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Sample records for abscission zone cortex

  1. Overexpression of INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION activates cell separation in vestigial abscission zones in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Stenvik, Grethe-Elisabeth; Butenko, Melinka A; Urbanowicz, Breeanna Rae; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Aalen, Reidunn B

    2006-06-01

    Plants may shed organs when they have been injured or served their purpose. The differential pattern of organ abscission in different species is most likely the result of evolutionary adaptation to a variety of life styles and environments. The final step of abscission-related cell separation in floral organs of wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana, which only abscises sepals, petals, and stamens, is controlled by INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION (IDA). Here, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis 35S:IDA lines constitutively overexpressing IDA exhibit earlier abscission of floral organs, showing that the abscission zones are responsive to IDA soon after the opening of the flowers. In addition, ectopic abscission was observed at the bases of the pedicel, branches of the inflorescence, and cauline leaves. The silique valves also dehisced prematurely. Scanning electron microscopy indicated a spread of middle lamella degradation from preformed abscission zone cells to neighboring cells. A transcript encoding an arabinogalactan protein (AGP) was upregulated in the 35S:IDA lines, and large amounts of AGP were secreted at the sites of abscission. AGP was shown to be a constituent of wild-type floral abscission zones during and soon after cell separation had been completed. We suggest that the restricted expression pattern of IDA precludes abscission of nonfloral organs in Arabidopsis.

  2. Cell Wall Remodeling in Abscission Zone Cells during Ethylene-Promoted Fruit Abscission in Citrus.

    PubMed

    Merelo, Paz; Agustí, Javier; Arbona, Vicent; Costa, Mário L; Estornell, Leandro H; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Coimbra, Silvia; Gómez, María D; Pérez-Amador, Miguel A; Domingo, Concha; Talón, Manuel; Tadeo, Francisco R

    2017-01-01

    Abscission is a cell separation process by which plants can shed organs such as fruits, leaves, or flowers. The process takes place in specific locations termed abscission zones. In fruit crops like citrus, fruit abscission represents a high percentage of annual yield losses. Thus, understanding the molecular regulation of abscission is of capital relevance to control production. To identify genes preferentially expressed within the citrus fruit abscission zone (AZ-C), we performed a comparative transcriptomics assay at the cell type resolution level between the AZ-C and adjacent fruit rind cells (non-abscising tissue) during ethylene-promoted abscission. Our strategy combined laser microdissection with microarray analysis. Cell wall modification-related gene families displayed prominent representation in the AZ-C. Phylogenetic analyses of such gene families revealed a link between phylogenetic proximity and expression pattern during abscission suggesting highly conserved roles for specific members of these families in abscission. Our transcriptomic data was validated with (and strongly supported by) a parallel approach consisting on anatomical, histochemical and biochemical analyses on the AZ-C during fruit abscission. Our work identifies genes potentially involved in organ abscission and provides relevant data for future biotechnology approaches aimed at controlling such crucial process for citrus yield.

  3. Cell Wall Remodeling in Abscission Zone Cells during Ethylene-Promoted Fruit Abscission in Citrus

    PubMed Central

    Merelo, Paz; Agustí, Javier; Arbona, Vicent; Costa, Mário L.; Estornell, Leandro H.; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Coimbra, Silvia; Gómez, María D.; Pérez-Amador, Miguel A.; Domingo, Concha; Talón, Manuel; Tadeo, Francisco R.

    2017-01-01

    Abscission is a cell separation process by which plants can shed organs such as fruits, leaves, or flowers. The process takes place in specific locations termed abscission zones. In fruit crops like citrus, fruit abscission represents a high percentage of annual yield losses. Thus, understanding the molecular regulation of abscission is of capital relevance to control production. To identify genes preferentially expressed within the citrus fruit abscission zone (AZ-C), we performed a comparative transcriptomics assay at the cell type resolution level between the AZ-C and adjacent fruit rind cells (non-abscising tissue) during ethylene-promoted abscission. Our strategy combined laser microdissection with microarray analysis. Cell wall modification-related gene families displayed prominent representation in the AZ-C. Phylogenetic analyses of such gene families revealed a link between phylogenetic proximity and expression pattern during abscission suggesting highly conserved roles for specific members of these families in abscission. Our transcriptomic data was validated with (and strongly supported by) a parallel approach consisting on anatomical, histochemical and biochemical analyses on the AZ-C during fruit abscission. Our work identifies genes potentially involved in organ abscission and provides relevant data for future biotechnology approaches aimed at controlling such crucial process for citrus yield. PMID:28228766

  4. A new aspect of flower abscission: involvement of a specific alkalization of the cytosol in the abscission zone cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The correlation between organ abscission and pH changes in the abscission zone (AZ) cells, visualized by the pH-sensitive and intracellularly trapped dye, 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein-acetoxymethyl (BCECF-AM) ester derivative, combined with confocal microscopy was studied. ...

  5. Microarray analysis of the abscission-related transcriptome in tomato flower abscission zone in response to auxin depletion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abscission, the separation of organs from the parent plant, results in postharvest quality loss in many fresh produce. The process is initiated by changes in the auxin gradient across the abscission zone (AZ), is triggered by ethylene and may be accelerated by postharvest stresses. Although changes ...

  6. Analysis of Gene Promoters for Two Tomato Polygalacturonases Expressed in Abscission Zones and the Stigma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seung-Beom; Sexton, Roy; Tucker, Mark L.

    2000-01-01

    The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv Ailsa Craig) polygalacturonase genes TAPG1 (LYCes;Pga1;2) and TAPG4 (LYCes;Pga1;5) are abundantly expressed in both abscission zones and the pistils of mature flowers. To further investigate the spatial and temporal expression patterns for these genes, the TAPG gene promoters were ligated to β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter genes and transformed into tomato. GUS expression with both constructs was similar and entirely consistent with the expression patterns of the native gene transcripts. GUS activity was observed in the weakening abscission zones of the leaf petiole, flower and fruit pedicel, flower corolla, and fruit calyx. In leaf petiole and flower pedicel zones this activity was enhanced by ethylene and inhibited by indole-3-acetic acid. On induction of abscission with ethylene, GUS accumulation was much earlier in TAPG4:GUS than in TAPG1:GUS transformants. Moreover, TAPG4:GUS staining appeared to predominate in the vascular bundles relative to surrounding cortex cells whereas TAPG1:GUS was more evenly distributed across the separation layer. Like the native genes, GUS was also expressed in the stigma. Activity was not apparent in pistils until the flowers had opened and was confined to the stigma and style immediately proximal to it. A minimal promoter construct consisting of a 247-bp 5′-upstream element from TAPG1 was found to be sufficient to direct GUS expression in both abscission zones and the stigma. PMID:10889236

  7. Abscission of flowers and floral organs is closely associated with alkalization of the cytosol in abscission zone cells

    PubMed Central

    Sundaresan, Srivignesh; Philosoph-Hadas, Sonia; Riov, Joseph; Belausov, Eduard; Kochanek, Betina; Tucker, Mark L.; Meir, Shimon

    2015-01-01

    In vivo changes in the cytosolic pH of abscission zone (AZ) cells were visualized using confocal microscopic detection of the fluorescent pH-sensitive and intracellularly trapped dye, 2’,7’-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF), driven by its acetoxymethyl ester. A specific and gradual increase in the cytosolic pH of AZ cells was observed during natural abscission of flower organs in Arabidopsis thaliana and wild rocket (Diplotaxis tenuifolia), and during flower pedicel abscission induced by flower removal in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill). The alkalization pattern in the first two species paralleled the acceleration or inhibition of flower organ abscission induced by ethylene or its inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), respectively. Similarly, 1-MCP pre-treatment of tomato inflorescence explants abolished the pH increase in AZ cells and pedicel abscission induced by flower removal. Examination of the pH changes in the AZ cells of Arabidopsis mutants defective in both ethylene-induced (ctr1, ein2, eto4) and ethylene-independent (ida, nev7, dab5) abscission pathways confirmed these results. The data indicate that the pH changes in the AZ cells are part of both the ethylene-sensitive and -insensitive abscission pathways, and occur concomitantly with the execution of organ abscission. pH can affect enzymatic activities and/or act as a signal for gene expression. Changes in pH during abscission could occur via regulation of transporters in AZ cells, which might affect cytosolic pH. Indeed, four genes associated with pH regulation, vacuolar H+-ATPase, putative high-affinity nitrate transporter, and two GTP-binding proteins, were specifically up-regulated in tomato flower AZ following abscission induction, and 1-MCP reduced or abolished the increased expression. PMID:25504336

  8. Abscission of flowers and floral organs is closely associated with alkalization of the cytosol in abscission zone cells.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Srivignesh; Philosoph-Hadas, Sonia; Riov, Joseph; Belausov, Eduard; Kochanek, Betina; Tucker, Mark L; Meir, Shimon

    2015-03-01

    In vivo changes in the cytosolic pH of abscission zone (AZ) cells were visualized using confocal microscopic detection of the fluorescent pH-sensitive and intracellularly trapped dye, 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF), driven by its acetoxymethyl ester. A specific and gradual increase in the cytosolic pH of AZ cells was observed during natural abscission of flower organs in Arabidopsis thaliana and wild rocket (Diplotaxis tenuifolia), and during flower pedicel abscission induced by flower removal in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill). The alkalization pattern in the first two species paralleled the acceleration or inhibition of flower organ abscission induced by ethylene or its inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), respectively. Similarly, 1-MCP pre-treatment of tomato inflorescence explants abolished the pH increase in AZ cells and pedicel abscission induced by flower removal. Examination of the pH changes in the AZ cells of Arabidopsis mutants defective in both ethylene-induced (ctr1, ein2, eto4) and ethylene-independent (ida, nev7, dab5) abscission pathways confirmed these results. The data indicate that the pH changes in the AZ cells are part of both the ethylene-sensitive and -insensitive abscission pathways, and occur concomitantly with the execution of organ abscission. pH can affect enzymatic activities and/or act as a signal for gene expression. Changes in pH during abscission could occur via regulation of transporters in AZ cells, which might affect cytosolic pH. Indeed, four genes associated with pH regulation, vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, putative high-affinity nitrate transporter, and two GTP-binding proteins, were specifically up-regulated in tomato flower AZ following abscission induction, and 1-MCP reduced or abolished the increased expression.

  9. Identification and Kinetics of Accumulation of Proteins Induced by Ethylene in Bean Abscission Zones 1

    PubMed Central

    del Campillo, Elena; Lewis, Lowell N.

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional gel electrophoresis system that combines a cationic polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH near neutrality with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the spectrum of basic polypeptides that accumulate in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) abscission zones after treatment with ethylene. Results showed that, as abscission progressed, at least seven basic proteins accumulated in the abscission zone prior to the accumulation of 9.5 cellulase. Six of the seven proteins correspond to pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. Among them, two isoforms of β-1,3-glucanase and multiple isoforms of chitinase were identified. A 22 kilodalton polypeptide that accumulated to high levels was identified as a thaumatin-like protein by analysis of its N-terminal sequence (up to 20 amino acids) and its serological relationship with heterologous thaumatin antibodies. A 15 kilodalton polypeptide serologically related to PR P1 (p14) from tomato was identified as bean PR P1 (p14)-like protein. The kinetics of accumulation of glucanases, chitinases, thaumatin-like and PR P1 (p14)-like proteins during ethylene treatment were similar and they showed that PR proteins accumulated in abscission zones prior to the increase in 9.5 cellulase. Addition of indoleacetic acid, a potent inhibitor of abscission, reduced the accumulation of these proteins to a similar extent (60%). The synchronized accumulation of this set of PR proteins, early in the abscission process, may play a role in induced resistance to possible fungal attack after a plant part is shed. The seventh protein does not correspond to any previously characterized PR protein. This new 45 kilodalton polypeptide accumulated in abscission zones on exposure to ethylene concomitantly with the increase in 9.5 cellulase. Its N-terminal sequence (up to 15 amino acids) showed some homology with the amino terminal sequence of chitinase. Polyclonal antibodies against chitinase recognized the 45

  10. De novo Transcriptome Sequencing and Development of Abscission Zone-Specific Microarray as a New Molecular Tool for Analysis of Tomato Organ Abscission

    PubMed Central

    Sundaresan, Srivignesh; Philosoph-Hadas, Sonia; Riov, Joseph; Mugasimangalam, Raja; Kuravadi, Nagesh A.; Kochanek, Bettina; Salim, Shoshana; Tucker, Mark L.; Meir, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    Abscission of flower pedicels and leaf petioles of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) can be induced by flower removal or leaf deblading, respectively, which leads to auxin depletion, resulting in increased sensitivity of the abscission zone (AZ) to ethylene. However, the molecular mechanisms that drive the acquisition of abscission competence and its modulation by auxin gradients are not yet known. We used RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) to obtain a comprehensive transcriptome of tomato flower AZ (FAZ) and leaf AZ (LAZ) during abscission. RNA-Seq was performed on a pool of total RNA extracted from tomato FAZ and LAZ, at different abscission stages, followed by de novo assembly. The assembled clusters contained transcripts that are already known in the Solanaceae (SOL) genomics and NCBI databases, and over 8823 identified novel tomato transcripts of varying sizes. An AZ-specific microarray, encompassing the novel transcripts identified in this study and all known transcripts from the SOL genomics and NCBI databases, was constructed to study the abscission process. Multiple probes for longer genes and key AZ-specific genes, including antisense probes for all transcripts, make this array a unique tool for studying abscission with a comprehensive set of transcripts, and for mining for naturally occurring antisense transcripts. We focused on comparing the global transcriptomes generated from the FAZ and the LAZ to establish the divergences and similarities in their transcriptional networks, and particularly to characterize the processes and transcriptional regulators enriched in gene clusters that are differentially regulated in these two AZs. This study is the first attempt to analyze the global gene expression in different AZs in tomato by combining the RNA-Seq technique with oligonucleotide microarrays. Our AZ-specific microarray chip provides a cost-effective approach for expression profiling and robust analysis of multiple samples in a rapid succession. PMID:26834766

  11. Profiling gene expression in citrus fruit calyx abscission zone (AZ-C) treated with ethylene.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chunzhen; Zhang, Lingyun; Yang, Xuelian; Zhong, Guangyan

    2015-10-01

    On-tree storage and harvesting of mature fruit account for a large proportion of cost in the production of citrus, and a reduction of the cost would not be achieved without a thorough understanding of the mechani sm of the mature fruit abscission. Genome-wide gene expression changes in ethylene-treated fruit calyx abscission zone (AZ-C) of Citrus sinensis cv. Olinda were therefore investigated using a citrus genome array representing up to 33,879 citrus transcripts. In total, 1313 and 1044 differentially regulated genes were identified in AZ-C treated with ethylene for 4 and 24 h, respectively. The results showed that mature citrus fruit abscission commenced with the activation of ethylene signal transduction pathway that led to the activation of ethylene responsive transcription factors and the subsequent transcriptional regulation of a large set of ethylene responsive genes. Significantly down-regulated genes included those of starch/sugar biosynthesis, transportation of water and growth promoting hormone synthesis and signaling, whereas significantly up-regulated genes were those involved in defense, cell wall degradation, and secondary metabolism. Our data unraveled the underlying mechanisms of some known important biochemical events occurring at AZ-C and should provide informative suggestions for future manipulation of the events to achieve a controllable abscission for mature citrus fruit.

  12. Comparative transcriptional survey between laser-microdissected cells from laminar abscission zone and petiolar cortical tissue during ethylene-promoted abscission in citrus leaves

    PubMed Central

    Agustí, Javier; Merelo, Paz; Cercós, Manuel; Tadeo, Francisco R; Talón, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Background Abscission is the cell separation process by which plants are able to shed organs. It has a great impact on the yield of most crop plants. At the same time, the process itself also constitutes an excellent model to study cell separation processes, since it occurs in concrete areas known as abscission zones (AZs) which are composed of a specific cell type. However, molecular approaches are generally hampered by the limited area and cell number constituting the AZ. Therefore, detailed studies at the resolution of cell type are of great relevance in order to accurately describe the process and to identify potential candidate genes for biotechnological applications. Results Efficient protocols for the isolation of specific citrus cell types, namely laminar abscission zone (LAZ) and petiolar cortical (Pet) cells based on laser capture microdissection (LCM) and for RNA microextraction and amplification have been developed. A comparative transcriptome analysis between LAZ and Pet from citrus leaf explants subjected to an in-vitro 24 h ethylene treatment was performed utilising microarray hybridization and analysis. Our analyses of gene functional classes differentially represented in ethylene-treated LAZ revealed an activation program dominated by the expression of genes associated with protein synthesis, protein fate, cell type differentiation, development and transcription. The extensive repertoire of genes associated with cell wall biosynthesis and metabolism strongly suggests that LAZ layers activate both catabolic and anabolic wall modification pathways during the abscission program. In addition, over-representation of particular members of different transcription factor families suggests important roles for these genes in the differentiation of the effective cell separation layer within the many layers contained in the citrus LAZ. Preferential expression of stress-related and defensive genes in Pet reveals that this tissue is likely to be reprogrammed to

  13. Genome-wide identification of cassava R2R3 MYB family genes related to abscission zone separation after environmental-stress-induced abscission

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wenbin; Yang, Yiling; Li, Yayun; Wang, Gan; Peng, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cassava plants (Manihot esculenta Crantz) resist environmental stresses by shedding leaves in leaf pulvinus abscission zones (AZs), thus leading to adaptation to new environmental conditions. Little is known about the roles of cassava R2R3 MYB factors in regulating AZ separation. Herein, 166 cassava R2R3 MYB genes were identified. Evolutionary analysis indicated that the 166 R2R3 MYB genes could be divided into 11 subfamilies. Transcriptome analysis indicated that 26 R2R3 MYB genes were expressed in AZs across six time points during both ethylene- and water-deficit stress-induced leaf abscission. Comparative expression profile analysis of similar SOTA (Self Organizing Tree Algorithm) clusters demonstrated that 10 R2R3 MYB genes had similar expression patterns at six time points in response to both treatments. GO (Gene Ontology) annotation confirmed that all 10 R2R3 MYB genes participated in the responses to stress and ethylene and auxin stimuli. Analysis of the putative 10 R2R3 MYB promoter regions showed that those genes primarily contained ethylene- and stress-related cis-elements. The expression profiles of the genes acting downstream of the selected MYBs were confirmed to be involved in cassava abscission zone separation. All these results indicated that R2R3 MYB plays an important regulatory role in AZ separation. PMID:27573926

  14. Cellular and Pectin Dynamics during Abscission Zone Development and Ripe Fruit Abscission of the Monocot Oil Palm

    PubMed Central

    Roongsattham, Peerapat; Morcillo, Fabienne; Fooyontphanich, Kim; Jantasuriyarat, Chatchawan; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Amblard, Philippe; Collin, Myriam; Mouille, Gregory; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Tranbarger, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    The oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) fruit primary abscission zone (AZ) is a multi-cell layered boundary region between the pedicel (P) and mesocarp (M) tissues. To examine the cellular processes that occur during the development and function of the AZ cell layers, we employed multiple histological and immunohistochemical methods combined with confocal, electron and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy approaches. During early fruit development and differentiation of the AZ, the orientation of cell divisions in the AZ was periclinal compared with anticlinal divisions in the P and M. AZ cell wall width increased earlier during development suggesting cell wall assembly occurred more rapidly in the AZ than the adjacent P and M tissues. The developing fruit AZ contain numerous intra-AZ cell layer plasmodesmata (PD), but very few inter-AZ cell layer PD. In the AZ of ripening fruit, PD were less frequent, wider, and mainly intra-AZ cell layer localized. Furthermore, DAPI staining revealed nuclei are located adjacent to PD and are remarkably aligned within AZ layer cells, and remain aligned and intact after cell separation. The polarized accumulation of ribosomes, rough endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and vesicles suggested active secretion at the tip of AZ cells occurred during development which may contribute to the striated cell wall patterns in the AZ cell layers. AZ cells accumulated intracellular pectin during development, which appear to be released and/or degraded during cell separation. The signal for the JIM5 epitope, that recognizes low methylesterified and un-methylesterified homogalacturonan (HG), increased in the AZ layer cell walls prior to separation and dramatically increased on the separated AZ cell surfaces. Finally, FT-IR microspectroscopy analysis indicated a decrease in methylesterified HG occurred in AZ cell walls during separation, which may partially explain an increase in the JIM5 epitope signal. The results obtained

  15. Cellular and Pectin Dynamics during Abscission Zone Development and Ripe Fruit Abscission of the Monocot Oil Palm.

    PubMed

    Roongsattham, Peerapat; Morcillo, Fabienne; Fooyontphanich, Kim; Jantasuriyarat, Chatchawan; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Amblard, Philippe; Collin, Myriam; Mouille, Gregory; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Tranbarger, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    The oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) fruit primary abscission zone (AZ) is a multi-cell layered boundary region between the pedicel (P) and mesocarp (M) tissues. To examine the cellular processes that occur during the development and function of the AZ cell layers, we employed multiple histological and immunohistochemical methods combined with confocal, electron and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy approaches. During early fruit development and differentiation of the AZ, the orientation of cell divisions in the AZ was periclinal compared with anticlinal divisions in the P and M. AZ cell wall width increased earlier during development suggesting cell wall assembly occurred more rapidly in the AZ than the adjacent P and M tissues. The developing fruit AZ contain numerous intra-AZ cell layer plasmodesmata (PD), but very few inter-AZ cell layer PD. In the AZ of ripening fruit, PD were less frequent, wider, and mainly intra-AZ cell layer localized. Furthermore, DAPI staining revealed nuclei are located adjacent to PD and are remarkably aligned within AZ layer cells, and remain aligned and intact after cell separation. The polarized accumulation of ribosomes, rough endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and vesicles suggested active secretion at the tip of AZ cells occurred during development which may contribute to the striated cell wall patterns in the AZ cell layers. AZ cells accumulated intracellular pectin during development, which appear to be released and/or degraded during cell separation. The signal for the JIM5 epitope, that recognizes low methylesterified and un-methylesterified homogalacturonan (HG), increased in the AZ layer cell walls prior to separation and dramatically increased on the separated AZ cell surfaces. Finally, FT-IR microspectroscopy analysis indicated a decrease in methylesterified HG occurred in AZ cell walls during separation, which may partially explain an increase in the JIM5 epitope signal. The results obtained

  16. Flavor of oranges as impacted by abscission zone formation for trees affected by huanglongbing disease and Lasiodiploida infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trees affected by Huanglongbing (HLB) exhibit excessive fruit drop, which is exacerbated by secondary infection of the abscission zone by the fungus Lasiodiplodia. ‘Hamlin’ orange trees, both healthy and affected by HLB, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas, determined by Polymerase chain reactio...

  17. Transcriptome profiling of petal abscission zone and functional analysis of AUX/IAA family genes reveal that RhIAA16 is involved in petal shedding in rose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rose is one of the most important cut flowers among ornamental plants. Rose flower longevity is largely dependent on the timing of petal shedding occurrence. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying petal abscission in rose, we performed transcriptome profiling of the petal abscission zone d...

  18. Two abscission zones proximal to Lansium domesticum fruit: one more sensitive to exogenous ethylene than the other

    PubMed Central

    Taesakul, Prapinporn; Siriphanich, Jingtair; van Doorn, Wouter G.

    2015-01-01

    Longkong (Lansium domesticum) fruit grows in bunches and is also sold as bunches. Individual fruit can separate from the bunch both before and after commercial harvest. The fruit has two separation sites. The first is located between bracts on the stem and the fused sepals (separation zone 1: SZ1) and the second between the fused sepals and the fruit (separation zone 2: SZ2). True abscission occurred at both zones. We investigated whether the two zones were active at different stages of development and if they were differentially sensitive to ethylene. Abscission occurred in the SZ1 in very young fruit (fruit still at the ovary stage), during early fruit development (5 weeks after full bloom; WAFB), and in ripe and overripe fruit (15–17 WAFB). Abscission did not spontaneously occur in the SZ2, but by the time the fruit was fully ripe, 15 WAFB, and later, a slight mechanical force was sufficient to break this zone. In fruit bunches severed from the tree at 5, 8, and 13 WAFB, break strength (BS) in SZ1 decreased much more after exogenous ethylene treatment than that in SZ2. Ethylene induced abscission in the SZ1, but not in SZ2. At 5, 8, and 13 WAFB, treatment with 1-methylcyclopropane (1-MCP; an inhibitor of ethylene perception) had a small effect on BS in the SZ1 and no effect in the SZ2. It is concluded that abscission in the SZ1 was much more sensitive to ethylene than that in the SZ2. In intact plants SZ1 reacts to endogenous ethylene, e.g., as a result of stress, while SZ2 apparently allows animals to remove the ripe fruit from the tree with minimal force. PMID:25954290

  19. Stamen Abscission Zone Transcriptome Profiling Reveals New Candidates for Abscission Control: Enhanced Retention of Floral Organs in Transgenic Plants Overexpressing Arabidopsis ZINC FINGER PROTEIN21[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Suqin; Lashbrook, Coralie C.

    2008-01-01

    Organ detachment requires cell separation within abscission zones (AZs). Physiological studies have established that ethylene and auxin contribute to cell separation control. Genetic analyses of abscission mutants have defined ethylene-independent detachment regulators. Functional genomic strategies leading to global understandings of abscission have awaited methods for isolating AZ cells of low abundance and very small size. Here, we couple laser capture microdissection of Arabidopsis thaliana stamen AZs and GeneChip profiling to reveal the AZ transcriptome responding to a developmental shedding cue. Analyses focus on 551 AZ genes (AZ551) regulated at the highest statistical significance (P ≤ 0.0001) over five floral stages linking prepollination to stamen shed. AZ551 includes mediators of ethylene and auxin signaling as well as receptor-like kinases and extracellular ligands thought to act independent of ethylene. We hypothesized that novel abscission regulators might reside in disproportionately represented Gene Ontology Consortium functional categories for cell wall modifying proteins, extracellular regulators, and nuclear-residing transcription factors. Promoter-β-glucuronidase expression of one transcription factor candidate, ZINC FINGER PROTEIN2 (AtZFP2), was elevated in stamen, petal, and sepal AZs. Flower parts of transgenic lines overexpressing AtZFP2 exhibited asynchronous and delayed abscission. Abscission defects were accompanied by altered floral morphology limiting pollination and fertility. Hand-pollination restored transgenic fruit development but not the rapid abscission seen in wild-type plants, demonstrating that pollination does not assure normal rates of detachment. In wild-type stamen AZs, AtZFP2 is significantly up-regulated postanthesis. Phenotype data from transgene overexpression studies suggest that AtZFP2 participates in processes that directly or indirectly influence organ shed. PMID:18192438

  20. De novo transcriptome sequencing and customized abscission zone-specific microarray as a new molecular tool for analysis of tomato organ abscission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abscission, which is the process of organ separation, is a highly regulated process occurring as a final stage of organ development. In the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) system, flower and leaf abscission was induced by flower removal or leaf deblading, leading to auxin depletion which results in in...

  1. Transcriptome Profiling of Petal Abscission Zone and Functional Analysis of an Aux/IAA Family Gene RhIAA16 Involved in Petal Shedding in Rose

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuerong; Liu, Chun; Li, Xiaodong; Xu, Haiqian; Liang, Yue; Ma, Nan; Fei, Zhangjun; Gao, Junping; Jiang, Cai-Zhong; Ma, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Roses are one of the most important cut flowers among ornamental plants. Rose flower longevity is largely dependent on the timing of petal shedding occurrence. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying petal abscission in rose, we performed transcriptome profiling of the petal abscission zone during petal shedding using Illumina technology. We identified a total of 2592 differentially transcribed genes (DTGs) during rose petal shedding. Gene ontology term enrichment and pathway analysis revealed that major biochemical pathways the DTGs were involved in included ethylene biosynthesis, starch degradation, superpathway of cytosolic glycolysis, pyruvate dehydrogenase and TCA cycle, photorespiration and the lactose degradation III pathway. This suggests that alterations in carbon metabolism are an important part of rose petal abscission. Among these DTGs, approximately 150 genes putatively encoding transcription factors were identified in rose abscission zone. These included zinc finger, WRKY, ERF, and Aux/IAA gene families, suggesting that petal abscission involves complex transcriptional reprogramming. Approximately 108 DTGs were related to hormone pathways, of which auxin and ethylene related DTGs were the largest groups including 52 and 41 genes, respectively. These also included 12 DTGs related to gibberellin and 6 DTGs in jasmonic acid pathway. Surprisingly, no DTGs involved in the biosynthesis/signaling of abscisic acid, cytokinin, brassinosteroid, and salicylic acid pathways were detected. Moreover, among DTGs related to auxin, we identified an Aux/IAA gene RhIAA16 that was up-regulated in response to petal shedding. Down-regulation of RhIAA16 by virus-induced gene silencing in rose promoted petal abscission, suggesting that RhIAA16 plays an important role in rose petal abscission. PMID:27695465

  2. Transcriptome Profiling of Petal Abscission Zone and Functional Analysis of an Aux/IAA Family Gene RhIAA16 Involved in Petal Shedding in Rose.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuerong; Liu, Chun; Li, Xiaodong; Xu, Haiqian; Liang, Yue; Ma, Nan; Fei, Zhangjun; Gao, Junping; Jiang, Cai-Zhong; Ma, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Roses are one of the most important cut flowers among ornamental plants. Rose flower longevity is largely dependent on the timing of petal shedding occurrence. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying petal abscission in rose, we performed transcriptome profiling of the petal abscission zone during petal shedding using Illumina technology. We identified a total of 2592 differentially transcribed genes (DTGs) during rose petal shedding. Gene ontology term enrichment and pathway analysis revealed that major biochemical pathways the DTGs were involved in included ethylene biosynthesis, starch degradation, superpathway of cytosolic glycolysis, pyruvate dehydrogenase and TCA cycle, photorespiration and the lactose degradation III pathway. This suggests that alterations in carbon metabolism are an important part of rose petal abscission. Among these DTGs, approximately 150 genes putatively encoding transcription factors were identified in rose abscission zone. These included zinc finger, WRKY, ERF, and Aux/IAA gene families, suggesting that petal abscission involves complex transcriptional reprogramming. Approximately 108 DTGs were related to hormone pathways, of which auxin and ethylene related DTGs were the largest groups including 52 and 41 genes, respectively. These also included 12 DTGs related to gibberellin and 6 DTGs in jasmonic acid pathway. Surprisingly, no DTGs involved in the biosynthesis/signaling of abscisic acid, cytokinin, brassinosteroid, and salicylic acid pathways were detected. Moreover, among DTGs related to auxin, we identified an Aux/IAA gene RhIAA16 that was up-regulated in response to petal shedding. Down-regulation of RhIAA16 by virus-induced gene silencing in rose promoted petal abscission, suggesting that RhIAA16 plays an important role in rose petal abscission.

  3. Overexpression of SlREV alters the development of the flower pedicel abscission zone and fruit formation in tomato.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guojian; Fan, Jing; Xian, Zhiqiang; Huang, Wei; Lin, Dongbo; Li, Zhengguo

    2014-12-01

    Versatile roles of REVOLUTA (REV), a Class III homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP III) transcription factor, have been depicted mainly in Arabidopsis and Populus. In this study, we investigated the functions of its tomato homolog, namely SlREV. Overexpression of a microRNA166-resistant version of SlREV (35S::REV(Ris)) not only resulted in vegetative abnormalities such as curly leaves and fasciated stems, but also caused dramatic reproductive alterations including continuous production of flowers at the pedicel abscission zone (AZ) and ectopic fruit formation on receptacles. Microscopic analysis showed that meristem-like structures continuously emerged from the exodermises of the pedicel AZs and that ectopic carpels formed between the first and second whorl of floral buds in 35S::REV(Ris) plants. Transcriptional data suggest that SlREV may regulate genes related to meristem maintenance and cell differentiation in the development of the flower pedicel abscission zone, and modulate genes in homeodomain and MADS-box families and hormone pathways during fruit formation. Altogether, these results reveal novel roles of SlREV in tomato flower development and fruit formation.

  4. Changes in Free and Conjugated Indole 3-Acetic Acid and Abscisic Acid in Young Cotton Fruits and Their Abscission Zones in Relation to Fruit Retention during and after Moisture Stress

    PubMed Central

    Guinn, Gene; Brummett, Donald L.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were conducted with field-grown cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) in 1985 and 1986 to determine effects of water deficit on levels of conjugated indole 3-acetic acid (IAA) and abscisic acid (ABA) in young fruits (bolls) and their abscission zones in relation to boll retention. Tissues were harvested three times during an irrigation cycle in 1985. They were harvested twice during an irrigation cycle and once after irrigation in 1986 to determine extent of recoveries of measured parameters. As reported earlier, the free IAA content of abscission zones decreased with moisture stress. Irrigation caused a partial recovery in free IAA content of abscission zones and caused a partial recovery in rate of boll retention. In contrast to free IAA, conjugated IAA increased with water deficit, both in 3-day-old bolls and in their abscission zones. Bolls contained much more ester IAA than their abscission zones. Some, but not all, of the increase in ester IAA in bolls during moisture stress could have come from a conversion of amide-linked IAA. Amide IAA decreased slightly during stress and increased after irrigation, but the concentration was low relative to ester IAA. Free and conjugated ABA both increased during stress and decreased after irrigation. However, the concentration of conjugated ABA remained relatively high in abscission zones. Ester IAA, being more resistant than free IAA to enzymic destruction during stress, may hasten recovery of fruit retention after relief of stress by providing a source of free IAA in abscission zones to inhibit continued abscission. PMID:16665881

  5. ROLE OF ETHYLENE IN LEAF ABSCISSION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    position of application. The positional effects of auxin are explained as being due to differences in transport in the explant. Thus, distally applied auxin ...inhibits abscission regardless of the accelerated rate of ethylene evolution by being rapidly transported to the abscission zone. Auxin applied

  6. A petal breakstrength meter for Arabidopsis abscission studies

    PubMed Central

    Lease, Kevin A; Cho, Sung Ki; Walker, John C

    2006-01-01

    Background Abscission is the regulated dropping of plant organs, such as leaves or flower petals. This process involves a break down of the cell wall between layers of cells in the abscission zone, causing the organ to become detached. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana undergoes floral organ abscission. Various experimental methods have been used to study Arabidopsis floral organ abscission, including measuring the petal breakstrength, or the amount of force required to pull a petal from the receptacle. Petal breakstrength provides a quantitative insight into the physical integrity of the petal abscission zone. Results We developed a petal breakstrength meter that allows rapid data acquisition on a personal computer. We present the design of the device and show its utility in measuring Arabidopsis petal breakstrength for abscission studies. Conclusion This petal breakstrength meter should enable researchers to perform the petal breakstrength assay as a routine part of the characterization of environmental and genetic factors affecting abscission. PMID:16483376

  7. The manipulation of auxin in the abscission zone cells of Arabidopsis flowers reveals that indoleacetic acid signaling is a prerequisite for organ shedding.

    PubMed

    Basu, Manojit M; González-Carranza, Zinnia H; Azam-Ali, Sayed; Tang, Shouya; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Roberts, Jeremy A

    2013-05-01

    A number of novel strategies were employed to examine the role of indoleacetic acid (IAA) in regulating floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Analysis of auxin influx facilitator expression in β-glucuronidase reporter plants revealed that AUXIN RESISTANT1, LIKE AUX1, and LAX3 were specifically up-regulated at the site of floral organ shedding. Flowers from mutants where individual family members were down-regulated exhibited a reduction in the force necessary to bring about petal separation; however, the effect was not additive in double or quadruple mutants. Using the promoter of a polygalacturonase (At2g41850), active primarily in cells undergoing separation, to drive expression of the bacterial genes iaaL and iaaM, we have shown that it is possible to manipulate auxin activity specifically within the floral organ abscission zone (AZ). Analysis of petal breakstrength reveals that if IAA AZ levels are reduced, shedding takes place prematurely, while if they are enhanced, organ loss is delayed. The At2g41850 promoter was also used to transactivate the gain-of-function AXR3-1 gene in order to disrupt auxin signaling specifically within the floral organ AZ cells. Flowers from transactivated lines failed to shed their sepals, petals, and anthers during pod expansion and maturity, and these organs frequently remained attached to the plant even after silique desiccation and dehiscence had taken place. These observations support a key role for IAA in the regulation of abscission in planta and reveal, to our knowledge for the first time, a requirement for a functional IAA signaling pathway in AZ cells for organ shedding to take place.

  8. The Manipulation of Auxin in the Abscission Zone Cells of Arabidopsis Flowers Reveals That Indoleacetic Acid Signaling Is a Prerequisite for Organ Shedding1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Manojit M.; González-Carranza, Zinnia H.; Azam-Ali, Sayed; Tang, Shouya; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Roberts, Jeremy A.

    2013-01-01

    A number of novel strategies were employed to examine the role of indoleacetic acid (IAA) in regulating floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Analysis of auxin influx facilitator expression in β-glucuronidase reporter plants revealed that AUXIN RESISTANT1, LIKE AUX1, and LAX3 were specifically up-regulated at the site of floral organ shedding. Flowers from mutants where individual family members were down-regulated exhibited a reduction in the force necessary to bring about petal separation; however, the effect was not additive in double or quadruple mutants. Using the promoter of a polygalacturonase (At2g41850), active primarily in cells undergoing separation, to drive expression of the bacterial genes iaaL and iaaM, we have shown that it is possible to manipulate auxin activity specifically within the floral organ abscission zone (AZ). Analysis of petal breakstrength reveals that if IAA AZ levels are reduced, shedding takes place prematurely, while if they are enhanced, organ loss is delayed. The At2g41850 promoter was also used to transactivate the gain-of-function AXR3-1 gene in order to disrupt auxin signaling specifically within the floral organ AZ cells. Flowers from transactivated lines failed to shed their sepals, petals, and anthers during pod expansion and maturity, and these organs frequently remained attached to the plant even after silique desiccation and dehiscence had taken place. These observations support a key role for IAA in the regulation of abscission in planta and reveal, to our knowledge for the first time, a requirement for a functional IAA signaling pathway in AZ cells for organ shedding to take place. PMID:23509178

  9. Comprehensive analysis of SAUR gene family in citrus and its transcriptional correlation with fruitlet drop from abscission zone A.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rangjin; Dong, Cuicui; Ma, Yanyan; Deng, Lie; He, Shaolan; Yi, Shilai; Lv, Qiang; Zheng, Yongqiang

    2015-11-01

    Small auxin-up RNA (SAUR) gene family is large, and the members of which can be rapidly induced by auxin and encode highly unstable mRNAs. SAUR genes are involved in various developmental and physiological processes, such as leaf senescence, fruitlet abscission, and hypocotyl development. However, their modes of action in citrus remain unknown. Hereby, a systematic analysis of SAUR gene family in citrus was conducted through a genome-wide search. In this study, a total of 70 SAUR genes, referred to as CitSAURs, have been identified in citrus. The evolutionary relationship and the intro-exon organization were analyzed, revealing strong gene conservation and the expansion of particular functional genes during plant evolution. Expression analysis showed that the major of CitSAUR genes were expressed in at least one tissue and showed distinctive expression levels, indicating the SAUR gene family play important roles in the development and growth of citrus organs. However, there were more than 20 CitSAUR genes such as CitSARU36, CitSAUR37, and CitSAUR54 exhibiting very low expression level in all tissue tested. Twenty-three out of 70 CitSAUR genes were responded to indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) treatment, of which just CitSAUR19 was down-regulated. Additionally, 14 CitSAUR genes exhibited distinct changes during fruitlet abscission, however just 5 of them including CitSAUR06, CitSAUR08, CitSAUR44, CitSAUR61, and CitSAUR64 were associated with fruitlet abscission. The current study provides basic information for the citrus SAUR gene family and will pave the way for deciphering the precise role of SAURs in citrus development and growth as well as fruitlet abscission.

  10. Abscission of mango fruitlets as influenced by enhanced ethylene biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Nunez-Elisea, R; Davenport, T L

    1986-12-01

    Experiments were conducted on developing fruitlet explants of two mango (Mangifera indica L.) cultivars to establish the source and dynamics of ethylene production prior to and during fruitlet abscission. Abscission of all fruits in the samples occurred at approximately 86 and 74 hours postharvest in ;Keitt' and ;Tommy Atkins,' respectively. Increased abscission began 26 hours from harvest and was preceded by enhanced ethylene synthesis. Enhanced ethylene production initiated approximately 48 hours prior to abscission and increased to a maximum near the time of fruitlet abscission. The seed produced the highest amount of ethylene on a per gram fresh weight basis. The pericarp, however, was the main source of ethylene on an absolute basis, since it represented more than 85% of total fruitlet weight. Pedicels containing the abscission zone produced no detectable ethylene prior to or at the moment of abscission. Fumigation of ;Tommy Atkins' fruitlets with 1, 15, or 100 microliters per liter ethylene accelerated abscission by 24 to 36 hours in comparison with unfumigated controls. Diffusion of ethylene from distal fruitlet tissues to the abscission zone triggers the events leading to separation of the fruit from the tree.

  11. Early Induction of Apple Fruitlet Abscission Is Characterized by an Increase of Both Isoprene Emission and Abscisic Acid Content12[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Giulia, Eccher; Alessandro, Botton; Mariano, Dimauro; Andrea, Boschetti; Benedetto, Ruperti; Angelo, Ramina

    2013-01-01

    Apple (Malus domestica) fruitlet abscission represents an interesting model system to study the early phases of the shedding process, during which major transcriptomic changes and metabolic rearrangements occur within the fruit. In apple, the drop of fruits at different positions within the cluster can be selectively magnified through chemical thinners, such as benzyladenine and metamitron, acting as abscission enhancers. In this study, different abscission potentials were obtained within the apple fruitlet population by means of the above-cited thinners. A metabolomic study was conducted on the volatile organic compounds emitted by abscising fruitlets, allowing for identification of isoprene as an early marker of abscission induction. A strong correlation was also observed between isoprene production and abscisic acid (ABA) levels in the fruit cortex, which were shown to increase in abscising fruitlets with respect to nonabscising ones. Transcriptomic evidence indicated that abscission-related ABA is biologically active, and its increased biosynthesis is associated with the induction of a specific ABA-responsive 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase gene. According to a hypothetical model, ABA may transiently cooperate with other hormones and secondary messengers in the generation of an intrafruit signal leading to the downstream activation of the abscission zone. The shedding process therefore appears to be triggered by multiple interdependent pathways, whose fine regulation, exerted within a very short temporal window by both endogenous and exogenous factors, determines the final destiny of the fruitlets. PMID:23444344

  12. Resolving new ultrastructural features of cytokinetic abscission with soft-X-ray cryo-tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Shachar; Kirchenbuechler, David; Nachmias, Dikla; Tamir, Adi; Werner, Stephan; Elbaum, Michael; Elia, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cytokinetic abscission is mediated by the ESCRT membrane fission machinery. While much has been clarified on the topology and kinetics of abscission through high-resolution microscopy, key questions regarding the mechanism of abscission remain open. Here we apply cryogenic soft-X-ray tomography to elucidate new ultrastructural details in the intercellular membrane bridge connecting cells undergoing abscission. In particular, we resolve defined ring-like structures inside the midbody dark zone that have been inaccessible to EM, and identify membrane extrusions at the abscission sites. In cells at late stages of abscission we resolve a complex array of helical spirals, extending the structural information obtained by EM. Our results highlight the advantages of soft-X-ray tomography and emphasize the importance of using complementary approaches for characterizing cellular structures. Notably, by providing new structural data from intact cells we present a realistic view on the topology of abscission and suggest new mechanistic models for ESCRT mediated abscission. PMID:27282220

  13. Core Mechanisms Regulating Developmentally Timed and Environmentally Triggered Abscission[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Drought-triggered abscission is a strategy used by plants to avoid the full consequences of drought; however, it is poorly understood at the molecular genetic level. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) can be used to elucidate the pathway controlling drought-triggered leaf shedding. We further show that much of the pathway regulating developmentally timed floral organ abscission is conserved in regulating drought-triggered leaf abscission. Gene expression of HAESA (HAE) and INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION (IDA) is induced in cauline leaf abscission zones when the leaves become wilted in response to limited water and HAE continues to accumulate in the leaf abscission zones through the abscission process. The genes that encode HAE/HAESA-LIKE2, IDA, NEVERSHED, and MAPK KINASE4 and 5 are all necessary for drought-induced leaf abscission. Our findings offer a molecular mechanism explaining drought-triggered leaf abscission. Furthermore, the ability to study leaf abscission in Arabidopsis opens up a new avenue to tease apart mechanisms involved in abscission that have been difficult to separate from flower development as well as for understanding the mechanistic role of water and turgor pressure in abscission. PMID:27468996

  14. Involvement of hydrogen peroxide in leaf abscission signaling, revealed by analysis with an in vitro abscission system in Capsicum plants.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Masaru; Munemura, Ikuko; Tomita, Reiko; Kobayashi, Kappei

    2008-10-01

    Although auxin and ethylene play pivotal roles in leaf abscission, the subsequent signaling molecules are poorly understood. This is mainly because it is difficult to effectively treat the intact abscission zone (AZ) with pharmacological reagents. We developed an in vitro experimental system that reproduces stress-induced leaf abscission in planta. In this system, 1-mm-thick petiole strips, encompassing the AZ, were separated within 4 days of abscission at the AZ through cell wall degradation in an auxin depletion- and ethylene-dependent manner. The system allowed us to show that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is involved in abscission signaling. Microscopic analyses revealed continuous H(2)O(2) production by AZ cells. H(2)O(2) scavengers and diphenylene iodonium, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, suppressed in vitro abscission and cellulase expression. Conversely, the application of H(2)O(2) promoted in vitro abscission and expression of cellulase. Ethephon-induced abscission was suppressed by inhibitors of H(2)O(2) production, whereas the expression of ethylene-responsive genes was unaffected by both H(2)O(2) and an H(2)O(2) inhibitor. These results indicated that H(2)O(2) acts downstream from ethylene in in vitro abscission signaling. In planta, salinity stress induced the expression of genes that respond to ethylene and reactive oxygen species, and also induced H(2)O(2) production at the AZ, which preceded leaf abscission. These results indicate that H(2)O(2) has roles in leaf abscission associated with ethylene both in vitro and in planta.

  15. Development and regulation of pedicel abscission in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Toshitsugu

    2015-01-01

    To shed unfertilized flowers or ripe fruits, many plant species develop a pedicel abscission zone (AZ), a specialized tissue that develops between the organ and the main body of the plant. Regulation of pedicel abscission is an important agricultural concern because pre-harvest abscission can reduce yields of fruit or grain crops, such as apples, rice, wheat, etc. Tomato has been studied as a model system for abscission, as tomato plants develop a distinct AZ at the midpoint of the pedicel and several tomato mutants, such as jointless, have pedicels that lack an AZ. This mini-review focuses on recent advances in research on the mechanisms regulating tomato pedicel abscission. Molecular genetic studies revealed that three MADS-box transcription factors interactively play a central role in pedicel AZ development. Transcriptome analyses identified activities involved in abscission and also found novel transcription factors that may regulate AZ activities. Another study identified transcription factors mediating abscission pathways from induction signals to activation of cell wall hydrolysis. These recent findings in tomato will enable significant advances in understanding the regulation of abscission in other key agronomic species. PMID:26124769

  16. Auxin is a long-range signal that acts independently of ethylene signaling on leaf abscission in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xu; Zimmermann, Jorma; Polle, Andrea; Fischer, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Timing of leaf abscission is an important trait for biomass production and seasonal acclimation in deciduous trees. The signaling leading to organ separation, from the external cue (decreasing photoperiod) to ethylene-regulated hydrolysis of the middle lamellae in the abscission zone, is only poorly understood. Data from annual species indicate that the formation of an auxin gradient spanning the abscission zone regulates the timing of abscission. We established an experimental system in Populus to induce leaf shedding synchronously under controlled greenhouse conditions in order to test the function of auxin in leaf abscission. Here, we show that exogenous auxin delayed abscission of dark-induced leaves over short and long distances and that a new auxin response maximum preceded the formation of an abscission zone. Several auxin transporters were down-regulated during abscission and inhibition of polar auxin transport delayed leaf shedding. Ethylene signaling was not involved in the regulation of these auxin transporters and in the formation of an abscission zone, but was required for the expression of hydrolytic enzymes associated with cell separation. Since exogenous auxin delayed abscission in absence of ethylene signaling auxin likely acts independently of ethylene signaling on cell separation. PMID:26322071

  17. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF THE INTERACTION OF ETHYLENE AND AUXIN DURING FLOWER ABSCISSION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abscission, the separation of organs from the parent plant, results in postharvest quality loss in many ornamentals and other fresh produce. The process is initiated by changes in the auxin gradient across the abscission zone (AZ), is triggered by ethylene, and may be accelerated by postharvest stre...

  18. Primary and Secondary Abscission in Pisum sativum and Euphorbia pulcherrima—How Do They Compare and How Do They Differ?

    PubMed Central

    Hvoslef-Eide, Anne K.; Munster, Cristel M.; Mathiesen, Cecilie A.; Ayeh, Kwadwo O.; Melby, Tone I.; Rasolomanana, Paoly; Lee, YeonKyeong

    2016-01-01

    Abscission is a highly regulated and coordinated developmental process in plants. It is important to understand the processes leading up to the event, in order to better control abscission in crop plants. This has the potential to reduce yield losses in the field and increase the ornamental value of flowers and potted plants. A reliable method of abscission induction in poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) flowers has been established to study the process in a comprehensive manner. By correctly decapitating buds of the third order, abscission can be induced in 1 week. AFLP differential display (DD) was used to search for genes regulating abscission. Through validation using qRT-PCR, more information of the genes involved during induced secondary abscission have been obtained. A study using two pea (Pisum sativum) mutants in the def (Developmental funiculus) gene, which was compared with wild type peas (tall and dwarf in both cases) was performed. The def mutant results in a deformed, abscission-less zone instead of normal primary abscission at the funiculus. RNA in situ hybridization studies using gene sequences from the poinsettia differential display, resulted in six genes differentially expressed for abscission specific genes in both poinsettia and pea. Two of these genes are associated with gene up- or down-regulation during the first 2 days after decapitation in poinsettia. Present and previous results in poinsettia (biochemically and gene expressions), enables a more detailed division of the secondary abscission phases in poinsettia than what has previously been described from primary abscission in Arabidopsis. This study compares the inducible secondary abscission in poinsettia and the non-abscising mutants/wild types in pea demonstrating primary abscission zones. The results may have wide implications on the understanding of abscission, since pea and poinsettia have been separated for 94–98 million years in evolution, hence any genes or processes in common

  19. The ARF, AUX/IAA and GH3 gene families in citrus: genome-wide identification and expression analysis during fruitlet drop from abscission zone A.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rangjin; Pang, Shaoping; Ma, Yanyan; Deng, Lie; He, Shaolan; Yi, Shilai; Lv, Qiang; Zheng, Yongqiang

    2015-12-01

    Completion of the whole genome sequencing of citrus enabled us to perform genome-wide identification and functional analysis of the gene families involved in agronomic traits and morphological diversity of citrus. In this study, 22 CitARF, 11 CitGH3 and 26 CitAUX/IAA genes were identified in citrus, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all the genes of each gene family could be subdivided into three groups and showed strong evolutionary conservation. The GH3 and AUX/IAA gene families shrank and ARF gene family was highly conserved in the citrus genome after speciation from Arabidopsis thaliana. Tissue-specific expression profiles revealed that 54 genes were expressed in at least one tissue while just 5 genes including CitARF07, CitARF20, CitGH3.04, CitAUX/IAA25 and CitAUX/IAA26 with very low expression level in all tissues tested, suggesting that the CitARF, CitGH3 and CitAUX/IAA gene families played important roles in the development of citrus organs. In addition, our data found that the expression of 2 CitARF, 4 CitGH3 and 4 AUX/IAA genes was affected by IAA treatment, and 7 genes including, CitGH3.04, CitGH3.07, CitAUX/IAA03, CitAUX/IAA04, CitAUX/IAA18, CitAUX/IAA19 and CitAUX/IAA23 were related to fruitlet abscission. This study provides a foundation for future studies on elucidating the precise role of citrus ARF, GH3 and AUX/IAA genes in early steps of auxin signal transduction and open up a new opportunity to uncover the molecular mechanism underlying citrus fruitlet abscission.

  20. Ethylene-induced differential gene expression during abscission of citrus leaves

    PubMed Central

    Merelo, Paz; Cercós, Manuel; Tadeo, Francisco R.; Talón, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to identify and classify genes involved in the process of leaf abscission in Clementina de Nules (Citrus clementina Hort. Ex Tan.). A 7 K unigene citrus cDNA microarray containing 12 K spots was used to characterize the transcriptome of the ethylene-induced abscission process in laminar abscission zone-enriched tissues and the petiole of debladed leaf explants. In these conditions, ethylene induced 100% leaf explant abscission in 72 h while, in air-treated samples, the abscission period started later and took 240 h. Gene expression monitored during the first 36 h of ethylene treatment showed that out of the 12 672 cDNA microarray probes, ethylene differentially induced 725 probes distributed as follows: 216 (29.8%) probes in the laminar abscission zone and 509 (70.2%) in the petiole. Functional MIPS classification and manual annotation of differentially expressed genes highlighted key processes regulating the activation and progress of the cell separation that brings about abscission. These included cell-wall modification, lipid transport, protein biosynthesis and degradation, and differential activation of signal transduction and transcription control pathways. Expression data associated with the petiole indicated the occurrence of a double defensive strategy mediated by the activation of a biochemical programme including scavenging ROS, defence and PR genes, and a physical response mostly based on lignin biosynthesis and deposition. This work identifies new genes probably involved in the onset and development of the leaf abscission process and suggests a different but co-ordinated and complementary role for the laminar abscission zone and the petiole during the process of abscission. PMID:18515267

  1. Ethephon induced abscission in mango: physiological fruitlet responses

    PubMed Central

    Hagemann, Michael H.; Winterhagen, Patrick; Hegele, Martin; Wünsche, Jens N.

    2015-01-01

    Fruitlet abscission of mango is typically very severe, causing considerable production losses worldwide. Consequently, a detailed physiological and molecular characterization of fruitlet abscission in mango is required to describe the onset and time-dependent course of this process. To identify the underlying key mechanisms of abscission, ethephon, an ethylene releasing substance, was applied at two concentrations (600 and 7200 ppm) during the midseason drop stage of mango. The abscission process is triggered by ethylene diffusing to the abscission zone where it binds to specific receptors and thereby activating several key physiological responses at the cellular level. The treatments reduced significantly the capacity of polar auxin transport through the pedicel at 1 day after treatment and thereafter when compared to untreated pedicels. The transcript levels of the ethylene receptor genes MiETR1 and MiERS1 were significantly upregulated in the pedicel and pericarp at 1, 2, and 3 days after the ethephon application with 7200 ppm, except for MiETR1 in the pedicel, when compared to untreated fruitlet. In contrast, ethephon applications with 600 ppm did not affect expression levels of MiETR1 in the pedicel and of MiERS1 in the pericarp; however, MiETR1 in the pericarp at day 2 and MiERS1 in the pedicel at days 2 and 3 were significantly upregulated over the controls. Moreover, two novel short versions of the MiERS1 were identified and detected more often in the pedicel of treated than untreated fruitlets at all sampling times. Sucrose concentration in the fruitlet pericarp was significantly reduced to the control at 2 days after both ethephon treatments. In conclusion, it is postulated that the ethephon-induced abscission process commences with a reduction of the polar auxin transport capacity in the pedicel, followed by an upregulation of ethylene receptors and finally a decrease of the sucrose concentration in the fruitlets. PMID:26442021

  2. Auxin involvement in tepal senescence and abscission in Lilium: a tale of two lilies

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Lara; Arrom, Laia; Mariotti, Lorenzo; Battelli, Riccardo; Picciarelli, Piero; Kille, Peter; Stead, Tony; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Rogers, Hilary J.

    2015-01-01

    Petal wilting and/or abscission terminates the life of the flower. However, how wilting and abscission are coordinated is not fully understood. There is wide variation in the extent to which petals wilt before abscission, even between cultivars of the same species. For example, tepals of Lilium longiflorum wilt substantially, while those of the closely related Lilium longiflorum×Asiatic hybrid (L.A.) abscise turgid. Furthermore, close comparison of petal death in these two Lilium genotypes shows that there is a dramatic fall in fresh weight/dry weight accompanied by a sharp increase in ion leakage in late senescent L. longiflorum tepals, neither of which occur in Lilium L.A. Despite these differences, a putative abscission zone was identified in both lilies, but while the detachment force was reduced to zero in Lilium L.A., wilting of the fused tepals in L. longiflorum occurred before abscission was complete. Abscission is often negatively regulated by auxin, and the possible role of auxin in regulating tepal abscission relative to wilting was tested in the two lilies. There was a dramatic increase in auxin levels with senescence in L. longiflorum but not in Lilium L.A. Fifty auxin-related genes were expressed in early senescent L. longiflorum tepals including 12 ARF-related genes. In Arabidopsis, several ARF genes are involved in the regulation of abscission. Expression of a homologous transcript to Arabidopsis ARF7/19 was 8-fold higher during senescence in L. longiflorum compared with abscising Lilium L.A., suggesting a conserved role for auxin-regulated abscission in monocotyledonous ethylene-insensitive flowers. PMID:25422499

  3. Auxin involvement in tepal senescence and abscission in Lilium: a tale of two lilies.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Lara; Arrom, Laia; Mariotti, Lorenzo; Battelli, Riccardo; Picciarelli, Piero; Kille, Peter; Stead, Tony; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Rogers, Hilary J

    2015-02-01

    Petal wilting and/or abscission terminates the life of the flower. However, how wilting and abscission are coordinated is not fully understood. There is wide variation in the extent to which petals wilt before abscission, even between cultivars of the same species. For example, tepals of Lilium longiflorum wilt substantially, while those of the closely related Lilium longiflorum×Asiatic hybrid (L.A.) abscise turgid. Furthermore, close comparison of petal death in these two Lilium genotypes shows that there is a dramatic fall in fresh weight/dry weight accompanied by a sharp increase in ion leakage in late senescent L. longiflorum tepals, neither of which occur in Lilium L.A. Despite these differences, a putative abscission zone was identified in both lilies, but while the detachment force was reduced to zero in Lilium L.A., wilting of the fused tepals in L. longiflorum occurred before abscission was complete. Abscission is often negatively regulated by auxin, and the possible role of auxin in regulating tepal abscission relative to wilting was tested in the two lilies. There was a dramatic increase in auxin levels with senescence in L. longiflorum but not in Lilium L.A. Fifty auxin-related genes were expressed in early senescent L. longiflorum tepals including 12 ARF-related genes. In Arabidopsis, several ARF genes are involved in the regulation of abscission. Expression of a homologous transcript to Arabidopsis ARF7/19 was 8-fold higher during senescence in L. longiflorum compared with abscising Lilium L.A., suggesting a conserved role for auxin-regulated abscission in monocotyledonous ethylene-insensitive flowers.

  4. Clast-cortex aggregates in experimental and natural calcite-bearing fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempe, Marieke; Smith, Steven A. F.; Ferri, Fabio; Mitchell, Thomas M.; Di Toro, Giulio

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the formation mechanisms of rounded clast-cortex aggregates, a composite grain found in the slipping zones of faults hosted in calcite- and clay-rich rocks. The natural aggregates contain a central clast commonly made of host-rock fragments or reworked cataclasite from the slipping zone. The central clasts are surrounded by an outer cortex of calcite or clay grains a few μm or less in size. In laboratory experiments on calcite gouges using two rotary-shear apparatus we investigated the dependence of clast-cortex aggregate formation on the applied slip rate, normal stress, total displacement and ambient humidity. Clast-cortex aggregates formed at all investigated slip rates (100 μm/s to 1 m/s) but only at relatively low normal stresses (≤5 MPa). The aggregates were better developed with increasing displacement (up to 5 m) and did not form in experiments with water-dampened gouges. In the experiments, aggregates formed in low-strain regions within the gouge layers, adjacent to the highest-strain slip zones. We propose that clast-cortex aggregates in calcite-bearing slip zones form in the shallow portions of faults during shearing in relatively dry conditions, but our experiments suggest that they cannot be used as indicators of seismic slip. Formation involves clast rotation due to granular flow accompanied by accretion of fine matrix material possibly facilitated by electrostatic forces.

  5. Functional differences between the outer and inner zones of the guinea pig adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Strott, C A; Goff, A K; Lyons, C D

    1981-12-01

    The guinea pig adrenal cortex is grossly composed of two regions: an outer, yellow zone and an inner, brown zone. These zones, which represent 33% and 66% of the total adrenocortical volume, respectively, can be separated by blunt dissection. It has been previously reported that specific pregnenolone and pregnenolone sulfate binding proteins are present in the high speed supernatant fraction (cytosol) prepared from the whole adrenal cortex of the guinea pig. However, when cytosol was prepared from the separate outer and inner cortical zones, it was found that the steroid-binding proteins were concentrated in the inner zone. This correlated with the level of pregnenolone which was significantly greater in the cytosol of the inner zone where greater than 50% was found to be bound. In contrast, the concentration of cortisol was 30 times greater in the cytosol of the outer cortical zone and less than 4% was found to be bound. These data suggest that cortisol is produced primarily in the outer cortical zone, a region which comprises only one-third of the total cortical volume. On the other hand, the coexistence of pregnenolone and its binding protein in the inner cortical zone, a region which comprises two-thirds or the greatest cortical volume, indicates a different functional status for this zone. The exact hormonal control of these two vastly different regions (chromatically, morphologically, and functionally) remains to be determined. It is speculated that the inner cortical zone of the adult guinea pig adrenal is the counterpart of the fetal cortex which did not involute.

  6. Functional differences between the outer and inner zones of the guinea pig adrenal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Strott, C.A.; Goff, A.K.; Lyons, C.D.

    1981-12-01

    The guinea pig adrenal cortex is grossly composed of two regions: an outer, yellow zone and an inner, brown zone. These zones, which represent 33% and 66% of the total adrenocortical volume, respectively, can be separated by blunt dissection. It has been previously reported that specific pregnenolone and pregnenolone sulfate binding proteins are present in the high speed supernatant fraction (cytosol) prepared from the whole adrenal cortex of the guinea pig. However, when cytosol was prepared from the separate outer and inner cortical zones, it was found that the steroid-binding proteins were concentrated in the inner zone. This correlated with the level of pregnenolone which was significantly greater in the cytosol of the inner zone where greater than 50% was found to be bound. In contrast, the concentration of cortisol was 30 times greater in the cytosol of the outer cortical zone and less than 4% was found to be bound. These data suggest that cortisol is produced primarily in the outer cortical zone, a region which comprises only one-third of the total cortical volume. On the other hand, the coexistence of pregnenolone and its binding protein in the inner cortical zone, a region which comprises two-thirds or the greatest cortical volume, indicates a different functional status for this zone. The exact hormonal control of these two vastly different regions (chromatically, morphologically, and functionally) remains to be determined. It is speculated that the inner cortical zone of the adult guinea pig adrenal is the counterpart of the fetal cortex which did not involute.

  7. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase Induction in Tomato Flower Pedicel Phloem and Abscission Related Processes Are Differentially Sensitive to Ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Chersicola, Marko; Kladnik, Aleš; Tušek Žnidarič, Magda; Mrak, Tanja; Gruden, Kristina; Dermastia, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Ethylene has impact on several physiological plant processes, including abscission, during which plants shed both their vegetative and reproductive organs. Cell separation and programmed cell death are involved in abscission, and these have also been correlated with ethylene action. However, the detailed spatiotemporal pattern of the molecular events during abscission remains unknown. We examined the expression of two tomato ACO genes, LeACO1, and LeACO4 that encode the last enzyme in ethylene biosynthesis, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO), together with the expression of other abscission-associated genes involved in cell separation and programmed cell death, during a period of 0–12 h after abscission induction in the tomato flower pedicel abscission zone and nearby tissues. In addition, we determined their localization in specific cell layers of the flower pedicel abscission zone and nearby tissues obtained by laser microdissection before and 8 h after abscission induction. The expression of both ACO genes was localized to the vascular tissues in the pedicel. While LeACO4 was more uniformly expressed in all examined cell layers, the main expression site of LeACO1 was in cell layers just outside the abscission zone in its proximal and distal part. We showed that after abscission induction, ACO1 protein was synthesized in phloem companion cells, in which it was localized mainly in the cytoplasm. Samples were additionally treated with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), a competitive inhibitor of ethylene actions, and analyzed 8 h after abscission induction. Cell-layer-specific changes in gene expression were observed together with the specific localization and ethylene sensitivity of the hallmarks of cell separation and programmed cell death. While treatment with 1-MCP prevented separation of cells through inhibition of the expression of polygalacturonases, which are the key enzymes involved in degradation of the middle lamella, this had less impact on

  8. Distribution of neurons in functional areas of the mouse cerebral cortex reveals quantitatively different cortical zones.

    PubMed

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2013-01-01

    How are neurons distributed along the cortical surface and across functional areas? Here we use the isotropic fractionator (Herculano-Houzel and Lent, 2005) to analyze the distribution of neurons across the entire isocortex of the mouse, divided into 18 functional areas defined anatomically. We find that the number of neurons underneath a surface area (the N/A ratio) varies 4.5-fold across functional areas and neuronal density varies 3.2-fold. The face area of S1 contains the most neurons, followed by motor cortex and the primary visual cortex. Remarkably, while the distribution of neurons across functional areas does not accompany the distribution of surface area, it mirrors closely the distribution of cortical volumes-with the exception of the visual areas, which hold more neurons than expected for their volume. Across the non-visual cortex, the volume of individual functional areas is a shared linear function of their number of neurons, while in the visual areas, neuronal densities are much higher than in all other areas. In contrast, the 18 functional areas cluster into three different zones according to the relationship between the N/A ratio and cortical thickness and neuronal density: these three clusters can be called visual, sensory, and, possibly, associative. These findings are remarkably similar to those in the human cerebral cortex (Ribeiro et al., 2013) and suggest that, like the human cerebral cortex, the mouse cerebral cortex comprises two zones that differ in how neurons form the cortical volume, and three zones that differ in how neurons are distributed underneath the cortical surface, possibly in relation to local differences in connectivity through the white matter. Our results suggest that beyond the developmental divide into visual and non-visual cortex, functional areas initially share a common distribution of neurons along the parenchyma that become delimited into functional areas according to the pattern of connectivity established later.

