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Sample records for abscopal radiation effects

  1. Abscopal Effects and Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Ghodadra, Anish; Bhatt, Sumantha; Camacho, Juan C.

    2016-07-15

    We present the case of an 80-year-old male with squamous cell carcinoma with bilobar hepatic metastases who underwent targeted Yttrium-90 radioembolization of the right hepatic lobe lesion. Subsequently, there was complete regression of the nontargeted, left hepatic lobe lesion. This may represent the first ever reported abscopal effect in radioembolization. The abscopal effect refers to the phenomenon of tumor response in nontargeted sites after targeted radiotherapy. In this article, we briefly review the immune-mediated mechanisms responsible for the abscopal effect.

  2. Can immunostimulatory agents enhance the abscopal effect of radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Levy, Antonin; Chargari, Cyrus; Marabelle, Aurelien; Perfettini, Jean-Luc; Magné, Nicolas; Deutsch, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Ionising radiation (IR) may harm cancer cells through a rare indirect out-of-field phenomenon described as the abscopal effect. Increasing evidence demonstrates that radiotherapy could be capable of generating tumour-specific immune responses. On the other hand, effects of IR also include inhibitory immune signals on the tumour microenvironment. Following these observations, and in the context of newly available immunostimulatory agents in metastatic cancers (anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 and programmed cell death protein-1 or -ligand 1 [PD1 or PDL-1]), there is a remarkable potential for synergistic combinations of IR with such agents that act through the reactivation of immune surveillance. Here, we present and discuss the pre-clinical and clinical rationale supporting the enhancement of the abscopal effect of IR on the blockade of immune checkpoints and discuss the evolving potential of immunoradiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Abscopal Effect Associated With a Systemic Anti-melanoma Immune Response

    SciTech Connect

    Stamell, Emily F.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

    2013-02-01

    The clearance of nonirradiated tumors after localized radiation therapy is known as the abscopal effect. Activation of an antitumor immune response has been proposed as a mechanism for the abscopal effect. Here we report a patient with metastatic melanoma who received palliative radiation to his primary tumor with subsequent clearance of all his nonirradiated in-transit metastases. Anti-MAGEA3 antibodies were found upon serological testing, demonstrating an association between the abscopal effect and a systemic antitumor immune response. A brain recurrence was then treated with a combination of stereotactic radiosurgery and immunotherapy with ipilimumab. The patient experienced a complete remission that includedmore » resolution of nodal metastases, with a concomitant increase in MAGEA3 titers and a new response to the cancer antigen PASD1. This case supports the immune hypothesis for the abscopal effect, and illustrates the potential of combining radiotherapy and immunotherapy in the treatment of melanoma.« less

  4. Immunotherapy Plus Cryotherapy: Potential Augmented Abscopal Effect for Advanced Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, Joe; Cornell, David L.; Mittal, Sumeet K.; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2018-01-01

    Since the 1920s the gold standard for treating cancer has been surgery, which is typically preceded or followed with chemotherapy and/or radiation, a process that perhaps contributes to the destruction of a patient’s immune defense system. Cryosurgery ablation of a solid tumor is mechanistically similar to a vaccination where hundreds of unique antigens from a heterogeneous population of tumor cells derived from the invading cancer are released. However, releasing tumor-derived self-antigens into circulation may not be sufficient enough to overcome the checkpoint escape mechanisms some cancers have evolved to avoid immune responses. The potentiated immune response caused by blocking tumor checkpoints designed to prevent programmed cell death may be the optimal treatment method for the immune system to recognize these new circulating cryoablated self-antigens. Preclinical and clinical evidence exists for the complementary roles for Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein (CTLA-4) and PD-1 antagonists in regulating adaptive immunity, demonstrating that combination immunotherapy followed by cryosurgery provides a more targeted immune response to distant lesions, a phenomenon known as the abscopal effect. We propose that when the host’s immune system has been “primed” with combined anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1 adjuvants prior to cryosurgery, the preserved cryoablated tumor antigens will be presented and processed by the host’s immune system resulting in a robust cytotoxic CD8+ T-cell response. Based on recent investigations and well-described biochemical mechanisms presented herein, a polyvalent autoinoculation of many tumor-specific antigens, derived from a heterogeneous population of tumor cancer cells, would present to an unhindered yet pre-sensitized immune system yielding a superior advantage in locating, recognizing, and destroying tumor cells throughout the body. PMID:29644213

  5. Abscopal effects of radiotherapy on advanced melanoma patients who progressed after ipilimumab immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Antonio M; Simeone, Ester; Giannarelli, Diana; Muto, Paolo; Falivene, Sara; Borzillo, Valentina; Giugliano, Francesca Maria; Sandomenico, Fabio; Petrillo, Antonella; Curvietto, Marcello; Esposito, Assunta; Paone, Miriam; Palla, Marco; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Caracò, Corrado; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Mozzillo, Nicola; Ascierto, Paolo A

    2014-01-01

    Cancer radiotherapy (RT) may induce what is referred to as the "abscopal effect," a regression of non-irradiated metastatic lesions distant from the primary tumor site directly subject to irradiation. This clinical response is rare, but has been surmised to be an immune-mediated phenomenon, suggesting that immunotherapy and RT could potentially synergize. Here, we report the outcome of patients with advanced melanoma treated with the immune checkpoint blockade monoclonal antibody antagonist, ipilimumab followed by RT. Patients were selected for enrollment at the National Cancer Institute "Fondazione G.Pascale" through the expanded access program in Italy. Those who experienced disease progression after ipilimumab thus received subsequent RT and were selected for analysis. Among 21 patients, 13 patients (62%) received RT to treat metastases in the brain and 8 received RT directed at extracranial sites. An abscopal response was observed in 11 patients (52%), 9 of whom had partial responses (43%) and 2 had stable disease (10%). The median time from RT to an abscopal response was 1 month (range 1-4). Median overall survival (OS) for all 21 patients was 13 months (range 6-26). Median OS for patients with abscopal responses was extended to 22.4 months (range 2.5-50.3) vs. 8.3 months (range 7.6-9.0) without. A local response to RT was detected in 13 patients (62%) and, of these, 11 patients (85%) had an abscopal response and abscopal effects were only observed among patients exhibiting a local response. These results suggest RT after ipilimumab may lead to abscopal responses in some patients with advanced melanoma correlating with prolonged OS. Our data also suggest that local responses to RT may be predictive of abscopal responses. Further research in larger randomized trials is needed to validate these results.

  6. Abscopal effects of radiotherapy on advanced melanoma patients who progressed after ipilimumab immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, Antonio M; Simeone, Ester; Giannarelli, Diana; Muto, Paolo; Falivene, Sara; Borzillo, Valentina; Giugliano, Francesca Maria; Sandomenico, Fabio; Petrillo, Antonella; Curvietto, Marcello; Esposito, Assunta; Paone, Miriam; Palla, Marco; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Caracò, Corrado; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Mozzillo, Nicola; Ascierto, Paolo A

    2014-01-01

    Cancer radiotherapy (RT) may induce what is referred to as the “abscopal effect,” a regression of non-irradiated metastatic lesions distant from the primary tumor site directly subject to irradiation. This clinical response is rare, but has been surmised to be an immune-mediated phenomenon, suggesting that immunotherapy and RT could potentially synergize. Here, we report the outcome of patients with advanced melanoma treated with the immune checkpoint blockade monoclonal antibody antagonist, ipilimumab followed by RT. Patients were selected for enrollment at the National Cancer Institute “Fondazione G.Pascale” through the expanded access program in Italy. Those who experienced disease progression after ipilimumab thus received subsequent RT and were selected for analysis. Among 21 patients, 13 patients (62%) received RT to treat metastases in the brain and 8 received RT directed at extracranial sites. An abscopal response was observed in 11 patients (52%), 9 of whom had partial responses (43%) and 2 had stable disease (10%). The median time from RT to an abscopal response was 1 month (range 1–4). Median overall survival (OS) for all 21 patients was 13 months (range 6–26). Median OS for patients with abscopal responses was extended to 22.4 months (range 2.5–50.3) vs. 8.3 months (range 7.6–9.0) without. A local response to RT was detected in 13 patients (62%) and, of these, 11 patients (85%) had an abscopal response and abscopal effects were only observed among patients exhibiting a local response. These results suggest RT after ipilimumab may lead to abscopal responses in some patients with advanced melanoma correlating with prolonged OS. Our data also suggest that local responses to RT may be predictive of abscopal responses. Further research in larger randomized trials is needed to validate these results. PMID:25083318

  7. Investigating the Abscopal Effects of Radioablation on Shielded Bone Marrow in Rodent Models Using Multimodality Imaging.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Solmaz F; Zawaski, Janice A; Inoue, Taeko; Rendon, David A; Zieske, Arthur W; Punia, Jyotinder N; Sabek, Omaima M; Gaber, M Waleed

    2017-07-01

    The abscopal effect is the response to radiation at sites that are distant from the irradiated site of an organism, and it is thought to play a role in bone marrow (BM) recovery by initiating responses in the unirradiated bone marrow. Understanding the mechanism of this effect has applications in treating BM failure (BMF) and BM transplantation (BMT), and improving survival of nuclear disaster victims. Here, we investigated the use of multimodality imaging as a translational tool to longitudinally assess bone marrow recovery. We used positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging to quantify bone marrow activity, vascular response and marrow repopulation in fully and partially irradiated rodent models. We further measured the effects of radiation on serum cytokine levels, hematopoietic cell counts and histology. PET/CT imaging revealed a radiation-induced increase in proliferation in the shielded bone marrow (SBM) compared to exposed bone marrow (EBM) and sham controls. T 2 -weighted MRI showed radiation-induced hemorrhaging in the EBM and unirradiated SBM. In the EBM and SBM groups, we found alterations in serum cytokine and hormone levels and in hematopoietic cell population proportions, and histological evidence of osteoblast activation at the bone marrow interface. Importantly, we generated a BMT mouse model using fluorescent-labeled bone marrow donor cells and performed fluorescent imaging to reveal the migration of bone marrow cells from shielded to radioablated sites. Our study validates the use of multimodality imaging to monitor bone marrow recovery and provides evidence for the abscopal response in promoting bone marrow recovery after irradiation.

  8. MO-FG-BRA-04: Leveraging the Abscopal Effect Via New Design Radiotherapy Biomaterials Loaded with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y; Cifter, G; Altundal, Y

    Purpose: Studies show that stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of a primary tumor in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) could Result in an immune-mediated regression of metastasis outside the radiation field, a phenomenon known as abscopal effect. However toxicities due to repeated systematic administration of ICI have been shown to be a major obstacle in clinical trials. Towards overcoming these toxicity limitations, we investigate a potential new approach whereby the ICI are administered via sustained in-situ release from radiotherapy (RT) biomaterials (e.g. fiducials) coated with a polymer containing the ICI. Methods: New design RT biomaterials were prepared by coatingmore » commercially available spacers/fiducials with a biocompatible polymer (PLGA) film containing fluorescent nanoparticles of size needed to load the ICI. The release of the nanoparticles was investigated in-vitro. Meanwhile, an experimentally determined in- vivo nanoparticle diffusion coefficient was employed in analytic calculations based on Fick’s second law to estimate the time for achieving the concentrations of ICI in the tumor draining lymph node (TDLN) that are needed to engender the abscopal effect during SBRT. The ICI investigated here was anti-CTLA-4 antibody (ipilimumab) at approved FDA concentrations. Results: Our in -vitro study results showed that RT biomaterials could be designed to achieve burst release of nanoparticles within one day. Meanwhile, our calculations indicate that for a 2 to 4 cm tumor it would take 4–22 days, respectively, following burst release, for the required concentration of ICI nanoparticles to accumulate in the TDLN during SBRT. Conclusion: Current investigations combining RT and immunotherapy involve repeated intravenous administration of ICI leading to significant systemic toxicities. Our preliminary results highlight a potential new approach for sustained in-situ release of the ICI from new design RT biomaterials. These

  9. THE ABSCOPAL EFFECT OF X IRRADIATION ON BONE GROWTH IN RATS

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, A.M.; Cohen, J.

    1963-06-01

    The abscopal effect of irradiation (that which is evident at a distance from the irradiated volume but within the same organism) was investigated in rats. It was possible to demonstrate the effects on growth locally and abscopally when x-ray doses of 400 and 800 r were delivered to the lower extremity and when 800 r was delivered to the knee alone. A distinction between abscopal effects after local irradiation and systemic effects after whole-body irradiation is discussed. The weights of control and irradiated animals were similar for the first 21 days, during which period they did not exhibit any untowardmore » effects of irradiation. However, after 21 days there was a decrease in weight gain, which persisted until the 72nd day. Group A (controls) was the heaviest group, with a mean weight of 412 g. Group B (800 r to the left hind extremity) had a mean weight of 378. Group C (400 r to the left hind extremity) and Group D (800 r to the left knee) exhibited mean weights of 391 and 394 g, respectively. Roentgenographic measurements revealed that all animals receiving irradiation had retardation in the growth of the irradiated tibiae, which were shorter than both the control and the contralateral (unirradiated) tibiae. Only the animals that had received 800 r to their leff hind extremity showed significant differences in the lengths of their unirradiated bones compared with the bones of the control animals of Group A, that is, a significant abscopal growth retardation. Although the abscopal effect appeared to be associated with the volume of tissue irradiated, the way this effect is mediated is not known. The weight gains of the animals demonstrated a strong association between decrease in weight gain, the volume of tissue irradiated, and the dose administered. The impaired weight gsin roughly paralleled the abscopal retardation of bone growth. The animals which received the highest dose of irradiation, 800 r, to the largest volume of tissue, 10% of the body volume

  10. Abscopal Effect in a Stage IV Melanoma Patient who Progressed on Pembrolizumab.

    PubMed

    Tsui, James M; Mihalcioiu, Catalin; Cury, Fabio L

    2018-02-27

    In this case report, we present the clinical course of a woman with locally advanced mucosal melanoma of the oral cavity. She was initially treated with surgery with adjuvant local radiation of 50 Gy in 20 fractions. She quickly relapsed with an aggressive regional recurrence of the disease on the neck and with numerous pulmonary metastases. Immunotherapy with pembrolizumab was started, with initial good response and reduction in the size of the lesion in the neck. The regression, however, was short-lived, as the mass quickly grew at a remarkable rate and the lung lesions progressed significantly. Palliative local radiation of 24 Gy in three fractions delivered at days zero, seven, and 21 to the neck mass was eventually given with the goal to alleviate symptoms. An immediate tumor regression was observed after the first fraction of radiotherapy. Remarkably, the lung lesions had also started regressing following radiation. We believe this to be a case of abscopal effect witnessed during the delivery of radiotherapy. A review of the recent literature is also presented here.

  11. Abscopal Effect in a Stage IV Melanoma Patient who Progressed on Pembrolizumab

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, James M; Mihalcioiu, Catalin

    2018-01-01

    In this case report, we present the clinical course of a woman with locally advanced mucosal melanoma of the oral cavity. She was initially treated with surgery with adjuvant local radiation of 50 Gy in 20 fractions. She quickly relapsed with an aggressive regional recurrence of the disease on the neck and with numerous pulmonary metastases. Immunotherapy with pembrolizumab was started, with initial good response and reduction in the size of the lesion in the neck. The regression, however, was short-lived, as the mass quickly grew at a remarkable rate and the lung lesions progressed significantly. Palliative local radiation of 24 Gy in three fractions delivered at days zero, seven, and 21 to the neck mass was eventually given with the goal to alleviate symptoms. An immediate tumor regression was observed after the first fraction of radiotherapy. Remarkably, the lung lesions had also started regressing following radiation. We believe this to be a case of abscopal effect witnessed during the delivery of radiotherapy. A review of the recent literature is also presented here. PMID:29719740

  12. Antigen-capturing nanoparticles improve the abscopal effect and cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Yuanzeng; Roche, Kyle C.; Tian, Shaomin; Eblan, Michael J.; McKinnon, Karen P.; Caster, Joseph M.; Chai, Shengjie; Herring, Laura E.; Zhang, Longzhen; Zhang, Tian; Desimone, Joseph M.; Tepper, Joel E.; Vincent, Benjamin G.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Wang, Andrew Z.

    2017-09-01

    Immunotherapy holds tremendous promise for improving cancer treatment. To administer radiotherapy with immunotherapy has been shown to improve immune responses and can elicit the 'abscopal effect'. Unfortunately, response rates for this strategy remain low. Herein we report an improved cancer immunotherapy approach that utilizes antigen-capturing nanoparticles (AC-NPs). We engineered several AC-NP formulations and demonstrated that the set of protein antigens captured by each AC-NP formulation is dependent on the NP surface properties. We showed that AC-NPs deliver tumour-specific proteins to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and significantly improve the efficacy of αPD-1 (anti-programmed cell death 1) treatment using the B16F10 melanoma model, generating up to a 20% cure rate compared with 0% without AC-NPs. Mechanistic studies revealed that AC-NPs induced an expansion of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells and increased both CD4+T/Treg and CD8+T/Treg ratios (Treg, regulatory T cells). Our work presents a novel strategy to improve cancer immunotherapy with nanotechnology.

  13. Abscopal Effects With Hypofractionated Schedules Extending Into the Effector Phase of the Tumor-Specific T-Cell Response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanwei; Niedermann, Gabriele

    2018-05-01

    Hypofractionated radiation therapy (hRT) combined with immune checkpoint blockade can induce T-cell-mediated local and abscopal antitumor effects. We had previously observed peak levels of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) between days 5 and 8 after hRT. Because TILs are regarded as radiosensitive, hRT schedules extending into this period might be less immunogenic, prompting us to compare clinically relevant, short and extended schedules with equivalent biologically effective doses combined with anti-programmed cell death 1 (PD1) antibody treatment. In mice bearing 2 B16-CD133 melanoma tumors, the primary tumor was irradiated with 3 × 9.18 Gy in 3 or 5 days or with 5 × 6.43 Gy in 10 days; an anti-PD1 antibody was given weekly. The mice were monitored for tumor growth and survival. T-cell responses were determined on days 8 and 15 of treatment. The role of regional lymph nodes was studied by administering FTY720, which blocks lymph node egress of activated T cells. Tumor growth measurements after combination treatment using short or extended hRT and control treatment were also performed in the wild-type B16 melanoma and 4T1 breast carcinoma models. In the B16-CD133 model, growth inhibition of irradiated primary and nonirradiated secondary tumors and overall survival were similar with all 3 hRT/anti-PD1 combinations, superior to hRT and anti-PD1 monotherapy, and was strongly dependent on CD8 + T cells. TIL infiltration and local and systemic tumor-specific CD8 + T-cell responses were also similar, regardless of whether short or extended hRT was used. Administration of FTY720 accelerated growth of both primary and secondary tumors, strongly reduced their TIL infiltration, and increased tumor-specific CD8 + T cells in the lymph nodes draining the irradiated tumor. In the 4T1 model, local and abscopal tumor control was also similar, regardless of whether short or extended hRT was used, although the synergy between hRT and anti-PD1 was weaker. No

  14. In-field and abscopal response after short-course radiation therapy in patients with metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma progressing on PD-1 checkpoint blockade: a case series.

    PubMed

    Xu, Melody J; Wu, Susan; Daud, Adil I; Yu, Siegrid S; Yom, Sue S

    2018-05-30

    Patients with metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma (mMCC) who experience disease progression on immunotherapy have limited additional standard options. Given evidence of synergism between radiation therapy (RT) and immunotherapy, two patients progressing on PD-1 inhibition were referred for short-course RT. Two patients were found to have progressive mMCC on PD-1 inhibitor therapy and were treated with single-fraction palliative RT. Both patients were observed to have local control at irradiated regions, as well as durable abscopal response at unirradiated, out-of-field, sites of metastatic disease. Short-course RT is a compelling strategy that could be a means to augment response in patients with mMCC who show progression on immune checkpoint blockade. Ongoing clinical trials are investigating the relationship between RT and immunotherapy in mMCC.

  15. Abscopal effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): proof of principle in an experimental model of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Trivillin, Verónica A; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Colombo, Lucas L; Thorp, Silvia I; Garabalino, Marcela A; Monti Hughes, Andrea; González, Sara J; Farías, Rubén O; Curotto, Paula; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A; Carando, Daniel G; Schwint, Amanda E

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate, for the first time, the abscopal effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Twenty-six BDIX rats were inoculated subcutaneously with 1 × 10 6 DHD/K12/TRb syngeneic colon cancer cells in the right hind flank. Three weeks post-inoculation, the right leg of 12 rats bearing the tumor nodule was treated with BPA-BNCT (BPA-Boronophenylalanine) at the RA-3 nuclear reactor located in Buenos Aires, Argentina, at an absorbed dose of 7.5 Gy to skin as the dose-limiting tissue. The remaining group of 14 tumor-bearing rats were left untreated and used as control. Two weeks post-BNCT, 1 × 10 6 DHD/K12/TRb cells were injected subcutaneously in the contralateral left hind flank of each of the 26 BDIX rats. Tumor volume in both legs was measured weekly for 7 weeks to determine response to BNCT in the right leg and to assess a potential influence of BNCT in the right leg on tumor development in the left leg. Within the BNCT group, a statistically significant reduction was observed in contralateral left tumor volume in animals whose right leg tumor responded to BNCT (post-treatment/pre-treatment tumor volume <1) versus animals who failed to respond (post/pre ≥1), i.e., 13 ± 15 vs 271 ± 128 mm 3 . In addition, a statistically significant reduction in contralateral left leg tumor volume was observed in BNCT-responsive animals (post/pre <1) vs untreated animals, i.e., 13 ± 15 vs 254 ± 251 mm 3 . The present study performed in a simple animal model provides proof of principle that the positive response of a tumor to BNCT is capable of inducing an abscopal effect.

  16. Effects of Radiation on Metastasis and Tumor Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Vilalta, Marta; Rafat, Marjan; Graves, Edward E.

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that tumor cells migrate from the primary lesion to distant sites to form metastases and that these lesions limit patient outcome in a majority of cases. However the extent to which radiation influences this process and to which migration in turn alters radiation response remains controversial. There are preclinical and clinical reports showing that focal radiotherapy can both increase the development of distant metastasis, as well as that it can induce the regression of established metastases through the abscopal effect. More recently, preclinical studies have suggested that radiation can attract migrating tumor cells and may thereby facilitate tumor recurrence. In this review, we summarize these phenomena and their potential mechanisms of action, and evaluate their significance for modern radiation therapy strategies. PMID:27022944

  17. INDIRECT EFFECT OF X-RADIATION ON BONE GROWTH IN RATS

    SciTech Connect

    Conard, R.A.

    1962-12-21

    Effects of 200 to 600 r of x irradiation on tibial bone growth in groups of weanling male rats were studied by in vivo measurement of tibial bone growth in serial radiographs. By comparison of growth rates in shielded with unshielded legs, direct and indirect effects of radiation were demonstrated, both roughly dose dependent, but with the indirect effect being about twice that of the direct effect. Pair-feeding experiments showed that about 70% of the indirect effect was due to radiation-induced lowered food consumption. By partial-body shielding experiments, using pnir-fed controls, it was shown that the abdomen may be themore » site of a non-nutritional abscopal effect. (auth)« less

  18. A Phase I trial using local regional treatment, nonlethal irradiation, intratumoral and systemic polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid polylysine carboxymethylcellulose to treat liver cancer: in search of the abscopal effect

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Andrew N; Contractor, Sohail; Castaneda, Ismael; Cathcart, Charles S; Razdan, Dolly; Klyde, David; Kisza, Piotr; Gonzales, Sharon F; Salazar, Andres M

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine the safety of an approach to immunologically enhance local treatment of hepatocellular cancer (HCC) by combining nonlethal radiation, local regional therapy with intratumoral injection, and systemic administration of a potent Toll-like receptor (TLR) immune adjuvant. Methods Patients with HCC not eligible for liver transplant or surgery were subject to: 1) 3 fractions of 2-Gy focal nonlethal radiation to increase tumor antigen expression, 2) intra-/peri-tumoral (IT) injection of the TLR3 agonist, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid polylysine carboxymethylcellulose (poly-ICLC), to induce an immunologic “danger” response in the tumor microenvironment with local regional therapy, and 3) systemic boosting of immunity with intramuscular poly-ICLC. Primary end points were safety and tolerability; secondary end points were progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years. Results Eighteen patients with HCC not eligible for surgery or liver transplant were treated. Aside from 1 embolization-related severe adverse event, all events were ≤grade II. PFS was 66% at 6 months, 39% at 12 months, and 28% at 24 months. Overall 1-year survival was 69%, and 2-year survival 38%. In patients <60 years old, 2-year survival was 62.5% vs. 11.1% in patients aged >60 years (P<0.05). Several patients had prolonged PFS and OS. Conclusion Intra-tumoral injection of the TLR3 agonist poly-ICLC in patients with HCC is safe and tolerable when combined with local nonlethal radiation and local regional treatment. Further work is in progress to evaluate if this approach improves survival compared to local regional treatment alone and characterize changes in anticancer immunity. PMID:28848723

  19. Amelioration of Head and Neck Radiation-Induced Mucositis and Distant Marrow Suppression in Fanca-/- and Fancg-/- Mice by Intraoral Administration of GS-Nitroxide (JP4-039).

    PubMed

    Willis, John; Epperly, Michael W; Fisher, Renee; Zhang, Xichen; Shields, Donna; Hou, Wen; Wang, Hong; Li, Song; Wipf, Peter; Parmar, Kalindi; Guinan, Eva; Steinman, Justin; Greenberger, Joel S

    2018-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck are appearing with increased frequency in both marrow transplanted and non-transplanted Fanconi anemia (FA) patients. FA patients commonly display radiosensitivity of epithelial tissues, complicating effective radiotherapy. Fancd2 -/- mice (C57BL/6J and 129/Sv background) demonstrate epithelial tissue sensitivity to single-fraction or fractionated irradiation to the head and neck and distant marrow suppression (abscopal effect), both ameliorated by intraoral administration of the mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant, GS-nitroxide, JP4-039. We now report that mice of two other FA genotypes, Fancg -/- (B6) and the most prevalent human genotype Fanca -/- (129/Sv), also demonstrate: 1. reduced longevity of hematopoiesis in long-term bone marrow cultures; 2. radiosensitivity of bone marrow stromal cell lines; and 3. head and neck radiation-induced severe mucositis and abscopal suppression of distant marrow hematopoiesis. Intraoral administration of JP4-039/F15, but not non-mitochondrial-targeted 4-amino-Tempo/F15 or F15 alone, prior to each radiation treatment ameliorated both local and abscopal radiation effects. Head and neck irradiated TGF-β-resistant SMAD3 -/- (129/Sv) mice and double-knockout SMAD3 -/- Fancd2 -/- (129/Sv) mice treated daily with TGF-β receptor antagonist, LY364947, still displayed abscopal bone marrow suppression, implicating a non-TGF-β mechanism. Thus, amelioration of both local normal tissue radiosensitivity and distant marrow suppression by intraoral administration of JP4-039 in Fancg -/- and Fanca -/- mice supports a clinical trial of this locally administered normal tissue radioprotector and mitigator during head and neck irradiation in FA patients.

  20. Hypo-fractionated radiation, magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia and a viral immunotherapy treatment of spontaneous canine cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoopes, P. Jack; Moodie, Karen L.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Petryk, James D.; Sechrist, Shawntel; Gladstone, David J.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Veliz, Frank A.; Bursey, Alicea A.; Wagner, Robert J.; Rajan, Ashish; Dugat, Danielle; Crary-Burney, Margaret; Fiering, Steven N.

    2017-02-01

    It has recently been shown that cancer treatments such as radiation and hyperthermia, which have conventionally been viewed to have modest immune based anti-cancer effects, may, if used appropriately stimulate a significant and potentially effective local and systemic anti-cancer immune effect (abscopal effect) and improved prognosis. Using eight spontaneous canine cancers (2 oral melanoma, 3 oral amelioblastomas and 1 carcinomas), we have shown that hypofractionated radiation (6 x 6 Gy) and/or magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (2 X 43°C / 45 minutes) and/or an immunogenic virus-like nanoparticle (VLP, 2 x 200 μg) are capable of delivering a highly effective cancer treatment that includes an immunogenic component. Two tumors received all three therapeutic modalities, one tumor received radiation and hyperthermia, two tumors received radiation and VLP, and three tumors received only mNP hyperthermia. The treatment regimen is conducted over a 14-day period. All patients tolerated the treatments without complication and have had local and distant tumor responses that significantly exceed responses observed following conventional therapy (surgery and/or radiation). The results suggest that both hypofractionated radiation and hyperthermia have effective immune responses that are enhanced by the intratumoral VLP treatment. Molecular data from these tumors suggest Heat Shock Protein (HSP) 70/90, calreticulin and CD47 are targets that can be exploited to enhance the local and systemic (abscopal effect) immune potential of radiation and hyperthermia cancer treatment.

  1. Radionuclides in radiation-induced bystander effect; may it share in radionuclide therapy?

    PubMed

    Widel, M

    2017-01-01

    For many years in radiobiology and radiotherapy predominated the conviction that cellular DNA is the main target for ionizing radiation, however, the view has changed in the past 20 years. Nowadays, it is assumed that not only directed (targeted) radiation effect, but also an indirect (non-targeted) effect may contribute to the result of radiation treatment. Non-targeted effect is relatively well recognized after external beam irradiation in vitro and in vivo, and comprises such phenomena like radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), genomic instability, adaptive response and abscopal (out of field) effect. These stress-induced and molecular signaling mediated phenomena appear in non-targeted cells as variety responses resembling that observed in directly hit cells. Bystander effects can be both detrimental and beneficial in dependence on dose, dose-rate, cell type, genetic status and experimental condition. Less is known about radionuclide-induced non-targeted effects in radionuclide therapy, although, based on characteristics of the radionuclide radiation, on experiments in vitro utilizing classical and 3-D cell cultures, and preclinical study on animals it seems obvious that exposure to radionuclide is accompanied by various bystander effects, mostly damaging, less often protective. This review summarizes existing data on radionuclide induced bystander effects comprising radionuclides emitting beta- and alpha-particles and Auger electrons used in tumor radiotherapy and diagnostics. So far, separation of the direct effect of radionuclide decay from crossfire and bystander effects in clinical targeted radionuclide therapy is impossible because of the lack of methods to assess whether, and to what extent bystander effect is involved in human organism. Considerations on this topic are also included.

  2. Radiation Therapy Side Effects

    Cancer.gov

    Radiation therapy has side effects because it not only kills or slows the growth of cancer cells, it can also affect nearby healthy cells. Many people who get radiation therapy experience fatigue. Other side effects depend on the part of the body that is being treated. Learn more about possible side effects.

  3. Microcircuit radiation effects databank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Radiation test data submitted by many testers is collated to serve as a reference for engineers who are concerned with and have some knowledge of the effects of the natural radiation environment on microcircuits. Total dose damage information and single event upset cross sections, i.e., the probability of a soft error (bit flip) or of a hard error (latchup) are presented.

  4. Radiative transfer dynamo effect

    DOE PAGES

    Munirov, Vadim R.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2017-01-17

    Here, magnetic fields in rotating and radiating astrophysical plasma can be produced due to a radiative interaction between plasma layers moving relative to each other. The efficiency of current drive, and with it the associated dynamo effect, is considered in a number of limits. It is shown here, however, that predictions for these generated magnetic fields can be significantly higher when kinetic effects, previously neglected, are taken into account.

  5. Radiative transfer dynamo effect.

    PubMed

    Munirov, Vadim R; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields in rotating and radiating astrophysical plasma can be produced due to a radiative interaction between plasma layers moving relative to each other. The efficiency of current drive, and with it the associated dynamo effect, is considered in a number of limits. It is shown here, however, that predictions for these generated magnetic fields can be significantly higher when kinetic effects, previously neglected, are taken into account.

  6. Radiation effects in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, R. J. M.

    The radiation protection guidelines of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are under review by Scientific Committe 75 of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. The re-evaluation of the current guidelines is necessary, first, because of the increase in information about radiation risks since 1970 when the original recommendations were made and second, the population at risk has changed. For example, women have joined the ranks of the astronauts. Two types of radiation, protons and heavy ions, are of particular concern in space. Unfortunately, there is less information about the effects on tissues and the induction of cancer by these radiations than by other radiations. The choice of Quality Factors (Q) for obtaining dose equivalents for these radiations, is an important aspect of the risk estimate for space travel. There are not sufficient data for the induction of late effects by either protons or by heavy ions. The current information suggests a RBE for the relative protons of about 1, whereas, -a RBE of 20 for tumor induction by heavy ions, such as iron-56, appears appropriate. The recommendations for the dose equivalent career limits for skin and the lens of the eye have been reduced but the 30-day and annual limits have been raised.

  7. Microcircuit radiation effects databank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This databank is the collation of radiation test data submitted by many testers and serves as a reference for engineers who are concerned with and have some knowledge of the effects of the natural radiation environment on microcircuits. It contains radiation sensitivity results from ground tests and is divided into two sections. Section A lists total dose damage information, and section B lists single event upset cross sections, I.E., the probability of a soft error (bit flip) or of a hard error (latchup).

  8. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  9. Biological Complexities in Radiation Carcinogenesis and Cancer Radiotherapy: Impact of New Biological Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Mozdarani, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Although radiation carcinogenesis has been shown both experimentally and epidemiologically, the use of ionizing radiation is also one of the major modalities in cancer treatment. Various known cellular and molecular events are involved in carcinogenesis. Apart from the known phenomena, there could be implications for carcinogenesis and cancer prevention due to other biological processes such as the bystander effect, the abscopal effect, intrinsic radiosensitivity and radioadaptation. Bystander effects have consequences for mutation initiated cancer paradigms of radiation carcinogenesis, which provide the mechanistic justification for low-dose risk estimates. The abscopal effect is potentially important for tumor control and is mediated through cytokines and/or the immune system (mainly cell-mediated immunity). It results from loss of growth and stimulatory and/or immunosuppressive factors from the tumor. Intrinsic radiosensitivity is a feature of some cancer prone chromosomal breakage syndromes such as ataxia telangectiasia. Radiosensitivity is manifested as higher chromosomal aberrations and DNA repair impairment is now known as a good biomarker for breast cancer screening and prediction of prognosis. However, it is not yet known whether this effect is good or bad for those receiving radiation or radiomimetic agents for treatment. Radiation hormesis is another major concern for carcinogenesis. This process which protects cells from higher doses of radiation or radio mimic chemicals, may lead to the escape of cells from mitotic death or apoptosis and put cells with a lower amount of damage into the process of cancer induction. Therefore, any of these biological phenomena could have impact on another process giving rise to genome instability of cells which are not in the field of radiation but still receiving a lower amount of radiation. For prevention of radiation induced carcinogenesis or risk assessment as well as for successful radiation therapy, all these

  10. EFFECTS OF WHOLE-BODY X IRRADIATION ON THE PRINCIPLE CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS OF GUINEA-PIG LIVER (in French)

    SciTech Connect

    Lartique, O.

