki,WIOM generally agree within one order of magnitude over a range of more than ten orders of magnitude. This level of agreement is much better than that achieved by different vapour pressure estimation methods that are more commonly used in the SOA community. Also, in contrast to the agreement between vapour pressure estimates, the agreement between the Ki,WIOM estimates does not deteriorate with increasing number of functional groups. Furthermore, these partitioning coefficients Ki,WIOM predicted SOA mass yields in agreement with those measured in chamber experiments of the oxidation of normal alkanes. If a Ki,WIOM prediction method was based on one or more surrogate molecules representing the solvation properties of the mixed OM phase of SOA, the choice of those molecule(s) was found to have a relatively minor effect on the predicted Ki,WIOM, as long as the molecule(s) are not very polar. This suggests that a single surrogate molecule, such as 1-octanol or a hypothetical SOA structure proposed by Kalberer et al. (2004), may often be

  10. Formation, structure and bond dissociation thresholds of gas-phase vanadium oxide cluster ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, R. C.; Zemski, K. A.; Justes, D. R.; Castleman, A. W.

    2001-01-01

    The formation and structure of gas-phase vanadium oxide cluster anions are examined using a guided ion beam mass spectrometer coupled with a laser vaporization source. The dominant peaks in the anion total mass distribution correspond to clusters having stoichiometries of the form (VO2)n(VO3)m(O2)q-. Collision-induced dissociation studies of the vanadium oxide species V2O4-6-, V3O6-9-, V4O8-10-, V5O11-13-, V6O13-15-, and V7O16-18- indicate that VO2, VO3, and V2O5 units are the main building blocks of these clusters. There are many similarities between the anion mass distribution and that of the cation distribution studied previously. The principal difference is a shift to higher oxygen content by one additional oxygen atom for the stoichiometric anions (VxOy-) as compared to the cations with the same number of vanadium atoms, which is attributed to the extra pair of electrons of the anionic species. The oxygen-rich clusters, VxOy(O2)-, are shown to more tightly adsorb molecular oxygen than those of the corresponding cationic clusters. In addition, the bond dissociation thresholds for the vanadium oxide clusters ΔE(V+-O)=6.09±0.28 eV, ΔE(OV+-O)=3.51±0.36 eV, and ΔE(O2V--O)=5.43±0.31 eV are determined from the energy-dependent collision-induced dissociation cross sections with Xe as the collision partner. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first bond dissociation energy reported for the breaking of the V-O bond of a vanadium oxide anion.

  11. Aerobic exercise before diving reduces venous gas bubble formation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Dujić, Željko; Duplančic, Darko; Marinovic-Terzić, Ivana; Baković, Darija; Ivančev, Vladimir; Valic, Zoran; Eterović, Davor; Petri, Nadan M; Wisløff, Ulrik; Brubakk, Alf O

    2004-01-01

    We have previously shown in a rat model that a single bout of high-intensity aerobic exercise 20h before a simulated dive reduces bubble formation and after the dive protects from lethal decompression sickness. The present study investigated the importance of these findings in man. Twelve healthy male divers were compressed in a hyperbaric chamber to 280kPa at a rate of 100kPamin−1 breathing air and remaining at pressure for 80min. The ascent rate was 9mmin−1 with a 7min stop at 130kPa. Each diver underwent two randomly assigned simulated dives, with or without preceding exercise. A single interval exercise performed 24h before the dive consisted of treadmill running at 90% of maximum heart rate for 3min, followed by exercise at 50% of maximum heart rate for 2min; this was repeated eight times for a total exercise period of 40min. Venous gas bubbles were monitored with an ultrasonic scanner every 20min for 80min after reaching surface pressure. The study demonstrated that a single bout of strenuous exercise 24h before a dive to 18 m of seawater significantly reduced the average number of bubbles in the pulmonary artery from 0.98 to 0.22 bubbles cm−2(P= 0.006) compared to dives without preceding exercise. The maximum bubble grade was decreased from 3 to 1.5 (P= 0.002) by pre-dive exercise, thereby increasing safety. This is the first report to indicate that pre-dive exercise may form the basis for a new way of preventing serious decompression sickness. PMID:14755001

  12. Formation of secondary organic aerosols from gas-phase emissions of heated cooking oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tengyu; Li, Zijun; Chan, ManNin; Chan, Chak K.

    2017-06-01

    Cooking emissions can potentially contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) but remain poorly understood. In this study, formation of SOA from gas-phase emissions of five heated vegetable oils (i.e., corn, canola, sunflower, peanut and olive oils) was investigated in a potential aerosol mass (PAM) chamber. Experiments were conducted at 19-20 °C and 65-70 % relative humidity (RH). The characterization instruments included a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS). The efficiency of SOA production, in ascending order, was peanut oil, olive oil, canola oil, corn oil and sunflower oil. The major SOA precursors from heated cooking oils were related to the content of monounsaturated fat and omega-6 fatty acids in cooking oils. The average production rate of SOA, after aging at an OH exposure of 1. 7 × 1011 molecules cm-3 s, was 1. 35 ± 0. 30 µg min-1, 3 orders of magnitude lower compared with emission rates of fine particulate matter (PM2. 5) from heated cooking oils in previous studies. The mass spectra of cooking SOA highly resemble field-derived COA (cooking-related organic aerosol) in ambient air, with R2 ranging from 0.74 to 0.88. The average carbon oxidation state (OSc) of SOA was -1.51 to -0.81, falling in the range between ambient hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) and semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA), indicating that SOA in these experiments was lightly oxidized.

  13. Pore Effect on the Occurrence and Formation of Gas Hydrate in Permafrost of Qilian Mountain, Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, H.; Lu, H.; Lu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Gas hydrates were found in the permafrost of Qilian Mountain, Qinghai- Tibet Plateau, China in 2008. It has been found that gas hydrates occur in Jurassic sedimentary rocks, and the hydrated gases are mainly thermogenic. Different from the gas hydrates existing in loose sands in Mallik, Mackenzie Delta, Canada and North Slope, Alaska, USA, the gas hydrates in Qilian Mountain occurred in hard rocks. For understanding the occurrence and formation mechanism of gas hydrate in hard rcok, extensive experimental investigations have been conducted to study the pore features and hydrate formation in the rocks recovered from the hydrate layers in Qilian Mountain. The structures of sedimentary rock were observed by high-resolution X-ray CT, and pore size distribution of a rock specimen was measured with the mercury-injection method. Methane hydrate was synthesized in water-saturated rocks, and the saturations of hydrate in sedimentary rocks of various types were estimated from the amount of gas released from certain volume of rock. X-ray CT observation revealed that fractures were developed in the rocks associated with faults, while those away from faults were generally with massive structure. The mercury-injection analysis of pore features found that the porosities of the hydrate-existing rocks were generally less than 3%, and the pore sizes were generally smaller than 100 nm. The synthesizing experiments found that the saturation of methane hydrate were generally lower than 6% of pore space in rocks, but up to 16% when fractures developed. The low hydrate saturation in Qilian sedimentary rocks has been found mainly due to the small pore size of rock. The low hydrate saturation in the rocks might be the reason for the failure of regional seismic and logging detections of gas hydrates in Qilian Mountain.

  14. Lurking systematics in predicting galaxy cold gas masses using dust luminosities and star formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janowiecki, Steven; Cortese, Luca; Catinella, Barbara; Goodwin, Adelle J.

    2018-05-01

    We use galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey to evaluate commonly used indirect predictors of cold gas masses. We calibrate predictions for cold neutral atomic and molecular gas using infrared dust emission and gas depletion time methods that are self-consistent and have ˜20 per cent accuracy (with the highest accuracy in the prediction of total cold gas mass). However, modest systematic residual dependences are found in all calibrations that depend on the partition between molecular and atomic gas, and can over/underpredict gas masses by up to 0.3 dex. As expected, dust-based estimates are best at predicting the total gas mass while depletion time-based estimates are only able to predict the (star-forming) molecular gas mass. Additionally, we advise caution when applying these predictions to high-z galaxies, as significant (0.5 dex or more) errors can arise when incorrect assumptions are made about the dominant gas phase. Any scaling relations derived using predicted gas masses may be more closely related to the calibrations used than to the actual galaxies observed.

  15. [Complex treatment of patients with cholangiogenic hepatic abscess].

    PubMed

    Nychytaĭlo, M Iu; Skums, A V; Medvets'kyĭ, Ie B; Ohorodnyk, P V; Mashkovs'kyĭ, H Iu; Shkarban, V P; Shkarban, P O; Farzolakh, Mekhraban Jafarlu

    2005-07-01

    Results of treatment of 47 patients with cholangiogenic hepatic abscess were analyzed. Clinical, laboratory and special methods of investigation were applied for diagnosis. The authors consider ultrasound investigation (USI), computer tomography and the abscess puncture under the USI control with subsequent cytological and bacterial control the decisive methods in diagnosis of hepatic abscess. In complex of treatment of patients miniinvasive technologies were applied--the abscess puncture, its cavity drainage under USI control transcutaneus transhepatic cholangiostomy, endoscopic papillosphincterotomy with lithotripsy and nasobiliary drainage, according to indications. Efficacy of the abscess cavity sanation, using miramistinum and decasan, was proved. In general therapy the directed transport of medicines was applied.