  9. ACTION OF AUXIN ON LEAF ABSCISSION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate a two-stage effect of auxin on abscission. The two stages were demonstrated on greenhouse-grown Black...the second stage - the stage which is stimulated by auxin . Similar experiments were performed with petioles of various lengths and ages. The...implications of these results indicate possible sites of auxin action on leaf abscission. (Author)

  10. Abscission: Role of Abscisic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cracker, L. E.; Abeles, F. B.

    1969-01-01

    The effect of abscisic acid on cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv. Acala 4-42) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Red Kidney) explants was 2-fold. It increased ethylene production from the explants, which was found to account for some of its ability to accelerate abscission. Absci is acid also increased the activity of cellulase. Increased synthesis of cellulase was not du to an increase in aging of the explants but rather was an effect of abscisic acid on the processes that lead to cellulase synthesis or activity. PMID:16657181

  11. Transcriptome Analysis of Soybean Leaf Abscission Identifies Transcriptional Regulators of Organ Polarity and Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joonyup; Yang, Jinyoung; Yang, Ronghui; Sicher, Richard C.; Chang, Caren; Tucker, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    Abscission, organ separation, is a developmental process that is modulated by endogenous and environmental factors. To better understand the molecular events underlying the progression of abscission in soybean, an agriculturally important legume, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of RNA isolated from the leaf abscission zones (LAZ) and petioles (Non-AZ, NAZ) after treating stem/petiole explants with ethylene for 0, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. As expected, expression of several families of cell wall modifying enzymes and many pathogenesis-related (PR) genes specifically increased in the LAZ as abscission progressed. Here, we focus on the 5,206 soybean genes we identified as encoding transcription factors (TFs). Of the 5,206 TFs, 1,088 were differentially up- or down-regulated more than eight-fold in the LAZ over time, and, within this group, 188 of the TFs were differentially regulated more than eight-fold in the LAZ relative to the NAZ. These 188 abscission-specific TFs include several TFs containing domains for homeobox, MYB, Zinc finger, bHLH, AP2, NAC, WRKY, YABBY, and auxin-related motifs. To discover the connectivity among the TFs and highlight developmental processes that support organ separation, the 188 abscission-specific TFs were then clustered based on a >four-fold up- or down-regulation in two consecutive time points (i.e., 0 and 12 h, 12 and 24 h, 24 and 48 h, or 48 and 72 h). By requiring a sustained change in expression over two consecutive time intervals and not just one or several time intervals, we could better tie changes in TFs to a particular process or phase of abscission. The greatest number of TFs clustered into the 0 and 12 h group. Transcriptional network analysis for these abscission-specific TFs indicated that most of these TFs are known as key determinants in the maintenance of organ polarity, lateral organ growth, and cell fate. The abscission-specific expression of these TFs prior to the onset of abscission and their functional

  12. Transcriptome Analysis of Soybean Leaf Abscission Identifies Transcriptional Regulators of Organ Polarity and Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joonyup; Yang, Jinyoung; Yang, Ronghui; Sicher, Richard C; Chang, Caren; Tucker, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    Abscission, organ separation, is a developmental process that is modulated by endogenous and environmental factors. To better understand the molecular events underlying the progression of abscission in soybean, an agriculturally important legume, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of RNA isolated from the leaf abscission zones (LAZ) and petioles (Non-AZ, NAZ) after treating stem/petiole explants with ethylene for 0, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. As expected, expression of several families of cell wall modifying enzymes and many pathogenesis-related (PR) genes specifically increased in the LAZ as abscission progressed. Here, we focus on the 5,206 soybean genes we identified as encoding transcription factors (TFs). Of the 5,206 TFs, 1,088 were differentially up- or down-regulated more than eight-fold in the LAZ over time, and, within this group, 188 of the TFs were differentially regulated more than eight-fold in the LAZ relative to the NAZ. These 188 abscission-specific TFs include several TFs containing domains for homeobox, MYB, Zinc finger, bHLH, AP2, NAC, WRKY, YABBY, and auxin-related motifs. To discover the connectivity among the TFs and highlight developmental processes that support organ separation, the 188 abscission-specific TFs were then clustered based on a >four-fold up- or down-regulation in two consecutive time points (i.e., 0 and 12 h, 12 and 24 h, 24 and 48 h, or 48 and 72 h). By requiring a sustained change in expression over two consecutive time intervals and not just one or several time intervals, we could better tie changes in TFs to a particular process or phase of abscission. The greatest number of TFs clustered into the 0 and 12 h group. Transcriptional network analysis for these abscission-specific TFs indicated that most of these TFs are known as key determinants in the maintenance of organ polarity, lateral organ growth, and cell fate. The abscission-specific expression of these TFs prior to the onset of abscission and their functional

  13. Genome-wide digital transcript analysis of putative fruitlet abscission related genes regulated by ethephon in litchi

    PubMed Central

    Li, Caiqin; Wang, Yan; Ying, Peiyuan; Ma, Wuqiang; Li, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    The high level of physiological fruitlet abscission in litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) causes severe yield loss. Cell separation occurs at the fruit abscission zone (FAZ) and can be triggered by ethylene. However, a deep knowledge of the molecular events occurring in the FAZ is still unknown. Here, genome-wide digital transcript abundance (DTA) analysis of putative fruit abscission related genes regulated by ethephon in litchi were studied. More than 81 million high quality reads from seven ethephon treated and untreated control libraries were obtained by high-throughput sequencing. Through DTA profile analysis in combination with Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses, a total of 2730 statistically significant candidate genes were involved in the ethephon-promoted litchi fruitlet abscission. Of these, there were 1867 early-responsive genes whose expressions were up- or down-regulated from 0 to 1 d after treatment. The most affected genes included those related to ethylene biosynthesis and signaling, auxin transport and signaling, transcription factors (TFs), protein ubiquitination, ROS response, calcium signal transduction, and cell wall modification. These genes could be clustered into four groups and 13 subgroups according to their similar expression patterns. qRT-PCR displayed the expression pattern of 41 selected candidate genes, which proved the accuracy of our DTA data. Ethephon treatment significantly increased fruit abscission and ethylene production of fruitlet. The possible molecular events to control the ethephon-promoted litchi fruitlet abscission were prompted out. The increased ethylene evolution in fruitlet would suppress the synthesis and polar transport of auxin and trigger abscission signaling. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time to monitor the gene expression profile occurring in the FAZ-enriched pedicel during litchi fruit abscission induced by ethephon on the genome-wide level. This study will contribute to a better

  14. Genome-wide digital transcript analysis of putative fruitlet abscission related genes regulated by ethephon in litchi.

    PubMed

    Li, Caiqin; Wang, Yan; Ying, Peiyuan; Ma, Wuqiang; Li, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    The high level of physiological fruitlet abscission in litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) causes severe yield loss. Cell separation occurs at the fruit abscission zone (FAZ) and can be triggered by ethylene. However, a deep knowledge of the molecular events occurring in the FAZ is still unknown. Here, genome-wide digital transcript abundance (DTA) analysis of putative fruit abscission related genes regulated by ethephon in litchi were studied. More than 81 million high quality reads from seven ethephon treated and untreated control libraries were obtained by high-throughput sequencing. Through DTA profile analysis in combination with Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses, a total of 2730 statistically significant candidate genes were involved in the ethephon-promoted litchi fruitlet abscission. Of these, there were 1867 early-responsive genes whose expressions were up- or down-regulated from 0 to 1 d after treatment. The most affected genes included those related to ethylene biosynthesis and signaling, auxin transport and signaling, transcription factors (TFs), protein ubiquitination, ROS response, calcium signal transduction, and cell wall modification. These genes could be clustered into four groups and 13 subgroups according to their similar expression patterns. qRT-PCR displayed the expression pattern of 41 selected candidate genes, which proved the accuracy of our DTA data. Ethephon treatment significantly increased fruit abscission and ethylene production of fruitlet. The possible molecular events to control the ethephon-promoted litchi fruitlet abscission were prompted out. The increased ethylene evolution in fruitlet would suppress the synthesis and polar transport of auxin and trigger abscission signaling. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time to monitor the gene expression profile occurring in the FAZ-enriched pedicel during litchi fruit abscission induced by ethephon on the genome-wide level. This study will contribute to a better

  15. The germinal zones of the basal ganglia but not the septum generate GABAergic interneurons for the cortex.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Anna N; Alfonsi, Fabienne; Humphreys, Michael P; Choi, Christina K P; Rocha, Susana F; Kessaris, Nicoletta

    2010-09-08

    Cortical interneurons originate from subpallial precursors and migrate into the cortex during development. Using genetic lineage tracing in transgenic mice we examine the contribution of two germinal zones, the septum and the lateral ganglionic eminence/caudal ganglionic eminence (LGE/CGE) to interneurons of the cortex. We find that the septal neuroepithelium does not generate interneurons for the neocortex. There is, however, clear migration of cells from the LGE/CGE to the cortex. Comparison of the dynamics of cortical colonization by the two major cohorts of interneurons originating in the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) and the LGE/CGE has shown differences in the timing of migration and initial route of entry into the cortex. LGE/CGE-derived interneurons enter the cortex later than the MGE-derived ones. They invade the cortex through the subventricular/intermediate zone route and only later disperse within the cortical plate and the marginal zone. During the first postnatal week MGE interneurons move extensively to acquire their laminar position within the cortical plate whereas LGE/CGE-derived cells remain largely within the upper layers of the cortex. The two populations intermingle in the adult cortex but have distinct neurochemical properties and different overall distributions. LGE/CGE-derived interneurons account for one third of the total GABAergic interneuron population in the adult cortex.

  16. Afferent and Efferent Connections of the Cortex-Amygdala Transition Zone in Mice.

    PubMed

    Cádiz-Moretti, Bernardita; Abellán-Álvaro, María; Pardo-Bellver, Cecília; Martínez-García, Fernando; Lanuza, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    The transitional zone between the ventral part of the piriform cortex and the anterior cortical nucleus of the amygdala, named the cortex-amygdala transition zone (CxA), shows two differential features that allow its identification as a particular structure. First, it receives dense cholinergic and dopaminergic innervations as compared to the adjacent piriform cortex and amygdala, and second, it receives projections from the main and accessory olfactory bulbs. In this work we have studied the pattern of afferent and efferent projections of the CxA, which are mainly unknown, by using the retrograde tracer Fluorogold and the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextranamine. The results show that the CxA receives a relatively restricted set of intratelencephalic connections, originated mainly by the olfactory system and basal forebrain, with minor afferents from the amygdala. The only relevant extratelencephalic afference originates in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). The efferent projections of the CxA reciprocate the inputs from the piriform cortex and olfactory amygdala. In addition, the CxA projects densely to the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus and the olfactory tubercle. The extratelencephalic projections of the CxA are very scarce, and target mainly hypothalamic structures. The pattern of connections of the CxA suggests that it is indeed a transitional area between the piriform cortex and the cortical amygdala. Double labeling with choline acetyltransferase indicates that the afferent projection from the basal forebrain is the origin of its distinctive cholinergic innervation, and double labeling with dopamine transporter shows that the projection from the VTA is the source of dopaminergic innervation. These connectivity and neurochemical features, together with the fact that it receives vomeronasal in addition to olfactory information, suggest that the CxA may be involved in processing olfactory information endowed with relevant biological meaning, such as odors

  17. Afferent and Efferent Connections of the Cortex-Amygdala Transition Zone in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cádiz-Moretti, Bernardita; Abellán-Álvaro, María; Pardo-Bellver, Cecília; Martínez-García, Fernando; Lanuza, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    The transitional zone between the ventral part of the piriform cortex and the anterior cortical nucleus of the amygdala, named the cortex-amygdala transition zone (CxA), shows two differential features that allow its identification as a particular structure. First, it receives dense cholinergic and dopaminergic innervations as compared to the adjacent piriform cortex and amygdala, and second, it receives projections from the main and accessory olfactory bulbs. In this work we have studied the pattern of afferent and efferent projections of the CxA, which are mainly unknown, by using the retrograde tracer Fluorogold and the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextranamine. The results show that the CxA receives a relatively restricted set of intratelencephalic connections, originated mainly by the olfactory system and basal forebrain, with minor afferents from the amygdala. The only relevant extratelencephalic afference originates in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). The efferent projections of the CxA reciprocate the inputs from the piriform cortex and olfactory amygdala. In addition, the CxA projects densely to the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus and the olfactory tubercle. The extratelencephalic projections of the CxA are very scarce, and target mainly hypothalamic structures. The pattern of connections of the CxA suggests that it is indeed a transitional area between the piriform cortex and the cortical amygdala. Double labeling with choline acetyltransferase indicates that the afferent projection from the basal forebrain is the origin of its distinctive cholinergic innervation, and double labeling with dopamine transporter shows that the projection from the VTA is the source of dopaminergic innervation. These connectivity and neurochemical features, together with the fact that it receives vomeronasal in addition to olfactory information, suggest that the CxA may be involved in processing olfactory information endowed with relevant biological meaning, such as odors

  18. Polyamine-induced modulation of genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis and signalling pathways and nitric oxide production during olive mature fruit abscission

    PubMed Central

    Parra-Lobato, Maria C.; Gomez-Jimenez, Maria C.

    2011-01-01

    After fruit ripening, many fruit-tree species undergo massive natural fruit abscission. Olive (Olea europaea L.) is a stone-fruit with cultivars such as Picual (PIC) and Arbequina (ARB) which differ in mature fruit abscission potential. Ethylene (ET) is associated with abscission, but its role during mature fruit abscission remains largely uncharacterized. The present study investigates the possible roles of ET and polyamine (PA) during mature fruit abscission by modulating genes involved in the ET signalling and biosynthesis pathways in the abscission zone (AZ) of both cultivars. Five ET-related genes (OeACS2, OeACO2, OeCTR1, OeERS1, and OeEIL2) were isolated in the AZ and adjacent cells (AZ–AC), and their expression in various olive organs and during mature fruit abscission, in relation to interactions between ET and PA and the expression induction of these genes, was determined. OeACS2, OeACO2, and OeEIL2 were found to be the only genes that were up-regulated in association with mature fruit abscission. Using the inhibition of ET and PA biosynthesis, it is demonstrated that OeACS2 and OeEIL2 expression are under the negative control of PA while ET induces their expression in AZ–AC. Furthermore, mature fruit abscission depressed nitric oxide (NO) production present mainly in the epidermal cells and xylem of the AZ. Also, NO production was differentially responsive to ET, PA, and different inhibitors. Taken together, the results indicate that PA-dependent ET signalling and biosynthesis pathways participate, at least partially, during mature fruit abscission, and that endogenous NO and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid maintain an inverse correlation, suggesting an antagonistic action of NO and ET in abscission signalling. PMID:21633085

  19. Neural oscillation, network, eloquent cortex and epileptogenic zone revealed by magnetoencephalography and awake craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Kandasamy, Regunath; Reza, Faruque; Abdullah, Jafri M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a method of functional neuroimaging. The concomitant use of MEG and electrocorticography has been found to be useful in elucidating neural oscillation and network, and to localize epileptogenic zone and functional cortex. We describe our early experience using MEG in neurosurgical patients, emphasizing on its impact on patient management as well as the enrichment of our knowledge in neurosciences. Materials and Methods: A total of 10 subjects were included; five patients had intraaxial tumors, one with an extraaxial tumor and brain compression, two with arteriovenous malformations, one with cerebral peduncle hemorrhage and one with sensorimotor cortical dysplasia. All patients underwent evoked and spontaneous MEG recordings. MEG data was processed at band-pass filtering frequency of between 0.1 and 300 Hz with a sampling rate of 1 kHz. MEG source localization was performed using either overdetermined equivalent current dipoles or underdetermined inversed solution. Neuromag collection of events software was used to study brain network and epileptogenic zone. The studied data were analyzed for neural oscillation in three patients; brain network and clinical manifestation in five patients; and for the location of epileptogenic zone and eloquent cortex in two patients. Results: We elucidated neural oscillation in three patients. One demonstrated oscillatory phenomenon on stimulation of the motor-cortex during awake surgery, and two had improvement in neural oscillatory parameters after surgery. Brain networks corresponding to clinico-anatomical relationships were depicted in five patients, and two networks were illustrated here. Finally, we demonstrated epilepsy cases in which MEG data was found to be useful in localizing the epileptogenic zones and functional cortices. Conclusion: The application of MEG while enhancing our knowledge in neurosciences also has a useful role in epilepsy and awake surgery. PMID:25685205

  20. A knotted1-like homeobox protein regulates abscission in tomato by modulating the auxin pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    KD1, a gene encoding a KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX transcription factor is known to be involved, in tomato, in ontogeny of the compound leaf. KD1 is also highly expressed in both leaf and flower abscission zones. Reducing abundance of transcripts of this gene in tomato, using both virus induced gene sile...

  1. CAST AWAY, a membrane-associated receptor-like kinase, inhibits organ abscission in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Burr, Christian A; Leslie, Michelle E; Orlowski, Sara K; Chen, Iris; Wright, Catherine E; Daniels, Mark J; Liljegren, Sarah J

    2011-08-01

    Receptor-like kinase-mediated cell signaling pathways play fundamental roles in many aspects of plant growth and development. A pair of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs), HAESA (HAE) and HAESA-LIKE2 (HSL2), have been shown to activate the cell separation process that leads to organ abscission. Another pair of LRR-RLKs, EVERSHED (EVR) and SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE1, act as inhibitors of abscission, potentially by modulating HAE/HSL2 activity. Cycling of these RLKs to and from the cell surface may be regulated by NEVERSHED (NEV), a membrane trafficking regulator that is essential for organ abscission. We report here the characterization of CAST AWAY (CST), a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase that acts as a spatial inhibitor of cell separation. Disruption of CST suppresses the abscission defects of nev mutant flowers and restores the discrete identity of the trans-Golgi network in nev abscission zones. After organ shedding, enlarged abscission zones with obscured boundaries are found in nev cst flowers. We show that CST is a dual-specificity kinase in vitro and that myristoylation at its amino terminus promotes association with the plasma membrane. Using the bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay, we have detected interactions of CST with HAE and EVR at the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis protoplasts and hypothesize that CST negatively regulates cell separation signaling directly and indirectly. A model integrating the potential roles of receptor-like kinase signaling and membrane trafficking during organ separation is presented.

  2. Differential expression of several xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase genes regulates flower opening and petal abscission in roses

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amar Pal; Dubey, Shveta; Lakhwani, Deepika; Pandey, Saurabh Prakash; Khan, Kasim; Dwivedi, Upendra Nath; Nath, Pravendra; Sane, Aniruddha P.

    2013-01-01

    Flower opening is a process that requires movement of petals from a closed position to a horizontal open position, while petal abscission requires cell-wall disassembly. Both processes are controlled by ethylene and require cell-wall modification at the junction (abscission zone) of the petal and thalamus to facilitate the movement or separation of petals. In the present study, a family of xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH) genes was studied to understand their role in petal abscission in flowers of Rosa bourboniana (ethylene sensitive, early abscising) and Rosa hybrida (less ethylene sensitive, late abscising). Transcriptome sequencing of petal abscission zone cDNA was performed at different time points (ethylene treated and untreated) and screened for XTH genes. The study identified nine new XTH genes that showed differential changes in gene expression during flower opening and abscission. Of these, RbXTH3, RbXTH5, RbXTH6 and RbXTH12 were rapidly induced by ethylene within 1–4 h of ethylene treatment, corresponding to the period of flower opening. These genes also showed an early up-regulation during flower opening under ethylene-untreated (field abscission) conditions, indicating a possible role in anthesis and petal movement during flower opening. Other genes such as RbXTH4 and RbXTH9 were up-regulated later at 8–12 h after ethylene treatment and at 24–36 h under natural abscission conditions, indicating a possible role in abscission. Treatment with a higher ethylene dose (15 µL L−1 ethylene) accelerated abscission, leading to higher steady-state levels of XTH gene transcripts at an earlier time point compared with 0.5 µL L−1 ethylene. In contrast, transcript accumulation of most of the XTHs was considerably delayed in the late-abscising rose, R. hybrida, in keeping with the slower flower opening and delayed petal abscission. The results suggest coordinated action of different XTHs in cell-wall modification of xyloglucan moieties during

  3. Understanding the Physiology of Postharvest Needle Abscission in Balsam Fir.

    PubMed

    Lada, Rajasekaran R; MacDonald, Mason T

    2015-01-01

    Balsam fir (Abies balsamea) trees are commonly used as a specialty horticultural species for Christmas trees and associated greenery in eastern Canada and United States. Postharvest needle abscission has always been a problem, but is becoming an even bigger challenge in recent years presumably due to increased autumn temperatures and earlier harvesting practices. An increased understanding of postharvest abscission physiology in balsam fir may benefit the Christmas tree industry while simultaneously advancing our knowledge in senescence and abscission of conifers in general. Our paper describes the dynamics of needle abscission in balsam fir while identifying key factors that modify abscission patterns. Concepts such as genotypic abscission resistance, nutrition, environmental factors, and postharvest changes in water conductance and hormone evolution are discussed as they relate to our understanding of the balsam fir abscission physiology. Our paper ultimately proposes a pathway for needle abscission via ethylene and also suggests other potential alternative pathways based on our current understanding.

  4. Understanding the Physiology of Postharvest Needle Abscission in Balsam Fir

    PubMed Central

    Lada, Rajasekaran R.; MacDonald, Mason T.

    2015-01-01

    Balsam fir (Abies balsamea) trees are commonly used as a specialty horticultural species for Christmas trees and associated greenery in eastern Canada and United States. Postharvest needle abscission has always been a problem, but is becoming an even bigger challenge in recent years presumably due to increased autumn temperatures and earlier harvesting practices. An increased understanding of postharvest abscission physiology in balsam fir may benefit the Christmas tree industry while simultaneously advancing our knowledge in senescence and abscission of conifers in general. Our paper describes the dynamics of needle abscission in balsam fir while identifying key factors that modify abscission patterns. Concepts such as genotypic abscission resistance, nutrition, environmental factors, and postharvest changes in water conductance and hormone evolution are discussed as they relate to our understanding of the balsam fir abscission physiology. Our paper ultimately proposes a pathway for needle abscission via ethylene and also suggests other potential alternative pathways based on our current understanding. PMID:26635863

  5. Roles of Ethylene Production and Ethylene Receptor Expression in Regulating Apple Fruitlet Abscission1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Eccher, Giulia; Begheldo, Maura; Boschetti, Andrea; Ruperti, Benedetto; Botton, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Apple (Malus × domestica) is increasingly being considered an interesting model species for studying early fruit development, during which an extremely relevant phenomenon, fruitlet abscission, may occur as a response to both endogenous and/or exogenous cues. Several studies were carried out shedding light on the main physiological and molecular events leading to the selective release of lateral fruitlets within a corymb, either occurring naturally or as a result of a thinning treatment. Several studies pointed out a clear association between a rise of ethylene biosynthetic levels in the fruitlet and its tendency to abscise. A direct mechanistic link, however, has not yet been established between this gaseous hormone and the generation of the abscission signal within the fruit. In this work, the role of ethylene during the very early stages of abscission induction was investigated in fruitlet populations with different abscission potentials due either to the natural correlative inhibitions determining the so-called physiological fruit drop or to a well-tested thinning treatment performed with the cytokinin benzyladenine. A crucial role was ascribed to the ratio between the ethylene produced by the cortex and the expression of ethylene receptor genes in the seed. This ratio would determine the final probability to abscise. A working model has been proposed consistent with the differential distribution of four receptor transcripts within the seed, which resembles a spatially progressive cell-specific immune-like mechanism evolved by apple to protect the embryo from harmful ethylene. PMID:25888617

  6. Roles of Ethylene Production and Ethylene Receptor Expression in Regulating Apple Fruitlet Abscission.

    PubMed

    Eccher, Giulia; Begheldo, Maura; Boschetti, Andrea; Ruperti, Benedetto; Botton, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    Apple (Malus × domestica) is increasingly being considered an interesting model species for studying early fruit development, during which an extremely relevant phenomenon, fruitlet abscission, may occur as a response to both endogenous and/or exogenous cues. Several studies were carried out shedding light on the main physiological and molecular events leading to the selective release of lateral fruitlets within a corymb, either occurring naturally or as a result of a thinning treatment. Several studies pointed out a clear association between a rise of ethylene biosynthetic levels in the fruitlet and its tendency to abscise. A direct mechanistic link, however, has not yet been established between this gaseous hormone and the generation of the abscission signal within the fruit. In this work, the role of ethylene during the very early stages of abscission induction was investigated in fruitlet populations with different abscission potentials due either to the natural correlative inhibitions determining the so-called physiological fruit drop or to a well-tested thinning treatment performed with the cytokinin benzyladenine. A crucial role was ascribed to the ratio between the ethylene produced by the cortex and the expression of ethylene receptor genes in the seed. This ratio would determine the final probability to abscise. A working model has been proposed consistent with the differential distribution of four receptor transcripts within the seed, which resembles a spatially progressive cell-specific immune-like mechanism evolved by apple to protect the embryo from harmful ethylene.

  7. Abscission, organ separation, is more complex than you might think

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abscission, organ separation, is an integral part of the life of a plant. Natural and artificial regulation of abscission can have substantive effects on crop yield and fruit quality. It’s been nearly 100 years since the discovery that ethylene played a role in abscission and more than 50 years si...

  8. Environmental Factors in the Physiology of Abscission

    PubMed Central

    Addicott, Fredrick T.

    1968-01-01

    This paper reviews the physiological effects of the principal environmental factors which can influence the process of leaf abscission. The factors include temperature, light, water, gases, mineral elements, soil conditions, and parasitic organisms. These factors influence a variety of internal physiological conditions and processes which in turn may either accelerate or retard the process of abscission. The most important internal factors include A) sugar, pectin, cellulose, and other carbohydrates; B) energy-yielding respiration; C) enzymic reactions; D) amino acids, purines, and other nitrogenous substances; E) levels of plant hormones; and F) the molecular biological pathway. The current information is consistent with the hypothesis that the environmental factors act in leaf abscission via direct or indirect influences on the synthesis or reaction rate of enzymes. PMID:16657013

  9. Mapping phonemic processing zones along human perisylvian cortex: an electro-corticographic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Molholm, Sophie; Mercier, Manuel R.; Liebenthal, Einat; Schwartz, Theodore H.; Ritter, Walter; Foxe, John J.; De Sanctis, Pierfilippo

    2015-01-01

    The auditory system is organized such that progressively more complex features are represented across successive cortical hierarchical stages. Just when and where the processing of phonemes, fundamental elements of the speech signal, is achieved in this hierarchy remains a matter of vigorous debate. Non-invasive measures of phonemic representation have been somewhat equivocal. While some studies point to a primary role for middle/anterior regions of the superior temporal gyrus (STG), others implicate the posterior STG. Differences in stimulation, task and inter-individual anatomical/functional variability may account for these discrepant findings. Here, we sought to clarify this issue by mapping phonemic representation across left perisylvian cortex, taking advantage of the excellent sampling density afforded by intracranial recordings in humans. We asked whether one or both major divisions of the STG were sensitive to phonemic transitions. The high signal-to-noise characteristics of direct intracranial recordings allowed for analysis at the individual participant level, circumventing issues of inter-individual anatomic and functional variability that may have obscured previous findings at the group level of analysis. The mismatch negativity (MMN), an electro-physiological response elicited by changes in repetitive streams of stimulation, served as our primary dependent measure. Oddball configurations of pairs of phonemes, spectro-temporally matched non-phonemes, and simple tones were presented. The loci of the MMN clearly differed as a function of stimulus type. Phoneme representation was most robust over middle/anterior STG/STS, but was also observed over posterior STG/SMG. These data point to multiple phonemic processing zones along perisylvian cortex, both anterior and posterior to primary auditory cortex. This finding is considered within the context of a dual stream model of auditory processing in which functionally distinct ventral and dorsal auditory

  10. The Transcription Factor AtDOF4.7 Is Involved in Ethylene- and IDA-Mediated Organ Abscission in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gao-Qi; Wei, Peng-Cheng; Tan, Feng; Yu, Man; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Qi-Jun; Wang, Xue-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Organ abscission is an important plant developmental process that occurs in response to environmental stress or pathogens. In Arabidopsis, ligand signals, such as ethylene or INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION (IDA), can regulate organ abscission. Previously, we reported that overexpression of AtDOF4.7, a transcription factor gene, directly suppresses the expression of the abscission-related gene ARABIDOPSIS DEHISCENCE ZONE POLYGALACTURONASE 2 (ADPG2), resulting in a deficiency of floral organ abscission. However, the relationship between AtDOF4.7 and abscission pathways still needs to be investigated. In this study, we showed that ethylene regulates the expression of AtDOF4.7, and the peptide ligand, IDA negatively regulates AtDOF4.7 at the transcriptional level. Genetic evidence indicates that AtDOF4.7 and IDA are involved in a common pathway, and a MAPK cascade can phosphorylate AtDOF4.7 in vitro. Further in vivo data suggest that AtDOF4.7 protein levels may be regulated by this phosphorylation. Collectively, our results indicate that ethylene regulates AtDOF4.7 that is involved in the IDA-mediated floral organ abscission pathway.

  11. The Transcription Factor AtDOF4.7 Is Involved in Ethylene- and IDA-Mediated Organ Abscission in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gao-Qi; Wei, Peng-Cheng; Tan, Feng; Yu, Man; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Qi-Jun; Wang, Xue-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Organ abscission is an important plant developmental process that occurs in response to environmental stress or pathogens. In Arabidopsis, ligand signals, such as ethylene or INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION (IDA), can regulate organ abscission. Previously, we reported that overexpression of AtDOF4.7, a transcription factor gene, directly suppresses the expression of the abscission-related gene ARABIDOPSIS DEHISCENCE ZONE POLYGALACTURONASE 2 (ADPG2), resulting in a deficiency of floral organ abscission. However, the relationship between AtDOF4.7 and abscission pathways still needs to be investigated. In this study, we showed that ethylene regulates the expression of AtDOF4.7, and the peptide ligand, IDA negatively regulates AtDOF4.7 at the transcriptional level. Genetic evidence indicates that AtDOF4.7 and IDA are involved in a common pathway, and a MAPK cascade can phosphorylate AtDOF4.7 in vitro. Further in vivo data suggest that AtDOF4.7 protein levels may be regulated by this phosphorylation. Collectively, our results indicate that ethylene regulates AtDOF4.7 that is involved in the IDA-mediated floral organ abscission pathway. PMID:27379143

  12. Developmental Links between the Fetal and Adult Zones of the Adrenal Cortex Revealed by Lineage Tracing▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Mohamad; Parker, Keith L.; Morohashi, Ken-ichirou

    2008-01-01

    The nuclear receptor Ad4BP/SF-1 is essential for development of the adrenal cortex and the gonads, which derive from a common adrenogonadal primordium. The adrenal cortex subsequently forms morphologically distinct compartments: the inner (fetal) and outer (definitive or adult) zones. Despite considerable effort, the mechanisms that mediate the differential development of the adrenal and gonadal primordia and the fetal and adult adrenal cortices remain incompletely understood. We previously identified a fetal adrenal-specific enhancer (FAdE) in the Ad4BP/SF-1 locus that directs transgene expression to the fetal adrenal cortex and demonstrated that this enhancer is autoregulated by Ad4BP/SF-1. We now combine the FAdE with the Cre/loxP system to trace cell lineages in which the FAdE was active at some stage in development. These lineage-tracing studies establish definitively that the adult cortex derives from precursor cells in the fetal cortex in which the FAdE was activated before the organization into two distinct zones. The potential of these fetal adrenocortical cells to enter the pathway that eventuates in cells of the adult cortex disappeared by embryonic day 14.5. Thus, these studies demonstrate a direct link between the fetal and adult cortices involving a transition that must occur before a specific stage of development. PMID:18809574

  13. HLB-associated pre-harvest fruit abscission is mediated by jasmonate/ethylene signaling triggered by secondary fungal infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One symptom of citrus huanglongbing (HLB) is excessive pre-harvest fruit drop. Recently, higher incidence of Lasiodiplodia theobromae (Diplodia) was found in HLB-symptomatic orange calyx abscission zones (AZ-C) than in non-symptomatic fruit, and the infection was positively correlated with the reduc...

  14. Overexpression of a novel MADS-box gene SlFYFL delays senescence, fruit ripening and abscission in tomato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qiaoli; Hu, Zongli; Zhu, Zhiguo; Dong, Tingting; Zhao, Zhiping; Cui, Baolu; Chen, Guoping

    2014-03-01

    MADS-domain proteins are important transcription factors involved in many biological processes of plants. In our study, a tomato MADS-box gene, SlFYFL, was isolated. SlFYFL is expressed in all tissues of tomato and significantly higher in mature leave, fruit of different stages, AZ (abscission zone) and sepal. Delayed leaf senescence and fruit ripening, increased storability and longer sepals were observed in 35S:FYFL tomato. The accumulation of carotenoid was reduced, and ethylene content, ethylene biosynthetic and responsive genes were down-regulated in 35S:FYFL fruits. Abscission zone (AZ) did not form normally and abscission zone development related genes were declined in AZs of 35S:FYFL plants. Yeast two-hybrid assay revealed that SlFYFL protein could interact with SlMADS-RIN, SlMADS1 and SlJOINTLESS, respectively. These results suggest that overexpression of SlFYFL regulate fruit ripening and development of AZ via interactions with the ripening and abscission zone-related MADS box proteins.

  15. The Abscission Checkpoint: Making It to the Final Cut.

    PubMed

    Nähse, Viola; Christ, Liliane; Stenmark, Harald; Campsteijn, Coen

    2017-01-01

    Cytokinesis is the final stage of cell division and is concluded by abscission of the intercellular bridge to physically separate the daughter cells. Timing of cytokinetic abscission is monitored by a molecular machinery termed the abscission checkpoint. This machinery delays abscission in cells with persistent chromatin in the intercellular bridge. Recent work has also uncovered its response to high membrane tension, nuclear pore defects, and DNA replication stress. Although it is known that the abscission checkpoint depends on persistent activity of the Aurora B protein kinase, we have only recently begun to understand its molecular basis. We propose here a molecular framework for abscission checkpoint signaling and we discuss outstanding questions relating to its function and physiological relevance.

  16. Role of RNA and Protein Synthesis in Abscission

    PubMed Central

    Abeles, F. B.

    1968-01-01

    The cell separation aspect of abscission is thought to involve the action of specific cell wall degrading enzymes. Enzymes represent synthesis which in turn is preceded by the synthesis of specific RNA molecules, and it follows that inhibition of either of these processes would also block abscission. Since abscission is a localized phenomenon usually involving 2 or 3 cell layers, RNA and protein synthesis should also be localized. Manipulations of plant material which either accelerate or retard abscission may be due to the regulation of RNA and protein synthesis. This paper is a review of literature concerned with these and related questions. Images PMID:16657020

  17. Bimodal effect of hydrogen peroxide and oxidative events in nitrite-induced rapid root abscission by the water fern Azolla pinnata

    DOE PAGES

    Cohen, Michael F.; Gurung, Sushma; Birarda, Giovanni; ...

    2015-07-09

    In the genus Azolla rapid abscission of roots from floating fronds occurs within minutes in response to a variety of stresses, including exposure to nitrite. We found that hydrogen peroxide, though itself not an inducer of root abscission, modulates nitrite-induced root abscission by Azolla pinnata in a dose-dependent manner, with 2 mM H2O2 significantly diminishing the responsiveness to 2 mM NaNO2, and 10 mM H2O2 slightly enhancing it. Hypoxia, which has been found in other plants to result in autogenic production of H2O2, dramatically stimulated root abscission of A. pinnata in response to nitrite, especially for plants previously cultivated inmore » medium containing 5 mM KNO3 compared to plants cultivated under N2-fixing conditions without combined nitrogen. Plants, including Azolla, produce the small signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite using nitrate reductase. We found Azolla plants to display dose-dependent root abscission in response to the NO donor spermine NONOate. Treatment of plants with the thiol-modifying agents S-methyl methanethiosulfonate or glutathione inhibited the nitrite-induced root abscission response. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared spectromicroscopy revealed higher levels of carbonylation in the abscission zone of dropped roots, indicative of reaction products of polysaccharides with potent free radical oxidants. Lastly, we hypothesize that metabolic products of nitrite and NO react with H2O2 in the apoplast leading to free-radical-mediated cleavage of structural polysaccharides and consequent rapid root abscission.« less

  18. Bimodal effect of hydrogen peroxide and oxidative events in nitrite-induced rapid root abscission by the water fern Azolla pinnata

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Michael F.; Gurung, Sushma; Birarda, Giovanni; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Yamasaki, Hideo

    2015-07-09

    In the genus Azolla rapid abscission of roots from floating fronds occurs within minutes in response to a variety of stresses, including exposure to nitrite. We found that hydrogen peroxide, though itself not an inducer of root abscission, modulates nitrite-induced root abscission by Azolla pinnata in a dose-dependent manner, with 2 mM H2O2 significantly diminishing the responsiveness to 2 mM NaNO2, and 10 mM H2O2 slightly enhancing it. Hypoxia, which has been found in other plants to result in autogenic production of H2O2, dramatically stimulated root abscission of A. pinnata in response to nitrite, especially for plants previously cultivated in medium containing 5 mM KNO3 compared to plants cultivated under N2-fixing conditions without combined nitrogen. Plants, including Azolla, produce the small signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite using nitrate reductase. We found Azolla plants to display dose-dependent root abscission in response to the NO donor spermine NONOate. Treatment of plants with the thiol-modifying agents S-methyl methanethiosulfonate or glutathione inhibited the nitrite-induced root abscission response. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared spectromicroscopy revealed higher levels of carbonylation in the abscission zone of dropped roots, indicative of reaction products of polysaccharides with potent free radical oxidants. Lastly, we hypothesize that metabolic products of nitrite and NO react with H2O2 in the apoplast leading to free-radical-mediated cleavage of structural polysaccharides and consequent rapid root abscission.

  19. Bimodal effect of hydrogen peroxide and oxidative events in nitrite-induced rapid root abscission by the water fern Azolla pinnata

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Michael F.; Gurung, Sushma; Birarda, Giovanni; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Yamasaki, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    In the genus Azolla rapid abscission of roots from floating fronds occurs within minutes in response to a variety of stresses, including exposure to nitrite. We found that hydrogen peroxide, though itself not an inducer of root abscission, modulates nitrite-induced root abscission by Azolla pinnata in a dose-dependent manner, with 2 mM H2O2 significantly diminishing the responsiveness to 2 mM NaNO2, and 10 mM H2O2 slightly enhancing it. Hypoxia, which has been found in other plants to result in autogenic production of H2O2, dramatically stimulated root abscission of A. pinnata in response to nitrite, especially for plants previously cultivated in medium containing 5 mM KNO3 compared to plants cultivated under N2-fixing conditions without combined nitrogen. Plants, including Azolla, produce the small signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite using nitrate reductase. We found Azolla plants to display dose-dependent root abscission in response to the NO donor spermine NONOate. Treatment of plants with the thiol-modifying agents S-methyl methanethiosulfonate or glutathione inhibited the nitrite-induced root abscission response. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared spectromicroscopy revealed higher levels of carbonylation in the abscission zone of dropped roots, indicative of reaction products of polysaccharides with potent free radical oxidants. We hypothesize that metabolic products of nitrite and NO react with H2O2 in the apoplast leading to free-radical-mediated cleavage of structural polysaccharides and consequent rapid root abscission. PMID:26217368

  20. An improved fruit transcriptome and the identification of the candidate genes involved in fruit abscission induced by carbohydrate stress in litchi

    PubMed Central

    Li, Caiqin; Wang, Yan; Huang, Xuming; Li, Jiang; Wang, Huicong; Li, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Massive young fruit abscission usually causes low and unstable yield in litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.), an important fruit crop cultivated in tropical and subtropical areas. However, the molecular mechanism of fruit drop has not been fully characterized. This study aimed at identification of molecular components involved in fruitlet abscission in litchi, for which reference genome is not available at present. An improved de novo transcriptome assembly was firstly achieved by using an optimized assembly software, Trinity. Using improved transcriptome assembly as reference, digital transcript abundance (DTA) profiling was performed to screen and identify candidate genes involved in fruit abscission induced by girdling plus defoliation (GPD), a treatment significantly decreased the soluble sugar contents causing carbohydrate stress to fruit. Our results showed that the increasing fruit abscission rate after GPD treatment was associated with higher ethylene production and lower glucose levels in fruit. A total of 2,771 differentially expressed genes were identified as GPD-responsive genes, 857 of which were defined by GO and KEGG enrichment analyses as the candidate genes involved in fruit abscission process. These genes were involved in diverse metabolic processes and pathways, including carbohydrate metabolism, plant hormone synthesis, and signaling, transcription factor activity and cell wall modification that were rapidly induced in the early stages (within 2 days after treatment). qRT-PCR was used to explore the expression pattern of 15 selected candidate genes in the abscission zone, pericarp, and seed, which confirmed the accuracy of our DTA data. More detailed information for different functional categories was also analyzed. This study profiled the gene expression related to fruit abscission induced by carbohydrate stress at whole transcriptome level and thus provided a better understanding of the regulatory mechanism of young fruit abscission in litchi. PMID

  1. Examination of the Abscission-Associated Transcriptomes for Soybean, Tomato, and Arabidopsis Highlights the Conserved Biosynthesis of an Extensible Extracellular Matrix and Boundary Layer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joonyup; Sundaresan, Srivignesh; Philosoph-Hadas, Sonia; Yang, Ronghui; Meir, Shimon; Tucker, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Abscission zone (AZ) development and the progression of abscission (detachment of plant organs) have been roughly separated into four stages: first, AZ differentiation; second, competence to respond to abscission signals; third, activation of abscission; and fourth, formation of a protective layer and post-abscission trans-differentiation. Stage three, activation of abscission, is when changes in the cell wall and extracellular matrix occur to support successful organ separation. Most abscission research has focused on gene expression for enzymes that disassemble the cell wall within the AZ and changes in phytohormones and other signaling events that regulate their expression. Here, transcriptome data for soybean, tomato and Arabidopsis were examined and compared with a focus not only on genes associated with disassembly of the cell wall but also on gene expression linked to the biosynthesis of a new extracellular matrix. AZ-specific up-regulation of genes associated with cell wall disassembly including cellulases (beta-1,4-endoglucanases, CELs), polygalacturonases (PGs), and expansins (EXPs) were much as expected; however, curiously, changes in expression of xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolases (XTHs) were not AZ-specific in soybean. Unexpectedly, we identified an early increase in the expression of genes underlying the synthesis of a waxy-like cuticle. Based on the expression data, we propose that the early up-regulation of an abundance of small pathogenesis-related (PR) genes is more closely linked to structural changes in the extracellular matrix of separating cells than an enzymatic role in pathogen resistance. Furthermore, these observations led us to propose that, in addition to cell wall loosening enzymes, abscission requires (or is enhanced by) biosynthesis and secretion of small proteins (15–25 kDa) and waxes that form an extensible extracellular matrix and boundary layer on the surface of separating cells. The synthesis of the boundary layer

  2. Fruit abscission by Physalis species as defense against frugivory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit abscission as a response to herbivory is well-documented in many plant species, but its effect on further damage by mobile herbivores that survive fruit abscission is relatively unstudied. Physalis plants abscise fruit containing feeding larvae of their main frugivore, Heliothis subflexa Guen...

  3. Spatially Directed Proteomics of the Human Lens Outer Cortex Reveals an Intermediate Filament Switch Associated With the Remodeling Zone

    PubMed Central

    Wenke, Jamie L.; McDonald, W. Hayes; Schey, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To quantify protein changes in the morphologically distinct remodeling zone (RZ) and adjacent regions of the human lens outer cortex using spatially directed quantitative proteomics. Methods Lightly fixed human lens sections were deparaffinized and membranes labeled with fluorescent wheat germ agglutinin (WGA-TRITC). Morphology directed laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate tissue from four distinct regions of human lens outer cortex: differentiating zone (DF), RZ, transition zone (TZ), and inner cortex (IC). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) of the plasma membrane fraction from three lenses (21-, 22-, and 27-year) revealed changes in major cytoskeletal proteins including vimentin, filensin, and phakinin. Peptides from proteins of interest were quantified using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry and isotopically-labeled internal peptide standards. Results Results revealed an intermediate filament switch from vimentin to beaded filament proteins filensin and phakinin that occurred at the RZ. Several other cytoskeletal proteins showed significant changes between regions, while most crystallins remained unchanged. Targeted proteomics provided accurate, absolute quantification of these proteins and confirmed vimentin, periplakin, and periaxin decrease from the DF to the IC, while filensin, phakinin, and brain acid soluble protein 1 (BASP1) increase significantly at the RZ. Conclusions Mass spectrometry-compatible fixation and morphology directed laser capture enabled proteomic analysis of narrow regions in the human lens outer cortex. Results reveal dramatic cytoskeletal protein changes associated with the RZ, suggesting that one role of these proteins is in membrane deformation and/or the establishment of ball and socket joints in the human RZ. PMID:27537260

  4. Ethephon As a Potential Abscission Agent for Table Grapes: Effects on Pre-Harvest Abscission, Fruit Quality, and Residue

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Giuseppe; Mazzeo, Andrea; Matarrese, Angela M. S.; Pacucci, Carmela; Trani, Antonio; Fidelibus, Matthew W.; Gambacorta, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Some plant growth regulators, including ethephon, can stimulate abscission of mature grape berries. The stimulation of grape berry abscission reduces fruit detachment force (FDF) and promotes the development of a dry stem scar, both of which could facilitate the production of high quality stemless fresh-cut table grapes. The objective of this research was to determine how two potential abscission treatments, 1445 and 2890 mg/L ethephon, affected FDF, pre-harvest abscission, fruit quality, and ethephon residue of Thompson Seedless and Crimson Seedless grapes. Both ethephon treatments strongly induced abscission of Thompson Seedless berries causing >90% pre-harvest abscission. Lower ethephon rates, a shorter post-harvest interval, or berry retention systems such as nets, would be needed to prevent excessive pre-harvest losses. The treatments also slightly affected Thompson Seedless berry skin color, with treated fruit being darker, less uniform in color, and with a more yellow hue than non-treated fruit. Ethephon residues on Thompson Seedless grapes treated with the lower concentration of ethephon were below legal limits at harvest. Ethephon treatments also promoted abscission of Crimson Seedless berries, but pre-harvest abscission was much lower (≅49%) in Crimson Seedless compared to Thompson Seedless. Treated fruits were slightly darker than non-treated fruits, but ethephon did not affect SSC, acidity, or firmness of Crimson Seedless, and ethephon residues were below legal limits. PMID:27303407

  5. The Phytotoxin Coronatine Induces Abscission-Related Gene Expression and Boll Ripening during Defoliation of Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaoli; Duan, Liusheng; Zhang, Mingcai; Tan, Weiming; Xu, Dongyong; Li, Zhaohu

    2014-01-01

    Defoliants can increase machine harvest efficiency of cotton (Gossypium hirusutum L.), prevent lodging and reduce the time from defoliation to harvest. Coronatine (COR) is a chlorosis-inducing non-host-specific phytotoxin that induces leaf and/or fruit abscission in some crops. The present study investigates how COR might induce cotton leaf abscission by modulating genes involved in cell wall hydrolases and ACC (ethylene precursor) in various cotton tissues. The effects of COR on cotton boll ripening, seedcotton yield, and seed development were also studied. After 14 d of treatment with COR, cells within the leaf abscission zone (AZ) showed marked differentiation. Elevated transcripts of GhCEL1, GhPG and GhACS were observed in the AZs treated with COR and Thidiazuron (TDZ). The relative expression of GhCEL1 and GhACS in TDZ treated plants was approximately twice that in plants treated with COR for 12 h. However, only GhACS expression increased in leaf blade and petiole. There was a continuous increase in the activity of hydrolytic enzymes such as cellulase (CEL) and polygalacturonase (PG), and ACC accumulation in AZs following COR and TDZ treatments, but there was greater increase in ACC activity of COR treated boll crust, indicating that COR had greater ripening effect than TDZ. Coronatine significantly enhanced boll opening without affecting boll weight, lint percentage and seed quality. Therefore, COR can be a potential cotton defoliant with different physiological mechanism of action from the currently used TDZ. PMID:24845465

  6. The phytotoxin coronatine induces abscission-related gene expression and boll ripening during defoliation of cotton.

    PubMed

    Du, Mingwei; Li, Yi; Tian, Xiaoli; Duan, Liusheng; Zhang, Mingcai; Tan, Weiming; Xu, Dongyong; Li, Zhaohu

    2014-01-01

    Defoliants can increase machine harvest efficiency of cotton (Gossypium hirusutum L.), prevent lodging and reduce the time from defoliation to harvest. Coronatine (COR) is a chlorosis-inducing non-host-specific phytotoxin that induces leaf and/or fruit abscission in some crops. The present study investigates how COR might induce cotton leaf abscission by modulating genes involved in cell wall hydrolases and ACC (ethylene precursor) in various cotton tissues. The effects of COR on cotton boll ripening, seedcotton yield, and seed development were also studied. After 14 d of treatment with COR, cells within the leaf abscission zone (AZ) showed marked differentiation. Elevated transcripts of GhCEL1, GhPG and GhACS were observed in the AZs treated with COR and Thidiazuron (TDZ). The relative expression of GhCEL1 and GhACS in TDZ treated plants was approximately twice that in plants treated with COR for 12 h. However, only GhACS expression increased in leaf blade and petiole. There was a continuous increase in the activity of hydrolytic enzymes such as cellulase (CEL) and polygalacturonase (PG), and ACC accumulation in AZs following COR and TDZ treatments, but there was greater increase in ACC activity of COR treated boll crust, indicating that COR had greater ripening effect than TDZ. Coronatine significantly enhanced boll opening without affecting boll weight, lint percentage and seed quality. Therefore, COR can be a potential cotton defoliant with different physiological mechanism of action from the currently used TDZ.

  7. Mechanistic insight into a peptide hormone signaling complex mediating floral organ abscission

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Julia; Brandt, Benjamin; Wildhagen, Mari; Hohmann, Ulrich; Hothorn, Ludwig A; Butenko, Melinka A; Hothorn, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Plants constantly renew during their life cycle and thus require to shed senescent and damaged organs. Floral abscission is controlled by the leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase (LRR-RK) HAESA and the peptide hormone IDA. It is unknown how expression of IDA in the abscission zone leads to HAESA activation. Here we show that IDA is sensed directly by the HAESA ectodomain. Crystal structures of HAESA in complex with IDA reveal a hormone binding pocket that accommodates an active dodecamer peptide. A central hydroxyproline residue anchors IDA to the receptor. The HAESA co-receptor SERK1, a positive regulator of the floral abscission pathway, allows for high-affinity sensing of the peptide hormone by binding to an Arg-His-Asn motif in IDA. This sequence pattern is conserved among diverse plant peptides, suggesting that plant peptide hormone receptors may share a common ligand binding mode and activation mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15075.001 PMID:27058169

  8. PKCɛ switches Aurora B specificity to exit the abscission checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Tanya; Brownlow, Nicola; Kjaer, Svend; Carlton, Jeremy; Parker, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The ‘NoCut', or Aurora B abscission checkpoint can be activated if DNA is retained in the cleavage furrow after completion of anaphase. Checkpoint failure leads to incomplete abscission and a binucleate outcome. These phenotypes are also observed after loss of PKCɛ in transformed cell models. Here we show that PKCɛ directly modulates the Aurora B-dependent abscission checkpoint by phosphorylating Aurora B at S227. This phosphorylation invokes a switch in Aurora B specificity, with increased phosphorylation of a subset of target substrates, including the CPC subunit Borealin. This switch is essential for abscission checkpoint exit. Preventing the phosphorylation of Borealin leads to abscission failure, as does expression of a non-phosphorylatable Aurora B S227A mutant. Further, depletion of the ESCRT-III component and Aurora B substrate CHMP4C enables abscission, bypassing the PKCɛ–Aurora B exit pathway. Thus, we demonstrate that PKCɛ signals through Aurora B to exit the abscission checkpoint and complete cell division. PMID:28004745

  9. PKCɛ switches Aurora B specificity to exit the abscission checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Pike, Tanya; Brownlow, Nicola; Kjaer, Svend; Carlton, Jeremy; Parker, Peter J

    2016-12-22

    The 'NoCut', or Aurora B abscission checkpoint can be activated if DNA is retained in the cleavage furrow after completion of anaphase. Checkpoint failure leads to incomplete abscission and a binucleate outcome. These phenotypes are also observed after loss of PKCɛ in transformed cell models. Here we show that PKCɛ directly modulates the Aurora B-dependent abscission checkpoint by phosphorylating Aurora B at S227. This phosphorylation invokes a switch in Aurora B specificity, with increased phosphorylation of a subset of target substrates, including the CPC subunit Borealin. This switch is essential for abscission checkpoint exit. Preventing the phosphorylation of Borealin leads to abscission failure, as does expression of a non-phosphorylatable Aurora B S227A mutant. Further, depletion of the ESCRT-III component and Aurora B substrate CHMP4C enables abscission, bypassing the PKCɛ-Aurora B exit pathway. Thus, we demonstrate that PKCɛ signals through Aurora B to exit the abscission checkpoint and complete cell division.

  10. FOREVER YOUNG FLOWER Negatively Regulates Ethylene Response DNA-Binding Factors by Activating an Ethylene-Responsive Factor to Control Arabidopsis Floral Organ Senescence and Abscission.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Han; Li, Pei-Fang; Chen, Ming-Kun; Lee, Yung-I; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2015-08-01

    In this study of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we investigated the relationship between FOREVER YOUNG FLOWER (FYF) and Ethylene Response DNA-binding Factors (EDFs) and functionally analyzed a key FYF target, an Ethylene-Responsive Factor (ERF), that controls flower senescence/abscission. Ectopic expression of EDF1/2/3/4 caused promotion of flower senescence/abscission and the activation of the senescence-associated genes. The presence of a repressor domain in EDFs and the enhancement of the promotion of senescence/abscission in EDF1/2/3/4+SRDX (converting EDFs to strong repressors by fusion with the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression motif repression domain SRDX) transgenic plants suggested that EDFs act as repressors. The significant reduction of β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression by 35S:FYF in EDF1/2/3/4:GUS plants indicates that EDF1/2/3/4 functions downstream of FYF in regulating flower senescence/abscission. In this study, we also characterized an ERF gene, FOREVER YOUNG FLOWER UP-REGULATING FACTOR1 (FUF1), which is up-regulated by FYF during flower development. Ectopic expression of FUF1 caused similar delayed flower senescence/abscission as seen in 35S:FYF plants. This phenotype was correlated with deficient abscission zone formation, ethylene insensitivity, and down-regulation of EDF1/2/3/4 and abscission-associated genes in 35S:FUF1 flowers. In contrast, significant promotion of flower senescence/abscission and up-regulation of EDF1/2/3/4 were observed in 35S:FUF1+SRDX transgenic dominant-negative plants, in which FUF1 is converted to a potent repressor by fusion to an SRDX-suppressing motif. Thus, FUF1 acts as an activator in suppressing EDF1/2/3/4 function and senescence/abscission of the flowers. Our results reveal that FYF regulates flower senescence/abscission by negatively regulating EDF1/2/3/4, which is the downstream gene in the ethylene response, by activating FUF1 in Arabidopsis.

  11. Protein kinase C epsilon in cell division: control of abscission.

    PubMed

    Saurin, Adrian T; Brownlow, Nicola; Parker, Peter J

    2009-02-15

    Cell division requires the separation and partitioning of sister chromatids to opposite ends of the cell before an actomyosin ring contracts the membrane in between during cytokinesis. The final irreversible step occurs during abscission when the ring breaks down and the membrane is sealed in its place. The physical mechanics of contraction depend on RhoA, which is stimulated by a centralspindlin complex around the cell equator. However exactly how these events are reversed to allow actomyosin breakdown and abscission were not well understood. Here we will discuss new findings that implicate Protein Kinase C epsilon (PKCepsilon) as a regulator of RhoA signalling required for abscission.

  12. A safe zone for the passage of screws through the posterior tibial cortex in tibial tubercle transfer.

    PubMed

    Shetty, A A; Tindall, A J; Nickolaou, N; James, K D; Ignotus, P

    2005-04-01

    In tibial tubercle transfer, surgery drills and screws can put the popliteal vessels at risk if the posterior cortex is breached. This complication can be devastating. We have looked at arteriograms of 50 knees and identified a safe zone through which an instrument can be passed with more confidence. In our study we found no vessels directly posterior to the supero-medial aspect of the proximal metaphysis in any knee. Whilst care must still be taken, this area will allow surgeons greater confidence to obtain a stronger bicortical hold with any fixation device.

  13. Abscission checkpoint control: stuck in the middle with Aurora B.

    PubMed

    Carmena, Mar

    2012-07-01

    At the end of cell division, the cytoplasmic bridge joining the daughter cells is severed through a process that involves scission of the plasma membrane. The presence of chromatin bridges 'stuck' in the division plane is sensed by the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) component Aurora B kinase, triggering a checkpoint that delays abscission until the chromatin bridges have been resolved. Recent work has started to shed some light on the molecular mechanism by which the CPC controls the timing of abscission.

  14. Carbohydrate Stress Affecting Fruitlet Abscission and Expression of Genes Related to Auxin Signal Transduction Pathway in Litchi

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Jian-Fei; Wu, Jian-Yang; Zhong, Hai-Ying; Li, Cai-Qin; Chen, Jian-Ye; Lu, Wang-Jin; Li, Jian-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Auxin, a vital plant hormone, regulates a variety of physiological and developmental processes. It is involved in fruit abscission through transcriptional regulation of many auxin-related genes, including early auxin responsive genes (i.e., auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (AUX/IAA), Gretchen Hagen3 (GH3) and small auxin upregulated (SAUR)) and auxin response factors (ARF), which have been well characterized in many plants. In this study, totally five auxin-related genes, including one AUX/IAA (LcAUX/IAA1), one GH3 (LcGH3.1), one SAUR (LcSAUR1) and two ARFs (LcARF1 and LcARF2), were isolated and characterized from litchi fruit. LcAUX/IAA1, LcGH3.1, LcSAUR1, LcARF1 and LcARF2 contain open reading frames (ORFs) encoding polypeptides of 203, 613, 142, 792 and 832 amino acids, respectively, with their corresponding molecular weights of 22.67, 69.20, 11.40, 88.20 and 93.16 kDa. Expression of these genes was investigated under the treatment of girdling plus defoliation which aggravated litchi fruitlet abscission due to the blockage of carbohydrates transport and the reduction of endogenous IAA content. Results showed that transcript levels of LcAUX/IAA1, LcGH3.1 and LcSAUR1 mRNAs were increased after the treatment in abscission zone (AZ) and other tissues, in contrast to the decreasing accumulation of LcARF1 mRNA, suggesting that LcAUX/IAA1, LcSAUR1 and LcARF1 may play more important roles in abscission. Our results provide new insight into the process of fruitlet abscission induced by carbohydrate stress and broaden our understanding of the auxin signal transduction pathway in this process at the molecular level. PMID:23443112

  15. Principal Slip Zones in Limestone: Natural and Experimental Examples of `Clast-Cortex Grains' and Implications for the Seismic Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. A.; Billi, A.; di Toro, G.; Niemeijer, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    Many earthquakes in central Italy (e.g L’Aquila Mw 6.3, 6 April 2009), and in other areas worldwide, nucleate within and rupture through limestones. During individual earthquakes a majority of fault displacement is accommodated by thin principal slip zones (PSZs). At present, however, there are no reliable microstructural or geochemical indicators of seismic slip in carbonate rocks. We present detailed field and microstructural observations of the PSZs of seismically active normal faults that cut limestones in central Italy, and compare these PSZs to experiments on layers of simulated calcite gouge using a recently-installed high velocity rotary shear apparatus at INGV, Rome. Geological constraints indicate that the natural PSZs are exhumed from <3km depth, where ambient temperatures are <100°C. SEM and XRD observations suggest that the PSZs are composed of c. 100% calcite. The PSZs contain a 2-10mm thick, texturally-distinct ultracataclasite layer immediately adjacent to the slip surface. The ultracataclasite is itself internally zoned; 200-300μm thick ultracataclastic sub-layers record extreme localization of slip, and some of the sub-layers contain microstructural evidence for fluidization. 100-200μm thick, syn-tectonic calcite veins suggest fluid involvement in faulting. Peculiar rounded grains up to 3mm in diameter consisting of a central (often angular) clast wrapped by a laminated outer cortex of ultra-fine grained calcite are found in the ultracataclasite. The cortex can display concentric or lensoid internal laminations and appears to have developed by progressive accretion of matrix material. These ‘clast-cortex grains’ closely resemble: 1) accretionary lapilli in pyroclastic deposits; 2) ‘armoured’ grains found in the basal detachments of mega-landslides, and; 3) ‘clay-clast aggregates’ produced in saturated high-velocity friction experiments and found in some natural clay-bearing faults. We suggest that localized fluidization of

  16. Transcriptome analysis of soybean leaf abscission identifies transcriptional regulators of organ polarity and cell fate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abscission, organ detachment, is a developmental process that is modulated by environmental factors. To understand the molecular events underlying the progression of abscission in soybean, we induced abscission in 21 day-old soybean by treating leaf explants with ethylene. RNA-seq was completed for ...

  17. Germinal zones in the developing cerebral cortex of ferret: ontogeny, cell cycle kinetics, and diversity of progenitors.

    PubMed

    Reillo, Isabel; Borrell, Víctor

    2012-09-01

    Expansion and folding of the cerebral cortex are landmark features of mammalian brain evolution. This is recapitulated during embryonic development, and specialized progenitor cell populations known as intermediate radial glia cells (IRGCs) are believed to play central roles. Because developmental mechanisms involved in cortical expansion and folding are likely conserved across phylogeny, it is crucial to identify features specific for gyrencephaly from those unique to primate brain development. Here, we studied multiple features of cortical development in ferret, a gyrencephalic carnivore, in comparison with primates. Analyzing the combinatorial expression of transcription factors, cytoskeletal proteins, and cell cycle parameters, we identified a combination of traits that distinguish in ferret similar germinal layers as in primates. Transcription factor analysis indicated that inner subventricular zone (ISVZ) and outer subventricular zone (OSVZ) may contain an identical mixture of progenitor cell subpopulations in ferret. However, we found that these layers emerge at different time points, differ in IRGC abundance, and progenitors have different cell cycle kinetics and self-renewal dynamics. Thus, ISVZ and OSVZ are likely distinguished by genetic differences regulating progenitor cell behavior and dynamics. Our findings demonstrate that some, but not all, features of primate cortical development are shared by the ferret, suggesting a conserved role in the evolutionary emergence of gyrencephaly.

  18. Deer predation on leaf miners via leaf abscission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Kazuo; Sugiura, Shinji

    2008-03-01

    The evergreen oak Quercus gilva Blume sheds leaves containing mines of the leaf miner Stigmella sp. (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae) earlier than leaves with no mines in early spring in Nara, central Japan. The eclosion rates of the leaf miner in abscised and retained leaves were compared in the laboratory to clarify the effects of leaf abscission on leaf miner survival in the absence of deer. The leaf miner eclosed successfully from both fallen leaves and leaves retained on trees. However, sika deer ( Cervus nippon centralis Kishida) feed on the fallen mined leaves. Field observations showed that deer consume many fallen leaves under Q. gilva trees, suggesting considerable mortality of leaf miners due to deer predation via leaf abscission. This is a previously unreported relationship between a leaf miner and a mammalian herbivore via leaf abscission.

  19. Deer predation on leaf miners via leaf abscission.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Kazuo; Sugiura, Shinji

    2008-03-01

    The evergreen oak Quercus gilva Blume sheds leaves containing mines of the leaf miner Stigmella sp. (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae) earlier than leaves with no mines in early spring in Nara, central Japan. The eclosion rates of the leaf miner in abscised and retained leaves were compared in the laboratory to clarify the effects of leaf abscission on leaf miner survival in the absence of deer. The leaf miner eclosed successfully from both fallen leaves and leaves retained on trees. However, sika deer (Cervus nippon centralis Kishida) feed on the fallen mined leaves. Field observations showed that deer consume many fallen leaves under Q. gilva trees, suggesting considerable mortality of leaf miners due to deer predation via leaf abscission. This is a previously unreported relationship between a leaf miner and a mammalian herbivore via leaf abscission.

  20. ULK3 regulates cytokinetic abscission by phosphorylating ESCRT-III proteins.

    PubMed

    Caballe, Anna; Wenzel, Dawn M; Agromayor, Monica; Alam, Steven L; Skalicky, Jack J; Kloc, Magdalena; Carlton, Jeremy G; Labrador, Leticia; Sundquist, Wesley I; Martin-Serrano, Juan

    2015-05-26

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery mediates the physical separation between daughter cells during cytokinetic abscission. This process is regulated by the abscission checkpoint, a genome protection mechanism that relies on Aurora B and the ESCRT-III subunit CHMP4C to delay abscission in response to chromosome missegregation. In this study, we show that Unc-51-like kinase 3 (ULK3) phosphorylates and binds ESCRT-III subunits via tandem MIT domains, and thereby, delays abscission in response to lagging chromosomes, nuclear pore defects, and tension forces at the midbody. Our structural and biochemical studies reveal an unusually tight interaction between ULK3 and IST1, an ESCRT-III subunit required for abscission. We also demonstrate that IST1 phosphorylation by ULK3 is an essential signal required to sustain the abscission checkpoint and that ULK3 and CHMP4C are functionally linked components of the timer that controls abscission in multiple physiological situations.

  1. REGULATION OF ETHYLENE EVOLUTION AND LEAF ABSCISSION BY AUXIN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    It is shown that auxin enhanced ethylene evolution occurs in a variety of plant material, and that ethylene evolution can be constrolled by...endogenous as well as exogenous levels of auxin . The importance of auxin regulated ethylene evolution on a physiological process is demonstrated by investigating the abscission of bean petiole explants.

  2. Characterization and structural analysis of wild type and a non-abscission mutant at the development funiculus (Def) locus in Pisum sativum L

    PubMed Central

    Ayeh, Kwadwo Owusu; Lee, YeonKyeong; Ambrose, Mike J; Hvoslef-Eide, Anne Kathrine

    2009-01-01

    Background In pea seeds (Pisum sativum L.), the Def locus defines an abscission event where the seed separates from the funicle through the intervening hilum region at maturity. A spontaneous mutation at this locus results in the seed failing to abscise from the funicle as occurs in wild type peas. In this work, structural differences between wild type peas that developed a distinct abscission zone (AZ) between the funicle and the seed coat and non-abscission def mutant were characterized. Results A clear abscission event was observed in wild type pea seeds that were associated with a distinct double palisade layers at the junction between the seed coat and funicle. Generally, mature seeds fully developed an AZ, which was not present in young wild type seeds. The AZ was formed exactly below the counter palisade layer. In contrast, the palisade layers at the junction of the seed coat and funicle were completely absent in the def mutant pea seeds and the cells in this region were seen to be extensions of surrounding parenchymatous cells. Conclusion The Def wild type developed a distinct AZ associated with palisade layer and counterpalisade layer at the junction of the seed coat and funicle while the def mutant pea seed showed non-abscission and an absence of the double palisade layers in the same region. We conclude that the presence of the double palisade layer in the hilum of the wild type pea seeds plays an important structural role in AZ formation by delimiting the specific region between the seed coat and the funicle and may play a structural role in the AZ formation and subsequent detachment of the seed from the funicle. PMID:19549315

  3. Clast-cortex grains in natural and experimental carbonate-bearing fault zones: slip-rate independent formation at shallow depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempe, M.; Ferri, F.; Smith, S. A.; Mitchell, T. M.; Di Toro, G.

    2013-12-01

    Clast-cortex grains are a peculiar microstructure found in the slipping zones of faults hosted in calcite- and clay-rich rocks, and in the basal detachments of catastrophic landslides. These rounded aggregate-type grains contain a central clast of varying size (from μm to cm), commonly made of fragments of intact host rock or reworked cataclasites from the slipping zone. The central clasts are surrounded by an outer, sometimes laminated, cortex of clay or carbonate grains a few μm or less in size. Their broad similarity to volcanic accretionary lapilli suggests that they may be formed by high-energy fluidization processes. Clay-rich aggregate grains have also been reproduced in low- to high-velocity rotary-shear experiments (e.g. Boutareaud et al., 2008, Han and Hirose, 2012), but the significance of clast-cortex grains in tectonic fault zones remains largely unknown. To put further constraints on the conditions and physico-chemical processes that lead to the formation of clast-cortex grains, laboratory experiments were conducted on confined layers of granular calcite gouge (starting grain size <150 μm) using two rotary-shear apparatus that allow the use of a wide range of slip velocities (0.1 μm/s to 6.5 m/s), normal stresses (up to 35 MPa) and displacements (up to tens of meters), under different ambient conditions (i.e., room humidity, with pore fluids and under vacuum). The microstructural evolution of the gouge layers was investigated using SEM and image analysis techniques. We identified clast-cortex grains that formed in experiments at low normal stress (<5 MPa) and at all investigated slip rates (ranging from 100 μm/s to 1 m/s). The cortexes were better developed with increasing displacement (up to 5 m), and did not form in experiments with 'wet' gouges (20 weight% of deionized H2O). Additionally, an increase in normal stress up to 17 MPa appears to impede clast-cortex grain formation. Both the internal structure (e.g. laminations) and shape (e

  4. Cloning and molecular characterization of an ethylene receptor gene, MiERS1, expressed during mango fruitlet abscission and fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Ish-Shalom, Mazal; Dahan, Yardena; Maayan, Inbar; Irihimovitch, Vered

    2011-08-01

    We isolated and characterized a mango (Mangifera indica L.) cDNA homolog of the ethylene receptor gene ERS1, designated MiERS1. Genomic Southern blot analysis suggested the existence of a second gene with homology to MiERS1. Spatial and temporal expression patterns of MiERS1 were first studied during fruitlet drop and compared with those of a previously identified MiETR1 gene that encodes an ETR1-type ethylene receptor. Experiments were conducted on developing fruitlet explants in which fruitlet abscission was induced by ethephon treatment. Northern analysis revealed a notable increase in MiERS1 mRNA levels in the fruitlet's activated abscission zone within 24 h of ethephon application, followed by a decreasing pattern 48 h post-treatment. A transient, albeit lesser, increase in MiERS1 mRNA levels was also observed in treated fruitlet seed and mesocarp tissues. In contrast, in the abscission zone, accumulation of MiETR1 transcript remained unchanged; a temporal increase in MiETR1 transcript level was observed in the fruitlet mesocarp, whereas in the seed, MiETR1 expression had already dropped by 24 h. Expression profiles of MiERS1 and MiETR1 were then studied during fruit ripening. In agreement with a previous study and coinciding with the climacteric rise in ethylene production, RNA blot analysis revealed that during fruit ripening, MiETR1 mRNA level increases in both mesocarp and seed tissues. Unexpectedly, however, in those same tissues, MiERS1 transcript accumulation was barely detected. Collectively, our data highlight MiERS1's possible specific function in regulating fruitlet abscission rather than fruit ripening.