    1960-01-01

    In the guinea pig, the LD/sub 50/30/ varies according to the type of vegetables fed in the diet. Following whole body irradiation to a LD/sub 50/30/, deposition of excess neutral fat occurs in the central zone of the liver lobule at the time of the acute phase of the radiation syndrome. A drop in liver glycogen and an increase in liver water are observed concomitantly. These changes are abscopal and transitory effects of x radiation on the liver. X-ray anemia alone is unable to produce a fatty liver in the guinea pig. (auth)

  11. Radiation effect on implanted pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Pourhamidi, A.H.

    1983-10-01

    It was previously thought that diagnostic or therapeutic ionizing radiation did not have an adverse effect on the function of cardiac pacemakers. Recently, however, some authors have reported damaging effect of therapeutic radiation on cardiac pulse generators. An analysis of a recently-extracted pacemaker documented the effect of radiation on the pacemaker pulse generator.

  12. Radiation effects on electronic parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1971-01-01

    A search of literature concerning the long term effects of nuclear radiation on electronic parts was conducted to determine the effects of radiation fields encountered on deep space missions to parts used in the Pioneer Spacecraft. Topics discussed include: the various types of radiation the spacecraft will encounter, effects of radiation on electronic parts, and estimates of the damage thresholds for transistors and integrated circuits used on the Pioneer Spacecraft.

  13. Radiation Effects: Core Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicello, John F.

    1999-01-01

    The risks to personnel in space from the naturally occurring radiations are generally considered to be one of the most serious limitations to human space missions, as noted in two recent reports of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. The Core Project of the Radiation Effects Team for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute is the consequences of radiations in space in order to develop countermeasure, both physical and pharmaceutical, to reduce the risks of cancer and other diseases associated with such exposures. During interplanetary missions, personnel in space will be exposed to galactic cosmic rays, including high-energy protons and energetic ions with atomic masses of iron or higher. In addition, solar events will produce radiation fields of high intensity for short but irregular durations. The level of intensity of these radiations is considerably higher than that on Earth's surface, and the biological risks to astronauts is consequently increased, including increased risks of carcinogenesis and other diseases. This group is examining the risk of cancers resulting from low-dose, low-dose rate exposures of model systems to photons, protons, and iron by using ground-based accelerators which are capable of producing beams of protons, iron, and other heavy ions at energies comparable to those encountered in space. They have begun the first series of experiments using a 1-GeV iron beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and 250-MeV protons at Loma Linda University Medical Center's proton synchrotron facility. As part of these studies, this group will be investigating the potential for the pharmaceutical, Tamoxifen, to reduce the risk of breast cancer in astronauts exposed to the level of doses and particle types expected in space. Theoretical studies are being carried out in a collaboration between scientists at NASA's Johnson Space Center and Johns Hopkins University in parallel with the experimental program have provided

  14. Radiation Environment Effects on Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladbury, Ray.

    2017-01-01

    Space poses a variety of radiation hazards. These hazards pose different risks for different missions depending on the mission environment, duration and requirements. This presentation presents a brief look at several radiation related hazards, including destructive and nondestructive Single-Event Effect, Total Ionizing Dose, Displacement Damage and Spacecraft Charging. The temporal and spatial characteristics for the environments of concern for each are considered.

  15. RADIATION EFFECTS ON IMMUNE MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, R.D.; Hale, W.M.

    1963-03-01

    Experiments were performed on pathogen-free Swiss albino mice to determine the repressive effect of ionizing radiation on immune mechanisms. In animals given sublethal doses of Co/sup 60/ gamma radiation by acute short-term exposure or by chronic long-term exposure at a low dose rate, ability to produce antibody was inhibited or abolished, and natural resistance and active and passive immunity to pneumococcal and Trichinella infections were severely depressed. It appears that the repression resulted from damage to the cellular defensive mechanisms of the host. Active immunity and natural resistance to influenza virus infections were not altered significantly by radiation. Exposure tomore » radiation enhanced the severity of anaphylactic shock markedly in mice previously sensitized to tetanus toxoid and challenged with tetanus toxoid after radiation. Chronic exposure to radiation caused immediate increased sensitivity to fatal anaphylaxis. (auth)« less

  16. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  17. Radiation effects program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-09-01

    No existing LINAC Based Beam Heating facility comes within a factor of ten of the needs of a high heating rate thermodynamic properties research facility. The facility could be built at the Naval Research Lab. for a cost in the neighborhood of 2 million dollars. The 10 MeV electron beam would not produce any serious radioactivity but would provide unprecedented beam power for such other applications as food processing, sewer treatment, materials curing, radiation hardness assurance, etc. One can always achieve lower current densities by scattering the beam and moving the device under test further away from the scatterer. In this case one must rely on the TLD readings to indicate the dose rate at the point of interest. For general utility with the beam covering about four TLD's fairly evenly one can claim that the NRL LINAC can produce a maximum dose rate of about 6 x 10 to the 10th power rads (Si) per second for a pulse length of 1.5 microseconds, and about 1.4 x 10 to the 11th power rads (Si) per second in a 50 nanosecond pulse. In both cases the beam area is about 0.4 square centimeters.

  18. Radiation effects in accelerator components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borden, M. J.

    1995-05-01

    A review of basic radiation effects is presented. The fundamental definitions of radioactivity are given for alpha, beta, positron decay, gamma-ray emission and electron capture. The interaction of neutrons with material is covered including: absorption through radiative capture, neutron-proton interaction, alpha particle emission, neutron-multi-neutron reactions and fission. Basic equations defining inelastic and elastic scattering are presented with examples of neutron energy loss per collision for several elements. Photon interactions are considered for gamma-rays and x-rays. Photoelectric collisions, the Compton effect and pair production are reviewed. Electron-proton interactions are discussed with emphasis placed on defect production. Basic displacement damage mechanisms for photon and particle interaction are presented. Several examples of radiation effects to plastics, electronics and ceramics are presented. Extended references are given for each example.

  19. Radiation effects on eye components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durchschlag, H.; Fochler, C.; Abraham, K.; Kulawik, B.

    1999-08-01

    The most important water-soluble components of the vertebrate eye (lens proteins, aqueous humor, vitreous, hyaluronic acid, ascorbic acid) have been investigated in aqueous solution, after preceding X- or UV-irradiation. Spectroscopic, chromatographic, electrophoretic, hydrodynamic and analytic techniques have been applied, to monitor several radiation damages such as destruction of aromatic and sulfur-containing amino acids, aggregation, crosslinking, dissociation, fragmentation, and partial unfolding. Various substances were found which were able to protect eye components effectively against radiation, some of them being also of medical relevance.

  20. Atmospheric effects on radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurica, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    Two essentially distinct regions of the electromagnetic spectrum are discussed: (1) the scattering region in which the radiation energy is provided by the incident solar flux; and (2) the infrared region in which emission by the earth's surface and atmospheric gases supply radiative energy. In each of these spectral regions the atmosphere performs its dual function with respect to a remote sensing measurement of surface properties. The atmosphere acts both as a filter and as a noise generator removing and obscuring sought after information. Nevertheless, with proper application of concepts such as have been considered, it will be possible to remove these unwanted atmospheric effects and to improve identification techniques being developed.

  1. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  2. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Amir; Semones, Edward; Ewert, Michael; Broyan, James; Walker, Steven

    2017-09-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles is described. Using accelerated alpha particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the method is applied to sample tiles from the Heat Melt Compactor, which were created by melting material from a simulated astronaut waste stream, consisting of materials such as trash and unconsumed food. The shielding effectiveness calculated from measurements of the Heat Melt Compactor sample tiles is about 10% less than the shielding effectiveness of polyethylene. Shielding material produced from the astronaut waste stream in the form of Heat Melt Compactor tiles is therefore found to be an attractive solution for protection against space radiation.

  3. Radiation effects in spacecraft electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, James P.

    1989-01-01

    Effects on the internal spacecraft electronics due to exposure to the natural and enhanced space radiation environment will be reviewed. The emphasis will be placed on the description of the nature of both the exposure environment and failure mechanisms in semiconductors. Understanding both the system environment and device effects is critical in the use of laboratory simulation environments to obtain the data necessary to design and qualify components for successful application.

  4. Radiation effects in reconfigurable FPGAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Heather

    2017-04-01

    Field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are co-processing hardware used in image and signal processing. FPGA are programmed with custom implementations of an algorithm. These algorithms are highly parallel hardware designs that are faster than software implementations. This flexibility and speed has made FPGAs attractive for many space programs that need in situ, high-speed signal processing for data categorization and data compression. Most commercial FPGAs are affected by the space radiation environment, though. Problems with TID has restricted the use of flash-based FPGAs. Static random access memory based FPGAs must be mitigated to suppress errors from single-event upsets. This paper provides a review of radiation effects issues in reconfigurable FPGAs and discusses methods for mitigating these problems. With careful design it is possible to use these components effectively and resiliently.

  5. Current clinical trials testing combinations of immunotherapy and radiation.

    PubMed

    Crittenden, Marka; Kohrt, Holbrook; Levy, Ronald; Jones, Jennifer; Camphausen, Kevin; Dicker, Adam; Demaria, Sandra; Formenti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical evidence of successful combinations of ionizing radiation with immunotherapy has inspired testing the translation of these results to the clinic. Interestingly, the preclinical work has consistently predicted the responses encountered in clinical trials. The first example came from a proof-of-principle trial started in 2001 that tested the concept that growth factors acting on antigen-presenting cells improve presentation of tumor antigens released by radiation and induce an abscopal effect. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was administered during radiotherapy to a metastatic site in patients with metastatic solid tumors to translate evidence obtained in a murine model of syngeneic mammary carcinoma treated with cytokine FLT-3L and radiation. Subsequent clinical availability of vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has triggered a wave of enthusiasm for testing them in combination with radiotherapy. Examples of ongoing clinical trials are described in this report. Importantly, most of these trials include careful immune monitoring of the patients enrolled and will generate important data about the proimmunogenic effects of radiation in combination with a variety of immune modulators, in different disease settings. Results of these studies are building a platform of evidence for radiotherapy as an adjuvant to immunotherapy and encourage the growth of this novel field of radiation oncology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiation Effects in Advanced Microelectonic Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. H.

    1997-01-01

    Several new radiation phenomena have been observed in laboratory testing of advanced microelectonics that are not yet of sufficient importance for typical space applications, but provide insight into the likely effects of scaling and device design on radiation hardness.

  7. Radiation effects in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.

    1999-04-01

    Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make anmore » attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.« less

  8. Slope effects on shortwave radiation components and net radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter-Shea, Elizabeth A.; Blad, Blaine L.; Hays, Cynthia J.; Mesarch, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    The main objective of the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) has been stated as 'the development of techniques that may be applied to satellite observations of the radiation reflected and emitted from the Earth to yield quantitative information concerning land surface climatological conditions.' The major field study, FIFE (the First ISLSCP Field Experiment), was conducted in 1978-89 to accomplish this objective. Four intensive field campaigns (IFC's) were carried out in 1987 and one in 1989. Factors contributing to observed reflected radiation from the FIFE site must be understood before the radiation observed by satellites can be used to quantify surface processes. Analysis since our last report has focused on slope effects on incoming and outgoing shortwave radiation and net radiation from data collected in 1989.

  9. Greenhouse Effect, Radiative Forcing and Climate Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponater, Michael; Dietmüller, Simone; Sausen, Robert

    Temperature conditions and climate on Earth are controlled by the balance between absorbed solar radiation and outgoing terrestrial radiation. The greenhouse effect is a synonym for the trapping of infrared radiation by radiatively active atmospheric constituents. It generally causes a warming of the planet's surface, compared to the case without atmosphere. Perturbing the radiation balance of the planet, e.g., by anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, induces climate change. Individual contributions to a total climate impact are usually quantified and ranked in terms of their respective radiative forcing. This method involves some limitations, because the effect of the external forcing is modified by radiative feedbacks. Here the current concept of radiative forcing and potential improvements are explained.

  10. Spallation radiation effects in materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, L.K.; Farrell, K.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1996-06-01

    Spallation refers to the process whereby particles (chiefly neutrons) are ejected from nuclei upon bombardment by high-energy protons. Spallation neutron sources (SNS`s) use these neutrons for neutron scattering and diffraction research, and SNS`s are proposed as the basis for systems for tritium production and transmutation of nuclear waste. Materials in SNS`s are exposed to the incident proton beam (energies typically about 1000 MeV) and to the spallation neutrons (spectrum of energies extending up to about 1000 MeV). By contrast the fission neutrons in nuclear reactors have an average energy of only about 2 MeV, and the neutrons in fusion reactorsmore » would have energies below about 14 MeV. Furthermore, the protons and neutrons in SNS`s for scattering and diffraction research are pulsed at frequencies of about 10 to 60 Hz, from which significant changes in the kinetics of point and extended defects may be expected. In addition, much higher transmutation rates occur in SNS-irradiated materials, On the whole, then, significant differences in microstructural development and macroscopic properties may result upon exposure in SNS systems, as compared with fission and fusion irradiations. In a more general sense, subjecting materials to new radiation environments has almost routinely led to new discoveries. To the extent that data are avaiable, however, the spallation environment appears to increase the degree of damage without introducing totally new effects. The first part of this presentation is an overview of radiation effects in materials, outlining essential concepts and property changes and their physical bases. This background is followed by a description of SNS irradiation environments and the effects on materials of exposure to these environments. A special discussion is given of the selection of target (e.g., liquid mercury), container (e.g., austenitic stainless steel or ferritic/martensitic steel), and structural materials in SNS systems.« less

  11. TU-CD-303-02: Beyond Radiation Induced Double Strand Breaks - a New Horizon for Radiation Therapy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.

    Recent advances in cancer research have shed new light on the complex processes of how therapeutic radiation initiates changes at cellular, tissue, and system levels that may lead to clinical effects. These new advances may transform the way we use radiation to combat certain types of cancers. For the past two decades many technological advancements in radiation therapy have been largely based on the hypothesis that direct radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks cause cell death and thus tumor control and normal tissue damage. However, new insights have elucidated that in addition to causing cellular DNA damage, localized therapeutic radiation alsomore » initiates cascades of complex downstream biological responses in tissue that extend far beyond where therapeutic radiation dose is directly deposited. For instance, studies show that irradiated dying tumor cells release tumor antigens that can lead the immune system to a systemic anti-cancer attack throughout the body of cancer patient; targeted irradiation to solid tumor also increases the migration of tumor cells already in bloodstream, the seeds of potential metastasis. Some of the new insights may explain the long ago discovered but still unexplained non-localized radiation effects (bystander effect and abscopal effect) and the efficacy of spatially fractionated radiation therapy (microbeam radiation therapy and GRID therapy) where many “hot” and “cold” spots are intentionally created throughout the treatment volume. Better understanding of the mechanisms behind the non-localized radiation effects creates tremendous opportunities to develop new and integrated cancer treatment strategies that are based on radiotherapy, immunology, and chemotherapy. However, in the multidisciplinary effort to advance new radiobiology, there are also tremendous challenges including a lack of multidisciplinary researchers and imaging technologies for the microscopic radiation-induced responses. A better grasp of the

  12. Oxidative DNA damage caused by inflammation may link to stress-induced non-targeted effects

    PubMed Central

    Sprung, Carl N.; Ivashkevich, Alesia; Forrester, Helen B.; Redon, Christophe E.; Georgakilas, Alexandros; Martin, Olga A.

    2013-01-01

    A spectrum of radiation-induced non-targeted effects has been reported during the last two decades since Nagasawa and Little first described a phenomenon in cultured cells that was later called the “bystander effect”. These non-targeted effects include radiotherapy-related abscopal effects, where changes in organs or tissues occur distant from the irradiated region. The spectrum of non-targeted effects continue to broaden over time and now embrace many types of exogenous and endogenous stressors that induce a systemic genotoxic response including a widely studied tumor microenvironment. Here we discuss processes and factors leading to DNA damage induction in non-targeted cells and tissues and highlight similarities in the regulation of systemic effects caused by different stressors. PMID:24041866

  13. Graphene Field Effect Transistor for Radiation Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Mary J. (Inventor); Chen, Zhihong (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a graphene field effect transistor-based radiation sensor for use in a variety of radiation detection applications, including manned spaceflight missions. The sensing mechanism of the radiation sensor is based on the high sensitivity of graphene in the local change of electric field that can result from the interaction of ionizing radiation with a gated undoped silicon absorber serving as the supporting substrate in the graphene field effect transistor. The radiation sensor has low power and high sensitivity, a flexible structure, and a wide temperature range, and can be used in a variety of applications, particularly in space missions for human exploration.

  14. Equipment Level Fallout Radiation Effects Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-10

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) mitigation Program to evaluate and, where possible, mitigate the effects of the nuclear attack. Fallout radiation has been identified as an environment which may effect the performance of the regional and national telecommunication system. This report presents the investigations in the network level fallout radiation methodology used to determine the effects of this environment. Alternative techniques are presented to improve the

  15. Potential health effects of space radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Chui-Hsu; Craise, Laurie M.

    1993-01-01

    Crewmembers on missions to the Moon or Mars will be exposed to radiation belts, galactic cosmic rays, and possibly solar particle events. The potential health hazards due to these space radiations must be considered carefully to ensure the success of space exploration. Because there is no human radioepidemiological data for acute and late effects of high-LET (Linear-Energy-Transfer) radiation, the biological risks of energetic charged particles have to be estimated from experimental results on animals and cultured cells. Experimental data obtained to date indicate that charged particle radiation can be much more effective than photons in causing chromosome aberrations, cell killing, mutation, and tumor induction. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) varies with biological endpoints and depends on the LET of heavy ions. Most lesions induced by low-LET radiation can be repaired in mammalian cells. Energetic heavy ions, however, can produce large complex DNA damages, which may lead to large deletions and are irreparable. For high-LET radiation, therefore, there are less or no dose rate effects. Physical shielding may not be effective in minimizing the biological effects on energetic heavy ions, since fragments of the primary particles can be effective in causing biological effects. At present the uncertainty of biological effects of heavy particles is still very large. With further understanding of the biological effects of space radiation, the career doses can be kept at acceptable levels so that the space radiation environment need not be a barrier to the exploitation of the promise of space.

  16. Effects of Microwave Radiation on Neuronal Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    salivary glands and human cultured cells to extremely low- frequency (ELF) EMF alters patterns of polypeptide synthesis (18,19). The effects displayed...at 16 Hz. Continuous exposure to radio- frequency radiation for 4 consecutive days led to the development of a cell number density gradient. The...RADIATION ON NEURONAL ACTIVITY SUMMARY The effects of radiofrequency radiation on rat hippocampal fetal neurons were examined. Carrier frequencies of 300 to

  17. Effects Of Radiation On Insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents data on responses of electrically insulating thermosetting and thermoplastic polymers to radiation. Lowest-threshold-dose (LTD) levels and 25-percent-change levels presented for such properties as tensile strength and electrical resistivity. Data on radiation-induced outgassing also given.

  18. Health Effects of UV Radiation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Agency Search Search Main menu Environmental Topics Air Bed Bugs Chemicals and Toxics Environmental Information by Location Greener Living Health Land, Waste, and ... radiation from the sun and from tanning beds is classified as a human carcinogen by the ...

  19. [Effects of optical radiation in ocular structures].

    PubMed

    Pascu, Ruxandra Angela

    2007-01-01

    The eye and the skin are organs that are particularly vulnerable to external aggression, such as electromagnetic radiation- meaning ultraviolet radiation, visible radiation (especially blue light) and infrared radiation. The three mechanisms involved are: the photo-thermic mechanism, the photochemical mechanism and the photomechanical mechanism. The effects of such exposures can be either temporary or permanent, if inadequate protection occurs. Today, there are enough data so that special protection measures can be taken concerning the potential damage of optical radiation. Among those, we mention artificial implants or sun glasses containing UV filters or surgical gestures that can be taken to protect the eye against the surgical light. Ultimately, the effects of optical radiation upon the eye are related to being well informed about the risks of uncontrolled exposure and the protection measures against it.

  20. Health effects of prenatal radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Williams, Pamela M; Fletcher, Stacy

    2010-09-01

    Pregnant women are at risk of exposure to nonionizing and ionizing radiation resulting from necessary medical procedures, workplace exposure, and diagnostic or therapeutic interventions before the pregnancy is known. Nonionizing radiation includes microwave, ultrasound, radio frequency, and electromagnetic waves. In utero exposure to nonionizing radiation is not associated with significant risks; therefore, ultrasonography is safe to perform during pregnancy. Ionizing radiation includes particles and electromagnetic radiation (e.g., gamma rays, x-rays). In utero exposure to ionizing radiation can be teratogenic, carcinogenic, or mutagenic. The effects are directly related to the level of exposure and stage of fetal development. The fetus is most susceptible to radiation during organogenesis (two to seven weeks after conception) and in the early fetal period (eight to 15 weeks after conception). Noncancer health effects have not been detected at any stage of gestation after exposure to ionizing radiation of less than 0.05 Gy (5 rad). Spontaneous abortion, growth restriction, and mental retardation may occur at higher exposure levels. The risk of cancer is increased regardless of the dose. When an exposure to ionizing radiation occurs, the total fetal radiation dose should be estimated and the mother counseled about the potential risks so that she can make informed decisions about her pregnancy management.

  1. Radiation damage effects on solid state detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainor, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Totally depleted silicon diodes are discussed which are used as nuclear particle detectors in investigations of galactic and solar cosmic radiation and trapped radiation. A study of radiation and chemical effects on the diodes was conducted. Work on electron and proton irradiation of surface barrier detectors with thicknesses up to 1 mm was completed, and work on lithium-drifted silicon devices with thicknesses of several millimeters was begun.

  2. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Boerma, Marjan; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Nelson, Gregory A.; Cheema, Amrita K.; Koturbash, Igor; Singh, Sharda P.; Tackett, Alan J.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of studies addressing effects of ionizing radiation on the heart. Clinical studies have identified early and late manifestations of radiation-induced heart disease, a side effect of radiation therapy to tumors in the chest when all or part of the heart is situated in the radiation field. Studies in preclinical animal models have contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation may injure the heart. More recent observations in human subjects suggest that ionizing radiation may have cardiovascular effects at lower doses than was previously thought. This has led to examinations of low-dose photons and low-dose charged particle irradiation in animal models. Lastly, studies have started to identify noninvasive methods for detection of cardiac radiation injury and interventions that may prevent or mitigate these adverse effects. Altogether, this ongoing research should increase our knowledge of biological mechanisms of cardiovascular radiation injury, identify non-invasive biomarkers for early detection, and potential interventions that may prevent or mitigate these adverse effects. PMID:27919338

  3. Bystander Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Little, John B.

    The objectives of this grant renewal are to provide administrative support and travel funds to allow the continued participation of the principal investigator (Dr. John B. Little) as an advisor to research initiated by several research fellows from his laboratory. The actual research will be carried out under the direction of Dr. Hatsumi Nagasawa with the collaboration of Dr. Joel Bedford at the Colorado State University, and by Drs. Edouard Azzam and Sonia de Toledo at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Dr. Little will advise on the planning of experiments and development of experimental protocols, themore » analysis of data, and the preparation of manuscripts for publication. The Specific Aims for several of the planned experiments include: 1) to extend studies of the role of recombinational repair in the bystander effect by examining other genes in this pathway and cell lines deficient in excision repair; 2) to continue studies to determine the nature of the damage signal transmitted to bystander cells including the expression of several connexins in the bystander response, and the extent to which the enhanced oxidative metabolism observed in bystander cells may relate to the nature of the transmitted bystander signal; 3) to utilize a genome-wide approach to examine the genetic basis for the hypersensitivity to ionization we have observed in unaffected parents of patients with hereditary retinoblastoma, as well as from a group of apparently normal individuals that show similar radiosensitivity; 4) to complete studies concerning the induction of high frequencies of cells with massive chromosome damage in clonal derivatives of p53 and p21 knockout mouse cell lines; in particular to examine the role of telomere changes in this phenomenon. Overall, the results of these studies should enhance our understanding of the risk of low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation, including human populations to residential radon as well as occupational

  4. TU-CD-303-04: Radiation-Induced Long Distance Tumor Cell Migration Into and Out of the Radiation Field and Its Clinical Implication

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, E.

    2015-06-15

    Recent advances in cancer research have shed new light on the complex processes of how therapeutic radiation initiates changes at cellular, tissue, and system levels that may lead to clinical effects. These new advances may transform the way we use radiation to combat certain types of cancers. For the past two decades many technological advancements in radiation therapy have been largely based on the hypothesis that direct radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks cause cell death and thus tumor control and normal tissue damage. However, new insights have elucidated that in addition to causing cellular DNA damage, localized therapeutic radiation alsomore » initiates cascades of complex downstream biological responses in tissue that extend far beyond where therapeutic radiation dose is directly deposited. For instance, studies show that irradiated dying tumor cells release tumor antigens that can lead the immune system to a systemic anti-cancer attack throughout the body of cancer patient; targeted irradiation to solid tumor also increases the migration of tumor cells already in bloodstream, the seeds of potential metastasis. Some of the new insights may explain the long ago discovered but still unexplained non-localized radiation effects (bystander effect and abscopal effect) and the efficacy of spatially fractionated radiation therapy (microbeam radiation therapy and GRID therapy) where many “hot” and “cold” spots are intentionally created throughout the treatment volume. Better understanding of the mechanisms behind the non-localized radiation effects creates tremendous opportunities to develop new and integrated cancer treatment strategies that are based on radiotherapy, immunology, and chemotherapy. However, in the multidisciplinary effort to advance new radiobiology, there are also tremendous challenges including a lack of multidisciplinary researchers and imaging technologies for the microscopic radiation-induced responses. A better grasp of the

  5. Overview of radiation effects research in photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Robert C.; Cohn, Lewis M.; Taylor, Edward W.; Greenwell, Roger A.

    1995-05-01

    A brief overview of ongoing radiation effects research in photonics is presented focusing on integrated optic and acousto-optic components. A short summary of radiation-induced effects in electro-optic modulators, detector arrays, and other photonic technologies is presented along with extensive references. The coordinated radiation effects studies among researchers within the Tri-Service Organizations and international experimental teams are beginning to demonstrate consistent measurements of radiation-induced effects in photonic components and confirming earlier reported data. This paper will present an overview of these coordinated investigations and focus on key research being conducted with the AFMC Phillips Laboratory, Naval Research Laboratory, Defence Nuclear Agency, NATO Nuclear Effects Task Group, and the Tri-Service Photonics Coordinating Committee.

  6. Radiation Effect on Human Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Cruz, Angela; Bors, Karen; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Predicting the occurrence of human cancer following exposure of an epidemiologic population to any agent causing genetic damage is a difficult task. To an approximation, this is because the uncertainty of uniform exposure to the damaging agent, and the uncertainty of uniform processing of that damage within a complex set of biological variables, degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event within clinically normal individuals. This situation begs the need for alternate controlled experimental models that are predictive for the development of human cancer following exposures to agents causing genetic damage. Such models historically have not been of substantial proven value. It is more recently encouraging, however, that developments in molecular and cell biology have led to an expanded knowledge of human carcinogenesis, and of molecular markers associated with that process. It is therefore appropriate to consider new laboratory models developed to accomodate that expanded knowledge in order to assess the cancer risks associated with exposures to genotoxic agents. When ionizing radiation of space is the genotoxic agent, then a series of additional considerations for human cancer risk assessment must also be applied. These include the dose of radiation absorbed by tissue at different locations in the body, the quality of the absorbed radiation, the rate at which absorbed dose accumulates in tissue, the way in which absorbed dose is measured and calculated, and the alterations in incident radiation caused by shielding materials. It is clear that human cancer risk assessment for damage caused by ionizing radiation is a multidisciplinary responsibility, and that within this responsibility no single discipline can hold disproportionate sway if a risk assessment model of radiation-induced human cancer is to be developed that has proven value. Biomolecular and cellular markers from the work reported here are considered

  7. Radiation effect on rocket engine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Huei-Huang; Kross, K. W.; Krebsbach, A. N.

    1990-01-01

    Critical problem areas involving the effect of radiation on the combustion of bipropellants are addressed by formulating a universal scaling law in combination with a radiation-enhanced vaporization combustion model. Numerical algorithms are developed and data pertaining to the Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) and the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) are used to conduct parametric sensitivity studies to predict the principal intercoupling effects of radiation. The analysis reveals that low-enthalpy engines, such as the VTE, are vulnerable to a substantial performance setback due to radiative loss, whereas the performance of high-enthalpy engines such as the SSME are hardly affected over a broad range of engine operation. Combustion enhancement by radiative heating of the propellant has a significant impact on propellants with high absorptivity.

  8. Radiative effects of global MODIS cloud regimes

    PubMed Central

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin; Kato, Seiji

    2018-01-01

    We update previously published MODIS global cloud regimes (CRs) using the latest MODIS cloud retrievals in the Collection 6 dataset. We implement a slightly different derivation method, investigate the composition of the regimes, and then proceed to examine several aspects of CR radiative appearance with the aid of various radiative flux datasets. Our results clearly show the CRs are radiatively distinct in terms of shortwave, longwave and their combined (total) cloud radiative effect. We show that we can clearly distinguish regimes based on whether they radiatively cool or warm the atmosphere, and thanks to radiative heating profiles to discern the vertical distribution of cooling and warming. Terra and Aqua comparisons provide information about the degree to which morning and afternoon occurrences of regimes affect the symmetry of CR radiative contribution. We examine how the radiative discrepancies among multiple irradiance datasets suffering from imperfect spatiotemporal matching depend on CR, and whether they are therefore related to the complexity of cloud structure, its interpretation by different observational systems, and its subsequent representation in radiative transfer calculations. PMID:29619289

  9. Radiative Effects of Global MODIS Cloud Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oraiopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dong Min; Kato, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    We update previously published MODIS global cloud regimes (CRs) using the latest MODIS cloud retrievals in the Collection 6 dataset. We implement a slightly different derivation method, investigate the composition of the regimes, and then proceed to examine several aspects of CR radiative appearance with the aid of various radiative flux datasets. Our results clearly show the CRs are radiatively distinct in terms of shortwave, longwave and their combined (total) cloud radiative effect. We show that we can clearly distinguish regimes based on whether they radiatively cool or warm the atmosphere, and thanks to radiative heating profiles to discern the vertical distribution of cooling and warming. Terra and Aqua comparisons provide information about the degree to which morning and afternoon occurrences of regimes affect the symmetry of CR radiative contribution. We examine how the radiative discrepancies among multiple irradiance datasets suffering from imperfect spatiotemporal matching depend on CR, and whether they are therefore related to the complexity of cloud structure, its interpretation by different observational systems, and its subsequent representation in radiative transfer calculations.

  10. Radiative effects of global MODIS cloud regimes.

    PubMed

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin; Kato, Seiji

    2016-03-16

    We update previously published MODIS global cloud regimes (CRs) using the latest MODIS cloud retrievals in the Collection 6 dataset. We implement a slightly different derivation method, investigate the composition of the regimes, and then proceed to examine several aspects of CR radiative appearance with the aid of various radiative flux datasets. Our results clearly show the CRs are radiatively distinct in terms of shortwave, longwave and their combined (total) cloud radiative effect. We show that we can clearly distinguish regimes based on whether they radiatively cool or warm the atmosphere, and thanks to radiative heating profiles to discern the vertical distribution of cooling and warming. Terra and Aqua comparisons provide information about the degree to which morning and afternoon occurrences of regimes affect the symmetry of CR radiative contribution. We examine how the radiative discrepancies among multiple irradiance datasets suffering from imperfect spatiotemporal matching depend on CR, and whether they are therefore related to the complexity of cloud structure, its interpretation by different observational systems, and its subsequent representation in radiative transfer calculations.

  11. The Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Mammalian Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biaglow, John E.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the effects of radiation on dividing cells and factors influencing these effects; also briefly reviews the radical mechanism for radiation damage. Emphasizes the importance of oxygen in radiation effects. (CS)

  12. Assurance Against Radiation Effects on Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: The Space Radiation Environment. The Effects on Electronics. The Environment in Action. NASA Approaches to Commercial Electronics: the mission mix, flight projects, and proactive research. Final Thoughts: atomic interactions, direct ionization, interaction with nucleus.

  13. Effects of solar radiation on glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Kinser, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of solar radiation of selected glasses are reported. Optical property degradation is studied using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Strength changes are measured using a concentric ring bend test. Direct fracture toughness measurements using an indentation test are planned.

  14. [Effects of radiation exposure on human body].

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Kenji; Sasatani, Megumi

    2012-03-01

    There are two types of radiation health effect; acute disorder and late on-set disorder. Acute disorder is a deterministic effect that the symptoms appear by exposure above a threshold. Tissues and cells that compose the human body have different radiation sensitivity respectively, and the symptoms appear in order, from highly radiosensitive tissues. The clinical symptoms of acute disorder begin with a decrease in lymphocytes, and then the symptoms appear such as alopecia, skin erythema, hematopoietic damage, gastrointestinal damage, central nervous system damage with increasing radiation dose. Regarding the late on-set disorder, a predominant health effect is the cancer among the symptoms of such as cancer, non-cancer disease and genetic effect. Cancer and genetic effect are recognized as stochastic effects without the threshold. When radiation dose is equal to or more than 100 mSv, it is observed that the cancer risk by radiation exposure increases linearly with an increase in dose. On the other hand, the risk of developing cancer through low-dose radiation exposure, less 100 mSv, has not yet been clarified scientifically. Although uncertainty still remains regarding low level risk estimation, ICRP propound LNT model and conduct radiation protection in accordance with LNT model in the low-dose and low-dose rate radiation from a position of radiation protection. Meanwhile, the mechanism of radiation damage has been gradually clarified. The initial event of radiation-induced diseases is thought to be the damage to genome such as radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Recently, it is clarified that our cells could recognize genome damage and induce the diverse cell response to maintain genome integrity. This phenomenon is called DNA damage response which induces the cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, apoptosis, cell senescence and so on. These responses act in the direction to maintain genome integrity against genome damage, however, the death of large number of

  15. Perturbed effects at radiation physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Külahcı, Fatih; Şen, Zekâi

    2013-09-01

    Perturbation methodology is applied in order to assess the linear attenuation coefficient, mass attenuation coefficient and cross-section behavior with random components in the basic variables such as the radiation amounts frequently used in the radiation physics and chemistry. Additionally, layer attenuation coefficient (LAC) and perturbed LAC (PLAC) are proposed for different contact materials. Perturbation methodology provides opportunity to obtain results with random deviations from the average behavior of each variable that enters the whole mathematical expression. The basic photon intensity variation expression as the inverse exponential power law (as Beer-Lambert's law) is adopted for perturbation method exposition. Perturbed results are presented not only in terms of the mean but additionally the standard deviation and the correlation coefficients. Such perturbation expressions provide one to assess small random variability in basic variables.