  16. Efficient CO2-Reducing Activity of NAD-Dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Thiobacillus sp. KNK65MA for Formate Production from CO2 Gas

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Dae Haeng; Kim, Min Hoo; Lee, Sang Hyun; Jung, Kwang Deog; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2014-01-01

    NAD-dependent formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from Candida boidinii (CbFDH) has been widely used in various CO2-reduction systems but its practical applications are often impeded due to low CO2-reducing activity. In this study, we demonstrated superior CO2-reducing properties of FDH from Thiobacillus sp. KNK65MA (TsFDH) for production of formate from CO2 gas. To discover more efficient CO2-reducing FDHs than a reference enzyme, i.e. CbFDH, five FDHs were selected with biochemical properties and then, their CO2-reducing activities were evaluated. All FDHs including CbFDH showed better CO2-reducing activities at acidic pHs than at neutral pHs and four FDHs were more active than CbFDH in the CO2 reduction reaction. In particular, the FDH from Thiobacillus sp. KNK65MA (TsFDH) exhibited the highest CO2-reducing activity and had a dramatic preference for the reduction reaction, i.e., a 84.2-fold higher ratio of CO2 reduction to formate oxidation in catalytic efficiency (k cat/K B) compared to CbFDH. Formate was produced from CO2 gas using TsFDH and CbFDH, and TsFDH showed a 5.8-fold higher formate production rate than CbFDH. A sequence and structural comparison showed that FDHs with relatively high CO2-reducing activities had elongated N- and C-terminal loops. The experimental results demonstrate that TsFDH can be an alternative to CbFDH as a biocatalyst in CO2 reduction systems. PMID:25061666

  17. Ambient observations of dimers from terpene oxidation in the gas phase: Implications for new particle formation and growth: Ambient Observations of Gas-Phase Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, Claudia; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Yli-Juuti, Taina

    Here, we present ambient observations of dimeric monoterpene oxidation products (C 16–20H yO 6–9) in gas and particle phases in the boreal forest in Finland in spring 2013 and 2014, detected with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer with a filter inlet for gases and aerosols employing acetate and iodide as reagent ions. These are among the first online dual-phase observations of such dimers in the atmosphere. Estimated saturation concentrations of 10 -15 to 10 -6 µg m -3 (based on observed thermal desorptions and group-contribution methods) and measured gas-phase concentrations of 10 -3 to 10 -2 µg m -3 (~10more » 6–10 7 molecules cm -3) corroborate a gas-phase formation mechanism. Regular new particle formation (NPF) events allowed insights into the potential role dimers may play for atmospheric NPF and growth. The observationally constrained Model for Acid-Base chemistry in NAnoparticle Growth indicates a contribution of ~5% to early stage particle growth from the ~60 gaseous dimer compounds.« less

  18. Ambient observations of dimers from terpene oxidation in the gas phase: Implications for new particle formation and growth: Ambient Observations of Gas-Phase Dimers

    DOE PAGES

    Mohr, Claudia; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Yli-Juuti, Taina; ...

    2017-03-28

    Here, we present ambient observations of dimeric monoterpene oxidation products (C 16–20H yO 6–9) in gas and particle phases in the boreal forest in Finland in spring 2013 and 2014, detected with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer with a filter inlet for gases and aerosols employing acetate and iodide as reagent ions. These are among the first online dual-phase observations of such dimers in the atmosphere. Estimated saturation concentrations of 10 -15 to 10 -6 µg m -3 (based on observed thermal desorptions and group-contribution methods) and measured gas-phase concentrations of 10 -3 to 10 -2 µg m -3 (~10more » 6–10 7 molecules cm -3) corroborate a gas-phase formation mechanism. Regular new particle formation (NPF) events allowed insights into the potential role dimers may play for atmospheric NPF and growth. The observationally constrained Model for Acid-Base chemistry in NAnoparticle Growth indicates a contribution of ~5% to early stage particle growth from the ~60 gaseous dimer compounds.« less

  19. [Conservative treatment of hepatic amebic abscesses].

    PubMed

    Garlicki, A; Kluba-Wojewoda, U; Krukowiecki, J; Kowalski, P

    1996-04-01

    A case is presented of hepatic amebic abscesses in a young man after return from India. After establishing of the aetiology of the disease conservative treatment was started which was completed with success. The authors point to the possibility of transmission of amoeba dysentery to Poland due to journeys to tropical or subtropical countries.

  20. Breast abscess due to Actinomyces europaeus.

    PubMed

    Silva, W A; Pinheiro, A M; Jahns, B; Bögli-Stuber, K; Droz, S; Zimmerli, S

    2011-06-01

    Actinomyces europaeus was first described in 1997 as a new species causing predominantly skin and soft-tissue infections. Mastitis due to A. europaeus is an unusual condition. This article reports a case of primary breast abscess caused by A. europaeus in a postmenopausal woman.

  1. Liver abscess caused by tuberculosis and melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Azali, Hafiz Yafee Amar; Norly, Salleh; Wong, Leh Meng; Tan, Kia Sin; Safian, Naim Muhammad

    2007-04-01

    We report an unusual co-existence of Burkholderia pseudomallei and acid fast bacilli in a young Malay gentleman with liver abscess. He was treated with antibiotics and surgical drainage. This phenomenon has not been reported in previous literature and the dilemma of its management is discussed.

  2. Paragenesis of thermal denudation with gas-emission crater and lake formation, Yamal Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babkina, Elena; Khomutov, Artem; Leibman, Marina; Dvornikov, Yury; Kizyakov, Alexander; Babkin, Evgeny

    2017-04-01

    Gas-emission craters (GECs) found in the North of West Siberia in 2014 occur in an area of wide tabular ground ice (TGI) distribution. TGI observed in the GEC walls also provokes thermal denudation: a complex of processes responsible for formation of thermocirques (TCs). TCs are semi-circle shaped depressions resulting from TGI thaw and removal of detached material downslope. Shores of many lakes are terraced and have ancient to recent traces of thermal denudation activity. TCs are numerous in the GEC area giving reason to assume that GEC, TGI, TC, and lakes are interrelated. First found Yamal crater (GEC-1) expanded from initial 18 m wide deep hole in 2013 to an irregularly-shaped lake up to 85 meters wide in 2016. Expansion of the GEC was controlled by TGI thaw. This can be considered in terms of thermal denudation and analyzed on the basis of TC study in the adjacent area. In summer 2014 and 2015 (the lifetime of the GEC-1) its wall retreat covered the area of 1730 square meters, which gives 865 square meters per year. In 2016, which was the warmest for the period of observation at weather station Marre-Sale, retreat area increased to 2200 square meters per year. TC, which exposed TGI similar to that in the walls of GEC-1, is observed on the nearest lakeshore. TC activation probably started in 2012 as elsewhere on Yamal. In 2015 its area according to GPS survey reached 4400 square meters (a four-year average 1100 square meters). Since September 2015 and till October 2016 its area expanded by 2600 square meters, thus increased by 59%, and more than twice compared to previous annual average. Lake adjacent to GEC-1 in 2016 was separated from crater edge by only a 13 meter wide isthmus, most likely both GEC-1 lake and adjacent lake merge in few years. Therefore, single basis of erosion for thermal denudation appear. After lakes merge, it would become hard to determine what the initial process for the lake formation was if not for the occasional discovery of the GEC

  3. Imported Amoebic Liver Abscess in France

    PubMed Central

    Cordel, Hugues; Prendki, Virginie; Madec, Yoann; Houze, Sandrine; Paris, Luc; Bourée, Patrice; Caumes, Eric; Matheron, Sophie; Bouchaud, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide, amoebic liver abscess (ALA) can be found in individuals in non-endemic areas, especially in foreign-born travelers. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of ALA in patients admitted to French hospitals between 2002 and 2006. We compared imported ALA cases in European and foreign-born patients and assessed the factors associated with abscess size using a logistic regression model. Results We investigated 90 ALA cases. Patient median age was 41. The male:female ratio was 3.5∶1. We were able to determine the origin for 75 patients: 38 were European-born and 37 foreign-born. With respect to clinical characteristics, no significant difference was observed between European and foreign-born patients except a longer lag time between the return to France after traveling abroad and the onset of symptoms for foreign-born. Factors associated with an abscess size of more than 69 mm were being male (OR = 11.25, p<0.01), aged more than 41 years old (OR = 3.63, p = 0.02) and being an immigrant (OR = 11.56, p = 0.03). Percutaneous aspiration was not based on initial abscess size but was carried out significantly more often on patients who were admitted to surgical units (OR = 10, p<0.01). The median time to abscess disappearance for 24 ALA was 7.5 months. Conclusions/Significance In this study on imported ALA was one of the largest worldwide in terms of the number of cases included males, older patients and foreign-born patients presented with larger abscesses, suggesting that hormonal and immunological factors may be involved in ALA physiopathology. The long lag time before developing ALA after returning to a non-endemic area must be highlighted to clinicians so that they will consider Entamoeba histolytica as a possible pathogen of liver abscesses more often. PMID:23951372

  4. Simulation of electron beam formation and transport in a gas-filled electron-optical system with a plasma emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Grishkov, A. A.; Kornilov, S. Yu., E-mail: kornilovsy@gmail.com; Rempe, N. G.