  5. Abscission is regulated by the ESCRT-III protein shrub in Drosophila germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Matias, Neuza Reis; Mathieu, Juliette; Huynh, Jean-René

    2015-02-01

    Abscission is the final event of cytokinesis that leads to the physical separation of the two daughter cells. Recent technical advances have allowed a better understanding of the cellular and molecular events leading to abscission in isolated yeast or mammalian cells. However, how abscission is regulated in different cell types or in a developing organism remains poorly understood. Here, we characterized the function of the ESCRT-III protein Shrub during cytokinesis in germ cells undergoing a series of complete and incomplete divisions. We found that Shrub is required for complete abscission, and that levels of Shrub are critical for proper timing of abscission. Loss or gain of Shrub delays abscission in germline stem cells (GSCs), and leads to the formation of stem-cysts, where daughter cells share the same cytoplasm as the mother stem cell and cannot differentiate. In addition, our results indicate a negative regulation of Shrub by the Aurora B kinase during GSC abscission. Finally, we found that Lethal giant discs (lgd), known to be required for Shrub function in the endosomal pathway, also regulates the duration of abscission in GSCs.

  6. Natural Variation in Fruit Abscission-Related Traits in Apple (Malus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abscission or retention of ripening fruit is a major component of seed dispersal strategies and also has important implications for horticultural production. Abscission-related traits have generally not been targeted in breeding efforts, and their genetic bases remain mostly unknown. We evaluated ...

  7. ATR and a Chk1-Aurora B pathway coordinate postmitotic genome surveillance with cytokinetic abscission

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Douglas R.; Ullman, Katharine S.

    2015-01-01

    Aurora B regulates cytokinesis timing and plays a central role in the abscission checkpoint. Cellular events monitored by this checkpoint are beginning to be elucidated, yet signaling pathways upstream of Aurora B in this context remain poorly understood. Here we reveal a new connection between postmitotic genome surveillance and cytokinetic abscission. Underreplicated DNA lesions are known to be transmitted through mitosis and protected in newly formed nuclei by recruitment of 53BP1 and other proteins until repair takes place. We find that this genome surveillance initiates before completion of cytokinesis. Elevating replication stress increases this postmitotic process and delays cytokinetic abscission by keeping the abscission checkpoint active. We further find that ATR activity in midbody-stage cells links postmitotic genome surveillance to abscission timing and that Chk1 integrates this and other signals upstream of Aurora B to regulate when the final step in the physical separation of daughter cells occurs. PMID:25904336

  8. Eph-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of citron kinase controls abscission

    PubMed Central

    Jungas, Thomas; Perchey, Renaud T.; Fawal, Mohamad; Callot, Caroline; Froment, Carine; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Besson, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis is the last step of cell division, culminating in the physical separation of daughter cells at the end of mitosis. Cytokinesis is a tightly regulated process that until recently was mostly viewed as a cell-autonomous event. Here, we investigated the role of Ephrin/Eph signaling, a well-known local cell-to-cell communication pathway, in cell division. We show that activation of Eph signaling in vitro leads to multinucleation and polyploidy, and we demonstrate that this is caused by alteration of the ultimate step of cytokinesis, abscission. Control of abscission requires Eph kinase activity, and Src and citron kinase (CitK) are downstream effectors in the Eph-induced signal transduction cascade. CitK is phosphorylated on tyrosines in neural progenitors in vivo, and Src kinase directly phosphorylates CitK. We have identified the specific tyrosine residues of CitK that are phosphorylated and show that tyrosine phosphorylation of CitK impairs cytokinesis. Finally, we show that, similar to CitK, Ephrin/Eph signaling controls neuronal ploidy in the developing neocortex. Our study indicates that CitK integrates intracellular and extracellular signals provided by the local environment to coordinate completion of cytokinesis. PMID:27551053

  9. Cross-talk between environmental stresses and plant metabolism during reproductive organ abscission

    PubMed Central

    Sawicki, Mélodie; Aït Barka, Essaïd; Clément, Christophe; Vaillant-Gaveau, Nathalie; Jacquard, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    In plants, flowering is a crucial process for reproductive success and continuity of the species through time. Fruit production requires the perfect development of reproductive structures. Abscission, a natural process, can occur to facilitate shedding of no longer needed, infected, or damaged organs. If stress occurs during flower development, abscission can intervene at flower level, leading to reduced yield. Flower abscission is a highly regulated developmental process simultaneously influenced and activated in response to exogenous (changing environmental conditions, interactions with microorganisms) and endogenous (physiological modifications) stimuli. During climate change, plant communities will be more susceptible to environmental stresses, leading to increased flower and fruit abscission, and consequently a decrease in fruit yield. Understanding the impacts of stress on the reproductive phase is therefore critical for managing future agricultural productivity. Here, current knowledge on flower/fruit abscission is summarized by focusing specifically on effects of environmental stresses leading to this process in woody plants. Many of these stresses impair hormonal balance and/or carbohydrate metabolism, but the exact mechanisms are far from completely known. Hormones are the abscission effectors and the auxin/ethylene balance is of particular importance. The carbohydrate pathway is the result of complex regulatory processes involving the balance between photosynthesis and mobilization of reserves. Hormones and carbohydrates together participate in complex signal transduction systems, especially in response to stress. The available data are discussed in relation to reproductive organ development and the process of abscission. PMID:25711702

  10. ULK3 regulates cytokinetic abscission by phosphorylating ESCRT-III proteins

    PubMed Central

    Caballe, Anna; Wenzel, Dawn M; Agromayor, Monica; Alam, Steven L; Skalicky, Jack J; Kloc, Magdalena; Carlton, Jeremy G; Labrador, Leticia; Sundquist, Wesley I; Martin-Serrano, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery mediates the physical separation between daughter cells during cytokinetic abscission. This process is regulated by the abscission checkpoint, a genome protection mechanism that relies on Aurora B and the ESCRT-III subunit CHMP4C to delay abscission in response to chromosome missegregation. In this study, we show that Unc-51-like kinase 3 (ULK3) phosphorylates and binds ESCRT-III subunits via tandem MIT domains, and thereby, delays abscission in response to lagging chromosomes, nuclear pore defects, and tension forces at the midbody. Our structural and biochemical studies reveal an unusually tight interaction between ULK3 and IST1, an ESCRT-III subunit required for abscission. We also demonstrate that IST1 phosphorylation by ULK3 is an essential signal required to sustain the abscission checkpoint and that ULK3 and CHMP4C are functionally linked components of the timer that controls abscission in multiple physiological situations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06547.001 PMID:26011858

  11. Inhibition of ESCRT-II-CHMP6 interactions impedes cytokinetic abscission and leads to cell death.

    PubMed

    Goliand, Inna; Nachmias, Dikla; Gershony, Ofir; Elia, Natalie

    2014-11-15

    Recently the ESCRT-III filamentous complex was designated as the driving force for mammalian cell abscission, that is, fission of the intercellular membrane bridge connecting daughter cells at the end of cytokinesis. However, how ESCRT-III is activated to set on abscission has not been resolved. Here we revisit the role of the upstream canonical ESCRT players ESCRT-II and CHMP6 in abscission. Using high-resolution imaging, we show that these proteins form highly ordered structures at the intercellular bridge during abscission progression. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a truncated version of CHMP6, composed of its first 52 amino acids (CHMP6-N), arrives at the intercellular bridge, blocks abscission, and subsequently leads to cell death. This phenotype is abolished in a mutated version of CHMP6-N designed to prevent CHMP6-N binding to its ESCRT-II partner. Of interest, deleting the first 10 amino acids from CHMP6-N does not interfere with its arrival at the intercellular bridge but almost completely abolishes the abscission failure phenotype. Taken together, these data suggest an active role for ESCRT-II and CHMP6 in ESCRT-mediated abscission. Our work advances the mechanistic understanding of ESCRT-mediated membrane fission in cells and introduces an easily applicable tool for upstream inhibition of the ESCRT pathway in live mammalian cells.

  12. Relationship between petal abscission and programmed cell death in Prunus yedoensis and Delphinium belladonna

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Ichimura, Kazuo

    2007-01-01

    Depending on the species, the end of flower life span is characterized by petal wilting or by abscission of petals that are still fully turgid. Wilting at the end of petal life is due to programmed cell death (PCD). It is not known whether the abscission of turgid petals is preceded by PCD. We studied some parameters that indicate PCD: chromatin condensation, a decrease in nuclear diameter, DNA fragmentation, and DNA content per nucleus, using Prunus yedoensis and Delphiniumbelladonna which both show abscission of turgid petals at the end of floral life. No DNA degradation, no chromatin condensation, and no change in nuclear volume was observed in P. yedoensis petals, prior to abscission. In abscising D.belladonna petals, in contrast, considerable DNA degradation was found, chromatin was condensed and the nuclear volume considerably reduced. Following abscission, the nuclear area in both species drastically increased, and the chromatin became unevenly distributed. Similar chromatin changes were observed after dehydration (24 h at 60°C) of petals severed at the time of flower opening, and in dehydrated petals of Ipomoea nil and Petunia hybrida, severed at the time of flower opening. In these flowers the petal life span is terminated by wilting rather than abscission. It is concluded that the abscission of turgid petals in D. belladonna was preceded by a number of PCD indicators, whereas no such evidence for PCD was found at the time of P. yedoensis petal abscission. Dehydration of the petal cells, after abscission, was associated with a remarkable nuclear morphology which was also found in younger petals subjected to dehydration. This nuclear morphology has apparently not been described previously, for any organism. PMID:17618454

  13. Relationship between petal abscission and programmed cell death in Prunus yedoensis and Delphinium belladonna.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Ichimura, Kazuo; van Doorn, Wouter G

    2007-10-01

    Depending on the species, the end of flower life span is characterized by petal wilting or by abscission of petals that are still fully turgid. Wilting at the end of petal life is due to programmed cell death (PCD). It is not known whether the abscission of turgid petals is preceded by PCD. We studied some parameters that indicate PCD: chromatin condensation, a decrease in nuclear diameter, DNA fragmentation, and DNA content per nucleus, using Prunus yedoensis and Delphinium belladonna which both show abscission of turgid petals at the end of floral life. No DNA degradation, no chromatin condensation, and no change in nuclear volume was observed in P. yedoensis petals, prior to abscission. In abscising D. belladonna petals, in contrast, considerable DNA degradation was found, chromatin was condensed and the nuclear volume considerably reduced. Following abscission, the nuclear area in both species drastically increased, and the chromatin became unevenly distributed. Similar chromatin changes were observed after dehydration (24 h at 60 degrees C) of petals severed at the time of flower opening, and in dehydrated petals of Ipomoea nil and Petunia hybrida, severed at the time of flower opening. In these flowers the petal life span is terminated by wilting rather than abscission. It is concluded that the abscission of turgid petals in D. belladonna was preceded by a number of PCD indicators, whereas no such evidence for PCD was found at the time of P. yedoensis petal abscission. Dehydration of the petal cells, after abscission, was associated with a remarkable nuclear morphology which was also found in younger petals subjected to dehydration. This nuclear morphology has apparently not been described previously, for any organism.

  14. Intra-areal and corticocortical circuits arising in the dysgranular zone of rat primary somatosensory cortex that processes deep somatic input.

    PubMed

    Kim, Uhnoh; Lee, Taehee

    2013-08-01

    Somesthesis-guided exploration of the external world requires cortical processing of both cutaneous and proprioceptive information and their integration into motor commands to guide further haptic movement. In the past, attention has been given mostly to the cortical circuits processing cutaneous information for somatic motor integration. By comparison, little has been examined about how cortical circuits are organized for higher order proprioceptive processing. Using the rat cortex as a model, we characterized the intrinsic and corticocortical circuits arising in the major proprioceptive region of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) that is conventionally referred to as the dysgranular zone (DSZ). We made small injections of biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) as an anterograde tracer in various parts of the DSZ, revealing three distinct principles of its cortical circuit organization. First, its intrinsic circuits extend mainly along the major axis of DSZ to organize multiple patches of interconnections. Second, the central and peripheral regions of DSZ produce differential patterns of intra-areal and corticocortical circuits. Third, the projection fields of DSZ encompass only selective regions of the second somatic (SII), posterior parietal (PPC), and primary motor (MI) cortices. These projection fields are at least partially separated from those of SI cutaneous areas. We hypothesize, based on these observations, that the cortical circuits of DSZ facilitate a modular integration of proprioceptive information along its major axis and disseminate this information to only selective parts of higher order somatic and MI cortices in parallel with cutaneous information.

  15. ESCRT-III assembly and cytokinetic abscission are induced by tension release in the intercellular bridge.

    PubMed

    Lafaurie-Janvore, Julie; Maiuri, Paolo; Wang, Irène; Pinot, Mathieu; Manneville, Jean-Baptiste; Betz, Timo; Balland, Martial; Piel, Matthieu

    2013-03-29

    The last step of cell division, cytokinesis, produces two daughter cells that remain connected by an intercellular bridge. This state often represents the longest stage of the division process. Severing the bridge (abscission) requires a well-described series of molecular events, but the trigger for abscission remains unknown. We found that pulling forces exerted by daughter cells on the intercellular bridge appear to regulate abscission. Counterintuitively, these forces prolonged connection, whereas a release of tension induced abscission. Tension release triggered the assembly of ESCRT-III (endosomal sorting complex required for transport-III), which was followed by membrane fission. This mechanism may allow daughter cells to remain connected until they have settled in their final locations, a process potentially important for tissue organization and morphogenesis.

  16. Allele-Specific Interactions between CAST AWAY and NEVERSHED Control Abscission in Arabidopsis Flowers.

    PubMed

    Groner, William D; Christy, Megan E; Kreiner, Catherine M; Liljegren, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    An advantage of analyzing abscission in genetically tractable model plants is the ability to make use of classic genetic tools such as suppression analysis. We have investigated the regulation of organ abscission by carrying out suppression analysis in Arabidopsis flowers. Plants carrying mutations in the NEVERSHED (NEV) gene, which encodes an ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein, retain their outer floral organs after fertilization. Mutant alleles of CAST AWAY (CST), which encodes a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, were found to restore organ abscission in nev flowers in an allele-specific manner. To further explore the basis of the interactions between CST and NEV, we tested whether the site of a nev mutation is predictive of its ability to be suppressed. Our results suggest instead that the strength of a nev allele influences whether organ abscission can be rescued by a specific allele of CST.

  17. Chlamydial infection induces host cytokinesis failure at abscission.

    PubMed

    Brown, Heather M; Knowlton, Andrea E; Grieshaber, Scott S

    2012-10-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacteria and the infectious agent responsible for the sexually transmitted disease Chlamydia. Infection with Chlamydia can lead to serious health sequelae such as pelvic inflammatory disease and reproductive tract scarring contributing to infertility and ectopic pregnancies. Additionally, chlamydial infections have been epidemiologically linked to cervical cancer in patients with a prior human papilomavirus (HPV) infection. Chlamydial infection of cultured cells causes multinucleation, a potential pathway for chromosomal instability. Two mechanisms that are known to initiate multinucleation are cell fusion and cytokinesis failure. This study demonstrates that multinucleation of the host cell by Chlamydia is entirely due to cytokinesis failure. Moreover, cytokinesis failure is due in part to the chlamydial effector CPAF acting as an anaphase promoting complex mimic causing cells to exit mitosis with unaligned and unattached chromosomes. These lagging and missegregated chromosomes inhibit cytokinesis by blocking abscission, the final stage of cytokinesis.

  18. Chlamydial Infection Induces Host Cytokinesis Failure at Abscission

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Heather M.; Knowlton, Andrea E.; Grieshaber, Scott S.

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacteria and the infectious agent responsible for the sexually transmitted disease Chlamydia. Infection with Chlamydia can lead to serious health sequelae such as pelvic inflammatory disease and reproductive tract scarring contributing to infertility and ectopic pregnancies. Additionally, chlamydial infections have been epidemiologically linked to cervical cancer in patients with a prior human papilomavirus (HPV) infection. Chlamydial infection of cultured cells causes multinucleation, a potential pathway for chromosomal instability. Two mechanisms that are known to initiate multinucleation are cell fusion and cytokinesis failure. This study demonstrates that multinucleation of the host cell by Chlamydia is entirely due to cytokinesis failure. Moreover, cytokinesis failure is due in part to the chlamydial effector CPAF acting as an anaphase promoting complex mimic causing cells to exit mitosis with unaligned and unattached chromosomes. These lagging and missegregated chromosomes inhibit cytokinesis by blocking abscission, the final stage of cytokinesis. PMID:22646503

  19. Abscissic acid localization by light microscopic immunohistochemistry in Chenopodium polyspermum L. Effect of water stress.

    PubMed

    Sotta, B; Sossountzov, L; Maldiney, R; Sabbagh, I; Tachon, P; Miginiac, E

    1985-03-01

    An indirect immunohistochemical technique was developed using a rabbit anti-abscissic acid (ABA) serum and the soluble peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) complex for the localization of endogenous ABA in the aerial parts of Chenopodium. Terminal bud, axillary bud bearing nodes, and adult leaves were prefixed by a soluble carbodiimide to obtain the coupling of ABA on cellular proteins and postfixed by a conventional mixture of aldehydes. They were then embedded in paraffin or in plastic. Numerous controls were carried out on sections and on a model system to test the validity of the technique. Based on the staining patterns observed along the plant, an apico-basal gradient of ABA was revealed. In the older buds, ABA was mainly concentrated in the quiescent meristematic cells of the apex. Phloem cells of the main axis and chloroplasts of the leaves were specifically labeled. No reaction product was visualized in the parenchyma cells or in the cambial zone. Water stress, which is known to increase ABA content, induced an increase of immunoreactivity within the same compartments. This physiological test validates the stain.

  20. Transcriptomics of shading-induced and NAA-induced abscission in apple (Malus domestica) reveals a shared pathway involving reduced photosynthesis, alterations in carbohydrate transport and signaling and hormone crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA), a synthetic auxin analogue, is widely used as an effective thinner in apple orchards. When applied shortly after fruit set, some fruit abscise leading to improved fruit size and quality. However, the thinning results of NAA are inconsistent and difficult to predict, sometimes leading to excess fruit drop or insufficient thinning which are costly to growers. This unpredictability reflects our incomplete understanding of the mode of action of NAA in promoting fruit abscission. Results Here we compared NAA-induced fruit drop with that caused by shading via gene expression profiling performed on the fruit abscission zone (FAZ), sampled 1, 3, and 5 d after treatment. More than 700 genes with significant changes in transcript abundance were identified from NAA-treated FAZ. Combining results from both treatments, we found that genes associated with photosynthesis, cell cycle and membrane/cellular trafficking were downregulated. On the other hand, there was up-regulation of genes related to ABA, ethylene biosynthesis and signaling, cell wall degradation and programmed cell death. While the differentially expressed gene sets for NAA and shading treatments shared only 25% identity, NAA and shading showed substantial similarity with respect to the classes of genes identified. Specifically, photosynthesis, carbon utilization, ABA and ethylene pathways were affected in both NAA- and shading-induced young fruit abscission. Moreover, we found that NAA, similar to shading, directly interfered with leaf photosynthesis by repressing photosystem II (PSII) efficiency within 10 minutes of treatment, suggesting that NAA and shading induced some of the same early responses due to reduced photosynthesis, which concurred with changes in hormone signaling pathways and triggered fruit abscission. Conclusions This study provides an extensive transcriptome study and a good platform for further investigation of possible regulatory genes involved in the

  1. ALIX and ESCRT-I/II function as parallel ESCRT-III recruiters in cytokinetic abscission.

    PubMed

    Christ, Liliane; Wenzel, Eva M; Liestøl, Knut; Raiborg, Camilla; Campsteijn, Coen; Stenmark, Harald

    2016-02-29

    Cytokinetic abscission, the final stage of cell division where the two daughter cells are separated, is mediated by the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. The ESCRT-III subunit CHMP4B is a key effector in abscission, whereas its paralogue, CHMP4C, is a component in the abscission checkpoint that delays abscission until chromatin is cleared from the intercellular bridge. How recruitment of these components is mediated during cytokinesis remains poorly understood, although the ESCRT-binding protein ALIX has been implicated. Here, we show that ESCRT-II and the ESCRT-II-binding ESCRT-III subunit CHMP6 cooperate with ESCRT-I to recruit CHMP4B, with ALIX providing a parallel recruitment arm. In contrast to CHMP4B, we find that recruitment of CHMP4C relies predominantly on ALIX. Accordingly, ALIX depletion leads to furrow regression in cells with chromosome bridges, a phenotype associated with abscission checkpoint signaling failure. Collectively, our work reveals a two-pronged recruitment of ESCRT-III to the cytokinetic bridge and implicates ALIX in abscission checkpoint signaling.

  2. ALIX and ESCRT-I/II function as parallel ESCRT-III recruiters in cytokinetic abscission

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Liliane; Wenzel, Eva M.; Liestøl, Knut; Raiborg, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinetic abscission, the final stage of cell division where the two daughter cells are separated, is mediated by the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. The ESCRT-III subunit CHMP4B is a key effector in abscission, whereas its paralogue, CHMP4C, is a component in the abscission checkpoint that delays abscission until chromatin is cleared from the intercellular bridge. How recruitment of these components is mediated during cytokinesis remains poorly understood, although the ESCRT-binding protein ALIX has been implicated. Here, we show that ESCRT-II and the ESCRT-II–binding ESCRT-III subunit CHMP6 cooperate with ESCRT-I to recruit CHMP4B, with ALIX providing a parallel recruitment arm. In contrast to CHMP4B, we find that recruitment of CHMP4C relies predominantly on ALIX. Accordingly, ALIX depletion leads to furrow regression in cells with chromosome bridges, a phenotype associated with abscission checkpoint signaling failure. Collectively, our work reveals a two-pronged recruitment of ESCRT-III to the cytokinetic bridge and implicates ALIX in abscission checkpoint signaling. PMID:26929449

  3. The human cerebral cortex is neither one nor many: neuronal distribution reveals two quantitatively different zones in the gray matter, three in the white matter, and explains local variations in cortical folding

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Pedro F. M.; Ventura-Antunes, Lissa; Gabi, Mariana; Mota, Bruno; Grinberg, Lea T.; Farfel, José M.; Ferretti-Rebustini, Renata E. L.; Leite, Renata E. P.; Filho, Wilson J.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2013-01-01

    The human prefrontal cortex has been considered different in several aspects and relatively enlarged compared to the rest of the cortical areas. Here we determine whether the white and gray matter of the prefrontal portion of the human cerebral cortex have similar or different cellular compositions relative to the rest of the cortical regions by applying the Isotropic Fractionator to analyze the distribution of neurons along the entire anteroposterior axis of the cortex, and its relationship with the degree of gyrification, number of neurons under the cortical surface, and other parameters. The prefrontal region shares with the remainder of the cerebral cortex (except for occipital cortex) the same relationship between cortical volume and number of neurons. In contrast, both occipital and prefrontal areas vary from other cortical areas in their connectivity through the white matter, with a systematic reduction of cortical connectivity through the white matter and an increase of the mean axon caliber along the anteroposterior axis. These two parameters explain local differences in the distribution of neurons underneath the cortical surface. We also show that local variations in cortical folding are neither a function of local numbers of neurons nor of cortical thickness, but correlate with properties of the white matter, and are best explained by the folding of the white matter surface. Our results suggest that the human cerebral cortex is divided in two zones (occipital and non-occipital) that differ in how neurons are distributed across their gray matter volume and in three zones (prefrontal, occipital, and non-occipital) that differ in how neurons are connected through the white matter. Thus, the human prefrontal cortex has the largest fraction of neuronal connectivity through the white matter and the smallest average axonal caliber in the white matter within the cortex, although its neuronal composition fits the pattern found for other, non-occipital areas. PMID

  4. Opposing Activities of Aurora B Kinase and B56-PP2A Phosphatase on MKlp2 Determine Abscission Timing.

    PubMed

    Fung, Suet Yin Sarah; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Liao, Pei-Ju; Wong, Jasmine; Lee, Sang Hyun

    2017-01-09

    After cleavage furrow ingression during cytokinesis, nascent daughter cells remain connected by an intercellular bridge (ICB) and the midbody [1, 2]. The midbody becomes an assembly platform for ESCRT complexes that split apart the plasma membrane (PM) anchored to the ICB and complete abscission, which is the final step of cell division [3-5]. Aurora B governs abscission by regulating its timing as a checkpoint [6-10]. However, the underlying mechanisms for this process remain unknown. Here, we reveal the mechanism controlling abscission through integration of Aurora B kinase and B56-bound PP2A phosphatase activities on the kinesin motor protein MKlp2. We identify MKlp2 as an essential protein for promoting abscission, which may regulate tethering and stabilizing of the PM to the microtubule cytoskeleton at the ICB through its previously uncharacterized lipid association motif (LAM). MKlp2 recruits Aurora B to the ICB [11-15]. In turn, Aurora B phosphorylation of MKlp2 S878 in the LAM is a key inhibitory signal for abscission. Conversely, B56-PP2A promotes abscission by opposing Aurora B phosphorylation of MKlp2 S878. Strikingly, a phospho-resistant MKlp2 S878A mutant overcomes Aurora-B-mediated abscission blockade. Thus, abscission is determined by the balance of Aurora B and B56-PP2A activities on MKlp2 S878 within the LAM. Together, these findings establish a key mechanism for Aurora B regulation of abscission in mammalian cells.

  5. Implications of nonrandom seed abscission and global stilling for migration of wind-dispersed plant species.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Sally E; Katul, Gabriel G

    2013-06-01

    Migration of plant populations is a potential survival response to climate change that depends critically on seed dispersal. Biological and physical factors determine dispersal and migration of wind-dispersed species. Recent field and wind tunnel studies demonstrate biological adaptations that bias seed release toward conditions of higher wind velocity, promoting longer dispersal distances and faster migration. However, another suite of international studies also recently highlighted a global decrease in near-surface wind speeds, or 'global stilling'. This study assessed the implications of both factors on potential plant population migration rates, using a mechanistic modeling framework. Nonrandom abscission was investigated using models of three seed release mechanisms: (i) a simple drag model; (ii) a seed deflection model; and (iii) a 'wear and tear' model. The models generated a single functional relationship between the frequency of seed release and statistics of the near-surface wind environment, independent of the abscission mechanism. An Inertial-Particle, Coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian Closure model (IP-CELC) was used to investigate abscission effects on seed dispersal kernels and plant population migration rates under contemporary and potential future wind conditions (based on reported global stilling trends). The results confirm that nonrandom seed abscission increased dispersal distances, particularly for light seeds. The increases were mitigated by two physical feedbacks: (i) although nonrandom abscission increased the initial acceleration of seeds from rest, the sensitivity of the seed dispersal to this initial condition declined as the wind speed increased; and (ii) while nonrandom abscission increased the mean dispersal length, it reduced the kurtosis of seasonal dispersal kernels, and thus the chance of long-distance dispersal. Wind stilling greatly reduced the modeled migration rates under biased seed release conditions. Thus, species that require

  6. New Clothes for the Jasmonic Acid Receptor COI1: Delayed Abscission, Meristem Arrest and Apical Dominance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joonyup; Dotson, Bradley; Rey, Camila; Lindsey, Joshua; Bleecker, Anthony B.; Binder, Brad M.; Patterson, Sara E.

    2013-01-01

    In a screen for delayed floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis, we have identified a novel mutant of CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1), the F-box protein that has been shown to be the jasmonic acid (JA) co-receptor. While JA has been shown to have an important role in senescence, root development, pollen dehiscence and defense responses, there has been little focus on its critical role in floral organ abscission. Abscission, or the detachment of organs from the main body of a plant, is an essential process during plant development and a unique type of cell separation regulated by endogenous and exogenous signals. Previous studies have indicated that auxin and ethylene are major plant hormones regulating abscission; and here we show that regulation of floral organ abscission is also controlled by jasmonic acid in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our characterization of coi1-1 and a novel allele (coi1-37) has also revealed an essential role in apical dominance and floral meristem arrest. In this study we provide genetic evidence indicating that delayed abscission 4 (dab4-1) is allelic to coi1-1 and that meristem arrest and apical dominance appear to be evolutionarily divergent functions for COI1 that are governed in an ecotype-dependent manner. Further characterizations of ethylene and JA responses of dab4-1/coi1-37 also provide new information suggesting separate pathways for ethylene and JA that control both floral organ abscission and hypocotyl growth in young seedlings. Our study opens the door revealing new roles for JA and its interaction with other hormones during plant development. PMID:23573263

  7. Post-pruning shoot growth increases fruit abscission and reduces stem carbohydrates and yield in macadamia

    PubMed Central

    McFadyen, Lisa M.; Robertson, David; Sedgley, Margaret; Kristiansen, Paul; Olesen, Trevor

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims There is good evidence for deciduous trees that competition for carbohydrates from shoot growth accentuates early fruit abscission and reduces yield but the effect for evergreen trees is not well defined. Here, whole-tree tip-pruning at anthesis is used to examine the effect of post-pruning shoot development on fruit abscission in the evergreen subtropical tree macadamia (Macadamia integrifolia, M. integrifolia × tetraphylla). Partial-tree tip-pruning is also used to test the localization of the effect. Methods In the first experiment (2005/2006), all branches on trees were tip-pruned at anthesis, some trees were allowed to re-shoot (R treatment) and shoots were removed from others (NR treatment). Fruit set and stem total non-structural carbohydrates (TNSC) over time, and yield were measured. In the second experiment (2006/2007), upper branches of trees were tip-pruned at anthesis, some trees were allowed to re-shoot (R) and shoots were removed from others (NR). Fruit set and yield were measured separately for upper (pruned) and lower (unpruned) branches. Key Results In the first experiment, R trees set far fewer fruit and had lower yield than NR trees. TNSC fell and rose in all treatments but the decline in R trees occurred earlier than in NR trees and coincided with early shoot growth and the increase in fruit abscission relative to the other treatments. In the second experiment, fruit abscission on upper branches of R trees increased relative to the other treatments but there was little difference in fruit abscission between treatments on lower branches. Conclusions This study is the first to demonstrate an increase in fruit abscission in an evergreen tree in response to pruning. The effect appeared to be related to competition for carbohydrates between post-pruning shoot growth and fruit development and was local, with shoot growth on pruned branches having no effect on fruit abscission on unpruned branches. PMID:21325025

  8. Ethylene: role in fruit abscission and dehiscence processes.

    PubMed

    Lipe, J A; Morgan, P W

    1972-12-01

    Two peaks of ethylene production occur during the development of cotton fruitz (Gossypium hirsutum L.). These periods precede the occurrence of young fruit shedding and mature fruit dehiscence, both of which are abscission phenomena and the latter is generally assumed to be part of the total ripening process. Detailed study of the dehiscence process revealed that ethylene production of individual, attached cotton fruits goes through a rising, cyclic pattern which reaches a maximum prior to dehiscence. With detached pecan fruits (Carya illinoensis [Wang.] K. Koch), ethylene production measured on alternate days rose above 1 microliter per kilogram fresh weight per hour before dehiscence began and reached a peak several days prior to complete dehiscence. Ethylene production by cotton and pecan fruits was measured just prior to dehiscence and then the internal concentration of the gas near the center of the fruit was determined. From these data a ratio of production rate to internal concentration was determined which allowed calculation of the approximate ethylene concentration in the intact fruit prior to dehiscence and selection of appropriate levels to apply to fruits. Ethylene at 10 microliters per liter of air appears to saturate dehiscence of cotton, pecan, and okra (Hibiscus esculentus L.) fruits and the process is completed in 3 to 4 days. In all cases some hastening of dehiscence was observed with as little as 0.1 microliter of exogenous ethylene per liter of air. The time required for response to different levels of ethylene was determined and compared to the time course of ethylene production and dehiscence. We concluded that internal levels of ethylene rose to dehiscence-stimulating levels a sufficience time before dehiscence for the gas to have initiated the process. Since our data and calculations indicate that enough ethylene is made a sufficient time before dehiscence, to account for the process, we propose that ethylene is one of the regulators of

  9. Ethylene: Role in Fruit Abscission and Dehiscence Processes 12

    PubMed Central

    Lipe, John A.; Morgan, Page W.

    1972-01-01

    Two peaks of ethylene production occur during the development of cotton fruitz (Gossypium hirsutum L.). These periods precede the occurrence of young fruit shedding and mature fruit dehiscence, both of which are abscission phenomena and the latter is generally assumed to be part of the total ripening process. Detailed study of the dehiscence process revealed that ethylene production of individual, attached cotton fruits goes through a rising, cyclic pattern which reaches a maximum prior to dehiscence. With detached pecan fruits (Carya illinoensis [Wang.] K. Koch), ethylene production measured on alternate days rose above 1 microliter per kilogram fresh weight per hour before dehiscence began and reached a peak several days prior to complete dehiscence. Ethylene production by cotton and pecan fruits was measured just prior to dehiscence and then the internal concentration of the gas near the center of the fruit was determined. From these data a ratio of production rate to internal concentration was determined which allowed calculation of the approximate ethylene concentration in the intact fruit prior to dehiscence and selection of appropriate levels to apply to fruits. Ethylene at 10 microliters per liter of air appears to saturate dehiscence of cotton, pecan, and okra (Hibiscus esculentus L.) fruits and the process is completed in 3 to 4 days. In all cases some hastening of dehiscence was observed with as little as 0.1 microliter of exogenous ethylene per liter of air. The time required for response to different levels of ethylene was determined and compared to the time course of ethylene production and dehiscence. We concluded that internal levels of ethylene rose to dehiscence-stimulating levels a sufficience time before dehiscence for the gas to have initiated the process. Since our data and calculations indicate that enough ethylene is made a sufficient time before dehiscence, to account for the process, we propose that ethylene is one of the regulators of

  10. Computational model of cytokinetic abscission driven by ESCRT-III polymerization and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Elia, Natalie; Fabrikant, Gur; Kozlov, Michael M; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2012-05-16

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III complex, capable of polymerization and remodeling, participates in abscission of the intercellular membrane bridge connecting two daughter cells at the end of cytokinesis. Here, we integrate quantitative imaging of ESCRT-III during cytokinetic abscission with biophysical properties of ESCRT-III complexes to formulate and test a computational model for ESCRT-mediated cytokinetic abscission. We propose that cytokinetic abscission is driven by an ESCRT-III fission complex, which arises from ESCRT-III polymerization at the edge of the cytokinetic midbody structure, located at the center of the intercellular bridge. Formation of the fission complex is completed by remodeling and breakage of the ESCRT-III polymer assisted by VPS4. Subsequent spontaneous constriction of the fission complex generates bending deformation of the intercellular bridge membrane. The related membrane elastic force propels the fission complex along the intercellular bridge away from the midbody until it reaches an equilibrium position, determining the scission site. Membrane attachment to the dome-like end-cap of the fission complex drives membrane fission, completing the abscission process. We substantiate the model by theoretical analysis of the membrane elastic energy and by experimental verification of the major model assumptions.

  11. Involvement of Abscisic Acid in Ethylene-Induced Cotyledon Abscission in Cotton Seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Suttle, J. C.; Hultstrand, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv LG102) seedlings raised from seeds exposed to 100 [mu]M norflurazon (NFZ) during imbibition contained reduced levels of free abscisic acid (ABA) and were visibly achlorophyllous. Exposure of untreated cotton seedlings to ethylene concentrations >1 [mu]L/L for 24 h resulted in cotyledon abscission. In contrast, exposure of NFZ-treated seedlings to concentrations of ethylene [less than or equal to]50 [mu]L/L elicited no cotyledon abscission. Application of ABA, an ABA analog, or jasmonic acid to NFZ-treated seedlings restored ethylene-induced abscission. Isolated cotyledonary node explants prepared from NFZ-treated seedlings exhibited an altered dose-response pattern of ethylene-induced petiole abscission. Endogenous levels of free IAA were unaltered in NFZ-treated seedlings. Ethylene treatment (50 [mu]L/L, 24 h) had no effect on free indoleacetic acid (IAA) levels in either control or NFZ-treated seedlings. Levels of conjugated (ester plus amide) IAA were substantially increased in NFZ-treated seedlings regardless of ethylene treatment. These results indicate that endogenous ABA plays an essential, but physiologically undefined, role in ethylene-induced cotyledon abscission in cotton. PMID:12231720

  12. Control of Abscission in Agricultural Crops and Its Physiological Basis 1

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, W. C.; Rasmussen, G. K.; Rogers, B. J.; Reece, P. C.; Henry, W. H.

    1968-01-01

    Some naphthalene and phenoxy compounds prevent preharvest drop of apples, pears, and citrus fruits. These studies have been complicated by an unrecognized high level of ethylene produced by leaves and fruit on trees sprayed with these growth regulators. An apparent contradiction is the effectiveness of both 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and n-dimethylaminosuccinamic acid (a growth retardant which retards biosynthesis of auxin) in preventing abscission of apples. Thus, in the presence of low auxin concentrations in the tissue, this growth retardant prevents fruit abscission even more effectively than 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid at high auxin concentrations in the tissue. This anomaly is clarified on the basis that n-dimethylaminosuccinamic acid, in the presence of a known low ethylene biosynthesis, delays maturity of the fruit and thus prevents fruit abscission. On the other hand, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid prevents abscission by direct growth hormone action, in spite of the side effects of ethylene production which speeds ripening of the fruit. With the promotion of abscission of leaves and fruit of agricultural crops, attention is given to the use of chemicals which induce ethylene production when applied to the plant, but which have no growth promotion effect to retard abscission. We can distinguish 5 kinds of such chemicals. One group includes gibberellic and abscisic acids that induce treated leaves to produce ethylene and abscise (under certain circumstances). However, they do not induce ethylene production by fruit and do not promote fruit abscission. A second group includes ascorbic acid, which, when used at relatively high levels, induces fruit to produce enough ethylene to promote abscission. Ascorbic acid-treated leaves also produce ethylene but not enough to cause much defoliation. A third group includes protein-synthesis inhibitors, such as cycloheximide. When low concentrations (about 30 μmoles/l) are sprayed on the fruit, the rapid effect of

  13. Selective expression of hyaluronan and receptor for hyaluronan mediated motility (Rhamm) in the adult mouse subventricular zone and rostral migratory stream and in ischemic cortex.

    PubMed

    Lindwall, Charlotta; Olsson, Martina; Osman, Ahmed M; Kuhn, H Georg; Curtis, Maurice A

    2013-03-29

    Hyaluronan is a large glycosaminoglycan, which is abundant in the extracellular matrix of the developing rodent brain. In the adult brain however, levels of hyaluronan are significantly reduced. In this study, we used neurocan-GFP as a histochemical probe to analyze the distribution of hyaluronan in the adult mouse subventricular zone (SVZ), as well as in the rostral migratory stream (RMS). Interestingly, we observed that hyaluronan is generally downregulated in the adult brain, but notably remains at high levels in the SVZ and RMS; areas in which neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) persist, proliferate and migrate throughout life. In addition, we found that the receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility (Rhamm) was expressed in migrating neuroblasts in these areas, indicating that Rhamm could be involved in regulating hyaluronan-mediated cell migration. Hyaluronan levels are balanced by synthesis through hyaluronan synthases (Has) and degradation by hyaluronidases (Hyal). We found that Has1 and Has2, as well as Hyal1 and Hyal2 were expressed in GFAP positive cells in the adult rodent SVZ and RMS, indicating that astrocytes could be regulating hyaluronan-mediated functions in these areas. We also demonstrate that hyaluronan levels are substantially increased at six weeks following a photothrombotic stroke lesion to the adult mouse cortex. Furthermore, GFAP positive cells in the peri-infarct area express Rhamm. Thus, hyaluronan may be involved in regulating cell migration in the normal SVZ and RMS and could also be responsible for priming the peri-infarct area following an ischemic lesion for cell migration.

  14. Timing is everything: early degradation of abscission layer is associated with increased seed shattering in U.S. weedy rice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Seed shattering, or shedding, is an important fitness trait for wild and weedy grasses. U.S. weedy rice (Oryza sativa) is a highly shattering weed, thought to have evolved from non-shattering cultivated ancestors. All U.S. weedy rice individuals examined to date contain a mutation in the sh4 locus associated with loss of shattering during rice domestication. Weedy individuals also share the shattering trait with wild rice, but not the ancestral shattering mutation at sh4; thus, how weedy rice reacquired the shattering phenotype is unknown. To establish the morphological basis of the parallel evolution of seed shattering in weedy rice and wild, we examined the abscission layer at the flower-pedicel junction in weedy individuals in comparison with wild and cultivated relatives. Results Consistent with previous work, shattering wild rice individuals possess clear, defined abscission layers at flowering, whereas non-shattering cultivated rice individuals do not. Shattering weedy rice from two separately evolved populations in the U.S. (SH and BHA) show patterns of abscission layer formation and degradation distinct from wild rice. Prior to flowering, the abscission layer has formed in all weedy individuals and by flowering it is already degrading. In contrast, wild O. rufipogon abscission layers have been shown not to degrade until after flowering has occurred. Conclusions Seed shattering in weedy rice involves the formation and degradation of an abscission layer in the flower-pedicel junction, as in wild Oryza, but is a developmentally different process from shattering in wild rice. Weedy rice abscission layers appear to break down earlier than wild abscission layers. The timing of weedy abscission layer degradation suggests that unidentified regulatory genes may play a critical role in the reacquisition of shattering in weedy rice, and sheds light on the morphological basis of parallel evolution for shattering in weedy and wild rice. PMID:21235796

  15. Survival and arm abscission are linked to regional heterothermy in an intertidal sea star.

    PubMed

    Pincebourde, Sylvain; Sanford, Eric; Helmuth, Brian

    2013-06-15

    Body temperature is a more pertinent variable to physiological stress than ambient air temperature. Modeling and empirical studies on the impacts of climate change on ectotherms usually assume that body temperature within organisms is uniform. However, many ectotherms show significant within-body temperature heterogeneity. The relationship between regional heterothermy and the response of ectotherms to sublethal and lethal conditions remains underexplored. We quantified within-body thermal heterogeneity in an intertidal sea star (Pisaster ochraceus) during aerial exposure at low tide to examine the lethal and sublethal effects of temperatures of different body regions. In manipulative experiments, we measured the temperature of the arms and central disc, as well as survival and arm abscission under extreme aerial conditions. Survival was related strongly to central disc temperature. Arms were generally warmer than the central disc in individuals that survived aerial heating, but we found the reverse in those that died. When the central disc reached sublethal temperatures of 31-35°C, arms reached temperatures of 33-39°C, inducing arm abscission. The absolute temperature of individual arms was a poor predictor of arm abscission, but the arms lost were consistently the hottest at the within-individual scale. Therefore, the vital region of this sea star may remain below the lethal threshold under extreme conditions, possibly through water movement from the arms to the central disc and/or evaporative cooling, but at the cost of increased risk of arm abscission. Initiation of arm abscission seems to reflect a whole-organism response while death occurs as a result of stress acting directly on central disc tissues.

  16. Ethylene and flower longevity in Alstroemeria: relationship between tepal senescence, abscission and ethylene biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Carol; Chanasut, Usawadee; Harren, Frans J M; Laarhoven, Luc-Jan; Thomas, Brian; Rogers, Hilary J; Stead, Anthony D

    2005-03-01

    Senescence of floral organs is broadly divided into two groups: those that exhibit sensitivity to exogenous ethylene and those that do not. Endogenous ethylene production from the former group is via a well-characterized biochemical pathway and is either due to developmental or pollination-induced senescence. Many flowers from the order Liliales are characterized as ethylene-insensitive since they do not appear to produce endogenous ethylene, or respond to exogenous ethylene treatments, however, the majority of cases studied are wilting flowers, rather than those where life is terminated by perianth abscission. The role of ethylene in the senescence and abscission of Alstroemeria peruviana cv. Rebecca and cv. Samora tepals was previously unclear, with silver treatments recommended for delaying leaf rather than flower senescence. In the present paper the effects of exogenous ethylene, 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid (CEPA) and silver thiosulphate (STS) treatments on tepal senescence and abscission have been investigated. Results indicate that sensitivity to ethylene develops several days after flower opening such that STS only has a limited ability to delay tepal abscission. Detachment force measurements indicate that cell separation events are initiated after anthesis. Endogenous ethylene production was measured using laser photoacoustics and showed that Alstroemeria senesce independently of ethylene production, but that an extremely small amount of ethylene (0.15 nl flower(-1) h(-1)) is produced immediately prior to abscission. Investigation of the expression of genes involved in ethylene biosysnthesis by semi-quantitative RT-PCR indicated that transcriptional regulation is likely to be at the level of ACC oxidase, and that the timing of ACC oxidase gene expression is coincident with development of sensitivity to exogenous ethylene.

  17. Light inhibits gravity-regulated peg formation and asymmetric mRNA accumulation of auxin-inducible CsIAA1 in the cortex of the transition zone in cucumber seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Nobuharu; Saito, Yuko; Miyazawa, Yutaka; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    When cucumber seedlings are grown horizontally, a specialized protuberance, termed the peg, develops on the lower side of the transition zone between the hypocotyl and the root. Gravimorphogenesis regulates the lateral positioning of the peg in the transition zone and it has been suggested that auxin plays an important role in peg formation in cucumber seedlings. Here, we found that light inhibited auxin-regulated peg formation. In the transition zone of horizontally positioned cucumber seedlings grown in the dark, we detected an asymmetric accumulation of mRNA from the auxin-inducible gene CsIAA1 in the epidermis and cortex. However, in seedlings grown under illumination, this asymmetry was greatly reduced. In dark- and light-grown seedlings, application of 10 -3 M indole-3-acetic acid induced peg formation on both the lower and upper sides of the transition zone. These results suggest that light inhibits peg formation via modification of auxin distribution and/or levels in the transition zone of cucumber seedlings.

  18. Ethylene Evolution following Treatment with 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic Acid and Ethephon in an in Vitro Olive Shoot System in Relation to Leaf Abscission

    PubMed Central

    Lavee, S.; Martin, George C.

    1981-01-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) supplied via the cut base of detached olive shoots caused a burst of ethylene from leaves, but other cyclopropanes tested did not exhibit this effect. Ethephon (ET) and another ethylene-releasing compound caused a prolonged increase in ethylene evolution. ACC had only a very limited effect on leaf abscission regardless of concentration, whereas shoots placed with cut bases in ET for 60 to 80 minutes exhibited 100% leaf abscission within 90 hours. Shoots with inflorescences treated with ET just prior to anthesis began to wilt in vitro within 20 to 30 hours and failed to exhibit leaf abscission. At earlier stages of development, ET induced more leaf abscission on reproductive shoots than on vegetative shoots. It is suggested that the duration of ethylene evolution from the leaves governs their potential for abscission and that bursts of ethylene evolution even though large in amount may not induce abscission. Images PMID:16661837

  19. Identification and molecular characterization of an IDA-like gene from litchi, LcIDL1, whose ectopic expression promotes floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Peiyuan; Li, Caiqin; Liu, Xuncheng; Xia, Rui; Zhao, Minglei; Li, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Unexpected abscission of flowers or fruits is a major limiting factor for crop productivity. Key genes controlling abscission in plants, especially in popular fruit trees, are largely unknown. Here we identified a litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) IDA-like (INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION-like) gene LcIDL1 as a potential key regulator of abscission. LcIDL1 encodes a peptide that shows the closest homology to Arabidopsis IDA, and is localized in cell membrane and cytoplasm. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression level of LcIDL1 accumulated gradually following flower abscission, and it was obviously induced by fruit abscission-promoting treatments. Transgenic plants expressing LcIDL1 in Arabidopsis revealed a role of LcIDL1 similar to IDA in promoting floral organ abscission. Moreover, ectopic expression of LcIDL1 in Arabidopsis activated the expression of abscission-related genes. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that LcIDL1 may act as a key regulator in control of abscission. PMID:27845425

  20. Unconditioned oromotor taste reactivity elicited by sucrose and quinine is unaffected by extensive bilateral damage to the gustatory zone of the insular cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    King, Camille Tessitore; Hashimoto, Koji; Blonde, Ginger D; Spector, Alan C

    2015-03-02

    Rats display stereotypical oromotor and somatic responses to small volumes of intraorally infused taste solutions. These behaviors, known as taste reactivity, are categorized by their association with ingestion or rejection and are thought to reflect the palatability of the stimulus. Because supracollicular decerebrate rats display normal taste reactivity responses, it would appear that forebrain structures are not necessary for generating them. However, because moving the plane of transection rostrally, or damaging or manipulating specific ventral forebrain sites disrupts normal taste reactivity behavior, lesions of the gustatory cortex, a region that has been suggested to be involved with palatability processing, may do the same. In the current study, rats received two injections of either ibotenic acid (N=12) or vehicle (N=8), targeting the conventionally defined gustatory cortex in each hemisphere, and were implanted with intraoral cannulae. Following recovery, their responses to intraoral infusions (0.23ml in 1min) of dH2O, sucrose (1.0M and 0.1M), and quinine hydrochloride (3mM and 0.3mM) were video recorded. Analysis of brains with sufficient bilateral lesions (N=10) revealed that, on average, approximately 94% of the gustatory cortex was destroyed. These extensive bilateral lesions had no significant effect on taste reactivity; the numbers of ingestive and aversive responses to sucrose and quinine were similar between groups. Though these findings do not rule out involvement of the gustatory cortex in palatability processing, they make evident that the region of insular cortex destroyed is not necessary for the normal expression of unconditioned affective behavioral responses to taste stimuli.

  1. Unconditioned Oromotor Taste Reactivity Elicited by Sucrose and Quinine is Unaffected by Extensive Bilateral Damage to the Gustatory Zone of the Insular Cortex in Rats

    PubMed Central

    King, Camille Tessitore; Hashimoto, Koji; Blonde, Ginger D.; Spector, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Rats display stereotypical oromotor and somatic responses to small volumes of intraorally infused taste solutions. These behaviors, known as taste reactivity, are categorized by their association with ingestion or rejection and are thought to reflect the palatability of the stimulus. Because supracollicular decerebrate rats display normal taste reactivity responses, it would appear that forebrain structures are not necessary for generating them. However, because moving the plane of transection rostrally, or damaging or manipulating specific ventral forebrain sites disrupts normal taste reactivity behavior, lesions of the gustatory cortex, a region that has been suggested to be involved with palatability processing, may do the same. In the current study, rats received two injections of either ibotenic acid (N=12) or vehicle (N=8), targeting the conventionally defined gustatory cortex in each hemisphere, and were implanted with intraoral cannulae. Following recovery, their responses to intraoral infusions (0.23 ml in 1 min) of dH20, sucrose (1.0M and 0.1M), and quinine hydrochloride (3 mM and 0.3 mM) were video recorded. Analysis of brains with sufficient bilateral lesions (N=10) revealed that, on average, approximately 94% of the gustatory cortex was destroyed. These extensive bilateral lesions had no significant effect on taste reactivity; the numbers of ingestive and aversive responses to sucrose and quinine were similar between groups. Though these findings do not rule out involvement of the gustatory cortex in palatability processing, they make evident that the region of insular cortex destroyed is not necessary for the normal expression of unconditioned affective behavioral responses to taste stimuli. PMID:25536305

  2. Transcriptomic signatures in seeds of apple (Malus domestica L. Borkh) during fruitlet abscission.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Sergio; Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Mendes, Marta Adelina; Botton, Alessandro; Eccher, Giulia; Masiero, Simona; Colombo, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Abscission is the regulated process of detachment of an organ from a plant. In apple the abscission of fruits occurs during their early development to control the fruit load depending on the nutritional state of the plant. In order to control production and obtain fruits with optimal market qualities, the horticultural procedure of thinning is performed to further reduce the number of fruitlets. In this study we have conducted a transcriptomic profiling of seeds from two different types of fruitlets, according to size and position in the fruit cluster. Transcriptomic profiles of central and lateral fruit seeds were obtained by RNAseq. Comparative analysis was performed by the functional categorization of differentially expressed genes by means of Gene Ontology (GO) annotation of the apple genome. Our results revealed the overexpression of genes involved in responses to stress, hormone biosynthesis and also the response and/or transport of auxin and ethylene. A smaller set of genes, mainly related to ion transport and homeostasis, were found to be down-regulated. The transcriptome characterization described in this manuscript contributes to unravelling the molecular mechanisms and pathways involved in the physiological abscission of apple fruits and suggests a role for seeds in this process.

  3. ARABIDOPSIS DEHISCENCE ZONE POLYGALACTURONASE1 (ADPG1), ADPG2, and QUARTET2 Are Polygalacturonases Required for Cell Separation during Reproductive Development in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Mikihiro; Kay, Pippa; Wilson, Sarah; Swain, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Cell separation is thought to involve degradation of pectin by several hydrolytic enzymes, particularly polygalacturonase (PG). Here, we characterize an activation tagging line with reduced growth and male sterility caused by increased expression of a PG encoded by QUARTET2 (QRT2). QRT2 is essential for pollen grain separation and is part of a small family of three closely related endo-PGs in the Arabidopsis thaliana proteome, including ARABIDOPSIS DEHISCENCE ZONE POLYGALACTURONASE1 (ADPG1) and ADPG2. Functional assays and complementation experiments confirm that ADPG1, ADPG2, and QRT2 are PGs. Genetic analysis demonstrates that ADPG1 and ADPG2 are essential for silique dehiscence. In addition, ADPG2 and QRT2 contribute to floral organ abscission, while all three genes contribute to anther dehiscence. Expression analysis is consistent with the observed mutant phenotypes. INDEHISCENT (IND) encodes a putative basic helix-loop-helix required for silique dehiscence, and we demonstrate that the closely related HECATE3 (HEC3) gene is required for normal seed abscission and show that IND and HEC3 are required for normal expression of ADPG1 in the silique dehiscence zone and seed abscission zone, respectively. We also show that jasmonic acid and ethylene act together with abscisic acid to regulate floral organ abscission, in part by promoting QRT2 expression. These results demonstrate that multiple cell separation events, including both abscission and dehiscence, require closely related PG genes. PMID:19168715

  4. Flower abscission in Vitis vinifera L. triggered by gibberellic acid and shade discloses differences in the underlying metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Domingos, Sara; Scafidi, Pietro; Cardoso, Vania; Leitao, Antonio E.; Di Lorenzo, Rosario; Oliveira, Cristina M.; Goulao, Luis F.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding abscission is both a biological and an agronomic challenge. Flower abscission induced independently by shade and gibberellic acid (GAc) sprays was monitored in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) growing under a soilless greenhouse system during two seasonal growing conditions, in an early and late production cycle. Physiological and metabolic changes triggered by each of the two distinct stimuli were determined. Environmental conditions exerted a significant effect on fruit set as showed by the higher natural drop rate recorded in the late production cycle with respect to the early cycle. Shade and GAc treatments increased the percentage of flower drop compared to the control, and at a similar degree, during the late production cycle. The reduction of leaf gas exchanges under shade conditions was not observed in GAc treated vines. The metabolic profile assessed in samples collected during the late cycle differently affected primary and secondary metabolisms and showed that most of the treatment-resulting variations occurred in opposite trends in inflorescences unbalanced in either hormonal or energy deficit abscission-inducing signals. Particularly concerning carbohydrates metabolism, sucrose, glucose, tricarboxylic acid metabolites and intermediates of the raffinose family oligosaccharides pathway were lower in shaded and higher in GAc samples. Altered oxidative stress remediation mechanisms and indolacetic acid (IAA) concentration were identified as abscission signatures common to both stimuli. According to the global analysis performed, we report that grape flower abscission mechanisms triggered by GAc application and C-starvation are not based on the same metabolic pathways. PMID:26157448

  5. Expression analysis in soybean of IDA-like, HAESA-like and other key regulatory proteins during leaf abscission and cyst nematode infected roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stimulatory and inhibitory role of ethylene and auxin, respectively, in leaf abscission is well documented. More recently, IDA peptides and their putative interacting receptor like kinase partner, HAESA, were shown to be essential components in Arabidopsis floral organ abscission. It was propo...

  6. Profilin 1 is required for abscission during late cytokinesis of chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Ralph T; Wiesner, Sebastian; Braun, Attila; Wimmer, Reiner; Berna, Alejandro; Elad, Nadav; Medalia, Ohad; Pfeifer, Alexander; Aszódi, Attila; Costell, Mercedes; Fässler, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    Profilins are key factors for dynamic rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. However, the functions of profilins in differentiated mammalian cells are uncertain because profilin deficiency is early embryonic lethal for higher eukaryotes. To examine profilin function in chondrocytes, we disrupted the profilin 1 gene in cartilage (Col2pfn1). Homozygous Col2pfn1 mice develop progressive chondrodysplasia caused by disorganization of the growth plate and defective chondrocyte cytokinesis, indicated by the appearance of binucleated cells. Surprisingly, Col2pfn1 chondrocytes assemble and contract actomyosin rings normally during cell division; however, they display defects during late cytokinesis as they frequently fail to complete abscission due to their inability to develop strong traction forces. This reduced force generation results from an impaired formation of lamellipodia, focal adhesions and stress fibres, which in part could be linked to an impaired mDia1-mediated actin filament elongation. Neither an actin nor a poly-proline binding-deficient profilin 1 is able to rescue the defects. Taken together, our results demonstrate that profilin 1 is not required for actomyosin ring formation in dividing chondrocytes but necessary to generate sufficient force for abscission during late cytokinesis. PMID:19262563

  7. Leaf Abscission Induced by Ethylene in Water-Stressed Intact Seedlings of Cleopatra Mandarin Requires Previous Abscisic Acid Accumulation in Roots.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Cadenas, A.; Tadeo, F. R.; Talon, M.; Primo-Millo, E.

    1996-09-01

    The involvement of abscisic acid (ABA) in the process of leaf abscission induced by 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) transported from roots to shoots in Cleopatra mandarin (Citrus reshni Hort. ex Tan.) seedlings grown under water stress was studied using norflurazon (NF). Water stress induced both ABA (24-fold) and ACC (16-fold) accumulation in roots and arrested xylem flow. Leaf bulk ABA also increased (8-fold), although leaf abscission did not occur. Shortly after rehydration, root ABA and ACC returned to their prestress levels, whereas sharp and transitory increases of ACC (17-fold) and ethylene (10-fold) in leaves and high percentages of abscission (up to 47%) were observed. NF suppressed the ABA and ACC accumulation induced by water stress in roots and the sharp increases of ACC and ethylene observed after rewatering in leaves. NF also reduced leaf abscission (7-10%). These results indicate that water stress induces root ABA accumulation and that this is required for the process of leaf abscission to occur. It was also shown that exogenous ABA increases ACC levels in roots but not in leaves. Collectively, the data suggest that ABA, the primary sensitive signal to water stress, modulates the levels of ethylene, which is the hormonal activator of leaf abscission. This assumption implies that root ACC levels are correlated with root ABA amounts in a dependent way, which eventually links water status to an adequate, protective response such as leaf abscission.

  8. Afferent inhibition and the functional properties of neurons in the projection zone of the whiskers in the somatosensory cortex of the cat.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, A A

    2000-01-01

    The effects of afferent evoked inhibition on the functional properties of neurons in the whisker projection zone were studied in the cat brain. These investigations showed that afferent inhibition produced significant changes in the receptive fields of neurons, resulting in the induction of directional sensitivity. These data provide evidence for a defined topical ordering of intracortical inhibitory interactions. It is suggested that in natural conditions, movement of an object across the whisker field, resulting in sequential stimulation of the whiskers, results in sequential tuning of the detector properties of neurons receiving afferent flows from the whiskers. This process may form part of the mechanism for recognizing the direction of stimulus movement.

  9. High-resolution transcript profiling reveals shoot abscission process of spruce dwarf mistletoe Arceuthobium sichuanense in response to ethephon

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonglin; Xiong, Dianguang; Jiang, Ning; Li, Xuewu; Yang, Qiqing; Tian, Chengming

    2016-01-01

    Arceuthobium (dwarf mistletoes) are hemiparasites that may cause great damage to infected trees belonging to Pinaceae and Cupressaceae. Currently, dwarf mistletoe control involves the use of the ethylene-producing product ethephon (ETH), which acts by inducing dwarf mistletoe shoot abscission. However, the process by which ETH functions is mostly unknown. Therefore, the transcriptome of the ETH-exposed plants was compared to non-exposed controls to identify genes associated with the response to ethephon. In this study, the reference transcriptome was contained 120,316 annotated unigenes, with a total of 21,764 ETH-responsive differentially expressed unigenes were identified. These ETH-associated genes clustered into 20 distinctly expressed pattern groups, providing a view of molecular events with good spatial and temporal resolution. As expected, the greatest number of unigenes with changed expression were observed at the onset of abscission, suggesting induction by ethylene. ETH also affected genes associated with shoot abscission processes including hormone biosynthesis and signaling, cell wall hydrolysis and modification, lipid transference, and more. The comprehensive transcriptome data set provides a wealth of genomic resources for dwarf mistletoe communities and contributes to a better understanding of the molecular regulatory mechanism of ethylene-caused shoots abscission. PMID:27941945

  10. Clks 1, 2 and 4 prevent chromatin breakage by regulating the Aurora B-dependent abscission checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Petsalaki, Eleni; Zachos, George

    2016-01-01

    When chromatin is trapped at the intercellular bridge, cells delay completion of cytokinesis (abscission) to prevent chromosome breakage. Here we show that inhibition of Cdc-like kinases (Clks) 1, 2 or 4 accelerates midbody resolution in normally segregating cells and correlates with premature abscission, chromatin breakage and generation of DNA damage in cytokinesis with trapped chromatin. Clk1, Clk2 and Clk4 localize to the midbody in an interdependent manner, associate with Aurora B kinase and are required for Aurora B–serine 331 (S331) phosphorylation and complete Aurora B activation in late cytokinesis. Phosphorylated Aurora B–S331 localizes to the midbody centre and is required for phosphorylation and optimal localization of the abscission protein Chmp4c. In addition, expression of phosphomimetic mutants Aurora B–S331E or Chmp4c-S210D delays midbody disassembly and prevents chromatin breakage in Clk-deficient cells. We propose that Clks 1, 2 and 4 impose the abscission checkpoint by phosphorylating Aurora B–S331 at the midbody. PMID:27126587

  11. Clks 1, 2 and 4 prevent chromatin breakage by regulating the Aurora B-dependent abscission checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Petsalaki, Eleni; Zachos, George

    2016-04-29

    When chromatin is trapped at the intercellular bridge, cells delay completion of cytokinesis (abscission) to prevent chromosome breakage. Here we show that inhibition of Cdc-like kinases (Clks) 1, 2 or 4 accelerates midbody resolution in normally segregating cells and correlates with premature abscission, chromatin breakage and generation of DNA damage in cytokinesis with trapped chromatin. Clk1, Clk2 and Clk4 localize to the midbody in an interdependent manner, associate with Aurora B kinase and are required for Aurora B-serine 331 (S331) phosphorylation and complete Aurora B activation in late cytokinesis. Phosphorylated Aurora B-S331 localizes to the midbody centre and is required for phosphorylation and optimal localization of the abscission protein Chmp4c. In addition, expression of phosphomimetic mutants Aurora B-S331E or Chmp4c-S210D delays midbody disassembly and prevents chromatin breakage in Clk-deficient cells. We propose that Clks 1, 2 and 4 impose the abscission checkpoint by phosphorylating Aurora B-S331 at the midbody.

  12. ApoER2 Controls Not Only Neuronal Migration in the Intermediate Zone But Also Termination of Migration in the Developing Cerebral Cortex.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Yuki; Kubo, Ken-Ichiro; Fujino, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Tokuo T; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2016-11-30

    Neuronal migration contributes to the establishment of mammalian brain. The extracellular protein Reelin sends signals to various downstream molecules by binding to its receptors, the apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2) and very low-density lipoprotein receptor and exerts essential roles in the neuronal migration and formation of the layered neocortex. However, the cellular and molecular functions of Reelin signaling in the cortical development are not yet fully understood. Here, to gain insight into the role of Reelin signaling during cortical development, we examined the migratory behavior of Apoer2-deficient neurons in the developing brain. Stage-specific labeling of newborn neurons revealed that the neurons ectopically invaded the marginal zone (MZ) and that neuronal migration of both early- and late-born neurons was disrupted in the intermediate zone (IZ) in the Apoer2 KO mice. Rescue experiments showed that ApoER2 functions both in cell-autonomous and noncell-autonomous manners, that Rap1, integrin, and Akt are involved in the termination of migration beneath the MZ, and that Akt also controls neuronal migration in the IZ downstream of ApoER2. These data indicate that ApoER2 controls multiple processes in neuronal migration, including the early stage of radial migration and termination of migration beneath the MZ in the developing neocortex.

  13. Enrichment of mGluR7a in the presynaptic active zones of GABAergic and non-GABAergic terminals on interneurons in the rat somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Dalezios, Yannis; Luján, Rafael; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Roberts, J David B; Somogyi, Peter

    2002-09-01

    The release of glutamate and GABA is modulated by presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). We used immunocytochemical methods to define the location of the group III receptor mGluR7a in glutamatergic and GABAergic terminals innervating GABAergic interneurons and pyramidal cells. Immunoreactivity for mGluR7a was localized in the presynaptic active zone of both identified GABAergic and presumed glutamatergic terminals. Terminals innervating dendritic spines showed a variable level of receptor immunoreactivity, ranging from immunonegative to strongly immunopositive. The frequency of strongly mGluR7a positive terminals innervating the soma and dendrites of mGluR1 alpha/somatostatin-expressing interneurons was very high relative to other neurons. On dendrites that received mGluR7a-enriched glutamatergic innervation, at least 80% of GABAergic terminals were immunopositive for mGluR7a. On such dendrites virtually all (95%) vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) positive (GABAergic) terminals were enriched in mGluR7a. The targets of VIP/mGluR7a-expressing terminals were mainly (88%) mGluR1 alpha-expressing interneurons, which were mostly somatostatin immunopositive. Parvalbumin positive terminals were immunonegative for mGluR7a. Some parvalbumin immunoreactive dendrites received strongly mGluR7a positive terminals. The subcellular location, as well as the cell type and synapse-specific distribution of mGluR7a in isocortical neuronal circuits, is homologous to its distribution in the hippocampus. The specific location of mGluR7a in the presynaptic active zone of both glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses may be related to the proximity of calcium channels and the vesicle fusion machinery. The enrichment of mGluR7a in the main GABAergic, as well as in the glutamatergic, innervation of mGluR1 alpha/somatostatin-expressing interneurons suggests that their activation is under unique regulation by extracellular glutamate.

  14. Pollination increases ethylene production in Lilium hybrida cv. Brindisi flowers but does not affect the time to tepal senescence or tepal abscission.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Silvia; Prisa, Domenico; Burchi, Gianluca; van Doorn, Wouter G

    2015-01-15

    In many species, pollination induces a rapid increase in ethylene production, which induces early petal senescence, petal abscission, or flower closure. Cross-pollination in Lilium hybrida cv. Brindisi resulted in a small increase in flower ethylene production. In intact plants and in isolated flowers, pollination had no effect on the time to tepal senescence or tepal abscission. When applied to closed buds of unpollinated flowers, exogenous ethylene slightly hastened the time to tepal senescence and abscission. However, exogenous ethylene had no effect when the flowers had just opened, i.e. at the time of pollination. Experiments with silver thiosulphate, which blocks the ethylene receptor, indicated that endogenous ethylene had a slight effect on the regulation of tepal senescence and tepal abscission, although only at the time the tepals were still inside buds and not in open flowers. Low ethylene-sensitivity after anthesis therefore explains why pollination had no effect on the processes studied.

  15. Somatic cell encystment promotes abscission in germline stem cells following a regulated block in cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Kari F; DiNardo, Stephen

    2015-07-27

    In many tissues, the stem cell niche must coordinate behavior across multiple stem cell lineages. How this is achieved is largely unknown. We have identified delayed completion of cytokinesis in germline stem cells (GSCs) as a mechanism that regulates the production of stem cell daughters in the Drosophila testis. Through live imaging, we show that a secondary F-actin ring is formed through regulation of Cofilin activity to block cytokinesis progress after contractile ring disassembly. The duration of this block is controlled by Aurora B kinase. Additionally, we have identified a requirement for somatic cell encystment of the germline in promoting GSC abscission. We suggest that this non-autonomous role promotes coordination between stem cell lineages. These findings reveal the mechanisms by which cytokinesis is inhibited and reinitiated in GSCs and why such complex regulation exists within the stem cell niche.

  16. Age-related changes in the inner zone of the adrenal cortex of the rat--a morphologic and biochemical study.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, H; Magalhães, M C; Magalhães, M M

    1998-09-15

    In this work, a correlative morphologic and biochemical study on the effects of ageing on the rat adrenal Inner Zone (IZ) was made. Male Wistar rats were studied at 2, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Structural data of Zona Fasciculata (ZF) showed age-related increase in cell volume (P < 0.05), decrease in mitochondria (P < 0.01) and smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) volumes, and increase in lipid droplets (P < 0.01) and lipofuscin granules (P < 0.01) volumes. In Zona Reticularis, the main change observed was the increase in lipofuscin granules (P < 0.001). Serum corticosterone from unstimulated rats increased until 12 months but decreased thereafter (P < 0.01), to levels below those from 2-month-old rats. Similarly, plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) presented a maximum at 12 months, followed by a decrease to levels higher than at 2 months (P < 0.05). In rats injected either with only ACTH or dexamethasone, before ACTH stimulation, corticosterone level had a maximum at 12 months. In aged rats, serum high density lipoprotein (HDL) and adrenal cholesterol ester increased significantly (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively), whereas adrenal corticosterone decreased. Products of lipid peroxidation, assayed with the thiobarbituric acid reaction and fluorimetry showed an age-related increase (P < 0.05). The age-related decrease in mitochondria and SER volumes is consistent with the decrease of serum corticosterone. The increase in lipid droplet and HDL and the reduction of adrenal corticosterone level correlate with the increase of adrenal cholesterol ester content. These suggest a continued uptake of steroid precursor but a reduced steroid synthesis. On the whole, the data provide evidence for an age-related reduced functional ability of IZ and particularly of ZF.