  16. Modifiers of radiation effects in the eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiman, Norman J.; Stewart, Fiona A.; Hall, Eric J.

    2017-11-01

    World events, including the threat of radiological terrorism and the fear of nuclear accidents, have highlighted an urgent need to develop medical countermeasures to prevent or reduce radiation injury. Similarly, plans for manned spaceflight to a near-Earth asteroid or journey to Mars raise serious concerns about long-term effects of space radiation on human health and the availability of suitable therapeutic interventions. At the same time, the need to protect normal tissue from the deleterious effects of radiotherapy has driven considerable research into the design of effective radioprotectors. For more than 70 years, animal models of radiation cataract have been utilized to test the short and long-term efficacy of various radiation countermeasures. While some compounds, most notably the Walter Reed (WR) class of radioprotectors, have reported limited effectiveness when given before exposure to low-LET radiation, the human toxicity of these molecules at effective doses limits their usefulness. Furthermore, while there has been considerable testing of eye responses to X- and gamma irradiation, there is limited information about using such models to limit the injurious effects of heavy ions and neutrons on eye tissue. A new class of radioprotector molecules, including the sulfhydryl compound PrC-210, are reported to be effective at much lower doses and with far less side effects. Their ability to modify ocular radiation damage has not yet been examined. The ability to non-invasively measure sensitive, radiation-induced ocular changes over long periods of time makes eye models an attractive option to test the radioprotective and radiation mitigating abilities of new novel compounds.

  17. Cloud effects on middle ultraviolet global radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, J.; Chai, A.-T.; Mo, T.; Green, A. E. O.

    1977-01-01

    An Eppley radiometer and a Robertson-Berger sunburn meter are employed along with an all-sky camera setup to study cloud effects on middle ultraviolet global radiation at the ground level. Semiempirical equations to allow for cloud effects presented in previous work are compared with the experimental data. The study suggests a means of defining eigenvectors of cloud patterns and correlating them with the radiation at the ground level.

  18. Correlated Uncertainties in Radiation Shielding Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werneth, Charles M.; Maung, Khin Maung; Blattnig, Steve R.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    2013-01-01

    The space radiation environment is composed of energetic particles which can deliver harmful doses of radiation that may lead to acute radiation sickness, cancer, and even death for insufficiently shielded crew members. Spacecraft shielding must provide structural integrity and minimize the risk associated with radiation exposure. The risk of radiation exposure induced death (REID) is a measure of the risk of dying from cancer induced by radiation exposure. Uncertainties in the risk projection model, quality factor, and spectral fluence are folded into the calculation of the REID by sampling from probability distribution functions. Consequently, determining optimal shielding materials that reduce the REID in a statistically significant manner has been found to be difficult. In this work, the difference of the REID distributions for different materials is used to study the effect of composition on shielding effectiveness. It is shown that the use of correlated uncertainties allows for the determination of statistically significant differences between materials despite the large uncertainties in the quality factor. This is in contrast to previous methods where uncertainties have been generally treated as uncorrelated. It is concluded that the use of correlated quality factor uncertainties greatly reduces the uncertainty in the assessment of shielding effectiveness for the mitigation of radiation exposure.

  19. Radiation Effects in Fission and Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odette, G. Robert; Wirth, Brian D.

    Since the prediction of "Wigner disease" [1] and the subsequent observation of anisotropic growth of the graphite used in the Chicago Pile, the effects of radiation on materials has been an important technological concern. The broad field of radiation effects impacts many critical advanced technologies, ranging from semiconductor processing to severe materials degradation in nuclear reactor environments. Radiation effects also occur in many natural environments, ranging from deep space to inside the Earth's crust. As selected examples that involve many basic phenomena that cross-cut and illustrate the broader impacts of radiation exposure on materials, this article focuses on modeling microstructural changes in iron-based ferritic alloys under high-energy neutron irradiation relevant to light water fission reactor pressure vessels. We also touch briefly on radiation effects in structural alloys for fusion reactor first wall and blanket structures; in this case the focus is on modeling the evolution of self-interstitial atom clusters and dislocation loops. Note, since even the narrower topic of structural materials for nuclear energy applications encompass a vast literature dating from 1942, the references included in this article are primarily limited to these two narrower subjects. Thus, the references cited here are presented as examples, rather than comprehensive bibliographies. However, the interested reader is referred to proceedings of continuing symposia series that have been sponsored by several organizations, several monographs [2-4] and key journals (e.g., Journal of Nuclear Materials, Radiation Effects and Defects in Solids).

  20. Radiation effects in astrophysical ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boduch, Philippe; Dartois, Emmanuel; de Barros, Ana L. F.; da Silveira, Enio F.; Domaracka, Alicja; Lv, Xue-Yang; Palumbo, Maria Elisabetta; Pilling, Sergio; Rothard, Hermann; Seperuelo Duarte, Eduardo; Strazzulla, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    The interaction of heavy ions with astrophysical ices was studied at different beamlines of GANIL by infrared absorption spectroscopy. This allowed simulating in the laboratory the physico-chemical modifications induced in icy objects in space, exposed to radiation fields such as the solar wind, magnetospheric particles and interstellar cosmic rays. We briefly discuss sputtering, destruction and formation of molecules, amorphization and compaction, implantation, and finally the formation of organic molecules. This latter topic is related to the question of the initial conditions for the emergence of life.

  1. Effect of intra-tumoral magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia and viral nanoparticle immunogenicity on primary and metastatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoopes, P. Jack; Mazur, Courtney M.; Osterberg, Bjorn; Song, Ailin; Gladstone, David J.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Veliz, Frank A.; Bursey, Alicea A.; Wagner, Robert J.; Fiering, Steven N.

    2017-02-01

    Although there is long association of medical hyperthermia and immune stimulation, the relative lack of a quantifiable and reproducible effect has limited the utility and advancement of this relationship in preclinical/clinical cancer and non-cancer settings. Recent cancer-based immune findings (immune checkpoint modulators etc.) including improved mechanistic understanding and biological tools now make it possible to modify and exploit the immune system to benefit conventional cancer treatments such as radiation and hyperthermia. Based on the prior experience of our research group including; cancer-based heat therapy, magnetic nanoparticle (mNP) hyperthermia, radiation biology, cancer immunology and Cowpea Mosaic Virus that has been engineered to over express antigenic proteins without RNA or DNA (eCPMV/VLP). This research was designed to determine if and how the intra-tumoral delivery of mNP hyperthermia and VLP can work together to improve local and systemic tumor treatment efficacy. Using the C3H mouse/MTG-B mammary adenocarcinoma cell model and the C57-B6 mouse/B-16-F10 melanoma cancer cell model, our data suggests the appropriate combination of intra-tumoral mNP heat (e.g. 43°C /30-60 minutes) and VLP (100 μg/200 mm3 tumor) not only result in significant primary tumor regression but the creation a systemic immune reaction that has the potential to retard secondary tumor growth (abscopal effect) and resist tumor rechallenge. Molecular data from these experiments suggest treatment based cell damage and immune signals such as Heat Shock Protein (HSP) 70/90, calreticulin, MTA1 and CD47 are potential targets that can be exploited to enhance the local and systemic (abscopal effect) immune potential of hyperthermia cancer treatment

  2. Radiation effect on rocket engine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Huei-Huang

    1988-01-01

    The effects of radiation on the performance of modern rocket propulsion systems operating at high pressure and temperature were recognized as a key issue in the design and operation of various liquid rocket engines of the current and future generations. Critical problem areas of radiation coupled with combustion of bipropellants are assessed and accounted for in the formulation of a universal scaling law incorporated with a radiation-enhanced vaporization combustion model. Numerical algorithms are developed and the pertaining data of the Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) and Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) are used to conduct parametric sensitivity studies to predict the principal intercoupling effects of radiation. The analysis reveals that low enthalpy engines, such as the VTE, are vulnerable to a substantial performance set back by the radiative loss, whereas the performance of high enthalpy engines such as the SSME, are hardly affected over a broad range of engine operation. Additionally, combustion enhancement by the radiative heating of the propellant has a significant impact in those propellants with high absorptivity. Finally, the areas of research related with radiation phenomena in bipropellant engines are identified.

  3. The effects of radiation on angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Grabham, Peter; Sharma, Preety

    2013-10-26

    The average human body contains tens of thousands of miles of vessels that permeate every tissue down to the microscopic level. This makes the human vasculature a prime target for an agent like radiation that originates from a source and passes through the body. Exposure to radiation released during nuclear accidents and explosions, or during cancer radiotherapy, is well known to cause vascular pathologies because of the ionizing effects of electromagnetic radiations (photons) such as gamma rays. There is however, another type of less well-known radiation - charged ion particles, and these atoms stripped of electrons, have different physical properties to the photons of electromagnetic radiation. They are either found in space or created on earth by particle collider facilities, and are of significant recent interest due to their enhanced effectiveness and increasing use in cancer radiotherapy, as well as a health risk to the growing number of people spending time in the space environment. Although there is to date, relatively few studies on the effects of charged particles on the vascular system, a very different picture of the biological effects of these particles compared to photons is beginning to emerge. These under researched biological effects of ion particles have a large impact on the health consequences of exposure. In this short review, we will discuss the effects of charged particles on an important biological process of the vascular system, angiogenesis, which creates and maintains the vasculature and is highly important in tumor vasculogenesis.

  4. The effects of radiation on angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The average human body contains tens of thousands of miles of vessels that permeate every tissue down to the microscopic level. This makes the human vasculature a prime target for an agent like radiation that originates from a source and passes through the body. Exposure to radiation released during nuclear accidents and explosions, or during cancer radiotherapy, is well known to cause vascular pathologies because of the ionizing effects of electromagnetic radiations (photons) such as gamma rays. There is however, another type of less well-known radiation – charged ion particles, and these atoms stripped of electrons, have different physical properties to the photons of electromagnetic radiation. They are either found in space or created on earth by particle collider facilities, and are of significant recent interest due to their enhanced effectiveness and increasing use in cancer radiotherapy, as well as a health risk to the growing number of people spending time in the space environment. Although there is to date, relatively few studies on the effects of charged particles on the vascular system, a very different picture of the biological effects of these particles compared to photons is beginning to emerge. These under researched biological effects of ion particles have a large impact on the health consequences of exposure. In this short review, we will discuss the effects of charged particles on an important biological process of the vascular system, angiogenesis, which creates and maintains the vasculature and is highly important in tumor vasculogenesis. PMID:24160185

  5. Radiation effects in LDD MOS devices

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, R.L.; Adams, J.R.

    1987-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the response of lightly doped drain (LDD) n-channel transistors to ionizing radiation. Transistors were fabricated with conventional (non-LDD) and lightly doped drain (LDD) structures using both standard (non-hardened) and radiation hardened gate oxides. Characterization of the transistors began with a correlation of the total-dose effects due to 10 keV x-rays with Co-60 gamma rays. The authors find that for the gate oxides and transistor structures investigated in this work, 10 keV x-rays produce more fixed-charge guild-up in the gate oxide, and more interface charge than do Co-60 gamma rays. They determined thatmore » the radiation response of LDD transistors is similar to that of conventional (non-LDD) transistors. In addition, both standard and radiation-hardened transistors subjected to hot carrier stress before irradiation show a similar radiation response. After exposure to 1.0 x 10/sup 6/ rads(Si), non-hardened transistors show increased susceptibility to hot-carrier graduation, while the radiation-hardened transistors exhibit similar hot-carrier degradation to non-irradiated devices. The authors have demonstrated a fully-integrated radiation hardened process tht is solid to 1.0 x 10/sup 6/ rads(Si), and shows promise for achieving 1.0 x 10/sup 7/ rad(Si) total-dose capability.« less

  6. Neutron Radiation Effects in Fiber Optics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-05

    due to naturevs effects , the photophone as a device was doomed. However the principles of voice transmission by modulated ]iqht beams were not. From...AD-A091 661 NAVAL ACADEMY ANNAPOLIS NO F/S 20/6 NEUTRON RADIATION EFFECTS IN FIBER OPTICS.(U) N.N 80 M J MARSHFIELD NCLASSIFIED USNA-TSPR-107 MLE...34’I//E/////EE I ffffffffffffff /l-"lll/"."lmIii//2 //0 A TRIDENT SCHOLAR * PROJECT REPORT NO. 1im "NEUTRON RADIATION EFFECTS IN FIBE OPTICS UNITED

  7. Radiation effects on bovine taste bud membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shatzman, A.R.; Mossman, K.L.

    1982-11-01

    In order to investigate the mechanisms of radiation-induced taste loss, the effects of radiation on preparations of enriched bovine taste bud membranes were studied. Taste buds containing circumvallate papilae, and surrounding control epithelial tissues devoid of taste buds, were obtained from steers and given radiation doses of 0-7000 cGy (rad). Tissue fractions were isolated into membrane-enriched and heterogeneous components using differential and sucrose gradient centrifugation of tissue homogenates. The yield of membranes, as measured by protein content in the buoyant membrane-enriched fractions, was reduced in quantity with increasing radiation dose. The relation between radiation dose and membrane quantity in membrane-enrichedmore » fractions could be fit by a simple exponential model with taste bud-derived membranes twice as radiosensitive as membranes from control epithelial tissue. Binding of sucrose, sodium, and acetate and fluoride stimulation of adenylate cyclase were nearly identical in both irradiated and nonirradiated intact membranes. Radiation had no effect on fractions of heterogeneous components. While it is not clear what changes are occurring in enriched taste cell membranes, damage to membranes may play an important role in the taste loss observed in patients following radiotherapy.« less

  8. Effect of radiation processing on meat tenderisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanatt, Sweetie R.; Chawla, S. P.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-06-01

    The effect of radiation processing (0, 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy) on the tenderness of three types of popularly consumed meat in India namely chicken, lamb and buffalo was investigated. In irradiated meat samples dose dependant reduction in water holding capacity, cooking yield and shear force was observed. Reduction in shear force upon radiation processing was more pronounced in buffalo meat. Protein and collagen solubility as well as TCA soluble protein content increased on irradiation. Radiation processing of meat samples resulted in some change in colour of meat. Results suggested that irradiation leads to dose dependant tenderization of meat. Radiation processing of meat at a dose of 2.5 kGy improved its texture and had acceptable odour.

  9. Radiation effects on Brassica seeds and seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deoli, Naresh; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation consists of high energy charged particles and affects biological systems, but because of its stochastic, non-directional nature is difficult to replicate on Earth. Radiation damages biological systems acutely at high doses or cumulatively at low doses through progressive changes in DNA organization. These damages lead to death or cause of mutations. While radiation biology typically focuses on mammalian or human systems, little is known as to how radiation affects plants. In addition, energetic ion beams are widely used to generate new mutants in plants considering their high-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) as compared to gamma rays and X-rays. Understanding the effect of ionizing radiation on plant provides a basis for studying effects of radiation on biological systems and will help mitigate (space) radiation damage in plants. We exposed dry and imbibed Brassica rapa seeds and seedling roots to proton beams of varying qualities and compared the theoretical penetration range of different energy levels with observable growth response. We used 1, 2 and 3 MeV protons in air at the varying fluences to investigate the effect of direct irradiation on the seeds (1012 - 1015 ions/cm2) and seedlings (1013 ions/cm2). The range of protons in the tissue was calculated using Monte-Carlo based SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) software. The simulation and biological results indicate that ions did not penetrate the tissue of dry or hydrated seeds at all used ion energies. Therefore the entire energy was transferred to the treated tissue. Irradiated seeds were germinated vertically under dim light and roots growth was observed for two days after imbibition. The LD50 of the germination was about 2×1014 ions/cm2 and about 5×1014 ions/cm2 for imbibed and dry seeds, respectively. Since seedlings are most sensitive to gravity, the change in gravitropic behavior is a convenient means to assess radiation damage on physiological responses other than direct tissue

  10. Non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation–implications for low dose risk

    PubMed Central

    Kadhim, Munira; Salomaa, Sisko; Wright, Eric; Hildebrandt, Guido; Belyakov, Oleg V.; Prise, Kevin M.; Little, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    Non-DNA targeted effects of ionizing radiation, which include genomic instability, and a variety of bystander effects including abscopal effects and bystander mediated adaptive response, have raised concerns about the magnitude of low-dose radiation risk. Genomic instability, bystander effects and adaptive responses are powered by fundamental, but not clearly understood systems that maintain tissue homeostasis. Despite excellent research in this field by various groups, there are still gaps in our understanding of the likely mechanisms associated with non-DNA targeted effects, particularly with respect to systemic (human health) consequences at low and intermediate doses of ionizing radiation. Other outstanding questions include links between the different non-targeted responses and the variations in response observed between individuals and cell lines, possibly a function of genetic background. Furthermore, it is still not known what the initial target and early interactions in cells are that give rise to non-targeted responses in neighbouring or descendant cells. This paper provides a commentary on the current state of the field as a result of the Non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation (NOTE) Integrated Project funded by the European Union. Here we critically examine the evidence for non-targeted effects, discuss apparently contradictory results and consider implications for low-dose radiation health effects. PMID:23262375

  11. Radiation Effects on Current Field Programmable Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; LaBel, K.; Wang, J. J.; Cronquist, B.; Koga, R.; Penzin, S.; Swift, G.

    1997-01-01

    Manufacturers of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAS) take different technological and architectural approaches that directly affect radiation performance. Similar y technological and architectural features are used in related technologies such as programmable substrates and quick-turn application specific integrated circuits (ASICs). After analyzing current technologies and architectures and their radiation-effects implications, this paper includes extensive test data quantifying various devices total dose and single event susceptibilities, including performance degradation effects and temporary or permanent re-configuration faults. Test results will concentrate on recent technologies being used in space flight electronic systems and those being developed for use in the near term. This paper will provide the first extensive study of various configuration memories used in programmable devices. Radiation performance limits and their impacts will be discussed for each design. In addition, the interplay between device scaling, process, bias voltage, design, and architecture will be explored. Lastly, areas of ongoing research will be discussed.

  12. Radiation Effects In Satellite Cables

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    reverse current across the gap through the ionized air trapped in the gap . This reverse current opposes the effect of the photo-driven current and reduces ...using the measured gap of 30 pm) has the right sign (negative) for both cables and is very close in magnitude for one but is low by about a factor of 2.5...experiments of Reference 32. Therefore, the effect of a 100 volt field in reducing transport of photoelectrons across the gap in the experiment should

  13. DIRECT AND INDIRECT BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hobitz, H.

    1961-01-01

    The primary physical processes, ionization and excitation, induced by radiation in biological materials are discussed. Their effects in causing reduction, decarboxylation, and depolymerization in proteins and deoxyribonucleic acid of the cell nucleus are examined. The action of radiation doses of 100,000- 600,000 r on pollen of Digitalis purpurea maintained at room temperature and at approximates 190 deg C showed that biological activity was destroyed by doses >200,000 r at room temperature, but at approximates 190 deg the pollen retained some activity even after the highest dose. A similar effect was seen with Bacterium cadaveris cells, about 0.5% of which survivedmore » 50000 r given at l8O deg whereas no cells survived 20000 r given at 4 deg . The presence of 1% cysteamine at the higher temperature increased survival 20-fold. Cytochrome c showed markedly different responses to radiation in dry form as compared with aqueous solution. The anhydrous enzyme showed a linear decline in log activity with radiation dose but in aqueous solution the activity declined more slowly at higher doses. The radiation dose to-produce 50% inactivation was 4 x 10/sup 7/ r in dry form and 6 x 10/sup 5/ r in solution, a 67-fold difference. The results suggest that diffusion of the free radicals (H: or OH:) produced in the primary process is considerably hindered at low temperature and by the absence of water. (H.H.D.)« less

  14. Radiation dosimetry and biophysical models of space radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu; Shavers, Mark R.; George, Kerry

    2003-01-01

    Estimating the biological risks from space radiation remains a difficult problem because of the many radiation types including protons, heavy ions, and secondary neutrons, and the absence of epidemiology data for these radiation types. Developing useful biophysical parameters or models that relate energy deposition by space particles to the probabilities of biological outcomes is a complex problem. Physical measurements of space radiation include the absorbed dose, dose equivalent, and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra. In contrast to conventional dosimetric methods, models of radiation track structure provide descriptions of energy deposition events in biomolecules, cells, or tissues, which can be used to develop biophysical models of radiation risks. In this paper, we address the biophysical description of heavy particle tracks in the context of the interpretation of both space radiation dosimetry and radiobiology data, which may provide insights into new approaches to these problems.

  15. Inverse Faraday effect driven by radiation friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liseykina, T. V.; Popruzhenko, S. V.; Macchi, A.

    2016-07-01

    A collective, macroscopic signature to detect radiation friction in laser-plasma experiments is proposed. In the interaction of superintense circularly polarized laser pulses with high density targets, the effective dissipation due to radiative losses allows the absorption of electromagnetic angular momentum, which in turn leads to the generation of a quasistatic axial magnetic field. This peculiar ‘inverse Faraday effect’ is investigated by analytical modeling and three-dimensional simulations, showing that multi-gigagauss magnetic fields may be generated at laser intensities \\gt {10}23 {{{W}}{{cm}}}-2.

  16. Emerging Therapies for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sameera S; Higgins, Kristin A; McGarry, Ronald C

    2017-01-01

    The current standard of care for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) includes radiation, chemotherapy, and surgery in certain individualized cases. In unresectable NSCLC, chemoradiation has been the standard of care for the past three decades. Local and distant failure remains high in this group of patients, so dose escalation has been studied in both single institution and national clinical trials. Though initial studies showed a benefit to dose escalation, phase III studies examining dose escalation using standard fractionation or hyperfractionation have failed to show a benefit. Over the last 17 years, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has shown a high degree of safety and local control for stage I lung cancers and other localized malignancies. More recently, phase I/II studies using SBRT for dose escalation after conventional chemoradiation in locally advanced NSCLC have been promising with good apparent safety. Immunotherapy also offers opportunities to address distant disease and preclinical data suggest immunotherapy in tandem with SBRT may be a rational way to induce an "abscopal effect" although there are little clinical data as yet. By building on the proven concept of conventional chemoradiation for patients with locally advanced NSCLC with a subsequent radiation dose intensification to residual disease with SBRT concurrent with immunotherapy, we hope address the issues of metastatic and local failures. This "quadmodality" approach is still in its infancy but appears to be a safe and rational approach to the improving the outcome of NSCLC therapy.

  17. TU-CD-303-03: Localized Radiation Can Induce Systemic Anti-Cancer Immune and Non-Immune Responses and How We Might Utilize It

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M.

    Recent advances in cancer research have shed new light on the complex processes of how therapeutic radiation initiates changes at cellular, tissue, and system levels that may lead to clinical effects. These new advances may transform the way we use radiation to combat certain types of cancers. For the past two decades many technological advancements in radiation therapy have been largely based on the hypothesis that direct radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks cause cell death and thus tumor control and normal tissue damage. However, new insights have elucidated that in addition to causing cellular DNA damage, localized therapeutic radiation alsomore » initiates cascades of complex downstream biological responses in tissue that extend far beyond where therapeutic radiation dose is directly deposited. For instance, studies show that irradiated dying tumor cells release tumor antigens that can lead the immune system to a systemic anti-cancer attack throughout the body of cancer patient; targeted irradiation to solid tumor also increases the migration of tumor cells already in bloodstream, the seeds of potential metastasis. Some of the new insights may explain the long ago discovered but still unexplained non-localized radiation effects (bystander effect and abscopal effect) and the efficacy of spatially fractionated radiation therapy (microbeam radiation therapy and GRID therapy) where many “hot” and “cold” spots are intentionally created throughout the treatment volume. Better understanding of the mechanisms behind the non-localized radiation effects creates tremendous opportunities to develop new and integrated cancer treatment strategies that are based on radiotherapy, immunology, and chemotherapy. However, in the multidisciplinary effort to advance new radiobiology, there are also tremendous challenges including a lack of multidisciplinary researchers and imaging technologies for the microscopic radiation-induced responses. A better grasp of the

  18. Tutorial: Radiation Effects in Electronic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.

    2017-01-01

    This tutorial presentation will give an overview of radiation effects in electrical, electronic, and electromechanical (EEE) components as it applies to civilian space systems of varying size and complexity. The natural space environment presents many unique threats to electronic systems regardless of where the systems operate from low-Earth orbit to interplanetary space. The presentation will cover several topics, including: an overview and introduction to the applicable space radiation environments common to a broad range of mission designs; definitions and impacts of effects due to impinging particles in the space environment e.g., total ionizing dose (TID), total non-ionizing dose (TNID), and single-event effects (SEE); and, testing for and evaluation of TID, TNID, and SEE in EEE components.

  19. Space Radiation Effects in Advanced Flash Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. H.

    2001-01-01

    Memory storage requirements in space systems have steadily increased, much like storage requirements in terrestrial systems. Large arrays of dynamic memories (DRAMs) have been used in solid-state recorders, relying on a combination of shielding and error-detection-and correction (EDAC) to overcome the extreme sensitivity of DRAMs to space radiation. For example, a 2-Gbit memory (with 4-Mb DRAMs) used on the Clementine mission functioned perfectly during its moon mapping mission, in spite of an average of 71 memory bit flips per day from heavy ions. Although EDAC worked well with older types of memory circuits, newer DRAMs use extremely complex internal architectures which has made it increasingly difficult to implement EDAC. Some newer DRAMs have also exhibited catastrophic latchup. Flash memories are an intriguing alternative to DRAMs because of their nonvolatile storage and extremely high storage density, particularly for applications where writing is done relatively infrequently. This paper discusses radiation effects in advanced flash memories, including general observations on scaling and architecture as well as the specific experience obtained at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in evaluating high-density flash memories for use on the NASA mission to Europa, one of Jupiter's moons. This particular mission must pass through the Jovian radiation belts, which imposes a very demanding radiation requirement.

  20. Advanced CMOS Radiation Effects Testing and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, J. A.; Marshall, P. W.; Rodbell, K. P.; Gordon, M. S.; LaBel, K. A.; Schwank, J. R.; Dodds, N. A.; Castaneda, C. M.; Berg, M. D.; Kim, H. S.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Presentation at the annual NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program Electronic Technology Workshop (ETW). The material includes an update of progress in this NEPP task area over the past year, which includes testing, evaluation, and analysis of radiation effects data on the IBM 32 nm silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The testing was conducted using test vehicles supplied by directly by IBM.

  1. 47 CFR 95.855 - Transmitter effective radiated power limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Transmitter effective radiated power limitation. The effective radiated power (ERP) of each CTS and RTU shall... with an ERP exceeding 20 watts. No mobile RTU may transmit with an ERP exceeding 4 watts. [64 FR 59663...

  2. 47 CFR 95.855 - Transmitter effective radiated power limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Transmitter effective radiated power limitation. The effective radiated power (ERP) of each CTS and RTU shall... with an ERP exceeding 20 watts. No mobile RTU may transmit with an ERP exceeding 4 watts. [64 FR 59663...

  3. 47 CFR 22.867 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Effective radiated power limits. The effective radiated power (ERP) of ground and airborne stations... peak ERP of airborne mobile station transmitters must not exceed 12 Watts. (b) The peak ERP of ground...

  4. The effects of radiation on the outer planets grand tour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A handbook is presented which was designed to accompany an oral presentation on the effects of radiation on the outer planets grand tour (OPGT). A summary of OPGT radiation environments expected from natural sources and the radioisotope thermoelectric generators and basic radiation effects and processes are reviewed, and ionization and displacement effects are examined. The presentation summarizes the effects of radiation on miscellaneous spacecraft materials and devices. The annealing and hardening of electronics are described. Special emphasis is placed on microcircuits. Mathematical modeling of circuits affected by radiation and radiation environmental testing are discussed. A review of means of evaluating the performance and correcting failures of irradiated devices is also presented.

  5. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistagemore » carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of epidemiologic studies using

  6. The future impacts of non-targeted effects.

    PubMed

    Bright, Scott; Kadhim, Munira

    2018-04-11

    Ionizing radiation was traditionally thought to exert its detrimental effects through interaction with sensitive cellular targets, nuclear DNA being of most importance. This theory has since merged with a more recently described radiation response called non-targeted effects (NTE). This review will briefly look at the various types of NTE and the potential implications they may have for radiobiology research and its applications. The most well-known NTE are genomic instability (GI) and bystander effects (BE). Other NTE include abscopal effects, which are similar to bystander effects but are generally based in a clinical environment with immune involvement as the defining feature. Currently, our understanding of NTE is limited to certain signaling pathways/molecules, and as yet there is no theory that describes or can accurately predict the occurrence or outcome of these NTE. There are numerous groups investigating these processes in vitro and in vivo, and thus steady progress is being made. Developing a deeper understanding of NTE has potential impacts for therapy and diagnosis, safer occupational exposures, space flight and our general understanding of radiation biology.

  7. PDSOI and Radiation Effects: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forgione, Joshua B.

    2005-01-01

    Bulk silicon substrates are a common characteristic of nearly all commercial, Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS), integrated circuits. These devices operate well on Earth, but are not so well received in the space environment. An alternative to bulk CMOS is the Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI), in which a &electric isolates the device layer from the substrate. SO1 behavior in the space environment has certain inherent advantages over bulk, a primary factor in its long-time appeal to space-flight IC designers. The discussion will investigate the behavior of the Partially-Depleted SO1 (PDSOI) device with respect to some of the more common space radiation effects: Total Ionized Dose (TID), Single-Event Upsets (SEUs), and Single-Event Latchup (SEL). Test and simulation results from the literature, bulk and epitaxial comparisons facilitate reinforcement of PDSOI radiation characteristics.

  8. Radiation Effects on DC-DC Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, De-Xin; AbdulMazid, M. D.; Attia, John O.; Kankam, Mark D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this work, several DC-DC converters were designed and built. The converters are Buck Buck-Boost, Cuk, Flyback, and full-bridge zero-voltage switched. The total ionizing dose radiation and single event effects on the converters were investigated. The experimental results for the TID effects tests show that the voltages of the Buck Buck-Boost, Cuk, and Flyback converters increase as total dose increased when using power MOSFET IRF250 as a switching transistor. The change in output voltage with total dose is highest for the Buck converter and the lowest for Flyback converter. The trend of increase in output voltages with total dose in the present work agrees with those of the literature. The trends of the experimental results also agree with those obtained from PSPICE simulation. For the full-bridge zero-voltage switch converter, it was observed that the dc-dc converter with IRF250 power MOSFET did not show a significant change of output voltage with total dose. In addition, for the dc-dc converter with FSF254R4 radiation-hardened power MOSFET, the output voltage did not change significantly with total dose. The experimental results were confirmed by PSPICE simulation that showed that FB-ZVS converter with IRF250 power MOSFET's was not affected with the increase in total ionizing dose. Single Event Effects (SEE) radiation tests were performed on FB-ZVS converters. It was observed that the FB-ZVS converter with the IRF250 power MOSFET, when the device was irradiated with Krypton ion with ion-energy of 150 MeV and LET of 41.3 MeV-square cm/mg, the output voltage increased with the increase in fluence. However, for Krypton with ion-energy of 600 MeV and LET of 33.65 MeV-square cm/mg, and two out of four transistors of the converter were permanently damaged. The dc-dc converter with FSF254R4 radiation hardened power MOSFET's did not show significant change at the output voltage with fluence while being irradiated by Krypton with ion energy of 1.20 GeV and LET of 25

  9. Gamma Radiation Effects on Peanut Skin Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; de Souza Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira; Regitano-D’Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD) soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts’ antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil. PMID:22489142

  10. Alpha Radiation Effects on Silicon Oxynitride Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Morichetti, Francesco; Grillanda, Stefano; Manandhar, Sandeep

    2016-09-21

    Photonic technologies are today of great interest for use in harsh environments, such as outer space, where they can potentially replace current communication systems based on radiofrequency components. However, very much alike to electronic devices, the behavior of optical materials and circuits can be strongly altered by high-energy and high-dose ionizing radiations. Here, we investigate the effects of alpha () radiation with MeV-range energy on silicon oxynitride (SiON) optical waveguides. Irradiation with a dose of 5×1015 cm-2 increases the refractive index of the SiON core by nearly 10-2, twice as much that of the surrounding silica cladding, leading to amore » significant increase of the refractive index contrast of the waveguide. The higher mode confinement induced by -radiation reduces the loss of tightly bent waveguides. We show that this increases the quality factor of microring resonators by 20%, with values larger than 105 after irradiation.« less

  11. Effects of UV radiation on phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Raymond C.; Cullen, John J.

    1995-07-01

    It is now widely documented that reduced ozone will result in increased levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, especially UV-B (280-320nm), incident at the surface of the earth [Watson, 1988; Anderson et al., 1991; Schoeberl and Hartmann, 1991; Frederick and Alberts, 1991; WMO, 1991; Madronich, 1993; Kerr and McElroy, 1993], and there is considerable and increasing evidence that these higher levels of UV-B radiation may be detrimental to various forms of marine life in the upper layers of the ocean. With respect to aquatic ecosystems, we also know that this biologically- damaging mid-ultraviolet radiation can penetrate to ecologically- significant depths in marine and freshwater systems [Jerlov, 1950; Lenoble, 1956; Smith and Baker, 1979; Smith and Baker, 1980; Smith and Baker, 1981; Kirk et al., 1994]. This knowledge, plus the dramatic decline in stratospheric ozone over the Antarctic continent each spring, now known to be caused by anthropogenically released chemicals [Solomon, 1990; Booth et al., 1994], has resulted in increased UV-environmental research and a number of summary reports. The United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP) has provided recent updates with respect to the effects of ozone depletion on aquatic ecosystems (Hader, Worrest, Kumar in UNEP 1989, 1991, Hader, Worrest, Kumar and Smith UNEP 1994) and the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) has provided [SCOPE, 1992] a summary of the effects of increased UV radiation on biological systems. SCOPE has also reported [SCOPE, 1993] on the effects of increased UV on the biosphere. In addition, several books have recently been published reviewing various aspects of environmental UV photobiology [Young et al., 1993], UV effects on humans, animals and plants [Tevini, 1993], the biological effects of UV radiation in Antarctica [Weiler and Penhale, 1994], and UV research in freshwater ecosystems [Williamson and Zagarese, 1994]. Several other reviews are relevant [NAS, 1984; Caldwell

  12. 47 CFR 22.593 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effective radiated power limits. 22.593 Section... power limits. The effective radiated power of fixed stations operating on the channels listed in § 22.591 must not exceed 150 Watts. The equivalent isotropically radiated power of existing fixed microwave...