    2016-07-15

    The results of computer simulations of the electron-optical system of an electron gun with a plasma emitter are presented. The simulations are performed using the KOBRA3-INP, XOOPIC, and ANSYS codes. The results describe the electron beam formation and transport. The electron trajectories are analyzed. The mechanisms of gas influence on the energy inhomogeneity of the beam and its current in the regions of beam primary formation, acceleration, and transport are described. Recommendations for optimizing the electron-optical system with a plasma emitter are presented.

  5. A unifying picture of gas-phase formation and growth of PAH (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons), soot, diamond and graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1990-01-01

    A variety of seemingly different carbon formation processes -- polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and diamond in the interstellar medium, soot in hydrocarbon flames, graphite and diamond in plasma-assisted-chemical vapor deposition reactors -- may all have closely related underlying chemical reaction mechanisms. Two distinct mechanisms for gas-phase carbon growth are discussed. At high temperatures it proceeds via the formation of carbon clusters. At lower temperatures it follows a polymerization-type kinetic sequence of chemical reactions of acetylene addition to a radical, and reactivation of the resultant species through H-abstraction by a hydrogen atom.

  6. Herpesviruses in Abscesses and Cellulitis of Endodontic Origin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Vicky; Chen, Yanwen; Li, Hong; Kent, Karla; Baumgartner, J. Craig; Machida, Curtis A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute apical abscesses and cellulitis are severe endodontic diseases caused by opportunistic bacteria with possible co-infection with latent herpesviruses. The objectives of this study are to identify herpesviruses, including human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and Varicella zoster virus (VZV), in patients (n=31) presenting with acute apical abscesses and cellulitis of endodontic origin. Primary and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was conducted using virus-specific primers and DNA isolated from cell-free abscess fluid. From patients exhibiting concurrent spontaneous pain (n=28), nine abscesses contained HCMV, two abscesses contained EBV, one abscess contained HSV-1, and no abscesses contained VZV. Control PCR using genomic or recombinant templates demonstrated detection limits to a single genomic copy of HCMV, 100 genomic copies for EBV, and 1-10 copies for HSV-1, with no cross-amplification between herpesviral DNA targets. Nested PCR was required for detection of herpesviral DNA in the abscess specimens, indicating that these viruses were present in low copy number. Filtration of abscess specimens and virus transfer experiments using human fibroblastic MRC-5 cells confirmed the presence of HCMV particles in several abscess specimens. We conclude that herpesviruses are present, but not required for development of acute apical abscesses and cellulitis of endodontic origin. PMID:19166769

  7. The Vulnerability Formation Mechanism and Control Strategy of the Oil and Gas Pipeline City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. L.; Han, L.

    2017-12-01

    Most of the pipelines of oil and gas pipelines in our country have been for more than 25 years. These pipes are buried underground and was difficult to daily test. In addition, it was vulnerable to environmental, corrosion and natural disasters, So there is a hidden nature of accidents. The rapid development of urbanization, population accumulation, dense building and insufficient safety range are all the reasons for the frequent accidents of oil and gas pipelines. Therefore, to appraise and know the safe condition of the city various regions oil and gas pipelines is vital significant. In order to ensure the safety of oil and gas pipeline city, this paper defines the connotation of oil and gas pipeline city vulnerability according to the previous research on vulnerability. Then from three perspectives of environment, structure and behavior, based on the analytical paradigm of “structure—vulnerability conduct—performance” about oil and gas, the influential indicators of vulnerable oil and gas pipelines were analysed, the vulnerability mechanism framework of Oil and gas pipeline city was also constructed. Finally, the paper proposed the regulating strategy of the vulnerability of the oil and gas pipeline city to decrease its vulnerability index, which can be realize the city’s vulnerability evaluation and provides new ideas for the sustainable development of the city.

  8. Case report : tuberculosis liver abscess in male alcoholism patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siahaan, W. P.; Ginting, F.

    2018-03-01

    A liver abscess often occurs in low-middle income countries such as Indonesia. Two most common liver abscesses are amoebic and pyogenic liver abscess. Data that reported tuberculosis liver abscess (TLA) is extremely rare. A diagnostic criterion for tuberculosis liver abscess is rare and remains unclear. A 52-year-old man developed a TLA which was not associated with any pulmonary or gastrointestinal tract foci of tuberculosis. An ultrasonogram and abdominal scan showed an abscess in the right lobe. We performed paracentesis, and the pus from the lesion was positive tubercular bacilli on acid-fast bacilli staining. The patient was started on systemic antitubercular therapy to which he responded favorably. This report emphasizes the fact that, although a TLA is a very rare entity, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of liver abscess especially in Indonesia where the prevalence of tuberculosis is extremely high.

  9. Liver abscess that responded well to pazufloxacin therapy.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yukihiro; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Saigenji, Katsunori; Yago, Kazuo

    2006-02-01

    Pazufloxacin (PZFX), an injectable, new quinolone antibacterial drug, has strong antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria (which often account for liver abscess) and transfers well to liver tissue, gallbladder tissue, and bile. Therefore, it is probable that PZFX could be extremely useful for patients with liver abscess. Here, we report two cases of liver abscess that resolved with PZFX. PZFX was intravenously administered to patients who had undergone abscess drainage, at a dose level of 500 mg x 2/day. PZFX therapy thereby allowed the patients to shorten the period of hospital stay. Liver abscess has been considered as a poor-prognosis disorder, due to delay in diagnosis of the disorder and the high incidence of septicemia that subsequently occurs. However, now, appropriate antibacterial drug therapy in combination with abscess drainage successfully allows excellent prognosis of patients with liver abscess without the reduction in the activities of daily living (ADL) that accompanies hepatic artery injection.

  10. The genetic source and timing of hydrocarbon formation in gas hydrate reservoirs in Green Canyon, Block GC955

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, M. T.; Darrah, T.; Cook, A.; Sawyer, D.; Phillips, S.; Whyte, C. J.; Lary, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    Although large volumes of gas hydrates are known to exist along continental slopes and below permafrost, their role in the energy sector and the global carbon cycle remains uncertain. Investigations regarding the genetic source(s) (i.e., biogenic, thermogenic, mixed sources of hydrocarbon gases), the location of hydrocarbon generation, (whether hydrocarbons formed within the current reservoir formations or underwent migration), rates of clathrate formation, and the timing of natural gas formation/accumulation within clathrates are vital to evaluate economic potential and enhance our understanding of geologic processes. Previous studies addressed some of these questions through analysis of conventional hydrocarbon molecular (C1/C2+) and stable isotopic (e.g., δ13C-CH4, δ2H-CH4, δ13C-CO2) composition of gases, water chemistry and isotopes (e.g., major and trace elements, δ2H-H2O, δ18O-H2O), and dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C-DIC) of natural gas hydrate systems to determine proportions of biogenic and thermogenic gas. However, the effects from contributions of mixing, transport/migration, methanogenesis, and oxidation in the subsurface can complicate the first-order application of these techniques. Because the original noble gas composition of a fluid is preserved independent of microbial activity, chemical reactions, or changes in oxygen fugacity, the integration of noble gas data can provide both a geochemical fingerprint for sources of fluids and an additional insight as to the uncertainty between effects of mixing versus post-genetic modification. Here, we integrate inert noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, and associated isotopes) with these conventional approaches to better constrain the source of gas hydrate formation and the residence time of fluids (porewaters and natural gases) using radiogenic 4He ingrowth techniques in cores from two boreholes collected as part of the University of Texas led UT-GOM2-01 drilling project. Pressurized cores were extracted from

  11. Methane Hydrate Formation in Thick Sand Reservoirs: Long-range Gas Transport or Short-range Methane Diffusion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K.; Flemings, P. B.