  17. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylic Acid Transported from Roots to Shoots Promotes Leaf Abscission in Cleopatra Mandarin (Citrus reshni Hort. ex Tan.) Seedlings Rehydrated after Water Stress.

    PubMed

    Tudela, D; Primo-Millo, E

    1992-09-01

    The effect of water stress and subsequent rehydration on 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) content, ACC synthase activity, ethylene production, and leaf abscission was studied in Cleopatra mandarin (Citrus reshni Hort. ex Tan.) seedlings. Leaf abscission occurred when drought-stressed plants were allowed to rehydrate, whereas no abscission was observed in plants under water stress conditions. In roots of water-stressed plants, a high ACC accumulation and an increase in ACC synthase activity were observed. Neither increase in ACC content nor significant ethylene production were detected in leaves of water-stressed plants. After rehydration, a sharp rise in ACC content and ethylene production was observed in leaves of water-stressed plants. Content of ACC in xylem fluid was 10-fold higher in plants rehydrated for 2 h after water stress than in nonstressed plants. Leaf abscission induced by rehydration after drought stress was inhibited when roots or shoots were treated before water stress with aminooxyacetic acid (AOA, inhibitor of ACC synthase) or cobalt ion (inhibitor of ethylene-forming enzyme), respectively. However, AOA treatments to shoots did not suppress leaf abscission. The data indicate that water stress promotes ACC synthesis in roots of Cleopatra mandarin seedlings. Rehydration of plants results in ACC transport to the shoots, where it is oxidized to ethylene. Subsequently, this ethylene induces leaf abscission.

  18. Biological control of bacterial wilt in Arabidopsis thaliana involves abscissic acid signalling.

    PubMed

    Feng, Dong Xin; Tasset, Céline; Hanemian, Mathieu; Barlet, Xavier; Hu, Jian; Trémousaygue, Dominique; Deslandes, Laurent; Marco, Yves

    2012-06-01

    Means to control bacterial wilt caused by the phytopathogenic root bacteria Ralstonia solanacearum are limited. Mutants in a large cluster of genes (hrp) involved in the pathogenicity of R. solanacearum were successfully used in a previous study as endophytic biocontrol agents in challenge inoculation experiments on tomato. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling this resistance remained unknown. We developed a protection assay using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model plant and analyzed the events underlying the biological control by genetic, transcriptomic and molecular approaches. High protection rates associated with a significant decrease in the multiplication of R. solanacearum were observed in plants pre-inoculated with a ΔhrpB mutant strain. Neither salicylic acid, nor jasmonic acid/ethylene played a role in the establishment of this resistance. Microarray analysis showed that 26% of the up-regulated genes in protected plants are involved in the biosynthesis and signalling of abscissic acid (ABA). In addition 21% of these genes are constitutively expressed in the irregular xylem cellulose synthase mutants (irx), which present a high level of resistance to R. solanacearum. We propose that inoculation with the ΔhrpB mutant strain generates a hostile environment for subsequent plant colonization by a virulent strain of R. solanacearum.

  19. Multipolar mitosis and aneuploidy after chrysotile treatment: a consequence of abscission failure and cytokinesis regression

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Beatriz Araujo; Teixeira, Paula Rezende; Redick, Sambra; Doxsey, Stephen; Machado-Santelli, Glaucia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Chrysotile, like other types of asbestos, has been associated with mesothelioma, lung cancer and asbestosis. However, the cellular abnormalities induced by these fibers involved in cancer development have not been elucidated yet. Previous works show that chrysotile fibers induce features of cancer cells, such as aneuploidy, multinucleation and multipolar mitosis. In the present study, normal and cancer derived human cell lines were treated with chrysotile and the cellular and molecular mechanisms related to generation of aneuploid cells was elucidated. The first alteration observed was cytokinesis regression, the main cause of multinucleated cells formation and centrosome amplification. The multinucleated cells formed after cytokinesis regression were able to progress through cell cycle and generated aneuploid cells after abnormal mitosis. To understand the process of cytokinesis regression, localization of cytokinetic proteins was investigated. It was observed mislocalization of Anillin, Aurora B, Septin 9 and Alix in the intercellular bridge, and no determination of secondary constriction and abscission sites. Fiber treatment also led to overexpression of genes related to cancer, cytokinesis and cell cycle. The results show that chrysotile fibers induce cellular and molecular alterations in normal and tumor cells that have been related to cancer initiation and progression, and that tetraploidization and aneuploid cell formation are striking events after fiber internalization, which could generate a favorable context to cancer development. PMID:26788989

  20. Reed-Sternberg Cells Form by Abscission Failure in the Presence of Functional Aurora B Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Maia, André F.; Ribeiro, Susana A.; Pontes, Patrícia; Bickmore, Wendy; Earnshaw, William C.; Sambade, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Large multinucleated Reed-Sternberg cells (RS) and large mononucleated Hodgkin cells (H) are traditionally considered to be the neoplastic population in classical Hodgkin lymphoma, (cHL) and postulated to promote the disease. However, the contribution of these larger cells to the progression of cHL remains debatable. We used established cHL cell lines and cHL cellular fractions composed of small mononucleated cells only or enriched in large RS/H cells to investigate RS/H cell origin and to characterize the cells which they derive from. We confirm that the small mononucleated cells give rise to RS/H cells, and we show that the latter proliferate significantly more slowly than the small cells. By using live-cell imaging, we demonstrate that binucleated RS cells are generated by failure of abscission when a few small cells attempt to divide. Finally, our results reveal that the small mononucleated cells are chromosomally unstable, but this is unlikely to be related to a malfunctioning chromosomal passenger protein complex. We propose that the small mononucleated cells, rather than the RS/H cells, are the main drivers of cHL. PMID:25933052

  1. Analysis of Phosphorylation of the Receptor-Like Protein Kinase HAESA during Arabidopsis Floral Abscission

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Isaiah; Wang, Ying; Seitz, Kati; Baer, John; Bennewitz, Stefan; Mooney, Brian P.; Walker, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs) are the largest family of plant transmembrane signaling proteins. Here we present functional analysis of HAESA, an RLK that regulates floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis. Through in vitro and in vivo analysis of HAE phosphorylation, we provide evidence that a conserved phosphorylation site on a region of the HAE protein kinase domain known as the activation segment positively regulates HAE activity. Additional analysis has identified another putative activation segment phosphorylation site common to multiple RLKs that potentially modulates HAE activity. Comparative analysis suggests that phosphorylation of this second activation segment residue is an RLK specific adaptation that may regulate protein kinase activity and substrate specificity. A growing number of RLKs have been shown to exhibit biologically relevant dual specificity toward serine/threonine and tyrosine residues, but the mechanisms underlying dual specificity of RLKs are not well understood. We show that a phospho-mimetic mutant of both HAE activation segment residues exhibits enhanced tyrosine auto-phosphorylation in vitro, indicating phosphorylation of this residue may contribute to dual specificity of HAE. These results add to an emerging framework for understanding the mechanisms and evolution of regulation of RLK activity and substrate specificity. PMID:26784444

  2. Augmin shapes the anaphase spindle for efficient cytokinetic furrow ingression and abscission

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Ryota; Kamasaki, Tomoko; Hiruma, Shota; Poser, Ina; Yoda, Kinya; Yajima, Junichiro; Gerlich, Daniel W.; Goshima, Gohta

    2016-01-01

    During anaphase, distinct populations of microtubules (MTs) form by either centrosome-dependent or augmin-dependent nucleation. It remains largely unknown whether these different MT populations contribute distinct functions to cytokinesis. Here we show that augmin-dependent MTs are required for the progression of both furrow ingression and abscission. Augmin depletion reduced the accumulation of anillin, a contractile ring regulator at the cell equator, yet centrosomal MTs were sufficient to mediate RhoA activation at the furrow. This defect in contractile ring organization, combined with incomplete spindle pole separation during anaphase, led to impaired furrow ingression. During the late stages of cytokinesis, astral MTs formed bundles in the intercellular bridge, but these failed to assemble a focused midbody structure and did not establish tight linkage to the plasma membrane, resulting in furrow regression. Thus augmin-dependent acentrosomal MTs and centrosomal MTs contribute to nonredundant targeting mechanisms of different cytokinesis factors, which are required for the formation of a functional contractile ring and midbody. PMID:26764096

  3. Multipolar mitosis and aneuploidy after chrysotile treatment: a consequence of abscission failure and cytokinesis regression.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Beatriz Araujo; Rezende-Teixeira, Paula; Redick, Sambra; Doxsey, Stephen; Machado-Santelli, Glaucia Maria

    2016-02-23

    Chrysotile, like other types of asbestos, has been associated with mesothelioma, lung cancer and asbestosis. However, the cellular abnormalities induced by these fibers involved in cancer development have not been elucidated yet. Previous works show that chrysotile fibers induce features of cancer cells, such as aneuploidy, multinucleation and multipolar mitosis. In the present study, normal and cancer derived human cell lines were treated with chrysotile and the cellular and molecular mechanisms related to generation of aneuploid cells was elucidated. The first alteration observed was cytokinesis regression, the main cause of multinucleated cells formation and centrosome amplification. The multinucleated cells formed after cytokinesis regression were able to progress through cell cycle and generated aneuploid cells after abnormal mitosis. To understand the process of cytokinesis regression, localization of cytokinetic proteins was investigated. It was observed mislocalization of Anillin, Aurora B, Septin 9 and Alix in the intercellular bridge, and no determination of secondary constriction and abscission sites. Fiber treatment also led to overexpression of genes related to cancer, cytokinesis and cell cycle. The results show that chrysotile fibers induce cellular and molecular alterations in normal and tumor cells that have been related to cancer initiation and progression, and that tetraploidization and aneuploid cell formation are striking events after fiber internalization, which could generate a favorable context to cancer development.

  4. Modification of carotenoid levels by abscission agents and expression of carotenoid biosynthetic genes in 'valencia' sweet orange.

    PubMed

    Alferez, Fernando; Pozo, Luis V; Rouseff, Russell R; Burns, Jacqueline K

    2013-03-27

    The effect of 5-chloro-3-methyl-4-nitro-1H-pyrazole (CMNP) and ethephon on peel color, flavedo carotenoid gene expression, and carotenoid accumulation was investigated in mature 'Valencia' orange ( Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) fruit flavedo at three maturation stages. Abscission agent application altered peel color. CMNP was more effective than ethephon in promoting green-to-red (a) and blue-to-yellow (b) color at the middle and late maturation stages and total carotenoid changes at all maturation stages. Altered flow of carotenoid precursors during maturation due to abscission agents was suggested by changes in phytoene desaturase (Pds) and ζ-carotene desaturase (Zds) gene expression. However, each abscission agent affected downstream expression differentially. Ethephon application increased β-carotene hydroxilase (β-Chx) transcript accumulation 12-fold as maturation advanced from the early to middle and late stages. CMNP markedly increased β- and ε-lycopene cyclase (Lcy) transcript accumulation 45- and 15-fold, respectively, at midmaturation. Patterns of carotenoid accumulation in flavedo were supported in part by gene expression changes. CMNP caused greater accumulation of total flavedo carotenoids at all maturation stages when compared with ethephon or controls. In general, CMNP treatment increased total red carotenoids more than ethephon or the control but decreased total yellow carotenoids at each maturation stage. In control fruit flavedo, total red carotenoids increased and yellow carotenoids decreased as maturation progressed. Trends in total red carotenoids during maturation were consistent with measured a values. Changes in carotenoid accumulation and expression patterns in flavedo suggest that regulation of carotenoid accumulation is under transcriptional, translational, and post-translational control.

  5. Effect of pollinator-inflicted ovule damage on floral abscission in the yucca-yucca moth mutualism: the role of mechanical and chemical factors.

    PubMed

    Marr, Deborah L; Pellmyr, Olle

    2003-07-01

    The long-term persistence of obligate mutualisms (over 40 Mya in both fig/fig wasps and yucca/yucca moths) raises the question of how one species limits exploitation by the other species, even though there is selection pressure on individuals to maximize fitness. In the case of yuccas, moths serve as the plant's only pollinator, but eggs laid by the moths before pollination hatch into larvae that consume seeds. Previous studies have shown that flowers with high egg loads are more likely to abscise. This suggests that yucca flowers can select against moths that lay many eggs per flower through selective abscission of flowers; however, it is not known how yucca moths trigger floral abscission. We tested how the moth Tegeticula yuccasella triggers floral abscission during oviposition in Yucca filamentosa by examining the effects of ovipositor insertion and egg laying on ovule viability and floral abscission. Eggs are not laid at the site of ovipositor insertion: we used this separation to test whether wounded ovules were more closely associated with the ovipositor site or an egg's location. Using a tetrazolium stain to detect injured ovules, we determined whether the number of ovipositions affected the number of wounded ovules in naturally pollinated flowers. Two wounding experiments were used to test the effect of mechanical damage on the probability of floral abscission. The types of wounds in these experiments mimicked two types of oviposition-superficial oviposition in the ovary wall and oviposition into the locular cavity-that have been observed in species of Tegeticula. The effect of moth eggs on ovule viability was experimentally tested by culturing ovules in vitro, placing moth eggs on the ovules, and measuring changes in ovule viability with a tetrazolium stain. We found that ovules were physically wounded during natural oviposition. Ovules showed a visible wounding response in moth-pollinated flowers collected 7-12 h after oviposition. Exact location of

  6. Are we on the right track: Can our understanding of abscission in model systems promote or derail making improvements in less studied crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the world population grows and resources and climate conditions change, crop improvement continues to be one of the most important challenges for agriculturalists. The yield and quality of many crops is affected by abscission or shattering, and environmental stresses often hasten or alter the abs...

  7. Implications of premature needle abscission to the elemental nutrient status and nutrient retranslocation patterns of ozone injured Jeffrey pine

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, M.T.; Rundel, P.W. )

    1993-06-01

    The foliar nutrient relations of ozone stressed Jeffrey pine growing in the southern Sierra Nevada of California was compared in trees retaining different numbers of needle cohorts. A 20% reduction in foliar nitrogen occurred in the oldest needles of both sensitive trees (retaining two years of needles) and resistant trees (retaining five years of needles) which coincided with the flush of new needles in late June. Nitrogen content of recently expanded needles on sensitive trees was 15% lower than needles of similar age on resistant trees immediately after becoming fully expanded, but was not significantly different two months after expansion. Resistant trees retranslocated higher fractions of all phloem-mobile nutrients measured (N, K, P and Mg) although the differences were small (between 3 and 9%). The smaller foliar pool of nutrients resulting from premature abscission may result in ozone sensitive trees relying more heavily on soil supplies for both short and long term nutrient requirements.

  8. Nitrophenolates spray can alter boll abscission rate in cotton through enhanced peroxidase activity and increased ascorbate and phenolics levels.

    PubMed

    Djanaguiraman, M; Sheeba, J Annie; Devi, D Durga; Bangarusamy, U; Prasad, P V V

    2010-01-01

    Field studies were conducted from 2002 to 2005 to evaluate foliar spray of Atonik (a plant growth regulator (PGR) containing nitrophenolates) on cotton boll abscission rate by assessing various reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents, antioxidant content and antioxidant enzyme activity from 1 to 9 days after anthesis (DAA). The result indicated that the nitrophenolate spray reduced hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) accumulation, lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde--MDA), lipoxygenase (LOX) activity and membrane permeability relative to the control. Antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase, SOD; ascorbate peroxidase, APX; peroxidase, POX; glutathione peroxidase, GSH-Px) was significantly increased by the nitrophenolate spray. The POX (217%) and GSH-Px (242%) activities were enhanced compared with APX (7.7%) activity at 9 DAA. Enhanced accumulation of ascorbate (245%), phenol (253%) and proline (150%) was observed in nitrophenolate-sprayed plants compared with control at 9 DAA. Because ascorbate content is increased by higher dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) enzyme activity, the ascorbate was able to replenish reducing equivalents to phenoxyl radicals, resulting in an increase of phenolic compounds. The increased phenolic acid content may be involved in scavenging the ROS produced in developing cotton boll. The role of DHAR and glutathione reductase (GR) in keeping higher levels of reduced ascorbate and low levels of endogenous H(2)O(2) in the developing cotton boll may be the prerequisite for boll retention. Based on the present work, we conclude that nitrophenolate-sprayed plants counteracted the deleterious effects of ROS by the peroxide/phenolics/ascorbate system, which causes reduced boll abscission and increased yield.

  9. Integrin signaling via FAK-Src controls cytokinetic abscission by decelerating PLK1 degradation and subsequent recruitment of CEP55 at the midbody

    PubMed Central

    Kamranvar, Siamak A.; Gupta, Deepesh Kumar; Huang, Ying; Gupta, Rajesh Kumar; Johansson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion to extracellular matrix is required for cell cycle progression through the G1 phase and for the completion of cytokinesis in normal adherent cells. Cancer cells acquire the ability to proliferate anchorage-independently, a characteristic feature of malignantly transformed cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this escape of the normal control mechanisms remain unclear. The current study aimed to identify adhesion-induced reactions regulating the cytokinesis of non-transformed human fibroblasts. The adhesion-dependent control of cytokinesis was found to occur at a late stage close to the abscission, during which the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) severs the thin intercellular bridge connecting two nascent daughter cells. CEP55, a key protein involved in the abscission process, was localized at the midbody in both adherent and non-adherent fibroblasts, but it was unable to efficiently recruit ALIX, TSG101, and consequently the ESCRT-III subunit CHMP4B was missing in the non-adherent cells. PLK1, a kinase that prevents premature recruitment of CEP55 to the midbody, disappeared from this site more rapidly in the non-adherent cells. A FAK-Src signaling pathway downstream of integrin-mediated cell adhesion was found to decelerate both PLK1 degradation and CEP55 accumulation at the midbody. These data identify the regulation of PLK1 and CEP55 as steps where integrins exert control over the cytokinetic abscission. PMID:27127172

  10. Motor activity of centromere-associated protein-E contributes to its localization at the center of the midbody to regulate cytokinetic abscission

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Akihiro; Ohori, Momoko; Iwai, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Accurate control of cytokinesis is critical for genomic stability to complete high-fidelity transmission of genetic material to the next generation. A number of proteins accumulate in the intercellular bridge (midbody) during cytokinesis, and the dynamics of these proteins are temporally and spatially orchestrated to complete the process. In this study, we demonstrated that localization of centromere-associated protein-E (CENP-E) at the midbody is involved in cytokinetic abscission. The motor activity of CENP-E and the C-terminal midbody localization domain, which includes amino acids 2659–2666 (RYFDNSSL), are involved in the anchoring of CENP-E to the center of the midbody. Furthermore, CENP-E motor activity contributes to the accumulation of protein regulator of cytokinesis 1 (PRC1) in the midbody during cytokinesis. Midbody localization of PRC1 is critical to the antiparallel microtubule structure and recruitment of other midbody-associated proteins. Therefore, CENP-E motor activity appears to play important roles in the organization of these proteins to complete cytokinetic abscission. Our findings will be helpful for understanding how each step of cytokinesis is regulated to complete cytokinetic abscission. PMID:27835888

  11. Neurons in the medial cortex give rise to Timm-positive boutons in the cerebral cortex of lizards.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Garcia, C; Martinez-Guijarro, F J

    1988-11-01

    The origin of Timm-positive presynaptic boutons in the cerebral cortex of the lizard, Podarcis hispanica, was investigated by injections of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-saponine in Timm-positive areas, i.e. the dorsal and dorsomedial cortices. A broad retrograde labelling of cell somata in the medial cortex was found. Injections of HRP-saponine in the medial cortex resulted in broad anterograde labelling of boutons located in the Timm-positive zones. A double-labelling of the HRP labelled boutons was obtained by using the Neo-Timm or the sulphide-osmium methods. The present results suggest that neurons of the medial cortex send axons that terminate in Timm-positive boutons in the cerebral cortex of lizards.

  12. Safety Zones

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These are established primarily to reduce the accidental spread of hazardous substances by workers or equipment from contaminated areas to clean areas. They include the exclusion (hot) zone, contamination reduction (warm) zone, and support (cold) zone.

  13. Conservation of the abscission signaling peptide IDA during Angiosperm evolution: withstanding genome duplications and gain and loss of the receptors HAE/HSL2

    PubMed Central

    Stø, Ida M.; Orr, Russell J. S.; Fooyontphanich, Kim; Jin, Xu; Knutsen, Jonfinn M. B.; Fischer, Urs; Tranbarger, Timothy J.; Nordal, Inger; Aalen, Reidunn B.

    2015-01-01

    The peptide INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION (IDA), which signals through the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases HAESA (HAE) and HAESA-LIKE2 (HSL2), controls different cell separation events in Arabidopsis thaliana. We hypothesize the involvement of this signaling module in abscission processes in other plant species even though they may shed other organs than A. thaliana. As the first step toward testing this hypothesis from an evolutionarily perspective we have identified genes encoding putative orthologs of IDA and its receptors by BLAST searches of publically available protein, nucleotide and genome databases for angiosperms. Genes encoding IDA or IDA-LIKE (IDL) peptides and HSL proteins were found in all investigated species, which were selected as to represent each angiosperm order with available genomic sequences. The 12 amino acids representing the bioactive peptide in A. thaliana have virtually been unchanged throughout the evolution of the angiosperms; however, the number of IDL and HSL genes varies between different orders and species. The phylogenetic analyses suggest that IDA, HSL2, and the related HSL1 gene, were present in the species that gave rise to the angiosperms. HAE has arisen from HSL1 after a genome duplication that took place after the monocot—eudicots split. HSL1 has also independently been duplicated in the monocots, while HSL2 has been lost in gingers (Zingiberales) and grasses (Poales). IDA has been duplicated in eudicots to give rise to functionally divergent IDL peptides. We postulate that the high number of IDL homologs present in the core eudicots is a result of multiple whole genome duplications (WGD). We substantiate the involvement of IDA and HAE/HSL2 homologs in abscission by providing gene expression data of different organ separation events from various species. PMID:26579174

  14. A Jasmonate ZIM-Domain Protein NaJAZd Regulates Floral Jasmonic Acid Levels and Counteracts Flower Abscission in Nicotiana attenuata Plants

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Youngjoo; Baldwin, Ian T.; Galis, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonic acid is an important regulator of plant growth, development and defense. The jasmonate-ZIM domain (JAZ) proteins are key regulators in jasmonate signaling ubiquitously present in flowering plants but their functional annotation remains largely incomplete. Recently, we identified 12 putative JAZ proteins in native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, and initiated systematic functional characterization of these proteins by reverse genetic approaches. In this report, Nicotiana attenuata plants silenced in the expression of NaJAZd (irJAZd) by RNA interference were used to characterize NaJAZd function. Although NaJAZd transcripts were strongly and transiently up-regulated in the rosette leaves by simulated herbivory treatment, we did not observe strong defense-related phenotypes, such as altered herbivore performance or the constitutive accumulation of defense-related secondary metabolites in irJAZd plants compared to wild type plants, both in the glasshouse and the native habitat of Nicotiana attenuata in the Great Basin Desert, Utah, USA. Interestingly, irJAZd plants produced fewer seed capsules than did wild type plants as a result of increased flower abscission in later stages of flower development. The early- and mid-developmental stages of irJAZd flowers had reduced levels of jasmonic acid and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine, while fully open flowers had normal levels, but these were impaired in NaMYB305 transcript accumulations. Previously, NaMYB305-silenced plants were shown to have strong flower abscission phenotypes and contained lower NECTARIN 1 transcript levels, phenotypes which are copied in irJAZd plants. We propose that the NaJAZd protein is required to counteract flower abscission, possibly by regulating jasmonic acid and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine levels and/or expression of NaMYB305 gene in Nicotiana attenuata flowers. This novel insight into the function of JAZ proteins in flower and seed development highlights the diversity of functions played by jasmonates

  15. Myotubularin-related proteins 3 and 4 interact with polo-like kinase 1 and centrosomal protein of 55 kDa to ensure proper abscission.

    PubMed

    St-Denis, Nicole; Gupta, Gagan D; Lin, Zhen Yuan; Gonzalez-Badillo, Beatriz; Pelletier, Laurence; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2015-04-01

    The myotubularins are a family of phosphatases that dephosphorylate the phosphatidylinositols phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol-3,5-phosphate. Several family members are mutated in disease, yet the biological functions of the majority of myotubularins remain unknown. To gain insight into the roles of the individual enzymes, we have used affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry to identify protein-protein interactions for the myotubularins. The myotubularin interactome comprises 66 high confidence (false discovery rate ≤1%) interactions, including 18 pairwise interactions between individual myotubularins. The results reveal a number of potential signaling contexts for this family of enzymes, including an intriguing, novel role for myotubularin-related protein 3 and myotubularin-related protein 4 in the regulation of abscission, the final step of mitosis in which the membrane bridge remaining between two daughter cells is cleaved. Both depletion and overexpression of either myotubularin-related protein 3 or myotubularin-related protein 4 result in abnormal midbody morphology and cytokinesis failure. Interestingly, myotubularin-related protein 3 and myotubularin-related protein 4 do not exert their effects through lipid regulation at the midbody, but regulate abscission during early mitosis, by interacting with the mitotic kinase polo-like kinase 1, and with centrosomal protein of 55 kDa (CEP55), an important regulator of abscission. Structure-function analysis reveals that, consistent with known intramyotubularin interactions, myotubularin-related protein 3 and myotubularin-related protein 4 interact through their respective coiled coil domains. The interaction between myotubularin-related protein 3 and polo-like kinase 1 relies on the divergent, nonlipid binding Fab1, YOTB, Vac1, and EEA1 domain of myotubularin-related protein 3, and myotubularin-related protein 4 interacts with CEP55 through a short GPPXXXY motif, analogous to

  16. [Neuroanatomy of Frontal Association Cortex].

    PubMed

    Takada, Masahiko

    2016-11-01

    The frontal association cortex is composed of the prefrontal cortex and the motor-related areas except the primary motor cortex (i.e., the so-called higher motor areas), and is well-developed in primates, including humans. The prefrontal cortex receives and integrates large bits of diverse information from the parietal, temporal, and occipital association cortical areas (termed the posterior association cortex), and paralimbic association cortical areas. This information is then transmitted to the primary motor cortex via multiple motor-related areas. Given these facts, it is likely that the prefrontal cortex exerts executive functions for behavioral control. The functional input pathways from the posterior and paralimbic association cortical areas to the prefrontal cortex are classified primarily into six groups. Cognitive signals derived from the prefrontal cortex are conveyed to the rostral motor-related areas to transform them into motor signals, which finally enter the primary motor cortex via the caudal motor-related areas. Furthermore, it has been shown that, similar to the primary motor cortex, areas of the frontal association cortex form individual networks (known as "loop circuits") with the basal ganglia and cerebellum via the thalamus, and hence are extensively involved in the expression and control of behavioral actions.

  17. Ontogeny of somatostatin receptors in the rat somatosensory cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, B.J.; Leroux, P.; Bodenant, C.; Vaudry, H. )

    1991-03-08

    The distribution and density of SRIF receptors (SRIF-R) were studied during development in the rat somatosensory cortex by in vitro autoradiography with monoiodinated (Tyr0-DTrp8)S14. In 16-day-old fetuses (E16), intense labeling was evident in the intermediate zone of the cortex while low concentrations of SRIF-R were detected in the marginal and ventricular zones. The highest density of SRIF-R was measured in the intermediate zone at E18. At this stage, labeling was also intense in the internal part of the developing cortical plate; in contrast, the concentration of binding sites associated with the marginal and ventricular zones remained relatively low. Profound modifications in the distribution of SRIF-R appeared at birth. In particular, a transient reduction of receptor density occurred in the cortical plate. During the first postnatal week, the density of receptors measured in the intermediate zone decreased gradually; conversely, high levels of SRIF-R were observed in the developing cortical layers (II to VI). At postpartum day 13 (P13), a stage which just precedes completion of cell migration in the parietal cortex, the most intensely labeled regions were layers V-VI and future layers II-III. From P13 to adulthood, the concentrations of SRIF-R decreased in all cortical layers (I to VI) and the pattern of distribution of receptors at P21 was similar to that observed in the adults.

  18. Are We on the Right Track: Can Our Understanding of Abscission in Model Systems Promote or Derail Making Improvements in Less Studied Crops?

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Sara E.; Bolivar-Medina, Jenny L.; Falbel, Tanya G.; Hedtcke, Janet L.; Nevarez-McBride, Danielle; Maule, Andrew F.; Zalapa, Juan E.

    2016-01-01

    As the world population grows and resources and climate conditions change, crop improvement continues to be one of the most important challenges for agriculturalists. The yield and quality of many crops is affected by abscission or shattering, and environmental stresses often hasten or alter the abscission process. Understanding this process can not only lead to genetic improvement, but also changes in cultural practices and management that will contribute to higher yields, improved quality and greater sustainability. As plant scientists, we have learned significant amounts about this process through the study of model plants such as Arabidopsis, tomato, rice, and maize. While these model systems have provided significant valuable information, we are sometimes challenged to use this knowledge effectively as variables including the economic value of the crop, the uniformity of the crop, ploidy levels, flowering and crossing mechanisms, ethylene responses, cultural requirements, responses to changes in environment, and cellular and tissue specific morphological differences can significantly influence outcomes. The value of genomic resources for lesser-studied crops such as cranberries and grapes and the orphan crop fonio will also be considered. PMID:26858730

  19. CX-516 Cortex pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Danysz, Wojciech

    2002-07-01

    CX-516 is one of a series of AMPA modulators under development by Cortex, in collaboration with Shire and Servier, for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD), schizophrenia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) [234221]. By June 2001, CX-516 was in phase II trials for both schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) [412513]. A phase II trial in fragile X syndrome and autism was expected to start in May 2002 [449861]. In October 2001, Cortex was awarded a Phase II SBIR grant of $769,818 from the National Institutes of Mental Health to investigate the therapeutic potential of AMPAkines in schizophrenia. This award was to support a phase IIb study of CX-516 as a combination therapy in schizophrenia patients concomitantly treated with olanzapine. The trial was to enroll 80 patients and employ a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design in which the placebo group was to receive olanzapine plus placebo and the active group was to receive olanzapine plus CX-516 [425982]. In April 2000, Shire and Cortex signed an option agreement in which Shire was to evaluate CX-516for the treatment of ADHD. Under the terms of the agreement, Shire would undertake a double-blind, placebo-controlled evaluation of CX-516 involving ADHD patients. If the study proved effective, Shire would have the right to convert its option into an exclusive worldwide license for the AMPAkines for ADHD under a development and licensing agreement. Should Shire elect to execute this agreement, Shire would bear all future developmental costs [363618]. By February 2002, Cortex and Servier had revealed their intention to begin enrolment for an international study of an AMPAkine compound as a potential treatment for MCI in the near future. Assuming enrollment proceeded as anticipated, results were expected during the second quarter of 2003 [439301]. By May 2002, phase II trials were underway [450134]. In March 2002, Cortex was awarded extended funding under the

  20. A NEW CRYSTAL-CONTAINING CELL IN HUMAN ADRENAL CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Maria C.

    1972-01-01

    Electron microscope examination of the adrenal cortex from three male human subjects revealed a special type of cell occurring in periendothelial spaces, in all adrenal cortex zones. It is a clear, spindle-shaped cell the principal cytoplasmic features of which are crystalline inclusions with a structure similar to that of the Reinke crystals of human testicular interstitial cells and an abundance of microfilaments. Enzymatic digestions with pronase, pepsin, and ribonuclease were performed, and no digestion of the crystals was obtained. The crystals had no peroxidase or acid phosphatase activities. This cell appears to be exclusive to human males and it may be related to adrenal androgen secretion. PMID:4347248

  1. Neurocontrol in sensory cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritt, Jason; Nandi, Anirban; Schroeder, Joseph; Ching, Shinung

    Technology to control neural ensembles is rapidly advancing, but many important challenges remain in applications, such as design of controls (e.g. stimulation patterns) with specificity comparable to natural sensory encoding. We use the rodent whisker tactile system as a model for active touch, in which sensory information is acquired in a closed loop between feedforward encoding of sensory information and feedback guidance of sensing motions. Motivated by this system, we present optimal control strategies that are tailored for underactuation (a large ratio of neurons or degrees of freedom to stimulation channels) and limited observability (absence of direct measurement of the system state), common in available stimulation technologies for freely behaving animals. Using a control framework, we have begun to elucidate the feedback effect of sensory cortex activity on sensing in behaving animals. For example, by optogenetically perturbing primary sensory cortex (SI) activity at varied timing relative to individual whisker motions, we find that SI modulates future sensing behavior within 15 msec, on a whisk by whisk basis, changing the flow of incoming sensory information based on past experience. J.T.R. and S.C. hold Career Awards at the Scientific Interface from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund.

  2. Word Recognition in Auditory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWitt, Iain D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Although spoken word recognition is more fundamental to human communication than text recognition, knowledge of word-processing in auditory cortex is comparatively impoverished. This dissertation synthesizes current models of auditory cortex, models of cortical pattern recognition, models of single-word reading, results in phonetics and results in…

  3. Occurrence of new neurons in the piriform cortex.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ti-Fei; Liang, Yu-Xiang; So, Kwok-Fai

    2014-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been well studied in hippocampus and subventricular zone (SVZ); while this is much less appreciated in other brain regions, including amygdala, hypothalamus, and piriform cortex (PC). The present review aims at summarizing recent advances on the occurrence of new neurons in the PC, their potential origin, and migration route from the SVZ. We further discuss the relevant implications in olfactory dysfunction accompanying the neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Occurrence of new neurons in the piriform cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ti-Fei; Liang, Yu-Xiang; So, Kwok-Fai

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been well studied in hippocampus and subventricular zone (SVZ); while this is much less appreciated in other brain regions, including amygdala, hypothalamus, and piriform cortex (PC). The present review aims at summarizing recent advances on the occurrence of new neurons in the PC, their potential origin, and migration route from the SVZ. We further discuss the relevant implications in olfactory dysfunction accompanying the neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25653597

  5. The Interplay between Estrogen and Fetal Adrenal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kaludjerovic, Jovana; Ward, Wendy E.

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen is a steroid hormone that regulates embryogenesis, cell proliferation and differentiation, organogenesis, the timing of parturition, and fetal imprinting by carrying chemical messages from glands to cells within tissues or organs in the body. During development, placenta is the primary source of estrogen production but estrogen can only be produced if the fetus or the mother supplies dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), the estrogen prohormone. Studies show that the fetal zone of the fetal adrenal cortex supplies 60% of DHEA for placental estrogen production, and that placental estrogen in turn modulates the morphological and functional development of the fetal adrenal cortex. As such, in developed countries where humans are exposed daily to environmental estrogens, there is concern that the development of fetal adrenal cortex, and in turn, placental estrogen production may be disrupted. This paper discusses fetal adrenal gland development, how endogenous estrogen regulates the structure and function of the fetal adrenal cortex, and highlights the potential role that early life exposure to environmental estrogens may have on the development and endocrinology of the fetal adrenal cortex. PMID:22536492

  6. Radial glia and somal translocation of radial neurons in the developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Bagirathy

    2003-07-01

    A series of recent studies have demonstrated that radial glia are neural precursors in the developing cerebral cortex. These studies have further implied that these cells are the sole precursor constituents of the dorsal forebrain ventricular zone that generate the projection neurons of the cortex. In view of these new findings, this review discusses radial neurons, a progeny of cortical neurons that are generated by radial glia and adopt somal translocation as the mode of migration.

  7. Functional Zonation of the Adult Mammalian Adrenal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Vinson, Gavin P.

    2016-01-01

    The standard model of adrenocortical zonation holds that the three main zones, glomerulosa, fasciculata, and reticularis each have a distinct function, producing mineralocorticoids (in fact just aldosterone), glucocorticoids, and androgens respectively. Moreover, each zone has its specific mechanism of regulation, though ACTH has actions throughout. Finally, the cells of the cortex originate from a stem cell population in the outer cortex or capsule, and migrate centripetally, changing their phenotype as they progress through the zones. Recent progress in understanding the development of the gland and the distribution of steroidogenic enzymes, trophic hormone receptors, and other factors suggests that this model needs refinement. Firstly, proliferation can take place throughout the gland, and although the stem cells are certainly located in the periphery, zonal replenishment can take place within zones. Perhaps more importantly, neither the distribution of enzymes nor receptors suggest that the individual zones are necessarily autonomous in their production of steroid. This is particularly true of the glomerulosa, which does not seem to have the full suite of enzymes required for aldosterone biosynthesis. Nor, in the rat anyway, does it express MC2R to account for the response of aldosterone to ACTH. It is known that in development, recruitment of stem cells is stimulated by signals from within the glomerulosa. Furthermore, throughout the cortex local regulatory factors, including cytokines, catecholamines and the tissue renin-angiotensin system, modify and refine the effects of the systemic trophic factors. In these and other ways it more and more appears that the functions of the gland should be viewed as an integrated whole, greater than the sum of its component parts. PMID:27378832

  8. Chemosensory Learning in the Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Rolls, Edmund T.

    2011-01-01

    Taste is a primary reinforcer. Olfactory–taste and visual–taste association learning takes place in the primate including human orbitofrontal cortex to build representations of flavor. Rapid reversal of this learning can occur using a rule-based learning system that can be reset when an expected taste or flavor reward is not obtained, that is by negative reward prediction error, to which a population of neurons in the orbitofrontal cortex responds. The representation in the orbitofrontal cortex but not the primary taste or olfactory cortex is of the reward value of the visual/olfactory/taste input as shown by devaluation experiments in which food is fed to satiety, and by correlations of the activations with subjective pleasantness ratings in humans. Sensory-specific satiety for taste, olfactory, visual, and oral somatosensory inputs produced by feeding a particular food to satiety is implemented it is proposed by medium-term synaptic adaptation in the orbitofrontal cortex. Cognitive factors, including word-level descriptions, modulate the representation of the reward value of food in the orbitofrontal cortex, and this effect is learned it is proposed by associative modification of top-down synapses onto neurons activated by bottom-up taste and olfactory inputs when both are active in the orbitofrontal cortex. A similar associative synaptic learning process is proposed to be part of the mechanism for the top-down attentional control to the reward value vs. the sensory properties such as intensity of taste and olfactory inputs in the orbitofrontal cortex, as part of a biased activation theory of selective attention. PMID:21954379

  9. Vestibular projections in the human cortex.

    PubMed

    de Waele, C; Baudonnière, P M; Lepecq, J C; Tran Ba Huy, P; Vidal, P P

    2001-12-01

    There is considerable evidence from studies on cats and monkeys that several cortical areas such as area 2v at the tip of the intraparietal sulcus, area 3av in the sulcus centralis, the parietoinsular vestibular cortex adjacent to the posterior insula (PIVC) and area 7 in the inferior parietal lobule are involved in the processing of vestibular information. Microelectrode recordings from these areas have shown that: (1) most of these cortical neurons are connected trisynaptically to the labyrinthine endorgans and (2) they receive converging vestibular, visual and somatosensory inputs. These data suggest that a multimodal cortical system is involved in postural and gaze control. In humans, recent positron emission tomography (PET) scans and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have largely confirmed these data. However, because of the limited temporal resolution of these two methods, the minimum time of arrival of labyrinthine inputs from the vestibular hair cells to these cortical areas has not yet been determined. In this study, we used the evoked potential method to attempt to answer this question. Due to its excellent temporal resolution, this method is ideal for the investigation of the tri- or polysynaptic nature of the vestibulocortical pathways. Eleven volunteer patients, who underwent a vestibular neurectomy due to intractable Meniere's disease (MD) or acoustic neurinoma resection, were included in this experiment. Patients were anesthetized and the vestibular nerve was electrically stimulated. The evoked potentials were recorded by 30 subcutaneous active electrodes located on the scalp. The brain electrical source imaging (BESA) program (version 2.0, 1995) was used to calculate dipole sources. The latency period for the activation of five distinct cortical zones, including the prefrontal and/or the frontal lobe, the ipsilateral temporoparietal cortex, the anterior portion of the supplementary motor area (SMA) and the contralateral parietal

  10. MRI volumetry of prefrontal cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheline, Yvette I.; Black, Kevin J.; Lin, Daniel Y.; Pimmel, Joseph; Wang, Po; Haller, John W.; Csernansky, John G.; Gado, Mokhtar; Walkup, Ronald K.; Brunsden, Barry S.; Vannier, Michael W.

    1995-05-01

    Prefrontal cortex volumetry by brain magnetic resonance (MR) is required to estimate changes postulated to occur in certain psychiatric and neurologic disorders. A semiautomated method with quantitative characterization of its performance is sought to reliably distinguish small prefrontal cortex volume changes within individuals and between groups. Stereological methods were tested by a blinded comparison of measurements applied to 3D MR scans obtained using an MPRAGE protocol. Fixed grid stereologic methods were used to estimate prefrontal cortex volumes on a graphic workstation, after the images are scaled from 16 to 8 bits using a histogram method. In addition images were resliced into coronal sections perpendicular to the bicommissural plane. Prefrontal cortex volumes were defined as all sections of the frontal lobe anterior to the anterior commissure. Ventricular volumes were excluded. Stereological measurement yielded high repeatability and precision, and was time efficient for the raters. The coefficient of error was cortex boundaries on 3D images was critical to obtaining accurate measurements. MR prefrontal cortex volumetry by stereology can yield accurate and repeatable measurements. Small frontal lobe volume reductions in patients with brain disorders such as depression and schizophrenia can be efficiently assessed using this method.

  11. Cortical connectivity maps reveal anatomically distinct areas in the parietal cortex of the rat.

    PubMed

    Wilber, Aaron A; Clark, Benjamin J; Demecha, Alexis J; Mesina, Lilia; Vos, Jessica M; McNaughton, Bruce L

    2014-01-01

    A central feature of theories of spatial navigation involves the representation of spatial relationships between objects in complex environments. The parietal cortex has long been linked to the processing of spatial visual information and recent evidence from single unit recording in rodents suggests a role for this region in encoding egocentric and world-centered frames. The rat parietal cortex can be subdivided into four distinct rostral-caudal and medial-lateral regions, which includes a zone previously characterized as secondary visual cortex. At present, very little is known regarding the relative connectivity of these parietal subdivisions. Thus, we set out to map the connectivity of the entire anterior-posterior and medial-lateral span of this region. To do this we used anterograde and retrograde tracers in conjunction with open source neuronal segmentation and tracer detection tools to generate whole brain connectivity maps of parietal inputs and outputs. Our present results show that inputs to the parietal cortex varied significantly along the medial-lateral, but not the rostral-caudal axis. Specifically, retrosplenial connectivity is greater medially, but connectivity with visual cortex, though generally sparse, is more significant laterally. Finally, based on connection density, the connectivity between parietal cortex and hippocampus is indirect and likely achieved largely via dysgranular retrosplenial cortex. Thus, similar to primates, the parietal cortex of rats exhibits a difference in connectivity along the medial-lateral axis, which may represent functionally distinct areas.

  12. Spindle neurons of the human anterior cingulate cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nimchinsky, E. A.; Vogt, B. A.; Morrison, J. H.; Hof, P. R.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The human anterior cingulate cortex is distinguished by the presence of an unusual cell type, a large spindle neuron in layer Vb. This cell has been noted numerous times in the historical literature but has not been studied with modern neuroanatomic techniques. For instance, details regarding the neuronal class to which these cells belong and regarding their precise distribution along both ventrodorsal and anteroposterior axes of the cingulate gyrus are still lacking. In the present study, morphological features and the anatomic distribution of this cell type were studied using computer-assisted mapping and immunocytochemical techniques. Spindle neurons are restricted to the subfields of the anterior cingulate cortex (Brodmann's area 24), exhibiting a greater density in anterior portions of this area than in posterior portions, and tapering off in the transition zone between anterior and posterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, a majority of the spindle cells at any level is located in subarea 24b on the gyral surface. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that the neurofilament protein triple was present in a large percentage of these neurons and that they did not contain calcium-binding proteins. Injections of the carbocyanine dye DiI into the cingulum bundle revealed that these cells are projection neurons. Finally, spindle cells were consistently affected in Alzheimer's disease cases, with an overall loss of about 60%. Taken together, these observations indicate that the spindle cells of the human cingulate cortex represent a morphological subpopulation of pyramidal neurons whose restricted distribution may be associated with functionally distinct areas.

  13. The role of the epidermis and cortex in gravitropic curvature of maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, T.; Cleland, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    In order to determine the role of the epidermis and cortex in gravitropic curvature of seedling roots of maize (Zea mays L. cv. Merit), the cortex on the two opposite flanks was removed from the meristem through the growing zone; gravitropic curvature was measured with the roots oriented horizontally with the cut flanks either on the upper and lower side, or on the lateral sides as a wound control. Curvature was slower in both these treatments (53 degrees in 5 h) than in intact roots (82 degrees), but there was no difference between the two orientations in extent and rate of curvature, nor in the latent time, showing that epidermis and cortex were not the site of action of the growth-regulating signal. The amount of cortex removed made no difference in the extent of curvature. Curvature was eliminated when the endodermis was damaged, raising the possibility that the endodermis or the stele-cortex interface controls gravitropic curvature in roots. The elongation rate of roots from which just the epidermis had been peeled was reduced by 0.01 mM auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) from 0.42 to 0.27 mm h-1, contradicting the hypothesis that only the epidermis responds to changes in auxin activity during gravistimulation. These observations indicate that gravitropic curvature in maize roots is not driven by differential cortical cell enlargement, and that movement of growth regulator(s) from the tip to the elongating zone is unlikely to occur in the cortex.

  14. The role of the epidermis and cortex in gravitropic curvature of maize roots.

    PubMed

    Björkman, T; Cleland, R E

    1988-12-01

    In order to determine the role of the epidermis and cortex in gravitropic curvature of seedling roots of maize (Zea mays L. cv. Merit), the cortex on the two opposite flanks was removed from the meristem through the growing zone; gravitropic curvature was measured with the roots oriented horizontally with the cut flanks either on the upper and lower side, or on the lateral sides as a wound control. Curvature was slower in both these treatments (53 degrees in 5 h) than in intact roots (82 degrees), but there was no difference between the two orientations in extent and rate of curvature, nor in the latent time, showing that epidermis and cortex were not the site of action of the growth-regulating signal. The amount of cortex removed made no difference in the extent of curvature. Curvature was eliminated when the endodermis was damaged, raising the possibility that the endodermis or the stele-cortex interface controls gravitropic curvature in roots. The elongation rate of roots from which just the epidermis had been peeled was reduced by 0.01 mM auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) from 0.42 to 0.27 mm h-1, contradicting the hypothesis that only the epidermis responds to changes in auxin activity during gravistimulation. These observations indicate that gravitropic curvature in maize roots is not driven by differential cortical cell enlargement, and that movement of growth regulator(s) from the tip to the elongating zone is unlikely to occur in the cortex.

  15. Development of adrenal cortex zonation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yewei; Lerario, Antonio M; Rainey, William; Hammer, Gary D

    2015-06-01

    The human adult adrenal cortex is composed of the zona glomerulosa (zG), zona fasciculata (zF), and zona reticularis (zR), which are responsible for production of mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids, and adrenal androgens, respectively. The final completion of cortical zonation in humans does not occur until puberty with the establishment of the zR and its production of adrenal androgens; a process called adrenarche. The maintenance of the adrenal cortex involves the centripetal displacement and differentiation of peripheral Sonic hedgehog-positive progenitors cells into zG cells that later transition to zF cells and subsequently zR cells.

  16. Functional Specialization and Flexibility in Human Association Cortex.

    PubMed

    Yeo, B T Thomas; Krienen, Fenna M; Eickhoff, Simon B; Yaakub, Siti N; Fox, Peter T; Buckner, Randy L; Asplund, Christopher L; Chee, Michael W L

    2015-10-01

    The association cortex supports cognitive functions enabling flexible behavior. Here, we explored the organization of human association cortex by mathematically formalizing the notion that a behavioral task engages multiple cognitive components, which are in turn supported by multiple overlapping brain regions. Application of the model to a large data set of neuroimaging experiments (N = 10 449) identified complex zones of frontal and parietal regions that ranged from being highly specialized to highly flexible. The network organization of the specialized and flexible regions was explored with an independent resting-state fMRI data set (N = 1000). Cortical regions specialized for the same components were strongly coupled, suggesting that components function as partially isolated networks. Functionally flexible regions participated in multiple components to different degrees. This heterogeneous selectivity was predicted by the connectivity between flexible and specialized regions. Functionally flexible regions might support binding or integrating specialized brain networks that, in turn, contribute to the ability to execute multiple and varied tasks.

  17. Functional zonation of the rat adrenal cortex: the development and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Fumiko

    2014-01-01

    The adrenal cortex of mammals consists of three concentric zones, i.e., the zona glomerulosa (zG), the zona fasciculata (zF), and the zona reticularis (zR), which secrete mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids, and adrenal androgens, respectively. In 1994, we identified immunohistochemically a new zone between zG and zF of the rat adrenal gland. The zone appeared to be devoid of any significant endocrine functions specific to adrenocortical zones, therefore, we designated the zone as "undifferentiated cell zone (zU)". Further, BrdU (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine)-incorporating cells (cells in S-phase) were concentrated at the outer region and the inner region of zU, and these cells proliferated and migrated bidirectionally: toward zG centrifugally and toward zF centripetally. We proposed that cells in and around zU are stem/progenitor cells of the rat adrenal cortex, maintaining functional zonation of the adrenal cortex. The view is consistent with observations reported recently that Sonic hedgehog (Shh), an important factor in embryonic development and adult stem cell maintenance, exists in zU of the rat adrenal gland and the Shh-containing cells seem to migrate bidirectionally.

  18. Distinct development of the cerebral cortex in platypus and echidna.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Hardman, Craig D

    2012-01-01

    Both lineages of the modern monotremes have distinctive features in the cerebral cortex, but the developmental mechanisms that produce such different adult cortical architecture remain unknown. Similarly, nothing is known about the differences and/or similarities between monotreme and therian cortical development. We have used material from the Hill embryological collection to try to answer key questions concerning cortical development in monotremes. Our findings indicate that gyrencephaly begins to emerge in the echidna brain shortly before birth (crown-rump length 12.5 mm), whereas the cortex of the platypus remains lissencephalic throughout development. The cortices of both monotremes are very immature at the time of hatching, much like that seen in marsupials, and both have a subventricular zone (SubV) within both the striatum and pallium during post-hatching development. It is particularly striking that in the platypus, this region has an extension from the palliostriatal angle beneath the developing trigeminoreceptive part of the somatosensory cortex of the lateral cortex. The putative SubV beneath the trigeminal part of S1 appears to accommodate at least two distinct types of cell and many mitotic figures and (particularly in the platypus) appears to be traversed by large numbers of thalamocortical axons as these grow in. The association with putative thalamocortical fibres suggests that this region may also serve functions similar to the subplate zone of Eutheria. These findings suggest that cortical development in each monotreme follows distinct paths from at least the time of birth, consistent with a long period of independent and divergent cortical evolution.

  19. Population coding in somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Rasmus S; Panzeri, Stefano; Diamond, Mathew E

    2002-08-01

    Computational analyses have begun to elucidate which components of somatosensory cortical population activity may encode basic stimulus features. Recent results from rat barrel cortex suggest that the essence of this code is not synergistic spike patterns, but rather the precise timing of single neuron's first post-stimulus spikes. This may form the basis for a fast, robust population code.

  20. The rat cortex in stereotaxic coordinates.

    PubMed

    Schober, W

    1986-01-01

    On the basis of Nissl-preparations the cortex of albino rats has been mapped cytoarchitectonically. 13 frontal sections through the cortex are illustrated with coordinates. Therewith exists a stereotaxic atlas of the cortex of the rat and one can realize exactly experimental investigations in the different cortical areas.

  1. The Functions of the Orbitofrontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolls, Edmund T.

    2004-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex contains the secondary taste cortex, in which the reward value of taste is represented. It also contains the secondary and tertiary olfactory cortical areas, in which information about the identity and also about the reward value of odours is represented. The orbitofrontal cortex also receives information about the sight…

  2. Promoting flowering, lateral shoot outgrowth, leaf development, and flower abscission in tobacco plants overexpressing cotton FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT)-like gene GhFT1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Yannan; Zhang, Kun; Guo, Danli; Cui, Baiming; Wang, Xiyin; Huang, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) encodes a mobile signal protein, recognized as major component of florigen, which has a central position in regulating flowering, and also plays important roles in various physiological aspects. A mode is recently emerging for the balance of indeterminate and determinate growth, which is controlled by the ratio of FT-like and TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1)-like gene activities, and has a strong influence on the floral transition and plant architecture. Orthologs of GhFT1 was previously isolated and characterized from Gossypium hirsutum. We demonstrated that ectopic overexpression of GhFT1 in tobacco, other than promoting flowering, promoted lateral shoot outgrowth at the base, induced more axillary bud at the axillae of rosette leaves, altered leaf morphology, increased chlorophyll content, had higher rate of photosynthesis and caused flowers abscission. Analysis of gene expression suggested that flower identity genes were significantly upregulated in transgenic plants. Further analysis of tobacco FT paralogs indicated that NtFT4, acting as flower inducer, was upregulated, whereas NtFT2 and NtFT3 as flower inhibitors were upregulated in transgenic plants under long-day conditions, but downregulated under short-day conditions. Our data suggests that sufficient level of transgenic cotton FT might disturb the balance of the endogenous tobacco FT paralogs of inducers and repressors and resulted in altered phenotype in transgenic tobacco, emphasizing the expanding roles of FT in regulating shoot architecture by advancing determine growth. Manipulating the ratio for indeterminate and determinate growth factors throughout FT-like and TFL1-like gene activity holds promise to improve plant architecture and enhance crop yield. PMID:26136765

  3. Promoting flowering, lateral shoot outgrowth, leaf development, and flower abscission in tobacco plants overexpressing cotton FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT)-like gene GhFT1.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Yannan; Zhang, Kun; Guo, Danli; Cui, Baiming; Wang, Xiyin; Huang, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) encodes a mobile signal protein, recognized as major component of florigen, which has a central position in regulating flowering, and also plays important roles in various physiological aspects. A mode is recently emerging for the balance of indeterminate and determinate growth, which is controlled by the ratio of FT-like and TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1)-like gene activities, and has a strong influence on the floral transition and plant architecture. Orthologs of GhFT1 was previously isolated and characterized from Gossypium hirsutum. We demonstrated that ectopic overexpression of GhFT1 in tobacco, other than promoting flowering, promoted lateral shoot outgrowth at the base, induced more axillary bud at the axillae of rosette leaves, altered leaf morphology, increased chlorophyll content, had higher rate of photosynthesis and caused flowers abscission. Analysis of gene expression suggested that flower identity genes were significantly upregulated in transgenic plants. Further analysis of tobacco FT paralogs indicated that NtFT4, acting as flower inducer, was upregulated, whereas NtFT2 and NtFT3 as flower inhibitors were upregulated in transgenic plants under long-day conditions, but downregulated under short-day conditions. Our data suggests that sufficient level of transgenic cotton FT might disturb the balance of the endogenous tobacco FT paralogs of inducers and repressors and resulted in altered phenotype in transgenic tobacco, emphasizing the expanding roles of FT in regulating shoot architecture by advancing determine growth. Manipulating the ratio for indeterminate and determinate growth factors throughout FT-like and TFL1-like gene activity holds promise to improve plant architecture and enhance crop yield.

  4. Neural dynamics of error processing in medial frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Mars, Rogier B; Coles, Michael G H; Grol, Meike J; Holroyd, Clay B; Nieuwenhuis, Sander; Hulstijn, Wouter; Toni, Ivan

    2005-12-01

    Adaptive behavior requires an organism to evaluate the outcome of its actions, such that future behavior can be adjusted accordingly and the appropriate response selected. During associative learning, the time at which such evaluative information is available changes as learning progresses, from the delivery of performance feedback early in learning to the execution of the response itself during learned performance. Here, we report a learning-dependent shift in the timing of activation in the rostral cingulate zone of the anterior cingulate cortex from external error feedback to internal error detection. This pattern of activity is seen only in the anterior cingulate, not in the pre-supplementary motor area. The dynamics of these reciprocal changes are consistent with the claim that the rostral cingulate zone is involved in response selection on the basis of the expected outcome of an action. Specifically, these data illustrate how the anterior cingulate receives evaluative information, indicating that an action has not produced the desired result.

  5. [Features of the structure of the adrenal cortex in domesticated Vulpes fulvus silver foxes during postnatal ontogeny].

    PubMed

    Lutsenko, N D; Trut, L N; Ivanova, L N

    1980-01-01

    Studies have been made on the structure of the adrenal cortex in relatively wild and domesticated male and female silver foxes at the age of 1-7 days, 1, 2 and 8 months. It was demonstrated that during domestication, deep morphological changes in the adrenal cortex take place which indicate the decrease of functional activity in the fascicular zone and the increase of the activity in the reticular zone. Differences found in the first days of postnatal life become more evident in further ontogenesis.

  6. Orientation and color columns in monkey visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Dow, Bruce M

    2002-10-01

    The literature on orientation and color columns in monkey visual cortex is reviewed. The orientation column model most consistent with existing data is one containing 'stripes' of alternating positive and negative orientation 'singularities' (cytochrome oxidase blobs) which run along the centers of ocular dominance (OD) columns, with horizontal and vertical orientations alternating at interblob centers. Evidence is summarized suggesting that color is mapped continuously across the monkey's primary visual cortex, with the ends of the spectrum located at 'red' and 'blue' cytochrome oxidase blobs and extra-spectral purple located between adjacent red and blue blobs in the same OD column. In the orientation column model, the 'linear zones' of Obermayer and Blasdel have the appearance of the lines on a pumpkin. A pinwheel model of color columns, consistent with existing data, includes spectral and extra-spectral colors as spokes. Spectral iso-color lines run across iso-orientation lines in linear zones, while extra-spectral iso-color lines occupy the 'saddle points' of Obermayer and Blasdel. The color column model accounts for closure of the perceptual color circle, as proposed by Isaac Newton in 1704, but does not account for color opponency.

  7. Spatiotemporal patterning of glutamate receptors in developing ferret striate cortex.

    PubMed

    Smith, A L; Thompson, I D

    1999-03-01

    We have studied glutamate receptor levels during very early phases of cortical formation by using quantitative in vitro autoradiography to map the expression of NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptors in the developing primary visual cortex of the ferret. NMDA and non-NMDA receptors exhibit very different developmental profiles in primary visual cortex. NMDA receptor density is low at birth and increases throughout the first 2 postnatal months, rising between threefold (layers II/III) and ninefold (layer VI). In contrast, AMPA receptors are abundant at birth and their density remains constant for the first postnatal month, before rising by a maximum of 1.7-fold (layer I) at around the time of eye-opening (postnatal day 32). Kainate receptors are also present in high levels at birth and their expression levels rise in the early postnatal period by between 1. 5-fold (layer I) and threefold (layers V/VI) to a peak just after eye-opening. The proportion of the total ionotropic glutamate receptor binding contributed by NMDA receptors thus rises from 5% at birth to a maximum of 22% at 2 months of age, while the AMPA receptor contribution falls from 87% to 72% over the same period. Below cortex, all three glutamate receptor subtypes are expressed in the subplate region for the first 3 postnatal weeks. These developmental patterns, combined with the fact that AMPA receptors are densely expressed in the proliferative zones underlying presumptive area 17, indicate that non-NMDA receptor expression levels in primary visual cortex are mostly specified much earlier than those of NMDA receptors.

  8. The outer subventricular zone and primate-specific cortical complexification.

    PubMed

    Dehay, Colette; Kennedy, Henry; Kosik, Kenneth S

    2015-02-18

    Evolutionary expansion and complexification of the primate cerebral cortex are largely linked to the emergence of the outer subventricular zone (OSVZ), a uniquely structured germinal zone that generates the expanded primate supragranular layers. The primate OSVZ departs from rodent germinal zones in that it includes a higher diversity of precursor types, inter-related in bidirectional non-hierarchical lineages. In addition, primate-specific regulatory mechanisms are operating in primate cortical precursors via the occurrence of novel miRNAs. Here, we propose that the origin and evolutionary importance of the OSVZ is related to genetic changes in multiple regulatory loops and that cell-cycle regulation is a favored target for evolutionary adaptation of the cortex.

  9. Multimap formation in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rishabh; Millin, Rachel; Mel, Bartlett W.

    2015-01-01

    An extrastriate visual area such as V2 or V4 contains neurons selective for a multitude of complex shapes, all sharing a common topographic organization. Simultaneously developing multiple interdigitated maps—hereafter a “multimap”—is challenging in that neurons must compete to generate a diversity of response types locally, while cooperating with their dispersed same-type neighbors to achieve uniform visual field coverage for their response type at all orientations, scales, etc. Previously proposed map development schemes have relied on smooth spatial interaction functions to establish both topography and columnar organization, but by locally homogenizing cells' response properties, local smoothing mechanisms effectively rule out multimap formation. We found in computer simulations that the key requirements for multimap development are that neurons are enabled for plasticity only within highly active regions of cortex designated “learning eligibility regions” (LERs), but within an LER, each cell's learning rate is determined only by its activity level with no dependence on location. We show that a hybrid developmental rule that combines spatial and activity-dependent learning criteria in this way successfully produces multimaps when the input stream contains multiple distinct feature types, or in the degenerate case of a single feature type, produces a V1-like map with “salt-and-pepper” structure. Our results support the hypothesis that cortical maps containing a fine mixture of different response types, whether in monkey extrastriate cortex, mouse V1 or elsewhere in the cortex, rather than signaling a breakdown of map formation mechanisms at the fine scale, are a product of a generic cortical developmental scheme designed to map cells with a diversity of response properties across a shared topographic space. PMID:26641946

  10. Monkey brain cortex imaging by photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinmai; Wang, Lihong V

    2008-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is applied to image the brain cortex of a monkey through the intact scalp and skull ex vivo. The reconstructed PAT image shows the major blood vessels on the monkey brain cortex. For comparison, the brain cortex is imaged without the scalp, and then imaged again without the scalp and skull. Ultrasound attenuation through the skull is also measured at various incidence angles. This study demonstrates that PAT of the brain cortex is capable of surviving the ultrasound signal attenuation and distortion caused by a relatively thick skull.

  11. Prefrontal cortex glutamate and extraversion.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Simone; Schubert, Florian; Jaedke, Maren; Gallinat, Jürgen; Bajbouj, Malek

    2012-10-01

    Extraversion is considered one of the core traits of personality. Low extraversion has been associated with increased vulnerability to affective and anxiety disorders. Brain imaging studies have linked extraversion, approach behaviour and the production of positive emotional states to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and glutamatergic neurotransmission. However, the relationship between extraversion and glutamate in the DLPFC has not been investigated so far. In order to address this issue, absolute glutamate concentrations in the DLPFC and the visual cortex as a control region were measured by 3-Tesla proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in 29 subjects with high and low extraversion. We found increased glutamate levels in the DLPFC of introverts as compared with extraverts. The increased glutamate concentration was specific for the DLPFC and negatively associated with state anxiety. Although preliminary, results indicate altered top-down control of DLPFC due to reduced glutamate concentration as a function of extraversion. Glutamate measurement with 1H-MRS may facilitate the understanding of biological underpinnings of personality traits and psychiatric diseases associated with dysfunctions in approach behaviour and the production of positive emotional states.

  12. Normalization in human somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Gijs Joost; Arnedo, Vanessa; Offen, Shani; Heeger, David J; Grant, Arthur C

    2015-11-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure activity in human somatosensory cortex and to test for cross-digit suppression. Subjects received stimulation (vibration of varying amplitudes) to the right thumb (target) with or without concurrent stimulation of the right middle finger (mask). Subjects were less sensitive to target stimulation (psychophysical detection thresholds were higher) when target and mask digits were stimulated concurrently compared with when the target was stimulated in isolation. fMRI voxels in a region of the left postcentral gyrus each responded when either digit was stimulated. A regression model (called a forward model) was used to separate the fMRI measurements from these voxels into two hypothetical channels, each of which responded selectively to only one of the two digits. For the channel tuned to the target digit, responses in the left postcentral gyrus increased with target stimulus amplitude but were suppressed by concurrent stimulation to the mask digit, evident as a shift in the gain of the response functions. For the channel tuned to the mask digit, a constant baseline response was evoked for all target amplitudes when the mask was absent and responses decreased with increasing target amplitude when the mask was concurrently presented. A computational model based on divisive normalization provided a good fit to the measurements for both mask-absent and target + mask stimulation. We conclude that the normalization model can explain cross-digit suppression in human somatosensory cortex, supporting the hypothesis that normalization is a canonical neural computation.

  13. TOP-DOWN CONTROL OF MOTOR CORTEX ENSEMBLES BY DORSOMEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Nandakumar S.; Laubach, Mark

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Dorsomedial prefrontal cortex is critical for the temporal control of behavior. Dorsomedial prefrontal cortex might alter neuronal activity in areas such as motor cortex to inhibit temporally inappropriate responses. We tested this hypothesis by recording from neuronal ensembles in rodent dorsomedial prefrontal cortex during a delayed-response task. One-third of dorsomedial prefrontal neurons were significantly modulated during the delay period. The activity of many of these neurons was predictive of premature responding. We then reversibly inactivated dorsomedial prefrontal cortex while recording ensemble activity in motor cortex. Inactivation of dorsomedial prefrontal cortex reduced delay-related firing, but not response-related firing, in motor cortex. Finally, we made simultaneous recordings in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and motor cortex and found strong delay-related temporal correlations between neurons in the two cortical areas. These data suggest that functional interactions between dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and motor cortex might serve as a top-down control signal that inhibits inappropriate responding. PMID:17145511

  14. [Histological and molecular study of fetal human adrenal cortex (12-36 wk)].

    PubMed

    Folligan, K; Bouvier, R; Targe, F; Morel, Y; Trouillas, J

    2005-12-01

    Histological and functional characteristics of the fetal human adrenals was studied in 119 normal fetuses aged 12 to 36 weeks development (WD). Immunocytochemical detection of steroidogenesis enzyme (3beta-HSD and P450 c21) and evaluation of cell proliferation using two nuclear markers (Ki-67 and PCNA) were performed in 70 of them. The human fetal adrenal cortex is composed of two morphologically distinct zones: the definitive peripheral zone and the fetal inner zone. From the 12th WD, we observed expression of an adherence protein (NCAM) and two steroidogenesis enzymes (3beta-HSD and P450 c21) in the definitive zone cells, attesting to the capacity of these cells to synthesize mineralocorticoids and/or cortisol. In the fetal zone, only P450 c21 immunoreactivity was detected. From the 14th WD, a transitional zone between the definitive zone and the fetal zone was identified by immunocytochemistry, with expression of 3b-HSD from the 21st WD. Only cells of the definitive zone proliferated from the 12th to 25th WD. The indexes of proliferation of PCNA and Ki-67, 40% and 25% respectively, decreased gradually and were lower than 1% at the 25th WD.

  15. A Major Human White Matter Pathway Between Dorsal and Ventral Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Hiromasa; Rokem, Ariel; Winawer, Jonathan; Yeatman, Jason D; Wandell, Brian A; Pestilli, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Human visual cortex comprises many visual field maps organized into clusters. A standard organization separates visual maps into 2 distinct clusters within ventral and dorsal cortex. We combined fMRI, diffusion MRI, and fiber tractography to identify a major white matter pathway, the vertical occipital fasciculus (VOF), connecting maps within the dorsal and ventral visual cortex. We use a model-based method to assess the statistical evidence supporting several aspects of the VOF wiring pattern. There is strong evidence supporting the hypothesis that dorsal and ventral visual maps communicate through the VOF. The cortical projection zones of the VOF suggest that human ventral (hV4/VO-1) and dorsal (V3A/B) maps exchange substantial information. The VOF appears to be crucial for transmitting signals between regions that encode object properties including form, identity, and color and regions that map spatial information.