  13. The effects of solar radiation and black body re-radiation on thermal comfort.

    PubMed

    Hodder, Simon; Parsons, Ken

    2008-04-01

    When the sun shines on people in enclosed spaces, such as in buildings or vehicles, it directly affects thermal comfort. There is also an indirect effect as surrounding surfaces are heated exposing a person to re-radiation. This laboratory study investigated the effects of long wave re-radiation on thermal comfort, individually and when combined with direct solar radiation. Nine male participants (26.0 +/- 4.7 years) took part in three experimental sessions where they were exposed to radiation from a hot black panel heated to 100 degrees C; direct simulated solar radiation of 600 Wm(-2) and the combined simulated solar radiation and black panel radiation. Exposures were for 30 min, during which subjective responses and mean skin temperatures were recorded. The results showed that, at a surface temperature of 100 degrees C (close to maximum in practice), radiation from the flat black panel provided thermal discomfort but that this was relatively small when compared with the effects of direct solar radiation. It was concluded that re-radiation, from a dashboard in a vehicle, for example, will not have a major direct influence on thermal comfort and that existing models of thermal comfort do not require a specific modification. These results showed that, for the conditions investigated, the addition of re-radiation from internal components has an effect on thermal sensation when combined with direct solar radiation. However, it is not considered that it will be a major factor in a real world situation. This is because, in practice, dashboards are unlikely to maintain very high surface temperatures in vehicles without an unacceptably high air temperature. This study quantifies the contribution of short- and long-wave radiation to thermal comfort. The results will aid vehicle designers to have a better understanding of the complex radiation environment. These include direct radiation from the sun as well as re-radiation from the dashboard and other internal surfaces.

  14. Effect of microgravity & space radiation on microbes.

    PubMed

    Senatore, Giuliana; Mastroleo, Felice; Leys, Natalie; Mauriello, Gianluigi

    2018-06-01

    One of the new challenges facing humanity is to reach increasingly further distant space targets. It is therefore of upmost importance to understand the behavior of microorganisms that will unavoidably reach the space environment together with the human body and equipment. Indeed, microorganisms could activate their stress defense mechanisms, modifying properties related to human pathogenesis. The host-microbe interactions, in fact, could be substantially affected under spaceflight conditions and the study of microorganisms' growth and activity is necessary for predicting these behaviors and assessing precautionary measures during spaceflight. This review gives an overview of the effects of microgravity and space radiation on microorganisms both in real and simulated conditions.

  15. Biological effects of space radiation and development of effective countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-04-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronauts' exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronauts' health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling), oxidative stress, gastrointestinal tract bacterial translocation and immune system activation, peripheral hematopoietic cell counts, emesis, blood coagulation, skin, behavior/fatigue (including social exploration, submaximal exercise treadmill and spontaneous locomotor activity), heart functions, alterations in biological endpoints related to astronauts' vision problems (lumbar puncture/intracranial pressure, ocular ultrasound and histopathology studies), and survival, as well as long-term effects such as cancer and cataract development. A number of different countermeasures have been identified that can potentially mitigate or prevent the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to space radiation.

  16. Biological Effects of Space Radiation and Development of Effective Countermeasures

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronaut exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronaut health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling), oxidative stress, gastrointestinal tract bacterial translocation and immune system activation, peripheral hematopoietic cell counts, emesis, blood coagulation, skin, behavior/fatigue (including social exploration, submaximal exercise treadmill and spontaneous locomotor activity), heart functions, alterations in biological endpoints related to astronaut vision problems (lumbar puncture/intracranial pressure, ocular ultrasound and histopathology studies), and survival, as well as long-term effects such as cancer and cataract development. A number of different countermeasures have been identified that can potentially mitigate or prevent the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to space radiation. PMID:25258703

  17. Cloud Radiative Effect to Downward Longwave Radiation in the Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, K.; Hayasaka, T.

    2014-12-01

    Downward longwave radiation is important factor to affect climate change. In polar regions, estimation of the radiative effect of cloud on the downward longwave radiation has large uncertainty. Relatively large cloud effect to the radiation occurs there due to low temperature, small amount of water vapor, and strong inversion layer. The cloud effect is, however, not evaluated sufficiently because the long term polar night and high surface albedo make satellite retrieval difficult. The intent of the present study is to quantify cloud radiative effect for downward longwave radiation in the polar regions by in-situ observation and radiative transfer calculation. The observation sites in this study are Ny-Ålesund (NYA), Syowa (SYO), and South Pole (SPO). These stations belong to the Baseline Surface Radiation Network. The period of data analysis is from 2003 to 2012. The effect of cloud on the downward longwave radiation is evaluated by subtraction of calculated downward longwave radiation under clear-sky condition from observed value under all-sky condition. Radiative transfer model was used for the evaluation of clear sky radiation with vertical temperature and humidity profile obtained by radiosonde observations. Calculated result shows good correlation with observation under clear-sky condition. The RMSE is +0.83±5.0. The cloud effect varied from -10 - +110 W/m2 (-10 - +40 %). Cloud effect increased with increasing of cloud fraction and decreasing of cloud base height and precipitable water. In SYO negative effects were sometimes obtained. The negative cloud effect emerged under dry and temperature inversion condition lower than 2 km. One of reasons of negative effect is considered to be existence of cloud at temperature inversion altitude. When the cloud effect is smaller than -5 W/m2 (standard deviation between calculation and observation), 50 % of them have a condition with cloud base height estimated by micro pulse lidar lower than 2 km.

  18. The impact of the new biology on radiation risks in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicello, John F.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation is considered to be one of three or four major hazards for personnel in space and has emerged as the most critical issue to be resolved for long-term missions, both orbital and interplanetary. Space habitats are stressful and dangerous environments. Health and medical consequences arising from microgravity, stress, and trauma include weakened immune systems, increased viral activity, and loss of bone mass. The greatest risks from radiation are generally assumed to be cancers and possibly damage to the central nervous system. Synergistic effects arising from the other environmental hazards along with abscopal and exogenic factors are likely. Space programs represent an exceptional opportunity for examining the biological consequences of low-dose exposures of humans to radiation at every level of progression. Although astronauts are a relatively small population, they are healthy, physically active volunteers who undergo extensive testing and medical examinations before, during, and after protracted exposures with periodic follow-up examinations. The radiation environments along with other hazards are likewise monitored and documented. Extensive international research programs are in progress. Seven years ago the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration established the National Space Biomedical Research Institute through a cooperative agreement with a consortium of research and academic institutions in order to address radiation issues through a concerted, programmatic effort. Advanced technologies are rapidly being incorporated into these programs to determine the significance of new biological data and to evaluate the interplay among the different medical hazards. Programmatic in vivo and in vitro studies of the processes leading to carcinogenesis are in progress. Drugs and dietary supplements are being examined at the cellular and in vivo levels to assess their potential as dose-modifying agents. The infrastructure of this new approach, recent

  19. Effect of combined heat and radiation on microbial destruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. A.; Pflug, I. J.

    1977-01-01

    A series of experiments at several levels of relative humidity and radiation dose rates was carried out using spores of Bacillus subtilis var. niger to evaluate the effect of heat alone, radiation alone, and a combination of heat and radiation. Combined heat and radiation treatment of microorganisms yields a destruction rate greater than the additive rates of the independent agents. The synergistic mechanism shows a proportional dependency on radiation dose rate, an Arrhenius dependence on temperature, and a dependency on relative humidity. Maximum synergism occurs under conditions where heat and radiation individually destroy microorganisms at approximately equal rates. Larger synergistic advantage is possible at low relative humidities rather than at high relative humidities.

  20. LAURISTON S. TAYLOR LECTURE ON RADIATION PROTECTION AND MEASURMENTS: WHAT MAKES PARTICLE RADIATION SO EFFECTIVE?

    PubMed Central

    Blakely, Eleanor A.

    2012-01-01

    The scientific basis for the physical and biological effectiveness of particle radiations has emerged from many decades of meticulous basic research. A diverse array of biologically relevant consequences at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organism level have been reported, but what are the key processes and mechanisms that make particle radiation so effective, and what competing processes define dose dependences? Recent studies have shown that individual genotypes control radiation-regulated genes and pathways in response to radiations of varying ionization density. The fact that densely ionizing radiations can affect different gene families than sparsely ionizing radiations, and that the effects are dose- and time-dependent has opened up new areas of future research. The complex microenvironment of the stroma, and the significant contributions of the immune response have added to our understanding of tissue-specific differences across the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum. The importance of targeted vs. nontargeted effects remain a thorny, but elusive and important contributor to chronic low dose radiation effects of variable LET that still needs further research. The induction of cancer is also LET-dependent, suggesting different mechanisms of action across the gradient of ionization density. The focus of this 35th Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture is to chronicle the step-by-step acquisition of experimental clues that have refined our understanding of what makes particle radiation so effective, with emphasis on the example of radiation effects on the crystalline lens of the human eye. PMID:23032880

  1. Predicted levels of human radiation tolerance extrapolated from clinical studies of radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lushbaugh, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    Results of clinical studies of radiation effects on man are used to evaluate space radiation hazards encountered during manned space travel. Considered are effects of photons as well as of mixed fission neutrons and gamma irradiations in establishing body radiosensitivity and tolerance levels. Upper and lower dose-response-time relations for acute radiation syndromes in patients indicate that man is more than sufficiently radioresistant to make the risks of an early radiation effect during one short space mission intangibly small in relation to the other nonradiation risks involved.

  2. Radiation Effects: Overview for Space Environment Specialists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladbury, Ray

    2017-01-01

    Radiation Hardness Assurance (RHA) methodologies need to evolve to capitalize on the increased flexibility introduced by new models of space radiation environments. This presentation examines the characteristics of various radiation threats, the sources of error that RHA methodologies seek to control and the contributions of environment models to those errors. The influence of trends in microelectronic device technology is also considered.

  3. UV RADIATION EFFECTS ON MICROBES AND MICROBIAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ultraviolet (UV) region of solar radiation is defined as wavelengths in the range of 200 to 400 nm. In contrast to visible radiation (400 - 800 nm), which has a well-defined role as the energy source for most of the Earth's primary production, the effects of UV radiation on b...

  4. Improving the radiation hardness of graphene field effect transistors

    DOE PAGES

    Alexandrou, Konstantinos; Masurkar, Amrita; Edrees, Hassan; ...

    2016-10-11

    Ionizing radiation poses a significant challenge to the operation and reliability of conventional silicon-based devices. In this paper, we report the effects of gamma radiation on graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs), along with a method to mitigate those effects by developing a radiation-hardened version of our back-gated GFETs. We demonstrate that activated atmospheric oxygen from the gamma ray interaction with air damages the semiconductor device, and damage to the substrate contributes additional threshold voltage instability. Our radiation-hardened devices, which have protection against these two effects, exhibit minimal performance degradation, improved stability, and significantly reduced hysteresis after prolonged gamma radiation exposure. Finally,more » we believe this work provides an insight into graphene's interactions with ionizing radiation that could enable future graphene-based electronic devices to be used for space, military, and other radiation-sensitive applications.« less

  5. Improving the radiation hardness of graphene field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrou, Konstantinos; Masurkar, Amrita; Edrees, Hassan

    Ionizing radiation poses a significant challenge to the operation and reliability of conventional silicon-based devices. In this paper, we report the effects of gamma radiation on graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs), along with a method to mitigate those effects by developing a radiation-hardened version of our back-gated GFETs. We demonstrate that activated atmospheric oxygen from the gamma ray interaction with air damages the semiconductor device, and damage to the substrate contributes additional threshold voltage instability. Our radiation-hardened devices, which have protection against these two effects, exhibit minimal performance degradation, improved stability, and significantly reduced hysteresis after prolonged gamma radiation exposure. Finally,more » we believe this work provides an insight into graphene's interactions with ionizing radiation that could enable future graphene-based electronic devices to be used for space, military, and other radiation-sensitive applications.« less

  6. Gamma radiation effects on silicon photonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Grillanda, Stefano; Singh, Vivek; Raghunathan, Vivek; Morichetti, Francesco; Melloni, Andrea; Kimerling, Lionel; Agarwal, Anuradha M

    2016-07-01

    To support the use of integrated photonics in harsh environments, such as outer space, the hardness threshold to high-energy radiation must be established. Here, we investigate the effects of gamma (γ) rays, with energy in the MeV-range, on silicon photonic waveguides. By irradiation of high-quality factor amorphous silicon core resonators, we measure the impact of γ rays on the materials incorporated in our waveguide system, namely amorphous silicon, silicon dioxide, and polymer. While we show the robustness of amorphous silicon and silicon dioxide up to an absorbed dose of 15 Mrad, more than 100× higher than previous reports on crystalline silicon, polymer materials exhibit changes with doses as low as 1 Mrad.

  7. Radiation effects in advanced microelectronics technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, A. H.

    1998-06-01

    The pace of device scaling has increased rapidly in recent years. Experimental CMOS devices have been produced with feature sizes below 0.1 /spl mu/m, demonstrating that devices with feature sizes between 0.1 and 0.25 /spl mu/m will likely be available in mainstream technologies after the year 2000. This paper discusses how the anticipated changes in device dimensions and design are likely to affect their radiation response in space environments. Traditional problems, such as total dose effects, SEU and latchup are discussed, along with new phenomena. The latter include hard errors from heavy ions (microdose and gate-rupture errors), and complex failure modes related to advanced circuit architecture. The main focus of the paper is on commercial devices, which are displacing hardened device technologies in many space applications. However, the impact of device scaling on hardened devices is also discussed.

  8. Actinide Waste Forms and Radiation Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, R. C.; Weber, W. J.

    Over the past few decades, many studies of actinides in glasses and ceramics have been conducted that have contributed substantially to the increased understanding of actinide incorporation in solids and radiation effects due to actinide decay. These studies have included fundamental research on actinides in solids and applied research and development related to the immobilization of the high level wastes (HLW) from commercial nuclear power plants and processing of nuclear weapons materials, environmental restoration in the nuclear weapons complex, and the immobilization of weapons-grade plutonium as a result of disarmament activities. Thus, the immobilization of actinides has become a pressing issue for the twenty-first century (Ewing, 1999), and plutonium immobilization, in particular, has received considerable attention in the USA (Muller et al., 2002; Muller and Weber, 2001). The investigation of actinides and

  9. Light-Cone Effect of Radiation Fields in Cosmological Radiative Transfer Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyungjin

    2015-02-01

    We present a novel method to implement time-delayed propagation of radiation fields in cosmo-logical radiative transfer simulations. Time-delayed propagation of radiation fields requires construction of retarded-time fields by tracking the location and lifetime of radiation sources along the corresponding light-cones. Cosmological radiative transfer simulations have, until now, ignored this "light-cone effect" or implemented ray-tracing methods that are computationally demanding. We show that radiative trans-fer calculation of the time-delayed fields can be easily achieved in numerical simulations when periodic boundary conditions are used, by calculating the time-discretized retarded-time Green's function using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method and convolving it with the source distribution. We also present a direct application of this method to the long-range radiation field of Lyman-Werner band photons, which is important in the high-redshift astrophysics with first stars.

  10. Solar wind radiation damage effects in lunar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hapke, B.; Cohen, A. J.; Cassidy, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    The research on solar wind radiation damage and other effects in lunar samples which was conducted to understand the optical properties of lunar materials is reported. Papers presented include: solar radiation effects in lunar samples, albedo of the moon, radiation effects in lunar crystalline rocks, valence states of 3rd transition elements in Apollo 11 and 12 rocks, and trace ferric iron in lunar and meteoritic titanaugites.

  11. 47 CFR 22.913 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Effective radiated power limits. 22.913 Section 22.913 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.913 Effective radiated power limits. The effective...

  12. 47 CFR 22.913 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Effective radiated power limits. 22.913 Section 22.913 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.913 Effective radiated power limits. The effective...

  13. Aerosol radiative effects over BIMSTEC regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumit; Kar, S. C.; Mupparthy, Raghavendra S.

    Aerosols can have variety of shapes, composition, sizes and other properties that influence their optical characteristics and thus the radiative impact. The visible impact of aerosol is the formation of haze, a layer of particles from vehicular, industrial emissions and biomass burning. The characterization of these fine particles is important for regulators and researchers because of their potential impact on human health, their ability to travel thousands of kilometers crossing international borders, and their influence on climate forcing and global warming. The Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC) with Member Countries Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Thailand has emerged as an important regional group for technical and economic Cooperation. Continuing the quest for a deeper understanding of BIMSTEC countries weather and climate, in this paper we focused on aerosols and their direct radiative effects. Because of various contrasts like geophysical, agricultural practices, heterogeneous land/ocean surface, population etc these regions present an excellent natural laboratory for studying aerosol-meteorology interactions in tropical to sub-tropical environments. We exploited data available on multiple platforms (such as MISR, MODIS etc) and models (OPAC, SBDART etc) to compute the results. Ten regions were selected with different surface characteristics, also having considerable differences in the long-term trends and seasonal distribution of aerosols. In a preliminary analysis pertaining to pre-monsoon (March-April-May) of 2013, AOD _{555nm} is found to be maximum over Bangladesh (>0.52) and minimum over Bhutan (0.22), whereas other regions have intermediate values. Concurrent to these variability of AOD we found a strong reduction in incoming flux at surface of all the regions (> -25 Wm (-2) ), except Bhutan and Sri Lanka (< -18Wm (-2) ). The top of the atmosphere (TOA) forcing values are

  14. Modern Radiotherapy Concepts and the Impact of Radiation on Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Deloch, Lisa; Derer, Anja; Hartmann, Josefin; Frey, Benjamin; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.

    2016-01-01

    Even though there is extensive research carried out in radiation oncology, most of the clinical studies focus on the effects of radiation on the local tumor tissue and deal with normal tissue side effects. The influence of dose fractionation and timing particularly with regard to immune activation is not satisfactorily investigated so far. This review, therefore, summarizes current knowledge on concepts of modern radiotherapy (RT) and evaluates the potential of RT for immune activation. Focus is set on radiation-induced forms of tumor cell death and consecutively the immunogenicity of the tumor cells. The so-called non-targeted, abscopal effects can contribute to anti-tumor responses in a specific and systemic manner and possess the ability to target relapsing tumor cells as well as metastases. The impact of distinct RT concepts on immune activation is outlined and pre-clinical evidence and clinical observations on RT-induced immunity will be discussed. Knowledge on the radiosensitivity of immune cells as well as clinical evidence for enhanced immunity after RT will be considered. While stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy seem to have a beneficial outcome over classical RT fractionation in pre-clinical animal models, in vitro model systems suggest an advantage for classical fractionated RT for immune activation. Furthermore, the optimal approach may differ based on the tumor site and/or genetic signature. These facts highlight that clinical trials are urgently needed to identify whether high-dose RT is superior to induce anti-tumor immune responses compared to classical fractionated RT and in particular how the outcome is when RT is combined with immunotherapy in selected tumor entities. PMID:27379203

  15. Enhancements in biologically effective ultraviolet radiation following volcanic eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogelmann, A. M.; Ackerman, T. P.; Turco, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to estimate the changes in biologically effective radiation (UV-BE) at the earth's surface produced by the El Chichon (1982) and Mount Pinatubo (1991) eruptions. It is found that in both cases surface intensity can increase because the effect of ozone depletion outweighs the increased scattering.

  16. Combined effects of radiation and trauma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messerschmidt, Otfried

    Injuries, caused by both whole-body irradiation and wounds or burns, have been relatively little studied. Possibly because many investigators think that these injuries are just modified radiation-induced diseases for which the same treatment principles are valid. Other authors had the impression that, for instance, the radiation burn trauma is a new kind of disease which differs significantly from either radiation syndrome alone or from burn disease. There are many experimental data on animals which suggest that the pathology of combined injuries differs significantly from that of radiation-induced disease or of thermal or mechanical traumas. Wounds or burns which, in general, do not cause septicaemia could become entrance ports for bacteria when animals are exposed to whole-body irradiation. Thrombocytopenia is the reason for hemorrhages in wounds. The susceptibility to shock is increased considerably in combined injuries and the formation of callus in the bone fractures is significantly delayed. The healing of wounds and burns in the initial phase of the radiation syndrome does not always differ from healing in the non-irradiated organism. However, a few days or weeks later very serious wound infections and hemorrhages can occur. The additional injuries almost always worsen the development and prognosis of radiation-induced disease. The recommended treatment for combined injuries will differ in many respects from the treatment of wounds and burns or the radiation syndrome.

  17. Casimir Effect and Black Hole Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbardehghan, S.

    2018-03-01

    The gravitational field of a black hole intrinsically creates a potential barrier consisted of two reflecting boundaries; the first one far from the hole and the second one in the vicinity of its horizon. With respect to this fact and assuming the boundaries as good conductors (in view of an observer near the horizon just outside the second boundary), in a series of papers, R.M. Nugayev by considering a conformally coupled massless scalar field and based on the calculations of Candelas and Deutsch (the accelerated-mirror results) has claimed that " ...the existence of the potential barrier is as crucial for Hawking evaporation as the existence of the horizon". In this paper, by taking the same assumptions, through straightforward reasonings, we explicitly show that contrary to this claim, the effects of the first boundary on the black hole radiation are quite negligible. Moreover, the inclusion of the second boundary makes the situation more complicated, because the induced Casimir energy-momentum tensor by this boundary in its vicinity is divergent of order δ ^{-4} ( δ is the distance to the boundary).

  18. Radiofrequency radiation effects on the common bean

    SciTech Connect

    Thomkins, K.; Griggs, L.; Myles, E.L.

    Our environment is bombarded daily with thousands of objects we can visually detect. However, invisible to humans are the electromagnetic waves that penetrate our environment. Electromagnetic waves consist of a large spectrum of waves including the harmful gamma rays, x-rays, and ultraviolet rays. The question that has increased tremendously is: can low energy electromagnetic waves become harmful to living organisms? The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of radiofrequency radiation on protein synthesis of the common bean. Phaseolus vulgaris (kidney bean) was surface-sterilized and allowed to germinate on Mushurage and Skoog`s medium for 1 week. Hypocotyls weremore » wounded and placed on media to initiate callus production. Six petri dishes containing 1 g of callus were used in the experiment. Three dishes were exposed to 100kH in a Crawford cell for 24h. The remaining three petri dishes with callus were used as a control. After the exposure period, the protein from callus was extracted and analyzed by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The results show that hypocotyl growth was not different between control and experimental groups after 24 h. The result of one-dimensional gel electrophoresis did not show observable differences in protein synthesized by the control and experimental groups. Analysis of protein synthesis is still ongoing.« less

  19. GCR and SPE Radiation Effects in Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Rojdev, Kristina; Nichols, Charles

    2016-01-01

    This Year 3 project provides risk reduction data to assess galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and solar particle event (SPE) space radiation damage in materials used in manned low-earth orbit, lunar, interplanetary, and Martian surface missions. Long duration (up to 50 years) space radiation damage is being quantified for materials used in inflatable structures (1st priority), and space suit and habitable composite materials (2nd priority). The data collected has relevance for nonmetallic materials (polymers and composites) used in NASA missions where long duration reliability is needed in continuous or intermittent space radiation fluxes.

  20. The Effects of Ionizing Radiation on the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    de Barros da Cunha, Sandra Ribeiro; Ramos, Pedro Augusto Mendes; Nesrallah, Ana Cristina Aló; Parahyba, Cláudia Joffily; Fregnani, Eduardo Rodrigues; Aranha, Ana Cecília Corrêa

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to present a literature review on the effects of the ionizing radiation from radiotherapy treatment on dental tissues. Among the effects of increasing global life expectancy and longevity of the teeth in the oral cavity, increasing rates of neoplastic diseases have been observed. One of the important treatment modalities for head and neck neoplastic diseases is radiotherapy, which uses ionizing radiation as the main mechanism of action. Therefore, it is essential for dentists to be aware of the changes in oral and dental tissues caused by ionizing radiation, and to develop treatment and prevention strategies. In general, there is still controversy about the effects of ionizing radiation on dental structures. However, qualitative and quantitative changes in saliva and oral microbiota, presence of oral mucositis and radiation-related caries are expected, as they represent the well-known side effects of treatment with ionizing radiation. Points that still remain unclear are the effects of radiotherapy on enamel and dentin, and on their mechanisms of bonding to contemporary adhesive materials. Ionizing radiation has shown important interaction with organic tissues, since more deleterious effects have been shown on the oral mucosa, salivary glands and dentin, than on enamel. With the increasing number of patients with cancer seeking dental treatment before and after head and neck radiotherapy, it is important for dentists to be aware of the effects of ionizing radiation on the oral cavity.

  1. The effects of solar radiation on thermal comfort.

    PubMed

    Hodder, Simon G; Parsons, Ken

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between simulated solar radiation and thermal comfort. Three studies investigated the effects of (1) the intensity of direct simulated solar radiation, (2) spectral content of simulated solar radiation and (3) glazing type on human thermal sensation responses. Eight male subjects were exposed in each of the three studies. In Study 1, subjects were exposed to four levels of simulated solar radiation: 0, 200, 400 and 600 Wm(-2). In Study 2, subjects were exposed to simulated solar radiation with four different spectral contents, each with a total intensity of 400 Wm(-2) on the subject. In Study 3, subjects were exposed through glass to radiation caused by 1,000 Wm(-2) of simulated solar radiation on the exterior surface of four different glazing types. The environment was otherwise thermally neutral where there was no direct radiation, predicted mean vote (PMV)=0+/-0.5, [International Standards Organisation (ISO) standard 7730]. Ratings of thermal sensation, comfort, stickiness and preference and measures of mean skin temperature (t(sk)) were taken. Increase in the total intensity of simulated solar radiation rather than the specific wavelength of the radiation is the critical factor affecting thermal comfort. Thermal sensation votes showed that there was a sensation scale increase of 1 scale unit for each increase of direct radiation of around 200 Wm(-2). The specific spectral content of the radiation has no direct effect on thermal sensation. The results contribute to models for determining the effects of solar radiation on thermal comfort in vehicles, buildings and outdoors.

  2. Space radiation effects on plant and mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, C.; De Micco, V.; Macaeva, E.; Quintens, R.

    2014-11-01

    The study of the effects of ionizing radiation on organisms is related to different research aims. The current review emphasizes the studies on the effects of different doses of sparsely and densely ionizing radiation on living organisms, with the final purpose of highlighting specific and common effects of space radiation in mammals and plants. This topic is extremely relevant in the context of radiation protection from space environment. The response of different organisms to ionizing radiation depends on the radiation quality/dose and/or the intrinsic characteristics of the living system. Macromolecules, in particular DNA, are the critical targets of radiation, even if there is a strong difference between damages encountered by plant and mammalian cells. The differences in structure and metabolism between the two cell types are responsible for the higher resistance of the plant cell compared with its animal counterpart. In this review, we report some recent findings from studies performed in Space or on Earth, simulating space-like levels of radiation with ground-based facilities, to understand the effect of ionizing radiation on mammalian and plant cells. In particular, our attention is focused on genetic alterations and repair mechanisms in mammalian cells and on structures and mechanisms conferring radioresistance to plant cells.

  3. Radiation 101: Effects on Hardware and Robotic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    We present basic information on different types of radiation effects, including total ionizing dose, displacement damage, and single-event effects. The content is designed to educate space weather professionals, space operations professionals, and other science and engineering stakeholders.

  4. The biological effect of prolonged radiation and ways of selecting new anti-radiation drugs effective in this kind of radiation injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogozkin, V. D.; Chertkov, K. S.; Nikolov, I.

    1974-01-01

    The basic characteristics of prolonged radiation - increased tolerance of radiation injury - are attributed to cellular kinetics; as dose rate is reduced, the population rate is not disturbed, particularly that of stem cells which makes it possible for the organism to tolerate higher radiation loads. It is concluded that this effect makes approved radio protectors, whose effect contains an established cytostatic component, unsuitable for prolonged radiation. It is better to correct the stem pool formation process by either accelerating the proliferation of cells or limiting the effect of stimuli causing cells to lose colony forming properties.

  5. Acute Radiation Effects Resulting from Exposure to Solar Particle Event-Like Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann; Cengel, Keith

    2012-07-01

    A major solar particle event (SPE) may place astronauts at significant risk for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which may be exacerbated when combined with other space flight stressors, such that the mission or crew health may be compromised. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) Center of Acute Radiation Research (CARR) is focused on the assessment of risks of adverse biological effects related to the ARS in animal models exposed to space flight stressors combined with the types of radiation expected during an SPE. As part of this program, FDA-approved drugs that may prevent and/or mitigate ARS symptoms are being evaluated. The CARR studies are focused on the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to the types of radiation, at the appropriate energies, doses and dose-rates, present during an SPE (and standard reference radiations, gamma rays or electrons). The ARS is a phased syndrome which often includes vomiting and fatigue. Other acute adverse biologic effects of concern are the loss of hematopoietic cells, which can result in compromised bone marrow and immune cell functions. There is also concern for skin damage from high SPE radiation doses, including burns, and resulting immune system dysfunction. Using 3 separate animal model systems (ferrets, mice and pigs), the major ARS biologic endpoints being evaluated are: 1) vomiting/retching and fatigue, 2) hematologic changes (with focus on white blood cells) and immune system changes resulting from exposure to SPE radiation with and without reduced weightbearing conditions, and 3) skin injury and related immune system functions. In all of these areas of research, statistically significant adverse health effects have been observed in animals exposed to SPE-like radiation. Countermeasures for the management of ARS symptoms are being evaluated. New research findings from the past grant year will be discussed. Acknowledgements: This research is supported by the NSBRI Center of Acute

  6. Radiation shelter effectiveness beyond the earth magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurshakov, V. A.; Benghin, V. V.; Kolomensky, A. V.; Petrov, V. M.

    Solar energetic particles (SEP) and galactic cosmic rays are known to be the sources of radiation hazard for missions beyond the Earth magnetosphere. An additionally shielded compartment of the mission spacecraft, called usually the radiation shelter, is considered as an important part of the radiation safety system. The shielding of the radiation shelter must be at least a few times higher than that of the remaining compartments. The mission crewmembers are supposed to stay in the radiation shelter for relatively short time of less than a day or two during SEP events only. A job-oriented radiation monitoring system (RMS) should be used on board the Martian mission spacecraft to provide the crew with necessary prediction information concerning the onset of a large SEP event. The information should be obtained independently of the ground-based support services and, hence, should be derived from online measurements of the dynamics of soft X-rays and charged energetic particles using the RMS sensors. As a result, the signal for the spacecrew members to go to the shelter gets somewhat delayed with respect to the SEP event onset, so that they appear to stay outside the shelter for some time during the event. The dependence of the crew-received dose on the SEP event prediction lag has been analyzed in terms of the standard SEP dynamics model for a typical 500-day Martian mission scenario. The Martian mission dose simulations have demonstrated a high efficiency of the radiation shelter despite the unavoidable lag of the RMS prediction signal.

  7. Effects of radiation on DNA's double helix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The blueprint of life, DNA's double helix is found in the cells of everything from bacteria to astronauts. Exposure to radiation(depicted at right) such as X-rays (upper) or heavy ion particles (lower), can damage DNA and cause dire consequences both to the organism itself and to future generations. One of NASA's main goals is to develop better radiation shielding materials to protect astronauts from destructive radiation in space. This is particularly important for long space missions. NASA has selected researchers to study materials that provide better shielding. This research is managed by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research and is supported by the Microgravity Science and Applications Department at NASA's Marshall Center. During International Space Station Expedition Six, the Extravehicular Activity Radiation Monitoring (EVARM) will continue to measure radiation dosage encountered by the eyes, internal organs and skin during specific spacewalks, and relate it to the type of activity, location and other factors. An analysis of this information may be useful in mitigating potential exposure to space walkers in the future. (Illustration by Dr. Frank Cucinotta, NASA/Johnson Space Center, and Prem Saganti, Lockheed Martin)

  8. Measuring the greenhouse effect and radiative forcing through the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipona, Rolf; Kräuchi, Andreas; Brocard, Emmanuel

    2013-04-01

    In spite of a large body of existing measurements of incoming shortwave solar radiation and outgoing longwave terrestrial radiation at the Earth's surface and at the top of the atmosphere, there are few observations documenting how radiation profiles change through the atmosphere - information that is necessary to fully quantify the greenhouse effect of the Earth's atmosphere. Using weather balloons and specific radiometer equipped radiosondes, we continuously measured shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes from the surface of the Earth up to altitudes of 35 kilometers in the upper stratosphere. Comparing radiation profiles from night measurements with different amounts of water vapor, we show evidence of large greenhouse forcing. We show, that under cloud free conditions, water vapor increases with Clausius-Clapeyron ( 7% / K), and longwave downward radiation at the surface increases by 8 Watts per square meter per Kelvin. The longwave net radiation however, shows a positive increase (downward) of 2.4 Watts per square meter and Kelvin at the surface, which decreases with height and shows a similar but negative increase (upward) at the tropopause. Hence, increased tropospheric water vapor increases longwave net radiation towards the ground and towards space, and produces a heating of 0.42 Kelvin per Watt per square meter at the surface. References: Philipona et al., 2012: Solar and thermal radiation profiles and radiative forcing measured through the atmosphere. Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L13806, doi: 10.1029/2012GL052087.

  9. THE EFFECT OF IONIZING RADIATIONS ON ONTOGENESIS IN BIRDS

    SciTech Connect

    Dinu, M.