    2016-12-01

    We developed two 2-D numerical models to simulate hydrate formation by long range methane gas transport and short-range methane diffusion. We interpret that methane hydrates in thick sands are most likely formed by long range gas transport where methane gas is transported upward into the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) under buoyancy and locally forms hydrate to its stability limit. In short-range methane diffusion, methane is generated locally by biodegradation of organic matter in mud and diffused into bounding sands where it forms hydrate. We could not simulate enough methane transport by diffusion to account for its observed concentration in thick sands. In our models, we include the capillary effect on dissolved methane solubility and on the hydrate phase boundary, sedimentation and different compaction in sand and mud, fracture generation as well as the fully coupled multiphase flow and multicomponent transport. We apply our models to a 12 meter-thick hydrate-bearing sand layer at Walker Ridge 313, Northern Gulf of Mexico. With the long-range gas transport, hydrate saturation is greater than 90% and salinity is increased from seawater to about 8 wt.% through the entire sand. With short-range diffusion, hydrate saturation is more than 90% at the sand base and is less than 10% in the overlying section; salinity is close to seawater when sand is deposited to 800 meter below seafloor by short-range methane diffusion. With short-range diffusion, the amount of hydrate formed is much less than that interpreted from the well log data. Two transient gas layers separated by a hydrate layer are formed from short-range diffusion caused by capillary effect. This could be interpreted as a double bottom simulating reflector. This study provides further insights into different hydrate formation mechanisms, and could serve as a base to confirm the hydrate formation mechanism in fields.

  12. Theoretical Mechanistic and Kinetic Studies on Homogeneous Gas-Phase Formation of Polychlorinated Naphthalene from 2-Chlorophenol as Forerunner

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Zhang, Ruiming; Li, Yunfeng; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) are dioxins-like compounds and are formed along with polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in thermal and combustion procedures. Chlorophenols (CPs) are the most important forerunners of PCNs. A comprehensive comprehension of PCN formation procedure from CPs is a precondition for reducing the discharge of PCNs. Experiments on the formation of PCNs from CPs have been hindered by PCN toxicity and short of precise detection methods for active intermediate radicals. In this work, PCN formation mechanism in gas-phase condition from 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) as forerunner was studied by quantum chemistry calculations. Numbers of energetically advantaged formation routes were proposed. The rate constants of key elementary steps were calculated over 600–1200 K using canonical variational transition-state theory (CVT) with small curvature tunneling contribution (SCT) method. This study illustrates formation of PCNs with one chlorine atom loss from 2-CP is preferred over that without chlorine atom loss. In comparison with formation of PCDFs from 2-CP, PCN products are less chlorinated and have lower formation potential. PMID:26516839

  13. Theoretical Mechanistic and Kinetic Studies on Homogeneous Gas-Phase Formation of Polychlorinated Naphthalene from 2-Chlorophenol as Forerunner.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Zhang, Ruiming; Li, Yunfeng; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-10-26

    Polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) are dioxins-like compounds and are formed along with polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in thermal and combustion procedures. Chlorophenols (CPs) are the most important forerunners of PCNs. A comprehensive comprehension of PCN formation procedure from CPs is a precondition for reducing the discharge of PCNs. Experiments on the formation of PCNs from CPs have been hindered by PCN toxicity and short of precise detection methods for active intermediate radicals. In this work, PCN formation mechanism in gas-phase condition from 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) as forerunner was studied by quantum chemistry calculations. Numbers of energetically advantaged formation routes were proposed. The rate constants of key elementary steps were calculated over 600-1200 K using canonical variational transition-state theory (CVT) with small curvature tunneling contribution (SCT) method. This study illustrates formation of PCNs with one chlorine atom loss from 2-CP is preferred over that without chlorine atom loss. In comparison with formation of PCDFs from 2-CP, PCN products are less chlorinated and have lower formation potential.

  14. Adsorption of binary gas mixtures in heterogeneous carbon predicted by density functional theory: on the formation of adsorption azeotropes.

    PubMed

    Ritter, James A; Pan, Huanhua; Balbuena, Perla B

    2010-09-07

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) was used to predict the adsorption of nine different binary gas mixtures in a heterogeneous BPL activated carbon with a known pore size distribution (PSD) and in single, homogeneous, slit-shaped carbon pores of different sizes. By comparing the heterogeneous results with those obtained from the ideal adsorbed solution theory and with those obtained in the homogeneous carbon, it was determined that adsorption nonideality and adsorption azeotropes are caused by the coupled effects of differences in the molecular size of the components in a gas mixture and only slight differences in the pore sizes of a heterogeneous adsorbent. For many binary gas mixtures, selectivity was found to be a strong function of pore size. As the width of a homogeneous pore increases slightly, the selectivity for two different sized adsorbates may change from being greater than unity to less than unity. This change in selectivity can be accompanied by the formation of an adsorption azeotrope when this same binary mixture is adsorbed in a heterogeneous adsorbent with a PSD, like in BPL activated carbon. These results also showed that the selectivity exhibited by a heterogeneous adsorbent can be dominated by a small number of pores that are very selective toward one of the components in the gas mixture, leading to adsorption azeotrope formation in extreme cases.

  15. Formation of the First Star Clusters and Massive Star Binaries by Fragmentation of Filamentary Primordial Gas Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Shingo; Yoshida, Naoki; Sakurai, Yuya; Fujii, Michiko S.

    2018-03-01

    We perform a set of cosmological simulations of early structure formation incorporating baryonic streaming motions. We present a case where a significantly elongated gas cloud with ∼104 solar mass (M ⊙) is formed in a pre-galactic (∼107 M ⊙) dark halo. The gas streaming into the halo compresses and heats the massive filamentary cloud to a temperature of ∼10,000 Kelvin. The gas cloud cools rapidly by atomic hydrogen cooling, and then by molecular hydrogen cooling down to ∼400 Kelvin. The rapid decrease of the temperature and hence of the Jeans mass triggers fragmentation of the filament to yield multiple gas clumps with a few hundred solar masses. We estimate the mass of the primordial star formed in each fragment by adopting an analytic model based on a large set of radiation hydrodynamics simulations of protostellar evolution. The resulting stellar masses are in the range of ∼50–120 M ⊙. The massive stars gravitationally attract each other and form a compact star cluster. We follow the dynamics of the star cluster using a hybrid N-body simulation. We show that massive star binaries are formed in a few million years through multi-body interactions at the cluster center. The eventual formation of the remnant black holes will leave a massive black hole binary, which can be a progenitor of strong gravitational wave sources similar to those recently detected by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO).

  16. Hydraulic and Mechanical Effects from Gas Hydrate Conversion and Secondary Gas Hydrate Formation during Injection of CO2 into CH4-Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigalke, N.; Deusner, C.; Kossel, E.; Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Priegnitz, M.; Heeschen, K. U.; Abendroth, S.; Thaler, J.; Haeckel, M.

    2014-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into CH4-hydrate-bearing sediments has the potential to drive natural gas production and simultaneously sequester CO2 by hydrate conversion. The process aims at maintaining the in situ hydrate saturation and structure and causing limited impact on soil hydraulic properties and geomechanical stability. However, to increase hydrate conversion yields and rates it must potentially be assisted by thermal stimulation or depressurization. Further, secondary formation of CO2-rich hydrates from pore water and injected CO2 enhances hydrate conversion and CH4 production yields [1]. Technical stimulation and secondary hydrate formation add significant complexity to the bulk conversion process resulting in spatial and temporal effects on hydraulic and geomechanical properties that cannot be predicted by current reservoir simulation codes. In a combined experimental and numerical approach, it is our objective to elucidate both hydraulic and mechanical effects of CO2 injection and CH4-CO2-hydrate conversion in CH4-hydrate bearing soils. For the experimental approach we used various high-pressure flow-through systems equipped with different online and in situ monitoring tools (e.g. Raman microscopy, MRI and ERT). One particular focus was the design of triaxial cell experimental systems, which enable us to study sample behavior even during large deformations and particle flow. We present results from various flow-through high-pressure experimental studies on different scales, which indicate that hydraulic and geomechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments are drastically altered during and after injection of CO2. We discuss the results in light of the competing processes of hydrate dissociation, hydrate conversion and secondary hydrate formation. Our results will also contribute to the understanding of effects of temperature and pressure changes leading to dissociation of gas hydrates in ocean and permafrost systems. [1] Deusner C, Bigalke N, Kossel E

  17. Shale gas characterization based on geochemical and geophysical analysis: Case study of Brown shale, Pematang formation, Central Sumatra Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, A.; Nastria, N.; Soebandrio, D.; Riyanto, A.