  16. Vertical transmission of Zika virus targeting the radial glial cells affects cortex development of offspring mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kong-Yan; Zuo, Guo-Long; Li, Xiao-Feng; Ye, Qing; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Huang, Xing-Yao; Cao, Wu-Chun; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Luo, Zhen-Ge

    2016-01-01

    The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic in Latin America coincided with a marked increase in microcephaly in newborns. However, the causal link between maternal ZIKV infection and malformation of the fetal brain has not been firmly established. Here we show a vertical transmission of ZIKV in mice and a marked effect on fetal brain development. We found that intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of a contemporary ZIKV strain in pregnant mice led to the infection of radial glia cells (RGs) of dorsal ventricular zone of the fetuses, the primary neural progenitors responsible for cortex development, and caused a marked reduction of these cortex founder cells in the fetuses. Interestingly, the infected fetal mice exhibited a reduced cavity of lateral ventricles and a discernable decrease in surface areas of the cortex. This study thus supports the conclusion that vertically transmitted ZIKV affects fetal brain development and provides a valuable animal model for the evaluation of potential therapeutic or preventative strategies. PMID:27174054

  17. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    DOEpatents

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Yu, Zhenzhen

    2017-04-11

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  18. Mapping Prefrontal Cortex Functions in Human Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossmann, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    It has long been thought that the prefrontal cortex, as the seat of most higher brain functions, is functionally silent during most of infancy. This review highlights recent work concerned with the precise mapping (localization) of brain activation in human infants, providing evidence that prefrontal cortex exhibits functional activation much…

  19. Subspecialization in the human posterior medial cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bzdok, Danilo; Heeger, Adrian; Langner, Robert; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Vogt, Brent A.; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2014-01-01

    The posterior medial cortex (PMC) is particularly poorly understood. Its neural activity changes have been related to highly disparate mental processes. We therefore investigated PMC properties with a data-driven exploratory approach. First, we subdivided the PMC by whole-brain coactivation profiles. Second, functional connectivity of the ensuing PMC regions was compared by task-constrained meta-analytic coactivation mapping (MACM) and task-unconstrained resting-state correlations (RSFC). Third, PMC regions were functionally described by forward/reverse functional inference. A precuneal cluster was mostly connected to the intraparietal sulcus, frontal eye fields, and right temporo-parietal junction; associated with attention and motor tasks. A ventral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) cluster was mostly connected to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and middle left inferior parietal cortex (IPC); associated with facial appraisal and language tasks. A dorsal PCC cluster was mostly connected to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, anterior/posterior IPC, posterior midcingulate cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; associated with delay discounting. A cluster in the retrosplenial cortex was mostly connected to the anterior thalamus and hippocampus. Furthermore, all PMC clusters were congruently coupled with the default mode network according to task-constrained but not task-unconstrained connectivity. We thus identified distinct regions in the PMC and characterized their neural networks and functional implications. PMID:25462801

  20. Motor cortex layer 4: less is more

    PubMed Central

    Barbas, Helen; García-Cabezas, Miguel Á.

    2015-01-01

    The stratified motor cortex is variously thought to either lack or contain layer 4. Yamawaki et al. described a functional layer 4 in mouse motor cortex with properties and connections similar to layer 4 in sensory areas. Their results bolster a theoretical framework suggesting all primary cortical areas are equivalent. PMID:25868984

  1. Learning in the Rodent Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Peters, Andrew J; Liu, Haixin; Komiyama, Takaki

    2017-03-31

    The motor cortex is far from a stable conduit for motor commands and instead undergoes significant changes during learning. An understanding of motor cortex plasticity has been advanced greatly using rodents as experimental animals. Two major focuses of this research have been on the connectivity and activity of the motor cortex. The motor cortex exhibits structural changes in response to learning, and substantial evidence has implicated the local formation and maintenance of new synapses as crucial substrates of motor learning. This synaptic reorganization translates into changes in spiking activity, which appear to result in a modification and refinement of the relationship between motor cortical activity and movement. This review presents the progress that has been made using rodents to establish the motor cortex as an adaptive structure that supports motor learning. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Neuroscience Volume 40 is July 8, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  2. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha mediates one component of competitive, experience-dependent plasticity in developing visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Megumi; Stellwagen, David; Malenka, Robert C; Stryker, Michael P

    2008-06-12

    Rapid, experience-dependent plasticity in developing visual cortex is thought to be competitive. After monocular visual deprivation, the reduction in response of binocular neurons to one eye is matched by a corresponding increase to the other. Chronic optical imaging in mice deficient in TNFalpha reveals the normal initial loss of deprived-eye responses, but the subsequent increase in response to the open eye is absent. This mutation also blocks homeostatic synaptic scaling of mEPSCs in visual cortex in vitro, without affecting LTP. In monocular cortex, thought not to be subject to competition, responses in TNFalpha mutants are as reduced as in the binocular zone. Pharmacological inhibition of endogenous TNFalpha in wild-type mice phenocopies the knockout. These findings suggest that experience-dependent competition in developing visual cortex is the outcome of two distinct, noncompetitive processes, a loss of deprived-eye responses followed by an apparently homeostatic increase in responses dependent on TNFalpha signaling.

  3. Localization of Sonic hedgehog secreting and receiving cells in the developing and adult rat adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Guasti, Leonardo; Paul, Alex; Laufer, Ed; King, Peter

    2011-04-10

    Sonic hedgehog signaling was recently demonstrated to play an important role in murine adrenal cortex development. The organization of the rat adrenal differs from that of the mouse, with the zona glomerulosa and zona fasciculata separated by an undifferentiated zone in the rat, but not in the mouse. In the present study we aimed to determine the mRNA expression patterns of Sonic hedgehog and the hedgehog signaling pathway components Patched-1 and Gli1 in the developing and adult rat adrenal. Sonic hedgehog expression was detected at the periphery of the cortex in cells lacking CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 expression, while signal-receiving cells were localized in the overlying capsule mesenchyme. Using combined in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we found that the cells expressing Sonic hedgehog lie between the CYP11B2 and CYP11B1 layers, and thus Sonic hedgehog expression defines one cell population of the undifferentiated zone.

  4. A Stem Cell Niche for Intermediate Progenitor Cells of the Embryonic Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kriegstein, Arnold

    2009-01-01

    The excitatory neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex arise from asymmetric divisions of radial glial cells in the ventricular zone and symmetric division of intermediate progenitor cells (IPCs) in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the embryonic cortex. Little is known about the microenvironment in which IPCs divide or whether a stem cell niche exists in the SVZ of the embryonic cortex. Recent evidence suggests that vasculature may provide a niche for adult stem cells but its role in development is less clear. We have investigated the vasculature in the embryonic cortex during neurogenesis and find that IPCs are spatially and temporally associated with blood vessels during cortical development. Intermediate progenitors mimic the pattern of capillaries suggesting patterns of angiogenesis and neurogenesis are coordinated during development. More importantly, we find that IPCs divide near blood vessel branch points suggesting that cerebral vasculature establishes a stem cell niche for intermediate progenitors in the SVZ. These data provide novel evidence for the presence of a neurogenic niche for intermediate progenitors in the embryonic SVZ and suggest blood vessels are important for proper patterning of neurogenesis. PMID:19346271

  5. EM colocalization of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits at synapses in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Kharazia, V N; Phend, K D; Rustioni, A; Weinberg, R J

    1996-05-24

    Electrophysiology and light microscopy suggest that a single excitatory synapse may use both amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Using immunogold electron microscopy, we here provide direct evidence for colocalization at individual synapses in sensorimotor cortex of adult rats. Colocalization was most commonly observed on dendritic spines; subunits of the two classes of receptors seemed to be independently distributed within the synaptic active zone.

  6. A volumetric comparison of the insular cortex and its subregions in primates

    PubMed Central

    Bauernfeind, Amy L.; de Sousa, Alexandra A.; Avasthi, Tanvi; Dobson, Seth D.; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Lewandowski, Albert H.; Zilles, Karl; Semendeferi, Katerina; Allman, John M.; (Bud) Craig, Arthur D.; Hof, Patrick R.; Sherwood, Chet C.

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal composition of the insula in primates displays a gradient, transitioning from granular neocortex in the posterior-dorsal insula to agranular neocortex in the anterior-ventral insula with an intermediate zone of dysgranularity. Additionally, apes and humans exhibit a distinctive subdomain in the agranular insula, the frontoinsular cortex (FI), defined by the presence of clusters of von Economo neurons (VENs). Studies in humans indicate that the ventral anterior insula, including agranular insular cortex and FI, is involved in social awareness, and that the posterodorsal insula, including granular and dysgranular cortices, produces an internal representation of the body’s homeostatic state. We examined the volumes of these cytoarchitectural areas of insular cortex in 30 primate species, including the volume of FI in apes and humans. Results indicate that the whole insula scales hyperallometrically (exponent = 1.13) relative to total brain mass, and the agranular insula (including FI) scales against total brain mass with even greater positive allometry (exponent = 1.23), providing a potential neural basis for enhancement of social cognition in association with increased brain size. The relative volumes of the subdivisions of the insular cortex, after controlling for total brain volume, are not correlated with species typical social group size. Although its size is predicted by primate-wide allometric scaling patterns, we found that the absolute volume of the left and right agranular insula and left FI are among the most differentially expanded of the human cerebral cortex compared to our closest living relative, the chimpanzee. PMID:23466178

  7. Large-Scale Meta-Analysis of Human Medial Frontal Cortex Reveals Tripartite Functional Organization

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Luke J.; Banich, Marie T.; Wager, Tor D.; Yarkoni, Tal

    2016-01-01

    The functional organization of human medial frontal cortex (MFC) is a subject of intense study. Using fMRI, the MFC has been associated with diverse psychological processes, including motor function, cognitive control, affect, and social cognition. However, there have been few large-scale efforts to comprehensively map specific psychological functions to subregions of medial frontal anatomy. Here we applied a meta-analytic data-driven approach to nearly 10,000 fMRI studies to identify putatively separable regions of MFC and determine which psychological states preferentially recruit their activation. We identified regions at several spatial scales on the basis of meta-analytic coactivation, revealing three broad functional zones along a rostrocaudal axis composed of 2–4 smaller subregions each. Multivariate classification analyses aimed at identifying the psychological functions most strongly predictive of activity in each region revealed a tripartite division within MFC, with each zone displaying a relatively distinct functional signature. The posterior zone was associated preferentially with motor function, the middle zone with cognitive control, pain, and affect, and the anterior with reward, social processing, and episodic memory. Within each zone, the more fine-grained subregions showed distinct, but subtler, variations in psychological function. These results provide hypotheses about the functional organization of medial prefrontal cortex that can be tested explicitly in future studies. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Activation of medial frontal cortex in fMRI studies is associated with a wide range of psychological states ranging from cognitive control to pain. However, this high rate of activation makes it challenging to determine how these various processes are topologically organized across medial frontal anatomy. We conducted a meta-analysis across nearly 10,000 studies to comprehensively map psychological states to discrete subregions in medial frontal cortex

  8. Auditory projections to extrastriate visual cortex: connectional basis for multisensory processing in 'unimodal' visual neurons.

    PubMed

    Clemo, H Ruth; Sharma, Giriraj K; Allman, Brian L; Meredith, M Alex

    2008-10-01

    Neurophysiological studies have recently documented multisensory properties in 'unimodal' visual neurons of the cat posterolateral lateral suprasylvian (PLLS) cortex, a retinotopically organized area involved in visual motion processing. In this extrastriate visual area, a region has been identified where both visual and auditory stimuli were independently effective in activating neurons (bimodal zone), as well as a second region where visually-evoked activity was significantly facilitated by concurrent auditory stimulation but was unaffected by auditory stimulation alone (subthreshold multisensory region). Given their different distributions, the possible corticocortical connectivity underlying these distinct forms of crossmodal convergence was examined using biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) tracer methods in 21 adult cats. The auditory cortical areas examined included the anterior auditory field (AAF), primary auditory cortex (AI), dorsal zone (DZ), secondary auditory cortex (AII), field of the rostral suprasylvian sulcus (FRS), field anterior ectosylvian sulcus (FAES) and the posterior auditory field (PAF). Of these regions, the DZ, AI, AII, and FAES were found to project to the both the bimodal zone and the subthreshold region of the PLLS. This convergence of crossmodal inputs to the PLLS suggests not only that complex auditory information has access to this region but also that these connections provide the substrate for the different forms (bimodal versus subthreshold) of multisensory processing which may facilitate its functional role in visual motion processing.

  9. Vocalization Induced CFos Expression in Marmoset Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cory T.; DiMauro, Audrey; Pistorio, Ashley; Hendry, Stewart; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2010-01-01

    All non-human primates communicate with conspecifics using vocalizations, a system involving both the production and perception of species-specific vocal signals. Much of the work on the neural basis of primate vocal communication in cortex has focused on the sensory processing of vocalizations, while relatively little data are available for vocal production. Earlier physiological studies in squirrel monkeys had shed doubts on the involvement of primate cortex in vocal behaviors. The aim of the present study was to identify areas of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) cortex that are potentially involved in vocal communication. In this study, we quantified cFos expression in three areas of marmoset cortex – frontal, temporal (auditory), and medial temporal – under various vocal conditions. Specifically, we examined cFos expression in these cortical areas during the sensory, motor (vocal production), and sensory–motor components of vocal communication. Our results showed an increase in cFos expression in ventrolateral prefrontal cortex as well as the medial and lateral belt areas of auditory cortex in the vocal perception condition. In contrast, subjects in the vocal production condition resulted in increased cFos expression only in dorsal premotor cortex. During the sensory–motor condition (antiphonal calling), subjects exhibited cFos expression in each of the above areas, as well as increased expression in perirhinal cortex. Overall, these results suggest that various cortical areas outside primary auditory cortex are involved in primate vocal communication. These findings pave the way for further physiological studies of the neural basis of primate vocal communication. PMID:21179582

  10. Background and stimulus-induced patterns of high metabolic activity in the visual cortex (area 17) of the squirrel and macaque monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, A.L.; Hendrickson, A.E.

    1983-02-01

    The authors have used 2-deoxy-D-(/sup 14/C)glucose (2-DG) autoradiography and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry to examine background and stimulus-induced patterns of metabolic activity in monkey striate cortex. In squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) that binocularly or monocularly viewed diffuse white light or binocularly viewed bars of many orientations and spatial frequencies, 2-DG consumption was not uniform across the cortex but consisted of regularly spaced radial zones of high uptake. The cytochrome oxidase stain in these animals also revealed patches of high metabolism which coincided with the 2-DG patches. Squirrel monkeys binocularly viewing vertical stripes showed parallel bands of increased 2-DG uptake in the cortex, while the cytochrome label in these animals remained patchy. In macaque (Macaca nemestrina) monkeys, binocular stimulation with many orientations and spatial frequencies produced radial zones of high 2-DG uptake. When viewed tangentially, these zones formed a dots-in-rows pattern with a spacing of 350 X 500 microns; cytochrome oxidase staining produced an identical pattern. Macaca differed from Saimiri in that monocular stimulation labeled alternate rows. These results indicate that there are radial zones of high background metabolism across squirrel and macaque monkey striate cortex. In Saimiri these zones do not appear to be related to an eye dominance system, while in Macaca they do. The presence of these zones of high metabolism may complicate the interpretation of 2-DG autoradiographs that result from specific visual stimuli.

  11. The piriform, perirhinal, and entorhinal cortex in seizure generation.

    PubMed

    Vismer, Marta S; Forcelli, Patrick A; Skopin, Mark D; Gale, Karen; Koubeissi, Mohamad Z

    2015-01-01

    Understanding neural network behavior is essential to shed light on epileptogenesis and seizure propagation. The interconnectivity and plasticity of mammalian limbic and neocortical brain regions provide the substrate for the hypersynchrony and hyperexcitability associated with seizure activity. Recurrent unprovoked seizures are the hallmark of epilepsy, and limbic epilepsy is the most common type of medically-intractable focal epilepsy in adolescents and adults that necessitates surgical evaluation. In this review, we describe the role and relationships among the piriform (PIRC), perirhinal (PRC), and entorhinal cortex (ERC) in seizure-generation and epilepsy. The inherent function, anatomy, and histological composition of these cortical regions are discussed. In addition, the neurotransmitters, intrinsic and extrinsic connections, and the interaction of these regions are described. Furthermore, we provide evidence based on clinical research and animal models that suggest that these cortical regions may act as key seizure-trigger zones and, even, epileptogenesis.

  12. Medial perirhinal cortex disambiguates confusable objects.

    PubMed

    Kivisaari, Sasa L; Tyler, Lorraine K; Monsch, Andreas U; Taylor, Kirsten I

    2012-12-01

    Our brain disambiguates the objects in our cluttered visual world seemingly effortlessly, enabling us to understand their significance and to act appropriately. The role of anteromedial temporal structures in this process, particularly the perirhinal cortex, is highly controversial. In some accounts, the perirhinal cortex is necessary for differentiating between perceptually and semantically confusable objects. Other models claim that the perirhinal cortex neither disambiguates perceptually confusable objects nor plays a unique role in semantic processing. One major hurdle to resolving this central debate is the fact that brain damage in human patients typically encompasses large portions of the anteromedial temporal lobe, such that the identification of individual substructures and precise neuroanatomical locus of the functional impairments has been difficult. We tested these competing accounts in patients with Alzheimer's disease with varying degrees of atrophy in anteromedial structures, including the perirhinal cortex. To assess the functional contribution of each anteromedial temporal region separately, we used a detailed region of interest approach. From each participant, we obtained magnetic resonance imaging scans and behavioural data from a picture naming task that contrasted naming performance with living and non-living things as a way of manipulating perceptual and semantic confusability; living things are more similar to one another than non-living things, which have more distinctive features. We manually traced neuroanatomical regions of interest on native-space cortical surface reconstructions to obtain mean thickness estimates for the lateral and medial perirhinal cortex and entorhinal cortex. Mean cortical thickness in each region of interest, and hippocampal volume, were submitted to regression analyses predicting naming performance. Importantly, atrophy of the medial perirhinal cortex, but not lateral perirhinal cortex, entorhinal cortex or

  13. Entorhinal cortex stimulation modulates amygdala and piriform cortex responses to olfactory bulb inputs in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mouly, A-M; Di Scala, G

    2006-01-01

    The rodent olfactory bulb sends direct projections to the piriform cortex and to two structures intimately implicated in memory processes, the entorhinal cortex and the amygdala. The piriform cortex has monosynaptic projections with the amygdala and the piriform cortex and is therefore in a position to modulate olfactory input either directly in the piriform cortex, or via the amygdala. In order to investigate this hypothesis, field potential signals induced in anesthetized rats by electrical stimulation of the olfactory bulb or the entorhinal cortex were recorded simultaneously in the piriform cortex (anterior part and posterior part) and the amygdala (basolateral nucleus and cortical nucleus). Single-site paired-pulse stimulation was used to assess the time courses of short-term inhibition and facilitation in each recording site in response to electrical stimulation of the olfactory bulb and entorhinal cortex. Paired-pulse stimulation of the olfactory bulb induced homosynaptic inhibition for short interpulse interpulse intervals (20-30 ms) in all the recording sites, with a significantly lower degree of inhibition in the anterior piriform cortex than in the other structures. At longer intervals (40-80 ms), paired-pulse facilitation was observed in all the structures. Paired-pulse stimulation of the entorhinal cortex mainly resulted in inhibition for the shortest interval duration (20 ms) in anterior piriform cortex, posterior piriform cortex and amygdala basolateral but not cortical nucleus. Double-site paired-pulse stimulation was then applied to determine if stimulation of the entorhinal cortex can modulate responses to olfactory bulb stimulation. For short interpulse intervals (20 ms) heterosynaptic inhibition was observed in anterior piriform cortex, posterior piriform cortex and amygdala basolateral but not cortical nucleus. The level of inhibition was greater in the basolateral nucleus than in the other structures. Taken together these data suggest that the

  14. Preparatory attention in visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Battistoni, Elisa; Stein, Timo; Peelen, Marius V

    2017-03-02

    Top-down attention is the mechanism that allows us to selectively process goal-relevant aspects of a scene while ignoring irrelevant aspects. A large body of research has characterized the effects of attention on neural activity evoked by a visual stimulus. However, attention also includes a preparatory phase before stimulus onset in which the attended dimension is internally represented. Here, we review neurophysiological, functional magnetic resonance imaging, magnetoencephalography, electroencephalography, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies investigating the neural basis of preparatory attention, both when attention is directed to a location in space and when it is directed to nonspatial stimulus attributes (content-based attention) ranging from low-level features to object categories. Results show that both spatial and content-based attention lead to increased baseline activity in neural populations that selectively code for the attended attribute. TMS studies provide evidence that this preparatory activity is causally related to subsequent attentional selection and behavioral performance. Attention thus acts by preactivating selective neurons in the visual cortex before stimulus onset. This appears to be a general mechanism that can operate on multiple levels of representation. We discuss the functional relevance of this mechanism, its limitations, and its relation to working memory, imagery, and expectation. We conclude by outlining open questions and future directions.

  15. Space and the parietal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Masud; Nachev, Parashkev

    2007-01-01

    Current views of the parietal cortex have difficulty accommodating the human inferior parietal lobe (IPL) within a simple dorsal versus ventral stream dichotomy. In humans, lesions of the right IPL often lead to syndromes such as hemispatial neglect that are seemingly in accord with the proposal that this region has a crucial role in spatial processing. However, recent imaging and lesion studies have revealed that inferior parietal regions have non-spatial functions, such as in sustaining attention, detecting salient events embedded in a sequence of events and controlling attention over time. Here, we review these findings and show that spatial processes and the visual guidance of action are only part of the repertoire of parietal functions. Although sub-regions in the human superior parietal lobe and intraparietal sulcus contribute to vision-for-action and spatial functions, more inferior parietal regions have distinctly non-spatial attributes that are neither conventionally ‘dorsal’ nor conventionally ‘ventral’ in nature. PMID:17134935

  16. Food related processes in the insular cortex

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Sabine; Kullmann, Stephanie; Veit, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    The insular cortex is a multimodal brain region with regional cytoarchitectonic differences indicating various functional specializations. As a multisensory neural node, the insular cortex integrates perception, emotion, interoceptive awareness, cognition, and gustation. Regarding the latter, predominantly the anterior part of the insular cortex is regarded as the primary taste cortex. In this review, we will specifically focus on the involvement of the insula in food processing and on multimodal integration of food-related items. Influencing factors of insular activation elicited by various foods range from calorie-content to the internal physiologic state, body mass index or eating behavior. Sensory perception of food-related stimuli including seeing, smelling, and tasting elicits increased activation in the anterior and mid-dorsal part of the insular cortex. Apart from the pure sensory gustatory processing, there is also a strong association with the rewarding/hedonic aspects of food items, which is reflected in higher insular activity and stronger connections to other reward-related areas. Interestingly, the processing of food items has been found to elicit different insular activation in lean compared to obese subjects and in patients suffering from an eating disorder (anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN)). The knowledge of functional differences in the insular cortex opens up the opportunity for possible noninvasive treatment approaches for obesity and eating disorders. To target brain functions directly, real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging neurofeedback offers a state-of-the-art tool to learn to control the anterior insular cortex activity voluntarily. First evidence indicates that obese adults have an enhanced ability to regulate the anterior insular cortex. PMID:23986683

  17. The Role of Human Parietal Cortex in Attention Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Shihui; Jiang, Yi; Gu, Hua; Rao, Hengyi; Mao, Lihua; Cui, Yong; Zhai, Renyou

    2004-01-01

    The parietal cortex has been proposed as part of the neural network for guiding spatial attention. However, it is unclear to what degree the parietal cortex contributes to the attentional modulations of activities of the visual cortex and the engagement of the frontal cortex in the attention network. We recorded behavioural performance and…

  18. A fibronectin-like molecule is present in the developing cat cerebral cortex and is correlated with subplate neurons

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The subplate is a transient zone of the developing cerebral cortex through which postmitotic neurons migrate and growing axons elongate en route to their adult positions within the cortical plate. To learn more about the cellular interactions that occur in this zone, we have examined whether fibronectins (FNs), a family of molecules known to promote migration and elongation in other systems, are present during the fetal and postnatal development of the cat's cerebral cortex. Three different anti-FN antisera recognized a single broad band with an apparent molecular mass of 200-250 kD in antigen-transfer analyses (reducing conditions) of plasma-depleted (perfused) whole fetal brain or synaptosome preparations, indicating that FNs are present at these ages. This band can be detected as early as 1 mo before birth at embryonic day 39. Immunohistochemical examination of the developing cerebral cortex from animals between embryonic day 46 and postnatal day 7 using any of the three antisera revealed that FN-like immunoreactivity is restricted to the subplate and the marginal zones, and is not found in the cortical plate. As these zones mature into their adult counterparts (the white matter and layer 1 of the cerebral cortex), immunostaining gradually disappears and is not detectable by postnatal day 70. Previous studies have shown that the subplate and marginal zones contain a special, transient population of neurons (Chun, J. J. M., M. J. Nakamura, and C. J. Shatz. 1987. Nature (Lond.). 325:617-620). The FN-like immunostaining in the subplate and marginal zone is closely associated with these neurons, and some of the immunostaining delineates them. Moreover, the postnatal disappearance of FN-like immunostaining from the subplate is correlated spatially and temporally with the disappearance of the subplate neurons. When subplate neurons are killed by neurotoxins, FN-like immunostaining is depleted in the lesioned area. These observations show that an FN-like molecule is

  19. Premotor cortex mediates perceptual performance.

    PubMed

    Callan, Daniel; Callan, Akiko; Gamez, Mario; Sato, Masa-aki; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2010-06-01

    Articulatory goals have long been proposed to mediate perception. Examples include direct realist and constructivist (analysis by synthesis) theories of speech perception. Although the activity in brain regions involved with action production has been shown to be present during action observation (Mirror Neuron System), the relationship of this activity to perceptual performance has not been clearly demonstrated at the event level. To this end we used functional magnetic resonance imaging fMRI and magnetoencephalography MEG to measure brain activity for correct and incorrect trials of an auditory phonetic identification in noise task. FMRI analysis revealed activity in the premotor cortex including the neighboring frontal opercular part of Broca's area (PMC/Broca's) for both perception and production tasks involving the same phonetic stimuli (potential mirror system site) that was significantly greater for correct over incorrect perceptual identification trials. Time-frequency analysis of single trials conducted over MEG current localized to PMC/Broca's using a hierarchical variational Bayesian source analysis technique revealed significantly greater event-related synchronization ERS and desynchronization ERD for correct over incorrect trials in the alpha, beta, and gamma frequency range prior to and after stimulus presentation. Together, these fMRI and MEG results are consistent with the hypothesis that articulatory processes serve to facilitate perceptual performance, while further dispelling concerns that activity found in ventral PMC/Broca's (mirror system) is merely a product of covert production of the perceived action. The finding of performance predictive activity prior to stimulus onset as well as activity related to task difficulty instead of information available in stimulation are consistent with constructivist and contrary to direct realist theories of perception.

  20. Electrical Excitability of Early Neurons in the Human Cerebral Cortex during the Second Trimester of Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Anna R.; Filipovic, Radmila; Mo, Zhicheng; Rasband, Matthew N.; Zecevic, Nada

    2009-01-01

    Information about development of the human cerebral cortex (proliferation, migration, and differentiation of neurons) is largely based on postmortem histology. Physiological properties of developing human cortical neurons are difficult to access experimentally and therefore remain largely unexplored. Animal studies have shown that information about the arousal of electrical activity in individual cells within fundamental cortical zones (subventricular zone [SVZ], intermediate zone, subplate [SP], and cortical plate [CP]) is necessary for understanding normal brain development. Here we ask where, in what cortical zone, and when, in what gestational week (gw), human neurons acquire the ability to generate nerve impulses (action potentials [APs]). We performed electrical recordings from individual cells in acute brain slices harvested postmortem from the human fetal cerebral cortex (16–22 gw). Tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ current occurs more frequently among CP cells and with significantly greater peak amplitudes than in SVZ. As early as 16 gw, a relatively small population of CP neurons (27%) was able to generate sodium APs upon direct current injection. Neurons located in the SP exhibited the highest level of cellular differentiation, as judged by their ability to fire repetitive APs. At 19 gw, a fraction of human CP and SP neurons possess βIV spectrin–positive axon initial segments populated with voltage-gated sodium channels (PanNav). These results yield the first physiological characterization of developing human fetal cortical neurons with preserved morphologies in intact surrounding brain tissue. PMID:19015375

  1. Altered neuronal architecture and plasticity in the visual cortex of adult MMP-3-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Jeroen; Nys, Julie; Moons, Lieve; Hu, Tjing-Tjing; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2015-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are Zn(2+)-dependent endopeptidases considered to be essential for normal brain development and neuroplasticity by modulating extracellular matrix proteins, receptors, adhesion molecules, growth factors and cytoskeletal proteins. Specifically, MMP-3 has recently been implicated in synaptic plasticity, hippocampus-dependent learning and neuronal development and migration in the cerebellum. However, the function(s) of this enzyme in the neocortex is understudied. Therefore, we explored the phenotypical characteristics of the neuronal architecture and the capacity for experience-dependent cortical plasticity in the visual cortex of adult MMP-3-deficient (MMP-3(-/-)) mice. Golgi-Cox stainings revealed a significant reduction in apical dendritic length and an increased number of apical obliques for layer V pyramidal neurons in the visual cortex of adult MMP-3(-/-) mice compared to wild-type (WT) animals. In addition, a significant upregulation of both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated neurofilament protein (NF)-high, phosphorylated NF-medium, NF-low and α-internexin was detected in the visual cortex of MMP-3(-/-) mice. To assess the effect of MMP-3 deficiency on cortical plasticity, we monocularly enucleated adult MMP-3(-/-) mice and analyzed the reactivation of the contralateral visual cortex 7 weeks post-enucleation. In contrast to previous results in C57Bl/6J adult mice, activity remained confined to the binocular zone and did not expand into the monocular regions indicative for an aberrant open-eye potentiation. Permanent hypoactivity in the monocular cortex lateral and medial to V1 also indicated a lack of cross-modal plasticity. These observations demonstrate that genetic inactivation of MMP-3 has profound effects on the structural integrity and plasticity response of the visual cortex of adult mice.

  2. The Organization of the Forelimb Representation of the C57BL/6 Mouse Motor Cortex as Defined by Intracortical Microstimulation and Cytoarchitecture

    PubMed Central

    Adkins, DeAnna L.; Donlan, Nicole A.; Asay, Aaron L.; Thomas, Nagheme; Kleim, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    The organization of forelimb representation areas of the monkey, cat, and rat motor cortices has been studied in depth, but its characterization in the mouse lags far behind. We used intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) and cytoarchitectonics to characterize the general organization of the C57BL/6 mouse motor cortex, and the forelimb representation in more detail. We found that the forelimb region spans a large area of frontal cortex, bordered primarily by vibrissa, neck, shoulder, and hindlimb representations. It included a large caudal forelimb area, dominated by digit representation, and a small rostral forelimb area, containing elbow and wrist representations. When the entire motor cortex was mapped, the forelimb was found to be the largest movement representation, followed by head and hindlimb representations. The ICMS-defined motor cortex spanned cytoarchitecturally identified lateral agranular cortex (AGl) and also extended into medial agranular cortex. Forelimb and hindlimb representations extended into granular cortex in a region that also had cytoarchitectural characteristics of AGl, consistent with the primary motor–somatosensory overlap zone (OL) characterized in rats. Thus, the mouse motor cortex has homologies with the rat in having 2 forelimb representations and an OL but is distinct in the predominance of digit representations. PMID:20739477

  3. Modularity in the Organization of Mouse Primary Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Weiqing; Gămănuţ, Răzvan; Bista, Pawan; D’Souza, Rinaldo D.; Wang, Quanxin; Burkhalter, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Layer 1 (L1) of primary visual cortex (V1) is the target of projections from many brain regions outside of V1. We found that inputs to the non-columnar mouse V1 from the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus and feedback projections from multiple higher cortical areas to L1 are patchy. The patches are matched to a pattern of M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor expression at fixed locations of mouse, rat and monkey V1. Neurons in L2/3 aligned with M2-rich patches have high spatial acuity whereas cells in M2-poor zones exhibited high temporal acuity. Together M2+ and M2− zones form constant-size domains that are repeated across V1. Domains map subregions of the receptive field, such that multiple copies are contained within the point image. The results suggest that the modular network in mouse V1 selects spatiotemporally distinct clusters of neurons within the point image for top-down control and differential routing of inputs to cortical streams. PMID:26247867

  4. Perirhinal cortex and temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Biagini, Giuseppe; D'Antuono, Margherita; Benini, Ruba; de Guzman, Philip; Longo, Daniela; Avoli, Massimo

    2013-08-29

    The perirhinal cortex-which is interconnected with several limbic structures and is intimately involved in learning and memory-plays major roles in pathological processes such as the kindling phenomenon of epileptogenesis and the spread of limbic seizures. Both features may be relevant to the pathophysiology of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy that represents the most refractory adult form of epilepsy with up to 30% of patients not achieving adequate seizure control. Compared to other limbic structures such as the hippocampus or the entorhinal cortex, the perirhinal area remains understudied and, in particular, detailed information on its dysfunctional characteristics remains scarce; this lack of information may be due to the fact that the perirhinal cortex is not grossly damaged in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and in models mimicking this epileptic disorder. However, we have recently identified in pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats the presence of selective losses of interneuron subtypes along with increased synaptic excitability. In this review we: (i) highlight the fundamental electrophysiological properties of perirhinal cortex neurons; (ii) briefly stress the mechanisms underlying epileptiform synchronization in perirhinal cortex networks following epileptogenic pharmacological manipulations; and (iii) focus on the changes in neuronal excitability and cytoarchitecture of the perirhinal cortex occurring in the pilocarpine model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Overall, these data indicate that perirhinal cortex networks are hyperexcitable in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy, and that this condition is associated with a selective cellular damage that is characterized by an age-dependent sensitivity of interneurons to precipitating injuries, such as status epilepticus.

  5. New Madrid Seismic Zone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    NEW MADRID SEISMIC ZONE BY COLONEL J.DAVID NORWOOD United States Army DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A...mCTBB l USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT New Madrid Seismic Zone by J. David Norwood, COL, USA Michael A. Pearson, COL, USA Project Advisor The...ABSTRACT AUTHOR: J. David Norwood, Colonel, U.S. Army TITLE: New Madrid Seismic Zone FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 22 April 1998 . PAGES:

  6. Influence of the embryonic preplate on the organization of the cerebral cortex: a targeted ablation model.

    PubMed

    Xie, Y; Skinner, E; Landry, C; Handley, V; Schonmann, V; Jacobs, E; Fisher, R; Campagnoni, A

    2002-10-15

    Transgenic mice were generated to permit the targeted ablation of cortical preplate cells at the time they are born. In these mice, the 1.3 kb golli promoter of the myelin basic protein gene was used to drive the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) transgene in cortical preplate cells. Heterozygous transgenic pairs were bred, and pregnant dams were treated with ganciclovir at embryonic days 11-12 to ablate preplate cells at the time the preplate was forming. This paradigm exposed control (TK-) and experimental (TK+) littermates to exactly the same conditions. Embryological ablation of preplate cells led to an early disruption of the radial glial framework and subplate structure in the developing cortex and dramatically altered the cellular lamination and connectivity of the cortical plate. The disturbed radial glial network contributed to an impaired radial migration of neurons into the cortical plate from the ventricular zone. The cortical plate became dyslaminated, and there was a substantial reduction in short- and long-range cortical projections within the cortex and to subcortical regions. Cell death within the cortical plate and the proliferative zones was substantially increased in the ablated animals. After birth, a cortical lesion developed, which became exacerbated with the secondary onset of hydrocephaly in the second postnatal week. The results underscore the critical importance of the preplate in cortex formation, mediated through its guidance of the formation of radial glial scaffolding, subsequent neuronal migration into the incipient cortical plate, and the final arrangement of its vertical organization and cellular connectivity.

  7. A Computational Model of Cerebral Cortex Folding

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jingxin; Guo, Lei; Li, Gang; Faraco, Carlos; Miller, L Stephen; Liu, Tianming

    2010-01-01

    The geometric complexity and variability of the human cerebral cortex has long intrigued the scientific community. As a result, quantitative description of cortical folding patterns and the understanding of underlying folding mechanisms have emerged as important research goals. This paper presents a computational 3-dimensional geometric model of cerebral cortex folding initialized by MRI data of a human fetal brain and deformed under the governance of a partial differential equation modeling cortical growth. By applying different simulation parameters, our model is able to generate folding convolutions and shape dynamics of the cerebral cortex. The simulations of this 3D geometric model provide computational experimental support to the following hypotheses: 1) Mechanical constraints of the skull regulate the cortical folding process. 2) The cortical folding pattern is dependent on the global cell growth rate of the whole cortex. 3) The cortical folding pattern is dependent on relative rates of cell growth in different cortical areas. 4) The cortical folding pattern is dependent on the initial geometry of the cortex. PMID:20167224

  8. Dissociating motor cortex from the motor

    PubMed Central

    Schieber, Marc H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract During closed-loop control of a brain–computer interface, neurons in the primary motor cortex can be intensely active even though the subject may be making no detectable movement or muscle contraction. How can neural activity in the primary motor cortex become dissociated from the movements and muscles of the native limb that it normally controls? Here we examine circumstances in which motor cortex activity is known to dissociate from movement – including mental imagery, visuo-motor dissociation and instructed delay. Many such motor cortex neurons may be related to muscle activity only indirectly. Furthermore, the integration of thousands of synaptic inputs by individual α-motoneurons means that under certain circumstances even cortico-motoneuronal cells, which make monosynaptic connections to α-motoneurons, can become dissociated from muscle activity. The natural ability of motor cortex neurons under voluntarily control to become dissociated from bodily movement may underlie the utility of this cortical area for controlling brain–computer interfaces. PMID:22005673

  9. [Numerical taxonomy of corlor in Phellodendron Cortex].

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan; Huang, Lu-qi; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Shan-shan; Jin, Shi-yuan

    2015-10-01

    Through the investigation of Phellodendron Cortex on the market, and 28 batches of samples were collected. By using spectrophotometer the color values of outer surface, inner surface and cross - section of these samples were measured. These measured color data was translated into 3D structure diagram by using the Lab color space tool. The level difference value, the mean value and the threshold value were calculated based the measured color data of these different batches of samples. All 28 groups measured data was analyzed using the methods of Ward linkage and average Euclidean distance. At the same time, we invited Professor Jin Shiyuan, the "Chinese medicine master", to identify, quality-evaluate and grade these 28 batches of Phellodendron Cortex samples base on the traditional experience, then compared the traditional empirical results with the spectrophotometer measurement results. The result showed that, the Phellodendron Cortex could be divided into Phellodendri Amurensis Cortex and Phellodendri Chinensis Cortex by color numerical clustering, and classified according to quality. The classification result has a high degree of consistency with the traditional experience.

  10. Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... zone lymphomas are a group of indolent (slow-growing) NHL B-cell lymphomas, which account for approximately 12 percent of all B-cell lymphomas. The median age for diagnosis is 65 years old. There are three types of marginal zone lymphoma: ...

  11. Urban Terrain Zone Characteristics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    function . An example of the interaction of some of these can result in an exposed surface of decorative brick veneer on a framed stracture . Or, a...Classification System for HOUT Studies . . . . . . . . .- ..- . . . . . . 14 2. Urban Terrain Zones Function /Morphology Relationship...By Function --All Cities Aggregated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 6. Building Types: Major Terrain Zones . . . . ...... 103 7. Urban Terrain

  12. Coastal zone management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, E. L., III

    1975-01-01

    A panel of federal and state representatives concerned with coastal zone affairs discussed their problems in this area. In addition, several demonstrations of the application of remote sensing technology to coastal zone management were described. These demonstrations were performed by several agencies in a variety of geographical areas.

  13. Float Zone Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the Analytical Float Zone Experiment System (AFZES) concept is presented. The types of experiments considered for such a facility are discussed. Reports from various industrial producers and users of float zone material are presented. Special emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art developments in low gravity manufacturing and their applications to space processing.

  14. Subduction of fracture zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi; Leeman, William

    2013-04-01

    Since Wilson proposed in 1965 the existence of a new class of faults on the ocean floor, namely transform faults, the geodynamic effects and importance of fracture zone subduction is still little studied. It is known that oceanic plates are characterized by numerous fracture zones, and some of them have the potential to transport into subduction zones large volumes of water-rich serpentinite, providing a fertile water source for magma generated in subduction-related arc volcanoes. In most previous geodynamic studies, subducting plates are considered to be homogeneous, and there is no clear indication how the subduction of a fracture zone influences the melting pattern in the mantle wedge and the slab-derived fluids distribution in the subarc mantle. Here we show that subduction of serpentinized fracture zones plays a significant role in distribution of melt and fluids in the mantle wedge above the slab. Using high-resolution tree-dimensional coupled petrological-termomechanical simulations of subduction, we show that fluids, including melts and water, vary dramatically in the region where a serpentinized fracture zone enters into subduction. Our models show that substantial hydration and partial melting tend to concentrate where fracture zones are being subducted, creating favorable conditions for partially molten hydrous plumes to develop. These results are consistent with the along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes in several regions, as the Aleutian Arc, the Cascades, the Southern Mexican Volcanic Arc, and the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone.

  15. Investigating Aquatic Dead Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, Jeremy; Gurbisz, Cassie; Murray, Laura; Gray, William; Bosch, Jennifer; Burrell, Chris; Kemp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article features two engaging high school activities that include current scientific information, data, and authentic case studies. The activities address the physical, biological, and chemical processes that are associated with oxygen-depleted areas, or "dead zones," in aquatic systems. Students can explore these dead zones through both…

  16. Microgravity silicon zoning investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.; Gill, G. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A resistance heated zoner, suitable for early zoning experiments with silicon, was designed and put into operation. The initial power usage and size was designed for an shown to be compatible with payload carriers contemplated for the Shuttle. This equipment will be used in the definition and development of flight experiments and apparatus for float zoning silicon and other materials in microgravity.

  17. Mapping receptive fields in primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ringach, Dario L

    2004-01-01

    Nearly 40 years ago, in the pages of this journal, Hubel and Wiesel provided the first description of receptive fields in the primary visual cortex of higher mammals. They defined two classes of cortical cells, ‘simple’ and ‘complex’, based on neural responses to simple visual stimuli. The notion of a hierarchy of receptive fields, where increasingly intricate receptive fields are constructed from more elementary ones, was introduced. Since those early days we have witnessed the birth of quantitative methods to map receptive fields and mathematical descriptions of simple and complex cell function. Insights gained from these models, along with new theoretical concepts, are refining our understanding of receptive field structure and the underlying cortical circuitry. Here, I provide a brief historical account of the evolution of receptive field mapping in visual cortex along with the associated conceptual advancements, and speculate on the shape novel theories of the cortex may take as a result these measurements. PMID:15155794

  18. Auditory spatial processing in the human cortex.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Nelli H; Tiitinen, Hannu; May, Patrick J C

    2012-12-01

    The auditory system codes spatial locations in a way that deviates from the spatial representations found in other modalities. This difference is especially striking in the cortex, where neurons form topographical maps of visual and tactile space but where auditory space is represented through a population rate code. In this hemifield code, sound source location is represented in the activity of two widely tuned opponent populations, one tuned to the right and the other to the left side of auditory space. Scientists are only beginning to uncover how this coding strategy adapts to various spatial processing demands. This review presents the current understanding of auditory spatial processing in the cortex. To this end, the authors consider how various implementations of the hemifield code may exist within the auditory cortex and how these may be modulated by the stimulation and task context. As a result, a coherent set of neural strategies for auditory spatial processing emerges.

  19. Mismatch Receptive Fields in Mouse Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zmarz, Pawel; Keller, Georg B

    2016-11-23

    In primary visual cortex, a subset of neurons responds when a particular stimulus is encountered in a certain location in visual space. This activity can be modeled using a visual receptive field. In addition to visually driven activity, there are neurons in visual cortex that integrate visual and motor-related input to signal a mismatch between actual and predicted visual flow. Here we show that these mismatch neurons have receptive fields and signal a local mismatch between actual and predicted visual flow in restricted regions of visual space. These mismatch receptive fields are aligned to the retinotopic map of visual cortex and are similar in size to visual receptive fields. Thus, neurons with mismatch receptive fields signal local deviations of actual visual flow from visual flow predicted based on self-motion and could therefore underlie the detection of objects moving relative to the visual flow caused by self-motion. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  20. The Age of Human Cerebral Cortex Neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, R D; Curtis, M A; Spalding, K L; Buchholz, B A; Fink, D; Bjork-Eriksson, T; Nordborg, C; Gage, F H; Druid, H; Eriksson, P S; Frisen, J

    2006-04-06

    The traditional static view of the adult mammalian brain has been challenged by the realization of continuous generation of neurons from stem cells. Based mainly on studies in experimental animals, adult neurogenesis may contribute to recovery after brain insults and decreased neurogenesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurological and psychiatric diseases in man. The extent of neurogenesis in the adult human brain has, however, been difficult to establish. We have taken advantage of the integration of {sup 14}C, generated by nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War, in DNA to establish the age of neurons in the major areas of the human cerebral cortex. Together with the analysis of the cortex from patients who received BrdU, which integrates in the DNA of dividing cells, our results demonstrate that whereas non-neuronal cells turn over, neurons in the human cerebral cortex are not generated postnatally at detectable levels, but are as old as the individual.

  1. Spatial updating in human parietal cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Elisha P.; Genovese, Christopher R.; Colby, Carol L.

    2003-01-01

    Single neurons in monkey parietal cortex update visual information in conjunction with eye movements. This remapping of stimulus representations is thought to contribute to spatial constancy. We hypothesized that a similar process occurs in human parietal cortex and that we could visualize it with functional MRI. We scanned subjects during a task that involved remapping of visual signals across hemifields. We observed an initial response in the hemisphere contralateral to the visual stimulus, followed by a remapped response in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the stimulus. We ruled out the possibility that this remapped response resulted from either eye movements or visual stimuli alone. Our results demonstrate that updating of visual information occurs in human parietal cortex.

  2. Controlling contractile instabilities in the actomyosin cortex

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Masatoshi; Naganathan, Sundar Ram; Jülicher, Frank; Grill, Stephan W

    2017-01-01

    The actomyosin cell cortex is an active contractile material for driving cell- and tissue morphogenesis. The cortex has a tendency to form a pattern of myosin foci, which is a signature of potentially unstable behavior. How a system that is prone to such instabilities can rveliably drive morphogenesis remains an outstanding question. Here, we report that in the Caenorhabditis elegans zygote, feedback between active RhoA and myosin induces a contractile instability in the cortex. We discover that an independent RhoA pacemaking oscillator controls this instability, generating a pulsatory pattern of myosin foci and preventing the collapse of cortical material into a few dynamic contracting regions. Our work reveals how contractile instabilities that are natural to occur in mechanically active media can be biochemically controlled to robustly drive morphogenetic events. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19595.001 PMID:28117665

  3. 75 FR 3859 - Safety Zone; Baltimore Captain of Port Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Baltimore Captain of Port Zone AGENCY... establishing a temporary safety zone in all navigable waters of the Captain of the Port Baltimore zone. The... authorized by the Captain of the Port Baltimore, or his designated representative. This safety zone...

  4. Space representation in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Shintaro

    2013-04-01

    The representation of space and its function in the prefrontal cortex have been examined using a variety of behavioral tasks. Among them, since the delayed-response task requires the temporary maintenance of spatial information, this task has been used to examine the mechanisms of spatial representation. In addition, the concept of working memory to explain prefrontal functions has helped us to understand the nature and functions of space representation in the prefrontal cortex. The detailed analysis of delay-period activity observed in spatial working memory tasks has provided important information for understanding space representation in the prefrontal cortex. Directional delay-period activity has been shown to be a neural correlate of the mechanism for temporarily maintaining information and represent spatial information for the visual cue and the saccade. In addition, many task-related prefrontal neurons exhibit spatially selective activities. These neurons are also important components of spatial information processing. In fact, information flow from sensory-related neurons to motor-related neurons has been demonstrated, along with a change in spatial representation as the trial progresses. The dynamic functional interactions among neurons exhibiting different task-related activities and representing different aspects of information could play an essential role in information processing. In addition, information provided from other cortical or subcortical areas might also be necessary for the representation of space in the prefrontal cortex. To better understand the representation of space and its function in the prefrontal cortex, we need to understand the nature of functional interactions between the prefrontal cortex and other cortical and subcortical areas.

  5. Perirhinal cortex and temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Biagini, Giuseppe; D'Antuono, Margherita; Benini, Ruba; de Guzman, Philip; Longo, Daniela; Avoli, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The perirhinal cortex—which is interconnected with several limbic structures and is intimately involved in learning and memory—plays major roles in pathological processes such as the kindling phenomenon of epileptogenesis and the spread of limbic seizures. Both features may be relevant to the pathophysiology of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy that represents the most refractory adult form of epilepsy with up to 30% of patients not achieving adequate seizure control. Compared to other limbic structures such as the hippocampus or the entorhinal cortex, the perirhinal area remains understudied and, in particular, detailed information on its dysfunctional characteristics remains scarce; this lack of information may be due to the fact that the perirhinal cortex is not grossly damaged in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and in models mimicking this epileptic disorder. However, we have recently identified in pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats the presence of selective losses of interneuron subtypes along with increased synaptic excitability. In this review we: (i) highlight the fundamental electrophysiological properties of perirhinal cortex neurons; (ii) briefly stress the mechanisms underlying epileptiform synchronization in perirhinal cortex networks following epileptogenic pharmacological manipulations; and (iii) focus on the changes in neuronal excitability and cytoarchitecture of the perirhinal cortex occurring in the pilocarpine model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Overall, these data indicate that perirhinal cortex networks are hyperexcitable in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy, and that this condition is associated with a selective cellular damage that is characterized by an age-dependent sensitivity of interneurons to precipitating injuries, such as status epilepticus. PMID:24009554

  6. Rapid axonal sprouting and pruning accompany functional reorganization in primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Yamahachi, Homare; Marik, Sally A; McManus, Justin N J; Denk, Winfried; Gilbert, Charles D

    2009-12-10

    The functional architecture of adult cerebral cortex retains a capacity for experience-dependent change. This is seen following focal binocular lesions, which induce rapid changes in receptive field size and position. To follow the dynamics of the circuitry underlying these changes, we imaged the intrinsic long-range horizontal connections within the lesion projection zone (LPZ) in adult macaque primary visual cortex. To image the same axons over time, we combined viral vector-mediated EGFP transfer and two-photon microscopy. The lesion triggered, within the first week, an approximately 2-fold outgrowth of axons toward the center of the LPZ. Over the subsequent month, axonal density declined due to a parallel process of pruning and sprouting but maintained a net increase relative to prelesion levels. The rate of turnover of axonal boutons also increased. The axonal restructuring recapitulates the pattern of exuberance and pruning seen in early development and correlates well with the functional changes following retinal lesions.

  7. Neurophysiological and simulation studies of striate cortex receptive field maps: the role of intracortical interneuronal interactions.

    PubMed

    Lazareva, N A; Saltykov, K A; Shevelev, I A; Tikhomirov, A S; Novikova, R V; Tsutskiridze, D Yu

    2007-07-01

    Acute experiments on 27 adult anesthetized and immobilized cats investigated 101 on and off receptive fields in 67 neurons in visual cortex field 17 by mapping using single local stimuli presented sequentially at different parts of the visual field, as well as in combination with additional stimulation of the center of the receptive field. Both classical and combined mapping identified receptive fields with single receptive zones (63.4% and 29.3% respectively), along with fields consisting of several (2-5) excitatory and/or inhibitory zones (36.6% and 70.7%). We provide the first report of receptive fields with horseshoe, cross, and T shapes. Simulations of horizontal interneuronal interactions in the visual cortex responsible for the multiplicity of excitatory and inhibitory zones of receptive fields were performed. A role for cooperative interactions of neurons in this effect was demonstrated. The possible functional role of receptive fields of different types in extracting the features of visual images is discussed.

  8. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and

  9. Anomalous zones (domal)

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, D.H. )

    1990-09-01

    Each zone contains several anomalous salt properties (anomalous features). Zones cannot be characterized by any single property Zones are highly variable, lenticular, and discontinuous in detail; however, once established, they commonly have a predictable trend. The individual anomalous features can occur alone (locally in pairs) over areas of various sizes and shapes. These alone occurrences are not anomalous zones. Anomalous zones may be of any origin, and origin is not part of the definition. Typical origins include: primary (sedimentary), external sheath zone, separating two spines of salt, or caused by toroidal flow. The major importance of an anomalous zone is that it consists of various anomalous features distributed discontinuously along the zone. Thus, if three or more anomalous properties are observed together, one should look for others. The anomalous zones observed in the Gulf Coast thus far are vertical, linear, and semicontinuous. Most are reasonably straight, but some bend sharply, end abruptly, or coalesce. Textures in salt involve grain size, color (white to dark gray), grain shape, or grain distribution of the salt. Typical anomalous textures are coarse-grain, poikiloblastic, and friability. A change in color is commonplace and seldom anomalous. Structural anomalous features, broadly defined, account for most of the rest of the anomalous features. Not uncommonly they cause mining problems. Among the structural anomalous features: INCLUSIONS: Sediments, hydrocarbons, brine, gases. Common gases are air (as N{sub 2}), CH-compounds, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S. STRUCTURES: Sheared salt, undue stabbing or jointing, voids (crystal-lined pockets), permeability, increased porosity COMPOSITION: High anhydrite content, visible anhydrite as grains or boudins, very black salt = disseminated impurities such as clay.

  10. 16. UPPER PASSENGER LOADING ZONE, NOTE LOADING ZONE BELOW WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. UPPER PASSENGER LOADING ZONE, NOTE LOADING ZONE BELOW WITH TURN STILES - Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Arch, Mississippi River between Washington & Poplar Streets, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  11. Primary Auditory Cortex Regulates Threat Memory Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigestrand, Mattis B.; Schiff, Hillary C.; Fyhn, Marianne; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Sears, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    Distinguishing threatening from nonthreatening stimuli is essential for survival and stimulus generalization is a hallmark of anxiety disorders. While auditory threat learning produces long-lasting plasticity in primary auditory cortex (Au1), it is not clear whether such Au1 plasticity regulates memory specificity or generalization. We used…

  12. Motor cortex inhibition induced by acoustic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Andrea A; Sharott, Andrew; Trottenberg, Thomas; Kupsch, Andreas; Brown, Peter

    2004-09-01

    The influence of the brainstem motor system on cerebral motor areas may play an important role in motor control in health and disease. A new approach to investigate this interaction in man is combining acoustic stimulation activating the startle system with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the motor cortex. However, it is unclear whether the inhibition of TMS responses following acoustic stimulation occurs at the level of the motor cortex through reticulo-cortical projections or subcortically, perhaps through reticulo-spinal projections. We compared the influence of acoustic stimulation on motor effects elicited by TMS over motor cortical areas to those evoked with subcortical electrical stimulation (SES) through depth electrodes in five patients treated with deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. SES bypasses the motor cortex, demonstrating any interaction with acoustic stimuli at the subcortical level. EMG was recorded from the contralateral biceps brachii muscle. Acoustic stimulation was delivered binaurally through headphones and used as a conditioning stimulus at an interstimulus interval of 50 ms. When TMS was used as the test stimulus, the area and amplitude of the conditioned motor response was significantly inhibited (area: 57.5+/-12.9%, amplitude: 47.9+/-7.4%, as percentage of unconditioned response) whereas facilitation occurred with SES (area: 110.1+/-4.3%, amplitude: 116.9+/-6.9%). We conclude that a startle-evoked activation of reticulo-cortical projections transiently inhibits the motor cortex.

  13. The piriform cortex and human focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, David N; Jackson, Graeme D

    2014-01-01

    It is surprising that the piriform cortex, when compared to the hippocampus, has been given relatively little significance in human epilepsy. Like the hippocampus, it has a phylogenetically preserved three-layered cortex that is vulnerable to excitotoxic injury, has broad connections to both limbic and cortical areas, and is highly epileptogenic - being critical to the kindling process. The well-known phenomenon of early olfactory auras in temporal lobe epilepsy highlights its clinical relevance in human beings. Perhaps because it is anatomically indistinct and difficult to approach surgically, as it clasps the middle cerebral artery, it has, until now, been understandably neglected. In this review, we emphasize how its unique anatomical and functional properties, as primary olfactory cortex, predispose it to involvement in focal epilepsy. From recent convergent findings in human neuroimaging, clinical epileptology, and experimental animal models, we make the case that the piriform cortex is likely to play a facilitating and amplifying role in human focal epileptogenesis, and may influence progression to epileptic intractability.

  14. Excitatory neuronal connectivity in the barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Feldmeyer, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Neocortical areas are believed to be organized into vertical modules, the cortical columns, and the horizontal layers 1–6. In the somatosensory barrel cortex these columns are defined by the readily discernible barrel structure in layer 4. Information processing in the neocortex occurs along vertical and horizontal axes, thereby linking individual barrel-related columns via axons running through the different cortical layers of the barrel cortex. Long-range signaling occurs within the neocortical layers but also through axons projecting through the white matter to other neocortical areas and subcortical brain regions. Because of the ease of identification of barrel-related columns, the rodent barrel cortex has become a prototypical system to study the interactions between different neuronal connections within a sensory cortical area and between this area and other cortical as well subcortical regions. Such interactions will be discussed specifically for the feed-forward and feedback loops between the somatosensory and the somatomotor cortices as well as the different thalamic nuclei. In addition, recent advances concerning the morphological characteristics of excitatory neurons and their impact on the synaptic connectivity patterns and signaling properties of neuronal microcircuits in the whisker-related somatosensory cortex will be reviewed. In this context, their relationship between the structural properties of barrel-related columns and their function as a module in vertical synaptic signaling in the whisker-related cortical areas will be discussed. PMID:22798946

  15. The Piriform Cortex and Human Focal Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, David N.; Jackson, Graeme D.

    2014-01-01

    It is surprising that the piriform cortex, when compared to the hippocampus, has been given relatively little significance in human epilepsy. Like the hippocampus, it has a phylogenetically preserved three-layered cortex that is vulnerable to excitotoxic injury, has broad connections to both limbic and cortical areas, and is highly epileptogenic – being critical to the kindling process. The well-known phenomenon of early olfactory auras in temporal lobe epilepsy highlights its clinical relevance in human beings. Perhaps because it is anatomically indistinct and difficult to approach surgically, as it clasps the middle cerebral artery, it has, until now, been understandably neglected. In this review, we emphasize how its unique anatomical and functional properties, as primary olfactory cortex, predispose it to involvement in focal epilepsy. From recent convergent findings in human neuroimaging, clinical epileptology, and experimental animal models, we make the case that the piriform cortex is likely to play a facilitating and amplifying role in human focal epileptogenesis, and may influence progression to epileptic intractability. PMID:25538678

  16. Motor Cortex Reorganization across the Lifespan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plowman, Emily K.; Kleim, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    The brain is a highly dynamic structure with the capacity for profound structural and functional change. Such neural plasticity has been well characterized within motor cortex and is believed to represent one of the neural mechanisms for acquiring and modifying motor behaviors. A number of behavioral and neural signals have been identified that…

  17. Developmental Outcomes after Early Prefrontal Cortex Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eslinger, Paul J.; Flaherty-Craig, Claire V.; Benton, Arthur L.

    2004-01-01

    The neuropsychological bases of cognitive, social, and moral development are minimally understood, with a seemingly wide chasm between developmental theories and brain maturation models. As one approach to bridging ideas in these areas, we review 10 cases of early prefrontal cortex damage from the clinical literature, highlighting overall clinical…

  18. Microglia in the Cerebral Cortex in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetreault, Nicole A.; Hakeem, Atiya Y.; Jiang, Sue; Williams, Brian A.; Allman, Elizabeth; Wold, Barbara J.; Allman, John M.

    2012-01-01

    We immunocytochemically identified microglia in fronto-insular (FI) and visual cortex (VC) in autopsy brains of well-phenotyped subjects with autism and matched controls, and stereologically quantified the microglial densities. Densities were determined blind to phenotype using an optical fractionator probe. In FI, individuals with autism had…

  19. Vibrissa motor cortex activity suppresses contralateral whisking behavior.

    PubMed

    Ebbesen, Christian Laut; Doron, Guy; Lenschow, Constanze; Brecht, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Anatomical, stimulation and lesion data implicate vibrissa motor cortex in whisker motor control. Work on motor cortex has focused on movement generation, but correlations between vibrissa motor cortex activity and whisking are weak. The exact role of vibrissa motor cortex remains unknown. We recorded vibrissa motor cortex neurons during various forms of vibrissal touch, which were invariably associated with whisker protraction and movement. Free whisking, object palpation and social touch all resulted in decreased cortical activity. To understand this activity decrease, we performed juxtacellular recordings, nanostimulation and in vivo whole-cell recordings. Social touch resulted in decreased spiking activity, decreased cell excitability and membrane hyperpolarization. Activation of vibrissa motor cortex by intracortical microstimulation elicited whisker retraction, as if to abort vibrissal touch. Various vibrissa motor cortex inactivation protocols resulted in contralateral protraction and increased whisker movements. These data collectively point to movement suppression as a prime function of vibrissa motor cortex activity.

  20. Decreased survival in glioblastomas is specific to contact with the ventricular-subventricular zone, not subgranular zone or corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Akshitkumar M; Dewan, Michael C; White-Dzuro, Gabrielle A; Brinson, Philip R; Weaver, Kyle D; Thompson, Reid C; Ihrie, Rebecca A; Chambless, Lola B

    2017-04-01

    The clinical effect of radiographic contact of glioblastoma (GBM) with neurogenic zones (NZ)-the ventricular-subventricular (VSVZ) and subgranular (SGZ) zones-and the corpus callosum (CC) remains unclear and, in the case of the SGZ, unexplored. We investigated (1) if GBM contact with a NZ correlates with decreased survival; (2) if so, whether this effect is associated with a specific NZ; and (3) if radiographic contact with or invasion of the CC by GBM is associated with decreased survival. We retrospectively identified 207 adult patients who underwent cytoreductive surgery for GBM followed by chemotherapy and/or radiation. Age, preoperative Karnofsky performance status score (KPS), and extent of resection were recorded. Preoperative MRIs were blindly analyzed to calculate tumor volume and assess its contact with VSVZ, SGZ, CC, and cortex. Overall (OS) and progression free (PFS) survivals were calculated and analyzed with multivariate Cox analyses. Among the 207 patients, 111 had GBM contacting VSVZ (VSVZ+GBMs), 23 had SGZ+GBMs, 52 had CC+GBMs, and 164 had cortex+GBMs. VSVZ+, SGZ+, and CC+ GBMs were significantly larger in size relative to their respective non-contacting controls. Multivariate Cox survival analyses revealed GBM contact with the VSVZ, but not SGZ, CC, or cortex, as an independent predictor of lower OS, PFS, and early recurrence. We hypothesize that the VSVZ niche has unique properties that contribute to GBM pathobiology in adults.

  1. In need of constraint: Understanding the role of the cingulate cortex in the impulsive mind.

    PubMed

    Golchert, Johannes; Smallwood, Jonathan; Jefferies, Elizabeth; Liem, Franziskus; Huntenburg, Julia M; Falkiewicz, Marcel; Lauckner, Mark E; Oligschläger, Sabine; Villringer, Arno; Margulies, Daniel S

    2017-02-01

    functional connectivity of a region of anterior cingulate cortex. This suggests that poor perseveration and premeditation might be linked to dysfunctions in how the rostral zone of the ACC interacts with the multiple demand network that allows cognition to proceed in a controlled way.

  2. [Raman spectra of monkey cerebral cortex tissue].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ji-chun; Guo, Jian-yu; Cai, Wei-ying; Wang, Zu-geng; Sun, Zhen-rong

    2010-01-01

    Monkey cerebral cortex, an important part in the brain to control action and thought activities, is mainly composed of grey matter and nerve cell. In the present paper, the in situ Raman spectra of the cerebral cortex of the birth, teenage and aged monkeys were achieved for the first time. The results show that the Raman spectra for the different age monkey cerebral cortex exhibit most obvious changes in the regions of 1000-1400 and 2800-3000 cm(-1). With monkey growing up, the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1313 and 2885 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH2 chain vibrational mode of lipid become stronger and stronger whereas the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1338 and 2932 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH3 chain vibrational mode of protein become weaker and weaker. In addition, the two new Raman bands at 1296 and 2850 cm(-1) are only observed in the aged monkey cerebral cortex, therefore, the two bands can be considered as a character or "marker" to differentiate the caducity degree with monkey growth In order to further explore the changes, the relative intensity ratios of the Raman band at 1313 cm(-1) to that at 1338 cm(-1) and the Raman band at 2885 cm(-1) to that at 2 932 cm(-1), I1313/I1338 and I2885/I2932, which are the lipid-to-protein ratios, are introduced to denote the degree of the lipid content. The results show that the relative intensity ratios increase significantly with monkey growth, namely, the lipid content in the cerebral cortex increases greatly with monkey growth. So, the authors can deduce that the overmuch lipid is an important cause to induce the caducity. Therefore, the results will be a powerful assistance and valuable parameter to study the order of life growth and diagnose diseases.

  3. Cerebral Cortex Structure in Prodromal Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nopoulos, Peggy C.; Aylward, Elizabeth H.; Ross, Christopher A.; Johnson, Hans J.; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Juhl, Andrew R.; Pierson, Ronald K.; Mills, James; Langbehn, Douglas R.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of subjects who are gene-expanded for Huntington Disease, but not yet diagnosed (termed prodromal HD), report that the cortex is “spared,” despite the decrement in striatal and cerebral white-matter volume. Measurement of whole-cortex volume can mask more subtle, but potentially clinically relevant regional changes in volume, thinning, or surface area. The current study addressed this limitation by evaluating cortical morphology of 523 prodromal HD subjects. Participants included 693 individuals enrolled in the PREDICT-HD protocol. Of these participants, 523 carried the HD gene mutation (prodromal HD group); the remaining 170 were non gene-expanded and served as the comparison group. Based on age and CAG repeat length, gene-expanded subjects were categorized as “Far from onset,” “Midway to onset,” “Near onset,” and “already diagnosed.” MRI scans were processed using FreeSurfer. Cortical volume, thickness, and surface area were not significantly different between the Far from onset group and controls. However, beginning in the Midway to onset group, the cortex showed significant volume decrement, affecting most the posterior and superior cerebral regions. This pattern progressed when evaluating the groups further into the disease process. Areas that remained mostly unaffected included ventral and medial regions of the frontal and temporal cortex. Morphologic changes were mostly in thinning as surface area did not substantially change in most regions. Early in the course of HD, the cortex shows changes that are manifest as cortical thinning and are most robust in the posterior and superior regions of the cerebrum. PMID:20688164

  4. Sensorimotor organization in double cortex syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jirsch, Jeffrey D; Bernasconi, Neda; Villani, Flavio; Vitali, Paolo; Avanzini, Giuliano; Bernasconi, Andrea

    2006-06-01

    Subcortical band heterotopia is a diffuse malformation of cortical development related to pharmacologically intractable epilepsy. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), patients with "double cortex" syndrome (DCS) present with a band of heterotopic gray matter separated from the overlying cortex by a layer of white matter. The function and connectivity of the subcortical heterotopic band in humans is only partially understood. We studied six DCS patients with bilateral subcortical band heterotopias and six healthy controls using functional MRI (fMRI). In controls, simple motor task elicited contralateral activation of the primary motor cortex (M1) and ipsilateral activation of the cerebellum and left supplementary motor area (SMA). All DCS patients showed task-related contralateral activation of both M1 and the underlying heterotopic band. Ipsilateral motor activation was seen in 4/6 DCS patients. Furthermore, there were additional activations of nonprimary normotopic cortical areas. The sensory stimulus resulted in activation of the contralateral primary sensory cortex (SI) and the thalamus in all healthy subjects. The left sensory task also induced a contralateral activation of the insular cortex. Sensory activation of the contralateral SI was seen in all DCS patients and secondary somatosensory areas in 5/6. The heterotopic band beneath SI became activated in 3/6 DCS patients. Activations were also seen in subcortical structures for both paradigms. In DCS, motor and sensory tasks induce an activation of the subcortical heterotopic band. The recruitment of bilateral primary areas and higher-order association normotopic cortices indicates the need for a widespread network to perform simple tasks.

  5. [Morphofunctional status of the adrenal cortex in female silver foxes and the effect of domestication and photoperiodic conditions].

    PubMed

    Lutsenko, N D; Trut, L N

    1987-01-01

    Studies on 7-day-old and 8-month-old female silver foxes indicate that additional photostimulation affects to a various extent morphological and functional condition of the adrenal cortex in animals selected and unselected for the domestication type of behaviour. In relatively wild foxes, additional illumination stimulated the activity of the reticular zone, whereas in domesticated animals the same photoperiod increased the activity in the fascicular zone. It is suggested that selection of silver foxes for the domestication type of behaviour affects the sensitivity of the adrenals to external illumination.

  6. Buffer Zone Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    New requirements for buffer zones and sign posting contribute to soil fumigant mitigation and protection for workers and bystanders. The buffer provides distance between the pesticide application site and bystanders, reducing exposure risk.