    1963-01-01

    The effect of strong doses of ionizing radiations on the ontogenetic development of birds and formation of mutations was studied. The data obtained show that ionizing radiations have a different effect on the biological substratum, depending on their nature and relationship to physiological limits. Gamma radiations have a negative action on the biochemical process altering ths substratum and upsetting the entity of heredity. It was found that x rays produce a temporary stimulating effect on metabolic processes influencing the vitality, ontogenetic development, resistance, the appearance of sexual instinct, and the fertility. Ionizing radiations affect functioning of endocrinic glands and consequentlymore » the ratio of sexes in the offspring. From the results obtained it cand be stated that strong doses of ionizing radiations may be used to obtain variation of mutations, and that in general they are a factor in the evolution of the living organism. (OTS)« less

  10. Effective UV radiation from model calculations and measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feister, Uwe; Grewe, Rolf

    1994-01-01

    Model calculations have been made to simulate the effect of atmospheric ozone and geographical as well as meteorological parameters on solar UV radiation reaching the ground. Total ozone values as measured by Dobson spectrophotometer and Brewer spectrometer as well as turbidity were used as input to the model calculation. The performance of the model was tested by spectroradiometric measurements of solar global UV radiation at Potsdam. There are small differences that can be explained by the uncertainty of the measurements, by the uncertainty of input data to the model and by the uncertainty of the radiative transfer algorithms of the model itself. Some effects of solar radiation to the biosphere and to air chemistry are discussed. Model calculations and spectroradiometric measurements can be used to study variations of the effective radiation in space in space time. The comparability of action spectra and their uncertainties are also addressed.

  11. The effects of space radiation on flight film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holly, Mark H.

    1995-01-01

    The Shuttle and its cargo are occasionally exposed to an amount of radiation large enough to create non-image forming exposures (fog) on photographic flight film. The television/photography working group proposed a test plan to quantify the sensitivity of photographic films to space radiation. This plan was flown on STS-37 and was later incorporated into a detailed supplementary objective (DSO) which was flown on STS48. This DSO addressed the effects of significant space radiation on representative samples of six highly sensitive flight films. In addition, a lead-lined bag was evaluated as a potential shield for flight film against space radiation.

  12. The effects of radiative heat loss on microgravity flame spread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fakheri, Ahmad; Olson, Sandra L.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of radiative heat loss from the surface of a solid material burning in a zero gravity environment in an opposed flow is studied through the use of a numerical model. Radiative heat loss is found to decrease the flame spread rate, the boundary layer thickness, and pyrolysis lengths. Blowoff extinction is predicted to occur at slower opposesd flow velocities than would occur if the radiative loss is not present. The radiative heat fluxes are comparable to the conduction fluxes, indicating the significance of the surface energy loss.

  13. Redistribution of resonance radiation. II - The effect of magnetic fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omont, A.; Cooper, J.; Smith, E. W.

    1973-01-01

    Previously obtained results for scattering of radiation in the presence of collisions are restated in a density matrix formalism which employs an irreducible-tensor description of the radiation field. This formalism is particularly useful for problems associated with radiative transfer theory. The redistribution is then extended to include the effect of a weak magnetic field. By averaging over a finite bandwidth which is on the order of the Doppler width, simplified expressions of physical significance for the scattering in the Doppler core and the Lorentz wings are obtained. Expressions are also obtained for the corresponding source function of radiative transfer theory.

  14. Effects of ionizing radiation on extracellular matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, F.; Bradley, D. A.; Winlove, C. P.

    2007-09-01

    The extracellular matrix is a ubiquitous and important component of tissues. We investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of its principal macromolecular components, pericardial collagen, ligament elastin and hyaluronan, a representative glycosaminoglycan. Samples were exposed to X-rays from an electron linear accelerator in the range of 10-100 Gy to cover the range of irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. A uniaxial mechanical testing protocol was used to characterize the fibrous proteins. For pericardial tissue the major change was an increase in the elastic modulus in the toe region of the curve (⩽20% strain), from 23±18 kPa for controls to 57±22 kPa at a dose of 10 Gy ( p=0.01, α=0.05). At larger strain (⩾20% strain), the elastic modulus in the linear region decreased from 1.92±0.70 MPa for control pericardium tissue to 1.31±0.56 MPa ( p=0.01, α=0.05) for 10 Gy X-irradiated sample. Similar observations have been made previously on tendon collagen at larger strains. For elastin, the stress-strain relationship was linear up to 30% strain, but the elastic modulus decreased significantly with irradiation (controls 626±65 kPa, irradiated 474±121 kPa ( p=0.02, α=0.05), at 10 Gy X-irradiation). The results suggest that for collagen the primary effect of irradiation is generation of additional cross-links, while for elastin chain scissions are important. The viscosity of HA (at 1.25% w/v and 0.125% w/v) was measured by both cone and plate and capillary viscometry, the former providing measurement at uniform shear rate and the latter providing a more sensitive indication of changes at low viscosity. Both techniques revealed a dose-dependent reduction in viscosity (from 3400±194 cP for controls to 1500±88 cP at a shear rate of 2 s -1 and dose of 75 Gy), again suggesting depolymerization.

  15. 47 CFR 22.659 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... radiated power limits. The purpose of the rules in this section, which limit effective radiated power (ERP... subsequently relocated. (a) Maximum ERP. The ERP of base transmitters must not exceed 100 Watts under any circumstances. The ERP of mobile transmitters must not exceed 60 Watts under any circumstances. (b) Co-channel...

  16. 47 CFR 22.913 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... radiated power (ERP) of transmitters in the Cellular Radiotelephone Service must not exceed the limits in this section. (a) Maximum ERP. In general, the effective radiated power (ERP) of base transmitters and... areas, as those areas are defined in § 22.949, the ERP of base transmitters and cellular repeaters of...

  17. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    R Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

    The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  18. The effect of clouds on the earth's radiation balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, G. F.; Wu, M. L. C.; Johnson, W. T.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of global cloudiness on the radiation balance at the top of the atmosphere is studied in general circulation model experiments. Wintertime simulations were conducted with clouds that had realistic optical properties, and were compared with simulations in which the clouds were transparent to either solar or thermal radiation. Clouds increase the net balance by limiting longwave loss to space, but decrease it by reflecting solar radiation. It is found that the net result of cloudiness is to maintain net radiation which is less than would be realized under clear conditions: Clouds cause the net radiation at the top of the atmosphere to increase due to longwave absorption, but to decrease even more due to cloud reflectance of solar radiation.

  19. Effects of ultraviolet radiation, visible light, and infrared radiation on erythema and pigmentation: a review.

    PubMed

    Sklar, Lindsay R; Almutawa, Fahad; Lim, Henry W; Hamzavi, Iltefat

    2013-01-01

    The effects of ultraviolet radiation, visible light, and infrared radiation on cutaneous erythema, immediate pigment darkening, persistent pigment darkening, and delayed tanning are affected by a variety of factors. Some of these factors include the depth of cutaneous penetration of the specific wavelength, the individual skin type, and the absorption spectra of the different chromophores in the skin. UVB is an effective spectrum to induce erythema, which is followed by delayed tanning. UVA induces immediate pigment darkening, persistent pigment darkening, and delayed tanning. At high doses, UVA (primarily UVA2) can also induce erythema in individuals with skin types I-II. Visible light has been shown to induce erythema and a tanning response in dark skin, but not in fair skinned individuals. Infrared radiation produces erythema, which is probably a thermal effect. In this article we reviewed the available literature on the effects of ultraviolet radiation, visible light, and infrared radiation on the skin in regards to erythema and pigmentation. Much remains to be learned on the cutaneous effects of visible light and infrared radiation.

  20. Radiation effects on science instruments in Grand Tour type missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    The extent of the radiation effects problem is delineated, along with the status of protective designs for 15 representative science instruments. Designs for protecting science instruments from radiation damage is discussed for the various instruments to be employed in the Grand Tour type missions. A literature search effort was undertaken to collect science instrument components damage/interference effects data on the various sensitive components such as Si detectors, vidicon tubes, etc. A small experimental effort is underway to provide verification of the radiation effects predictions.

  1. Effects of Radiation on Capacitor Dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.; Somoano, R. B.; Frickland, P. O.

    1987-01-01

    Data gathered on key design parameters. Report discusses study of electrical and mechanical properties of irradiated polymer dielectric materials. Data compiled for use by designers of high-energy-density capacitors that operate in presence of ionizing radiation. Study focused on polycarbonates, polyetheretherketones, polymethylpentenes, polyimides (including polyetherimide), polyolefins, polysulfones (including polyethersulfone and polyphenylsulfone), and polyvinylidene fluorides.

  2. Rays Sting: The Acute Cellular Effects of Ionizing Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Franco, A; Ciccarelli, M; Sorriento, D; Napolitano, L; Fiordelisi, A; Trimarco, B; Durante, M; Iaccarino, G

    2016-01-01

    High-precision radiation therapy is a clinical approach that uses the targeted delivery of ionizing radiation, and the subsequent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in high proliferative, radiation sensitive cancers. In particular, in thoracic cancer ratdiation treatments, can not avoid a certain amount of cardiac toxicity. Given the low proliferative rate of cardiac myocytes, research has looked at the effect of radiation on endothelial cells and consequent coronary heart disease as the mechanism of ratdiation induced cardiotoxicity. In fact, little is known concerning the direct effect of radiation on mitochondria dynamis in cardiomyocyte. The main effect of ionizing radiation is the production of ROS and recent works have uncovered that they directly participates to pivotal cell function like mitochondrial quality control. In particular ROS seems to act as check point within the cell to promote either mitochondrial biogenesis and survival or mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Thus, it appears evident that the functional state of the cell, as well as the expression patterns of molecules involved in mitochondrial metabolism may differently modulate mitochondrial fate in response to radiation induced ROS responses. Different molecules have been described to localize to mitochondria and regulate ROS production in response to stress, in particular GRK2. In this review we will discuss the evidences on the cardiac toxicity induced by X ray radiation on cardiomyocytes with emphasis on the role played by mitochondria dynamism. PMID:27326395

  3. Crystallographic effects during radiative melting of semitransparent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, B. W.; Viskanta, R.

    1987-10-01

    Experiments have been performed to illustrate crystallogrpahic effects during radiative melting of unconfined vertical layers of semitransparent material. Radiative melting of a polycrystalline paraffin was performed and the instantaneous layer weight and transmittance were measured using a cantilever beam technique and thermopile radiation detector, respectively. The effects of radiative flux, initial solid subcooling, spectral distribution of the irradiation, and crystal structure of the solid as determined qualitatively by the sample solidification rate were studied. Experimental results show conclusively the dominant influence of cystallographic effects in the form of multiple internal scattering of radiation during the melting process. A theoretical model is formulated to predict the melting rate of the material. Radiation transfer is treated by solving the one-dimensional radiative transfer equation for an absorbing-scattering medium using the discrete ordinates method. Melting rate and global layer reflectance as predicted by the model agree well with experimental data. Parametric studies conducted with the model illustrate the sensitivity of the melting behavior to such variables as incident radiative flux, initial layer opacity (material extinction coefficient), and scattering asymmetry factor.

  4. Biological effects of radiation, metabolic and replication kinetics alterations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, J.

    1972-01-01

    The biological effects of radiation upon normal and cancerous tissues were studied. A macromolecular precursor of DNA, 3ETdR, was incorporated into the cell nucleus during synthesis and provided intranuclear beta radiation. Tritium labeled cells were studied with autoradiographic methods; cell cycle kinetics were determined and cell functions modified by radiation dosage or by drugs were also evaluated. The long term program has included; (1) effects of radiation on cell replication and the correlation with incorporated dose levels, (2) radiation induced changes in cell function, viz., the response of beta irradiated spleen lymphocytes to antigenic stimulation by sheep red blood cells (SRBC), (3) kinetics of tumor and normal cell replication; and (4) megakaryocyte formation and modification by radiomimetic drugs.

  5. CRRES: Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite Program Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layman, Laura D.; Miller, George P.

    1993-01-01

    The experiments that comprise the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite Program (CRRES) (Apr. 1990 - Jul. 1992) are presented. The experiments are as follows: PEGSAT; El Coqui; the Kwajalein Campaign; and experiments G1 - G14.

  6. Quantum effects in the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, J.

    1990-11-01

    Based on the quantum correlated general relativistic Vlasov equations in an Einstein-de Sitter universe, we show that quantum effects are beyond measurability in the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  7. Space Radiation Effects on Electronics: Simple Concepts and New Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers the following topics: 1) The Space Radiation Environment; 2) The Effects on Electronics; 3) The Environment in Action; 4) NASA Approaches to Commercial Electronics; 5) Final Thoughts.

  8. Design considerations and test facilities for accelerated radiation effects testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, W. E.; Miller, C. G.; Parker, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Test design parameters for accelerated dose rate radiation effects tests for spacecraft parts and subsystems used in long term mission (years) are detailed. A facility for use in long term accelerated and unaccelerated testing is described.

  9. Far infrared radiation (FIR): its biological effects and medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Vatansever, Fatma; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Far infrared (FIR) radiation (λ = 3–100 μm) is a subdivision of the electromagnetic spectrum that has been investigated for biological effects. The goal of this review is to cover the use of a further sub-division (3– 12 μm) of this waveband, that has been observed in both in vitro and in vivo studies, to stimulate cells and tissue, and is considered a promising treatment modality for certain medical conditions. Technological advances have provided new techniques for delivering FIR radiation to the human body. Specialty lamps and saunas, delivering pure FIR radiation (eliminating completely the near and mid infrared bands), have became safe, effective, and widely used sources to generate therapeutic effects. Fibers impregnated with FIR emitting ceramic nanoparticles and woven into fabrics, are being used as garments and wraps to generate FIR radiation, and attain health benefits from its effects. PMID:23833705

  10. Evident Biological Effects of Space Radiation in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu

    2004-01-01

    Though cancer risks are the primary concern for astronauts exposed to space radiation and a number of astronauts have developed cancer, identifying a direct association or cause of disease has been somewhat problematic due to a lack of statistics and a lack of an appropriate control group. However, several bio,logical effects observed in astronauts are believed to be primarily due to exposure to space radiation. Among those are, light flashes experienced by astronauts from early missions, cataract development in the crewmembers and excess chromosome aberrations detected in astronauts' lymphocytes postmission. The space radiation environment and evident biological effects will be discussed.

  11. The Biological Effects of Nonionizing Radiation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-29

    fraction of incident energy converted into heat by these radiations in any part of the body depends not only on the physical characteristics of the...upon relations between the various relaxation times and resonance periods and the characteristics of the incident u-sound. Chivers felt that while there...discussions, for it would suggest that parallels between pulsed u-sound and pulsed rm-waves of similar pulse characteristics might well be sought experimentally

  12. Parameterisation of radiation effects on CVD diamond for proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartjes, F.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K. K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P. F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R. D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L. S.; Palmieri, V. G.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Procario, M.; Re, V.; Riester, J. L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Runolfsson, O.; Russ, J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R. J.; Tesarek, R.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, A.; Walsh, A. M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.; RD42 Collaboration

    1999-08-01

    The paper reviews measurements of the radiation hardness of CVD diamond for 24 GeV/c proton irradiation at fluences up to 5 ∗10 15 protons/cm 2. The results not only show radiation damage but also an annealing effect that is dominant at levels around 10 15 protons/cm 2. A model describing both effects is introduced, enabling a prediction of the distribution curve of the charge signal for other levels.

  13. Mechanisms of Radiation Induced Effects in Carbon Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    the defect types created for both ionizing and non-ionizing particles under exposure to high total ionization and displacement damage doses. Carbon...and displacement damage doses. Additionally, the radiation effects on CNT carrier transport parameters (mobility, lifetime, conductivity) have been...thermal oxidation. 2. Radiation Testing of SWCNTs 2.1 Displacement Damage Dose Effects as a Function of SWCNT Electronic-Type Displacement damage does

  14. Effects of Microwave Radiation on Oil Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Abdollah

    2011-12-01

    A variety of oil recovery methods have been developed and applied to mature and depleted reservoirs in order to improve the efficiency. Microwave radiation oil recovery method is a relatively new method and has been of great interest in the recent years. Crude oil is typically co-mingled with suspended solids and water. To increase oil recovery, it is necessary to remove these components. The separation of oil from water and solids using gravitational settling methods is typically incomplete. Oil-in-water and oil-water-solid emulsions can be demulsified and separated into their individual layers by microwave radiation. The data also show that microwave separation is faster than gravity separation and can be faster than conventional heating at many conditions. After separation of emulsion into water and oil layers, water can be discharged and oil is collected. High-frequency microwave recycling process can recover oil and gases from oil shale, residual oil, drill cuttings, tar sands oil, contaminated dredge/sediments, tires and plastics with significantly greater yields and lower costs than are available utilizing existing known technologies. This process is environmentally friendly, fuel-generating recycler to reduce waste, cut emissions, and save energy. This paper presents a critical review of Microwave radiation method for oil recovery.

  15. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: II. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vivo, clastogenic factors and transgenerational effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize the evidence for non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation in vivo. Currently, human health risks associated with radiation exposures are based primarily on the assumption that the detrimental effects of radiation occur in irradiated cells. Over the years a number of non-targeted effects of radiation exposure in vivo have been described that challenge this concept. These include radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effects, clastogenic factors produced in plasma from irradiated individuals that can cause chromosomal damage when cultured with nonirradiated cells, and transgenerational effects of parental irradiation that can manifest in the progeny. These effects pose new challenges to evaluating the risk(s) associated with radiation exposure and understanding radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  16. Turbulent Radiation Effects in HSCT Combustor Rich Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert J.; Vranos, Alexander; Yu, Weiduo

    1998-01-01

    A joint UTRC-University of Connecticut theoretical program was based on describing coupled soot formation and radiation in turbulent flows using stretched flamelet theory. This effort was involved with using the model jet fuel kinetics mechanism to predict soot growth in flamelets at elevated pressure, to incorporate an efficient model for turbulent thermal radiation into a discrete transfer radiation code, and to couple die soot growth, flowfield, and radiation algorithm. The soot calculations used a recently developed opposed jet code which couples the dynamical equations of size-class dependent particle growth with complex chemistry. Several of the tasks represent technical firsts; among these are the prediction of soot from a detailed jet fuel kinetics mechanism, the inclusion of pressure effects in the soot particle growth equations, and the inclusion of the efficient turbulent radiation algorithm in a combustor code.

  17. Effects of electromagnetic radiation on the hemorheology of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiwei; Tian, Tian; Xiao, Bo; Li, Wen

    2017-01-01

    The current work examines the effects of electromagnetic radiation on the hemorheology to provide an experimental basis for radiation protection. Electromagnetic radiation was generated by a Helmholtz coil constructed from copper wire. There were six rats altogether: three rats in the experimental group, and three rats in the control group. The rats in the experimental group were continuously exposed to radiation for 10 hours every day, and rats in the control group remained in a normal environment. After 30 days, the characteristics of hemorheology of the two groups were compared. The average plasma viscosity, whole blood high shear velocity, and whole blood low shear viscosity were lower in rats in the experimental group than in rats in the control group, while the whole blood shear viscosity was higher in the experimental group than in the control group. Results suggest that long term exposure to electromagnetic radiation does have certain impacts on the cardiovascular system, deeming it necessary to take preventative measures.

  18. Effect of viscous dissipation and radiation in an annular cone

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, N. J. Salman; Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Khan, T. M. Yunus, E-mail: yunus.tatagar@gmail.com

    The viscous dissipation is an effect due to which heat is generated inside the medium. The presence of radiation further complicates the heat transfer behavior inside porous medium. The present paper discusses the combined effect of viscous dissipation and radiation inside a porous medium confined in an annular cone with inner radius r{sub i}. The viscous dissipation and radiation terms are included in the energy equation thereby solving the coupled momentum and energy equations with the help of finite element method. The results are presented in terms of isothermal and streamline indicating the thermal and fluid flow behavior of porousmore » medium. It is found that the combination of viscous dissipation and radiation parameter and the cone angle has significant effect on the heat transfer and fluid flow behavior inside the porous medium. The fluid velocity is found to increase with the increase in Raleigh number.« less

  19. Space weather effects measured in atmospheric radiation on aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. K.; Bouwer, D.; Bailey, J. J.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, K.; Wieman, S. R.; Atwell, W.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Rice, D.; Schunk, R. W.; Bell, L. D.; Mertens, C. J.; Xu, X.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Wiley, S.; Teets, E.; Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.; Jones, J. B. L.; Crowley, G.; Azeem, S. I.; Halford, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. Of the domains that are affected by space weather, the coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Since 2013 Space Environment Technologies (SET) has been conducting observations of the atmospheric radiation environment at aviation altitudes using a small fleet of six instruments. The objective of this work is to improve radiation risk management in air traffic operations. Under the auspices of the Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) and Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX) projects our team is making dose rate measurements on multiple aircraft flying global routes. Over 174 ARMAS and USEWX flights have successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs), Solar Energetic Protons (SEPs), and outer radiation belt energetic electrons. The real-time radiation exposure is measured as an absorbed dose rate in silicon and then computed as an ambient dose equivalent rate for reporting dose relevant to radiative-sensitive organs and tissue in units of microsieverts per hour. ARMAS total ionizing absorbed dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time, processed on the ground into ambient dose equivalent rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users. Dose rates from flight altitudes up to 56,700 ft. are shown for flights across the planet under a variety of space weather conditions. We discuss several space weather

  20. [Radiation-induced bystander effect: the important part of ionizing radiation response. Potential clinical implications].

    PubMed

    Wideł, Maria; Przybyszewski, Waldemar; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna

    2009-08-18

    It has long been a central radiobiological dogma that the damaging effects of ionizing radiation, such as cell death, cytogenetic changes, apoptosis, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis, are the results of the direct ionization of cell structures, particularly DNA, or indirect damage via water radiolysis products. However, several years ago attention turned to a third mechanism of radiation, termed the "bystander effect" or "radiation-induced bystander effect" (RIBE). This is induced by agents and signals emitted by directly irradiated cells and manifests as a lowering of survival, cytogenetic damage, apoptosis enhancement, and biochemical changes in neighboring non-irradiated cells. The bystander effect is mainly observed in in vitro experiments using very low doses of alpha particles (range; mGy, cGy), but also after conventional irradiation (X-rays, gamma rays) at low as well as conventional doses. The mechanisms responsible for the bystander effect are complex and still poorly understood. It is believed that molecular signals released from irradiated cells induce different signaling ways in non-irradiated neighboring cells, leading to the observed events. The molecular signals may be transmitted through gap junction intercellular communication and through a medium transfer mechanism. The nature of these transmitted factors are diverse, and still not definitely established. It seems that RIBE may have important clinical implications for health risk associated with radiation exposure. Potentially, this effect may have important implications in the creation of whole-body or localized side effects in tissues beyond the irradiation field and also in low-dose radiological and radioisotope diagnostics. Factors emitted by irradiated cells may result in the risk of genetic instability, mutations, and second primary cancer induction. They might also have their own part in inducing and extending post-radiation side effects in normal tissue. The bystander effect may be a

  1. Radiative effect of anthropogenic dust ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingmueller, K.; Lelieveld, J.; Karydis, V.; Stenchikov, G. L.

    2017-12-01

    The chemical ageing of mineral dust mixing due to the uptake of air pollution affects the optical and hygroscopical properties of the dust particles and their atmospheric residence time. This results in an anthropogenic radiative forcing associated with mineral dust despite the natural origin of most dust particles. Using the atmospheric chemistry-climate model EMAC with a detailed parametrisation of chemical ageing and an emission scheme accounting for the chemical composition of desert soils, we study the direct radiative forcing globally and regionally. Preliminary results indicate large positive and negative forcings, depending on the region. The predominantly negative top of atmosphere forcing over large parts of the dust belt, from West Africa to East Asia, reaches about -2 W / m2 south of the Sahel, in contrast to positive forcings over India and the western Atlantic. Globally averaged, these forcings partially counterbalance, resulting in a negative forcing of -0.04 to -0.05 W / m2, nevertheless representing a considerable fraction of the total dust forcing.

  2. [Gonad protective effect of radiation protective apron in chest radiography].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Masatoshi; Kato, Hideyuki; Fujibuchi, Toshiou; Ochi, Shigehiro; Morita, Fuminori

    2004-12-01

    Depending on the facility, a radiation protective apron (protector) is used to protect the gonad from radiation exposure in chest radiography. To determine the necessity of using a protector during chest radiography, we measured the effect of the protector on the gonad in this study. First, using a human body phantom, we measured the absorbed dose of the female gonad with and without the protector, using a thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD), and confirmed its protective effect. Using the protector, the absorbed dose was reduced to 28+/-2% and 39+/-4% for field sizes of 14 x 17 inch and 14 x 14 inch, respectively. Next, we used Monte Carlo simulation and confirmed, not only the validity of the actual measurement values, but also the fact that the influence of radiation on the absorbed dose of the gonad was mostly from scattered radiation from inside the body for the 14 x 17 inch field size, and also from the X-ray tube for the 14 x 14 inch field size. Although a certain protective effect is achieved by using the protector, the radiation dose to the gonad is only a few microGy even without a protector. Thus, the risk of a genetic effect would be as small as 10(-8). Given that acceptable risk is below 10(-6), we conclude the use of a radiation protective apron is not necessary for diagnostic chest radiography.

  3. Countermeasures for space radiation induced adverse biologic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, A. R.; Wan, X. S.

    2011-11-01

    Radiation exposure in space is expected to increase the risk of cancer and other adverse biological effects in astronauts. The types of space radiation of particular concern for astronaut health are protons and heavy ions known as high atomic number and high energy (HZE) particles. Recent studies have indicated that carcinogenesis induced by protons and HZE particles may be modifiable. We have been evaluating the effects of proton and HZE particle radiation in cultured human cells and animals for nearly a decade. Our results indicate that exposure to proton and HZE particle radiation increases oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, cataract development and malignant transformation in in vivo and/or in vitro experimental systems. We have also shown that these adverse biological effects can be prevented, at least partially, by treatment with antioxidants and some dietary supplements that are readily available and have favorable safety profiles. Some of the antioxidants and dietary supplements are effective in preventing radiation induced malignant transformation in vitro even when applied several days after the radiation exposure. Our recent progress is reviewed and discussed in the context of the relevant literature.

  4. Effects of gamma-Radiation on Select Lipids and Antioxidants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandolph, Jacob; Mauer, Lisa; Perchonok, Michele

    2006-01-01

    Radiation encountered on an extended duration space mission (estimates of 3 Sieverts for a mission to Mars) poses a threat not only to human health, but also to the quality, nutritional value, and palatability of the food system. Free radicals generated by radiation interaction with foods may initiate many unwanted reactions including: 1) autoxidation in lipids that alters flavor, odor, and concentrations of essential fatty acids, and 2) depletion of antioxidants food products and dietary supplements. Studies have shown that antioxidants may provide long term health protection from oxidative stress caused by radiation exposure; therefore, consumption of antioxidants will be important. Stability of essential fatty acids is also important for astronauts long-term health status. The objectives of this study were to characterize the effects of low dose gamma-radiation on lipids and antioxidants by monitoring oxidation and reducing power, respectively, in model systems. Select oils and antioxidants were exposed to levels of gamma-radiation ranging from 0 to 1000 Gy (1 Gy = 1 Sv) using a Gammacell 220 and stored at ambient or elevated temperatures (65 C) for up to 3 months prior to analysis. A Fricke dosimeter was used to verify differences between the radiation doses administered. Primary and secondary products of lipid oxidation in soybean and peanut oils were monitored using conjugated diene and 2-thiobarbituric acid (TBARs) assays. Changes in fatty acid composition and formation and vitamin E levels were also measured. The reducing power of antioxidant compounds, including vitamins C and E and beta-carotene, was determined using the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. Significant differences (alpha =0.05) were present between all radiation doses tested using the Fricke dosimeter. Increasing radiation doses above 3 Sv resulted in significantly (alpha =0.05) elevated levels of oxidation and free fatty acids in soybean and peanut oils. Decreases in

  5. A Review: Some biological effects of high LET radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    There are qualitative and quantitative differences in the biological damage observed after exposure to high LET radiation as compared to that caused by low LET radiations. This review is concerned with these differences, which are ultimately reflected at the biochemical, cellular and even whole animal levels. In general, high LET radiations seem to produce biochemical damage which is more severe and possibly less repairable. Experimental data for those effects are presented in terms of biochemical RBE's with consideration of both early and late manifestations. An LET independent process by which significant biochemical damage may result from protons, neutrons and negative pion mesons is discussed.

  6. Biological effects and mechanisms of shortwave radiation: a review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2017-01-01

    With the increasing knowledge of shortwave radiation, it is widely used in wireless communications, radar observations, industrial manufacturing, and medical treatments. Despite of the benefits from shortwave, these wide applications expose humans to the risk of shortwave electromagnetic radiation, which is alleged to cause potential damage to biological systems. This review focused on the exposure to shortwave electromagnetic radiation, considering in vitro, in vivo and epidemiological results that have provided insight into the biological effects and mechanisms of shortwave. Additionally, some protective measures and suggestions are discussed here in the hope of obtaining more benefits from shortwave with fewer health risks.

  7. Advances in the biological effects of terahertz wave radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Hao, Yan-Hui; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2014-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) band lies between microwave and infrared rays in wavelength and consists of non-ionizing radiation. Both domestic and foreign research institutions, including the army, have attached considerable importance to the research and development of THz technology because this radiation exhibits both photon-like and electron-like properties, which grant it considerable application value and potential. With the rapid development of THz technology and related applications, studies of the biological effects of THz radiation have become a major focus in the field of life sciences. Research in this field has only just begun, both at home and abroad. In this paper, research progress with respect to THz radiation, including its biological effects, mechanisms and methods of protection, will be reviewed.

  8. Radiation effects in IFMIF Li target diagnostic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molla, J.; Vila, R.; Shikama, T.; Horiike, H.; Simakov, S.; Ciotti, M.; Ibarra, A.

    2009-04-01

    Diagnostics for the lithium target will be crucial for the operation of IFMIF. Several parameters as the lithium temperature, target thickness or wave pattern must be monitored during operation. Radiation effects may produce malfunctioning in any of these diagnostics due to the exposure to high radiation fields. The main diagnostic systems proposed for the operation of IFMIF are reviewed in this paper from the point of view of radiation damage. The main tools for the assessment of the performance of these diagnostics are the neutronics calculations by using specialised codes and the information accumulated during the last decades on the radiation effects in functional materials, components and diagnostics for ITER. This analysis allows to conclude that the design of some of the diagnostic systems must be revised to assure the high availability required for the target system.

  9. 1987 Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, Snowmass Village, CO, July 28-31, 1987, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Various papers on nuclear and space radiation effects are presented. The general topics addressed include: basic mechanisms of radiation effects, single-event phenomena, temperature and field effects, modeling and characterization of radiation effects, IC radiation effects and hardening, and EMP/SGEMP/IEMP phenomena. Also considered are: dosimetry/energy-dependent effects, sensors in and for radiation environments, spacecraft charging and space radiation effects, radiation effects and devices, radiation effects on isolation technologies, and hardness assurance and testing techniques.

  10. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: I. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    A long-standing dogma in the radiation sciences is that energy from radiation must be deposited in the cell nucleus to elicit a biological effect. A number of non-targeted, delayed effects of ionizing radiation have been described that challenge this dogma and pose new challenges to evaluating potential hazards associated with radiation exposure. These effects include induced genomic instability and non-targeted bystander effects. The in vitro evidence for non-targeted effects in radiation biology will be reviewed, but the question as to how one extrapolates from these in vitro observations to the risk of radiation-induced adverse health effects such as cancer remains open.

  11. Effects of ionizing radiation in ginkgo and guarana [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabelo Soriani, Renata; Cristina Satomi, Lucilia; Pinto, Terezinha de Jesus A.

    2005-07-01

    Raw plant materials normally carry high bioburden due to their origin, offering potential hazards to consumers. The use of decontamination processes is therefore an important step towards the consumer safety and therapeutical efficiency. Several authors have reported the treatment of medicinal herbs with ionizing radiation. This work evaluated the effects of different radiation doses on the microbial burden and chemical constituents of ginkgo ( Ginkgo biloba L.) and guaraná ( Paullinia cupana H.B.K.).

  12. Effects of gamma radiation on the chromosomes of Gryllidae (orthoptera)

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, H.C.; Kevan, D.K.; Vickery, V.R.

    1972-12-01

    BS>Six species if Gryllidae (orthoptera), Gryllus assimilis, G, Bim aculatus, G. pennsylvanicus, Acheta domesticus, Scapipedus marginatus, and Allonemobius allardi, were subjected to gamma radiation treatment (dosages varied from 1000 rads to 2446 rads) in order to induce chromosomal abnormalities. Gamma radiation was found to affect development, survival, and reproduction. Effects of gamma rays were similar in all of the species studied, but sensitivity varied between the different species. (auth)

  13. Towards quantifying global aerosol radiative effects using lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsen, T. J.

    2017-12-01

    Spaceborne lidar observations alleviate many of the limitations of passivesensors and have great potential to provide accurate global all-sky estimatesof the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE). However, analysis of CALIPSOlidar observations show that CALIPSO does not detect allradiatively-significant aerosol, i.e. aerosol that directly modifies theEarth's radiation budget. We estimated that using CALIPSO observationsresults in an underestimate of the magnitude of the global mean aerosol DREby up to 54%. The CATS lidar on-board the ISS is shown to have a poorersensitivity than CALIPSO and the expected sensitivity of the upcoming ATLIDlidar on EarthCARE indicates that calculations of the aerosol DRE willcontinue to be significantly biased. Improvements to our knowledge of aerosol forcing, which contributes thelargest uncertainty to climate sensitivity, could be achieved by a futurespace-based HSRL mission. To this end, high-accuracy ground-based andairborne lidar datasets have been used to compute the detection sensitivityrequired to accurately resolve the aerosol DRE. Multiwavelength HSRLmeasurements also can retrieve vertically-resolved aerosol optical propertiesneeded for radiative transfer calculations which are not provided by currentsatellite observations. Current satellite observations also do not provideall the quantities needed to compute the aerosol direct radiative forcing,i.e. the radiative effect of just anthropogenic aerosols. A multiwavelengthHSRL allows for a more refined aerosol classification to be made enablingboth calculations of anthropogenic aerosol radiative effects and betterconstraints on global models.

  14. Biological Effects of Atomic Radiations; ACCIONES BIOLOGICAS DE LAS RADIACIONES ATOMICAS

    SciTech Connect

    Patetta-Queirolo, M.A.

    1959-02-01

    A resume is presented of each class in a course on the biological effects of nuclear radiations. The topics discussed include the physical and chemical bases of radiation effects, primary and secondary processes, accumulated effects, biochemical and cellular effects, radiation effects on living organisms and tissues, radioecology, genetic effects, cytogenetic effects, genetics of radiation in mammals, response of mammals to irradiation, dosimetry, and protection against radiations. (J.S.R.)