    2017-07-01

    Geochemical and geophysical analyses of shale gas have been carried out in Brown Shale, Middle Pematang Formation, Central Sumatra Basin. The paper is aimed at delineating the sweet spot distribution of potential shale gas reservoir, which is based on Total Organic Carbon (TOC), Maturity level data, and combined with TOC modeling that refers to Passey and Regression Multi Linear method. We used 4 well data, side wall core and 3D pre-stack seismic data. Our analysis of geochemical properties is based on well log and core data and its distribution are constrained by a framework of 3D seismic data, which is transformed into acoustic impedance. Further, the sweet spot of organic-rich shale is delineated by mapping TOC, which is extracted from inverted acoustic impedance. Our experiment analysis shows that organic materials contained in the formation of Middle Pematang Brown Shale members have TOC range from 0.15 to 2.71 wt.%, which is classified in the quality of poor to very good. In addition, the maturity level of organic material is ranging from 373°C to 432°C, which is indicated by vitrinite reflectance (Ro) of 0.58. In term of kerogen type, this Brown shale formation is categorized as kerogen type of II I III, which has the potential to generate a mixture of gasIoil on the environment.

  18. The α-Effect and Competing Mechanisms: The Gas-Phase Reactions of Microsolvated Anions with Methyl Formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Ditte L.; Nichols, Charles M.; Reece, Jennifer N.; Hammerum, Steen; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2014-02-01

    The enhanced reactivity of α-nucleophiles, which contain an electron lone pair adjacent to the reactive site, has been demonstrated in solution and in the gas phase and, recently, for the gas-phase SN2 reactions of the microsolvated HOO-(H2O) ion with methyl chloride. In the present work, we continue to explore the significance of microsolvation on the α-effect as we compare the gas-phase reactivity of the microsolvated α-nucleophile HOO-(H2O) with that of microsolvated normal alkoxy nucleophiles, RO-(H2O), in reactions with methyl formate, where three competing reactions are possible. The results reveal enhanced reactivity of HOO-(H2O) towards methyl formate, and clearly demonstrate the presence of an overall α-effect for the reactions of the microsolvated α-nucleophile. The association of the nucleophiles with a single water molecule significantly lowers the degree of proton abstraction and increases the SN2 and BAC2 reactivity compared with the unsolvated analogs. HOO-(H2O) reacts with methyl formate exclusively via the BAC2 channel. While microsolvation lowers the overall reaction efficiency, it enhances the BAC2 reaction efficiency for all anions compared with the unsolvated analogs. This may be explained by participation of the solvent water molecule in the BAC2 reaction in a way that continuously stabilizes the negative charge throughout the reaction.

  19. Geological and geochemical characterization of the Lower Cretaceous Pearsall Formation, Maverick Basin, south Texas: A future shale gas resource?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    As part of an assessment of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in the northern Gulf of Mexico onshore Mesozoic section, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) evaluated the Lower Cretaceous Pearsall Formation of the Maverick Basin, south Texas, as a potential shale gas resource. Wireline logs were used to determine the stratigraphic distribution of the Pearsall Formation and to select available core and cuttings samples for analytical investigation. Samples used for this study spanned updip to downdip environments in the Maverick Basin, including several from the current shale gas-producing area of the Pearsall Formation.The term shale does not adequately describe any of the Pearsall samples evaluated for this study, which included argillaceous lime wackestones from more proximal marine depositional environments in Maverick County and argillaceous lime mudstones from the distal Lower Cretaceous shelf edge in western Bee County. Most facies in the Pearsall Formation were deposited in oxygenated environments as evidenced by the presence of biota preserved as shell fragments and the near absence of sediment laminae, which is probably caused by bioturbation. Organic material is poorly preserved and primarily consists of type III kerogen (terrestrial) and type IV kerogen (inert solid bitumen), with a minor contribution from type II kerogen (marine) based on petrographic analysis and pyrolysis. Carbonate dominates the mineralogy followed by clays and quartz. The low abundance and broad size distribution of pyrite are consistent with the presence of oxic conditions during sediment deposition. The Pearsall Formation is in the dry gas window of hydrocarbon generation (mean random vitrinite reflectance values, Ro = 1.2–2.2%) and contains moderate levels of total organic carbon (average 0.86 wt. %), which primarily resides in the inert solid bitumen. Solid bitumen is interpreted to result from in-situ thermal cracking of liquid hydrocarbon generated from original type II kerogen

  20. A whiff of nebular gas in Titan's atmosphere - Potential implications for the conditions and timing of Titan's formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glein, Christopher R.

    2017-09-01

    In situ data from the GCMS instrument on the Huygens probe indicate that Titan's atmosphere contains small amounts of the primordial noble gases 36Ar and 22Ne (tentative detection), but it is unknown how they were obtained by the satellite. Based on the apparent similarity in the 22Ne/36Ar (atom) ratio between Titan's atmosphere and the solar composition, a previously neglected hypothesis for the origin of primordial noble gases in Titan's atmosphere is suggested - these species may have been acquired near the end of Titan's formation, when the moon could have gravitationally captured some nebular gas that would have been present in its formation environment (the Saturnian subnebula). These noble gases may be remnants of a primary atmosphere. This could be considered the simplest hypothesis to explain the 22Ne/36Ar ratio observed at Titan. However, the 22Ne/36Ar ratio may not be exactly solar if these species can be fractionated by external photoevaporation in the solar nebula, atmospheric escape from Titan, or sequestration on the surface of Titan. While the GCMS data are consistent with a 22Ne/36Ar ratio of 0.05 to 2.5 times solar (1σ range), simple estimates that attempt to account for some of the effects of these evolutionary processes suggest a sub-solar ratio, which may be depleted by approximately one order of magnitude. Models based on capture of nebular gas can explain why the GCMS did not detect any other primordial noble gas isotopes, as their predicted abundances are below the detection limits (especially for 84Kr and 132Xe). It is also predicted that atmospheric Xe on Titan should be dominated by radiogenic 129Xe if the source of primordial Xe is nebular gas. Of order 10-2-10-1 bar of primordial H2 may have been captured along with the noble gases from a gas-starved disk, but this H2 would have quickly escaped from the initial atmosphere. To have the opportunity to capture nebular gas, Titan should have formed within ∼10 Myr of the formation of the

  1. The Lithological Constraint To Gas Hydrate Formation: Evidence OF Grain Size Of Sediments From IODP 311 On CASCADIA Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.

    2006-12-01

    A total of 614 sediment samples at intervals of about 1.5 m from all 5 sites of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 on Cascadia Margin were analyzed using a Beckman Coulter LS-230 Particle Analyzer. The grain-size data were then plotted in depth and compared with other proxies of gas hydrate- occurrence such as soupy/mousse-like structures in sediments, gas hydrate concentration (Sh) derived from LWD data using Archie's relation, IR core images (infrared image) and the recovered samples of gas hydrate¨Cbearing sediments. A good relationship between the distribution of coarse grains in size of 31-63¦Ìm and 63-125¦Ìm sediments and the potential occurrence of gas hydrate was found across the entire gas hydrate stability zone. The depth distribution of grain size from the Site U1326 shows clear excursions at depths of 5-8, 21-26, 50- 123, 132-140, 167-180, 195-206 and 220-240 mbsf, which coincide with the potential occurrence of gas hydrate suggested by soupy/mousse-like structures, logging-derived gas hydrate concentrations (Sh) and the recovered samples of the gas hydrate¨Cbearing sand layers. The lithology of sediments significantly affects the formation of gas hydrate. Gas hydrate forms preferentially within relatively coarse grain-size sediments above 31 ¦Ìm. Key words: grain size of sediments, constraint, occurrence of gas hydrate, IODP 311 IODP Expedition 311 Scientists: Michael Riedel (Co-chief Scientist), Timothy S. Collett (Co-chief Scientist), Mitchell Malone (Expedition Project Manager/Staff Scientist), Gilles Gu¨¨rin, Fumio Akiba, Marie-Madeleine Blanc-Valleron, Michelle Ellis, Yoshitaka Hashimoto, Verena Heuer, Yosuke Higashi, Melanie Holland, Peter D. Jackson, Masanori Kaneko, Miriam Kastner, Ji-Hoon Kim, Hiroko Kitajima, Philip E. Long, Alberto Malinverno, Greg Myers, Leena D. Palekar, John Pohlman, Peter Schultheiss, Barbara Teichert, Marta E. Torres, Anne M. Tr¨¦hu, Jiasheng Wang, Ulrich G. Wortmann, Hideyoshi

  2. POEMS Syndrome Presentation with an Abscess within the Plasmacytoma—A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rishi; Abidi, Muneer H.; Grandhi, Bala

    2011-01-01

    POEMS Syndrome is a rare cause of demyelinating and axonal mixed neuropathy. Plasmacytomas are usually seen in POEMS syndrome and can be osseous or extramedullary. Plasmacytomas presenting as an abscess has not been noted earlier. Our patient presented with localized hyperpigmented patch on the back and later developed progressive weakness in upper and lower limbs. Initially serum and urine protein electrophoresis were normal. The patient was thought to have Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy and was treated accordingly without any improvement. Repeat serum protein electrophoresis showed monoclonal gammopathy. MRI of the back revealed an abscess in the paravertebral soft tissues reaching up to the skin. Needle biopsy was consistent with plasmacytoma. Later, he developed a purulent fungating lesion in the lower midback. Antibiotics were started and local resection was done followed by radiation. Pathology of the resected mass showed plasmacytoma extensively involving subcutaneous soft tissue and bone. The patient improved with the treatment. Cystic plasmacytomas and abscess within the plasmacytoma has not been reported earlier. Whether abscess formation is part of the disease spectrum due to infiltration of overlying tissue or is secondary to localized immunosuppression is unknown. Local treatment of a single plasmacytoma is useful in ameliorating systemic symptoms. PMID:22084694