  7. Microgravity silicon zoning investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.; Gill, G. L., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The flow instabilities in floating zones of silicon were investigated and methods for investigation of these instabilities in microgravity were defined. Three principal tasks were involved: (1) characterization of the float zone in small diameter rods; (2) investigation of melt flow instabilities in circular melts in silicon disks; and (3) the development of a prototype of an apparatus that could be used in near term space experiments to investigate flow instabilities in a molten zone. It is shown that in a resistance heated zoner with 4 to 7 mm diameter silicon rods that the critical Marangoni number is about 1480 compared to a predicted value of 14 indicative that viable space experiments might be performed. The prototype float zone apparatus is built and specifications are prepared for a flight zoner should a decision be reached to proceed with a space flight experimental investigation.

  8. Projection from the perirhinal cortex to the frontal motor cortex in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kyuhou, Shin ichi; Gemba, Hisae

    2002-03-01

    Stimulation of the anterior perirhinal cortex (PERa) induced marked surface-negative and depth-positive field potentials in the rat frontal motor cortex (MC) including the rostral and caudal forelimb areas. Injection of biotinylated dextran into the PERa densely labeled axon terminals in the superficial layers of the MC, where vigorous unit responses were evoked after PERa stimulation, indicated that the perirhinal-frontal projection preferentially activates the superficial layer neurons of the MC.

  9. Cascadia Subduction Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur D.; Petersen, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The geometry and recurrence times of large earthquakes associated with the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) were discussed and debated at a March 28-29, 2006 Pacific Northwest workshop for the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps. The CSZ is modeled from Cape Mendocino in California to Vancouver Island in British Columbia. We include the same geometry and weighting scheme as was used in the 2002 model (Frankel and others, 2002) based on thermal constraints (Fig. 1; Fluck and others, 1997 and a reexamination by Wang et al., 2003, Fig. 11, eastern edge of intermediate shading). This scheme includes four possibilities for the lower (eastern) limit of seismic rupture: the base of elastic zone (weight 0.1), the base of transition zone (weight 0.2), the midpoint of the transition zone (weight 0.2), and a model with a long north-south segment at 123.8? W in the southern and central portions of the CSZ, with a dogleg to the northwest in the northern portion of the zone (weight 0.5). The latter model was derived from the approximate average longitude of the contour of the 30 km depth of the CSZ as modeled by Fluck et al. (1997). A global study of the maximum depth of thrust earthquakes on subduction zones by Tichelaar and Ruff (1993) indicated maximum depths of about 40 km for most of the subduction zones studied, although the Mexican subduction zone had a maximum depth of about 25 km (R. LaForge, pers. comm., 2006). The recent inversion of GPS data by McCaffrey et al. (2007) shows a significant amount of coupling (a coupling factor of 0.2-0.3) as far east as 123.8? West in some portions of the CSZ. Both of these lines of evidence lend support to the model with a north-south segment at 123.8? W.

  10. Early postnatal migration and development of layer II pyramidal neurons in the rodent cingulate/retrosplenial cortex.

    PubMed

    Zgraggen, Eloisa; Boitard, Michael; Roman, Inge; Kanemitsu, Michiko; Potter, Gael; Salmon, Patrick; Vutskits, Laszlo; Dayer, Alexandre G; Kiss, Jozsef Z

    2012-01-01

    The cingulate and retrosplenial regions are major components of the dorsomedial (dm) limbic cortex and have been implicated in a range of cognitive functions such as emotion, attention, and spatial memory. While the structure and connectivity of these cortices are well characterized, little is known about their development. Notably, the timing and mode of migration that govern the appropriate positioning of late-born neurons remain unknown. Here, we analyzed migratory events during the early postnatal period from ventricular/subventricular zone (VZ/SVZ) to the cerebral cortex by transducing neuronal precursors in the VZ/SVZ of newborn rats/mice with Tomato/green fluorescent protein-encoding lentivectors. We have identified a pool of postmitotic pyramidal precursors in the dm part of the neonatal VZ/SVZ that migrate into the medial limbic cortex during the first postnatal week. Time-lapse imaging demonstrates that these cells migrate on radial glial fibers by locomotion and display morphological and behavioral changes as they travel through the white matter and enter into the cortical gray matter. In the granular retrosplenial cortex, these cells give rise to a Satb2+ pyramidal subtype and develop dendritic bundles in layer I. Our observations provide the first insight into the patterns and dynamics of cell migration into the medial limbic cortex.

  11. Dentin Caries Zones

    PubMed Central

    Pugach, M.K.; Strother, J.; Darling, C.L.; Fried, D.; Gansky, S.A.; Marshall, S.J.; Marshall, G.W.

    2009-01-01

    Caries Detector staining reveals 4 zones in dentin containing caries lesions, but characteristics of each zone are not well-defined. We therefore investigated the physical and microstructural properties of carious dentin in the 4 different zones to determine important differences revealed by Caries Detector staining. Six arrested dentin caries lesions and 2 normal controls were Caries-Detector-stained, each zone (pink, light pink, transparent, apparently normal) being analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging for microstructure, by AFM nano-indentation for mechanical properties, and by transverse digital microradiography (TMR) for mineral content. Microstructure changes, and nanomechanical properties and mineral content significantly decreased across zones. Hydrated elastic modulus and mineral content from normal dentin to pink Caries-Detector-stained dentin ranged from 19.5 [10.6-25.3] GPa to 1.6 [0.0-5.0] GPa and from 42.9 [39.8-44.6] vol% to 12.4 [9.1-14.2] vol%, respectively. Even the most demineralized pink zone contained considerable residual mineral. PMID:19131321

  12. Cholecystokinin from the entorhinal cortex enables neural plasticity in the auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Yu, Kai; Zhang, Zicong; Sun, Wenjian; Yang, Zhou; Feng, Jingyu; Chen, Xi; Liu, Chun-Hua; Wang, Haitao; Guo, Yi Ping; He, Jufang

    2014-03-01

    Patients with damage to the medial temporal lobe show deficits in forming new declarative memories but can still recall older memories, suggesting that the medial temporal lobe is necessary for encoding memories in the neocortex. Here, we found that cortical projection neurons in the perirhinal and entorhinal cortices were mostly immunopositive for cholecystokinin (CCK). Local infusion of CCK in the auditory cortex of anesthetized rats induced plastic changes that enabled cortical neurons to potentiate their responses or to start responding to an auditory stimulus that was paired with a tone that robustly triggered action potentials. CCK infusion also enabled auditory neurons to start responding to a light stimulus that was paired with a noise burst. In vivo intracellular recordings in the auditory cortex showed that synaptic strength was potentiated after two pairings of presynaptic and postsynaptic activity in the presence of CCK. Infusion of a CCKB antagonist in the auditory cortex prevented the formation of a visuo-auditory association in awake rats. Finally, activation of the entorhinal cortex potentiated neuronal responses in the auditory cortex, which was suppressed by infusion of a CCKB antagonist. Together, these findings suggest that the medial temporal lobe influences neocortical plasticity via CCK-positive cortical projection neurons in the entorhinal cortex.

  13. Rapid critical period induction by tonic inhibition in visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Youichi; Fagiolini, Michela; Obata, Kunihiko; Hensch, Takao K

    2003-07-30

    Mice lacking a synaptic isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) do not exhibit ocular dominance plasticity unless an appropriate level of GABAergic transmission is restored by direct infusion of benzodiazepines into the brain. To better understand how intracortical inhibition triggers experience-dependent changes, we dissected the precise timing requirement for GABA function in the monocular deprivation (MD) paradigm. Diazepam (DZ) or vehicle solution was infused daily before and/or during 4 d of MD in GAD65 knock-out mice. Extracellular single-unit recordings from the binocular zone of visual cortex were performed at the end of deprivation. We found that a minimum treatment of 2 d near the beginning of MD was sufficient to fully activate plasticity but did not need to overlap the deprivation per se. Extended delay after DZ infusion eventually led to loss of plasticity accompanied by improved intrinsic inhibitory circuit function. Two day DZ treatment just after eye opening similarly closed the critical period prematurely in wild-type mice. Raising wild-type mice in complete darkness from birth delayed the peak sensitivity to MD as in other mammals. Interestingly, 2 d DZ infusion in the dark also closed the critical period, whereas equally brief light exposure during dark-rearing had no such effect. Thus, enhanced tonic signaling through GABA(A) receptors rapidly creates a milieu for plasticity within neocortex capable of triggering a critical period for ocular dominance independent of visual experience itself.

  14. Modeling hyporheic zone processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Robert L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Rajaram, Harihar

    2003-01-01

    Stream biogeochemistry is influenced by the physical and chemical processes that occur in the surrounding watershed. These processes include the mass loading of solutes from terrestrial and atmospheric sources, the physical transport of solutes within the watershed, and the transformation of solutes due to biogeochemical reactions. Research over the last two decades has identified the hyporheic zone as an important part of the stream system in which these processes occur. The hyporheic zone may be loosely defined as the porous areas of the stream bed and stream bank in which stream water mixes with shallow groundwater. Exchange of water and solutes between the stream proper and the hyporheic zone has many biogeochemical implications, due to differences in the chemical composition of surface and groundwater. For example, surface waters are typically oxidized environments with relatively high dissolved oxygen concentrations. In contrast, reducing conditions are often present in groundwater systems leading to low dissolved oxygen concentrations. Further, microbial oxidation of organic materials in groundwater leads to supersaturated concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide relative to the atmosphere. Differences in surface and groundwater pH and temperature are also common. The hyporheic zone is therefore a mixing zone in which there are gradients in the concentrations of dissolved gasses, the concentrations of oxidized and reduced species, pH, and temperature. These gradients lead to biogeochemical reactions that ultimately affect stream water quality. Due to the complexity of these natural systems, modeling techniques are frequently employed to quantify process dynamics.

  15. Anterior Insular Cortex and Emotional Awareness

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaosi; Hof, Patrick R.; Friston, Karl J.; Fan, Jin

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the foundation for a role of the human anterior insular cortex (AIC) in emotional awareness, defined as the conscious experience of emotions. We first introduce the neuroanatomical features of AIC and existing findings on emotional awareness. Using empathy, the awareness and understanding of other people’s emotional states, as a test case, we then present evidence to demonstrate: 1) AIC and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) are commonly coactivated as revealed by a meta-analysis, 2) AIC is functionally dissociable from ACC, 3) AIC integrates stimulus-driven and top-down information, and 4) AIC is necessary for emotional awareness. We propose a model in which AIC serves two major functions: integrating bottom-up interoceptive signals with top-down predictions to generate a current awareness state and providing descending predictions to visceral systems that provide a point of reference for autonomic reflexes. We argue that AIC is critical and necessary for emotional awareness. PMID:23749500

  16. Monkey cortex through fMRI glasses.

    PubMed

    Vanduffel, Wim; Zhu, Qi; Orban, Guy A

    2014-08-06

    In 1998 several groups reported the feasibility of fMRI experiments in monkeys, with the goal to bridge the gap between invasive nonhuman primate studies and human functional imaging. These studies yielded critical insights in the neuronal underpinnings of the BOLD signal. Furthermore, the technology has been successful in guiding electrophysiological recordings and identifying focal perturbation targets. Finally, invaluable information was obtained concerning human brain evolution. We here provide a comprehensive overview of awake monkey fMRI studies mainly confined to the visual system. We review the latest insights about the topographic organization of monkey visual cortex and discuss the spatial relationships between retinotopy and category- and feature-selective clusters. We briefly discuss the functional layout of parietal and frontal cortex and continue with a summary of some fascinating functional and effective connectivity studies. Finally, we review recent comparative fMRI experiments and speculate about the future of nonhuman primate imaging.

  17. Barrel cortex and whisker-mediated behaviors.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Michael

    2007-08-01

    Neural networks of the rodent barrel cortex are particularly tractable for developing a quantitative understanding of response transformations in a cortical column. A column in barrel cortex consists of approximately 10 compartments. Two thalamic input pathways, a sensory lemniscal one and sensorimotor paralemniscal one, are transformed to approximately 7 population outputs, each with distinct spatiotemporal response characteristics. Granular and supragranular layers are sites of segregated processing in lemniscal and paralemniscal pathways, whereas infragranular layers are sites of intracolumnar, lemniscal/paralemniscal integration. Individual thalamocortical connections are relatively weak, and a considerable fraction of thalamocortical afferents contributes to each sensory response. Intracortically, relatively few but strong synaptic connections contribute to sensory responses, and responses are rapidly terminated by inhibition. Overall cortical population activity is very low. Whiskers mediate a wide range of behaviors and many natural tactile behaviors occur very rapidly. Vibrissal object recognition can be size invariant and motion invariant and is based on the tactile 'Gestaltwahrnehmung' of shape.

  18. Interareal synchronization in the visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Bressler, S L

    1996-04-01

    The primary visual cortex (V1) is part of a highly interconnected network of cortical areas, hierarchically organized but operating concurrently across hierarchical levels. The high degree of reciprocal interconnection among visual cortical areas provides a framework for their interaction during the performance of visual scene analysis. The functional interdependency of visual cortical areas which develops during scene analysis can be investigated by techniques which measure interareal correlated activity. Evidence from monkeys performing a visual pattern discrimination suggests that synchronization of aperiodic activity from neuronal ensembles in cortical areas at different hierarchical levels is a relevant aspect of visual function. The near-periodic nature of the synchronized response to moving light bars in earlier studies may have been a result of the type of stimulus used. Various models of visual cortex are discussed in which interareal synchronization plays a functional role.

  19. The role of prefrontal cortex in psychopathy

    PubMed Central

    Koenigs, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Psychopathy is a personality disorder characterized by remorseless and impulsive antisocial behavior. Given the significant societal costs of the recidivistic criminal activity associated with the disorder, there is a pressing need for more effective treatment strategies, and hence, a better understanding of the psychobiological mechanisms underlying the disorder. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is likely to play an important role in psychopathy. In particular, the ventromedial and anterior cingulate sectors of PFC are theorized to mediate a number of social and affective decision-making functions that appear to be disrupted in psychopathy. This article provides a critical summary of human neuroimaging data implicating prefrontal dysfunction in psychopathy. A growing body of evidence associates psychopathy with structural and functional abnormalities in ventromedial PFC and anterior cingulate cortex. Although this burgeoning field still faces a number of methodological challenges and outstanding questions that will need to be resolved by future studies, the research to date has established a link between psychopathy and PFC. PMID:22752782

  20. The role of the premotor cortex and the primary motor cortex in action verb comprehension: evidence from Granger causality analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Shu, Hua

    2012-08-01

    Although numerous studies find the premotor cortex and the primary motor cortex are involved in action language comprehension, so far the nature of these motor effects is still in controversy. Some researchers suggest that the motor effects reflect that the premotor cortex and the primary motor cortex make functional contributions to the semantic access of action verbs, while other authors argue that the motor effects are caused by comprehension. In the current study, we used Granger causality analysis to investigate the roles of the premotor cortex and the primary motor cortex in processing of manual-action verbs. Regions of interest were selected in the primary motor cortex (M1) and the premotor cortex based on a hand motion task, and in the left posterior middle temporal gyrus (lexical semantic area) based on the reading task effect. We found that (1) the left posterior middle temporal gyrus had a causal influence on the left M1; and (2) the left posterior middle temporal gyrus and the left premotor cortex had bidirectional causal relations. These results suggest that the premotor cortex and the primary motor cortex play different roles in manual verb comprehension. The premotor cortex may be involved in motor simulation that contributes to action language processing, while the primary motor cortex may be engaged in a processing stage influenced by the meaning access of manual-action verbs. Further investigation combining effective connectivity analysis and technique with high temporal resolution is necessary for better clarification of the roles of the premotor cortex and the primary motor cortex in action language comprehension.

  1. The auditory representation of speech sounds in human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Connie; Hamiton, Liberty S; Johnson, Keith; Chang, Edward F

    2016-03-04

    In humans, listening to speech evokes neural responses in the motor cortex. This has been controversially interpreted as evidence that speech sounds are processed as articulatory gestures. However, it is unclear what information is actually encoded by such neural activity. We used high-density direct human cortical recordings while participants spoke and listened to speech sounds. Motor cortex neural patterns during listening were substantially different than during articulation of the same sounds. During listening, we observed neural activity in the superior and inferior regions of ventral motor cortex. During speaking, responses were distributed throughout somatotopic representations of speech articulators in motor cortex. The structure of responses in motor cortex during listening was organized along acoustic features similar to auditory cortex, rather than along articulatory features as during speaking. Motor cortex does not contain articulatory representations of perceived actions in speech, but rather, represents auditory vocal information.

  2. Placental estrogen suppresses cyclin D1 expression in the nonhuman primate fetal adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Dumitrescu, Adina; Aberdeen, Graham W; Pepe, Gerald J; Albrecht, Eugene D

    2014-12-01

    We have previously shown that estrogen selectively suppresses growth of the fetal zone of the baboon fetal adrenal cortex, which produces the C19-steroid precursors, eg, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, which are aromatized to estrogen within the placenta. In the present study, we determined whether fetal adrenal expression of cell cycle regulators are altered by estrogen and thus provide a mechanism by which estrogen regulates fetal adrenocortical development. Cyclin D1 mRNA levels in the whole fetal adrenal were increased 50% (P < .05), and the number of cells in the fetal adrenal definitive zone expressing cyclin D1 protein was increased 2.5-fold (P < .05), whereas the total number of cells in the fetal zone and fetal serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were elevated 2-fold (P < .05) near term in baboons in which fetal serum estradiol levels were decreased by 95% (P < .05) after maternal administration of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and restored to normal by concomitant administration of letrozole plus estradiol throughout second half of gestation. However, fetal adrenocortical expression of cyclin D2, the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-2, Cdk4, and Cdk6, and Cdk regulatory proteins p27(Kip1) and p57(Kip2) were not changed by letrozole or letrozole plus estradiol administration. We suggest that estrogen controls the growth of the fetal zone of the fetal adrenal by down-regulating cyclin D1 expression and thus proliferation of progenitor cells within the definitive zone that migrate to the fetal zone. We propose that estrogen restrains growth and function of the fetal zone via cyclin D1 to maintain estrogen levels in a physiological range during primate pregnancy.

  3. Placental Estrogen Suppresses Cyclin D1 Expression in the Nonhuman Primate Fetal Adrenal Cortex*

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrescu, Adina; Aberdeen, Graham W.; Pepe, Gerald J.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that estrogen selectively suppresses growth of the fetal zone of the baboon fetal adrenal cortex, which produces the C19-steroid precursors, eg, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, which are aromatized to estrogen within the placenta. In the present study, we determined whether fetal adrenal expression of cell cycle regulators are altered by estrogen and thus provide a mechanism by which estrogen regulates fetal adrenocortical development. Cyclin D1 mRNA levels in the whole fetal adrenal were increased 50% (P < .05), and the number of cells in the fetal adrenal definitive zone expressing cyclin D1 protein was increased 2.5-fold (P < .05), whereas the total number of cells in the fetal zone and fetal serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were elevated 2-fold (P < .05) near term in baboons in which fetal serum estradiol levels were decreased by 95% (P < .05) after maternal administration of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and restored to normal by concomitant administration of letrozole plus estradiol throughout second half of gestation. However, fetal adrenocortical expression of cyclin D2, the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-2, Cdk4, and Cdk6, and Cdk regulatory proteins p27Kip1 and p57Kip2 were not changed by letrozole or letrozole plus estradiol administration. We suggest that estrogen controls the growth of the fetal zone of the fetal adrenal by down-regulating cyclin D1 expression and thus proliferation of progenitor cells within the definitive zone that migrate to the fetal zone. We propose that estrogen restrains growth and function of the fetal zone via cyclin D1 to maintain estrogen levels in a physiological range during primate pregnancy. PMID:25247468

  4. Human prefrontal cortex: evolution, development, and pathology.

    PubMed

    Teffer, Kate; Semendeferi, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex is critical to many cognitive abilities that are considered particularly human, and forms a large part of a neural system crucial for normal socio-emotional and executive functioning in humans and other primates. In this chapter, we survey the literature regarding prefrontal development and pathology in humans as well as comparative studies of the region in humans and closely related primate species. The prefrontal cortex matures later in development than more caudal regions, and some of its neuronal subpopulations exhibit more complex dendritic arborizations. Comparative work suggests that the human prefrontal cortex differs from that of closely related primate species less in relative size than it does in organization. Specific reorganizational events in neural circuitry may have taken place either as a consequence of adjusting to increases in size or as adaptive responses to specific selection pressures. Living in complex environments has been recognized as a considerable factor in the evolution of primate cognition. Normal frontal lobe development and function are also compromised in several neurological and psychiatric disorders. A phylogenetically recent reorganization of frontal cortical circuitry may have been critical to the emergence of human-specific executive and social-emotional functions, and developmental pathology in these same systems underlies many psychiatric and neurological disorders, including autism and schizophrenia.

  5. Rhythmic spontaneous activity in the piriform cortex.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Vives, Maria V; Descalzo, V F; Reig, R; Figueroa, N A; Compte, A; Gallego, R

    2008-05-01

    Slow spontaneous rhythmic activity is generated and propagates in neocortical slices when bathed in an artificial cerebrospinal fluid with ionic concentrations similar to the ones in vivo. This activity is extraordinarily similar to the activation of the cortex in physiological conditions (e.g., slow-wave sleep), thus representing a unique in vitro model to understand how cortical networks maintain and control ongoing activity. Here we have characterized the activity generated in the olfactory or piriform cortex and endopiriform nucleus (piriform network). Because these structures are prone to generate epileptic discharges, it seems critical to understand how they generate and regulate their physiological rhythmic activity. The piriform network gave rise to rhythmic spontaneous activity consisting of a succession of up and down states at an average frequency of 1.8 Hz, qualitatively similar to the corresponding neocortical activity. This activity originated in the deep layers of the piriform network, which displayed higher excitability and denser connectivity. A remarkable difference with neocortical activity was the speed of horizontal propagation (114 mm/s), one order of magnitude faster in the piriform network. Properties of the piriform cortex subserving fast horizontal propagation may underlie the higher vulnerability of this area to epileptic seizures.

  6. Does intrinsic motivation enhance motor cortex excitability?

    PubMed

    Radel, Rémi; Pjevac, Dusan; Davranche, Karen; d'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne; Colson, Serge S; Lapole, Thomas; Gruet, Mathieu

    2016-11-01

    Intrinsic motivation (IM) is often viewed as a spontaneous tendency for action. Recent behavioral and neuroimaging evidence indicate that IM, in comparison to extrinsic motivation (EM), solicits the motor system. Accordingly, we tested whether IM leads to greater excitability of the motor cortex than EM. To test this hypothesis, we used two different tasks to induce the motivational orientation using either words representing each motivational orientation or pictures previously linked to each motivational orientation through associative learning. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex was applied when viewing the stimuli. Electromyographic activity was recorded on the contracted first dorsal interosseous muscle. Two indexes of corticospinal excitability (the amplitude of motor-evoked potential and the length of cortical silent period) were obtained through unbiased automatic detection and analyzed using a mixed model that provided both statistical power and a high level of control over all important individual, task, and stimuli characteristics. Across the two tasks and the two indices of corticospinal excitability, the exposure to IM-related stimuli did not lead to a greater corticospinal excitability than EM-related stimuli or than stimuli with no motivational valence (ps > .20). While these results tend to dismiss the advantage of IM at activating the motor cortex, we suggest alternative hypotheses to explain this lack of effect, which deserves further research.

  7. The human cerebral cortex flattens during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Janssen, Joost; Schnack, Hugo; Balaban, Evan; Pina-Camacho, Laura; Alfaro-Almagro, Fidel; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Otero, Soraya; Baeza, Immaculada; Moreno, Dolores; Bargalló, Nuria; Parellada, Mara; Arango, Celso; Desco, Manuel

    2013-09-18

    The human cerebral cortex appears to shrink during adolescence. To delineate the dynamic morphological changes involved in this process, 52 healthy male and female adolescents (11-17 years old) were neuroimaged twice using magnetic resonance imaging, approximately 2 years apart. Using a novel morphometric analysis procedure combining the FreeSurfer and BrainVisa image software suites, we quantified global and lobar change in cortical thickness, outer surface area, the gyrification index, the average Euclidean distance between opposing sides of the white matter surface (gyral white matter thickness), the convex ("exposed") part of the outer cortical surface (hull surface area), sulcal length, depth, and width. We found that the cortical surface flattens during adolescence. Flattening was strongest in the frontal and occipital cortices, in which significant sulcal widening and decreased sulcal depth co-occurred. Globally, sulcal widening was associated with cortical thinning and, for the frontal cortex, with loss of surface area. For the other cortical lobes, thinning was related to gyral white matter expansion. The overall flattening of the macrostructural three-dimensional architecture of the human cortex during adolescence thus involves changes in gray matter and effects of the maturation of white matter.

  8. Salient sounds activate human visual cortex automatically

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, John J.; Störmer, Viola S.; Martinez, Antigona; Feng, Wenfeng; Hillyard, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Sudden changes in the acoustic environment enhance perceptual processing of subsequent visual stimuli that appear in close spatial proximity. Little is known, however, about the neural mechanisms by which salient sounds affect visual processing. In particular, it is unclear whether such sounds automatically activate visual cortex. To shed light on this issue, the present study examined event-related brain potentials (ERPs) that were triggered either by peripheral sounds that preceded task-relevant visual targets (Experiment 1) or were presented during purely auditory tasks (Experiments 2, 3, and 4). In all experiments the sounds elicited a contralateral ERP over the occipital scalp that was localized to neural generators in extrastriate visual cortex of the ventral occipital lobe. The amplitude of this cross-modal ERP was predictive of perceptual judgments about the contrast of co-localized visual targets. These findings demonstrate that sudden, intrusive sounds reflexively activate human visual cortex in a spatially specific manner, even during purely auditory tasks when the sounds are not relevant to the ongoing task. PMID:23699530

  9. Hierarchical Bayesian inference in the visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tai Sing; Mumford, David

    2003-07-01

    Traditional views of visual processing suggest that early visual neurons in areas V1 and V2 are static spatiotemporal filters that extract local features from a visual scene. The extracted information is then channeled through a feedforward chain of modules in successively higher visual areas for further analysis. Recent electrophysiological recordings from early visual neurons in awake behaving monkeys reveal that there are many levels of complexity in the information processing of the early visual cortex, as seen in the long-latency responses of its neurons. These new findings suggest that activity in the early visual cortex is tightly coupled and highly interactive with the rest of the visual system. They lead us to propose a new theoretical setting based on the mathematical framework of hierarchical Bayesian inference for reasoning about the visual system. In this framework, the recurrent feedforward/feedback loops in the cortex serve to integrate top-down contextual priors and bottom-up observations so as to implement concurrent probabilistic inference along the visual hierarchy. We suggest that the algorithms of particle filtering and Bayesian-belief propagation might model these interactive cortical computations. We review some recent neurophysiological evidences that support the plausibility of these ideas. 2003 Optical Society of America

  10. Hemispherical map for the human brain cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosun, Duygu; Prince, Jerry L.

    2001-07-01

    Understanding the function of the human brain cortex is a primary goal in human brain mapping. Methods to unfold and flatten the cortical surface for visualization and measurement have been described in previous literature; but comparison across multiple subjects is still difficult because of the lack of a standard mapping technique. We describe a new approach that maps each hemisphere of the cortex to a portion of a sphere in a standard way, making comparison of anatomy and function across different subjects possible. Starting with a three-dimensional magnetic resonance image of the brain, the cortex is segmented and represented as a triangle mesh. Defining a cut around the corpus collosum identifies the left and right hemispheres. Together, the two hemispheres are mapped to the complex plane using a conformal mapping technique. A Mobius transformation, which is conformal, is used to transform the points on the complex plane so that a projective transformation maps each brain hemisphere onto a spherical segment comprising a sphere with a cap removed. We determined the best size of the spherical cap by minimizing the relative area distortion between hemispherical maps and original cortical surfaces. The relative area distortion between the hemispherical maps and the original cortical surfaces for fifteen human brains is analyzed.

  11. Functional subregions of the human entorhinal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Maass, Anne; Berron, David; Libby, Laura A; Ranganath, Charan; Düzel, Emrah

    2015-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex (EC) is the primary site of interactions between the neocortex and hippocampus. Studies in rodents and nonhuman primates suggest that EC can be divided into subregions that connect differentially with perirhinal cortex (PRC) vs parahippocampal cortex (PHC) and with hippocampal subfields along the proximo-distal axis. Here, we used high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla to identify functional subdivisions of the human EC. In two independent datasets, PRC showed preferential intrinsic functional connectivity with anterior-lateral EC and PHC with posterior-medial EC. These EC subregions, in turn, exhibited differential connectivity with proximal and distal subiculum. In contrast, connectivity of PRC and PHC with subiculum followed not only a proximal-distal but also an anterior-posterior gradient. Our data provide the first evidence that the human EC can be divided into functional subdivisions whose functional connectivity closely parallels the known anatomical connectivity patterns of the rodent and nonhuman primate EC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06426.001 PMID:26052749

  12. Linear summation of cat motor cortex outputs.

    PubMed

    Ethier, Christian; Brizzi, Laurent; Darling, Warren G; Capaday, Charles

    2006-05-17

    Recruitment of movement-related muscle synergies involves the functional linking of motor cortical points. We asked how the outputs of two simultaneously stimulated motor cortical points would interact. To this end, experiments were done in ketamine-anesthetized cats. When prolonged (e.g., 500 ms) trains of intracortical microstimulation were applied in the primary motor cortex, stimulus currents as low as 10-20 microA evoked coordinated movements of the contralateral forelimb. Paw kinematics in three dimensions and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of eight muscles were simultaneously recorded. We show that the EMG outputs of two cortical points simultaneously stimulated are additive. The movements were represented as displacement vectors pointing from initial to final paw position. The displacement vectors resulting from simultaneous stimulation of two cortical points pointed in nearly the same direction as the algebraic resultant vector. Linear summation of outputs was also found when inhibition at one of the cortical points was reduced by GABAA receptor antagonists. A simple principle emerges from these results. Notwithstanding the underlying complex neuronal circuitry, motor cortex outputs combine nearly linearly in terms of movement direction and muscle activation patterns. Importantly, simultaneous activation does not change the nature of the output at each point. An additional implication is that not all possible movements need be explicitly represented in the motor cortex; a large number of different movements may be synthesized from a smaller repertoire.

  13. Occipital cortex of blind individuals is functionally coupled with executive control areas of frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Deen, Ben; Saxe, Rebecca; Bedny, Marina

    2015-08-01

    In congenital blindness, the occipital cortex responds to a range of nonvisual inputs, including tactile, auditory, and linguistic stimuli. Are these changes in functional responses to stimuli accompanied by altered interactions with nonvisual functional networks? To answer this question, we introduce a data-driven method that searches across cortex for functional connectivity differences across groups. Replicating prior work, we find increased fronto-occipital functional connectivity in congenitally blind relative to blindfolded sighted participants. We demonstrate that this heightened connectivity extends over most of occipital cortex but is specific to a subset of regions in the inferior, dorsal, and medial frontal lobe. To assess the functional profile of these frontal areas, we used an n-back working memory task and a sentence comprehension task. We find that, among prefrontal areas with overconnectivity to occipital cortex, one left inferior frontal region responds to language over music. By contrast, the majority of these regions responded to working memory load but not language. These results suggest that in blindness occipital cortex interacts more with working memory systems and raise new questions about the function and mechanism of occipital plasticity.

  14. The Functional Organization and Cortical Connections of Motor Cortex in Squirrels

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Dylan F.; Padberg, Jeffrey; Zahner, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Despite extraordinary diversity in the rodent order, studies of motor cortex have been limited to only 2 species, rats and mice. Here, we examine the topographic organization of motor cortex in the Eastern gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) and cortical connections of motor cortex in the California ground squirrel (Spermophilus beecheyi). We distinguish a primary motor area, M1, based on intracortical microstimulation (ICMS), myeloarchitecture, and patterns of connectivity. A sensorimotor area between M1 and the primary somatosensory area, S1, was also distinguished based on connections, functional organization, and myeloarchitecture. We term this field 3a based on similarities with area 3a in nonrodent mammals. Movements are evoked with ICMS in both M1 and 3a in a roughly somatotopic pattern. Connections of 3a and M1 are distinct and suggest the presence of a third far rostral field, termed “F,” possibly involved in motor processing based on its connections. We hypothesize that 3a is homologous to the dysgranular zone (DZ) in S1 of rats and mice. Our results demonstrate that squirrels have both similar and unique features of M1 organization compared with those described in rats and mice, and that changes in 3a/DZ borders appear to have occurred in both lineages. PMID:22021916

  15. Dynamic expression of calretinin in embryonic and early fetal human cortex

    PubMed Central

    González-Gómez, Miriam; Meyer, Gundela

    2014-01-01

    Calretinin (CR) is one of the earliest neurochemical markers in human corticogenesis. In embryos from Carnegie stages (CS) 17 to 23, calbindin (CB) and CR stain opposite poles of the incipient cortex suggesting early regionalization: CB marks the neuroepithelium of the medial boundary of the cortex with the choroid plexus (cortical hem). By contrast, CR is confined to the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral and caudal ganglionic eminences at the pallial-subpallial boundary (PSB, or antihem), from where CR+/Tbr1- neurons migrate toward piriform cortex and amygdala as a component of the lateral cortical stream. At CS 19, columns of CR+ cells arise in the rostral cortex, and contribute at CS 20 to the “monolayer” of horizontal Tbr1+/CR+ and GAD+ cells in the preplate. At CS 21, the “pioneer cortical plate” appears as a radial aggregation of CR+/Tbr1+ neurons, which cover the entire future neocortex and extend the first corticofugal axons. CR expression in early human corticogenesis is thus not restricted to interneurons, but is also present in the first excitatory projection neurons of the cortex. At CS 21/22, the cortical plate is established following a lateral to medial gradient, when Tbr1+/CR- neurons settle within the pioneer cortical plate, and thus separate superficial and deep pioneer neurons. CR+ pioneer neurons disappear shortly after the formation of the cortical plate. Reelin+ Cajal-Retzius cells begin to express CR around CS21 (7/8 PCW). At CS 21–23, the CR+ SVZ at the PSB is the source of CR+ interneurons migrating into the cortical SVZ. In turn, CB+ interneurons migrate from the subpallium into the intermediate zone following the fibers of the internal capsule. Early CR+ and CB+ interneurons thus have different origins and migratory routes. CR+ cell populations in the embryonic telencephalon take part in a complex sequence of events not analyzed so far in other mammalian species, which may represent a distinctive trait of the initial

  16. Distribution patterns of estrogen receptor alpha and beta in the human cortex and hippocampus during development and adulthood.

    PubMed

    González, Miriam; Cabrera-Socorro, Alfredo; Pérez-García, Carlos G; Fraser, James D; López, Francisco J; Alonso, Rafael; Meyer, Gundela

    2007-08-20

    The expression of estrogen receptors (ERs) in the developing and adult human brain has not been clearly established, although estrogens are crucial for neuronal differentiation, synapse formation, and cognitive functions. By using immunohistochemistry, we have studied the distribution of ER alpha and ER beta in human cerebral cortex and hippocampus from early prenatal stages to adult life. ER alpha was detected in the cortex at 9 gestational weeks (GW), with a high expression in proliferating zones and the cortical plate. The staining intensity decreased gradually during prenatal development but increased again from birth to adulthood. In contrast, ER beta was first detected at 15 GW in proliferating zones, and at 16/17 GW, numerous ER beta immunopositive cells were also observed in the cortical plate. ER beta expression persisted in the adult cortex, being widely distributed throughout cortical layers II-VI. In addition, from around 15 GW to adulthood, ER alpha and ER beta were expressed in human hippocampus mainly in pyramidal cells of Ammon's horn and in the dentate gyrus. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry in the adult cerebral cortex and hippocampus revealed lower protein expression of ER alpha compared with ER beta. Double immunostaining showed that during fetal life both ERs are expressed in neurons as well as in radial glia, although only ER alpha is expressed in the Cajal-Retzius neurons of the marginal zone. These observations demonstrate that the expression of ER alpha and ER beta displays different spatial-temporal patterns during human cortical and hippocampal development and suggest that both ERs may play distinct roles in several processes related to prenatal brain development.

  17. Eye-hand coordination during reaching. I. Anatomical relationships between parietal and frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Marconi, B; Genovesio, A; Battaglia-Mayer, A; Ferraina, S; Squatrito, S; Molinari, M; Lacquaniti, F; Caminiti, R

    2001-06-01

    The anatomical and physiological substrata of eye-hand coordination during reaching were studied through combined anatomical and physiological techniques. The association connections of parietal areas V6A and PEc, and those of dorso-rostral (F7) and dorso-caudal (F2) premotor cortex were studied in monkeys, after physiological characterization of the parietal regions where retrograde tracers were injected. The results show that parieto-occipital area V6A is reciprocally connected with F7, and receives a smaller projection from F2. Local parietal projections to V6A arise from areas MIP and, to a lesser extent, 7m, PEa and PEC: On the contrary, parietal area PEc is strongly and reciprocally connected with the part of F2 located close to the pre-central dimple (pre-CD). Local parietal projections to PEc come from a distributed network, including PEa, MIP, PEci and, to a lesser extent, 7m, V6A, 7a and MST. Premotor area F7 receives parietal projections mainly from 7m and V6A, and local frontal projections mainly from F2. On the contrary, premotor area F2 in the pre-CD zone receives parietal inputs from PEc and, to a lesser extent, PEci, while in the peri-arcuate zone F2 receives parietal projections from PEa and MIP. Local frontal projections to F2 pre-CD mostly stem from F4, and, to a lesser extent, from F7 and F3, and CMAd; those addressed to peri-arcuate zone of F2 arise mainly from F5 and, to a lesser extent, from F7, F4, dorsal (CMAd) and ventral (CMAv) cingulate motor areas, pre-supplementary (F6) and supplementary (F3) motor areas. The distribution of association cells in both frontal and parietal cortex was characterized through a spectral analysis that revealed an arrangement of these cells in the form of bands, composed of cell clusters, or 'columns'. The reciprocal connections linking parietal and frontal cortex might explain the presence of visually related and eye-position signals in premotor cortex, as well as the influence of information about arm

  18. Fast aurora zone analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booker, Mattie

    1992-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) of the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD), of the Goddard Space Flight Center provides acquisition data to tracking stations and orbit and attitude services to scientists and mission support personnel. The following paper explains how a method was determined that found spacecraft entry and exit times of the aurora zone.

  19. Splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Piris, Miguel A; Onaindía, Arantza; Mollejo, Manuela

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) is an indolent small B-cell lymphoma involving the spleen and bone marrow characterized by a micronodular tumoral infiltration that replaces the preexisting lymphoid follicles and shows marginal zone differentiation as a distinctive finding. SMZL cases are characterized by prominent splenomegaly and bone marrow and peripheral blood infiltration. Cells in peripheral blood show a villous cytology. Bone marrow and peripheral blood characteristic features usually allow a diagnosis of SMZL to be performed. Mutational spectrum of SMZL identifies specific findings, such as 7q loss and NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations, both genes related with marginal zone differentiation. There is a striking clinical variability in SMZL cases, dependent of the tumoral load and performance status. Specific molecular markers such as 7q loss, p53 loss/mutation, NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations have been found to be associated with the clinical variability. Distinction from Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis with marginal zone phenotype is still an open issue that requires identification of precise and specific thresholds with clinical meaning.

  20. Dilution Zone Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Studies to characterize dilution zone mixing; experiments on the effects of free-stream turbulence on a jet in crossflow; and the development of an interactive computer code for the analysis of the mixing of jets with a confined crossflow are reviewed.

  1. Microgravity Silicon Zoning Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.

    1985-01-01

    This research program is directed toward the understanding of the float zone crystal growth process, the melt interactions which lead to crystal inhomogeneities, and the influence of microgravity on reducing these inhomogeneities. Silicon was selected as the model crystal because its inhomogeneities lead to known variations in device performance, and because the mechanisms involved in its growth are understood better than for other high temperature crystals. The objective of the program is to understand the growth mechanisms in float zone growth and thereby determine the feasibility and advantages of float zone growth of silicon under microgravity conditions. This will be done by characterizing the growth at g = 1, projecting the changes in melt flows due to microgravity, observing these in space growth and determining the effects on defective inhomogeneities. A Thin Rod Zoner was constructed as a laboratory prototype for flight growth of 5 mm diameter silicon crystals, which can be done within the power and cooling capabilities of shuttle flights. A new method of zoning silicon, using resistance heating, has resulted in melting 5 mm diameter ingots.

  2. Flexible 'zoning' aids adaptability.

    PubMed

    Corben, Simon

    2013-09-01

    Simon Corben, business development director at Capita Symonds' Health team, examines how 'clever use of zoning' when planning new healthcare facilities could improve hospital design, increase inherent flexibility, and reduce lifetime costs, and argues that a 'loose-fit, non-bespoke approach' to space planning will lead to 'more flexible buildings that are suitable for conversion to alternative uses'.

  3. Quantitative analysis of somatosensory cortex development in eutherians, with a comparison with metatherians and monotremes.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S

    2015-01-01

    Extant eutherians exhibit a wide range of adult brain sizes and degree of cortical gyrification. Quantitative analysis of parietal isocortical sections held in museum collections was used to compare the pace of somatosensory cortex development relative to body size and pallial thickness among diverse eutherian embryos, foetuses, and neonates. Analysis indicated that, for most eutherians, cortical plate aggregation begins at about 6-18 mm greatest length or about 120-320 µm pallial thickness. Expansion of the proliferative compartment occurs at a similar pace in most eutherians, but exceptionally rapidly in hominoids. Involution of the pallial proliferative zones occurs over a wide range of body sizes (42 mm to over 500 mm greatest length) or when the cerebral cortex reaches a thickness of 1.2-9.8 mm depending on the eutherian group. Many of these values overlap with those for metatherians. The findings suggest that there is less evolutionary flexibility in the timing of cortical plate aggregation than in the rate of expansion of the pallial proliferative compartment and the duration of proliferative zone activity.

  4. Multipolar migration: the third mode of radial neuronal migration in the developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Hidenori; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2003-11-05

    Two distinct modes of radial neuronal migration, locomotion and somal translocation, have been reported in the developing cerebral cortex. Although these two modes of migration have been well documented, the cortical intermediate zone contains abundant multipolar cells, and they do not resemble the cells migrating by locomotion or somal translocation. Here, we report that these multipolar cells express neuronal markers and extend multiple thin processes in various directions independently of the radial glial fibers. Time-lapse analysis of living slices revealed that the multipolar cells do not have any fixed cell polarity, and that they very dynamically extend and retract multiple processes as their cell bodies slowly move. They do not usually move straight toward the pial surface during their radial migration, but instead frequently change migration direction and rate; sometimes they even remain in almost the same position, especially when they are in the subventricular zone. Occasionally, the multipolar cells jump tangentially during their radial migration. Because the migration modality of these cells clearly differs from locomotion or somal translocation, we refer to their novel type of migration as "multipolar migration." In view of the high proportion of cells exhibiting multipolar migration, this third mode of radial migration must be an important type of migration in the developing cortex.

  5. Differential distribution of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in developing human cortex.

    PubMed

    Boer, Karin; Encha-Razavi, Ferechte; Sinico, Martine; Aronica, Eleonora

    2010-04-09

    Neuronal and glial cells in human cerebral cortex are enriched in group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Developmental regulation of mGluRs has been shown in rodent brain and recent studies suggest an involvement of mGluR-mediated glutamate signaling in the proliferation and survival of neural progenitor cells. In the present study, we have investigated the expression and cell-specific distribution of group I mGluRs (mGluR1alpha and mGluR5) during prenatal human cortical development. mGluR5 was expressed in developing human cortex from the earliest stages tested (9 gestational weeks, GW), with strong expression in the ventricular/subventricular zones. mGluR1alpha immunoreactivity (IR) was observed in the cortical plate at 13GW and persisted throughout the prenatal development. Both receptors were expressed in pyramidal neurons in the first postnatal year. Group I mGluRs were also expressed by reelin-positive Cajal-Retzius cells present in the marginal zone/layer I of the developing cortex. mGluR5 IR in these cells was observed in the earliest developmental stages and persisted during the early postnatal period. In contrast, mGluR1alpha IR was detected in Cajal-Retzius cells during the late phase of prenatal development. These findings show a differential expression pattern of group I mGluR subtypes, suggesting a role for both receptors in the early stages of corticogenesis with, however, a different contribution to human cortical developmental events.

  6. Rat whisker motor cortex is subdivided into sensory-input and motor-output areas

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jared B.; Alloway, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Rodent whisking is an exploratory behavior that can be modified by sensory feedback. Consistent with this, many whisker-sensitive cortical regions project to agranular motor [motor cortex (MI)] cortex, but the relative topography of these afferent projections has not been established. Intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) evokes whisker movements that are used to map the functional organization of MI, but no study has compared the whisker-related inputs to MI with the ICMS sites that evoke whisker movements. To elucidate this relationship, anterograde tracers were placed in posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and in the primary somatosensory (SI) and secondary somatosensory (SII) cortical areas so that their labeled projections to MI could be analyzed with respect to ICMS sites that evoke whisker movements. Projections from SI and SII terminate in a narrow zone that marks the transition between the medial agranular (AGm) and lateral agranular (AGl) cortical areas, but PPC projects more medially and terminates in AGm proper. Paired recordings of MI neurons indicate that the region between AGm and AGl is highly responsive to whisker deflections, but neurons in AGm display negligible responses to whisker stimulation. By contrast, AGm microstimulation is more effective in evoking whisker movements than microstimulation of the transitional region between AGm and AGl. The AGm region was also found to contain a larger concentration of corticotectal neurons, which could convey whisker-related information to the facial nucleus. These results indicate that rat whisker MI is comprised of at least two functionally distinct subregions: a sensory processing zone in the transitional region between AGm and AGl, and a motor-output region located more medially in AGm proper. PMID:23372545

  7. Local homogeneity of cell cycle length in developing mouse cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, L.; Hayes, N. L.; Nowakowski, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    proliferating cells in the ventricular zone during early development of the cerebral cortex.

  8. Cortical Interneurons Require Jnk1 to Enter and Navigate the Developing Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Abigail K.; Meechan, Daniel W.; Adney, Danielle R.

    2014-01-01

    Proper assembly of cortical circuitry relies on the correct migration of cortical interneurons from their place of birth in the ganglionic eminences to their place of terminal differentiation in the cerebral cortex. Although molecular mechanisms mediating cortical interneuron migration have been well studied, intracellular signals directing their migration are largely unknown. Here we illustrate a novel and essential role for c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling in guiding the pioneering population of cortical interneurons into the mouse cerebral cortex. Migrating cortical interneurons express Jnk proteins at the entrance to the cortical rudiment and have enriched expression of Jnk1 relative to noninterneuronal cortical cells. Pharmacological blockade of JNK signaling in ex vivo slice cultures resulted in dose-dependent and highly specific disruption of interneuron migration into the nascent cortex. Time-lapse imaging revealed that JNK-inhibited cortical interneurons advanced slowly and assumed aberrant migratory trajectories while traversing the cortical entry zone. In vivo analyses of JNK-deficient embryos supported our ex vivo pharmacological data. Deficits in interneuron migration were observed in Jnk1 but not Jnk2 single nulls, and those migratory deficits were further exacerbated when homozygous loss of Jnk1 was combined with heterozygous reduction of Jnk2. Finally, genetic ablation of Jnk1 and Jnk2 from cortical interneurons significantly perturbed migration in vivo, but not in vitro, suggesting JNK activity functions to direct their guidance rather than enhance their motility. These data suggest JNK signaling, predominantly mediated by interneuron expressed Jnk1, is required for guiding migration of cortical interneurons into and within the developing cerebral cortex. PMID:24899703

  9. The time course of disinhibition of visual cortex neurons and sensitivity to cross-shaped figures.

    PubMed

    Shevelev, I A; Lazareva, N A; Saltykov, K A; Novikova, R V; Tikhomirov, A S; Sharaev, G A; Tsutskiridze, D Yu

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between the responses of 74 neurons in field 17 of the cat cortex to presentation of cross-shaped figures flashing in their receptive fields and the asynchronicity with which the lines of the figures were presented were investigated. The cross sensitivity of neurons was studied with simultaneous, leading, and delayed activation of the disinhibitory zone of the receptive field in relation to the time at which its major excitatory and end-stopping inhibitory zones were stimulated. Two types of temporal interaction were identified between the receptive field zones determining cross sensitivity. In cells of the first type (14 of 23 cells), the response was maximal in conditions of simultaneous stimulation of the major and disinhibitory zones of the receptive field; neurons of the second type (nine of 23 cells) showed the opposite temporal relationship. Digital simulation showed that cross sensitivity in neurons of the first type was supported by disinhibition of end-stopping inhibition, while in neurons of the second type it depended on a combination of disinhibitory and convergence mechanisms.

  10. The basic nonuniformity of the cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Collins, Christine E.; Wong, Peiyan; Kaas, Jon H.; Lent, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Evolutionary changes in the size of the cerebral cortex, a columnar structure, often occur through the addition or subtraction of columnar modules with the same number of neurons underneath a unit area of cortical surface. This view is based on the work of Rockel et al. [Rockel AJ, Hiorns RW, Powell TP (1980) The basic uniformity in structure of the neocortex. Brain 103:221–244], who found a steady number of approximately 110 neurons underneath a surface area of 750 μm2 (147,000 underneath 1 mm2) of the cerebral cortex of five species from different mammalian orders. These results have since been either corroborated or disputed by different groups. Here, we show that the number of neurons underneath 1 mm2 of the cerebral cortical surface of nine primate species and the closely related Tupaia sp. is not constant and varies by three times across species. We found that cortical thickness is not inversely proportional to neuronal density across species and that total cortical surface area increases more slowly than, rather than linearly with, the number of neurons underneath it. The number of neurons beneath a unit area of cortical surface varies linearly with neuronal density, a parameter that is neither related to cortical size nor total number of neurons. Our finding of a variable number of neurons underneath a unit area of the cerebral cortex across primate species indicates that models of cortical organization cannot assume that cortical columns in different primates consist of invariant numbers of neurons. PMID:18689685

  11. Retinotopic Organization of Human Ventral Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Arcaro, Michael J.; McMains, Stephanie A.; Singer, Benjamin D.; Kastner, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that human ventral visual cortex anterior to area hV4 contains two visual field maps, VO-1 and VO-2, that together form the VO-cluster (Brewer et al., 2005). This cluster is characterized by common functional response properties and responds preferentially to color and object stimuli. Here, we confirm the topographic and functional characteristics of the VO-cluster and describe two new visual field maps that are located anterior to VO-2 extending across the collateral sulcus into the posterior parahippocampal cortex (PHC). We refer to these visual field maps as parahippocampal areas PHC-1 and PHC-2. Each PHC map contains a topographic representation of contralateral visual space. The polar angle representation in PHC-1 extends from regions near the lower vertical meridian (that is the shared border with VO-2) to those close to the upper vertical meridian (that is the shared border with PHC-2). The polar angle representation in PHC-2 is a mirror-reversal of the PHC-1 representation. PHC-1 and PHC-2 share a foveal representation and show a strong bias towards representations of peripheral eccentricities. Both the foveal and peripheral representations of PHC-1 and PHC-2 respond more strongly to scenes than to objects or faces, with greater scene preference in PHC-2 than PHC-1. Importantly, both areas heavily overlap with the functionally defined parahippocampal place area (PPA). Our results suggest that ventral visual cortex can be subdivided on the basis of topographic criteria into a greater number of discrete maps than previously thought. PMID:19710316

  12. Inhibition by Somatostatin Interneurons in Olfactory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Large, Adam M.; Kunz, Nicholas A.; Mielo, Samantha L.; Oswald, Anne-Marie M.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory circuitry plays an integral role in cortical network activity. The development of transgenic mouse lines targeting unique interneuron classes has significantly advanced our understanding of the functional roles of specific inhibitory circuits in neocortical sensory processing. In contrast, considerably less is known about the circuitry and function of interneuron classes in piriform cortex, a paleocortex responsible for olfactory processing. In this study, we sought to utilize transgenic technology to investigate inhibition mediated by somatostatin (SST) interneurons onto pyramidal cells (PCs), parvalbumin (PV) interneurons, and other interneuron classes. As a first step, we characterized the anatomical distributions and intrinsic properties of SST and PV interneurons in four transgenic lines (SST-cre, GIN, PV-cre, and G42) that are commonly interbred to investigate inhibitory connectivity. Surprisingly, the distributions SST and PV cell subtypes targeted in the GIN and G42 lines were sparse in piriform cortex compared to neocortex. Moreover, two-thirds of interneurons recorded in the SST-cre line had electrophysiological properties similar to fast spiking (FS) interneurons rather than regular (RS) or low threshold spiking (LTS) phenotypes. Nonetheless, like neocortex, we find that SST-cells broadly inhibit a number of unidentified interneuron classes including putatively identified PV cells and surprisingly, other SST cells. We also confirm that SST-cells inhibit pyramidal cell dendrites and thus, influence dendritic integration of afferent and recurrent inputs to the piriform cortex. Altogether, our findings suggest that SST interneurons play an important role in regulating both excitation and the global inhibitory network during olfactory processing. PMID:27582691

  13. Apraxia, pantomime and the parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Niessen, E; Fink, G R; Weiss, P H

    2014-01-01

    Apraxia, a disorder of higher motor cognition, is a frequent and outcome-relevant sequel of left hemispheric stroke. Deficient pantomiming of object use constitutes a key symptom of apraxia and is assessed when testing for apraxia. To date the neural basis of pantomime remains controversial. We here review the literature and perform a meta-analysis of the relevant structural and functional imaging (fMRI/PET) studies. Based on a systematic literature search, 10 structural and 12 functional imaging studies were selected. Structural lesion studies associated pantomiming deficits with left frontal, parietal and temporal lesions. In contrast, functional imaging studies associate pantomimes with left parietal activations, with or without concurrent frontal or temporal activations. Functional imaging studies that selectively activated parietal cortex adopted the most stringent controls. In contrast to previous suggestions, current analyses show that both lesion and functional studies support the notion of a left-hemispheric fronto-(temporal)-parietal network underlying pantomiming object use. Furthermore, our review demonstrates that the left parietal cortex plays a key role in pantomime-related processes. More specifically, stringently controlled fMRI-studies suggest that in addition to storing motor schemas, left parietal cortex is also involved in activating these motor schemas in the context of pantomiming object use. In addition to inherent differences between structural and functional imaging studies and consistent with the dedifferentiation hypothesis, the age difference between young healthy subjects (typically included in functional imaging studies) and elderly neurological patients (typically included in structural lesion studies) may well contribute to the finding of a more distributed representation of pantomiming within the motor-dominant left hemisphere in the elderly.

  14. Identification of cortex in magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanMeter, John W.; Sandon, Peter A.

    1992-06-01

    The overall goal of the work described here is to make available to the neurosurgeon in the operating room an on-line, three-dimensional, anatomically labeled model of the patient brain, based on pre-operative magnetic resonance (MR) images. A stereotactic operating microscope is currently in experimental use, which allows structures that have been manually identified in MR images to be made available on-line. We have been working to enhance this system by combining image processing techniques applied to the MR data with an anatomically labeled 3-D brain model developed from the Talairach and Tournoux atlas. Here we describe the process of identifying cerebral cortex in the patient MR images. MR images of brain tissue are reasonably well described by material mixture models, which identify each pixel as corresponding to one of a small number of materials, or as being a composite of two materials. Our classification algorithm consists of three steps. First, we apply hierarchical, adaptive grayscale adjustments to correct for nonlinearities in the MR sensor. The goal of this preprocessing step, based on the material mixture model, is to make the grayscale distribution of each tissue type constant across the entire image. Next, we perform an initial classification of all tissue types according to gray level. We have used a sum of Gaussian's approximation of the histogram to perform this classification. Finally, we identify pixels corresponding to cortex, by taking into account the spatial patterns characteristic of this tissue. For this purpose, we use a set of matched filters to identify image locations having the appropriate configuration of gray matter (cortex), cerebrospinal fluid and white matter, as determined by the previous classification step.

  15. An integrator circuit in cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Maex, Reinoud; Steuber, Volker

    2013-09-01

    The brain builds dynamic models of the body and the outside world to predict the consequences of actions and stimuli. A well-known example is the oculomotor integrator, which anticipates the position-dependent elasticity forces acting on the eye ball by mathematically integrating over time oculomotor velocity commands. Many models of neural integration have been proposed, based on feedback excitation, lateral inhibition or intrinsic neuronal nonlinearities. We report here that a computational model of the cerebellar cortex, a structure thought to implement dynamic models, reveals a hitherto unrecognized integrator circuit. In this model, comprising Purkinje cells, molecular layer interneurons and parallel fibres, Purkinje cells were able to generate responses lasting more than 10 s, to which both neuronal and network mechanisms contributed. Activation of the somatic fast sodium current by subthreshold voltage fluctuations was able to maintain pulse-evoked graded persistent activity, whereas lateral inhibition among Purkinje cells via recurrent axon collaterals further prolonged the responses to step and sine wave stimulation. The responses of Purkinje cells decayed with a time-constant whose value depended on their baseline spike rate, with integration vanishing at low (< 1 per s) and high rates (> 30 per s). The model predicts that the apparently fast circuit of the cerebellar cortex may control the timing of slow processes without having to rely on sensory feedback. Thus, the cerebellar cortex may contain an adaptive temporal integrator, with the sensitivity of integration to the baseline spike rate offering a potential mechanism of plasticity of the response time-constant.

  16. Connectivity Changes Underlying Neurofeedback Training of Visual Cortex Activity

    PubMed Central

    Scharnowski, Frank; Rosa, Maria Joao; Golestani, Narly; Hutton, Chloe; Josephs, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Neurofeedback based on real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a new approach that allows training of voluntary control over regionally specific brain activity. However, the neural basis of successful neurofeedback learning remains poorly understood. Here, we assessed changes in effective brain connectivity associated with neurofeedback training of visual cortex activity. Using dynamic causal modeling (DCM), we found that training participants to increase visual cortex activity was associated with increased effective connectivity between the visual cortex and the superior parietal lobe. Specifically, participants who learned to control activity in their visual cortex showed increased top-down control of the superior parietal lobe over the visual cortex, and at the same time reduced bottom-up processing. These results are consistent with efficient employment of top-down visual attention and imagery, which were the cognitive strategies used by participants to increase their visual cortex activity. PMID:24609065

  17. Twin Convergence Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's QuikSCAT satellite has confirmed a 30-year old largely unproven theory that there are two areas near the equator where the winds converge year after year and drive ocean circulation south of the equator. By analyzing winds, QuikSCAT has found a year-round southern and northern Intertropical Convergence Zone. This find is important to climate modelers and weather forecasters because it provides more detail on how the oceans and atmosphere interact near the equator. The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is the region that circles the Earth near the equator, where the trade winds of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres come together. North of the equator, strong sun and warm water of the equator heats the air in the ITCZ, drawing air in from north and south and causing the air to rise. As the air rises it cools, releasing the accumulated moisture in an almost perpetual series of thunderstorms. Satellite data, however, has confirmed that there is an ITCZ north of the equator and a parallel ITCZ south of the equator. Variation in the location of the ITCZ is important to people around the world because it affects the north-south atmospheric circulation, which redistributes energy. It drastically affects rainfall in many equatorial nations, resulting in the wet and dry seasons of the tropics rather than the cold and warm seasons of higher latitudes. Longer term changes in the ITCZ can result in severe droughts or flooding in nearby areas. 'The double ITCZ is usually only identified in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans on a limited and seasonal basis,' said Timothy Liu, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif., and lead researcher on the project. In the eastern Pacific Ocean, the southern ITCZ is usually seen springtime. In the western Atlantic Ocean, the southern ITCZ was recently clearly identified only in the summertime. However, QuikSCAT's wind data has seen the southern ITCZ in all seasons across the

  18. Neural development of the neuregulin receptor ErbB4 in the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus: preferential expression by interneurons tangentially migrating from the ganglionic eminences.

    PubMed

    Yau, Hau-Jie; Wang, Hsiao-Fang; Lai, Cary; Liu, Fu-Chin

    2003-03-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinases represent an important class of signal transduction molecules that have been shown to play critical roles in neural development. We report in the present study that the neuregulin receptor ErbB4 is preferentially expressed by interneurons that are migrating tangentially from the ventral to the dorsal rat telencephalon. ErbB4 immunoreactivity was detected in the medial ganglionic eminence as early as embryonic day (E) 13 at the inception of tangential migration. Prominent ErbB4-positive migratory streams consisting of cells double-labeled with ErbB4 and Dlx, a marker of tangentially migrating cells, were found to advance along the lower intermediate zone and the marginal zone from the ventrolateral to the dorsomedial cortex at E16-E18. After E20, the ErbB4-positive stream in the lower intermediate zone shifted towards the germinal zone and further extended via the cortex into the hippocampal primordium. ErbB4 was not expressed by Tbr1-positive glutamatergic projection neurons during development. ErbB4 was preferentially expressed by the majority of parvalbumin-positive interneurons and subsets of other GABAergic interneurons in the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus in adulthood. The early onset and preferential expression of ErbB4 in tangentially migrating interneurons suggests that neuregulin/ErbB4 signaling may regulate the development and function of telencephalic interneurons.

  19. [Effect of a simple morphine system injection in some aminoacids in the anterior cingulate cortex during acute pain].

    PubMed

    Silva, Elizabeth; Quiñones, Belkis; Páez, Ximena; Hernández, Luis

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this research was to find out the effects of ip morphine pretreatment in the extracellular content of the arginine, glutamate, aspartate and GABA levels in the anterior cingulate cortex in rats, during the formalin test (phase I). A combination of micro dialysis and Capillary Electrophoresis Zone and laser-induced fluorescence detection (CZE-LIFD) technique was used to measure the extracellular levels of amino acids in microdialized zones. The microdialysis probes were unilaterally implanted in the left anterior cingulate cortex of freely moving rats. The samples were collected every 30 seconds and derivatized with fluorescein isothiocianate. The arginine, glutamate, aspartate and GABA levels were measured in the CZE-LIFD device. Arginine (p<0.001) and glutamate levels (p<0.012) were significantly increased in the first few minutes following the formalin test (phase 1). Pretreatment with morphine suppressed the glutamate increase. A transient GABA level increase (p<0.001) was also detected. These experiments suggest that rapid changes in neurotransmitters levels were detected in the first few minutes of acute pain as revealed by the glutamate and arginine level increases in the anterior cingulate cortex. These changes could be related to the emotion of pain processing (fear and aversion). Morphine pretreatment produced an increase in GABA levels and a decrease in glutamate levels in the first few minutes. These findings may be related to euphoria and/or analgesia.

  20. Epidural motor cortex stimulation suppresses somatosensory evoked potentials in the primary somatosensory cortex of the rat.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Ruei-Jen; Lee, Hsiao-Yun; Chang, Chen-Wei; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Kuo, Chung-Chih

    2012-06-29

    Motor cortex stimulation (MCS) is a promising clinical procedure to help alleviate chronic pain. Animal models demonstrated that MCS is effective in lessening nocifensive behaviors. The present study explored the effects of MCS on cortical somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) recorded at the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) of the rat. SEPs were evoked by electrical stimulation applied to the contralateral forepaws. Effects of different intensities, frequencies, and durations of MCS were tested. MCS at ≥2V suppressed SEPs of the ipsilateral SI. Suppression lasted 120 min at an intensity of 5 V. The optimal frequency was 50 Hz, and the duration was 30s. In contrast, MCS did not affect SEPs recorded on the contralateral SI. Cortical stimulation out of the motor cortex did not induce a decrease in the ipsilateral SEPs. We also investigated involvement of the endogenous opioid system in this inhibition of SEPs induced by MCS. The opioid antagonist, naloxone (0.5 mg/kg), was administered 30 min before MCS. Application of naloxone completely prevented the inhibitory effect of MCS on ipsilateral SEPs. These results demonstrate that MCS blocked the transmission of somatosensory information to the primary somatosensory cortex, and this interference was mediated by the endogenous opioid system. This inhibitory effect on sensory transmission induced by MCS may reflect its antinociceptive effect.

  1. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOEpatents

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  2. Subpallial origin of part of the calbindin-positive neurons of the claustral complex and piriform cortex.

    PubMed

    Legaz, Isabel; García-López, Margarita; Medina, Loreta

    2005-09-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether part of the calbindin-positive neurons of the claustral complex and piriform cortex originate in the subpallium. To that end, we prepared organotypic cultures of embryonic telencephalic slices, and applied the cell tracker CMTMR to the ventricular/subventricular zone of the lateral or medial ganglionic eminence. Following 48 h of incubation, we observed a number of CMTMR-labeled cells (showing red fluorescence) of subpallial origin in the claustral complex and piriform cortex. To know whether some of these cells of subpallial origin were calbindin-positive, we performed immunofluorescence for calbindin using an Alexa 488-conjugated secondary antiserum (green fluorescence). Our results showed that some of the CMTMR-labeled cells of subpallial origin in the claustral complex and piriform cortex are calbindin-positive (and possibly GABAergic). The subpallial origin of part of these cells was confirmed by observation of double labeled neurons in the claustral complex that expressed both Lhx6 mRNA (a marker of cells derived from the medial ganglionic eminence) and calbindin. Future studies will be required to analyze the existence of a subpopulation of non-GABAergic calbindin cells in the claustral complex and piriform cortex, and to know their origin.

  3. Overlapping and nonoverlapping cortical projections to cortex of the superior temporal sulcus in the rhesus monkey: double anterograde tracer studies.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, B; Cola, M G; Gutierrez, C; Massee, M; Weldon, C; Cusick, C G

    1996-06-24

    To examine how fibers from functionally distinct cortical zones interrelate within their target areas of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) in the rhesus monkey, separate anterograde tracers were injected in two different regions of the same hemisphere known to project to the STS. Paired injections were placed in dorsal prearcuate cortex and the caudal inferior parietal lobule (IPL), interconnected regions that are part of a hypothesized distributed network concerned with visuospatial analysis or directed attention; in a presumed auditory region of the superior temporal gyrus (STG) and in extrastriate visual cortex, the caudal IPL and lower rim of the intraparietal sulcus; and in dorsal prearcuate cortex and the STG. Overlapping and nonoverlapping projections were then examined in STS visual and polysensory areas. Prefrontal and parietal fibers directly overlapped extensively in area MST and all subdivisions of presumed polysensory cortex (areas TPOc, TPOi, and TPOr), although nonoverlapping connections were also found. Although STG and IPL fibers targeted all TPO subdivisions, connections were to nonoverlapping, but often adjacent, columns. Paired prefrontal and STG injections revealed largely nonoverlapping vertical columns of connections but substantial overlap within layers VI and I or areas TPOc and TPOi. The findings suggest that area TPO contains differently connected modules that may maintain at least initial segregation of visual versus auditory inputs. Other modules within area TPO receive directly converging input from the posterior parietal and the prefrontal cortices and may participate in a distributed cortical network concerned with visuospatial functions.

  4. Gateways of ventral and dorsal streams in mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Quanxin; Gao, Enquan; Burkhalter, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    It is widely held that the spatial processing functions underlying rodent navigation are similar to those encoding human episodic memory (Doeller et al, 2010). Spatial and nonspatial information are provided by all senses including vision. It has been suggested that visual inputs are fed to the navigational network in cortex and hippocampus through dorsal and ventral intracortical streams (Whitlock et al, 2008), but this has not been shown directly in rodents. We have used cyto- and chemoarchitectonic markers, topographic mapping of receptive fields and pathway tracing to determine in mouse visual cortex whether the lateromedial (LM) and the anterolateral fields (AL), which are the principal targets of primary visual cortex (V1) (Wang and Burkhalter, 2007) specialized for processing nonspatial and spatial visual information (Gao et al, 2006), are distinct areas with diverse connections. We have found that the LM/AL border coincides with a change in type 2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m2AChR) expression in layer 4 and with the representation of the lower visual field periphery. Our quantitative analyses further show that LM strongly projects to temporal cortex as well as the lateral entorhinal cortex, which has weak spatial selectivity (Hargreaves et al, 2005). In contrast, AL has stronger connections with posterior parietal cortex, motor cortex and the spatially selective medial entorhinal cortex (Haftig et al, 2005). These results support the notion that LM and AL are architecturally, topographically and connectionally distinct areas of extrastriate visual cortex and that they are gateways for ventral and dorsal streams. PMID:21289200

  5. Neurons and circuits for odor processing in the piriform cortex.

    PubMed

    Bekkers, John M; Suzuki, Norimitsu

    2013-07-01

    Increased understanding of the early stages of olfaction has lead to a renewed interest in the higher brain regions responsible for forming unified 'odor images' from the chemical components detected by the nose. The piriform cortex, which is one of the first cortical destinations of olfactory information in mammals, is a primitive paleocortex that is critical for the synthetic perception of odors. Here we review recent work that examines the cellular neurophysiology of the piriform cortex. Exciting new findings have revealed how the neurons and circuits of the piriform cortex process odor information, demonstrating that, despite its superficial simplicity, the piriform cortex is a remarkably subtle and intricate neural circuit.