  15. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants Part I: Quantification of radiation exposure and radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Pape, Yann Le; Remec, Igor

    A large fraction of light water reactor (LWR) construction utilizes concrete, including safety-related structures such as the biological shielding and containment building. Concrete is an inherently complex material, with the properties of concrete structures changing over their lifetime due to the intrinsic nature of concrete and influences from local environment. As concrete structures within LWRs age, the total neutron fluence exposure of the components, in particular the biological shield, can increase to levels where deleterious effects are introduced as a result of neutron irradiation. This work summarizes the current state of the art on irradiated concrete, including a review ofmore » the current literature and estimates the total neutron fluence expected in biological shields in typical LWR configurations. It was found a first-order mechanism for loss of mechanical properties of irradiated concrete is due to radiation-induced swelling of aggregates, which leads to volumetric expansion of the concrete. This phenomena is estimated to occur near the end of life of biological shield components in LWRs based on calculations of estimated peak neutron fluence in the shield after 80 years of operation.« less

  16. Aerosol Microphysical and Radiative Effects on Continental Cloud Ensembles

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yuan; Vogel, Jonathan M.; Lin, Yun; ...

    2018-01-10

    Aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions represent one of the largest uncertainties in the current climate assessment. Much of the complexity arises from the non-monotonic responses of clouds, precipitation and radiative fluxes to aerosol perturbations under various meteorological conditions. Here, an aerosol-aware Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to investigate the microphysical and radiative effects of aerosols in three weather systems during the March 2000 Cloud Intensive Observational Period campaign at the Southern Great Plains site of the US Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. Three cloud ensembles with different meteorological conditions are simulated, including a low-pressure deep convective cloud system, a series ofmore » lessprecipitating stratus and shallow cumulus, and a cold frontal passage. The WRF simulations are evaluated by the available observations of cloud fraction, liquid water path, precipitation, and surface temperature. The microphysical properties of cloud hydrometeors, such as their mass and number concentrations, generally show monotonic trends as a function of cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. Aerosol radiative effects do not interfere the trends of cloud microphysics, except for the stratus and shallow cumulus cases where aerosol semi-direct effects are identified. The precipitation changes by aerosols vary with the cloud types and their evolving stages, with more prominent aerosol invigoration effect and associated enhanced precipitation from the convective sources. Furthermore, the simulated aerosol direct effect suppresses precipitation in all three cases but does not overturn the direction of precipitation changes by the aerosol indirect effect. Cloud fraction exhibits much smaller sensitivity (typically less than 2%) to aerosol perturbations than the cloud microphysics, and the responses vary with aerosol concentrations and cloud regimes. The surface shortwave radiation shows a monotonic decrease by

  17. Aerosol Microphysical and Radiative Effects on Continental Cloud Ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuan; Vogel, Jonathan M.; Lin, Yun

    Aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions represent one of the largest uncertainties in the current climate assessment. Much of the complexity arises from the non-monotonic responses of clouds, precipitation and radiative fluxes to aerosol perturbations under various meteorological conditions. Here, an aerosol-aware Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to investigate the microphysical and radiative effects of aerosols in three weather systems during the March 2000 Cloud Intensive Observational Period campaign at the Southern Great Plains site of the US Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. Three cloud ensembles with different meteorological conditions are simulated, including a low-pressure deep convective cloud system, a series ofmore » lessprecipitating stratus and shallow cumulus, and a cold frontal passage. The WRF simulations are evaluated by the available observations of cloud fraction, liquid water path, precipitation, and surface temperature. The microphysical properties of cloud hydrometeors, such as their mass and number concentrations, generally show monotonic trends as a function of cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. Aerosol radiative effects do not interfere the trends of cloud microphysics, except for the stratus and shallow cumulus cases where aerosol semi-direct effects are identified. The precipitation changes by aerosols vary with the cloud types and their evolving stages, with more prominent aerosol invigoration effect and associated enhanced precipitation from the convective sources. Furthermore, the simulated aerosol direct effect suppresses precipitation in all three cases but does not overturn the direction of precipitation changes by the aerosol indirect effect. Cloud fraction exhibits much smaller sensitivity (typically less than 2%) to aerosol perturbations than the cloud microphysics, and the responses vary with aerosol concentrations and cloud regimes. The surface shortwave radiation shows a monotonic decrease by

  18. EFFECT OF VISIBLE RANGE ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATIONS ON ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    PubMed

    Azeemi, Samina T Yousuf; Shaukat, Saleem Farooq; Azeemi, Khawaja Shamsuddin; Khan, Idrees; Mahmood, Khalid; Naz, Farah

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the agent responsible for a range of clinical diseases. With emerging antimicrobial resistance, other treatment options including solar/photo-therapy are becoming increasingly common. Visible Range Radiation Therapy/Colour Therapy is an emerging technique in the field of energy/vibrational medicine that uses visible spectrum of Electromagnetic Radiations to cure different diseases. In this study, our goal was to understand the effect of Visible Range Electromagnetic Radiations on E. coli (in vitro) and therefore find out the most appropriate visible range radiation for the treatment of diseases caused by E. coli. A total of 6 non-repetitive E. coli isolates were obtained from urine samples obtained from hospitalized patients with UTI. Single colony of E. coli was inoculated in 3 ml of Lysogeny Broth (LB) and 40 μl of this E. coli suspension was poured into each of the plastic tubes which were then irradiated with six different wavelengths in the visible region (Table. 1) after 18 hours with one acting as a control. The Optical Densities of these irradiated samples were then measured. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy (TEFCAN ZEGA3) was carried out. The analysis of the microscopic and SEM images of irradiated E. coli samples with six different visible range radiations is representative of The fact that E. coli responded differently to every applied radiation in the visible region and the most profound inhibitory effects were that of 538nm Visible Range Radiation (Green) which proved to be bactericidal and 590nm Visible Range Radiation (yellow) which was bacteriostatic. The enhanced growth of E. coli with varying degrees was clearly observed in 610nm (orange), 644nm (red), 464nm (Purple) and 453nm (blue). It can be concluded that 538nm (Green) and 590nm (Yellow) can effectively be used for treating E. coli borne diseases.

  19. EFFECT OF VISIBLE RANGE ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATIONS ON ESCHERICHIA COLI

    PubMed Central

    Azeemi, Samina T. Yousuf; Shaukat, Saleem Farooq; Azeemi, Khawaja Shamsuddin; Khan, Idrees; Mahmood, Khalid; Naz, Farah

    2017-01-01

    Background: Escherichia coli is the agent responsible for a range of clinical diseases. With emerging antimicrobial resistance, other treatment options including solar/photo-therapy are becoming increasingly common. Visible Range Radiation Therapy/Colour Therapy is an emerging technique in the field of energy/vibrational medicine that uses visible spectrum of Electromagnetic Radiations to cure different diseases. In this study, our goal was to understand the effect of Visible Range Electromagnetic Radiations on E. coli (in vitro) and therefore find out the most appropriate visible range radiation for the treatment of diseases caused by E. coli. Materials and Methods: A total of 6 non-repetitive E. coli isolates were obtained from urine samples obtained from hospitalized patients with UTI. Single colony of E. coli was inoculated in 3 ml of Lysogeny Broth (LB) and 40 μl of this E. coli suspension was poured into each of the plastic tubes which were then irradiated with six different wavelengths in the visible region (Table. 1) after 18 hours with one acting as a control. The Optical Densities of these irradiated samples were then measured. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy (TEFCAN ZEGA3) was carried out. Results: The analysis of the microscopic and SEM images of irradiated E. coli samples with six different visible range radiations is representative of The fact that E. coli responded differently to every applied radiation in the visible region and the most profound inhibitory effects were that of 538nm Visible Range Radiation (Green) which proved to be bactericidal and 590nm Visible Range Radiation (yellow) which was bacteriostatic. The enhanced growth of E. coli with varying degrees was clearly observed in 610nm (orange), 644nm (red), 464nm (Purple) and 453nm (blue). Conclusion: It can be concluded that 538nm (Green) and 590nm (Yellow) can effectively be used for treating E. coli borne diseases. PMID:28331912

  20. Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack effect with anisotropic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, S.; Vokrouhlický, D.

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, we study the influence of optical scattering and thermal radiation models on the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect. The Lambertian formulation is compared with the scattering and emission laws and Lommel-Seeliger reflection. Although the form of the reflectivity function strongly influences the mean torques because of scattering or thermal radiation alone, their combined contribution to the rotation period YORP effect is not very different from the standard Lambertian values. For higher albedo values, the differences between the Hapke and Lambert models become significant for the YORP effect in attitude.

  1. The biological effects of ionising radiation on Crustaceans: A review.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Neil; Lerebours, Adélaïde; Smith, Jim T; Ford, Alex T

    2015-10-01

    Historic approaches to radiation protection are founded on the conjecture that measures to safeguard humans are adequate to protect non-human organisms. This view is disparate with other toxicants wherein well-developed frameworks exist to minimise exposure of biota. Significant data gaps for many organisms, coupled with high profile nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima, have prompted the re-evaluation of our approach toward environmental radioprotection. Elucidating the impacts of radiation on biota has been identified as priority area for future research within both scientific and regulatory communities. The crustaceans are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, comprising greater than 66,000 species of ecological and commercial importance. This paper aims to assess the available literature of radiation-induced effects within this subphylum and identify knowledge gaps. A literature search was conducted pertaining to radiation effects on four endpoints as stipulated by a number of regulatory bodies: mortality, morbidity, reproduction and mutation. A major finding of this review was the paucity of data regarding the effects of environmentally relevant radiation doses on crustacean biology. Extremely few studies utilising chronic exposure durations or wild populations were found across all four endpoints. The dose levels at which effects occur was found to vary by orders of magnitude thus presenting difficulties in developing phyla-specific benchmark values and reference levels for radioprotection. Based on the limited data, mutation was found to be the most sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure, with mortality the least sensitive. Current phyla-specific dose levels and limits proposed by major regulatory bodies were found to be inadequate to protect species across a range of endpoints including morbidity, mutation and reproduction and examples are discussed within. These findings serve to prioritise areas for future research that will significantly

  2. Non-Targeted Effects Induced by Ionizing Radiation: Mechanisms and Potential Impact on Radiation Induced Health Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    Not-targeted effects represent a paradigm shift from the "DNA centric" view that ionizing radiation only elicits biological effects and subsequent health consequences as a result of an energy deposition event in the cell nucleus. While this is likely true at higher radiation doses (> 1Gy), at low doses (< 100mGy) non-targeted effects associated with radiation exposure might play a significant role. Here definitions of non-targeted effects are presented, the potential mechanisms for the communication of signals and signaling networks from irradiated cells/tissues are proposed, and the various effects of this intra- and intercellular signaling are described. We conclude with speculationmore » on how these observations might lead to and impact long-term human health outcomes.« less

  3. Cloud Radiative Effect in dependence on Cloud Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aebi, Christine; Gröbner, Julian; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Vuilleumier, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Radiative transfer of energy in the atmosphere and the influence of clouds on the radiation budget remain the greatest sources of uncertainty in the simulation of climate change. Small changes in cloudiness and radiation can have large impacts on the Earth's climate. In order to assess the opposing effects of clouds on the radiation budget and the corresponding changes, frequent and more precise radiation and cloud observations are necessary. The role of clouds on the surface radiation budget is studied in order to quantify the longwave, shortwave and the total cloud radiative forcing in dependence on the atmospheric composition and cloud type. The study is performed for three different sites in Switzerland at three different altitude levels: Payerne (490 m asl), Davos (1'560 m asl) and Jungfraujoch (3'580 m asl). On the basis of data of visible all-sky camera systems at the three aforementioned stations in Switzerland, up to six different cloud types are distinguished (Cirrus-Cirrostratus, Cirrocumulus-Altocumulus, Stratus-Altostratus, Cumulus, Stratocumulus and Cumulonimbus-Nimbostratus). These cloud types are classified with a modified algorithm of Heinle et al. (2010). This cloud type classifying algorithm is based on a set of statistical features describing the color (spectral features) and the texture of an image (textural features) (Wacker et al. (2015)). The calculation of the fractional cloud cover information is based on spectral information of the all-sky camera data. The radiation data are taken from measurements with pyranometers and pyrgeometers at the different stations. A climatology of a whole year of the shortwave, longwave and total cloud radiative effect and its sensitivity to integrated water vapor, cloud cover and cloud type will be calculated for the three above-mentioned stations in Switzerland. For the calculation of the shortwave and longwave cloud radiative effect the corresponding cloud-free reference models developed at PMOD/WRC will be

  4. Effectiveness of eye drops protective against ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Daxer, A; Blumthaler, M; Schreder, J; Ettl, A

    1998-01-01

    To test the effectiveness of commercially available ultraviolet (UV)-protective eye drops (8-hydroxy-1-methylchinolinium methylsulphate) which are recommended for protection against both solar and artificial UV radiation. The spectral transmission in the wavelength range from 250 to 500 nm was investigated in 1-nm steps using a high-resolution double monochromator with holographic gratings of 2,400 lines/mm and a 1,000-watt halogen lamp as light source. The transmission spectrum was measured for different values of the layer thickness. The transmission of a liquid layer of about 10 microns, which corresponds to the thickness of the human tear film, shows a cut-off at 290 nm with a transmission of about 25-50% at shorter wavelengths. For wavelengths longer than 290 nm the transmission is higher than 90%. The threshold time ratio for keratitis formation with and without eye drops is above 0.93 considering solar radiation on the earth's surface and above 0.65 considering radiation from arc-welding, respectively. The transmission spectrum of the eye drops under realistic conditions does not show a protective effect against solar UV radiation. However, there exists reduction of UVC radiation in the spectral range typical of artificial UV sources such as arc-welding. We cannot recommend the application of these eye drops as an UV-protective aid against eye damage by solar UV radiation.

  5. The Effect of Radiation "Memory" in Alkali-Halide Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovkin, M. V.; Sal'nikov, V. N.

    2017-01-01

    The exposure of the alkali-halide crystals to ionizing radiation leads to the destruction of their structure, the emergence of radiation defects, and the formation of the electron and hole color centers. Destruction of the color centers upon heating is accompanied by the crystal bleaching, luminescence, and radio-frequency electromagnetic emission (REME). After complete thermal bleaching of the crystal, radiation defects are not completely annealed, as the electrons and holes released from the color centers by heating leave charged and locally uncompensated defects. Clusters of these "pre centers" lead to electric microheterogeneity of the crystal, the formation of a quasi-electret state, and the emergence of micro-discharges accompanied by radio emission. The generation of REME associated with residual defectiveness, is a manifestation of the effect of radiation "memory" in dielectrics.

  6. Environmental Radiation Effects: A Need to Question Old Paradigms

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, T.G.; Bedford, J.; Ulsh, B.

    2003-03-27

    A historical perspective is given of the current paradigm that does not explicitly protect the environment from radiation, but instead, relies on the concept that if dose limits are set to protect humans then the environment is automatically protected as well. We summarize recent international questioning of this paradigm and briefly present three different frameworks for protecting biota that are being considered by the U.S. DOE, the Canadian government and the International Commission on Radiological Protection. We emphasize that an enhanced collaboration is required between what has traditionally been separated disciplines of radiation biology and radiation ecology if we aremore » going to properly address the current environmental radiation problems. We then summarize results generated from an EMSP grant that allowed us to develop a Low Dose Irradiation Facility that specifically addresses effects of low-level, chronic irradiation on multiple levels of biological organization.« less

  7. Space Radiation Effects on Inflatable Habitat Materials Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess M.; Nichols, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The Space Radiation Effects on Inflatable Habitat Materials project provides much needed risk reduction data to assess space radiation damage of existing and emerging materials used in manned low-earth orbit, lunar, interplanetary, and Martian surface missions. More specifically, long duration (up to 50 years) space radiation damage will be quantified for materials used in inflatable structures (1st priority), as well as for habitable composite structures and space suits materials (2nd priority). The data acquired will have relevance for nonmetallic materials (polymers and composites) used in NASA missions where long duration reliability is needed in continuous or intermittent radiation fluxes. This project also will help to determine the service lifetimes for habitable inflatable, composite, and space suit materials.

  8. The Effects of Space Radiation on Linear Integrated Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A.

    2000-01-01

    Permanent and transient effects are discussed that are induced in linear integrated circuits by space radiation. Recent developments include enhanced damage at low dose rate, increased damage from protons due to displacement effects, and transients in digital comparators that can cause circuit malfunctions.

  9. Radiation effects in structural materials of spallation targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, P.

    2002-02-01

    Effects of radiation damage by protons and neutrons in structural materials of spallation neutron sources are reviewed. Effects of atomic displacements, defect mobility and transmutation products, especially hydrogen and helium, on physical and mechanical properties are discussed. The most promising candidate materials (austenitic stainless steels, ferritic/martensitic steels and refractory alloys) are compared, and needed investigations are identified.

  10. 47 CFR 22.913 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 22.913 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.913 Effective radiated power limits. The effective... such systems must not exceed 1000 Watts. The ERP of mobile transmitters and auxiliary test transmitters...

  11. The Impact on Space Radiation Requirements and Effects on ASIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, C.; Johnston, A.; Swift, G.

    1995-01-01

    The evolution of highly miniaturized electronic and mechanical systems will be accompanied by new problems and issues regarding the radiation response of these systems in the space environment. In this paper we discuss some of the more prominent radiation problems brought about by miniaturization. For example, autonomous micro-spacecraft will require large amounts of high density memory, most likely in the form of stacked, multichip modules of DRAM's, that must tolerate the radiation environment. However, advanced DRAM's (16 to 256 Mbit) are quite susceptible to radiation, particularly single event effects, and even exhibit new radiation phenomena that were not a problem for older, less dense memory chips. Another important trend in micro-spacecraft electronics is toward the use of low-voltage microelectronic systems that consume less power. However, the reduction in operating voltage also caries with it an increased susceptibility to radiation. In the case of application specific integrated microcircuits (ASIM's), advanced devices of this type, such as high density field programmable gate arrays (FPGA's) exhibit new single event effects (SEE), such as single particle reprogramming of anti-fuse links. New advanced bipolar circuits have been shown recently to degrade more rapidly in the low dose rate space environment than in the typical laboratory total dose radiation test used to qualify such devices. Thus total dose testing of these parts is no longer an appropriately conservative measure to be used for hardness assurance. We also note that the functionality of micromechanical Si-based devices may be altered due to the radiation-induced deposition of charge in the oxide passivation layers.

  12. Mechanism of SOA formation determines magnitude of radiative effects

    PubMed Central

    Penner, Joyce E.; Lin, Guangxing; Zhou, Cheng; Xu, Li; Zhuang, Bingliang

    2017-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) nearly always exists as an internal mixture, and the distribution of this mixture depends on the formation mechanism of SOA. A model is developed to examine the influence of using an internal mixing state based on the mechanism of formation and to estimate the radiative forcing of SOA in the future. For the present day, 66% of SOA is internally mixed with sulfate, while 34% is internally mixed with primary soot. Compared with using an external mixture, the direct effect of SOA is decreased due to the decrease in total aerosol surface area and the increase of absorption efficiency. Aerosol number concentrations are sharply reduced, and this is responsible for a large decrease in the cloud albedo effect. Internal mixing decreases the radiative effect of SOA by a factor of >4 compared with treating SOA as an external mixture. The future SOA burden increases by 24% due to CO2 increases and climate change, leading to a total (direct plus cloud albedo) radiative forcing of −0.05 W m−2. When the combined effects of changes in climate, anthropogenic emissions, and land use are included, the SOA forcing is −0.07 W m−2, even though the SOA burden only increases by 6.8%. This is caused by the substantial increase of SOA associated with sulfate in the Aitken mode. The Aitken mode increase contributes to the enhancement of first indirect radiative forcing, which dominates the total radiative forcing. PMID:29133426

  13. Mechanism of SOA formation determines magnitude of radiative effects.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jialei; Penner, Joyce E; Lin, Guangxing; Zhou, Cheng; Xu, Li; Zhuang, Bingliang

    2017-11-28

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) nearly always exists as an internal mixture, and the distribution of this mixture depends on the formation mechanism of SOA. A model is developed to examine the influence of using an internal mixing state based on the mechanism of formation and to estimate the radiative forcing of SOA in the future. For the present day, 66% of SOA is internally mixed with sulfate, while 34% is internally mixed with primary soot. Compared with using an external mixture, the direct effect of SOA is decreased due to the decrease in total aerosol surface area and the increase of absorption efficiency. Aerosol number concentrations are sharply reduced, and this is responsible for a large decrease in the cloud albedo effect. Internal mixing decreases the radiative effect of SOA by a factor of >4 compared with treating SOA as an external mixture. The future SOA burden increases by 24% due to CO 2 increases and climate change, leading to a total (direct plus cloud albedo) radiative forcing of -0.05 W m -2 When the combined effects of changes in climate, anthropogenic emissions, and land use are included, the SOA forcing is -0.07 W m -2 , even though the SOA burden only increases by 6.8%. This is caused by the substantial increase of SOA associated with sulfate in the Aitken mode. The Aitken mode increase contributes to the enhancement of first indirect radiative forcing, which dominates the total radiative forcing. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  14. Mechanism of SOA formation determines magnitude of radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jialei; Penner, Joyce E.; Lin, Guangxing; Zhou, Cheng; Xu, Li; Zhuang, Bingliang

    2017-11-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) nearly always exists as an internal mixture, and the distribution of this mixture depends on the formation mechanism of SOA. A model is developed to examine the influence of using an internal mixing state based on the mechanism of formation and to estimate the radiative forcing of SOA in the future. For the present day, 66% of SOA is internally mixed with sulfate, while 34% is internally mixed with primary soot. Compared with using an external mixture, the direct effect of SOA is decreased due to the decrease in total aerosol surface area and the increase of absorption efficiency. Aerosol number concentrations are sharply reduced, and this is responsible for a large decrease in the cloud albedo effect. Internal mixing decreases the radiative effect of SOA by a factor of >4 compared with treating SOA as an external mixture. The future SOA burden increases by 24% due to CO2 increases and climate change, leading to a total (direct plus cloud albedo) radiative forcing of ‑0.05 W m‑2. When the combined effects of changes in climate, anthropogenic emissions, and land use are included, the SOA forcing is ‑0.07 W m‑2, even though the SOA burden only increases by 6.8%. This is caused by the substantial increase of SOA associated with sulfate in the Aitken mode. The Aitken mode increase contributes to the enhancement of first indirect radiative forcing, which dominates the total radiative forcing.

  15. Mechanism of SOA Formation Determines Magnitude of Radiative Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Penner, J.; Lin, G.; Zhou, C.

    2017-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) nearly always exists as an internal mixture and the distribution of this mixture depends on the formation mechanism of SOA. A model is developed to examine the influence of using an internal mixing states based on the mechanism of formation and to estimate the radiative forcing of SOA in the future. For the present day, 66 % of SOA is internally mixed with sulfate, while 34 % is internally mixed with primary soot. When compared with using an external mixture, the direct effect of SOA is decreased, due to the decrease of total aerosol surface area and the increase of absorption efficiency. Aerosol number concentrations are sharply reduced and this is responsible for a large decrease in the cloud albedo effect. In total, internal mixing suppresses the radiative effect of SOA by a factor of >4 compared to treating SOA as an external mixture. The future SOA burden increases by 24% due to CO2 increases and climate change, leading to a total (direct plus cloud albedo) radiative forcing of -0.05 W m-2. When the combined effects of changes in climate, anthropogenic emissions and land use are included, the SOA forcing is -0.07 W m-2, even though the SOA burden only increases by 6.8%. This is caused by the substantial increase of SOA associated with sulfate in the Aitken mode. The Aitken mode increase contributes to the enhancement of first indirect radiative forcing, which dominates the total radiative forcing.

  16. Mechanism of SOA formation determines magnitude of radiative effects

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Jialei; Penner, Joyce E.; Lin, Guangxing; ...

    2017-11-13

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) nearly always exists as an internal mixture and the distribution of this mixture depends on the formation mechanism of SOA. A model is developed to examine the influence of using an internal mixing states based on the mechanism of formation and to estimate the radiative forcing of SOA in the future. For the present day, 66 % of SOA is internally mixed with sulfate, while 34 % is internally mixed with primary soot. When compared with using an external mixture, the direct effect of SOA is decreased, due to the decrease of total aerosol surface areamore » and the increase of absorption efficiency. Aerosol number concentrations are sharply reduced and this is responsible for a large decrease in the cloud albedo effect. In total, internal mixing suppresses the radiative effect of SOA by a factor of >4 compared to treating SOA as an external mixture. The future SOA burden increases by 24% due to CO2 increases and climate change, leading to a total (direct plus cloud albedo) radiative forcing of -0.05 W m-2. When the combined effects of changes in climate, anthropogenic emissions and land use are included, the SOA forcing is -0.07 W m-2, even though the SOA burden only increases by 6.8%. This is caused by the substantial increase of SOA associated with sulfate in the Aitken mode. The Aitken mode increase contributes to the enhancement of first indirect radiative forcing, which dominates the total radiative forcing.« less

  17. Mechanism of SOA formation determines magnitude of radiative effects

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jialei; Penner, Joyce E.; Lin, Guangxing

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) nearly always exists as an internal mixture and the distribution of this mixture depends on the formation mechanism of SOA. A model is developed to examine the influence of using an internal mixing states based on the mechanism of formation and to estimate the radiative forcing of SOA in the future. For the present day, 66 % of SOA is internally mixed with sulfate, while 34 % is internally mixed with primary soot. When compared with using an external mixture, the direct effect of SOA is decreased, due to the decrease of total aerosol surface areamore » and the increase of absorption efficiency. Aerosol number concentrations are sharply reduced and this is responsible for a large decrease in the cloud albedo effect. In total, internal mixing suppresses the radiative effect of SOA by a factor of >4 compared to treating SOA as an external mixture. The future SOA burden increases by 24% due to CO2 increases and climate change, leading to a total (direct plus cloud albedo) radiative forcing of -0.05 W m-2. When the combined effects of changes in climate, anthropogenic emissions and land use are included, the SOA forcing is -0.07 W m-2, even though the SOA burden only increases by 6.8%. This is caused by the substantial increase of SOA associated with sulfate in the Aitken mode. The Aitken mode increase contributes to the enhancement of first indirect radiative forcing, which dominates the total radiative forcing.« less

  18. Effect of low-dose ionizing radiation on luminous marine bacteria: radiation hormesis and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kudryasheva, N S; Rozhko, T V

    2015-04-01

    The paper summarizes studies of effects of alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides (americium-241, uranium-235+238, and tritium) on marine microorganisms under conditions of chronic low-dose irradiation in aqueous media. Luminous marine bacteria were chosen as an example of these microorganisms; bioluminescent intensity was used as a tested physiological parameter. Non-linear dose-effect dependence was demonstrated. Three successive stages in the bioluminescent response to americium-241 and tritium were found: 1--absence of effects (stress recognition), 2--activation (adaptive response), and 3--inhibition (suppression of physiological function, i.e. radiation toxicity). The effects were attributed to radiation hormesis phenomenon. Biological role of reactive oxygen species, secondary products of the radioactive decay, is discussed. The study suggests an approach to evaluation of non-toxic and toxic stages under conditions of chronic radioactive exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Relaxational effects in radiating stellar collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govender, Megan; Maartens, Roy; Maharaj, Sunil D.

    1999-12-01

    Relaxational effects in stellar heat transport can in many cases be significant. Relativistic Fourier-Eckart theory is inherently quasi-stationary, and cannot incorporate these effects. The effects are naturally accounted for in causal relativistic thermodynamics, which provides an improved approximation to kinetic theory. Recent results, based on perturbations of a static star, show that relaxation effects can produce a significant increase in the central temperature and temperature gradient for a given luminosity. We use a simple stellar model that allows for non-perturbative deviations from staticity, and confirms qualitatively the predictions of the perturbative models.

  20. Effects of diagnostic ionizing radiation on pregnancy via TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, W. H.; Artoli, A. M.

    2008-08-01

    In Sudan, X-rays are routinely used at least once for measurements of pelvis during the gestation period, though this is highly prohibited worldwide, except for a few life threatening cases. To demonstrate the effect of diagnostic ionizing radiation on uterus, fetus and neighboring tissues to the ovaries, two independent experiments on pregnant rabbits were conducted. The first experiment was a proof of concept that diagnostic ionizing radiation is hazardous throughout the gestation period. The second experiment was done through Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) to elucidate the morphological changes in the ultra structure of samples taken from irradiated pregnant rabbits. This study uses TEM to test the effect of diagnostic radiation of less than 0.6 Gray on the cellular level. Morphological changes have been captured and the images were analyzed to quantify these effects.

  1. Radiation hydrodynamics of triggered star formation: the effect of the diffuse radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Harries, Tim J.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the effect of including diffuse field radiation when modelling the radiatively driven implosion of a Bonnor-Ebert sphere (BES). Radiation-hydrodynamical calculations are performed by using operator splitting to combine Monte Carlo photoionization with grid-based Eulerian hydrodynamics that includes self-gravity. It is found that the diffuse field has a significant effect on the nature of radiatively driven collapse which is strongly coupled to the strength of the driving shock that is established before impacting the BES. This can result in either slower or more rapid star formation than expected using the on-the-spot approximation depending on the distance of the BES from the source object. As well as directly compressing the BES, stronger shocks increase the thickness and density in the shell of accumulated material, which leads to short, strong, photoevaporative ejections that reinforce the compression whenever it slows. This happens particularly effectively when the diffuse field is included as rocket motion is induced over a larger area of the shell surface. The formation and evolution of 'elephant trunks' via instability is also found to vary significantly when the diffuse field is included. Since the perturbations that seed instabilities are smeared out elephant trunks form less readily and, once formed, are exposed to enhanced thermal compression.

  2. Strong effects of ionizing radiation from Chernobyl on mutation rates.

    PubMed

    Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy A

    2015-02-10

    In this paper we use a meta-analysis to examine the relationship between radiation and mutation rates in Chernobyl across 45 published studies, covering 30 species. Overall effect size of radiation on mutation rates estimated as Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was very large (E = 0.67; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.59 to 0.73), accounting for 44.3% of the total variance in an unstructured random-effects model. Fail-safe calculations reflecting the number of unpublished null results needed to eliminate this average effect size showed the extreme robustness of this finding (Rosenberg's method: 4135 at p = 0.05). Indirect tests did not provide any evidence of publication bias. The effect of radiation on mutations varied among taxa, with plants showing a larger effect than animals. Humans were shown to have intermediate sensitivity of mutations to radiation compared to other species. Effect size did not decrease over time, providing no evidence for an improvement in environmental conditions. The surprisingly high mean effect size suggests a strong impact of radioactive contamination on individual fitness in current and future generations, with potentially significant population-level consequences, even beyond the area contaminated with radioactive material.

  3. Strong effects of ionizing radiation from Chernobyl on mutation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy A.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we use a meta-analysis to examine the relationship between radiation and mutation rates in Chernobyl across 45 published studies, covering 30 species. Overall effect size of radiation on mutation rates estimated as Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was very large (E = 0.67; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.59 to 0.73), accounting for 44.3% of the total variance in an unstructured random-effects model. Fail-safe calculations reflecting the number of unpublished null results needed to eliminate this average effect size showed the extreme robustness of this finding (Rosenberg's method: 4135 at p = 0.05). Indirect tests did not provide any evidence of publication bias. The effect of radiation on mutations varied among taxa, with plants showing a larger effect than animals. Humans were shown to have intermediate sensitivity of mutations to radiation compared to other species. Effect size did not decrease over time, providing no evidence for an improvement in environmental conditions. The surprisingly high mean effect size suggests a strong impact of radioactive contamination on individual fitness in current and future generations, with potentially significant population-level consequences, even beyond the area contaminated with radioactive material.

  4. In situ TEM of radiation effects in complex ceramics.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jie; Wang, L M; Sun, Kai; Ewing, Rodney C

    2009-03-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been extensively applied to study radiation effects in a wide variety of materials, such as metals, ceramics and semiconductors and is an indispensable tool in obtaining a fundamental understanding of energetic beam-matter interactions, damage events, and materials' behavior under intense radiation environments. In this article, in situ TEM observations of radiation effects in complex ceramics (e.g., oxides, silicates, and phosphates) subjected to energetic ion and electron irradiations have been summarized with a focus on irradiation-induced microstructural evolution, changes in microchemistry, and the formation of nanostructures. New results for in situ TEM observation of radiation effects in pyrochlore, A(2)B(2)O(7), and zircon, ZrSiO(4), subjected to multiple beam irradiations are presented, and the effects of simultaneous irradiations of alpha-decay and beta-decay on the microstructural evolution of potential nuclear waste forms are discussed. Furthermore, in situ TEM results of radiation effects in a sodium borosilicate glass subjected to electron-beam exposure are introduced to highlight the important applications of advanced analytical TEM techniques, including Z-contrast imaging, energy filtered TEM (EFTEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), in studying radiation effects in materials microstructural evolution and microchemical changes. By combining ex situ TEM and advanced analytical TEM techniques with in situ TEM observations under energetic beam irradiations, one can obtain invaluable information on the phase stability and response behaviors of materials under a wide range of irradiation conditions. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. THE EFFECT OF RADIATION ON HEREDITY

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumi, T.

    1963-07-01

    A review of radiation genetics is presented. (BBB)<>18:017509Changes in plasma aldolase activity in 11 cases of cancer of the uterus (10 cervical and one endometrial adenocarcinoma) and one case of epithelioma of the vulva were studied before, during, and after radiotherapy. Only in two cases was aldolase activity higher than normal. After radium therapy these values increased in 10 cases, with a maximum increase of 4 U/ ml from a normal level of 4 to 8 U/ml. In four cases the increase was 3 to 4 U/ ml; in six, 0.2 to 1.5 U/ml; in two, there was a decreasemore » of 0.8 and 1 U/ml. The third determination, made a week after the end of therapy, indicated a drop in activity of plasma except in two cases. In five determinations made one month after therapy, a further decrease was noted, except in the one case of epithelioma of the vulva irradiated with a smaller total dose. The average control value of 17% for the increase in aldolase activity found here is less than that found in other studies of malignant tumors, and much less than that found in other diseases. There appears to be a relation between enzymatic activity and tissue necrosis, but equation of this increase and necrosis is oversimplified because of the many exceptions. The gradual elimination of the enzyme by natural routes of excretion and the possibility of an antienzyme, which can block aldolase and thus decrease its activity value below normal, deserve exploration. It is suggested that the value of study of plasma aldolase activity lies not in its diagnostic but in its prognostic significance. (BBB)« less

  6. Pathology effects at radiation doses below those causing increased mortality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, Bruce A.; Gavrilova, Natalia; Grahn, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Mortality data from experiments conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on the long-term effects of external whole-body irradiation on B6CF(1) mice were used to investigate radiation-induced effects at intermediate doses of (60)Co gamma rays or fission-spectrum neutrons either delivered as a single exposure or protracted over 60 once-weekly exposures. Kaplan-Meier analyses were used to identify the lowest dose in the ANL data (within radiation quality, pattern of exposure, and sex) at which radiation-induced mortality caused by primary tumors could be detected (approximately 1-2 Gy for gamma rays and 10-15 cGy for neutrons). Doses at and below these levels were then examined for radiation-induced shifts in the spectrum of pathology detected at death. To do this, specific pathology events were pooled into larger assemblages based on whether they were cancer, cardiovascular disease or non-neoplastic diseases detected within the lungs and pleura, liver and biliary tract, reproductive organs, or urinary tract. Cancer and cardiovascular disease were further subdivided into categories based on whether they caused death, contributed to death, or were simply observed at death. Counts of how often events falling within each of these combined pathology categories occurred within a mouse were then used as predictor variables in logistic regression to determine whether irradiated mice could be distinguished from control mice. Increased pathology burdens were detected in irradiated mice at doses lower than those causing detectable shifts in mortality-22 cGy for gamma rays and 2 cGy for neutrons. These findings suggest that (1) models based on mortality data alone may underestimate radiation effects, (2) radiation may have adverse health consequences (i.e. elevated health risks) even when mortality risks are not detected, and (3) radiation-induced pathologies other than cancer do occur, and they involve multiple organ systems.