  3. Investigation of the chemical pathway of gaseous nitrogen dioxide formation during flue gas desulfurization with dry sodium bicarbonate injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Antoinette Weil

    The chemical reaction pathway for the viable flue gas desulfurization process, dry sodium bicarbonate injection, was investigated to mitigate undesirable plume discoloration. Based on a foundation of past findings, a simplified three-step reaction pathway was hypothesized for the formation of the plume-discoloring constituent, NO2. As the first step, it was hypothesized that sodium sulfite formed by sodium bicarbonate reaction with flue gas SO 2. As the second step, it was hypothesized that sodium nitrate formed by sodium sulfite reaction with flue gas NO. And as the third step, it was hypothesized that NO2 and sodium sulfate formed by sodium nitrate reaction with SO2. The second and third hypothesized steps were experimentally investigated using an isothermal fixed bed reactor. As reported in the past, technical grade sodium sulfite was found to be un-reactive with NO and O2. Freshly prepared sodium sulfite, maintained unexposed to moist air, was shown to react with NO and O2 resulting in a mixture of sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate together with a significant temperature rise. This reaction was found to proceed only when oxygen was present in the flue gas. As reported in the past, technical grade sodium nitrate was shown to be un-reactive with SO2. But freshly formed sodium nitrate kept unexposed to humidity was found to be reactive with SO2 and O 2 resulting in the formation of NO2 and sodium sulfate polymorphic Form I. The NO2 formation by this reaction was shown to be temperature dependent with maximum formation at 175°C. Plume mitigation methods were studied based on the validated three-step reaction pathway. Mitigation of NO2 was exhibited by limiting oxygen concentration in the flue gas to a level below 5%. It was also shown that significant NO2 mitigation was achieved by operating below 110°C or above 250°C. An innovative NO2 mitigation method was patented as a result of the findings of this study. The patented process incorporated a process step of

  4. Assessment of Undiscovered Technically Recoverable Oil and Gas Resources of the Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, Montana and North Dakota, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollastro, R.M.; Roberts, L.N.R.; Cook, T.A.; Lewan, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has completed an assessment of the undiscovered oil and associated gas resources of the Upper Devonian to Lower Mississippian Bakken Formation in the U.S. portion of the Williston Basin of Montana and North Dakota and within the Williston Basin Province. The assessment is based on geologic elements of a total petroleum system (TPS), which include (1) source-rock distribution, thickness, organic richness, maturation, petroleum generation, and migration; (2) reservoir-rock type (conventional or continuous), distribution, and quality; and (3) character of traps and time of formation with respect to petroleum generation and migration. Framework studies in stratigraphy and structural geology and modeling of petroleum geochemistry, combined with historical exploration and production analyses, were used to estimate the undiscovered, technically recoverable oil resource of the Bakken Formation. Using this framework, the USGS defined a Bakken-Lodgepole TPS and seven assessment units (AU) within the system. For the Bakken Formation, the undiscovered oil and associated gas resources were quantitatively estimated for six of these AUs.

  5. Engineering hydrogen gas production from formate in a hyperthermophile by heterologous production of an 18-subunit membrane-bound complex.

    PubMed

    Lipscomb, Gina L; Schut, Gerrit J; Thorgersen, Michael P; Nixon, William J; Kelly, Robert M; Adams, Michael W W

    2014-01-31

    Biohydrogen gas has enormous potential as a source of reductant for the microbial production of biofuels, but its low solubility and poor gas mass transfer rates are limiting factors. These limitations could be circumvented by engineering biofuel production in microorganisms that are also capable of generating H2 from highly soluble chemicals such as formate, which can function as an electron donor. Herein, the model hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally near 100 °C by fermenting sugars to produce H2, has been engineered to also efficiently convert formate to H2. Using a bacterial artificial chromosome vector, the 16.9-kb 18-gene cluster encoding the membrane-bound, respiratory formate hydrogen lyase complex of Thermococcus onnurineus was inserted into the P. furiosus chromosome and expressed as a functional unit. This enabled P. furiosus to utilize formate as well as sugars as an H2 source and to do so at both 80° and 95 °C, near the optimum growth temperature of the donor (T. onnurineus) and engineered host (P. furiosus), respectively. This accomplishment also demonstrates the versatility of P. furiosus for metabolic engineering applications.

  6. Engineering Hydrogen Gas Production from Formate in a Hyperthermophile by Heterologous Production of an 18-Subunit Membrane-bound Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Lipscomb, Gina L.; Schut, Gerrit J.; Thorgersen, Michael P.; Nixon, William J.; Kelly, Robert M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Biohydrogen gas has enormous potential as a source of reductant for the microbial production of biofuels, but its low solubility and poor gas mass transfer rates are limiting factors. These limitations could be circumvented by engineering biofuel production in microorganisms that are also capable of generating H2 from highly soluble chemicals such as formate, which can function as an electron donor. Herein, the model hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally near 100 °C by fermenting sugars to produce H2, has been engineered to also efficiently convert formate to H2. Using a bacterial artificial chromosome vector, the 16.9-kb 18-gene cluster encoding the membrane-bound, respiratory formate hydrogen lyase complex of Thermococcus onnurineus was inserted into the P. furiosus chromosome and expressed as a functional unit. This enabled P. furiosus to utilize formate as well as sugars as an H2 source and to do so at both 80° and 95 °C, near the optimum growth temperature of the donor (T. onnurineus) and engineered host (P. furiosus), respectively. This accomplishment also demonstrates the versatility of P. furiosus for metabolic engineering applications. PMID:24318960

  7. Stability and reactivity of liposome-encapsulated formate dehydrogenase and cofactor system in carbon dioxide gas-liquid flow.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Makoto; Yamashita, Takayuki; Yamashiro, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    Formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii (CbFDH) is potentially applicable in reduction of CO(2) through oxidation of cofactor NADH into NAD(+). For this, the CbFDH activity needs to be maintained under practical reaction conditions, such as CO(2) gas-liquid flow. In this work, CbFDH and cofactor were encapsulated in liposomes and the liposomal enzymes were characterized in an external loop airlift bubble column. The airlift was operated at 45 degrees C with N(2) or CO(2) as gas phase at the superficial gas velocity U(G) of 2.0 or 3.0 cm/s. The activities of liposomal CbFDH/cofactor systems were highly stable in the airlift regardless of the type of gas phase because liposome membranes prevented interactions of the encapsulated enzyme and cofactor molecules with the gas-liquid interface of bubbles. On the other hand, free CbFDH was deactivated in the airlift especially at high U(G) with CO(2) bubbles. The liposomal CbFDH/NADH could catalyze reduction of CO(2) in the airlift giving the fractional oxidation of the liposomal NADH of 23% at the reaction time of 360 min. The cofactor was kept inside liposomes during the reaction operation with less than 10% of leakage. All of the results obtained demonstrate that the liposomal CbFDH/NADH functions as a stable catalyst for reduction of CO(2) in the airlift. (c) 2010 American Institute of Chemical Engineers

  8. The photochemical formation and gas-particle partitioning of oxidation products of decamethyl cyclopentasiloxane and decamethyl tetrasiloxane in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandramouli, Bharadwaj; Kamens, Richard M.

    Decamethyl cyclopentasiloxane (D 5) and decamethyl tetrasiloxane (MD 2M) were injected into a smog chamber containing fine Arizona road dust particles (95% surface area <2.6 μM) and an urban smog atmosphere in the daytime. A photochemical reaction - gas-particle partitioning reaction scheme, was implemented to simulate the formation and gas-particle partitioning of hydroxyl oxidation products of D 5 and MD 2M. This scheme incorporated the reactions of D 5 and MD 2M into an existing urban smog chemical mechanism carbon bond IV and partitioned the products between gas and particle phase by treating gas-particle partitioning as a kinetic process and specifying an uptake and off-gassing rate. A photochemical model PKSS was used to simulate this set of reactions. A Langmuirian partitioning model was used to convert the measured and estimated mass-based partitioning coefficients ( KP) to a molar or volume-based form. The model simulations indicated that >99% of all product silanol formed in the gas-phase partition immediately to particle phase and the experimental data agreed with model predictions. One product, D 4TOH was observed and confirmed for the D 5 reaction and this system was modeled successfully. Experimental data was inadequate for MD 2M reaction products and it is likely that more than one product formed. The model set up a framework into which more reaction and partitioning steps can be easily added.