  6. Anterior insular cortex is necessary for empathetic pain perception

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaosi; Gao, Zhixian; Wang, Xingchao; Liu, Xun; Knight, Robert T.; Hof, Patrick R.

    2012-01-01

    Empathy refers to the ability to perceive and share another person’s affective state. Much neuroimaging evidence suggests that observing others’ suffering and pain elicits activations of the anterior insular and the anterior cingulate cortices associated with subjective empathetic responses in the observer. However, these observations do not provide causal evidence for the respective roles of anterior insular and anterior cingulate cortices in empathetic pain. Therefore, whether these regions are ‘necessary’ for empathetic pain remains unknown. Herein, we examined the perception of others’ pain in patients with anterior insular cortex or anterior cingulate cortex lesions whose locations matched with the anterior insular cortex or anterior cingulate cortex clusters identified by a meta-analysis on neuroimaging studies of empathetic pain perception. Patients with focal anterior insular cortex lesions displayed decreased discrimination accuracy and prolonged reaction time when processing others’ pain explicitly and lacked a typical interference effect of empathetic pain on the performance of a pain-irrelevant task. In contrast, these deficits were not observed in patients with anterior cingulate cortex lesions. These findings reveal that only discrete anterior insular cortex lesions, but not anterior cingulate cortex lesions, result in deficits in explicit and implicit pain perception, supporting a critical role of anterior insular cortex in empathetic pain processing. Our findings have implications for a wide range of neuropsychiatric illnesses characterized by prominent deficits in higher-level social functioning. PMID:22961548

  7. Radiant zone heated particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-12-27

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

  8. Renewable liquid reflecting zone plate

    DOEpatents

    Toor, Arthur; Ryutov, Dmitri D.

    2003-12-09

    A renewable liquid reflecting zone plate. Electrodes are operatively connected to a dielectric liquid in a circular or other arrangement to produce a reflecting zone plate. A system for renewing the liquid uses a penetrable substrate.

  9. Trojans in habitable zones.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Richard; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Dvorak, Rudolf; Erdi, Balint; Sándor, Zsolt

    2005-10-01

    With the aid of numerical experiments we examined the dynamical stability of fictitious terrestrial planets in 1:1 mean motion resonance with Jovian-like planets of extrasolar planetary systems. In our stability study of the so-called "Trojan" planets in the habitable zone, we used the restricted three-body problem with different mass ratios of the primary bodies. The application of the three-body problem showed that even massive Trojan planets can be stable in the 1:1 mean motion resonance. From the 117 extrasolar planetary systems only 11 systems were found with one giant planet in the habitable zone. Out of this sample set we chose four planetary systems--HD17051, HD27442, HD28185, and HD108874--for further investigation. To study the orbital behavior of the stable zone in the different systems, we used direct numerical computations (Lie Integration Method) that allowed us to determine the escape times and the maximum eccentricity of the fictitious "Trojan planets."

  10. Motor cortex stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    De Rose, Marisa; Guzzi, Giusy; Bosco, Domenico; Romano, Mary; Lavano, Serena Marianna; Plastino, Massimiliano; Volpentesta, Giorgio; Marotta, Rosa; Lavano, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Motor Cortex Stimulation (MCS) is less efficacious than Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease. However, it might be proposed to patients excluded from DBS or unresponsive to DBS. Ten patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral MCS contralaterally to the worst clinical side. A plate electrode was positioned over the motor cortex in the epidural space through single burr hole after identification of the area with neuronavigation and neurophysiological tests. Clinical assessment was performed by total UPDRS, UPDRS III total, UPDRS III-items 27-31, UPDRS IV, and UPDRS II before implantation in off-medication and on-medication states and after surgery at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months in on-medication/on-stimulation and off-medication/on-stimulation states. We assessed changes of quality of life, throughout the Parkinson's disease quality of life scale (PDQoL-39), and the dose of anti-Parkinson's disease medications, throughout the Ldopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD). During off-medication state, we observed moderate and transitory reduction of total UPDRS and UPDRS total scores and significant and long-lasting improvement in UPDRS III items 27-31 score for axial symptoms. There was marked reduction of UPDRS IV score and LEDD. PDQL-39 improvement was also significant. No important complications and adverse events occurred.

  11. Representation of numerosity in posterior parietal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Roitman, Jamie D.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.; Platt, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Humans and animals appear to share a similar representation of number as an analog magnitude on an internal, subjective scale. Neurological and neurophysiological data suggest that posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is a critical component of the circuits that form the basis of numerical abilities in humans. Patients with parietal lesions are impaired in their ability to access the deep meaning of numbers. Acalculiac patients with inferior parietal damage often have difficulty performing arithmetic (2 + 4?) or number bisection (what is between 3 and 5?) tasks, but are able to recite multiplication tables and read or write numerals. Functional imaging studies of neurologically intact humans performing subtraction, number comparison, and non-verbal magnitude comparison tasks show activity in areas within the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). Taken together, clinical cases and imaging studies support a critical role for parietal cortex in the mental manipulation of numerical quantities. Further, responses of single PPC neurons in non-human primates are sensitive to the numerosity of visual stimuli independent of low-level stimulus qualities. When monkeys are trained to make explicit judgments about the numerical value of such stimuli, PPC neurons encode their cardinal numerical value; without such training PPC neurons appear to encode numerical magnitude in an analog fashion. Here we suggest that the spatial and integrative properties of PPC neurons contribute to their critical role in numerical cognition. PMID:22666194

  12. Divergent Plasticity of Prefrontal Cortex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Bita; Homayoun, Houman

    2010-01-01

    The ‘executive’ regions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) such as the dorsolateral PFC (dlPFC) and its rodent equivalent medial PFC (mPFC) are thought to respond in concert with the ‘limbic’ regions of the PFC such as the orbitofrontal (OFC) cortex to orchestrate behavior that is consistent with context and expected outcome. Both groups of regions have been implicated in behavioral abnormalities associated with addiction and psychiatric disorders, in particular, schizophrenia and mood disorders. Theories about the pathophysiology of these disorders, however, incorporate abnormalities in discrete PFC regions independently of each other or assume they are one and the same and, thus, bunch them under umbrella of ‘PFC dysfunction.’ Emerging data from animal studies suggest that mPFC and OFC neurons display opposing patterns of plasticity during associative learning and in response to repeated exposure to psychostimulants. These data corroborate clinical studies reporting different patterns of activation in OFC versus dlPFC in individuals with schizophrenia or addictive disorders. These suggest that concomitant but divergent engagement of discrete PFC regions is critical for learning stimulus-outcome associations, and the execution of goal-directed behavior that is based on these associations. An atypical interplay between these regions may lead to abnormally high or low salience assigned to stimuli, resulting in symptoms that are fundamental to many psychiatric and addictive disorders, including attentional deficits, improper affective response to stimuli, and inflexible or impulsive behavior. PMID:17912252

  13. Faces and objects in macaque cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Doris Y; Freiwald, Winrich A; Knutsen, Tamara A; Mandeville, Joseph B; Tootell, Roger B H

    2003-09-01

    How are different object categories organized by the visual system? Current evidence indicates that monkeys and humans process object categories in fundamentally different ways. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies suggest that humans have a ventral temporal face area, but such evidence is lacking in macaques. Instead, face-responsive neurons in macaques seem to be scattered throughout temporal cortex, with some relative concentration in the superior temporal sulcus (STS). Here, using fMRI in alert fixating macaque monkeys and humans, we found that macaques do have discrete face-selective patches, similar in relative size and number to face patches in humans. The face patches were embedded within a large swath of object-selective cortex extending from V4 to rostral TE. This large region responded better to pictures of intact objects compared to scrambled objects, with different object categories eliciting different patterns of activity, as in the human. Overall, our results suggest that humans and macaques share a similar brain architecture for visual object processing.

  14. [Risk taking and the insular cortex].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Hironori; Tsutsui, Ken-Ichiro; Iijima, Toshio

    2013-08-01

    Risk taking can lead to ruin, but sometimes, it can also provide great success. How does our brain make a decision on whether to take a risk or to play it safe? Recent studies have revealed the neural basis of risky decision making. In this review, we focus on the role of the anterior insular cortex (AIC) in risky decision making. Although human imaging studies have shown activations of the AIC in various gambling tasks, the causal involvement of the AIC in risky decision making was still unclear. Recently, we demonstrated a causality of the AIC in risky decision making by using a pharmacological approach in behaving rats-temporary inactivation of the AIC decreased the risk preference in gambling tasks, whereas temporary inactivation of the adjacent orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) increased the risk preference. The latter finding is consistent with a previous finding that patients with damage to the OFC take abnormally risky decisions in the Iowa gambling task. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesize that the intact AIC promotes risk-seeking behavior, and that the AIC and OFC are crucial for balancing the opposing motives of whether to take a risk or avoid it. However, the functional relationship between the AIC and OFC remains unclear. Future combinations of inactivation and electrophysiological studies may promote further understanding of risky decision making.

  15. Frequency Specific Modulation of Human Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Feurra, Matteo; Paulus, Walter; Walsh, Vincent; Kanai, Ryota

    2011-01-01

    Oscillatory neuronal activities are commonly observed in response to sensory stimulation. However, their functional roles are still the subject of debate. One-way to probe the roles of oscillatory neural activities is to deliver alternating current to the cortex at biologically relevant frequencies and examine whether such stimulation influences perception and cognition. In this study, we tested whether transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) over the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) could elicit tactile sensations in humans in a frequency-dependent manner. We tested the effectiveness of tACS over SI at frequency bands ranging from 2 to 70 Hz. Our results show that stimulation in alpha (10–14 Hz) and high gamma (52–70 Hz) frequency range produces a tactile sensation in the contralateral hand. A weaker effect was also observed for beta (16–20 Hz) stimulation. These findings highlight the frequency dependency of effective tACS over SI with the effective frequencies corresponding to those observed in previous electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography studies of tactile perception. Our present study suggests that tACS could be used as a powerful online stimulation technique to reveal the causal roles of oscillatory brain activities. PMID:21713181

  16. Ocular integration in the human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jonathan C

    2006-10-01

    Human striate cortex contains an orderly map of the contralateral visual field, which is distorted to make a disproportionate amount of tissue available for the representation of the macula. Engrafted on the retinotopic map is a system of alternating inputs known as ocular dominance columns. These columns consist of interleaved bands of geniculocortical afferents in layer 4C serving either the right eye or the left eye. They can be revealed in humans with a history of prior visual loss in one eye by processing striate cortex for cytochrome oxidase at autopsy. Because their geniculate input is segregated, cells within ocular dominance columns in layer 4C respond to stimulation of one eye only. These monocular cells converge onto binocular cells in other layers, integrating signals from the two eyes. The columns in humans appear similar to those found in many primate species, including the macaque. In the squirrel monkey, however, the occurrence of ocular dominance columns is highly variable. Some squirrel monkeys lack columns, yet they seem to have no impairment of visual function. In animals with weakly expressed columns, one can detect a cortical pattern of metabolic activity corresponding to retinal blood vessels. It appears because visual deprivation from shadows cast by blood vessels induces remodeling of geniculocortical afferents, in a manner akin to the shrinkage of ocular dominance columns from congenital cataract. Although the function of ocular dominance columns is unknown, their metabolism is altered in strabismus, suggesting a role in visual suppression.

  17. Dynamic cortex stripping for vertebra evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieger, James; Burns, Joseph E.; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-03-01

    Vertebral cortex removal through cancellous bone reconstruction (CBR) algorithms on CT has been shown to enhance the detection rate of bone metastases by radiologists and reduce average reading time per case. Removal of the cortical bone provides an unobstructed view of the inside of vertebrae without any anomalous distractions. However, these algorithms rely on the assumption that the cortical bone of vertebrae can be removed without the identification of the endosteal cortical margin. We present a method for the identification of the endosteal cortical margin based on vertebral models and CT intensity information. First, triangular mesh models are created using the marching cubes algorithm. A search region is established along the normal of the surface and the image gradient is calculated at every point along the search region. The location with the greatest image gradient is selected as the corresponding point on the endosteal cortical margin. In order to analyze the strength of this method, ground truth and control models were also created. Our method was shown to have a significantly reduce the average error from 0.80 mm +/- 0.14 mm to 0.65 mm +/- 0.17 mm (p <0.0001) when compared to erosion. This method can potentially improve CBR algorithms, which improve visualization of cancellous bone lesions such as metastases, by more accurately identifying the inner wall of the vertebral cortex.

  18. Motor Cortex Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    De Rose, Marisa; Guzzi, Giusy; Bosco, Domenico; Romano, Mary; Lavano, Serena Marianna; Plastino, Massimiliano; Volpentesta, Giorgio; Marotta, Rosa; Lavano, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Motor Cortex Stimulation (MCS) is less efficacious than Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease. However, it might be proposed to patients excluded from DBS or unresponsive to DBS. Ten patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral MCS contralaterally to the worst clinical side. A plate electrode was positioned over the motor cortex in the epidural space through single burr hole after identification of the area with neuronavigation and neurophysiological tests. Clinical assessment was performed by total UPDRS, UPDRS III total, UPDRS III-items 27–31, UPDRS IV, and UPDRS II before implantation in off-medication and on-medication states and after surgery at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months in on-medication/on-stimulation and off-medication/on-stimulation states. We assessed changes of quality of life, throughout the Parkinson's disease quality of life scale (PDQoL-39), and the dose of anti-Parkinson's disease medications, throughout the Ldopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD). During off-medication state, we observed moderate and transitory reduction of total UPDRS and UPDRS total scores and significant and long-lasting improvement in UPDRS III items 27–31 score for axial symptoms. There was marked reduction of UPDRS IV score and LEDD. PDQL-39 improvement was also significant. No important complications and adverse events occurred. PMID:23213520

  19. The retrosplenial cortex and object recency memory in the rat.

    PubMed

    Powell, Anna L; Vann, Seralynne D; Olarte-Sánchez, Cristian M; Kinnavane, Lisa; Davies, Moira; Amin, Eman; Aggleton, John P; Nelson, Andrew J D

    2017-04-10

    It has been proposed that the retrosplenial cortex forms part of a "where/when" information network. The present study focussed on the related issue of whether retrosplenial cortex also contributes to "what/when" information, by examining object recency memory. In Experiment 1, rats with retrosplenial lesions were found to be impaired at distinguishing the temporal order of objects presented in a continuous series ('Within-Block' condition). The same lesioned rats could, however, distinguish between objects that had been previously presented in one of two discrete blocks ('Between-Block' condition). Experiment 2 used intact rats to map the expression of the immediate-early gene c-fos in retrosplenial cortex following performance of a between-block, recency discrimination. Recency performance correlated positively with levels of c-fos expression in both granular and dysgranular retrosplenial cortex (areas 29 and 30). Expression of c-fos in the granular retrosplenial cortex also correlated with prelimbic cortex and ventral subiculum c-fos activity, the latter also correlating with recency memory performance. The combined findings from both experiments reveal an involvement of the retrosplenial cortex in temporal order memory, which includes both between-block and within-block problems. The current findings also suggest that the rat retrosplenial cortex comprises one of a group of closely interlinked regions that enable recency memory, including the hippocampal formation, medial diencephalon, and medial frontal cortex. In view of the well-established importance of the retrosplenial cortex for spatial learning, the findings support the notion that, with its frontal and hippocampal connections, retrosplenial cortex has a key role for both what/when and where/when information. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. ILAE focal cortical dysplasia type IIIc in the ictal onset zone in epileptic patients with solitary meningioangiomatosis.

    PubMed

    Mukae, Nobutaka; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Morioka, Takato; Murakami, Nobuya; Hashiguchi, Kimiaki; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Sakata, Ayumi; Iihara, Koji

    2014-12-01

    "Solitary" meningioangiomatosis (MA) is a rare, benign, hamartomatous lesion of the cerebral cortex and frequently leads to epilepsy. However, the source of the epileptogenicity in meningioangiomatosis remains controversial. We report two surgically-treated meningioangiomatosis cases with medically intractable epilepsy. In both cases, chronic subdural electrocorticogram (ECoG) recordings identified the ictal onset zone on apparently normal cortex, adjacent to and/or above the meningioangiomatosis lesion, not on the meningioangiomatosis lesion itself. The ictal onset zone was resected, along with the MA lesion, and good seizure outcome was achieved. Histological examination of the ictal onset zone revealed the presence of ILAE focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) type IIIc. Our case studies suggest that in the surgical management of epilepsy with meningioangiomatosis, it is important to identify undetected, but epileptogenic, ILAE FCD Type IIIc, using preoperative multimodal examinations, including chronic ECoG recordings.

  1. Floristic zones and aeroallergen diversity.

    PubMed

    Weber, Richard W

    2003-08-01

    The interplay of geographic, geochemical, and meteorologic factors combines to define distinct floristic zones in North America. Latitude, elevation, Pacific or Atlantic Ocean influence, continental air mass influence, mountains, and hills are contributory geographic factors. Hardiness zones are defined by the nadir of temperature, which strongly affects the survival of individual plant species. There are 12 hardiness zones from the northernmost tundra to the tropics of Mexico. Although it is useful to consider the 10 major floristic zones, the hardiness zones cut across these zones and characterize subregions. A multiplicity of local terrain effects, such as soil porosity and acidity, and sun exposure also impact on plant growth. The ability of plant species, whether woody shrubs and trees, or herbaceous weeds and grasses, to adapt to conditions within the floristic zones determines their range. This article identifies the major aeroallergenic species and the regions in which they are most prevalent.

  2. Cdk5 is required for multipolar-to-bipolar transition during radial neuronal migration and proper dendrite development of pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Toshio; Hirasawa, Motoyuki; Tabata, Hidenori; Mutoh, Tetsuji; Adachi, Tomoko; Suzuki, Hiromi; Saruta, Keiko; Iwasato, Takuji; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Hashimoto, Mistuhiro; Nakajima, Kazunori; Ogawa, Masaharu; Kulkarni, Ashok B; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2007-06-01

    The mammalian cerebral cortex consists of six layers that are generated via coordinated neuronal migration during the embryonic period. Recent studies identified specific phases of radial migration of cortical neurons. After the final division, neurons transform from a multipolar to a bipolar shape within the subventricular zone-intermediate zone (SVZ-IZ) and then migrate along radial glial fibres. Mice lacking Cdk5 exhibit abnormal corticogenesis owing to neuronal migration defects. When we introduced GFP into migrating neurons at E14.5 by in utero electroporation, we observed migrating neurons in wild-type but not in Cdk5(-/-) embryos after 3-4 days. Introduction of the dominant-negative form of Cdk5 into the wild-type migrating neurons confirmed specific impairment of the multipolar-to-bipolar transition within the SVZ-IZ in a cell-autonomous manner. Cortex-specific Cdk5 conditional knockout mice showed inverted layering of the cerebral cortex and the layer V and callosal neurons, but not layer VI neurons, had severely impaired dendritic morphology. The amount of the dendritic protein Map2 was decreased in the cerebral cortex of Cdk5-deficient mice, and the axonal trajectory of cortical neurons within the cortex was also abnormal. These results indicate that Cdk5 is required for proper multipolar-to-bipolar transition, and a deficiency of Cdk5 results in abnormal morphology of pyramidal neurons. In addition, proper radial neuronal migration generates an inside-out pattern of cerebral cortex formation and normal axonal trajectories of cortical pyramidal neurons.

  3. Smartphones and Time Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, William; Secrest, Jeffery; Padgett, Clifford; Johnson, Wayne; Hagrelius, Claire

    2016-09-01

    Using the Sun to tell time is an ancient idea, but we can take advantage of modern technology to bring it into the 21st century for students in astronomy, physics, or physical science classes. We have employed smartphones, Google Earth, and 3D printing to find the moment of local noon at two widely separated locations. By reviewing GPS time-stamped photos from each place, we are able to illustrate that local noon is longitude-dependent and therefore explain the need for time zones.

  4. Liquid zone seal

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2001-01-01

    A seal assembly that provides a means for establishing multiple pressure zones within a system. The seal assembly combines a plate extending from the inner wall of a housing or inner enclosure that intersects with and is immersed in the fluid contained in a well formed in a tray contained within the enclosure. The fluid is a low vapor pressure oil, chemically inert and oxidation resistant. The use of a fluid as the sealing component provides a seal that is self-healing and mechanically robust not subject to normal mechanical wear, breakage, and formation of cracks or pinholes and decouples external mechanical vibrations from internal structural members.

  5. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation

  6. Reduced Anterior Cingulate Cortex Glutamatergic Concentrations in Childhood Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirza, Yousha; Tang, Jennifer; Russell, Aileen; Banerjee, S. Preeya; Bhandari, Rashmi; Ivey, Jennifer; Rose, Michelle; Moore, Gregory J.; Rosenberg, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine in vivo glutamatergic neurochemical alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex of children with major depressive disorder (MDD). Method: Single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic ([.sup.1]H-MRS) examinations of the anterior cingulate cortex were conducted in 13 psychotropic-naive children and adolescents with MDD…

  7. Metaphorically Feeling: Comprehending Textural Metaphors Activates Somatosensory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacey, Simon; Stilla, Randall; Sathian, K.

    2012-01-01

    Conceptual metaphor theory suggests that knowledge is structured around metaphorical mappings derived from physical experience. Segregated processing of object properties in sensory cortex allows testing of the hypothesis that metaphor processing recruits activity in domain-specific sensory cortex. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging…

  8. Olfactocentric Paralimbic Cortex Morphology in Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Fei; Kalmar, Jessica H.; Womer, Fay Y.; Edmiston, Erin E.; Chepenik, Lara G.; Chen, Rachel; Spencer, Linda; Blumberg, Hilary P.

    2011-01-01

    The olfactocentric paralimbic cortex plays a critical role in the regulation of emotional and neurovegetative functions that are disrupted in core features of bipolar disorder. Adolescence is thought to be a critical period in both the maturation of the olfactocentric paralimbic cortex and in the emergence of bipolar disorder pathology. Together,…

  9. Insular Cortex Is Involved in Consolidation of Object Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bermudez-Rattoni, Federico; Okuda, Shoki; Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the insular cortex (IC), also termed gustatory cortex, is critically involved in conditioned taste aversion and taste recognition memory. Although most studies of the involvement of the IC in memory have investigated taste, there is some evidence that the IC is involved in memory that is not based on taste. In…

  10. Successful cryopreservation of human ovarian cortex tissues using supercooling.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Hisashi; Zhang, Yue; Mihara, Makoto; Sato, Chifumi

    2012-01-01

    The development of new method to cryopreserve human ovarian cortex tissues without damage is needed for the improvement of quality of life (QOL) of female cancer patients. Here we show novel cryopreservation method of human ovarian cortex tissues by using supercooling (S.C.) procedure. Our method will be helpful in order to preserve fertility of female cancer patients.

  11. Activity in Prelimbic Cortex Subserves Fear Memory Reconsolidation over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Cristina A. J.; Gazarini, Lucas; Vanvossen, Ana C.; Hames, Mayara S.; Bertoglio, Leandro J.

    2014-01-01

    The prelimbic cortex has been implicated in the consolidation of previously learned fear. Herein, we report that temporarily inactivating this medial prefrontal cortex subregion with the GABA [subscript A] agonist muscimol (4.0 nmol in 0.2 µL per hemisphere) was able to equally disrupt 1-, 7-, and 21-d-old contextual fear memories after their…

  12. Medial Prefrontal Cortex Lesions Abolish Contextual Control of Competing Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddon, J. E.; Killcross, A. S.

    2005-01-01

    There is much debate as to the extent and nature of functional specialization within the different subregions of the prefrontal cortex. The current study was undertaken to investigate the effect of damage to medial prefrontal cortex subregions in the rat. Rats were trained on two biconditional discrimination tasks, one auditory and one visual, in…

  13. Periodontal tactile input activates the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Higaki, Nobuaki; Goto, Takaharu; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a role in complex cognitive behavioural planning, decision-making, and social behaviours. However, the effects of sensory integration during motor tasks on PFC activation have not been studied to date. Therefore, we investigated the effect of peripheral sensory information and external information on PFC activation using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was increased around bilateral Brodmann areas 46 and 10 during visual and auditory information integration during an occlusal force (biting) task. After local anesthesia, CBF values were significantly decreased, but occlusal force was similar. In conclusion, the effects of peripheral sensory information from the periodontal ligament and external information have minimal impacts on occlusal force maintenance but are important for PFC activation. PMID:27833164

  14. Dynamic neuroplasticity after human prefrontal cortex damage.

    PubMed

    Voytek, Bradley; Davis, Matar; Yago, Elena; Barceló, Francisco; Vogel, Edward K; Knight, Robert T

    2010-11-04

    Memory and attention deficits are common after prefrontal cortex (PFC) damage, yet people generally recover some function over time. Recovery is thought to be dependent upon undamaged brain regions, but the temporal dynamics underlying cognitive recovery are poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that the intact PFC compensates for damage in the lesioned PFC on a trial-by-trial basis dependent on cognitive load. The extent of this rapid functional compensation is indexed by transient increases in electrophysiological measures of attention and memory in the intact PFC, detectable within a second after stimulus presentation and only when the lesioned hemisphere is challenged. These observations provide evidence supporting a dynamic and flexible model of compensatory neural plasticity.

  15. The cerebral cortex in fetal Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Unterberger, U; Lubec, G; Dierssen, M; Stoltenburg-Didinger, G; Farreras, J C; Budka, H

    2003-01-01

    Brain histopathology of 32 fetuses with Down syndrome was compared to that of 25 age-matched normal controls and 9 brains of fetuses of HIV positive mothers. Four cases of Down syndrome and 1 HIV case showed microdysgenesia of the cerebral cortex. As the pathogenetic background of cortical irregularities is presently not known, we analyzed the neuronal expression of drebrin, an actin-binding protein of neuronal dendritic spines. This protein is thought to play a role in synaptic formation and was recently shown to be manifold reduced in brains of fetuses with Down syndrome. However, immunocytochemistry revealed no differences in drebrin expression pattern between Down patients and controls. We conclude that cerebral cortical microdysgenesia is an infrequent non-specific pathology in fetal Down syndrome.

  16. Decoding subjective decisions from orbitofrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Erin L.; Wallis, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    When making a subjective choice, the brain must compute a value for each option and compare those values to make a decision. The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is critically involved in this process, but the neural mechanisms remain obscure, in part due to limitations in our ability to measure and control the internal deliberations that can alter the dynamics of the decision process. Here, we tracked the dynamics by recovering temporally precise neural states from multi-dimensional data in OFC. During individual choices, OFC alternated between states associated with the value of two available options, with dynamics that predicted whether a subject would decide quickly or vacillate between the two alternatives. Ensembles of value-encoding neurons contributed to these states, with individual neurons shifting activity patterns as the network evaluated each option. Thus, the mechanism of subjective decision-making involves the dynamic activation of OFC states associated with each choice alternative. PMID:27273768

  17. Perceptual learning in the developing auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Bao, Shaowen

    2015-03-01

    A hallmark of the developing auditory cortex is the heightened plasticity in the critical period, during which acoustic inputs can indelibly alter cortical function. However, not all sounds in the natural acoustic environment are ethologically relevant. How does the auditory system resolve relevant sounds from the acoustic environment in such an early developmental stage when most associative learning mechanisms are not yet fully functional? What can the auditory system learn from one of the most important classes of sounds, animal vocalizations? How does naturalistic acoustic experience shape cortical sound representation and perception? To answer these questions, we need to consider an unusual strategy, statistical learning, where what the system needs to learn is embedded in the sensory input. Here, I will review recent findings on how certain statistical structures of natural animal vocalizations shape auditory cortical acoustic representations, and how cortical plasticity may underlie learned categorical sound perception. These results will be discussed in the context of human speech perception.

  18. Circadian clock signals in the adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Ota, Takumi; Fustin, Jean-Michel; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Doi, Masao; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2012-02-05

    Circadian secretion of steroid hormones by the adrenal cortex is required to maintain whole body homeostasis and to adequately respond to or anticipate environmental changes. The richly vascularized zona glomerulosa (ZG) cells in the pericapsular region regulate osmotic balance of body fluid by secreting mineralocorticoids responding to circulating bioactive substances, and more medially located zona fasciculata (ZF) cells regulate energy supply and consumption by secreting glucocorticoids under neuronal and hormonal regulation. The circadian clock regulates both steroidogenic pathways: the clock within the ZG regulates mineralocorticoid production via controlling rate-limiting synthetic enzymes, and the ZF secretes glucocorticoid hormones into the systemic circulation under the control of central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. A functional biological clock at the systemic and cellular levels is therefore necessary for steroid synthesis and secretion.

  19. Robust Motion Processing in the Visual Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sederberg, Audrey; Liu, Julia; Kaschube, Matthias

    2009-03-01

    Direction selectivity is an important model system for studying cortical processing. The role of inhibition in models of direction selectivity in the visual cortex is not well understood. We probe the selectivity of an integrate-and-fire neuron with a noisy background on top of a deterministic input current determined by a temporal-lag model for selectivity, including first only excitatory inputs and later both excitatory and inhibitory input. In this model, postsynaptic potentials are fully synchronous for the preferred direction and maximally dispersed in time for the null direction. Further, any inhibitory inputs lag excitatory inputs, as Priebe and Ferster have observed (2005). At any level of input strength, the selectivity is weak when only excitatory inputs are considered. The inclusion of inhibition significantly strengthens selectivity, and this selectivity is preserved over a wide range of background noise levels and for short stimulus durations. We conclude that inhibition likely plays an essential role in the mechanism underlying direction selectivity.

  20. Sex, beauty and the orbitofrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Ishai, Alumit

    2007-02-01

    Face perception is mediated by a distributed neural system in the human brain. Attention, memory and emotion modulate the neural activation evoked by faces, however the effects of gender and sexual orientation are currently unknown. To test whether subjects would respond more to their sexually-preferred faces, we scanned 40 hetero- and homosexual men and women whilst they assessed facial attractiveness. Behaviorally, regardless of their gender and sexual orientation, all subjects similarly rated the attractiveness of both male and female faces. Consistent with our hypothesis, a three-way interaction between stimulus gender, beauty and the sexual preference of the subject was found in the medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). In heterosexual women and homosexual men, attractive male faces elicited stronger activation than attractive female faces, whereas in heterosexual men and homosexual women, attractive female faces evoked stronger activation than attractive male faces. These findings suggest that the OFC represents the value of salient sexually-relevant faces, irrespective of their reproductive fitness.

  1. An extended retinotopic map of mouse cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jun; Ng, Lydia; Williams, Derric; Valley, Matthew; Li, Yang; Garrett, Marina; Waters, Jack

    2017-01-01

    Visual perception and behavior are mediated by cortical areas that have been distinguished using architectonic and retinotopic criteria. We employed fluorescence imaging and GCaMP6 reporter mice to generate retinotopic maps, revealing additional regions of retinotopic organization that extend into barrel and retrosplenial cortices. Aligning retinotopic maps to architectonic borders, we found a mismatch in border location, indicating that architectonic borders are not aligned with the retinotopic transition at the vertical meridian. We also assessed the representation of visual space within each region, finding that four visual areas bordering V1 (LM, P, PM and RL) display complementary representations, with overlap primarily at the central hemifield. Our results extend our understanding of the organization of mouse cortex to include up to 16 distinct retinotopically organized regions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18372.001 PMID:28059700

  2. A further analysis of olfactory cortex development

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza, María; De Carlos, Juan A.

    2012-01-01

    The olfactory cortex (OC) is a complex yet evolutionarily well-conserved brain region, made up of heterogeneous cell populations that originate in different areas of the developing telencephalon. Indeed, these cells are among the first cortical neurons to differentiate. To date, the development of the OC has been analyzed using birthdating techniques along with molecular markers and in vivo or in vitro tracking methods. In the present study, we sought to determine the origin and adult fate of these cell populations using ultrasound-guided in utero injections and electroporation of different genomic plasmids into the lateral walls of the ventricles. Our results provide direct evidence that in the mouse OC, cell fate is determined by the moment and place of origin of each specific cell populations. Moreover, by combining these approaches with the analysis of specific cell markers, we show that the presence of pallial and subpallial markers in these areas is independent of cell origin. PMID:22969708

  3. Gamma oscillations in the somatosensory cortex of newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, E V; Zakharov, A V; Lebedeva, Yu A; Inacio, A R; Minlebaev, M G; Sitdikova, G F; Khazipov, R N

    2014-01-01

    Here we addressed a question of whether gamma oscillations previously described in the whisker-related barrel cortex are a universal pattern of activity in the somatosensory cortex of newborn rats. Intracortical recording of local field potentials and action potentials in neurons using multisite silicon electrodes in 2-7-day-old rats showed that mechanical stimulation of single fingers or specific areas on the plantar or back side of the foot evoked early gamma oscillations followed by spindle-burst oscillations in the corresponding regions of the somatosensory cortex. Early gamma oscillations had maximum amplitude in layer IV of the somatosensory cortex and effectively synchronized action potentials in layer IV neurons. It was concluded that early gamma oscillations evoked by activation of the topographic sensory input are a universal activity pattern of the entire somatosensory cortex of newborn rats.

  4. Orthogonal acoustic dimensions define auditory field maps in human cortex.

    PubMed

    Barton, Brian; Venezia, Jonathan H; Saberi, Kourosh; Hickok, Gregory; Brewer, Alyssa A

    2012-12-11

    The functional organization of human auditory cortex has not yet been characterized beyond a rudimentary level of detail. Here, we use functional MRI to measure the microstructure of orthogonal tonotopic and periodotopic gradients forming complete auditory field maps (AFMs) in human core and belt auditory cortex. These AFMs show clear homologies to subfields of auditory cortex identified in nonhuman primates and in human cytoarchitectural studies. In addition, we present measurements of the macrostructural organization of these AFMs into "clover leaf" clusters, consistent with the macrostructural organization seen across human visual cortex. As auditory cortex is at the interface between peripheral hearing and central processes, improved understanding of the organization of this system could open the door to a better understanding of the transformation from auditory spectrotemporal signals to higher-order information such as speech categories.

  5. Retinotopy versus face selectivity in macaque visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Rajimehr, Reza; Bilenko, Natalia Y; Vanduffel, Wim; Tootell, Roger B H

    2014-12-01

    Retinotopic organization is a ubiquitous property of lower-tier visual cortical areas in human and nonhuman primates. In macaque visual cortex, the retinotopic maps extend to higher-order areas in the ventral visual pathway, including area TEO in the inferior temporal (IT) cortex. Distinct regions within IT cortex are also selective to specific object categories such as faces. Here we tested the topographic relationship between retinotopic maps and face-selective patches in macaque visual cortex using high-resolution fMRI and retinotopic face stimuli. Distinct subregions within face-selective patches showed either (1) a coarse retinotopic map of eccentricity and polar angle, (2) a retinotopic bias to a specific location of visual field, or (3) nonretinotopic selectivity. In general, regions along the lateral convexity of IT cortex showed more overlap between retinotopic maps and face selectivity, compared with regions within the STS. Thus, face patches in macaques can be subdivided into smaller patches with distinguishable retinotopic properties.

  6. [Emotional and Motivational Functions of the Prefrontal Cortex].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masataka

    2016-11-01

    Patients with the damage to the orbital region of the prefrontal cortex and monkeys with lesions in this area show impairment in emotional and motivational behavior. They also have difficulty in the extinction of learned behavior and in the reversal learning. This brain area is concerned with not only the value estimation of reward and aversive stimuli but also the expectation of these stimuli. The lateral prefrontal cortex plays an important role in the integration of emotion/motivation and cognition. The medial prefrontal cortex is concerned with action selection based on the previous reward history. The ventrolateral prefrontal cortex that comprises the anterior parts of the orbital and inferior medial prefrontal cortex plays an important role in emotion-based decision-making.

  7. The scaling of frontal cortex in primates and carnivores

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Eliot C.; Allman, John M.

    2004-01-01

    Size has a profound effect on the structure of the brain. Many brain structures scale allometrically, that is, their relative size changes systematically as a function of brain size. Here we use independent contrasts analysis to examine the scaling of frontal cortex in 43 species of mammals including 25 primates and 15 carnivores. We find evidence for significant differences in scaling between primates and carnivores. Primate frontal cortex hyperscales relative to the rest of neocortex and the rest of the brain. The slope of frontal cortex contrasts on rest of cortex contrasts is 1.18 (95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.30) for primates, which is significantly greater than isometric. It is also significantly greater than the carnivore value of 0.94 (95% confidence interval, 0.82-1.07). This finding supports the idea that there are substantial differences in frontal cortex structure and development between the two groups. PMID:15007170

  8. Functioning of Circuits Connecting Thalamus and Cortex.

    PubMed

    Sherman, S Murray

    2017-03-16

    Glutamatergic pathways in thalamus and cortex are divided into two distinct classes: driver, which carries the main information between cells, and modulator, which modifies how driver inputs function. Identifying driver inputs helps to reveal functional computational circuits, and one set of such circuits identified by this approach are cortico-thalamo-cortical (or transthalamic corticocortical) circuits. This, in turn, leads to the conclusion that there are two types of thalamic relay: first order nuclei (such as the lateral geniculate nucleus) that relay driver input from a subcortical source (i.e., retina), and higher order nuclei (such as the pulvinar) which are involved in these transthalamic pathways by relaying driver input from layer 5 of one cortical area to another. This thalamic division is also seen in other sensory pathways and beyond these so that most of thalamus by volume consists of higher-order relays. Many, and perhaps all, direct driver connections between cortical areas are paralleled by an indirect cortico-thalamo-cortical (transthalamic) driver route involving higher order thalamic relays. Such thalamic relays represent a heretofore unappreciated role in cortical functioning, and this assessment challenges and extends conventional views regarding both the role of thalamus and mechanisms of corticocortical communication. Finally, many and perhaps the vast majority of driver inputs relayed through thalamus arrive via branching axons, with extrathalamic targets often being subcortical motor centers. This raises the possibility that inputs relayed by thalamus to cortex also serve as efference copies, and this may represent an important feature of information relayed up the cortical hierarchy via transthalamic circuits. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:713-739, 2017.

  9. Topography of excitatory and inhibitory connectional anatomy in monkey visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Jennifer S.; Levitt, J. B.; Wu, Quanfeng

    1994-03-01

    It is chiefly within the superficial layers of 1 - 3 of the cerebral cortex that new properties are developed from relayed afferent information. The intrinsic circuitry of these layers is uniquely structured compared to the deeper layers; each pyramidal neuron connects laterally to other pyramids at a series of offset points spaced at regular intervals around it. As seen in tangential sections of layers 1 - 3, the pyramidal neuron axon terminal fields are roughly circular in cross section, forming a `polka dot' overall pattern of terminal distribution. In regions of peak density, the diameter of the circular fields matches the width of the uninnervated regions between the terminal fields. This dimension is also that of the average lateral spread of the dendrites of single pyramidal neurons making up the connections in each visual cortical area, a dimension which varies considerably between different cortical regions. Since every point across each cortical area shows similar laterally spreading patterns of connectivity, the overall array is believed to be a continuum of offset connectional lattices. It is also presumed that each pyramidal neuron, as well as projecting to separate points, receives convergent inputs from similar arrays of offset neurons. The geometry of local circuit inhibitory neurons matches elements of these lattices; basket neuron axons in these layers spread three times the diameter of the local pyramidal neuron dendritic fields while the basket neuron dendritic field matches that of the pyramidal cell. If both basket cell and pyramidal neuron at single points are coactivated by afferent relays, the basket axon might create a surround zone of inhibition preventing other pyramidal cells in the surrounding region being active simultaneously. As the pyramid develops its connections in this inhibitory field may fore each pyramidal neuron to send its axon out beyond the local inhibitory zone to find other pyramidal cells activated by the same stimulus

  10. Chemical Discrimination of Cortex Phellodendri amurensis and Cortex Phellodendri chinensis by Multivariate Analysis Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui; Wang, Huiyu; Zhang, Aihua; Yan, Guangli; Han, Ying; Li, Yuan; Wu, Xiuhong; Meng, Xiangcai; Wang, Xijun

    2016-01-01

    Background: As herbal medicines have an important position in health care systems worldwide, their current assessment, and quality control are a major bottleneck. Cortex Phellodendri chinensis (CPC) and Cortex Phellodendri amurensis (CPA) are widely used in China, however, how to identify species of CPA and CPC has become urgent. Materials and Methods: In this study, multivariate analysis approach was performed to the investigation of chemical discrimination of CPA and CPC. Results: Principal component analysis showed that two herbs could be separated clearly. The chemical markers such as berberine, palmatine, phellodendrine, magnoflorine, obacunone, and obaculactone were identified through the orthogonal partial least squared discriminant analysis, and were identified tentatively by the accurate mass of quadruple-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A total of 29 components can be used as the chemical markers for discrimination of CPA and CPC. Of them, phellodenrine is significantly higher in CPC than that of CPA, whereas obacunone and obaculactone are significantly higher in CPA than that of CPC. Conclusion: The present study proves that multivariate analysis approach based chemical analysis greatly contributes to the investigation of CPA and CPC, and showed that the identified chemical markers as a whole should be used to discriminate the two herbal medicines, and simultaneously the results also provided chemical information for their quality assessment. SUMMARY Multivariate analysis approach was performed to the investigate the herbal medicineThe chemical markers were identified through multivariate analysis approachA total of 29 components can be used as the chemical markers. UPLC-Q/TOF-MS-based multivariate analysis method for the herbal medicine samples Abbreviations used: CPC: Cortex Phellodendri chinensis, CPA: Cortex Phellodendri amurensis, PCA: Principal component analysis, OPLS-DA: Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis, BPI: Base peaks ion

  11. Pax6 regulates regional development and neuronal migration in the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Talamillo, Ana; Quinn, Jane C; Collinson, J Martin; Caric, Damira; Price, David J; West, John D; Hill, Robert E

    2003-03-01

    Mutations in the Pax6 gene disrupt telencephalic development, resulting in a thin cortical plate, expansion of proliferative layers, and the absence of the olfactory bulb. The primary defect in the neuronal cell population of the developing cerebral cortex was analysed by using mouse chimeras containing a mixture of wild-type and Pax6-deficient cells. The chimeric analysis shows that Pax6 influences cellular activity throughout corticogenesis. At early stages, Pax6-deficient and wildtype cells segregate into exclusive patches, indicating an inability of different cell genotypes to interact. At later stages, cells are sorted further based on telencephalic domains. Pax6-deficient cells are specifically reduced in the mediocaudal domain of the dorsal telencephalon, indicating a role in regionalization. In addition, Pax6 regulates the process of radial migration of neuronal precursors. Loss of Pax6 particularly affects movement of neuronal precursors at the subventricular zone/intermediate zone boundary at a transitional migratory phase essential for entry into the intermediate zone. We suggest that the primary role of Pax6 is the continual regulation of cell surface properties responsible for both cellular identity and radial migration, defects of which cause regional cell sorting and abnormalities of migration in chimeras.

  12. High-frequency stimulation of the ventrolateral thalamus regulates gene expression in hippocampus, motor cortex and caudate-putamen.

    PubMed

    Kádár, Elisabeth; Lim, Lee Wei; Carreras, Gemma; Genís, David; Temel, Yasin; Huguet, Gemma

    2011-05-19

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the ventrolateral (VL) thalamus is effective in treating the resting tremor of Parkinson's disease (PD). PD is a movement disorder that involves neurodegeneration, predominantly of the substantia nigra, but also in other brain areas, such as the motor cortex and hippocampus. The mechanisms of action of HFS on remote brain areas at the molecular level are largely unknown. Here, we investigated gene expression profiles using oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time PCR in rat hippocampi. We showed that chronic (14days) HFS modulates the expression of 176 hippocampal genes. Our results showed that genes involved in proliferation and neurogenesis-related biological functions were specifically regulated by HFS, including nestin (Nes) and doublecortin (Dcx), which are expressed in neural progenitor cells and immature neurons, respectively, as well as genes encoding proteins that may support neural differentiation or migration, such as Timp1, Ccl2, S100a4 and Angpt2. Next, we used quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) to profile these six genes in the motor cortex and the caudate-putamen, which included the subventricular zone (CPu-SVZ). Interestingly, HFS increased Dcx expression in the motor cortex whereas Nes was upregulated in the CPu-SVZ but not in the motor cortex. In the CPu-SVZ Timp1 and Ccl2 were highly upregulated by HFS. In conclusion, our findings suggest that HFS may enhance neuroplasticity at the molecular level in several remote brain areas such as the CPu-SVZ, motor cortex and hippocampus.

  13. The Laminar Cortex Model: A New Continuum Cortex Model Incorporating Laminar Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiaxin; Vegh, Viktor; Reutens, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Local field potentials (LFPs) are widely used to study the function of local networks in the brain. They are also closely correlated with the blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal, the predominant contrast mechanism in functional magnetic resonance imaging. We developed a new laminar cortex model (LCM) to simulate the amplitude and frequency of LFPs. Our model combines the laminar architecture of the cerebral cortex and multiple continuum models to simulate the collective activity of cortical neurons. The five cortical layers (layer I, II/III, IV, V, and VI) are simulated as separate continuum models between which there are synaptic connections. The LCM was used to simulate the dynamics of the visual cortex under different conditions of visual stimulation. LFPs are reported for two kinds of visual stimulation: general visual stimulation and intermittent light stimulation. The power spectra of LFPs were calculated and compared with existing empirical data. The LCM was able to produce spontaneous LFPs exhibiting frequency-inverse (1/ƒ) power spectrum behaviour. Laminar profiles of current source density showed similarities to experimental data. General stimulation enhanced the oscillation of LFPs corresponding to gamma frequencies. During simulated intermittent light stimulation, the LCM captured the fundamental as well as high order harmonics as previously reported. The power spectrum expected with a reduction in layer IV neurons, often observed with focal cortical dysplasias associated with epilepsy was also simulated. PMID:23093925

  14. The Near Zone to Far Zone Transformation (N2F)

    SciTech Connect

    Blackfield, Donald T.; Poole, Brian R.

    2016-03-11

    N2F is a C/C++ code used to calculate the far zone electromagnetic (EM) field, given E and H near zone field data. The method used by N2F can be found in Ref. 1 and 2. N2F determines the far field EΦ and Eθ in spherical coordinates for near zone data calculated in either Cartesian or Cylindrical geometry.

  15. Habitable zones in the universe.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Guillermo

    2005-12-01

    Habitability varies dramatically with location and time in the universe. This was recognized centuries ago, but it was only in the last few decades that astronomers began to systematize the study of habitability. The introduction of the concept of the habitable zone was key to progress in this area. The habitable zone concept was first applied to the space around a star, now called the Circumstellar Habitable Zone. Recently, other, vastly broader, habitable zones have been proposed. We review the historical development of the concept of habitable zones and the present state of the research. We also suggest ways to make progress on each of the habitable zones and to unify them into a single concept encompassing the entire universe.

  16. Breathing zone air sampler

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, John

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

  17. [Foot reflex zone massage].

    PubMed

    Kesselring, A

    1994-01-01

    Foot reflexology is defined as massage of zones on the feet which correspond to different parts of the body. A medline-search yielded no literature in the field of foot reflexology. Indications for and results of foot reflexology have been extrapolated from case-descriptions and two pilot studies with small samples. One study (Lafuente et al.) found foot reflexology to be as helpful to patients with headaches as medication (flunarizine), yet foot reflexology was fraught with less side-effects than medication. In a second study (Eichelberger et al.) foot reflexology was used postoperatively on gynecological patients. The intervention group showed a lesser need for medication to enhance bladder tonus than did the control group. The literature describes foot reflexology as enhancing urination, bowel movements and relaxation.

  18. Breathing zone air sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.

    1989-08-22

    A sampling apparatus is presented which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

  19. Principal Slip Zones in Limestone: Microstructural Characterization and Implications for the Seismic Cycle (Tre Monti Fault, Central Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven A. F.; Billi, Andrea; Toro, Giulio Di; Spiess, Richard

    2011-12-01

    Earthquakes in central Italy, and in other areas worldwide, often nucleate within and rupture through carbonates in the upper crust. During individual earthquake ruptures, most fault displacement is thought to be accommodated by thin principal slip zones. This study presents detailed microstructural observations of the slip zones of the seismically active Tre Monti normal fault zone. All of the slip zones cut limestone, and geological constraints indicate exhumation from <2 km depth, where ambient temperatures are ≪100°C. Scanning electron microscope observations suggest that the slip zones are composed of 100% calcite. The slip zones of secondary faults in the damage zone contain protocataclastic and cataclastic fabrics that are cross-cut by systematic fracture networks and stylolite dissolution surfaces. The slip zone of the principal fault has much more microstructural complexity, and contains a 2-10 mm thick ultracataclasite that lies immediately beneath the principal slip surface. The ultracataclasite itself is internally zoned; 200-300 μm-thick ultracataclastic sub-layers record extreme localization of slip. Syn-tectonic calcite vein networks spatially associated with the sub-layers suggest fluid involvement in faulting. The ultracataclastic sub-layers preserve compelling microstructural evidence of fluidization, and also contain peculiar rounded grains consisting of a central (often angular) clast wrapped by a laminated outer cortex of ultra-fine-grained calcite. These "clast-cortex grains" closely resemble those produced during layer fluidization in other settings, including the basal detachments of catastrophic landslides and saturated high-velocity friction experiments on clay-bearing gouges. An overprinting foliation is present in the slip zone of the principal fault, and electron backscatter diffraction analyses indicate the presence of a weak calcite crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) in the fine-grained matrix. The calcite c-axes are

  20. MCT8 expression in human fetal cerebral cortex is reduced in severe intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Chan, Shiao Y; Hancox, Laura A; Martín-Santos, Azucena; Loubière, Laurence S; Walter, Merlin N M; González, Ana-Maria; Cox, Phillip M; Logan, Ann; McCabe, Christopher J; Franklyn, Jayne A; Kilby, Mark D

    2014-02-01

    The importance of the thyroid hormone (TH) transporter, monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), to human neurodevelopment is highlighted by findings of severe global neurological impairment in subjects with MCT8 (SLC16A2) mutations. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), usually due to uteroplacental failure, is associated with milder neurodevelopmental deficits, which have been partly attributed to dysregulated TH action in utero secondary to reduced circulating fetal TH concentrations and decreased cerebral thyroid hormone receptor expression. We postulate that altered MCT8 expression is implicated in this pathophysiology; therefore, in this study, we sought to quantify changes in cortical MCT8 expression with IUGR. First, MCT8 immunohistochemistry was performed on occipital and parietal cerebral cortex sections obtained from appropriately grown for gestational age (AGA) human fetuses between 19 weeks of gestation and term. Secondly, MCT8 immunostaining in the occipital cortex of stillborn IUGR human fetuses at 24-28 weeks of gestation was objectively compared with that in the occipital cortex of gestationally matched AGA fetuses. Fetuses demonstrated widespread MCT8 expression in neurons within the cortical plate and subplate, in the ventricular and subventricular zones, in the epithelium of the choroid plexus and ependyma, and in microvessel wall. When complicated by IUGR, fetuses showed a significant fivefold reduction in the percentage area of cortical plate immunostained for MCT8 compared with AGA fetuses (P<0.05), but there was no significant difference in the proportion of subplate microvessels immunostained. Cortical MCT8 expression was negatively correlated with the severity of IUGR indicated by the brain:liver weight ratios (r(2)=0.28; P<0.05) at post-mortem. Our results support the hypothesis that a reduction in MCT8 expression in the IUGR fetal brain could further compromise TH-dependent brain development.

  1. MCT8 expression in human fetal cerebral cortex is reduced in severe intrauterine growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Shiao Y; Hancox, Laura A; Martín-Santos, Azucena; Loubière, Laurence S; Walter, Merlin N M; González, Ana-Maria; Cox, Phillip M; Logan, Ann; McCabe, Christopher J; Franklyn, Jayne A; Kilby, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    The importance of the thyroid hormone (TH) transporter, monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), to human neurodevelopment is highlighted by findings of severe global neurological impairment in subjects with MCT8 (SLC16A2) mutations. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), usually due to uteroplacental failure, is associated with milder neurodevelopmental deficits, which have been partly attributed to dysregulated TH action in utero secondary to reduced circulating fetal TH concentrations and decreased cerebral thyroid hormone receptor expression. We postulate that altered MCT8 expression is implicated in this pathophysiology; therefore, in this study, we sought to quantify changes in cortical MCT8 expression with IUGR. First, MCT8 immunohistochemistry was performed on occipital and parietal cerebral cortex sections obtained from appropriately grown for gestational age (AGA) human fetuses between 19 weeks of gestation and term. Secondly, MCT8 immunostaining in the occipital cortex of stillborn IUGR human fetuses at 24–28 weeks of gestation was objectively compared with that in the occipital cortex of gestationally matched AGA fetuses. Fetuses demonstrated widespread MCT8 expression in neurons within the cortical plate and subplate, in the ventricular and subventricular zones, in the epithelium of the choroid plexus and ependyma, and in microvessel wall. When complicated by IUGR, fetuses showed a significant fivefold reduction in the percentage area of cortical plate immunostained for MCT8 compared with AGA fetuses (P<0.05), but there was no significant difference in the proportion of subplate microvessels immunostained. Cortical MCT8 expression was negatively correlated with the severity of IUGR indicated by the brain:liver weight ratios (r2=0.28; P<0.05) at post-mortem. Our results support the hypothesis that a reduction in MCT8 expression in the IUGR fetal brain could further compromise TH-dependent brain development. PMID:24204008

  2. Forelimb training drives transient map reorganization in ipsilateral motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, David T; Schmid, Ariel N; Danaphongse, Tanya T; Flanagan, Kate E; Morrison, Robert A; Kilgard, Michael P; Rennaker, Robert L; Hays, Seth A

    2016-10-15

    Skilled motor training results in reorganization of contralateral motor cortex movement representations. The ipsilateral motor cortex is believed to play a role in skilled motor control, but little is known about how training influences reorganization of ipsilateral motor representations of the trained limb. To determine whether training results in reorganization of ipsilateral motor cortex maps, rats were trained to perform the isometric pull task, an automated motor task that requires skilled forelimb use. After either 3 or 6 months of training, intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) mapping was performed to document motor representations of the trained forelimb in the hemisphere ipsilateral to that limb. Motor training for 3 months resulted in a robust expansion of right forelimb representation in the right motor cortex, demonstrating that skilled motor training drives map plasticity ipsilateral to the trained limb. After 6 months of training, the right forelimb representation in the right motor cortex was significantly smaller than the representation observed in rats trained for 3 months and similar to untrained controls, consistent with a normalization of motor cortex maps. Forelimb map area was not correlated with performance on the trained task, suggesting that task performance is maintained despite normalization of cortical maps. This study provides new insights into how the ipsilateral cortex changes in response to skilled learning and may inform rehabilitative strategies to enhance cortical plasticity to support recovery after brain injury.

  3. Auditory cortex involvement in emotional learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Grosso, A; Cambiaghi, M; Concina, G; Sacco, T; Sacchetti, B

    2015-07-23

    Emotional memories represent the core of human and animal life and drive future choices and behaviors. Early research involving brain lesion studies in animals lead to the idea that the auditory cortex participates in emotional learning by processing the sensory features of auditory stimuli paired with emotional consequences and by transmitting this information to the amygdala. Nevertheless, electrophysiological and imaging studies revealed that, following emotional experiences, the auditory cortex undergoes learning-induced changes that are highly specific, associative and long lasting. These studies suggested that the role played by the auditory cortex goes beyond stimulus elaboration and transmission. Here, we discuss three major perspectives created by these data. In particular, we analyze the possible roles of the auditory cortex in emotional learning, we examine the recruitment of the auditory cortex during early and late memory trace encoding, and finally we consider the functional interplay between the auditory cortex and subcortical nuclei, such as the amygdala, that process affective information. We conclude that, starting from the early phase of memory encoding, the auditory cortex has a more prominent role in emotional learning, through its connections with subcortical nuclei, than is typically acknowledged.

  4. The auditory representation of speech sounds in human motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Connie; Hamilton, Liberty S; Johnson, Keith; Chang, Edward F

    2016-01-01

    In humans, listening to speech evokes neural responses in the motor cortex. This has been controversially interpreted as evidence that speech sounds are processed as articulatory gestures. However, it is unclear what information is actually encoded by such neural activity. We used high-density direct human cortical recordings while participants spoke and listened to speech sounds. Motor cortex neural patterns during listening were substantially different than during articulation of the same sounds. During listening, we observed neural activity in the superior and inferior regions of ventral motor cortex. During speaking, responses were distributed throughout somatotopic representations of speech articulators in motor cortex. The structure of responses in motor cortex during listening was organized along acoustic features similar to auditory cortex, rather than along articulatory features as during speaking. Motor cortex does not contain articulatory representations of perceived actions in speech, but rather, represents auditory vocal information. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12577.001 PMID:26943778

  5. Zoning should promote public health.

    PubMed

    Hirschhorn, Joel S

    2004-01-01

    Legally, governments use their police powers to protect public health, safety, and welfare through zoning. This paper presents a case for revisiting zoning on the basis of increasing evidence that certain types of community design promote public health, as opposed to the dominant pattern of sprawl development, which does not. Zoning, and the land use planning linked to it, that prohibits or disfavors health-promoting community designs contradicts the inherent public policy goal on which it is based. If there is a paradigm shift underway, from traditional sprawl to health-promoting community designs, then health professionals and others should understand why zoning must be reassessed.

  6. Evidence for inhibitory deficits in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Radhu, Natasha; Garcia Dominguez, Luis; Farzan, Faranak; Richter, Margaret A.; Semeralul, Mawahib O.; Chen, Robert; Fitzgerald, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal gamma-aminobutyric acid inhibitory neurotransmission is a key pathophysiological mechanism underlying schizophrenia. Transcranial magnetic stimulation can be combined with electroencephalography to index long-interval cortical inhibition, a measure of GABAergic receptor-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission from the frontal and motor cortex. In previous studies we have reported that schizophrenia is associated with inhibitory deficits in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex compared to healthy subjects and patients with bipolar disorder. The main objective of the current study was to replicate and extend these initial findings by evaluating long-interval cortical inhibition from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in patients with schizophrenia compared to patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. A total of 111 participants were assessed: 38 patients with schizophrenia (average age: 35.71 years, 25 males, 13 females), 27 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (average age: 36.15 years, 11 males, 16 females) and 46 healthy subjects (average age: 33.63 years, 23 females, 23 males). Long-interval cortical inhibition was measured from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and motor cortex through combined transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography. In the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, long-interval cortical inhibition was significantly reduced in patients with schizophrenia compared to healthy subjects (P = 0.004) and not significantly different between patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder and healthy subjects (P = 0.5445). Long-interval cortical inhibition deficits in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were also significantly greater in patients with schizophrenia compared to patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (P = 0.0465). There were no significant differences in long-interval cortical inhibition across all three groups in the motor cortex. These results demonstrate that long-interval cortical inhibition deficits in the

  7. [Focal evoked potentials in the rabbit visual cortex: density analysis of current sources].

    PubMed

    Supin, A Ia

    1981-01-01

    Focal evoked potentials were elicited in the rabbit visual cortex by punctiform light stimuli and analyzed by the current source density technique. They contained two main components. The first component was generated by local sink at depths form 0.6 to 1.0 mm (layer IV) with 30 ms latency and peak time about 50 ms. The second one was generated by less local sink at depths form 0.2-0.3 to 1.3-1.5 mm (layers III-VI) with peak time 90-100 ms. These two sinks are considered as active and indicating the localization of depolarizing synapses. Passive sources are dissipated around the zone of the active sinks.

  8. Autoradiographic study of the efferent connections of the entorhinal cortex in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Wyss, J.M.

    1981-07-10

    The major findings can be summarized as follows. Whereas the projection of the lateral entorhinal area (LEA) to the dentate gyrus is broad in its longitudinal extent, the medial entorhinal area (MEA), and especially the ventral portion of this zone, projects in a more lamellar fashion. In the transverse plane the LEA preferentially projects to the inner (dorsal) blade of the dentate gyrus, while the MEA innervates both blades equally. Within the radial dimension, the entorhinal cortex projects to the dentate gyrus according to a medial to lateral gradient, with lateral portions of the LEA projecting along the pial surface and successively more medial portions of the entorhinal projecting closer to the granule cells. The commissural entorhinal to dentate projections are similar to the ipsilateral projections in location; however, they are considerably reduced in septotemporal extent and do not arise from cells in the ventral half of either LEA or the intermediate entorhinal area (IEA). The projection of the entorhinal cortex to Ammon's horn reflects the same longitudinal characteristics as the dentate projections. An alvear input which extends only to the pyramidal cells at the CA1-subicular junction was most noticeable at ventral hippocampal levels. The extrahippocampal projections arise predominantly from cells in the LEA and project forward along the angular bundle to the piriform and periamygdaloid cortices, as well as the endopiriform nucleus, the lateral, basolateral, and cortical amygdaloid nuclei, the nucleus of the lateral olfactory tract, the olfactory tubercle, the anterior olfactory nucleus, the taenia tecta, and the indusium griseum.

  9. Fine-Tuning of Neurogenesis is Essential for the Evolutionary Expansion of the Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Poluch, Sylvie; Juliano, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    We used several animal models to study global and regional cortical surface expansion: The lissencephalic mouse, gyrencephalic normal ferrets, in which the parietal cortex expands more than the temporal cortex, and moderately lissencephalic ferrets, showing a similar degree of temporal and parietal expansion. We found that overall cortical surface expansion is achieved when specific events occur prior to surpragranular layer formation. (1) The subventricular zone (SVZ) shows substantial growth, (2) the inner SVZ contains an increased number of outer radial glia and intermediate progenitor cells expressing Pax6, and (3) the outer SVZ contains a progenitor cell composition similar to the combined VZ and inner SVZ. A greater parietal expansion is also achieved by eliminating the latero-dorsal neurogenic gradient, so that neurogenesis displays a similar developmental degree between parietal and temporal regions. In contrast, mice or lissencephalic ferrets show more advanced neurogenesis in the temporal region. In conclusion, we propose that global and regional cortical surface expansion rely on similar strategies consisting in altering the timing of neurogenic events prior to the surpragranular layer formation, so that more progenitor cells, and ultimately more neurons, are produced. This hypothesis is supported by findings from a ferret model of lissencephaly obtained by transiently blocking neurogenesis during the formation of layer IV. PMID:23968831

  10. Adrenaline cells of the rat adrenal cortex and medulla contain renin and prorenin.

    PubMed

    Berka, J L; Kelly, D J; Robinson, D B; Alcorn, D; Marley, P D; Fernley, R T; Skinner, S L

    1996-05-31

    The distribution and content of renin in Sprague-Dawley (SD) and transgenic (mREN-2)27 rats (TG) were compared to further define the cellular basis and function of the adrenal renin-angiotensin system. Antibody binding (to rat and mouse renin protein and prosequence) was visualised in serial paraffin sections using an avidin-biotin peroxidase technique. Chromaffin and adrenaline cells were identified by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase immunoreactivity, respectively. In SD zona glomerulosa (ZG), renin and its prosequence localised to small steroid cells while in homozygous (receiving lisinopril) and heterozygous (untreated) TG, steroid cells labelled in all cortical zones. In addition, throughout the cortex of each strain, large polyhedral adrenaline chromaffin cells occurring singly or in small groups and occasionally in rays labelled for renin and prosequence. Similar large adrenaline cells immunolabelled for all antisera in medulla while other cells were only TH-positive. Total adrenal renin content was 53 times higher in heterozygous transgenics than SD rats and was mainly (74%) prorenin. In SD, 37% of cortical renin was prorenin but in adrenal medulla only active renin was detected. Thus, from present and previous work both renin and prorenin occur not only in mitochondrial dense bodies of the ZG, but also in secretory granules of adrenaline chromaffin cells in both cortex and medulla implying in situ synthesis and paracrine functions.

  11. Nogo-a regulates neural precursor migration in the embryonic mouse cortex.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Carole; Schröter, Aileen; Thallmair, Michaela; Schwab, Martin E

    2010-10-01

    Although Nogo-A has been intensively studied for its inhibitory effect on axonal regeneration in the adult central nervous system, little is known about its function during brain development. In the embryonic mouse cortex, Nogo-A is expressed by radial precursor/glial cells and by tangentially migrating as well as postmigratory neurons. We studied radially migrating neuroblasts in wild-type and Nogo-A knockout (KO) mouse embryos. In vitro analysis showed that Nogo-A and its receptor components NgR, Lingo-1, TROY, and p75 are expressed in cells emigrating from embryonic forebrain-derived neurospheres. Live imaging revealed an increased cell motility when Nogo-A was knocked out or blocked with antibodies. Antibodies blocking NgR or Lingo-1 showed the same motility-enhancing effect supporting a direct role of surface Nogo-A on migration. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling of embryonic day (E)15.5 embryos demonstrated that Nogo-A influences the radial migration of neuronal precursors. At E17.5, the normal transient accumulation of radially migrating precursors within the subventricular zone was not detectable in the Nogo-A KO mouse cortex. At E19, migration to the upper cortical layers was disturbed. These findings suggest that Nogo-A and its receptor complex play a role in the interplay of adhesive and repulsive cell interactions in radial migration during cortical development.

  12. Quantitative analysis of somatosensory cortex development in metatherians and monotremes, with comparison to the laboratory rat.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S

    2015-01-01

    Metatherians and monotremes are born in an immature state, followed by prolonged nurturing by maternal lactation. Quantitative analysis of isocortical sections held in the collections at the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin was used to compare the pace of somatosensory cortex development relative to body size and pallial thickness between metatherian groups, monotremes, and the laboratory rat. Analysis indicated that the pace of pallial growth in the monotremes is much lower than that in the metatherians or laboratory rat, with an estimated 8.6-fold increase in parietal cortex thickness between 10 and 100 mm body length, compared to a 10- to 20-fold increase among the metatherians and the rat. It was found that aggregation of cortical plate neurons occurs at similar embryo size in the mammals studied (around 8-14 mm body length) and a similar pallial thickness (around 200 µm), but that proliferative zone involution occurs at a much higher body size and pallial thickness in the monotremes compared to the metatherians and the laboratory rat. The observations suggest that cortical development in the monotremes is slower and subject to different regulatory signals to the therians studied. The slow pace may be related to either generally slower metabolism in monotremes or less efficient nutrient supply to the offspring due to the lack of teats.

  13. Does Cell Lineage in the Developing Cerebral Cortex Contribute to its Columnar Organization?

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Marcos R.; Hedin-Pereira, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Since the pioneer work of Lorente de Nó, Ramón y Cajal, Brodmann, Mountcastle, Hubel and Wiesel and others, the cerebral cortex has been seen as a jigsaw of anatomic and functional modules involved in the processing of different sets of information. In fact, a columnar distribution of neurons displaying similar functional properties throughout the cerebral cortex has been observed by many researchers. Although it has been suggested that much of the anatomical substrate for such organization would be already specified at early developmental stages, before activity-dependent mechanisms could take place, it is still unclear whether gene expression in the ventricular zone (VZ) could play a role in the development of discrete functional units, such as minicolumns or columns. Cell lineage experiments using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have shown that the progeny of a single neuroepithelial/radial glial cell in the dorsal telencephalon is organized into discrete radial clusters of sibling excitatory neurons, which have a higher propensity for developing chemical synapses with each other rather than with neighboring non-siblings. Here, we will discuss the possibility that the cell lineage of single neuroepithelial/radial glia cells could contribute for the columnar organization of the neocortex by generating radial columns of sibling, interconnected neurons. Borrowing some concepts from the studies on cell–cell recognition and transcription factor networks, we will also touch upon the potential molecular mechanisms involved in the establishment of sibling-neuron circuits. PMID:20676384

  14. Does Congenital Deafness Affect the Structural and Functional Architecture of Primary Visual Cortex?

    PubMed Central

    Smittenaar, C.R.; MacSweeney, M.; Sereno, M.I.; Schwarzkopf, D.S.

    2016-01-01

    Deafness results in greater reliance on the remaining senses. It is unknown whether the cortical architecture of the intact senses is optimized to compensate for lost input. Here we performed widefield population receptive field (pRF) mapping of primary visual cortex (V1) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in hearing and congenitally deaf participants, all of whom had learnt sign language after the age of 10 years. We found larger pRFs encoding the peripheral visual field of deaf compared to hearing participants. This was likely driven by larger facilitatory center zones of the pRF profile concentrated in the near and far periphery in the deaf group. pRF density was comparable between groups, indicating pRFs overlapped more in the deaf group. This could suggest that a coarse coding strategy underlies enhanced peripheral visual skills in deaf people. Cortical thickness was also decreased in V1 in the deaf group. These findings suggest deafness causes structural and functional plasticity at the earliest stages of visual cortex. PMID:27014392

  15. Stream segregation in the anesthetized auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, Chris; Palmer, Alan R.; Sumner, Christian J.