  7. The Effect of Martian Dust on Radiator Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollingsworth, D. Keith; Witte, Larry C.; Hinke, Jaime; Hulbert, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were performed in which the effective emittance of three types of radiator Coatings was measured as Martian dust simulant was added to the radiator face. The apparatus consisted of multiple radiator coupons on which Carbondale Red Clay dust was deposited. The coupons were powered by electric heaters, using a guard-heating configuration to achieve the accuracy required for acceptable emittance calculations. The apparatus was containing in a vacuum chamber that featured a liquid-nitrogen cooled shroud that simulated the Martian sky temperature. Radiator temperatures ranged from 250 to 350 K with sky temperatures from 185 to 248 K. Results show that as dust was added to the radiator surfaces, the effective emittance of the high - emittance coatings decreased from near 0.9 to a value of about 0.5. A low-emittance control surface, polished aluminum, demonstrated a rise in effective emittance for thin dust layers, and then a decline as the dust layer thickened. This behavior is attributed to the conductive resistance caused by the dust layer.

  8. SW radiative effect of aerosol in GRAPES_GFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiying

    2017-04-01

    The aerosol particles can scatter and absorb solar radiation, and so change the shortwave radiation absorbed by the atmosphere, reached the surface and that reflected back to outer space at TOA. Since this process doesn't interact with other processes, it is called direct radiation effect. The clear sky downward SW and net SW fluxes at the surface in GRAPES_GFS of China Meteorological Administration are overestimated in Northern multitudes and Tropics. The main source of these errors is the absence of aerosol SW effect in GRAPES_GFS. The climatic aerosol mass concentration data, which include 13 kinds of aerosol and their 14 SW bands optical properties are considered in GRAPES_GFS. The calculated total optical depth, single scatter albedo and asymmetry factor are used as the input to radiation scheme. Compared with the satellite observation from MISER, the calculated total optical depth is in good consistent. The seasonal experiments show that, the summer averaged clear sky radiation fluxes at the surface are improved after including the SW effect of aerosol. The biases in the clear sky downward SW and net SW fluxes at the surface in Northern multitudes and Tropic reduced obviously. Furthermore, the weather forecast experiments also show that the skill scores in Northern hemisphere and East Asia also become better.

  9. Evaluating Shielding Effectiveness for Reducing Space Radiation Cancer Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Ren, Lei

    2007-01-01

    We discuss calculations of probability distribution functions (PDF) representing uncertainties in projecting fatal cancer risk from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE). The PDF s are used in significance tests of the effectiveness of potential radiation shielding approaches. Uncertainties in risk coefficients determined from epidemiology data, dose and dose-rate reduction factors, quality factors, and physics models of radiation environments are considered in models of cancer risk PDF s. Competing mortality risks and functional correlations in radiation quality factor uncertainties are treated in the calculations. We show that the cancer risk uncertainty, defined as the ratio of the 95% confidence level (CL) to the point estimate is about 4-fold for lunar and Mars mission risk projections. For short-stay lunar missions (<180 d), SPE s present the most significant risk, however one that is mitigated effectively by shielding, especially for carbon composites structures with high hydrogen content. In contrast, for long duration lunar (>180 d) or Mars missions, GCR risks may exceed radiation risk limits, with 95% CL s exceeding 10% fatal risk for males and females on a Mars mission. For reducing GCR cancer risks, shielding materials are marginally effective because of the penetrating nature of GCR and secondary radiation produced in tissue by relativistic particles. At the present time, polyethylene or carbon composite shielding can not be shown to significantly reduce risk compared to aluminum shielding based on a significance test that accounts for radiobiology uncertainties in GCR risk projection.

  10. Effect of radiofrequency radiation in cultured mammalian cells: A review.

    PubMed

    Manna, Debashri; Ghosh, Rita

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile phone related technologies will continue to increase in the foreseeable future worldwide. This has drawn attention to the probable interaction of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation with different biological targets. Studies have been conducted on various organisms to evaluate the alleged ill-effect on health. We have therefore attempted to review those work limited to in vitro cultured cells where irradiation conditions were well controlled. Different investigators have studied varied endpoints like DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, cellular morphology and viability to weigh the genotoxic effect of such radiation by utilizing different frequencies and dose rates under various irradiation conditions that include continuous or pulsed exposures and also amplitude- or frequency-modulated waves. Cells adapt to change in their intra and extracellular environment from different chemical and physical stimuli through organized alterations in gene or protein expression that result in the induction of stress responses. Many studies have focused on such effects for risk estimations. Though the effects of microwave radiation on cells are often not pronounced, some investigators have therefore combined radiofrequency radiation with other physical or chemical agents to observe whether the effects of such agents were augmented or not. Such reports in cultured cellular systems have also included in this review. The findings from different workers have revealed that, effects were dependent on cell type and the endpoint selection. However, contradictory findings were also observed in same cell types with same assay, in such cases the specific absorption rate (SAR) values were significant.

  11. Effect of Rosiglitazone on Radiation Damage in Bone Marrow Hemopoiesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkő, Klára; Pintye, Éva; Szabó, Boglárka; Géresi, Krisztina; Megyeri, Attila; Benkő, Ilona

    2008-12-01

    To study radiobiological effects and drugs, which can modify radiation injury, has an importance if we would like to avoid harmful effects of radiation due to emergency situations or treat patients with malignant diseases by radiotherapy. During the long treatment schedules patients may be treated by not only anticancer but many other drugs because of accompanying diseases. These drugs may also modify radiobiological effects. Rosiglitazone pre-treatment proved to be myeloprotective and accelerated recovery of 5-fluorouracil-damaged bone marrow in our previous experiments. Our new studies are designed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone has similar beneficial effects in radiation-damaged hemopoiesis. Bone marrow damage was precipitated by total body irradiation (TBI) using single increasing doses (2-10 Gy) of γ—irradiation in groups of mice. Lethality was well correlated with damage in hemopoiesis measured by cellularity of bone marrow (LD50 values were 4.8 and 5.3 gray respectively). Rosiglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug, had no significant effect on bone marrow cellularity. Insulin resistance associated with obesity or diabetes mellitus type 2 is intensively growing among cancer patients requiring some kind of radiotherapy. Therefore it is important to know whether drugs used for their therapy can modify radiation effects.

  12. Protective Effect of Chitin Urocanate Nanofibers against Ultraviolet Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Ikuko; Yoneda, Toshikazu; Omura, Yoshihiko; Osaki, Tomohiro; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Azuma, Kazuo; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Tsuka, Takeshi; Murahata, Yusuke; Ito, Norihiko; Okamoto, Yoshiharu; Minami, Saburo

    2015-01-01

    Urocanic acid is a major ultraviolet (UV)-absorbing chromophore. Chitins are highly crystalline structures that are found predominantly in crustacean shells. Alpha-chitin consists of microfibers that contain nanofibrils embedded in a protein matrix. Acid hydrolysis is a common method used to prepare chitin nanofibrils (NFs). We typically obtain NFs by hydrolyzing chitin with acetic acid. However, in the present study, we used urocanic acid to prepare urocanic acid chitin NFs (UNFs) and examined its protective effect against UVB radiation. Hos: HR-1 mice coated with UNFs were UVB irradiated (302 nm, 150 mJ/cm2), and these mice showed markedly lower UVB radiation-induced cutaneous erythema than the control. Additionally, sunburn cells were rarely detected in the epidermis of UNFs-coated mice after UVB irradiation. Although the difference was not as significant as UNFs, the number of sunburn cells in mice treated with acetic acid chitin nanofibrils (ANFs) tended to be lower than in control mice. These results demonstrate that ANFs have a protective effect against UVB and suggest that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of NFs influence the protective effect of ANFs against UVB radiation. The combination of NFs with other substances that possess UV-protective effects, such as urocanic acid, may provide an enhanced protective effect against UVB radiation. PMID:26703629

  13. Biophysics and medical effects of enhanced radiation weapons.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Glen I

    2012-08-01

    Enhanced radiation weapons (ERW) are fission-fusion devices where the massive numbers of neutrons generated during the fusion process are intentionally allowed to escape rather than be confined to increase yield (and fallout products). As a result, the energy partition of the weapon output shifts from blast and thermal energies toward prompt radiation. The neutron/gamma output ratio is also increased. Neutrons emitted from ERW are of higher energy than the Eave of neutrons from fission weapons. These factors affect the patterns of injury distribution; delay wound healing in combined injuries; reduce the therapeutic efficacy of medical countermeasures; and increase the dose to radiation-only casualties, thus potentiating the likelihood of encountering radiation-induced incapacitation. The risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis is also increased. Radiation exposure to first responders from activation products is increased over that expected from a fission weapon of similar yield. However, the zone of dangerous fallout is significantly reduced in area. At least four nations have developed the potential to produce such weapons. Although the probability of detonation of an ERW in the near future is very small, it is nonzero, and clinicians and medical planners should be aware of the medical effects of ERW.

  14. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  15. Multidecadal variations of solar radiation reaching the surface and the role of aerosol direct radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, M.; Diehl, T. L.; Bian, H.; Yu, H.; Kucsera, T. L.; Wild, M., Sr.; Hakuba, M. Z.; Qian, Y.; Stackhouse, P. W., Jr.; Pinker, R. T.; Zhang, Y.; Kato, S.; Loeb, N. G.; Kinne, S.; Streets, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    Incoming solar radiation drives the Earth's climate system. Long-term surface observations of the solar radiation reaching the surface (RSFC) have shown decreasing or increasing trends, often referred to as solar "dimming" or "brightening", in many regions of the world in the past several decades. Such long-term variation of RSFC mostly reflects the change of the solar-attenuation components within the atmosphere. Anthropogenic emissions of aerosols and precursor gases have changed significantly in the past decades with 50-80% reduction in North America and Europe but an increase of similar magnitude in East and South Asia since 1980, mirroring the change in RSFC over those regions. This has led to suggestions that aerosols play a critical role in determining RSFC trends. This work is to assess the role of direct radiative effects of aerosols on the solar "dimming" and "brightening" trends with modeling studies. First, we will show the trends of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol surface concentrations in different regions from 1980 to 2009 with remote sensing and in-situ data as well as model simulations, and attribute those changes to anthropogenic or natural sources. We will then show the trends of RSFC from the model and compare the results with observations from the surface networks and satellite-based products. Furthermore, we will use the GOCART model to attribute the "dimming/ brightening" trends to the changes of aerosols through the direct radiative effects. Finally, we will discuss the way forward to understand the aerosol effects on RSFC (as well as on other climate variables) through aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions.

  16. Zemax simulations describing collective effects in transition and diffraction radiation.

    PubMed

    Bisesto, F G; Castellano, M; Chiadroni, E; Cianchi, A

    2018-02-19

    Transition and diffraction radiation from charged particles is commonly used for diagnostics purposes in accelerator facilities as well as THz sources for spectroscopy applications. Therefore, an accurate analysis of the emission process and the transport optics is crucial to properly characterize the source and precisely retrieve beam parameters. In this regard, we have developed a new algorithm, based on Zemax, to simulate both transition and diffraction radiation as generated by relativistic electron bunches, therefore considering collective effects. In particular, unlike other previous works, we take into account electron beam physical size and transverse momentum, reproducing some effects visible on the produced radiation, not observable in a single electron analysis. The simulation results have been compared with two experiments showing an excellent agreement.

  17. Space Radiation and the Challenges Towards Effective Shielding Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, Abdulnasser

    2014-01-01

    The hazards of space radiation and their effective mitigation strategies continue to pose special science and technology challenges to NASA. It is widely accepted now that shielding space vehicles and structures will have to rely on new and innovative materials since aluminum, like all high Z materials, are poor shields against the particulate and highly ionizing nature of space radiation. Shielding solutions, motivated and constrained by power and mass limitations, couple this realization with "multifunctionality," both in design concept as well as in material function and composition. Materials endowed with effective shielding properties as well as with some degree of multi-functionality may be the kernel of the so-called "radiation-smart" structures and designs. This talk will present some of the challenges and potential mitigation ideas towards the realization of such structures and designs.

  18. Effects of cirrus composition on atmospheric radiation budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinne, Stefan; Liou, Kuo-Nan

    1988-01-01

    A radiative transfer model that can be used to determine the change in solar and infrared fluxes caused by variations in the composition of cirrus clouds was used to investigate the importance of particle size and shape on the radiation budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. Even though the cloud optical thickness dominates the radiative properties of ice clouds, the particle size and nonsphericity of ice crystals are also important in calculations of the transfer of near-IR solar wavelengths. Results show that, for a given optical thickness, ice clouds composed of larger particles would produce larger greenhouse effects than those composed of smaller particles. Moreover, spherical particles with equivalent surface areas, frequently used for ice crystal clouds, would lead to an overestimation of the greenhouse effect.

  19. Effects of solar radiation on hair and photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Dario, Michelli F; Baby, André R; Velasco, Maria Valéria R

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the negative effects of solar radiation (ultraviolet, visible and infrared wavelengths) on hair properties like color, mechanical properties, luster, protein content, surface roughness, among others, will be discussed. Despite knowing that radiation damages hair, there are no consensus about the particular effect of each segment of solar radiation on the hair shaft. The hair photoprotection products are primarily targeted to dyed hair, specially auburn pigments, and gray shades. They are usually based on silicones, antioxidants and quaternary chemical UV filters that have more affinity for negatively charged hair surface and present higher efficacy. Unfortunately, there are no regulated parameters, like for skin photoprotection, for efficacy evaluation of hair care products, which makes impossible to compare the results published in the literature. Thus, it is important that researchers make an effort to apply experimental conditions similar to a real level of sun exposure, like dose, irradiance, time, temperature and relative humidity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fate of Earth Microbes on Mars: UV Radiation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockell, Charles

    2000-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to quantitatively investigate aspects of the martian ultraviolet radiation environment. Biological action spectra for DNA inactivation are used to estimate biologically effective irradiances for the martian surface under cloudless skies. Although the present-day martian UV flux is similar to early earth and thus may not be a limitation to life in the evolutionary context, it is a constraint to an unadapted biota and will rapidly kill spacecraft-borne microbes not covered by a martian dust layer. Here calculations for loss of microbial viability on the Pathfinder and Polar lander spacecraft are presented and the effects of martian dust on loss of viability are discussed. Details of the radiative transfer model are presented.

  1. Fate of Earth Microbes on Mars -- UV Radiation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockell, Charles

    2000-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to quantitatively investigate aspects of the martian ultraviolet radiation environment. Biological action spectra for DNA inactivation are used to estimate biologically effective irradiances for the martian surface under cloudless skies. Although the present-day martian UV flux is similar to early earth and thus may not be a limitation to life in the evolutionary context, it is a constraint to an unadapted biota and will rapidly kill spacecraft-borne microbes not covered by a martian dust layer. Here calculations for loss of microbial viability on the Pathfinder and Polar lander spacecraft are presented and the effects of martian dust on loss of viability are discussed. Details of the radiative transfer model are presented.

  2. Microwave thermal radiation effects on skin tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hargsoon; Song, Kyo D.; Lee, Uhn; Choi, Sang H.

    2012-10-01

    Microwave/RF energy has been used for wireless power transmission including many therapeutic applications, such as transurethral microwave therapy (TUMT). For safe uses of RF power, it is important to know how to deliver microwave energy on focused area and control the temperature changes not to drastically increase on adjacent areas. Graphical analysis of thermal loading factor is important to understand how to achieve effective transmission of microwave through the tissue. The loss mechanism while transmission often appears as thermal effects due to absorption of microwave, especially for materials such as human skin, muscles, and other organic parts including brain. In this paper, microwave thermal effects are investigated to measure temperatures, penetration depth through animal skins in terms of input power and various frequencies. This result will be compare with the case of human applications.

  3. Effects of Bounded Fault on Seismic Radiation and Rupture Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, H.; Yang, H.

    2016-12-01

    It has been suggested that narrow rectangle fault may emit stopping phases that can largely affect seismic radiation and thus rupture propagation, e.g., generation of short-duration pulse-like ruptures. Here we investigate the effects of narrow along-dip rectangle fault (analogously to 2015 Nepal earthquake with 200 km * 40 km) on seismic radiation and rupture propagation through numerical modeling in the framework of the linear slip-weakening friction law. First, we found the critical slip-weakening distance Dc may largely affect the seismic radiation and other source parameters, such as rupture speed, final slip and stress drop. Fixing all other uniform parameters, decreasing Dc could decrease the duration time of slip rate and increase the peak slip rate, thus increase the seismic radiation energy spectrum of slip acceleration. In addition, smaller Dc could lead to larger rupture speed (close to S wave velocity), but smaller stress drop and final slip. The results show that Dc may control the efficiency of far-field radiation. Furthermore, the duration time of slip rate at locations close to boundaries is 1.5 - 4 s less than that in the center of the fault. Such boundary effect is especially remarkable for smaller Dc due to the smaller average duration time of slip rate, which could increase the high-frequency radiation energy and impede low-frequency component near the boundaries from the analysis of energy spectrum of slip acceleration. These results show high frequency energy tends to be radiated near the fault boundaries as long as Dc is small enough. In addition, ruptures are fragile and easy to self-arrest if the width of the seismogenic zone is very narrow. In other words, the sizes of nucleation zone need to be larger to initiate runaway ruptures. Our results show the critical sizes of nucleation zones increase as the widths of seismogenic zones decrease.

  4. Effects of particulate radiation on premixed gas flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbud-Madrid, Angel; Ronney, Paul D.

    1993-01-01

    Observations of the effect of the addition of fine solid particles to weakly combustible methane-air mixtures are reported. Burning rates, pressure rise, and thermal characteristics are found to exhibit nonmonotonic trends with increasing particle loading. These results are interpreted in terms of the effects of augmentation of radiant loss at small particle loadings and re-absorption of emitted radiation at larger loadings. It is suggested that in sufficiently large systems, flammability limits might not exist because of this reabsorption effect.

  5. Biological Effects of Nonionizing Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume IV. Number 3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    lines that produce EMR. perimental evidence on human health effects due to electromagnetic field exposures from high-voltage transmission lines is...1311, Mrch YOW that a permissible occupational exposure level to The biologic effects of electromagnetic fields on MW and RF radiation of 500 PW/cm 2...along with the principal physical param- eters of exposure . 6402 REGULATING POSSIBLE HEALTH EFFECTS FROM AC TRANSMISSION LINE ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS

  6. Skyglow effects in UV and visible spectra: Radiative fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Solano Lamphar, Hector Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Several studies have tried to understand the mechanisms and effects of radiative transfer under different night-sky conditions. However, most of these studies are limited to the various effects of visible spectra. Nevertheless, the invisible parts of the electromagnetic spectrum can pose a more profound threat to nature. One visible threat is from what is popularly termed skyglow. Such skyglow is caused by injudiciously situated or designed artificial night lighting systems which degrade desired sky viewing. Therefore, since lamp emissions are not limited to visible electromagnetic spectra, it is necessary to consider the complete spectrum of such lamps in order to understand the physical behaviour of diffuse radiation at terrain level. In this paper, the downward diffuse radiative flux is computed in a two-stream approximation and obtained ultraviolet spectral radiative fluxes are inter-related with luminous fluxes. Such a method then permits an estimate of ultraviolet radiation if the traditionally measured illuminance on a horizontal plane is available. The utility of such a comparison of two spectral bands is shown, using the different lamp types employed in street lighting. The data demonstrate that it is insufficient to specify lamp type and its visible flux production independently of each other. Also the UV emissions have to be treated by modellers and environmental scientists because some light sources can be fairly important pollutants in the near ultraviolet. Such light sources can affect both the living organisms and ambient environment.

  7. Synergistic effect of ozonation and ionizing radiation for PVA decomposition.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weihua; Chen, Lujun; Zhang, Yongming; Wang, Jianlong

    2015-08-01

    Ozonation and ionizing radiation are both advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) without chemical addition and secondary pollution. Also, the two processes' efficiency is determined by different pH conditions, which creates more possibilities for their combination. Importantly, the combined process of ozonation and ionizing radiation could be suitable for treating wastewaters with extreme pH values, i.e., textile wastewater. To find synergistic effects, the combined process of ozonation and ionizing radiation mineralization was investigated for degradation of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) at different pH levels. A synergistic effect was found at initial pH in the range 3.0-9.4. When the initial pH was 3.0, the combined process of ozonation and ionizing radiation gave a PVA mineralization degree of 17%. This was 2.7 times the sum achieved by the two individual processes, and factors of 2.1 and 1.7 were achieved at initial pH of 7.0 and 9.4, respectively. The combined process of ozonation and ionizing radiation was demonstrated to be a feasible strategy for treatment of PVA-containing wastewater. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. The effect of MLS laser radiation on cell lipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Kamila; Wróbel, Dominika; Nowacka, Olga; Pieszyński, Ireneusz; Bryszewska, Maria; Kujawa, Jolanta

    2018-03-14

    Authors of numerous publications have proved the therapeutic effect of laser irradiation on biological material, but the mechanisms at cellular and subcellular level are not yet well understood. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of laser radiation emitted by the MLS M1 system (Multiwave Locked System) at two wavelengths (808 nm continuous and 905 nm pulsed) on the stability and fluidity of liposomes with a lipid composition similar to that of human erythrocyte membrane or made of phosphatidylocholine. Liposomes were exposed to low-energy laser radiation at surface densities 195 mW/cm2 (frequency 1,000 Hz) and 230 mW/cm2 (frequency 2,000 Hz). Different doses of radiation energy in the range 0-15 J were applied. The surface energy density was within the range 0.46 - 4.9 J/cm 2. The fluidity and stability of liposomes subjected to such irradiation changed depending on the parameters of radiation used. Since MLS M1 laser radiation, depending on the parameters used, affects fluidity and stability of liposomes with the lipid content similar to erythrocyte membrane, it may also cause structural and functional changes in cell membranes.

  9. Effects of Processing on MOS Radiation Hardening

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    magnitude) impurity inclusion for Fluorine sources vs. Chlorine sources, many of the other beneficial effects on point defects, traps, MOS quality, etc...profiles. The addition of percent concentrations of a chlorine rates from 1 to 10 ml/nmr. This corresponded to fluorine bearing compound to the silicon...computes the partial roethane and gaseous nitrogen trifluoride . The alphatic liq- pres-ures of all the possible species in equilibrium in the uid

  10. Electronic effects in high-energy radiation damage in tungsten

    DOE PAGES

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Nordlund, Kai; ...

    2015-03-13

    Even though the effects of the electronic excitations during high-energy radiation damage processes are not currently understood, it is shown that their role in the interaction of radiation with matter is important. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collision cascades in bcc-tungsten using the coupled two-temperature molecular dynamics (2T-MD) model that incorporates both the effects of electronic stopping and electron–phonon interaction. We compare the combination of these effects on the induced damage with only the effect of electronic stopping, and conclude in several novel insights. In the 2T-MD model, the electron–phonon coupling results in less damage production in themore » molten region and in faster relaxation of the damage at short times. We show these two effects lead to a significantly smaller amount of the final damage at longer times.« less

  11. Crosstalk between telomere maintenance and radiation effects: A key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Grace; Ricoul, Michelle; Hempel, William M.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Sabatier, Laure

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that ionizing radiation induces chromosomal damage, both following direct radiation exposure and via non-targeted (bystander) effects, activating DNA damage repair pathways, of which the proteins are closely linked to telomeric proteins and telomere maintenance. Long-term propagation of this radiation-induced chromosomal damage during cell proliferation results in chromosomal instability. Many studies have shown the link between radiation exposure and radiation-induced changes in oxidative stress and DNA damage repair in both targeted and non-targeted cells. However, the effect of these factors on telomeres, long established as guardians of the genome, still remains to be clarified. In this review, we will focus on what is known about how telomeres are affected by exposure to low- and high-LET ionizing radiation and during proliferation, and will discuss how telomeres may be a key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:24486376

  12. Aerosol microphysical and radiative effects on continental cloud ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan; Vogel, Jonathan M.; Lin, Yun; Pan, Bowen; Hu, Jiaxi; Liu, Yangang; Dong, Xiquan; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Yung, Yuk L.; Zhang, Renyi

    2018-02-01

    Aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions represent one of the largest uncertainties in the current climate assessment. Much of the complexity arises from the non-monotonic responses of clouds, precipitation and radiative fluxes to aerosol perturbations under various meteorological conditions. In this study, an aerosol-aware WRF model is used to investigate the microphysical and radiative effects of aerosols in three weather systems during the March 2000 Cloud Intensive Observational Period campaign at the US Southern Great Plains. Three simulated cloud ensembles include a low-pressure deep convective cloud system, a collection of less-precipitating stratus and shallow cumulus, and a cold frontal passage. The WRF simulations are evaluated by several ground-based measurements. The microphysical properties of cloud hydrometeors, such as their mass and number concentrations, generally show monotonic trends as a function of cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. Aerosol radiative effects do not influence the trends of cloud microphysics, except for the stratus and shallow cumulus cases where aerosol semi-direct effects are identified. The precipitation changes by aerosols vary with the cloud types and their evolving stages, with a prominent aerosol invigoration effect and associated enhanced precipitation from the convective sources. The simulated aerosol direct effect suppresses precipitation in all three cases but does not overturn the aerosol indirect effect. Cloud fraction exhibits much smaller sensitivity (typically less than 2%) to aerosol perturbations, and the responses vary with aerosol concentrations and cloud regimes. The surface shortwave radiation shows a monotonic decrease by increasing aerosols, while the magnitude of the decrease depends on the cloud type.

  13. Chemical release and radiation effects experiment advanced planning and coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, William W.; Alzmann, Melanie

    1991-01-01

    The efforts conducted to provide assessments and planning support for the Chemical Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) Experiments are summarized. Included are activities regarding scientific working group and workshop development including the preparation of descriptive information on the CRRES Project.

  14. Effects of ionizing radiation on charge-coupled imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killiany, J. M.; Baker, W. D.; Saks, N. S.; Barbe, D. F.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on three different charge coupled imagers have been investigated. Device performance was evaluated as a function of total gamma ray dose. The principal failure mechanisms have been identified for each particular device structure. The clock and bias voltages required for high total dose operation of the devices are presented.

  15. Temperature dependent GaAs MMIC radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.T.; Roussos, J.A.; Gerdes, J.

    1993-12-01

    The temperature dependence of pulsed neutron and flash x-ray radiation effects was studied in GaAs MMICs. Above room temperature the long term current transients are dominated by electron trapping in previously existing defects. At low temperature in the range 126 to 259 K neutron induced lattice damage appears to play an increasingly important role in producing long term current transients.

  16. Radiation Effects on Optoelectronic Devices in Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Allan H.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation degradation of optoelectronic devices is discussed, including effects on optical emitters, detectors and optocouplers. The importance of displacement damage is emphasized, including the limitations of non-ionizing energy loss (NIEL) in normalizing damage. Failures of optoelectronics in fielded space systems are discussed, along with testing and qualification methods.

  17. Effects of Solar Radiation Pressure on Earth Satellite Orbits.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, R W; Jones, H M; Shapiro, I I

    1960-03-25

    Calculations show that, at a mean altitude of 1000 miles, radiation pressure can displace the orbit of the 100-foot Echo balloon at rates up to 3.7 miles per day, the orbit of the 12-foot Beacon satellite at 0.7 mile per day. For certain resonant conditions this effect accumulates, drastically affecting the satellite's lifetime.

  18. IMMUNOLOGIC EFFECTS OF NONIONIZING ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many of the studies in which animals or cells have been exposed at various frequencies and intensities of NER radiation have reported inconsistent and transient changes in the functional integrity of the immune defense system. Many of the reported immune effects of NER, however, ...

  19. 47 CFR 22.867 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effective radiated power limits. 22.867 Section 22.867 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.867...

  20. Modeling Trends in Tropospheric Aerosol Burden & Its Radiative Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large changes in emissions of aerosol precursors have occurred across the southeast U.S., North America, as well as the northern hemisphere. The spatial heterogeneity and contrasting trends in the aerosol burden is resulting in differing effects on regional radiative balance. Mul...

  1. 47 CFR 22.1013 - Effective radiated power limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... The effective radiated power (ERP) of transmitters in the Offshore Radiotelephone Service must not exceed the limits in this section. (a) Maximum power. The ERP of transmitters in this service must not exceed 1000 Watts under any circumstances. (b) Mobile transmitters. The ERP of mobile transmitters must...

  2. 47 CFR 22.535 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... limits. The effective radiated power (ERP) of transmitters operating on the channels listed in § 22.531 must not exceed the limits in this section. (a) Maximum ERP. The ERP must not exceed the applicable limits in this paragraph under any circumstances. Frequency range (MHz) Maximum ERP (Watts) 35-36 600 43...

  3. 47 CFR 22.535 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... limits. The effective radiated power (ERP) of transmitters operating on the channels listed in § 22.531 must not exceed the limits in this section. (a) Maximum ERP. The ERP must not exceed the applicable limits in this paragraph under any circumstances. Frequency range (MHz) Maximum ERP (Watts) 35-36 600 43...

  4. ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION AND ARSENIC INTERACTIONS: EFFECTS ON CLADOCERANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of arsenic and ultraviolet radiation (UV) on cladocerans have been examined separately, however the interaction of these two stresses has not been explored. Potential synergism between these two stresses is possible as arsenic is known to inhibit repair of UV induced ...

  5. Radiation Preservation of Foods and Its Effect on Nutrients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Edward S.; Thomas, Miriam H.

    1970-01-01

    Presents a discussion of (1) some possible applications of ionizing radiation to the treatment and preservation of food and (2) the effects of irradiation on nutrients such as proteins, fats, oils, carbohydrates and vitamins. The authors suggest that the irradiation process has great potential in food technology. Bibliography. (LC)

  6. Study of radiation effects on mammalian cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, W. K.

    1968-01-01

    Radiation effect on single cells and cell populations of Chinese hamster lung tissue is studied in vitro. The rate and position as the cell progresses through the generation cycle shows division delay, changes in some biochemical processes in the cell, chromosomal changes, colony size changes, and loss of reproductive capacity.

  7. The effects of radiation drag on radial, relativistic hydromagnetic winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Chiueh, Tzihong

    1992-01-01

    The effects of drag on an idealized relativistic MHD wind of radial geometry are studied. The astrophysical motivation is to understand the effects of radiation drag on the dynamics of a jet or wind passing through the intense radiation field of an accreting compact object. From a critical point analysis, it is found that a slow magnetosonic point can appear in a dragged flow even in the absence of gravitational force, as a result of a balance between the drag force and the combination of thermal pressure and centrifugal forces. As in the undragged case, the Alfven point does not impose any constraints on the flow. Although it is formally possible for a dragged flow to possess more than one fast magnetosonic point, it is shown that this is unlikely in practice. In the limit of a 'cold', centrifugally driven flow, it is shown that the fast magnetosonic point moves to infinite radius, just as in the drag-free case. For a given mass flux, the total energy output carried to infinity, and the final partition between the kinetic energy and the Poynting flux, are the same for the dragged and the drag-free flows. The main effects of radiation drag are to increase the amount of energy and angular momentum extracted from the source and to redistribute the regions where acceleration occurs in the flow. This is accomplished through the storage and release of magnetic energy, as a result of additional winding and compression of the field caused by the action of the drag. For a relativistic wind, the dissipated energy can exceed the final kinetic energy of the flow and may be comparable to the total flow energy (which is dominated by Poynting flux). The energy lost to radiation drag will appear as a Doppler-boosted beam of scattered radiation, which could dominate the background radiation if the flow is well-collimated.

  8. Gamma radiation effects on polydimethylsiloxane rubber foams under different radiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, H. L.; Liu, X. Y.; Zhong, F. C.; Li, X. Y.; Wang, L.; Ju, X.

    2013-07-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane rubber foams were irradiated by gamma ray under different radiation conditions designed by orthogonal design method. Compression set measurement, infrared attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy (ATR) and X-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used. Three aging factors' influence effects on the mechanical property and chemical structure were studied. It was found that among the three factors and the chosen levels, both properties were affected most by radiation dose, while radiation dose rate had no obvious influence on both properties. The stiffening of the rubber foams was caused by cross-linking reactions in the Si-CH3. At the same radiation dose, the rigidity of the foams irradiated in air was lower than that in nitrogen. When polydimethylsiloxane was irradiated at a high dose in sealed nitrogen atmosphere, carbon element distribution would be changed. Hydrocarbons produced by gamma ray in the sealed tube would make the carbon content in the skin-deep higher than that in the middle, which indicated that polydimethylsiloxane rubber foams storing in a sealed atmosphere filled with enough hydrocarbons should be helpful to extend the service life.

  9. NASA Radiation Track Image GUI for Assessing Space Radiation Biological Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    The high-charge high-energy (HZE) ion components of the galactic cosmic rays when compared to terrestrial forms of radiations present unique challenges to biological systems. In this paper we present a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) breakage model to visualize and analyze the impact of chromatin domains and DNA loops on clustering of DNA damage from X rays, protons, and HZE ions. Our model of DNA breakage is based on a stochastic process of DNA double-strand break (DSB) formulation that includes the amorphous model of the radiation track and a polymer model of DNA packed in the cell nucleus. Our model is a Monte-Carlo simulation based on a randomly located DSB cluster formulation that accomodates both high- and low-linear energy transfer radiations. We demonstrate that HZE ions have a strong impact on DSB clustering, both along the chromosome length and in the nucleus volume. The effects of chromosomal domains and DNA loops on the DSB fragment-size distribution and the spatial distribution of DSB in the nucleus were studied. We compare our model predictions with the spatial distribution of DSB obtained from experiments. The implications of our model predictions for radiation protection are discussed.