  9. Molecular gas heating mechanisms, and star formation feedback in merger/starbursts: NGC 6240 and Arp 193 as case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, Padelis P.; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Xilouris, E. M.

    2014-06-20

    We used the SPIRE/FTS instrument aboard the Herschel Space Observatory to obtain the Spectral Line Energy Distributions (SLEDs) of CO from J = 4-3 to J = 13-12 of Arp 193 and NGC 6240, two classical merger/starbursts selected from our molecular line survey of local Luminous Infrared Galaxies (L {sub IR} ≥ 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉}). The high-J CO SLEDs are then combined with ground-based low-J CO, {sup 13}CO, HCN, HCO{sup +}, CS line data and used to probe the thermal and dynamical states of their large molecular gas reservoirs. We find the two CO SLEDs strongly diverging frommore » J = 4-3 onward, with NGC 6240 having a much higher CO line excitation than Arp 193, despite their similar low-J CO SLEDs and L {sub FIR}/L {sub CO,} {sub 1} {sub –0}, L {sub HCN}/L {sub CO} (J = 1-0) ratios (proxies of star formation efficiency and dense gas mass fraction). In Arp 193, one of the three most extreme starbursts in the local universe, the molecular SLEDs indicate a small amount (∼5%-15%) of dense gas (n ≥ 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}) unlike NGC 6240 where most of the molecular gas (∼60%-70%) is dense (n ∼ (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5}) cm{sup –3}). Strong star-formation feedback can drive this disparity in their dense gas mass fractions, and also induce extreme thermal and dynamical states for the molecular gas. In NGC 6240, and to a lesser degree in Arp 193, we find large molecular gas masses whose thermal states cannot be maintained by FUV photons from Photon-Dominated Regions. We argue that this may happen often in metal-rich merger/starbursts, strongly altering the initial conditions of star formation. ALMA can now directly probe these conditions across cosmic epoch, and even probe their deeply dust-enshrouded outcome, the stellar initial mass function averaged over galactic evolution.« less

  10. BUDHIES II: a phase-space view of H I gas stripping and star formation quenching in cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffé, Yara L.; Smith, Rory; Candlish, Graeme N.; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Verheijen, Marc A. W.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the effect of ram-pressure from the intracluster medium on the stripping of H I gas in galaxies in a massive, relaxed, X-ray bright, galaxy cluster at z = 0.2 from the Blind Ultra Deep H I Environmental Survey (BUDHIES). We use cosmological simulations, and velocity versus position phase-space diagrams to infer the orbital histories of the cluster galaxies. In particular, we embed a simple analytical description of ram-pressure stripping in the simulations to identify the regions in phase-space where galaxies are more likely to have been sufficiently stripped of their H I gas to fall below the detection limit of our survey. We find a striking agreement between the model predictions and the observed location of H I-detected and non-detected blue (late-type) galaxies in phase-space, strongly implying that ram-pressure plays a key role in the gas removal from galaxies, and that this can happen during their first infall into the cluster. However, we also find a significant number of gas-poor, red (early-type) galaxies in the infall region of the cluster that cannot easily be explained with our model of ram-pressure stripping alone. We discuss different possible additional mechanisms that could be at play, including the pre-processing of galaxies in their previous environment. Our results are strengthened by the distribution of galaxy colours (optical and UV) in phase-space, that suggests that after a (gas-rich) field galaxy falls into the cluster, it will lose its gas via ram-pressure stripping, and as it settles into the cluster, its star formation will decay until it is completely quenched. Finally, this work demonstrates the utility of phase-space diagrams to analyse the physical processes driving the evolution of cluster galaxies, in particular H I gas stripping.

  11. Current trends in the diagnosis and treatment of tuboovarian abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Landers, D.V.; Sweet, R.L.

    Tuboovarian abscess is a well-recognized complication of acute salpingitis and has been reported in as many as one third of hospital admissions for acute salpingitis. The incidence of tuboovarian abscess is expected to increase as a result of the current epidemic of sexually transmitted diseases and their sequelae. Patients with tuboovarian abscess most commonly present with lower abdominal pain and an adnexal mass(es). Fever and leukocytosis may be absent. Ultrasound, computed tomographic scans, laparoscopy, or laparotomy may be necessary to confirm the diagnosis. Tuboovarian abscess may be unilateral or bilateral regardless of intrauterine contraceptive device usage. Tuboovarian abscess is polymicrobialmore » with a preponderance of anaerobic organisms. An initial conservative antimicrobial approach to the management of the unruptured tuboovarian abscess is appropriate if the antimicrobial agents used can penetrate abscesses, remain active within the abscess environment, and are active against the major pathogens in tuboovarian abscess, including the resistant gram-negative anaerobes such as Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides bivius. However, if the patient does not begin to show a response within a reasonable amount of time, about 48 to 72 hours, surgical intervention should be undertaken. Suspicion of rupture should remain an indication for immediate operation. Once operation is undertaken, a conservative approach with unilateral adnexectomy for one-side tuboovarian abscess is appropriate if future fertility or hormone production is desired.« less

  12. Toward a Deterministic Model of Planetary Formation. II. The Formation and Retention of Gas Giant Planets around Stars with a Range of Metallicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, Shigeru; Lin, D. N. C.

    2004-11-01

    The apparent dependence of detection frequency of extrasolar planets on the metallicity of their host stars is investigated with Monte Carlo simulations using a deterministic core-accretion planet formation model. According to this model, gas giants formed and acquired their mass Mp through planetesimal coagulation followed by the emergence of cores onto which gas is accreted. These protoplanets migrate and attain their asymptotic semimajor axis a through tidal interaction with their nascent disk. Based on the observed properties of protostellar disks, we generate an Mp-a distribution. Our results reproduce the observed lack of planets with intermediate mass Mp=10-100 M⊕ and a<~3 AU and with large mass Mp>~103 M⊕ and a<~0.2 AU. Based on the simulated Mp-a distributions, we also evaluate the metallicity dependence of the fraction of stars harboring planets that are detectable with current radial velocity surveys. If protostellar disks attain the same fraction of heavy elements as contained in their host stars, the detection probability around metal-rich stars would be greatly enhanced because protoplanetary cores formed in them can grow to several Earth masses prior to their depletion. These large masses are required for the cores to initiate rapid gas accretion and to transform into giant planets. The theoretically extrapolated metallicity dependence is consistent with the observations. This correlation does not arise naturally in the gravitational-instability scenario. We also suggest other metallicity dependences of the planet distributions that can be tested by ongoing observations.

  13. Importance of inorganic geochemical characteristics on assessment of shale gas potential in the Devonian Horn River Formation of western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung Kyung; Shinn, Young Jae; Choi, Jiyoung; Lee, Hyun Suk

    2017-04-01

    The gas generation and storage potentials of shale has mostly been assessed by original TOC (TOCo) and original kerogen type. However, in the Horn River Formation, organic geochemical tools and analysis are barely sufficient for assessing the TOCo and original kerogen type because residual carbon contents represent up to 90% of TOC in shales. Major and trace elements are used as proxies for the bottom water oxygen level, for terrestrial sediment input and for productivity, which is related with variation of kerogen type. By using the inorganic geochemical proxies, we attempt to assess original kerogen type in shale gas formation and suggest its implication for HIo (original Hydrogen Index) estimation. The estimated HIo in this study allows us to calculate a reliable TOCo. These results provide new insights into the accurate estimation of the hydrocarbon potential of shale gas resources. The inorganic geochemical proxies indicate vertical variations of productivity (EX-SiO2 and Baauth), terrestrial sediment input (Al2O3, Zr, Hf, and Nb) and oxygen content in bottom water during deposition (Moauth, Uauth and Th/U), which represent the temporal changes in the mixing ratio between Type II and III kerogens. The Horn River Formation has different HIo values calculated from EX-SiO2 (biogenic origin) and it is ranked by HIo value in descending order: Evie and Muskwa members (500-700 mgHC/gTOC) > middle Otterpark Member (400-500 mgHC/gTOC) > upper Otterpark Member (300-400 mgHC/gTOC) > lower Otterpark Member (200 mgHC/gTOC). Based on the original kerogen type and TOCo, the gas generation and storage potentials of the Evie, middle Otterpark and Muskwa members are higher than those of other members. The source rock potential is excellent for the Evie Member with a remarkable difference between TOCo and measured TOC.

  14. Defect formation in fluoropolymer films at their condensation from a gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchnikov, P. A.

    2018-01-01

    The questions of radiation defects, factors of influence of electronic high-frequency discharge plasma components on the molecular structure and properties of the fluoropolymer vacuum films synthesized on a substrate from a gas phase are considered. It is established that at sedimentation of fluoropolymer coverings from a gas phase in high-frequency discharge plasma in films there are radiation defects in molecular and supramolecular structure because of the influence of active plasma components which significantly influence their main properties.