    2015-01-01

    Auditory stream segregation describes the way that sounds are perceptually segregated into groups or streams on the basis of perceptual attributes such as pitch or spectral content. For sequences of pure tones, segregation depends on the tones' proximity in frequency and time. In the auditory cortex (and elsewhere) responses to sequences of tones are dependent on stimulus conditions in a similar way to the perception of these stimuli. However, although highly dependent on stimulus conditions, perception is also clearly influenced by factors unrelated to the stimulus, such as attention. Exactly how ‘bottom-up’ sensory processes and non-sensory ‘top-down’ influences interact is still not clear. Here, we recorded responses to alternating tones (ABAB …) of varying frequency difference (FD) and rate of presentation (PR) in the auditory cortex of anesthetized guinea-pigs. These data complement previous studies, in that top-down processing resulting from conscious perception should be absent or at least considerably attenuated. Under anesthesia, the responses of cortical neurons to the tone sequences adapted rapidly, in a manner sensitive to both the FD and PR of the sequences. While the responses to tones at frequencies more distant from neuron best frequencies (BFs) decreased as the FD increased, the responses to tones near to BF increased, consistent with a release from adaptation, or forward suppression. Increases in PR resulted in reductions in responses to all tones, but the reduction was greater for tones further from BF. Although asymptotically adapted responses to tones showed behavior that was qualitatively consistent with perceptual stream segregation, responses reached asymptote within 2 s, and responses to all tones were very weak at high PRs (>12 tones per second). A signal-detection model, driven by the cortical population response, made decisions that were dependent on both FD and PR in ways consistent with perceptual stream segregation. This

  16. Stream segregation in the anesthetized auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Scholes, Chris; Palmer, Alan R; Sumner, Christian J

    2015-10-01

    Auditory stream segregation describes the way that sounds are perceptually segregated into groups or streams on the basis of perceptual attributes such as pitch or spectral content. For sequences of pure tones, segregation depends on the tones' proximity in frequency and time. In the auditory cortex (and elsewhere) responses to sequences of tones are dependent on stimulus conditions in a similar way to the perception of these stimuli. However, although highly dependent on stimulus conditions, perception is also clearly influenced by factors unrelated to the stimulus, such as attention. Exactly how 'bottom-up' sensory processes and non-sensory 'top-down' influences interact is still not clear. Here, we recorded responses to alternating tones (ABAB …) of varying frequency difference (FD) and rate of presentation (PR) in the auditory cortex of anesthetized guinea-pigs. These data complement previous studies, in that top-down processing resulting from conscious perception should be absent or at least considerably attenuated. Under anesthesia, the responses of cortical neurons to the tone sequences adapted rapidly, in a manner sensitive to both the FD and PR of the sequences. While the responses to tones at frequencies more distant from neuron best frequencies (BFs) decreased as the FD increased, the responses to tones near to BF increased, consistent with a release from adaptation, or forward suppression. Increases in PR resulted in reductions in responses to all tones, but the reduction was greater for tones further from BF. Although asymptotically adapted responses to tones showed behavior that was qualitatively consistent with perceptual stream segregation, responses reached asymptote within 2 s, and responses to all tones were very weak at high PRs (>12 tones per second). A signal-detection model, driven by the cortical population response, made decisions that were dependent on both FD and PR in ways consistent with perceptual stream segregation. This

  17. A functional microcircuit for cat visual cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, R J; Martin, K A

    1991-01-01

    1. We have studied in vivo the intracellular responses of neurones in cat visual cortex to electrical pulse stimulation of the cortical afferents and have developed a microcircuit that simulates much of the experimental data. 2. Inhibition and excitation are not separable events, because individual neurones are embedded in microcircuits that contribute strong population effects. Synchronous electrical activation of the cortex inevitably set in motion a sequence of excitation and inhibition in every neurone we recorded. The temporal form of this response depends on the cortical layer in which the neurone is located. Superficial layer (layers 2+3) pyramidal neurones show a more marked polysynaptic excitatory phase than the pyramids of the deep layers (layers 5+6). 3. Excitatory effects on pyramidal neurones, particularly the superficial layer pyramids, are in general not due to monosynaptic input from thalamus, but polysynaptic input from cortical pyramids. Since the thalamic input is transient it does not provide the major, sustained excitation arriving at any cortical neurone. Instead the intracortical excitatory connections provide the major component of the excitation. 4. The polysynaptic excitatory response would be sustained well after the stimulus, were it not for the suppressive effect of intracortical inhibition induced by the pulse stimulation. 5. Intracellular recording combined with ionophoresis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists and antagonists showed that intracortical inhibition is mediated by GABAA and GABAB receptors. The GABAA component occurs in the early phase of the impulse response. It is reflected in the strong hyperpolarization that follows the excitatory response and lasts about 50 ms. The GABAB component occurs in the late phase of the response, and is reflected in a sustained hyperpolarization that lasts some 200-300 ms. Both components are seen in all cortical pyramidal neurones. However, the GABAA component appears more powerful

  18. The spatiotopic 'visual' cortex of the blind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likova, Lora

    2012-03-01

    Visual cortex activity in the blind has been shown in sensory tasks. Can it be activated in memory tasks? If so, are inherent features of its organization meaningfully employed? Our recent results in short-term blindfolded subjects imply that human primary visual cortex (V1) may operate as a modality-independent 'sketchpad' for working memory (Likova, 2010a). Interestingly, the spread of the V1 activation approximately corresponded to the spatial extent of the images in terms of their angle of projection to the subject. We now raise the questions of whether under long-term visual deprivation V1 is also employed in non-visual memory task, in particular in congenitally blind individuals, who have never had visual stimulation to guide the development of the visual area organization, and whether such spatial organization is still valid for the same paradigm that was used in blindfolded individuals. The outcome has implications for an emerging reconceptualization of the principles of brain architecture and its reorganization under sensory deprivation. Methods: We used a novel fMRI drawing paradigm in congenitally and late-onset blind, compared with sighted and blindfolded subjects in three conditions of 20s duration, separated by 20s rest-intervals, (i) Tactile Exploration: raised-line images explored and memorized; (ii) Tactile Memory Drawing: drawing the explored image from memory; (iii) Scribble: mindless drawing movements with no memory component. Results and Conclusions: V1 was strongly activated for Tactile Memory Drawing and Tactile Exploration in these totally blind subjects. Remarkably, after training, even in the memory task, the mapping of V1 activation largely corresponded to the angular projection of the tactile stimuli relative to the ego-center (i.e., the effective visual angle at the head); beyond this projective boundary, peripheral V1 signals were dramatically reduced or even suppressed. The matching extent of the activation in the congenitally blind

  19. The perirhinal cortex and recognition memory interference

    PubMed Central

    Watson, H.C.; Lee, A. C. H.

    2013-01-01

    There has recently been an increase in interest in the effects of visual interference on memory processing, with the aim of eluciating the role of the perirhinal cortex (PRC) in recognition memory. One view argues that the PRC processes highly complex conjunctions of object features, and recent evidence from rodents suggests that these representations may be vital for buffering against the effects of pre-retrieval interference on object recognition memory. To investigate whether PRC-dependent object representations play a similar role in humans, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to scan neurologically healthy participants while they carried out a novel interference-match-to-sample task. This paradigm was specifically designed to concurrently assess the impact of object vs. spatial interference, on recognition memory for objects or scenes, while keeping constant the amount of object and scene information presented across all trials. Activity at retrieval was examined, within an anatomically defined PRC region of interest, according to the demand for object or scene memory, following a period of object compared to spatial interference. Critically, we found greater PRC activity for object memory following object interference, compared to object memory following scene interference, and no difference between object and scene interference for scene recognition. These data demonstrate a role for the human PRC following a period of object, but not scene, interference, during object recognition memory, and emphasize the importance of representational content to mnemonic processing. PMID:23447626

  20. Optogenetic dissection of medial prefrontal cortex circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Riga, Danai; Matos, Mariana R.; Glas, Annet; Smit, August B.; Spijker, Sabine; Van den Oever, Michel C.

    2014-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is critically involved in numerous cognitive functions, including attention, inhibitory control, habit formation, working memory and long-term memory. Moreover, through its dense interconnectivity with subcortical regions (e.g., thalamus, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus), the mPFC is thought to exert top-down executive control over the processing of aversive and appetitive stimuli. Because the mPFC has been implicated in the processing of a wide range of cognitive and emotional stimuli, it is thought to function as a central hub in the brain circuitry mediating symptoms of psychiatric disorders. New optogenetics technology enables anatomical and functional dissection of mPFC circuitry with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. This provides important novel insights in the contribution of specific neuronal subpopulations and their connectivity to mPFC function in health and disease states. In this review, we present the current knowledge obtained with optogenetic methods concerning mPFC function and dysfunction and integrate this with findings from traditional intervention approaches used to investigate the mPFC circuitry in animal models of cognitive processing and psychiatric disorders. PMID:25538574

  1. The medial prefrontal cortex exhibits money illusion

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Bernd; Rangel, Antonio; Wibral, Matthias; Falk, Armin

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral economists have proposed that money illusion, which is a deviation from rationality in which individuals engage in nominal evaluation, can explain a wide range of important economic and social phenomena. This proposition stands in sharp contrast to the standard economic assumption of rationality that requires individuals to judge the value of money only on the basis of the bundle of goods that it can buy—its real value—and not on the basis of the actual amount of currency—its nominal value. We used fMRI to investigate whether the brain's reward circuitry exhibits money illusion. Subjects received prizes in 2 different experimental conditions that were identical in real economic terms, but differed in nominal terms. Thus, in the absence of money illusion there should be no differences in activation in reward-related brain areas. In contrast, we found that areas of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), which have been previously associated with the processing of anticipatory and experienced rewards, and the valuation of goods, exhibited money illusion. We also found that the amount of money illusion exhibited by the vmPFC was correlated with the amount of money illusion exhibited in the evaluation of economic transactions. PMID:19307555

  2. Sensitivity to syntax in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Dikker, Suzanne; Rabagliati, Hugh; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2009-01-01

    One of the most intriguing findings on language comprehension is that violations of syntactic predictions can affect event-related potentials as early as 120 ms, in the same time-window as early sensory processing. This effect, the so-called early left-anterior negativity (ELAN), has been argued to reflect word category access and initial syntactic structure building (Friederici, 2002). In two experiments, we used magnetoencephalography to investigate whether (a) rapid word category identification relies on overt category-marking closed-class morphemes and (b) whether violations of word category predictions affect modality-specific sensory responses. Participants read sentences containing violations of word category predictions. Unexpected items varied in whether or not their word category was marked by an overt function morpheme. In Experiment 1, the amplitude of the visual evoked M100 component was increased for unexpected items, but only when word category was overtly marked by a function morpheme. Dipole modeling localized the generator of this effect to the occipital cortex. Experiment 2 replicated the main results of Experiment 1 and eliminated two non-morphology-related explanations of the M100 contrast we observed between targets containing overt category-marking and targets that lacked such morphology. Our results show that during reading, syntactically relevant cues in the input can affect activity in occipital regions at around 125 ms, a finding that may shed new light on the remarkable rapidity of language processing. PMID:19121826

  3. The perirhinal cortex and recognition memory interference.

    PubMed

    Watson, Hilary C; Lee, Andy C H

    2013-02-27

    There has recently been an increase in interest in the effects of visual interference on memory processing, with the aim of elucidating the role of the perirhinal cortex (PRC) in recognition memory. One view argues that the PRC processes highly complex conjunctions of object features, and recent evidence from rodents suggests that these representations may be vital for buffering against the effects of pre-retrieval interference on object recognition memory. To investigate whether PRC-dependent object representations play a similar role in humans, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to scan neurologically healthy participants while they performed a novel interference-match-to-sample task. This paradigm was specifically designed to concurrently assess the impact of object versus spatial interference, on recognition memory for objects or scenes, while keeping constant the amount of object and scene information presented across all trials. Activity at retrieval was examined, within an anatomically defined PRC region of interest, according to the demand for object or scene memory, following a period of object compared with spatial interference. Critically, we found greater PRC activity for object memory following object interference, compared with object memory following scene interference, and no difference between object and scene interference for scene recognition. These data demonstrate a role for the human PRC during object recognition memory, following a period of object, but not scene interference, and emphasize the importance of representational content to mnemonic processing.

  4. Inhibition in the Human Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Inui, Koji; Nakagawa, Kei; Nishihara, Makoto; Motomura, Eishi; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2016-01-01

    Despite their indispensable roles in sensory processing, little is known about inhibitory interneurons in humans. Inhibitory postsynaptic potentials cannot be recorded non-invasively, at least in a pure form, in humans. We herein sought to clarify whether prepulse inhibition (PPI) in the auditory cortex reflected inhibition via interneurons using magnetoencephalography. An abrupt increase in sound pressure by 10 dB in a continuous sound was used to evoke the test response, and PPI was observed by inserting a weak (5 dB increase for 1 ms) prepulse. The time course of the inhibition evaluated by prepulses presented at 10–800 ms before the test stimulus showed at least two temporally distinct inhibitions peaking at approximately 20–60 and 600 ms that presumably reflected IPSPs by fast spiking, parvalbumin-positive cells and somatostatin-positive, Martinotti cells, respectively. In another experiment, we confirmed that the degree of the inhibition depended on the strength of the prepulse, but not on the amplitude of the prepulse-evoked cortical response, indicating that the prepulse-evoked excitatory response and prepulse-evoked inhibition reflected activation in two different pathways. Although many diseases such as schizophrenia may involve deficits in the inhibitory system, we do not have appropriate methods to evaluate them; therefore, the easy and non-invasive method described herein may be clinically useful. PMID:27219470

  5. Cortex and amygdala morphology in psychopathy.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, Marina; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Hare, Robert D; Cavedo, Enrica; Najt, Pablo; Pievani, Michela; Rasser, Paul E; Laakso, Mikko P; Aronen, Hannu J; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Vaurio, Olli; Thompson, Paul M; Tiihonen, Jari

    2011-08-30

    Psychopathy is characterized by abnormal emotional processes, but only recent neuroimaging studies have investigated its cerebral correlates. The study aim was to map local differences of cortical and amygdalar morphology. Cortical pattern matching and radial distance mapping techniques were used to analyze the magnetic resonance images of 26 violent male offenders (age: 32±8) with psychopathy diagnosed using the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) and no schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and in matched controls (age: 35± sp="0.12"/>11). The cortex displayed up to 20% reduction in the orbitofrontal and midline structures (corrected p<0.001 bilaterally). Up to 30% tissue reduction in the basolateral nucleus, and 10-30% enlargement effects in the central and lateral nuclei indicated abnormal structure of the amygdala (corrected p=0.05 on the right; and symmetrical pattern on the left). Psychopathy features specific morphology of the main cerebral structures involved in cognitive and emotional processing, consistent with clinical and functional data, and with a hypothesis of an alternative evolutionary brain development.

  6. Achieving That Elusive "Leadership Zone"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Reaching the "leadership zone" happens when librarians tap into the extraordinary skills lying within to overcome obstacles and transform sometimes-difficult situations into meaningful outcomes. Maturing into an experienced leader who stays in the leadership zone requires knowledge, training, and practice. This article provides tactical…

  7. The Intertropical Convergence Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Intertropical Convergence Zone, or ITCZ, is the region that circles the Earth, near the equator, where the trade winds of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres come together. The intense sun and warm water of the equator heats the air in the ITCZ, raising its humidity and causing it to rise. As the air rises it cools, releasing the accumulated moisture in an almost perpetual series of thunderstorms. Variation in the location of the ITCZ drastically affects rainfall in many equatorial nations, resulting in the wet and dry seasons of the tropics rather than the cold and warm seasons of higher latitudes. Longer term changes in the ITCZ can result in severe droughts or flooding in nearby areas. This image is a combination of cloud data from NOAA's newest Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-11) and color land cover classification data. The ITCZ is the band of bright white clouds that cuts across the center of the image. For more GOES images, visit the GOES Project Science site. Image Courtesy GOES Project Science Office

  8. Detecting livestock production zones.

    PubMed

    Grisi-Filho, J H H; Amaku, M; Ferreira, F; Dias, R A; Neto, J S Ferreira; Negreiros, R L; Ossada, R

    2013-07-01

    Communities are sets of nodes that are related in an important way, most likely sharing common properties and/or playing similar roles within a network. Unraveling a network structure, and hence the trade preferences and pathways, could be useful to a researcher or a decision maker. We implemented a community detection algorithm to find livestock communities, which is consistent with the definition of a livestock production zone, assuming that a community is a group of farm premises in which an animal is more likely to stay during its lifetime than expected by chance. We applied this algorithm to the network of animal movements within the state of Mato Grosso for 2007. This database holds information concerning 87,899 premises and 521,431 movements throughout the year, totaling 15,844,779 animals moved. The community detection algorithm achieved a network partition that shows a clear geographical and commercial pattern, two crucial features for preventive veterinary medicine applications; this algorithm provides also a meaningful interpretation to trade networks where links emerge based on trader node choices.

  9. Coastal Zone Color Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) spacecraft ocean color instrument is capable of measuring and mapping global ocean surface chlorophyll concentration. It is a scanning radiometer with multiband capability. With new electronics and some mechanical, and optical re-work, it probably can be made flight worthy. Some additional components of a second flight model are also available. An engineering study and further tests are necessary to determine exactly what effort is required to properly prepare the instrument for spaceflight and the nature of interfaces to prospective spacecraft. The CZCS provides operational instrument capability for monitoring of ocean productivity and currents. It could be a simple, low cost alternative to developing new instruments for ocean color imaging. Researchers have determined that with global ocean color data they can: specify quantitatively the role of oceans in the global carbon cycle and other major biogeochemical cycles; determine the magnitude and variability of annual primary production by marine phytoplankton on a global scale; understand the fate of fluvial nutrients and their possible affect on carbon budgets; elucidate the coupling mechanism between upwelling and large scale patterns in ocean basins; answer questions concerning the large scale distribution and timing of spring blooms in the global ocean; acquire a better understanding of the processes associated with mixing along the edge of eddies, coastal currents, western boundary currents, etc., and acquire global data on marine optical properties.

  10. Lithospheric flexure at fracture zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandwell, D.; Schubert, G.

    1982-01-01

    Studies attempting to demonstrate that lithospheric flexure occurs across the Pioneer and Mendocino fracture zones, and that the flexural topography is a topographic expression at these fracture zones, are presented. The flexure is modelled and compared with predicted depths with five bathymetric profiles which cross the two fracture zones at different ages. The model uses a thin elastic plate overlying an incompressible fluid half-space, and incorporates a temperature-dependent effective elastic thickness. Several conclusions were derived from this study. First, it is found that no significant slip on the fossil fault planes of the Mendocino and Pioneer fracture zones exists. In addition, the flexural amplitude is determined to increase with age. Finally, it is concluded that there is elastic coupling between the Mendocino and Pioneer fracture zones since the separation is less than a flexural wavelength.

  11. Motor cortex activity predicts response alternation during sensorimotor decisions

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Anna-Antonia; Siegel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Our actions are constantly guided by decisions based on sensory information. The motor cortex is traditionally viewed as the final output stage in this process, merely executing motor responses based on these decisions. However, it is not clear if, beyond this role, the motor cortex itself impacts response selection. Here, we report activity fluctuations over motor cortex measured using MEG, which are unrelated to choice content and predict responses to a visuomotor task seconds before decisions are made. These fluctuations are strongly influenced by the previous trial's response and predict a tendency to switch between response alternatives for consecutive decisions. This alternation behaviour depends on the size of neural signals still present from the previous response. Our results uncover a response-alternation bias in sensorimotor decision making. Furthermore, they suggest that motor cortex is more than an output stage and instead shapes response selection during sensorimotor decision making. PMID:27713396

  12. The Laryngeal Motor Cortex: Its Organization and Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Simonyan, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Our ability to learn and control the motor aspects of complex laryngeal behaviors, such as speech and song, is modulated by the laryngeal motor cortex (LMC), which is situated in the area 4 of the primary motor cortex and establishes both direct and indirect connections with laryngeal motoneurons. In contrast, the LMC in monkeys is located in the area 6 of the premotor cortex, projects only indirectly to laryngeal motoneurons and its destruction has essentially no effect on production of species-specific calls. These differences in cytoarchitectonic location and connectivity may be a result of hominid evolution that led to the LMC shift from the phylogenetically “old” to “new” motor cortex in order to fulfill its paramount function, i.e., voluntary motor control of human speech and song production. PMID:24929930

  13. Recurrent circuitry dynamically shapes the activation of piriform cortex.

    PubMed

    Franks, Kevin M; Russo, Marco J; Sosulski, Dara L; Mulligan, Abigail A; Siegelbaum, Steven A; Axel, Richard

    2011-10-06

    In the piriform cortex, individual odorants activate a unique ensemble of neurons that are distributed without discernable spatial order. Piriform neurons receive convergent excitatory inputs from random collections of olfactory bulb glomeruli. Pyramidal cells also make extensive recurrent connections with other excitatory and inhibitory neurons. We introduced channelrhodopsin into the piriform cortex to characterize these intrinsic circuits and to examine their contribution to activity driven by afferent bulbar inputs. We demonstrated that individual pyramidal cells are sparsely interconnected by thousands of excitatory synaptic connections that extend, largely undiminished, across the piriform cortex, forming a large excitatory network that can dominate the bulbar input. Pyramidal cells also activate inhibitory interneurons that mediate strong, local feedback inhibition that scales with excitation. This recurrent network can enhance or suppress bulbar input, depending on whether the input arrives before or after the cortex is activated. This circuitry may shape the ensembles of piriform cells that encode odorant identity.

  14. Remodeling of the piriform cortex after lesion in adult rodents.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Sharyn L; Mahairaki, Vasiliki; Zhou, Lijun; Song, Yeajin; Koliatsos, Vassilis E

    2014-09-10

    Denervation of the piriform cortex by bulbotomy causes a series of important cellular changes in the inhibitory interneurons of layer I and transsynaptic apoptosis of a large number of pyramidal neurons in outer layer II within 24 h. In this study, we report that following the marked loss of neurons in outer layer II, the piriform cortex is reconstituted by the addition of newly formed neurons that restore the number to a preinjury level within 30 days. We provide evidence that the number of newly divided neuronal progenitors increases after injury and further show that a population of doublecortin-positive cells that resides in the piriform cortex decreases after injury. Taken together, these findings suggest that the piriform cortex has significant neurogenic potential that is activated following sensory denervation and may contribute toward the replacement of neurons in outer layer II.

  15. Multiple dynamic representations in the motor cortex during sensorimotor learning.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Gutnisky, D A; Peron, S; O'Connor, D H; Wiegert, J S; Tian, L; Oertner, T G; Looger, L L; Svoboda, K

    2012-04-25

    The mechanisms linking sensation and action during learning are poorly understood. Layer 2/3 neurons in the motor cortex might participate in sensorimotor integration and learning; they receive input from sensory cortex and excite deep layer neurons, which control movement. Here we imaged activity in the same set of layer 2/3 neurons in the motor cortex over weeks, while mice learned to detect objects with their whiskers and report detection with licking. Spatially intermingled neurons represented sensory (touch) and motor behaviours (whisker movements and licking). With learning, the population-level representation of task-related licking strengthened. In trained mice, population-level representations were redundant and stable, despite dynamism of single-neuron representations. The activity of a subpopulation of neurons was consistent with touch driving licking behaviour. Our results suggest that ensembles of motor cortex neurons couple sensory input to multiple, related motor programs during learning.

  16. The laryngeal motor cortex: its organization and connectivity.

    PubMed

    Simonyan, Kristina

    2014-10-01

    Our ability to learn and control the motor aspects of complex laryngeal behaviors, such as speech and song, is modulated by the laryngeal motor cortex (LMC), which is situated in the area 4 of the primary motor cortex and establishes both direct and indirect connections with laryngeal motoneurons. In contrast, the LMC in monkeys is located in the area 6 of the premotor cortex, projects only indirectly to laryngeal motoneurons and its destruction has essentially no effect on production of species-specific calls. These differences in cytoarchitectonic location and connectivity may be a result of hominid evolution that led to the LMC shift from the phylogenetically 'old' to 'new' motor cortex in order to fulfill its paramount function, that is, voluntary motor control of human speech and song production.

  17. Robust neuronal dynamics in premotor cortex during motor planning

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nuo; Daie, Kayvon; Svoboda, Karel; Druckmann, Shaul

    2016-01-01

    Neural activity maintains representations that bridge past and future events, often over many seconds. Network models can produce persistent and ramping activity, but the positive feedback that is critical for these slow dynamics can cause sensitivity to perturbations. Here we use electrophysiology and optogenetic perturbations in mouse premotor cortex to probe robustness of persistent neural representations during motor planning. Preparatory activity is remarkably robust to large-scale unilateral silencing: detailed neural dynamics that drive specific future movements were quickly and selectively restored by the network. Selectivity did not recover after bilateral silencing of premotor cortex. Perturbations to one hemisphere are thus corrected by information from the other hemisphere. Corpus callosum bisections demonstrated that premotor cortex hemispheres can maintain preparatory activity independently. Redundancy across selectively coupled modules, as we observed in premotor cortex, is a hallmark of robust control systems. Network models incorporating these principles show robustness that is consistent with data. PMID:27074502

  18. Action preparation shapes processing in early visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Gutteling, Tjerk P; Petridou, Natalia; Dumoulin, Serge O; Harvey, Ben M; Aarnoutse, Erik J; Kenemans, J Leon; Neggers, Sebastian F W

    2015-04-22

    Preparation for an action, such as grasping an object, is accompanied by an enhanced perception of the object's action-relevant features, such as orientation and size. Cortical feedback from motor planning areas to early visual areas may drive this enhanced perception. To examine whether action preparation modulates activity in early human visual cortex, subjects grasped or pointed to oriented objects while high-resolution fMRI data were acquired. Using multivoxel pattern analysis techniques, we could decode with >70% accuracy whether a grasping or pointing action was prepared from signals in visual cortex as early as V1. These signals in early visual cortex were observed even when actions were only prepared but not executed. Anterior parietal cortex, on the other hand, showed clearest modulation for actual movements. This demonstrates that preparation of actions, even without execution, modulates relevant neuronal populations in early visual areas.

  19. The onset of visual experience gates auditory cortex critical periods

    PubMed Central

    Mowery, Todd M.; Kotak, Vibhakar C.; Sanes, Dan H.

    2016-01-01

    Sensory systems influence one another during development and deprivation can lead to cross-modal plasticity. As auditory function begins before vision, we investigate the effect of manipulating visual experience during auditory cortex critical periods (CPs) by assessing the influence of early, normal and delayed eyelid opening on hearing loss-induced changes to membrane and inhibitory synaptic properties. Early eyelid opening closes the auditory cortex CPs precociously and dark rearing prevents this effect. In contrast, delayed eyelid opening extends the auditory cortex CPs by several additional days. The CP for recovery from hearing loss is also closed prematurely by early eyelid opening and extended by delayed eyelid opening. Furthermore, when coupled with transient hearing loss that animals normally fully recover from, very early visual experience leads to inhibitory deficits that persist into adulthood. Finally, we demonstrate a functional projection from the visual to auditory cortex that could mediate these effects. PMID:26786281

  20. Cortex Matures Faster in Youths With Highest IQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIH Cortex Matures Faster in Youths With Highest IQ Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents For ... on. Photo: Getty image (StockDisc) Youths with superior IQ are distinguished by how fast the thinking part ...

  1. An immunocytochemical mapping of somatostatin in the cat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Martín, F; Coveñas, R; Narváez, J A; Tramu, G

    2003-10-01

    Using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, the localization of somatostatin-28 (1-12)-like immunoreactive fibers and cell bodies in the auditory cortex of the cat (anterior, primary, secondary, temporal, ventral, ventroposterior, posterior and dorsoposterior auditory fields) was studied. In general, the distribution of SOM-ir structures is widespread in the auditory cortex of the feline. A high density of immunoreactive fibers as well as a low density of cell bodies containing somatostatin were observed in all the layers of the eight above-mentioned auditory fields. These data indicate that somatostatin-28 (1-12) could act as a neurotransmitter and/or a neuromodulator in the auditory cortex of the cat. The origin of the SOM-ir fibers in the auditory cortex of the cat, as well as the issue of whether the cell bodies containing somatostatin-28 (1-12) are local or projecting neurons is discussed.

  2. Transient human auditory cortex activation during volitional attention shifting

    PubMed Central

    Uhlig, Christian Harm; Gutschalk, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    While strong activation of auditory cortex is generally found for exogenous orienting of attention, endogenous, intra-modal shifting of auditory attention has not yet been demonstrated to evoke transient activation of the auditory cortex. Here, we used fMRI to test if endogenous shifting of attention is also associated with transient activation of the auditory cortex. In contrast to previous studies, attention shifts were completely self-initiated and not cued by transient auditory or visual stimuli. Stimuli were two dichotic, continuous streams of tones, whose perceptual grouping was not ambiguous. Participants were instructed to continuously focus on one of the streams and switch between the two after a while, indicating the time and direction of each attentional shift by pressing one of two response buttons. The BOLD response around the time of the button presses revealed robust activation of the auditory cortex, along with activation of a distributed task network. To test if the transient auditory cortex activation was specifically related to auditory orienting, a self-paced motor task was added, where participants were instructed to ignore the auditory stimulation while they pressed the response buttons in alternation and at a similar pace. Results showed that attentional orienting produced stronger activity in auditory cortex, but auditory cortex activation was also observed for button presses without focused attention to the auditory stimulus. The response related to attention shifting was stronger contralateral to the side where attention was shifted to. Contralateral-dominant activation was also observed in dorsal parietal cortex areas, confirming previous observations for auditory attention shifting in studies that used auditory cues. PMID:28273110

  3. Auditory Cortex Basal Activity Modulates Cochlear Responses in Chinchillas

    PubMed Central

    León, Alex; Elgueda, Diego; Silva, María A.; Hamamé, Carlos M.; Delano, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    Background The auditory efferent system has unique neuroanatomical pathways that connect the cerebral cortex with sensory receptor cells. Pyramidal neurons located in layers V and VI of the primary auditory cortex constitute descending projections to the thalamus, inferior colliculus, and even directly to the superior olivary complex and to the cochlear nucleus. Efferent pathways are connected to the cochlear receptor by the olivocochlear system, which innervates outer hair cells and auditory nerve fibers. The functional role of the cortico-olivocochlear efferent system remains debated. We hypothesized that auditory cortex basal activity modulates cochlear and auditory-nerve afferent responses through the efferent system. Methodology/Principal Findings Cochlear microphonics (CM), auditory-nerve compound action potentials (CAP) and auditory cortex evoked potentials (ACEP) were recorded in twenty anesthetized chinchillas, before, during and after auditory cortex deactivation by two methods: lidocaine microinjections or cortical cooling with cryoloops. Auditory cortex deactivation induced a transient reduction in ACEP amplitudes in fifteen animals (deactivation experiments) and a permanent reduction in five chinchillas (lesion experiments). We found significant changes in the amplitude of CM in both types of experiments, being the most common effect a CM decrease found in fifteen animals. Concomitantly to CM amplitude changes, we found CAP increases in seven chinchillas and CAP reductions in thirteen animals. Although ACEP amplitudes were completely recovered after ninety minutes in deactivation experiments, only partial recovery was observed in the magnitudes of cochlear responses. Conclusions/Significance These results show that blocking ongoing auditory cortex activity modulates CM and CAP responses, demonstrating that cortico-olivocochlear circuits regulate auditory nerve and cochlear responses through a basal efferent tone. The diversity of the obtained effects

  4. Peripheral Nerve Injury in Developing Rats Reorganizes Motor Cortex.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-19

    Island 02912 *r201-484 It. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Personnel and Training Research Program May 19, 1986 Office of Naval...The Cerebral Cortex The Functional Areas of the Cerebral Cortex, E. G. Jones and A. Peters. Eds. (Plenum, New York, 1986 ) vol. 5, p. 243-270. 12. In rat...and processed for Nissl substance or cytochrome oxidase staining. In reconstructions, nap borders were defined as the mid-point between two distinct

  5. Reduced structural connectivity in ventral visual cortex in congenital prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Cibu; Avidan, Galia; Humphreys, Kate; Jung, Kwan-jin; Gao, Fuqiang; Behrmann, Marlene

    2009-01-01

    Using diffusion tensor imaging and tractography, we found that a disruption in structural connectivity in ventral occipito-temporal cortex may be the neurobiological basis for the lifelong impairment in face recognition that is experienced by individuals who suffer from congenital prosopagnosia. Our findings suggest that white-matter fibers in ventral occipito-temporal cortex support the integrated function of a distributed cortical network that subserves normal face processing.

  6. Differential Modification of Cortical and Thalamic Projections to Cat Primary Auditory Cortex Following Early- and Late-Onset Deafness.

    PubMed

    Chabot, Nicole; Butler, Blake E; Lomber, Stephen G

    2015-10-15

    Following sensory deprivation, primary somatosensory and visual cortices undergo crossmodal plasticity, which subserves the remaining modalities. However, controversy remains regarding the neuroplastic potential of primary auditory cortex (A1). To examine this, we identified cortical and thalamic projections to A1 in hearing cats and those with early- and late-onset deafness. Following early deafness, inputs from second auditory cortex (A2) are amplified, whereas the number originating in the dorsal zone (DZ) decreases. In addition, inputs from the dorsal medial geniculate nucleus (dMGN) increase, whereas those from the ventral division (vMGN) are reduced. In late-deaf cats, projections from the anterior auditory field (AAF) are amplified, whereas those from the DZ decrease. Additionally, in a subset of early- and late-deaf cats, area 17 and the lateral posterior nucleus (LP) of the visual thalamus project concurrently to A1. These results demonstrate that patterns of projections to A1 are modified following deafness, with statistically significant changes occurring within the auditory thalamus and some cortical areas. Moreover, we provide anatomical evidence for small-scale crossmodal changes in projections to A1 that differ between early- and late-onset deaf animals, suggesting that potential crossmodal activation of primary auditory cortex differs depending on the age of deafness onset.

  7. Inhibition of classically conditioned eyeblink responses by stimulation of the cerebellar cortex in the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed

    Hesslow, G

    1994-04-15

    The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that neurones in the anterior interpositus nucleus, under the control of Purkinje cells in the c1 and c3 zones of the cerebellar cortex, exert some control over classically conditioned responses. In particular, the experiments were designed to determine whether the cerebellar control of conditioned and unconditioned responses is different. The experiments were performed on cats decerebrated rostral to the red nucleus under halothane anaesthesia. The cats were conditioned using either a 1000 Hz tone or trains of stimuli through the skin of the proximal forelimb as the conditioned stimulus, and periorbital electrical stimulation as the unconditioned stimulus. A large proportion of the animals acquired conditioned responses at normal rates. It could be shown that these were true conditioned responses and did not result from sensitization or pseudoconditioning. For instance, unpaired presentations of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli caused rapid extinction. Cerebellar areas controlling eyeblink were identified by recording climbing fibre responses in the cerebellar cortex and recording EMG activity in the eyelid evoked by stimulation of the cerebellar cortex. When single shocks of 40-70 microA were applied to these areas during the emission of conditioned eyeblink responses, the latter were strongly inhibited. The inhibition had a latency of about 10 ms and a duration of 25-75 ms. It was shown that this inhibition of the conditioned responses was topographically specific and could only be evoked from cortical sites identified as controlling eyeblink. Stimulation of the periphery of an eyeblink area caused little or no inhibition. The effect of cortical stimulation on unconditioned reflex responses in the orbicularis oculi muscle was also tested. Some inhibition of unconditioned responses was observed, but quantitative analysis showed that this inhibition was considerably weaker than the corresponding

  8. Inhibition of classically conditioned eyeblink responses by stimulation of the cerebellar cortex in the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed Central

    Hesslow, G

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that neurones in the anterior interpositus nucleus, under the control of Purkinje cells in the c1 and c3 zones of the cerebellar cortex, exert some control over classically conditioned responses. In particular, the experiments were designed to determine whether the cerebellar control of conditioned and unconditioned responses is different. The experiments were performed on cats decerebrated rostral to the red nucleus under halothane anaesthesia. The cats were conditioned using either a 1000 Hz tone or trains of stimuli through the skin of the proximal forelimb as the conditioned stimulus, and periorbital electrical stimulation as the unconditioned stimulus. A large proportion of the animals acquired conditioned responses at normal rates. It could be shown that these were true conditioned responses and did not result from sensitization or pseudoconditioning. For instance, unpaired presentations of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli caused rapid extinction. Cerebellar areas controlling eyeblink were identified by recording climbing fibre responses in the cerebellar cortex and recording EMG activity in the eyelid evoked by stimulation of the cerebellar cortex. When single shocks of 40-70 microA were applied to these areas during the emission of conditioned eyeblink responses, the latter were strongly inhibited. The inhibition had a latency of about 10 ms and a duration of 25-75 ms. It was shown that this inhibition of the conditioned responses was topographically specific and could only be evoked from cortical sites identified as controlling eyeblink. Stimulation of the periphery of an eyeblink area caused little or no inhibition. The effect of cortical stimulation on unconditioned reflex responses in the orbicularis oculi muscle was also tested. Some inhibition of unconditioned responses was observed, but quantitative analysis showed that this inhibition was considerably weaker than the corresponding

  9. Developmental history of the subplate zone, subplate neurons and interstitial white matter neurons: relevance for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kostović, Ivica; Judaš, Miloš; Sedmak, Goran

    2011-05-01

    The subplate zone is a transient cytoarchitectonic compartment of the fetal telencephalic wall and contains a population of subplate neurons which are the main neurons of the fetal neocortex and play a key role in normal development of cerebral cortical structure and connectivity. While the subplate zone disappears during the perinatal and early postnatal period, numerous subplate neurons survive and remain embedded in the superficial (gyral) white matter of adolescent and adult brain as so-called interstitial neurons. In both fetal and adult brain, subplate/interstitial neurons belong to two major classes of cortical cells: (a) projection (glutamatergic) neurons and (b) local circuit (GABAergic) interneurons. As interstitial neurons remain strategically positioned at the cortical/white matter interface through which various cortical afferent systems enter the deep cortical layers, they probably serve as auxiliary interneurons involved in differential "gating" of cortical input systems. It is widely accepted that prenatal lesions which alter the number of surviving subplate neurons (i.e., the number of interstitial neurons) and/or the nature of their involvement in cortical circuitry represent an important causal factor in pathogenesis of at least some types of schizophrenia--e.g., in the subgroup of patients with cognitive impairment and deficits of frontal lobe functions. The abnormal functioning of cortical circuitry in schizophrenia becomes manifest during the adolescence, when there is an increased demand for proper functioning of the prefrontal cortex. In this review, we describe developmental history of subplate zone, subplate neurons and surviving interstitial neurons, as well as presumed consequences of the increased number of GABAergic interstitial neurons in the prefrontal cortex. We propose that the increased number of GABAergic interstitial neurons leads to the increased inhibition of prefrontal cortical neurons. This inhibitory action of GABAergic

  10. Neurodynamics of the prefrontal cortex during conditional visuomotor associations.

    PubMed

    Loh, Marco; Pasupathy, Anitha; Miller, Earl K; Deco, Gustavo

    2008-03-01

    The prefrontal cortex is believed to be important for cognitive control, working memory, and learning. It is known to play an important role in the learning and execution of conditional visuomotor associations, a cognitive task in which stimuli have to be associated with actions by trial-and-error learning. In our modeling study, we sought to integrate several hypotheses on the function of the prefrontal cortex using a computational model, and compare the results to experimental data. We constructed a module of prefrontal cortex neurons exposed to two different inputs, which we envision to originate from the inferotemporal cortex and the basal ganglia. We found that working memory properties do not describe the dominant dynamics in the prefrontal cortex, but the activation seems to be transient, probably progressing along a pathway from sensory to motor areas. During the presentation of the cue, the dynamics of the prefrontal cortex is bistable, yielding a distinct activation for correct and error trails. We find that a linear change in network parameters relates to the changes in neural activity in consecutive correct trials during learning, which is important evidence for the underlying learning mechanisms.

  11. The Role of Cingulate Cortex in Vicarious Pain

    PubMed Central

    Yesudas, Esther H.; Lee, Tatia M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Vicarious pain is defined as the observation of individuals in pain. There is growing neuroimaging evidence suggesting that the cingulate cortex plays a significant role in self-experienced pain processing. Yet, very few studies have directly tested the distinct functions of the cingulate cortex for vicarious pain. In this review, one EEG and eighteen neuroimaging studies reporting cingulate cortex activity during pain observation were discussed. The data indicate that there is overlapping neural activity in the cingulate cortex during self- and vicarious pain. Such activity may contribute to shared neural pain representations that permit inference of the affective state of individuals in pain, facilitating empathy. However, the exact location of neuronal populations in which activity overlaps or differs for self- and observed pain processing requires further confirmation. This review also discusses evidence suggesting differential functions of the cingulate cortex in cognitive, affective, and motor processing during empathy induction. While affective processing in the cingulate cortex during pain observation has been explored relatively more often, its attention and motor roles remain underresearched. Shedding light on the neural correlates of vicarious pain and corresponding empathy in healthy populations can provide neurobiological markers and intervention targets for empathic deficits found in various clinical disorders. PMID:25815331

  12. The multisensory function of the human primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Murray, Micah M; Thelen, Antonia; Thut, Gregor; Romei, Vincenzo; Martuzzi, Roberto; Matusz, Pawel J

    2016-03-01

    It has been nearly 10 years since Ghazanfar and Schroeder (2006) proposed that the neocortex is essentially multisensory in nature. However, it is only recently that sufficient and hard evidence that supports this proposal has accrued. We review evidence that activity within the human primary visual cortex plays an active role in multisensory processes and directly impacts behavioural outcome. This evidence emerges from a full pallet of human brain imaging and brain mapping methods with which multisensory processes are quantitatively assessed by taking advantage of particular strengths of each technique as well as advances in signal analyses. Several general conclusions about multisensory processes in primary visual cortex of humans are supported relatively solidly. First, haemodynamic methods (fMRI/PET) show that there is both convergence and integration occurring within primary visual cortex. Second, primary visual cortex is involved in multisensory processes during early post-stimulus stages (as revealed by EEG/ERP/ERFs as well as TMS). Third, multisensory effects in primary visual cortex directly impact behaviour and perception, as revealed by correlational (EEG/ERPs/ERFs) as well as more causal measures (TMS/tACS). While the provocative claim of Ghazanfar and Schroeder (2006) that the whole of neocortex is multisensory in function has yet to be demonstrated, this can now be considered established in the case of the human primary visual cortex.

  13. Object-specific semantic coding in human perirhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Alex; Tyler, Lorraine K

    2014-04-02

    Category-specificity has been demonstrated in the human posterior ventral temporal cortex for a variety of object categories. Although object representations within the ventral visual pathway must be sufficiently rich and complex to support the recognition of individual objects, little is known about how specific objects are represented. Here, we used representational similarity analysis to determine what different kinds of object information are reflected in fMRI activation patterns and uncover the relationship between categorical and object-specific semantic representations. Our results show a gradient of informational specificity along the ventral stream from representations of image-based visual properties in early visual cortex, to categorical representations in the posterior ventral stream. A key finding showed that object-specific semantic information is uniquely represented in the perirhinal cortex, which was also increasingly engaged for objects that are more semantically confusable. These findings suggest a key role for the perirhinal cortex in representing and processing object-specific semantic information that is more critical for highly confusable objects. Our findings extend current distributed models by showing coarse dissociations between objects in posterior ventral cortex, and fine-grained distinctions between objects supported by the anterior medial temporal lobes, including the perirhinal cortex, which serve to integrate complex object information.

  14. Cortex Integrity Relevance in Muscle Synergies in Severe Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    García-Cossio, Eliana; Broetz, Doris; Birbaumer, Niels; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent experimental evidence has indicated that the motor system coordinates muscle activations through a linear combination of muscle synergies that are specified at the spinal or brainstem networks level. After stroke upper limb impairment is characterized by abnormal patterns of muscle activations or synergies. Objective: This study aimed at characterizing the muscle synergies in severely affected chronic stroke patients. Furthermore, the influence of integrity of the sensorimotor cortex on synergy modularity and its relation with motor impairment was evaluated. Methods: Surface electromyography from 33 severely impaired chronic stroke patients was recorded during 6 bilateral movements. Muscle synergies were extracted and synergy patterns were correlated with motor impairment scales. Results: Muscle synergies extracted revealed different physiological patterns dependent on the preservation of the sensorimotor cortex. Patients without intact sensorimotor cortex showed a high preservation of muscle synergies. On the contrary, patients with intact sensorimotor cortex showed poorer muscle synergies preservation and an increase in new generated synergies. Furthermore, the preservation of muscle synergies correlated positively with hand functionality in patients with intact sensorimotor cortex and subcortical lesions only. Conclusion: Our results indicate that severely paralyzed chronic stroke patient with intact sensorimotor cortex might sculpt new synergy patterns as a response to maladaptive compensatory strategies. PMID:25294998

  15. What does spatial alternation tell us about retrosplenial cortex function?

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Andrew J. D.; Powell, Anna L.; Holmes, Joshua D.; Vann, Seralynne D.; Aggleton, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The retrosplenial cortex supports navigation, but there are good reasons to suppose that the retrosplenial cortex has a very different role in spatial memory from that of the hippocampus and anterior thalamic nuclei. For example, retrosplenial lesions appear to have little or no effect on standard tests of spatial alternation. To examine these differences, the current study sought to determine whether the retrosplenial cortex is important for just one spatial cue type (e.g., allocentric, directional or intra-maze cues) or whether the retrosplenial cortex helps the animal switch between competing spatial strategies or competing cue types. Using T-maze alternation, retrosplenial lesion rats were challenged with situations in which the available spatial information between the sample and test phases was changed, so taxing the interaction between different cue types. Clear lesion deficits emerged when intra- and extra-maze cues were placed in conflict (by rotating the maze between the sample and choice phases), or when the animals were tested in the dark in a double-maze. Finally, temporary inactivation of the retrosplenial cortex by muscimol infusions resulted in a striking deficit on standard T-maze alternation, indicating that, over time, other sites may be able to compensate for the loss of the retrosplenial cortex. This pattern of results is consistent with the impoverished use of both allocentric and directional information, exacerbated by an impaired ability to switch between different cue types. PMID:26042009

  16. Spatial processing in the auditory cortex of the macaque monkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recanzone, Gregg H.

    2000-10-01

    The patterns of cortico-cortical and cortico-thalamic connections of auditory cortical areas in the rhesus monkey have led to the hypothesis that acoustic information is processed in series and in parallel in the primate auditory cortex. Recent physiological experiments in the behaving monkey indicate that the response properties of neurons in different cortical areas are both functionally distinct from each other, which is indicative of parallel processing, and functionally similar to each other, which is indicative of serial processing. Thus, auditory cortical processing may be similar to the serial and parallel "what" and "where" processing by the primate visual cortex. If "where" information is serially processed in the primate auditory cortex, neurons in cortical areas along this pathway should have progressively better spatial tuning properties. This prediction is supported by recent experiments that have shown that neurons in the caudomedial field have better spatial tuning properties than neurons in the primary auditory cortex. Neurons in the caudomedial field are also better than primary auditory cortex neurons at predicting the sound localization ability across different stimulus frequencies and bandwidths in both azimuth and elevation. These data support the hypothesis that the primate auditory cortex processes acoustic information in a serial and parallel manner and suggest that this may be a general cortical mechanism for sensory perception.

  17. Cooperative processing in primary somatosensory cortex and posterior parietal cortex during tactile working memory.

    PubMed

    Ku, Yixuan; Zhao, Di; Bodner, Mark; Zhou, Yong-Di

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, causal roles of both the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) and the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) were investigated in a tactile unimodal working memory (WM) task. Individual magnetic resonance imaging-based single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (spTMS) was applied, respectively, to the left SI (ipsilateral to tactile stimuli), right SI (contralateral to tactile stimuli) and right PPC (contralateral to tactile stimuli), while human participants were performing a tactile-tactile unimodal delayed matching-to-sample task. The time points of spTMS were 300, 600 and 900 ms after the onset of the tactile sample stimulus (duration: 200 ms). Compared with ipsilateral SI, application of spTMS over either contralateral SI or contralateral PPC at those time points significantly impaired the accuracy of task performance. Meanwhile, the deterioration in accuracy did not vary with the stimulating time points. Together, these results indicate that the tactile information is processed cooperatively by SI and PPC in the same hemisphere, starting from the early delay of the tactile unimodal WM task. This pattern of processing of tactile information is different from the pattern in tactile-visual cross-modal WM. In a tactile-visual cross-modal WM task, SI and PPC contribute to the processing sequentially, suggesting a process of sensory information transfer during the early delay between modalities.

  18. Signaling Interactions in the Adrenal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Spät, András; Hunyady, László; Szanda, Gergő

    2016-01-01

    The major physiological stimuli of aldosterone secretion are angiotensin II (AII) and extracellular K+, whereas cortisol production is primarily regulated by corticotropin (ACTH) in fasciculata cells. AII triggers Ca2+ release from internal stores that is followed by store-operated and voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry, whereas K+-evoked depolarization activates voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. ACTH acts primarily through the formation of cAMP and subsequent protein phosphorylation by protein kinase A. Both Ca2+ and cAMP facilitate the transfer of cholesterol to mitochondrial inner membrane. The cytosolic Ca2+ signal is transferred into the mitochondrial matrix and enhances pyridine nucleotide reduction. Increased formation of NADH results in increased ATP production, whereas that of NADPH supports steroid production. In reality, the control of adrenocortical function is a lot more sophisticated with second messengers crosstalking and mutually modifying each other’s pathways. Cytosolic Ca2+ and cGMP are both capable of modifying cAMP metabolism, while cAMP may enhance Ca2+ release and voltage-activated Ca2+ channel activity. Besides, mitochondrial Ca2+ signal brings about cAMP formation within the organelle and this further enhances aldosterone production. Maintained aldosterone and cortisol secretion are optimized by the concurrent actions of Ca2+ and cAMP, as exemplified by the apparent synergism of Ca2+ influx (inducing cAMP formation) and Ca2+ release during response to AII. Thus, cross-actions of parallel signal transducing pathways are not mere intracellular curiosities but rather substantial phenomena, which fine-tune the biological response. Our review focuses on these functionally relevant interactions between the Ca2+ and the cyclic nucleotide signal transducing pathways hitherto described in the adrenal cortex. PMID:26973596

  19. Orbitofrontal Cortex Biases Attention to Emotional Events

    PubMed Central

    Hartikainen, K.M.; Ogawa, K.H.; Knight, R.T.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the role of orbitofrontal (OF) cortex in regulating emotion-attention interaction and the balance between involuntary and voluntary attention allocation. We studied patients with OF lesion applying reaction time (RT) and event-related potential (ERP) measures in a lateralized visual discrimination task with novel task-irrelevant affective pictures (unpleasant, pleasant or neutral) preceding a neutral target. This allowed for comparing the effects of automatic attention allocation to emotional vs neutral stimuli on subsequent voluntary attention allocation to target stimuli. N2-P3a and N2-P3b ERP components served as measures of involuntary and voluntary attention allocation correspondingly. Enhanced N2-P3a amplitudes to emotional distractors and reduced N2-P3b amplitudes to targets preceded by emotional distractors were observed in healthy subjects, suggesting automatic emotional orienting interfered with subsequent voluntary orienting. OF patients showed an opposite pattern with tendency towards reduced N2-P3a responses to emotional distractors, suggesting impaired automatic orienting to emotional stimuli due to orbitofrontal damage. Enhanced N2-P3b responses to targets preceded by any affective distractor was observed in OF patients, suggesting bias towards voluntary target-related attention allocation due to orbitofrontal lesion. Behavioral evidence indicated that LVF attention performance was modulated by emotional stimuli. Specifically, OF patients responded faster to LVF targets subsequent to pleasant emotional distractors. We suggest damage to the orbitofrontal circuitry leads to dysbalance between voluntary and involuntary attention allocation in the context of affective distracters with predisposition to posterior target related processing over frontal novelty and affect related processing. Furthermore, we suggest orbitofrontal influence on emotion- attention interaction is valence and hemisphere dependent. PMID:22413757

  20. Functional Connectivity of the Posteromedial Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cauda, Franco; Geminiani, Giuliano; D'Agata, Federico; Sacco, Katiuscia; Duca, Sergio; Bagshaw, Andrew P.; Cavanna, Andrea E.

    2010-01-01

    As different areas within the PMC have different connectivity patterns with various cortical and subcortical regions, we hypothesized that distinct functional modules may be present within the PMC. Because the PMC appears to be the most active region during resting state, it has been postulated to play a fundamental role in the control of baseline brain functioning within the default mode network (DMN). Therefore one goal of this study was to explore which components of the PMC are specifically involved in the DMN. In a sample of seventeen healthy volunteers, we performed an unsupervised voxelwise ROI-based clustering based on resting state functional connectivity. Our results showed four clusters with different network connectivity. Each cluster showed positive and negative correlations with cortical regions involved in the DMN. Progressive shifts in PMC functional connectivity emerged from anterior to posterior and from dorsal to ventral ROIs. Ventral posterior portions of PMC were found to be part of a network implicated in the visuo-spatial guidance of movements, whereas dorsal anterior portions of PMC were interlinked with areas involved in attentional control. Ventral retrosplenial PMC selectively correlated with a network showing considerable overlap with the DMN, indicating that it makes essential contributions in self-referential processing, including autobiographical memory processing. Finally, ventral posterior PMC was shown to be functionally connected with a visual network. The paper represents the first attempt to provide a systematic, unsupervised, voxelwise clustering of the human posteromedial cortex (PMC), using resting-state functional connectivity data. Moreover, a ROI-based parcellation was used to confirm the results. PMID:20927345

  1. Cathepsin B from human renal cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Gounaris, A D; Slater, E E

    1982-01-01

    Cysteine-proteinase activity was observed in homogenates of human-cadaver renal cortex. This activity co-purified with renin enzymic activity until separation by aminohexyl-Sepharose--pepstatin affinity chromatography. The cysteine proteinase was purified 1780-fold after the following successive chromatographic procedures: Sephadex G-75, DEAE-cellulose DE-52, and an organomercurial affinity resin. The proteinase activity was dependent upon activation by thiol-containing compounds such as dithiothreitol, as well as by EDTA, and was inhibited by the thiol-group-specific alkylating reagents iodoacetic acid and N-ethylmaleimide. DE-52 cellulose chromatography resolved the cysteine proteinase into two components. On the basis of molecular size (26 000 daltons), activity as a function of pH, stability as a function of pH, substrate specificity and thermal lability, the major component (95%) has been identified as cathepsin B. The DE-52 cellulose elution pattern of the minor component (5%) is suggestive of cathepsin H [Schwartz & Barrett (1980) Biochem. J. 191, 487-497] Enzymic activity was determined with synthetic substrates, in particular alpha-N-benzoyl-DL-arginine 2-naphthylamide (Bz-Arg-NNap), thus precluding the detection of cathepsin L [Kirschke, Langner, Wiederanders, Ansorge, Bohley & Broghammer (1976) Acta Biol. Med. Germ. 35, 285-299]. Inhibition by dimethyl sulphoxide was observed in the determination of Km = 7.0 +/- 0.4 mM for the substrate Bz-Arg-NNap, and care must therefore be taken in the preparation of substrate solutions. Images Fig. 4. PMID:7138503

  2. Auditory trace fear conditioning requires perirhinal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kholodar-Smith, D.B.; Boguszewski, P.; Brown, T.H.

    2008-01-01

    The hippocampus is well-known to be critical for trace fear conditioning, but nothing is known about the importance of perirhinal cortex (PR), which has reciprocal connections with hippocampus. PR damage severely impairs delay fear conditioning to ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) and discontinuous tones (pips), but has no effect on delay conditioning to continuous tones (Kholodar-Smith, Allen, and Brown, in press). Here we demonstrate that trace auditory fear conditioning also critically depends on PR function. The trace interval between the CS offset and the US onset was 16 s. Pre-training neurotoxic lesions were produced through multiple injections of N-methyl-D-aspartate along the full length of PR, which was directly visualized during the injections. Control animals received injections with phosphate-buffered saline. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the lesion volumes demonstrated that the neurotoxic damage was well-localized to PR and included most of its anterior-posterior extent. Automated video analysis quantified freezing behavior, which served as the conditional response. PR-damaged rats were profoundly impaired in trace conditioning to either of three different CSs (a USV, tone pips, and a continuous tone) as well as conditioning to the training context. Within both the lesion and control groups, the type of cue had no effect on the mean CR. The overall PR lesion effect size was 2.7 for cue conditioning and 3.9 for context conditioning. We suggest that the role of PR in trace fear conditioning may be distinct from some of its more perceptual functions. The results further define the essential circuitry underlying trace fear conditioning to auditory cues. PMID:18678265

  3. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  4. 49 CFR 71.3 - Atlantic zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Atlantic zone. 71.3 Section 71.3 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.3 Atlantic zone. The first zone, the Atlantic standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is between 52°30″...

  5. 49 CFR 71.3 - Atlantic zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Atlantic zone. 71.3 Section 71.3 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.3 Atlantic zone. The first zone, the Atlantic standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is between 52°30″...

  6. 49 CFR 71.3 - Atlantic zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Atlantic zone. 71.3 Section 71.3 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.3 Atlantic zone. The first zone, the Atlantic standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is between 52°30″...

  7. 49 CFR 71.3 - Atlantic zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Atlantic zone. 71.3 Section 71.3 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.3 Atlantic zone. The first zone, the Atlantic standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is between 52°30″...

  8. 49 CFR 71.3 - Atlantic zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Atlantic zone. 71.3 Section 71.3 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.3 Atlantic zone. The first zone, the Atlantic standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is between 52°30″...

  9. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  10. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  11. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  12. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  13. 47 CFR 73.505 - Zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.505 Zones. For the purpose of assignment of noncommercial educational FM stations, the United States is divided into three zones, Zone I, Zone I-A, and Zone II,...

  14. 47 CFR 73.505 - Zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.505 Zones. For the purpose of assignment of noncommercial educational FM stations, the United States is divided into three zones, Zone I, Zone I-A, and Zone II,...

  15. Capture zones for simple aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McElwee, Carl D.

    1991-01-01

    Capture zones showing the area influenced by a well within a certain time are useful for both aquifer protection and cleanup. If hydrodynamic dispersion is neglected, a deterministic curve defines the capture zone. Analytical expressions for the capture zones can be derived for simple aquifers. However, the capture zone equations are transcendental and cannot be explicitly solved for the coordinates of the capture zone boundary. Fortunately, an iterative scheme allows the solution to proceed quickly and efficiently even on a modest personal computer. Three forms of the analytical solution must be used in an iterative scheme to cover the entire region of interest, after the extreme values of the x coordinate are determined by an iterative solution. The resulting solution is a discrete one, and usually 100-1000 intervals along the x-axis are necessary for a smooth definition of the capture zone. The presented program is written in FORTRAN and has been used in a variety of computing environments. No graphics capability is included with the program; it is assumed the user has access to a commercial package. The superposition of capture zones for multiple wells is expected to be satisfactory if the spacing is not too close. Because this program deals with simple aquifers, the results rarely will be the final word in a real application.

  16. MEG reveals a fast pathway from somatosensory cortex to occipital areas via posterior parietal cortex in a blind subject.

    PubMed

    Ioannides, Andreas A; Liu, Lichan; Poghosyan, Vahe; Saridis, George A; Gjedde, Albert; Ptito, Maurice; Kupers, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Cross-modal activity in visual cortex of blind subjects has been reported during performance of variety of non-visual tasks. A key unanswered question is through which pathways non-visual inputs are funneled to the visual cortex. Here we used tomographic analysis of single trial magnetoencephalography (MEG) data recorded from one congenitally blind and two sighted subjects after stimulation of the left and right median nerves at three intensities: below sensory threshold, above sensory threshold and above motor threshold; the last sufficient to produce thumb twitching. We identified reproducible brain responses in the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor (M1) cortices at around 20 ms post-stimulus, which were very similar in sighted and blind subjects. Time-frequency analysis revealed strong 45-70 Hz activity at latencies of 20-50 ms in S1 and M1, and posterior parietal cortex Brodmann areas (BA) 7 and 40, which compared to lower frequencies, were substantially more pronounced in the blind than the sighted subjects. Critically, at frequencies from α-band up to 100 Hz we found clear, strong, and widespread responses in the visual cortex of the blind subject, which increased with the intensity of the somatosensory stimuli. Time-delayed mutual information (MI) revealed that in blind subject the stimulus information is funneled from the early somatosensory to visual cortex through posterior parietal BA 7 and 40, projecting first to visual areas V5 and V3, and eventually V1. The flow of information through this pathway occurred in stages characterized by convergence of activations into specific cortical regions. In sighted subjects, no linked activity was found that led from the somatosensory to the visual cortex through any of the studied brain regions. These results provide the first evidence from MEG that in blind subjects, tactile information is routed from primary somatosensory to occipital cortex via the posterior parietal cortex.

  17. Neural discriminability in rat lateral extrastriate cortex and deep but not superficial primary visual cortex correlates with shape discriminability.

    PubMed

    Vermaercke, Ben; Van den Bergh, Gert; Gerich, Florian; Op de Beeck, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed a surprising degree of functional specialization in rodent visual cortex. It is unknown to what degree this functional organization is related to the well-known hierarchical organization of the visual system in primates. We designed a study in rats that targets one of the hallmarks of the hierarchical object vision pathway in primates: selectivity for behaviorally relevant dimensions. We compared behavioral performance in a visual water maze with neural discriminability in five visual cortical areas. We tested behavioral discrimination in two independent batches of six rats using six pairs of shapes used previously to probe shape selectivity in monkey cortex (Lehky and Sereno, 2007). The relative difficulty (error rate) of shape pairs was strongly correlated between the two batches, indicating that some shape pairs were more difficult to discriminate than others. Then, we recorded in naive rats from five visual areas from primary visual cortex (V1) over areas LM, LI, LL, up to lateral occipito-temporal cortex (TO). Shape selectivity in the upper layers of V1, where the information enters cortex, correlated mostly with physical stimulus dissimilarity and not with behavioral performance. In contrast, neural discriminability in lower layers of all areas was strongly correlated with behavioral performance. These findings, in combination with the results from Vermaercke et al. (2014b), suggest that the functional specialization in rodent lateral visual cortex reflects a processing hierarchy resulting in the emergence of complex selectivity that is related to behaviorally relevant stimulus differences.

  18. Developmental patterns of doublecortin expression and white matter neuron density in the postnatal primate prefrontal cortex and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fung, Samantha J; Joshi, Dipesh; Allen, Katherine M; Sivagnanasundaram, Sinthuja; Rothmond, Debora A; Saunders, Richard; Noble, Pamela L; Webster, Maree J; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon

    2011-01-01

    Postnatal neurogenesis occurs in the subventricular zone and dentate gyrus, and evidence suggests that new neurons may be present in additional regions of the mature primate brain, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Addition of new neurons to the PFC implies local generation of neurons or migration from areas such as the subventricular zone. We examined the putative contribution of new, migrating neurons to postnatal cortical development by determining the density of neurons in white matter subjacent to the cortex and measuring expression of doublecortin (DCX), a microtubule-associated protein involved in neuronal migration, in humans and rhesus macaques. We found a striking decline in DCX expression (human and macaque) and density of white matter neurons (humans) during infancy, consistent with the arrival of new neurons in the early postnatal cortex. Considering the expansion of the brain during this time, the decline in white matter neuron density does not necessarily indicate reduced total numbers of white matter neurons in early postnatal life. Furthermore, numerous cells in the white matter and deep grey matter were positive for the migration-associated glycoprotein polysialiated-neuronal cell adhesion molecule and GAD65/67, suggesting that immature migrating neurons in the adult may be GABAergic. We also examined DCX mRNA in the PFC of adult schizophrenia patients (n = 37) and matched controls (n = 37) and did not find any difference in DCX mRNA expression. However, we report a negative correlation between DCX mRNA expression and white matter neuron density in adult schizophrenia patients, in contrast to a positive correlation in human development where DCX mRNA and white matter neuron density are higher earlier in life. Accumulation of neurons in the white matter in schizophrenia would be congruent with a negative correlation between DCX mRNA and white matter neuron density and support the hypothesis of a migration deficit in schizophrenia.

  19. Adaptive crossmodal plasticity in deaf auditory cortex: areal and laminar contributions to supranormal vision in the deaf.

    PubMed

    Lomber, Stephen G; Meredith, M Alex; Kral, Andrej

    2011-01-01

    This chapter is a summary of three interdigitated investigations to identify the neural substrate underlying supranormal vision in the congenitally deaf. In the first study, we tested both congenitally deaf and hearing cats on a battery of visual psychophysical tasks to identify those visual functions that are enhanced in the congenitally deaf. From this investigation, we found that congenitally deaf, compared to hearing, cats have superior visual localization in the peripheral field and lower visual movement detection thresholds. In the second study, we examined the role of "deaf" auditory cortex in mediating the supranormal visual abilities by reversibly deactivating specific cortical loci with cooling. We identified that in deaf cats, reversible deactivation of a region of cortex typically identified as the posterior auditory field (PAF) in hearing cats selectively eliminated superior visual localization abilities. It was also found that deactivation of the dorsal zone (DZ) of "auditory" cortex eliminated the superior visual motion detection abilities of deaf cats. In the third study, graded cooling was applied to deaf PAF and deaf DZ to examine the laminar contributions to the superior visual abilities of the deaf. Graded cooling of deaf PAF revealed that deactivation of the superficial layers alone does not cause significant visual localization deficits. Profound deficits were identified only when cooling extended through all six layers of deaf PAF. In contrast, graded cooling of deaf DZ showed that deactivation of only the superficial layers was required to elicit increased visual motion detection thresholds. Collectively, these three studies show that the superficial layers of deaf DZ mediate the enhanced visual motion detection of the deaf, while the full thickness of deaf PAF must be deactivated in order to eliminate the superior visual localization abilities of the congenitally deaf. Taken together, this combination of experimental approaches has

  20. Susceptibility of Primary Sensory Cortex to Spreading Depolarizations

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov, Volodymyr B.; Middleton, Natalie A.; Theriot, Jeremy J.; Parker, Patrick D.; Abdullah, Osama M.; Ju, Y. Sungtaek; Hartings, Jed A.

    2016-01-01

    Spreading depolarizations (SDs) are recognized as actors in neurological disorders as diverse as migraine and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Migraine aura involves sensory percepts, suggesting that sensory cortices might be intrinsically susceptible to SDs. We used optical imaging, MRI, and field potential and potassium electrode recordings in mice and electrocorticographic recordings in humans to determine the susceptibility of different brain regions to SDs. Optical imaging experiments in mice under isoflurane anesthesia showed that both cortical spreading depression and terminal anoxic depolarization arose preferentially in the whisker barrel region of parietal sensory cortex. MRI recordings under isoflurane, ketamine/xylazine, ketamine/isoflurane, and urethane anesthesia demonstrated that the depolarizations did not propagate from a subcortical source. Potassium concentrations showed larger increases in sensory cortex, suggesting a mechanism of susceptibility. Sensory stimulation biased the timing but not the location of depolarization onset. In humans with TBI, there was a trend toward increased incidence of SDs in parietal/temporal sensory cortex compared with other regions. In conclusion, SDs are inducible preferentially in primary sensory cortex in mice and most likely in humans. This tropism can explain the predominant sensory phenomenology of migraine aura. It also demonstrates that sensory cortices are vulnerable in brain injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Spreading depolarizations (SDs) are involved in neurologic disorders as diverse as migraine and traumatic brain injury. In migraine, the nature of aura symptoms suggests that sensory cortex may be preferentially susceptible. In brain injury, SDs occur at a vulnerable time, during which the issue of sensory stimulation is much debated. We show, in mouse and human, that sensory cortex is more susceptible to SDs. We find that sensory stimulation biases the timing but not the location of the depolarizations

  1. Contextual modulation of primary visual cortex by auditory signals

    PubMed Central

    Paton, A. T.

    2017-01-01

    Early visual cortex receives non-feedforward input from lateral and top-down connections (Muckli & Petro 2013 Curr. Opin. Neurobiol. 23, 195–201. (doi:10.1016/j.conb.2013.01.020)), including long-range projections from auditory areas. Early visual cortex can code for high-level auditory information, with neural patterns representing natural sound stimulation (Vetter et al. 2014 Curr. Biol. 24, 1256–1262. (doi:10.1016/j.cub.2014.04.020)). We discuss a number of questions arising from these findings. What is the adaptive function of bimodal representations in visual cortex? What type of information projects from auditory to visual cortex? What are the anatomical constraints of auditory information in V1, for example, periphery versus fovea, superficial versus deep cortical layers? Is there a putative neural mechanism we can infer from human neuroimaging data and recent theoretical accounts of cortex? We also present data showing we can read out high-level auditory information from the activation patterns of early visual cortex even when visual cortex receives simple visual stimulation, suggesting independent channels for visual and auditory signals in V1. We speculate which cellular mechanisms allow V1 to be contextually modulated by auditory input to facilitate perception, cognition and behaviour. Beyond cortical feedback that facilitates perception, we argue that there is also