  15. Phenotypes, serotypes and antibiotic susceptibility of Swedish Porphyromonas gingivalis isolates from periodontitis and periodontal abscesses.

    PubMed

    Dahlén, G; Gmür, R; Yoshino, T

    2007-04-01

    This study was conducted to reveal phenotypic, serological subtypes and antibiotic susceptibility among fresh isolates of Porphyromonas gingivalis in a Swedish population with periodontitis and periodontal abscess. Fifty-five subgingival strains were isolated and tentatively designated as P. gingivalis from 55 consecutive paper-point samples taken from 51 patients with periodontitis (at least one site with >6-mm pocket depth) in Sweden and were sent in for microbiological evaluation. Eight P. gingivalis strains from periodontal abscesses were also included. Four P. gingivalis strains served as reference and another four type strains were included. The strains were characterized by colony morphology, biochemical tests, enzyme profile, gas-liquid chromatography and antibiotic susceptibility. The strains were further characterized for whole cell protein profiles using sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and were identified to serotype by specific monoclonal antibodies. Among the 55 P. gingivalis strains 35 had smooth (S), 13 rough (R) and seven semi-rough colony morphologies. All strains were phenotypically homogeneous in biochemical tests, enzyme profile and antibiotic susceptibility. All strains produced phenylacetic acid and alpha-fucosidase. Almost all (96%) of the subgingival strains, but relatively fewer (62%) of the abscess strains, belonged to serotype A. Two subgingival and three abscess strains were classified as serotype B. No specific SDS-PAGE protein profiles were recorded for the two serotypes. The P. gingivalis strains from Swedish periodontitis cases showed homogeneity in terms of biochemical phenotypes and antibiotic susceptibility patterns. The strains fell into two serotypes, of which serotype A predominated in the periodontitis cases and serotype B was overrepresented in periodontal abscesses.

  16. Dynamics of Albumin Synthetic Response to Intra-Abdominal Abscess in Patients with Gastrointestinal Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bo; Han, Gang; Chen, Yu; A, Jiye; Gu, Guosheng; Chen, Jun; Wang, Gefei; Li, Jieshou

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Low serum albumin concentration is a predictor of failure of source control for intra-abdominal infection. However, data on dynamics of albumin synthesis in these patients and to what extent these changes contribute to hypoalbuminemia are relatively scarce. We investigated in a group of patients with gastrointestinal fistula the dynamic response of liver albumin synthesis to intra-abdominal abscess and how these related to hypoalbuminemia and circulating endocrine hormone profiles. Methods: Eight gastrointestinal fistula patients scheduled to undergo percutaneous abscess sump drainage were enrolled prospectively to measure albumin synthesis rates at different stages of the inflammatory response (immediately after diagnosis and 7 d following sump drainage when clinical signs of intra-abdominal sepsis had been eradicated). Eight age-, sex-, and body mass index–matched intestinal fistula patients were studied as control patients. Consecutive arterial blood samples were drawn during a primed-constant infusion (priming dose: 4 micromol·kg−1, infusion rate: 6 micromol·kg−1·min−1) to determine the incorporation rate of L-[ring-2H5]-phenylalanine directly into plasma albumin using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. Results: Patients suffering from intra-abdominal infection had reduced plasma albumin and total plasma protein concentrations, compared with control patients. Albumin fractional synthesis rates in patients with intra-abdominal abscess were decreased, compared with those in the control group. When the source of infection was removed, albumin synthesis rates returned to control values, whereas albumin concentrations did not differ significantly from the corresponding concentrations in control subjects and patients with intra-abdominal abscess. Conclusion: Despite nutritional intervention, albumin synthesis rate is decreased in intestinal fistula patients with intra-abdominal abscess; albumin synthesis returns to

  17. Dynamics of albumin synthetic response to intra-abdominal abscess in patients with gastrointestinal fistula.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Ren, Jianan; Han, Gang; Chen, Yu; A, Jiye; Gu, Guosheng; Chen, Jun; Wang, Gefei; Li, Jieshou

    2014-04-01

    Low serum albumin concentration is a predictor of failure of source control for intra-abdominal infection. However, data on dynamics of albumin synthesis in these patients and to what extent these changes contribute to hypoalbuminemia are relatively scarce. We investigated in a group of patients with gastrointestinal fistula the dynamic response of liver albumin synthesis to intra-abdominal abscess and how these related to hypoalbuminemia and circulating endocrine hormone profiles. Eight gastrointestinal fistula patients scheduled to undergo percutaneous abscess sump drainage were enrolled prospectively to measure albumin synthesis rates at different stages of the inflammatory response (immediately after diagnosis and 7 d following sump drainage when clinical signs of intra-abdominal sepsis had been eradicated). Eight age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched intestinal fistula patients were studied as control patients. Consecutive arterial blood samples were drawn during a primed-constant infusion (priming dose: 4 micromol·kg(-1), infusion rate: 6 micromol·kg(-1)·min(-1)) to determine the incorporation rate of L-[ring-(2)H5]-phenylalanine directly into plasma albumin using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. Patients suffering from intra-abdominal infection had reduced plasma albumin and total plasma protein concentrations, compared with control patients. Albumin fractional synthesis rates in patients with intra-abdominal abscess were decreased, compared with those in the control group. When the source of infection was removed, albumin synthesis rates returned to control values, whereas albumin concentrations did not differ significantly from the corresponding concentrations in control subjects and patients with intra-abdominal abscess. Despite nutritional intervention, albumin synthesis rate is decreased in intestinal fistula patients with intra-abdominal abscess; albumin synthesis returns to control values during convalescence.

  18. Spinal epidural abscess due to Aspergillus infection of the vertebrae: report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Dubbeld, P; van Oostenbrugge, R J; Twinjstra, A; Schouten, H C

    1996-01-01

    Aspergillus infection of the vertebral bodies and intervertebral disc spaces with consequent formation of a spinal epidural abscess was diagnosed in 3 patients with acute leukaemia. Medical therapy consisted of high-dose amphotericin-B with good local control of disease in one patient. The second patient underwent surgical drainage. The third patient had stabilisation of the disease. The clinical features, diagnosis and treatment are discussed.

  19. Sonographic diagnosis of abscess following breast-conserving surgery with insertion of nonabsorbable mesh.

    PubMed

    Song, Sung Eun; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Son, Gil-Soo; Kim, Young-Sik

    2014-09-01

    Immediate mesh insertion has been recently used for breast reconstruction after breast-conserving surgery. We report a case of abscess formation following immediate nonabsorbable mesh insertion with breast-conserving surgery. In this article, we demonstrate multimodal breast imaging features and pathologic correlations of the case. In addition, we illustrate characteristic sonographic findings of nonabsorbable mesh fibers to differentiate them from a gossypiboma caused by a retained surgical sponge or tumor recurrence. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Comparison of primary and secondary particle formation from natural gas engine exhaust and of their volatility characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanen, Jenni; Simonen, Pauli; Saarikoski, Sanna; Timonen, Hilkka; Kangasniemi, Oskari; Saukko, Erkka; Hillamo, Risto; Lehtoranta, Kati; Murtonen, Timo; Vesala, Hannu; Keskinen, Jorma; Rönkkö, Topi

    2017-07-01

    Natural gas usage in the traffic and energy production sectors is a growing trend worldwide; thus, an assessment of its effects on air quality, human health and climate is required. Engine exhaust is a source of primary particulate emissions and secondary aerosol precursors, which both contribute to air quality and can cause adverse health effects. Technologies, such as cleaner engines or fuels, that produce less primary and secondary aerosols could potentially significantly decrease atmospheric particle concentrations and their adverse effects. In this study, we used a potential aerosol mass (PAM) chamber to investigate the secondary aerosol formation potential of natural gas engine exhaust. The PAM chamber was used with a constant UV-light voltage, which resulted in relatively long equivalent atmospheric ages of 11 days at most. The studied retro-fitted natural gas engine exhaust was observed to form secondary aerosol. The mass of the total aged particles, i.e., particle mass measured downstream of the PAM chamber, was 6-268 times as high as the mass of the emitted primary exhaust particles. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation potential was measured to be 9-20 mg kgfuel-1. The total aged particles mainly consisted of organic matter, nitrate, sulfate and ammonium, with the fractions depending on exhaust after-treatment and the engine parameters used. Also, the volatility, composition and concentration of the total aged particles were found to depend on the engine operating mode, catalyst temperature and catalyst type. For example, a high catalyst temperature promoted the formation of sulfate particles, whereas a low catalyst temperature promoted nitrate formation. However, in particular, the concentration of nitrate needed a long time to stabilize - more than half an hour - which complicated the conclusions but also indicates the sensitivity of nitrate measurements on experimental parameters such as emission source and system temperatures. Sulfate was