  10. Treatment of Canine Oral Melanoma with Nanotechnology-Based Immunotherapy and Radiation.

    PubMed

    Hoopes, P Jack; Wagner, Robert J; Duval, Kayla; Kang, Kevin; Gladstone, David J; Moodie, Karen L; Crary-Burney, Margaret; Ariaspulido, Hugo; Veliz, Frank A; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Fiering, Steven N

    2018-04-12

    The presence and benefit of a radiation therapy-associated immune reaction is of great interest as the overall interest in cancer immunotherapy expands. The pathological assessment of irradiated tumors rarely demonstrates consistent immune or inflammatory response. More recent information, primarily associated with the "abscopal effect", suggests a subtle radiation-based systemic immune response may be more common and have more therapeutic potential than previously believed. However, to be of consistent value, the immune stimulatory potential of radiation therapy (RT) will clearly need to be supported by combination with other immunotherapy efforts. In this study, using a spontaneous canine oral melanoma model, we have assessed the efficacy and tumor immunopathology of two nanotechnology-based immune adjuvants combined with RT. The immune adjuvants were administered intratumorally, in an approach termed "in situ vaccination", that puts immunostimulatory reagents into a recognized tumor and utilizes the endogenous antigens in the tumor as the antigens in the antigen/adjuvant combination that constitutes a vaccine. The radiation treatment consisted of a local 6 × 6 Gy tumor regimen given over a 12 day period. The immune adjuvants were a plant-based virus-like nanoparticle (VLP) and a 110 nm diameter magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (mNPH) that was activated with an alternating magnetic field (AMF) to produce moderate heat (43 °C/60 min). The RT was used alone or combined with one or both adjuvants. The VLP (4 × 200 μg) and mNPH (2 × 7.5 mg/gram tumor) were delivered intratumorally respectively during the RT regimen. All patients received a diagnostic biopsy and CT-based 3-D radiation treatment plan prior to initiating therapy. Patients were assessed clinically 14-21 days post-treatment, monthly for 3 months following treatment, and bimonthly, thereafter. Immunohistopathologic assessment of the tumors was performed before and 14-21 days following treatment

  11. Biotropic Effect of Radiation Conditions on Orbital Cosmic Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsetlin, Vladimir; Ushakov, Igor; Gurieva, Tamar; Moisa, Svetlana; Zotin, Alexei; Lobanov, Alexei

    On the orbit of pilot orbital stations the crews undergo to low doses of chronic irradiation of cosmic radiation. The studying of radiobiological effects in different living systems were carried out in the ship’s side (OC “MIR” and ICS) and model surface experiments (power dose 200 mGy/day, density of neutron flow 30 particles/sm2 sec). It was shown that ionized radiation effects on embryonal development of Japanese quail embryo, inducing morphological disturbances in 12% of embryos. Many years ontogenesis (more 15 years of life in OC “MIR”) of microbial association evoked replacement of dominant types of micromycetes and bacterium and increasing of colony-formed units (CFU) in four orders. In laboratory low doses of γ-radiation induced the increasing of flight strain biomass of Aspergillus niger that corresponds to a radiation hormezis and also the increasing of radio-sensitivity. Moreover, under γ-neutron radiation were marked some deviations in morphology of supporting cell and numerous head falls of Aspergillus niger. The irradiation of Protozoa by low doses led to that spontaneous motion activity of spirostoms (Spirostomum ambiguum Ehbg.) accommodated in water processing by mixed γ-neutron radiation decreased twice that testified the fact that the definite factor of γ-neutron radiation effect is the changing of water medium state. In dry seeds of the highest plants wetting in water of preliminary low doses α-and γ-irradiation <10 cGy (increasing natural radiation background in 100-500 times) and accommodating in hypo-magnetic camera (induction of magnetic field in 100-300 times lower than geomagnetic one) the germination of seeds was higher approximately twice under γ-radiation. Low doses of γ-radiation decreased and α-radiation increased a negative influence of hypo-magnetic field on these processes. It was shown that hypomagnetic field occurred, in general, beneficial effect on the development of Planorbarius corneus: the portion of

  12. Solar radiation pressure effects on the Helios spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgevic, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model of the solar radiation force and torques, developed for the Mariner 10 Venus/Mercury spacecraft mission, was used for a detailed analysis of the effects of solar light pressure on the Helios spacecraft. Due to the fact that the main body of the Helios spacecraft is a surface of enclosure, inside of which most of the reradiated thermal energy is lost, expressions for the portion of the solar radiation force, produced by the thermal reradiation, had to be given a different form. Hence the need for the derivation of a somewhat different theoretical model for the force acting on the main body of the spacecraft.

  13. RADHOT: A Radiation Hydrodynamics Code for Weapon Effects Calculation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    h4A ( :: [ l), t.110 )" *- 7470 -C - C... C LUMI1LTI A F ’ :: ISUfI ----- --------------- 7480= P2 GM I ’: ;,,l. II 7490C:, A ......... ’ R..E I:I ’ S...AD-AlO 637 AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHTPATTERSON AFL O SCHOOETC F /8 12/ RADHOT: A RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR WEAPON EFFECTS CALCU--ETC(U...change of internal energy due to radiation atj rad F monochromatic flux V F -, F inward and outward-going monochromatic fluxes at Va cell boundary F -, F1

  14. Radiation and viscous dissipation effect on square porous annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Quadir, G. A.

    The present study is carried out to investigate the effect of radiation and viscous dissipation in a square porous annulus subjected to outside hot T{sub h} and inside cold T{sub c} temperature. The square annulus has a hollow section of dimension D×D at the interior of annulus. The flow is assumed to obey Darcy law. The governing equations are non-dimensionalised and solved with the help of finite element method. Results are discussed with respect to viscous dissipation parameter, radiation parameter and size of the hollow section of annulus.

  15. Direct Radiative Effect of Intense Dust Outbreaks in the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, A.; Obiso, V.; Basart, S.; Jorba, O.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Gassó, S.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The broader Mediterranean basin is affected by intense desert dust outbreaks in spring. In the present study, we make use of satellite observations and modelling to investigate dust radiative impacts during three consecutive dust outbreaks occurred over the Mediterranean in the period 9/4-15/4/2008. The direct radiative effect (DRE) is estimated by using two simulations run with the NMMB/BSC-Dust model, where the interaction between dust aerosols and radiation is activated and deactivated, respectively. The simulation domain covers the North Africa, the Middle East and Europe at 0.25ºx0.25° and 40σ-layers. The first outbreak took place over the central and eastern Mediterranean on the 9th reaching aerosol optical depths (AODs) close to 1. The second one, with AODs up to 2, lasted from 10th to 14th affecting mainly the central Mediterranean. The third one, with AODs up to 5, affected the Iberian Peninsula on the 15th. DREs are computed for the outgoing radiation at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), the absorbed radiation into the atmosphere (ATMAB), for the downwelling (SURF) and the absorbed (NETSURF) radiation at surface, for the shortwave (SW), longwave (LW) and NET (SW+LW) radiation. According to our results, it is evident that DREs' spatial patterns are driven by those of AOD. Negative (cooling) instantaneous DRETOA, DRESURF and DRENETSURF values up to -500W/m2, -700W/m2 and -600W/m2, respectively, and positive (warming) instantaneous DREATMAB up to 340W/m2 are found for the SW spectrum, during daytime. Opposite but less pronounced effects are encountered for the LW radiation and during nightime. Due to these perturbations on the radiation field, the surface temperature is reduced locally by up to 8°C during daytime and increased by up to 4°C during nightime. It is found that the regional average NET DREs can be as large as -12W/m2, -45W/m2, -30W/m2 and 27W/m2 for TOA, SURF, NETSURF and ATMAB, respectively. Impacts on atmospheric stability and dust

  16. Aerosol optical properties and their radiative effects in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanqing; Xia, Xiangao; Cribb, Maureen; Mi, Wen; Holben, Brent; Wang, Pucai; Chen, Hongbin; Tsay, Si-Chee; Eck, T. F.; Zhao, Fengsheng; Dutton, E. G.; Dickerson, R. E.

    2007-11-01

    As a fast developing country covering a large territory, China is experiencing rapid environmental changes. High concentrations of aerosols with diverse properties are emitted in the region, providing a unique opportunity for understanding the impact of environmental changes on climate. Until very recently, few observational studies were conducted in the source regions. The East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: An International Regional Experiment (EAST-AIRE) attempts to characterize the physical, optical and chemical properties of the aerosols and their effects on climate over China. This study presents some preliminary results using continuous high-quality measurements of aerosol, cloud and radiative quantities made at the first EAST-AIRE baseline station at Xianghe, about 70 km east of Beijing over a period of one year (September 2004 to September 2005). It was found that the region is often covered by a thick layer of haze (with a yearly mean aerosol optical depth equal to 0.82 at 500 nm and maximum greater than 4) due primarily to anthropogenic emissions. An abrupt "cleanup" of the haze often took place in a matter of one day or less because of the passage of cold fronts. The mean single scattering albedo is approximately 0.9 but has strong day-to-day variations with maximum monthly averages occurring during the summer. Large aerosol loading and strong absorption lead to a very large aerosol radiative effect at the surface (the annual 24-hour mean values equals 24 W m-2), but a much smaller aerosol radiative effect at the top of the atmosphere (one tenth of the surface value). The boundary atmosphere is thus heated dramatically during the daytime, which may affect atmospheric stability and cloud formation. In comparison, the cloud radiative effect at the surface is only moderately higher (-41 W m-2) than the aerosol radiative effect at the surface.

  17. Long-Term Lunar Radiation Degradation Effects on Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; ORourke, Mary Jane; Koontz, Steve; Alred, John; Hill, Charles; Devivar, Rodrigo; Morera-Felix, Shakira; Atwell, William; Nutt, Steve; Sabbann, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is focused on developing technologies for extending human presence beyond low Earth orbit. These technologies are to advance the state-of-the-art and provide for longer duration missions outside the protection of Earth's magnetosphere. One technology of great interest for large structures is advanced composite materials, due to their weight and cost savings, enhanced radiation protection for the crew, and potential for performance improvements when compared with existing metals. However, these materials have not been characterized for the interplanetary space environment, and particularly the effects of high energy radiation, which is known to cause damage to polymeric materials. Therefore, a study focusing on a lunar habitation element was undertaken to investigate the integrity of potential structural composite materials after exposure to a long-term lunar radiation environment. An overview of the study results are presented, along with a discussion of recommended future work.

  18. The effects of solar radiation on plant growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agard, Joslyn

    1995-01-01

    This phase of this continuing project was completed in April, 1994, using Dahlgren #855 hybrid sunflower seeds and Park Seeds #0950 non-hybrid sunflower seeds in both the control groups and the tests groups. The control groups (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6) were grown under normal, un-radiated, conditions. The tests groups (1a, 2a, 3a, 4a, 5a, and 6a) were grown onboard the Space Shuttle Discovery on the STS-60 flight in February 1994. All data from this experiment (both control and test groups) will be taken and recorded in a data log and compared against each other to determine the radiation effects of solar radiation on plant germination and growth.

  19. A brief survey of radiation effects on polymer dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laghari, Javaid R.; Hammoud, Ahmad N.

    1990-01-01

    Future space power needs are extrapolated to be at least three to four orders of magnitude more than is currently available. This long-term reliable power will be required on missions such as the Space Station, Pathfinder, Space Plane, and high-powered satellites, and for defense. Electrical insulation and dielectrics are the key electrical materials needed to support these power systems, where a single-point system failure could prove catastrophic or even fatal for the whole mission. Therefore, the impact of radiation, an environmental stress, on the properties and performance of insulation and dielectrics must be understood. The influence of radiation on polymer dielectrics, the insulating materials most commonly used for power transmission and storage, is reviewed. The effects of the type of radiation, dose, rate, and total exposure on the key electrical, mechanical, and physical properties of polymer dielectrics are described and explained.

  20. High dose bystander effects in spatially fractionated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Asur, Rajalakshmi; Butterworth, Karl T.; Penagaricano, Jose A.; Prise, Kevin M.; Griffin, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional radiotherapy of bulky tumors has certain limitations. Spatially fractionated radiation therapy (GRID) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are examples of advanced modulated beam therapies that help in significant reductions in normal tissue damage. GRID refers to the delivery of a single high dose of radiation to a large treatment area that is divided into several smaller fields, while IMRT allows improved dose conformity to the tumor target compared to conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. In this review, we consider spatially fractionated radiotherapy approaches focusing on GRID and IMRT, and present complementary evidence from different studies which support the role of radiation induced signaling effects in the overall radiobiological rationale for these treatments. PMID:24246848

  1. "Investigation of Trends in Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    While aerosol radiative effects have been recognized as some of the largest sources of uncertainty among the forcers of climate change, there has been little effort devoted to verification of the spatial and temporal variability of the magnitude and directionality of aerosol radiative forcing. A comprehensive investigation of the processes regulating aerosol distributions, their optical properties, and their radiative effects and verification of their simulated effects for past conditions relative to measurements is needed in order to build confidence in the estimates of the projected impacts arising from changes in both anthropogenic forcing and climate change. This study aims at addressing this issue through a systematic investigation of changes in anthropogenic emissions of SO2 and NOx over the past two decades in the United States, their impacts on anthropogenic aerosol loading in the North American troposphere, and subsequent impacts on regional radiation budgets. During the period 1990-2010, SO2 and NOx emissions across the US have reduced by about 66% and 50%, respectively, mainly due to Title IV of the U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments (CAA). A methodology is developed to consistently estimate emission inventories for the 20-year period accounting for air quality regulations as well as population trends, economic conditions, and technology changes in motor vehicles and electric power generation. The coupled WRF-CMAQ model is applied for time periods pre a

  2. Automated systems to monitor space radiation effect on photosynthetic organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, D.; di Costa, F.; Faraloni, C.; Fasolo, F.; Pace, E.; Perosino, M.; Torzillo, G.; Touloupakis, E.; Zanini, A.; Giardi, M. T.

    We developed automated biodevices to obtain, automatically, measures about the space radiation effect on living photosynthetic organisms, which can be used as biomass and oxygen-producing system on shuttles or ISS. Vitality measurements were performed by optical devices (fluorimeters) measuring fluorescence emission. Fluorescence methodology is a well known applied technique for studying photosynthetic activity, and in particular the oxygen-evolving process of photosynthetic organisms. Different strains of unicellular green algae are properly immobilized on agar growth medium and kept under survial light. The biodevices are characterised by the sensibility and selectivity of the biological component response, together with easy use, versatility, miniature size and low cost. We performed experiments in some facilities, in order to understand separately the effect of radiation of different LET, on the biochemical activity (gamma rays at Joint Research Centre -Varese, Italy; fast neutrons at CERF -- SPS beam at CERN -Geneva, Switzerland). The exposure to different radiation beams of the automatic devices, allowed us to test them under stress condition. In one year, these instrument are expected to be sent to space, inside a spacecraft, in order to study the effect of ionising cosmic radiation during an ESA flight.

  3. Effects of space radiation on electronic microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolasinski, W. A.

    1989-01-01

    The single event effects or phenomena (SEP), which so far have been observed as events falling on one or another of the SE classes: Single Event Upset (SEU), Single Event Latchup (SEL) and Single Event Burnout (SEB), are examined. Single event upset is defined as a lasting, reversible change in the state of a multistable (usually bistable) electronic circuit such as a flip-flop or latch. In a computer memory, SEUs manifest themselves as unexplained bit flips. Since latchup is in general caused by a single event of short duration, the single event part of the SEL term is superfluous. Nevertheless, it is used customarily to differentiate latchup due to a single heavy charged particle striking a sensitive cell from more ordinary kinds of latchup. Single event burnout (SEB) refers usually to total instantaneous failure of a power FET when struck by a single particle, with the device shorting out the power supply. An unforeseen failure of these kinds can be catastrophic to a space mission, and the possibilities are discussed.

  4. Profiling Transboundary Aerosols over Taiwan and Assessing Their Radiative Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Lin, Neng-Huei; Chou, Ming-Dah; Tsay, Si-Chee; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Hsu, N. Christina; Giles, David M.; Liu, Gin-Rong; Holben, Brent N.

    2010-01-01

    A synergistic process was developed to study the vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties and their effects on solar heating using data retrieved from ground-based radiation measurements and radiative transfer simulations. Continuous MPLNET and AERONET observations were made at a rural site in northern Taiwan from 2005 to 2007. The aerosol vertical extinction profiles retrieved from ground-based lidar measurements were categorized into near-surface, mixed, and two-layer transport types, representing 76% of all cases. Fine-mode (Angstrom exponent, alpha, approx.1.4) and moderate-absorbing aerosols (columnar single-scattering albedo approx.0.93, asymmetry factor approx.0.73 at 440 nm wavelength) dominated in this region. The column-integrated aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm (tau(sub 500nm)) ranges from 0.1 to 0.6 for the near-surface transport type, but can be doubled in the presence of upper-layer aerosol transport. We utilize aerosol radiative efficiency (ARE; the impact on solar radiation per unit change of tau(sub 500nm)) to quantify the radiative effects due to different vertical distributions of aerosols. Our results show that the ARE at the top-of-atmosphere (-23 W/ sq m) is weakly sensitive to aerosol vertical distributions confined in the lower troposphere. On the other hand, values of the ARE at the surface are -44.3, -40.6 and -39.7 W/sq m 38 for near-surface, mixed, and two-layer transport types, respectively. Further analyses show that the impact of aerosols on the vertical profile of solar heating is larger for the near-surface transport type than that of two-layer transport type. The impacts of aerosol on the surface radiation and the solar heating profiles have implications for the stability and convection in the lower troposphere.

  5. Direct radiative effect by multicomponent aerosol over China

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Song, Yu; Zhao, Chun

    The direct radiative effect (DRE) of multiple aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and mineral aerosol) and their spatiotemporal variations over China were investigated using a fully coupled meteorology–chemistry model (WRF-Chem) for the entire year of 2006. We made modifications to improve model performance, including updating land surface parameters, improving the calculation of transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of SO 2, and adding in heterogeneous reactions between mineral aerosol and acid gases. The modified model well reproduced the magnitude, seasonal pattern, and spatial distribution of the measured meteorological conditions, concentrations of PM 10 and its components, andmore » aerosol optical depth (AOD). A diagnostic iteration method was used to estimate the overall DRE of aerosols and contributions from different components. At the land surface, all kinds of aerosol species reduced the incident net radiation flux with a total DRE of 10.2 W m -2 over China. Aerosols significantly warm the atmosphere with the national mean DRE of +10.8 W m -2. BC was the leading radiative-heating component (+8.7 W m -2), followed by mineral aerosol (+1.1 W m -2). At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), BC introduced the largest radiative perturbation (+4.5 W m -2), followed by sulfate (-1.4 W m -2). The overall perturbation of aerosols on radiation transfer is quite small over China, demonstrating the counterbalancing effect between scattering and adsorbing aerosols. Aerosol DRE at the TOA had distinct seasonality, generally with a summer maximum and winter minimum, mainly determined by mass loadings, hygroscopic growth, and incident radiation flux.« less

  6. Radiation effects control: Eyes, skin. [space environment simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hightower, D.; Smathers, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    Adverse effects on the lens of the eye and the skin due to exposure to proton radiation during manned space flight were evaluated. Actual proton irradiation which might be encountered in space was simulated. Irradiation regimes included single acute exposures, daily fractionated exposures, and weekly fractionated exposures. Animals were exposed and then maintained and examined periodically until data sufficient to meet the objective were obtained. No significant skin effects were noted and no serious sight impairment was exhibited.

  7. THE EFFECT OF RADIATION ON ACETABULARIA. III. THE EFFECT OF X RADIATION AND ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ON THE NUCLEATED PART OF ACETABULARIA MEDITERRANEA (in German)

    SciTech Connect

    Six, E.

    1958-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of x rays and ultraviolet radiation of various wave lengths on the nucleated cell part of Acetabularia mediterranea. The x radintion leads to a reduction of the regenerative capacity, to a decrease of cyst formation of the regenerated cells, and to a lowering of the viability of the cysts. After a dose of 400 hr the regenerative capacity is almost completely destroyed. The capacity for the formation of reproductive gametes is lost after 40 hr. The effect of UV irradiation is, on the other hand, much less. It was concluded that the observedmore » functions of the nucleated cell part are essentially determined by the nucleus, which in rhizoids is extensively shielded against UV radiation. A complete regeneration up to cap formation follows so size and shape of the full-grown regenerated cells do not appear to be influenced essertially by x radiation. (tr-auth)« less

  8. Update on the biological effects of ionizing radiation, relative dose factors and radiation hygiene.

    PubMed

    White, Stuart C; Mallya, S M

    2012-03-01

    Diagnostic imaging is an indispensable part of contemporary medical and dental practice. Over the last few decades there has been a dramatic increase in the use of ionizing radiation for diagnostic imaging. The carcinogenic effects of high-dose exposure are well known. Does diagnostic radiation rarely cause cancer? We don't know but we should act as if it does. Accordingly, dentists should select patients wisely - only make radiographs when there is patient-specific reason to believe there is a reasonable expectation the radiograph will offer unique information influencing diagnosis or treatment. Low-dose examinations should be made: intraoral imaging - use fast film or digital sensors, thyroid collars, rectangular collimation; panoramic and lateral cephalometric imaging - use digital systems or rare-earth film screen combinations; and cone beam computed tomography - use low-dose machines, restrict field size to region of interest, reduce mA and length of exposure arc as appropriate. © 2012 Australian Dental Association.

  9. Using ISCCP Weather States to Decompose Cloud Radiative Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, L.; Rossow, W. B.

    2012-01-01

    The presentation will examine the shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) cloud radiative effect CRE (aka "cloud radiative forcing") at the top-of-the-atmosphere and surface of ISCCP weather states (aka "cloud regimes") in three distinct geographical zones, one tropical and two mid-latitude. Our goal is to understand and quantify the contribution of the different cloud regimes to the planetary radiation budget. In the tropics we find that the three most convectively active states are the ones with largest SW, LW and net TOA CRE contributions to the overall daytime tropical CRE budget. They account for 59%, 71% and 55% of the total CRE, respectively. The boundary layer-dominated weather states account for only 34% of the total SW CRE and 41% of the total net CRE, so to focus only on them in cloud feedback studies may be imprudent. We also find that in both the northern and southern midlatitude zones only two weather states, the first and third most convectively active with large amounts of nimbostratus-type clouds, contribute ",40% to both the SW and net TOA CRE budgets, highlighting the fact that cloud regimes associated with frontal systems are not only important for weather (precipitation) but also for climate (radiation budget). While all cloud regimes in all geographical zones have a slightly larger SFC than TOA SW CRE, implying cooling of the surface and slight warming of the atmosphere, their LW radiative effects are more subtle: in the tropics the weather states with plentiful high clouds warm the atmosphere while those with copious amounts of low clouds cool the atmosphere. In both midlatitude zones only the weather states with peak cloud fractions at levels above 440 mbar warm the atmosphere while all the rest cool it. These results make the connection of the contrasting CRE effects to the atmospheric dynamics more explicit - "storms" tend to warm the atmosphere whereas fair weather clouds cool it, suggesting a positive feedback of clouds on weather systems. The

  10. The effects of atmospheric cloud radiative forcing on climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, David A.

    1989-01-01

    In order to isolate the effects of atmospheric cloud radiative forcing (ACRF) on climate, the general circulation of an ocean-covered earth called 'Seaworld' was simulated using the Colorado State University GCM. Most current climate models, however, do not include an interactive ocean. The key simplifications in 'Seaworld' are the fixed boundary temperature with no land points, the lack of mountains and the zonal uniformity of the boundary conditions. Two 90-day 'perpetual July' simulations were performed and analyzed the last sixty days of each. The first run included all the model's physical parameterizations, while the second omitted the effects of clouds in both the solar and terrestrial radiation parameterizations. Fixed and identical boundary temperatures were set for the two runs, and resulted in differences revealing the direct and indirect effects of the ACRF on the large-scale circulation and the parameterized hydrologic processes.

  11. Evanescent radiation, quantum mechanics and the Casimir effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt to bridge the gap between classical and quantum mechanics and to explain the Casimir effect is presented. The general nature of chaotic motion is discussed from two points of view: the first uses catastrophe theory and strange attractors to describe the deterministic view of this motion; the underlying framework for chaos in these classical dynamic systems is their extreme sensitivity to initial conditions. The second interpretation refers to randomness associated with probabilistic dynamics, as for Brownian motion. The present approach to understanding evanescent radiation and its relation to the Casimir effect corresponds to the first interpretation, whereas stochastic electrodynamics corresponds to the second viewpoint. The nonlinear behavior of the electromagnetic field is also studied. This well-understood behavior is utilized to examine the motions of two orbiting charges and shows a closeness between the classical behavior and the quantum uncertainty principle. The evanescent radiation is used to help explain the Casimir effect.

  12. Functional proteomic analysis revealed ground-base ion radiations cannot reflect biological effects of space radiations of rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yeqing; Zhao, Qian; Han, Lu

    2016-07-01

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects. Radiobiological studies during space flights are unrepeatable due to the variable space radiation environment, ground-base ion radiations are usually performed to simulate of the space biological effect. Spaceflights present a low-dose rate (0.1˜~0.3mGy/day) radiation environment inside aerocrafts while ground-base ion radiations present a much higher dose rate (100˜~500mGy/min). Whether ground-base ion radiation can reflect effects of space radiation is worth of evaluation. In this research, we compared the functional proteomic profiles of rice plants between on-ground simulated HZE particle radiation and spaceflight treatments. Three independent ground-base seed ionizing radiation experiments with different cumulative doses (dose range: 2˜~20000mGy) and different liner energy transfer (LET) values (13.3˜~500keV/μμm) and two independent seed spaceflight experiments onboard Chinese 20th satellite and SZ-6 spacecraft were carried out. Alterations in the proteome were analyzed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry identifications. 45 and 59 proteins showed significant (p<0.05) and reproducible quantitative differences in ground-base ion radiation and spaceflight experiments respectively. The functions of ground-base radiation and spaceflight proteins were both involved in a wide range of biological processes. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis further revealed that ground-base radiation responsive proteins were mainly involved in removal of superoxide radicals, defense response to stimulus and photosynthesis, while spaceflight responsive proteins mainly participate in nucleoside metabolic process, protein folding and phosphorylation. The results implied that ground-base radiations cannot truly reflect effects of spaceflight radiations, ground-base radiation was a kind of indirect effect to rice causing

  13. Radiation effects and mitigation strategies for modern FPGAs

    SciTech Connect

    Stettler, M. W.; Caffrey, M. P.; Graham, P. S.

    2004-01-01

    Field Programmable Gate Array devices have become the technology of choice in small volume modern instrumentation and control systems. These devices have always offered significant advantages in flexibility, and recent advances in fabrication have greatly increased logic capacity, substantially increasing the number of applications for this technology. Unfortunately, the increased density (and corresponding shrinkage of process geometry), has made these devices more susceptible to failure due to external radiation. This has been an issue for space based systems for some time, but is now becoming an issue for terrestrial systems in elevated radiation environments and commercial avionics as well. Characterizingmore » the failure modes of Xilinx FPGAs, and developing mitigation strategies is the subject of ongoing research by a consortium of academic, industrial, and governmental laboratories. This paper presents background information of radiation effects and failure modes, as well as current and future mitigation techniques. In particular, the availability of very large FPGA devices, complete with generous amounts of RAM and embedded processor(s), has led to the implementation of complete digital systems on a single device, bringing issues of system reliability and redundancy management to the chip level. Radiation effects on a single FPGA are increasingly likely to have system level consequences, and will need to be addressed in current and future designs.« less

  14. The Effects of Crosswind Flight on Rotor Harmonic Noise Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Eric; Sim, Ben W.

    2013-01-01

    In order to develop recommendations for procedures for helicopter source noise characterization, the effects of crosswinds on main rotor harmonic noise radiation are assessed using a model of the Bell 430 helicopter. Crosswinds are found to have a significant effect on Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise radiation when the helicopter is trimmed with the fuselage oriented along the inertial flight path. However, the magnitude of BVI noise remains unchanged when the pilot orients the fuselage along the aerodynamic velocity vector, crabbing for zero aerodynamic sideslip. The effects of wind gradients on BVI noise are also investigated and found to be smaller in the crosswind direction than in the headwind direction. The effects of crosswinds on lower harmonic noise sources at higher flight speeds are also assessed. In all cases, the directivity of radiated noise is somewhat changed by the crosswind. The model predictions agree well with flight test data for the Bell 430 helicopter captured under various wind conditions. The results of this investigation would suggest that flight paths for future acoustic flight testing are best aligned across the prevailing wind direction to minimize the effects of winds on noise measurements when wind cannot otherwise be avoided.

  15. Radiation Effects and Hardening Techniques for Spacecraft Microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambles, J. W.; Maki, G. K.

    2002-01-01

    The natural radiation from the Van Allen belts, solar flares, and cosmic rays found outside of the protection of the earth's atmosphere can produce deleterious effects on microelectronics used in space systems. Historically civil space agencies and the commercial satellite industry have been able to utilize components produced in special radiation hardened fabrication process foundries that were developed during the 1970s and 1980s under sponsorship of the Departments of Defense (DoD) and Energy (DoE). In the post--cold war world the DoD and DoE push to advance the rad--hard processes has waned. Today the available rad--hard components lag two-plus technology node generations behind state- of-the-art commercial technologies. As a result space craft designers face a large performance gap when trying to utilize available rad--hard components. Compounding the performance gap problems, rad--hard components are becoming increasingly harder to get. Faced with the economic pitfalls associated with low demand versus the ever increasing investment required for integrated circuit manufacturing equipment most sources of rad--hard parts have simply exited this market in recent years, leaving only two domestic US suppliers of digital rad--hard components. This paper summarizes the radiation induced mechanisms that can cause digital microelectronics to fail in space, techniques that can be applied to mitigate these failure mechanisms, and ground based testing used to validate radiation hardness/tolerance. The radiation hardening techniques can be broken down into two classes, Hardness By Process (HBP) and Hardness By Design (HBD). Fortunately many HBD techniques can be applied to commercial fabrication processes providing space craft designer with radiation tolerant Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) that can bridge the performance gap between the special HBP foundries and the commercial state-of-the-art performance.

  16. Genetic susceptibility: radiation effects relevant to space travel.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yuanlin; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Warner, Christy; Bedford, Joel S

    2012-11-01

    Genetic variation in the capacity to repair radiation damage is an important factor influencing both cellular and tissue radiosensitivity variation among individuals as well as dose rate effects associated with such damage. This paper consists of two parts. The first part reviews some of the available data relating to genetic components governing such variability among individuals in susceptibility to radiation damage relevant for radiation protection and discusses the possibility and extent to which these may also apply for space radiations. The second part focuses on the importance of dose rate effects and genetic-based variations that influence them. Very few dose rate effect studies have been carried out for the kinds of radiations encountered in space. The authors present here new data on the production of chromosomal aberrations in noncycling low passage human ATM+/+ or ATM+/- cells following irradiations with protons (50 MeV or 1 GeV), 1 GeV(-1) n iron ions and gamma rays, where doses were delivered at a high dose rate of 700 mGy(-1) min, or a lower dose rate of 5 mGy min(-1). Dose responses were essentially linear over the dose ranges tested and not significantly different for the two cell strains. Values of the dose rate effectiveness factor (DREF) were expressed as the ratio of the slopes of the dose-response curves for the high versus the lower (5 mGy min(-1)) dose rate exposures. The authors refer to this as the DREF5. For the gamma ray standard, DREF5 values of approximately two were observed. Similar dose rate effects were seen for both energies of protons (DREF5 ≈ 2.2 in both cases). For 1 GeV(-1) n iron ions [linear energy transfer (LET) ≈ 150 keV μ(-1)], the DREF5 was not 1 as might have been expected on the basis of LET alone but was approximately 1.3. From these results and conditions, the authors estimate that the relative biological effectiveness for 1 GeV(-1) n iron ions for high and low dose rates, respectively, were about 10 and 15

  17. Photoprotection beyond ultraviolet radiation--effective sun protection has to include protection against infrared A radiation-induced skin damage.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, P; Calles, C; Benesova, T; Macaluso, F; Krutmann, J

    2010-01-01

    Solar radiation is well known to damage human skin, for example by causing premature skin ageing (i.e. photoageing). We have recently learned that this damage does not result from ultraviolet (UV) radiation alone, but also from longer wavelengths, in particular near-infrared radiation (IRA radiation, 760-1,440 nm). IRA radiation accounts for more than one third of the solar energy that reaches human skin. While infrared radiation of longer wavelengths (IRB and IRC) does not penetrate deeply into the skin, more than 65% of the shorter wavelength (IRA) reaches the dermis. IRA radiation has been demonstrated to alter the collagen equilibrium of the dermal extracellular matrix in at least two ways: (a) by leading to an increased expression of the collagen-degrading enzyme matrix metalloproteinase 1, and (b) by decreasing the de novo synthesis of the collagen itself. IRA radiation exposure therefore induces similar biological effects to UV radiation, but the underlying mechanisms are substantially different, specifically, the cellular response to IRA irradiation involves the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Effective sun protection requires specific strategies to prevent IRA radiation-induced skin damage. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. [Biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation].

    PubMed

    Fedorowski, A; Steciwko, A

    1998-01-01

    Since the mid 1970's, when Adey discovered that extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF) may affect the calcium ions efflux from various cells, bioeffects of non-ionizing radiation (NIR) have become the subject of growing interest and numerous research projects. At present, the fact that NIR exerts both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on different physiological cellular parameters is rather unquestionable. At the same time, some epidemiological studies suggest that exposure to EMF is potentially harmful even if its intensity is very low. It has been proved that thermal factors are not responsible for these effects, therefore nowadays, they are called 'non-thermal effects'. Our paper deals with three different aspects of biological effects of non-ionizing radiation, bioelectromagnetism, electromagnetobiology and electromagnetic bioinformation. Firstly, we describe how EMF and photons can be produced within a living cell, how biological cycles are controlled, and what are the features of endogenous electromagnetic radiation. Secondly, we discuss various facets of external EMF interactions with living matter, focusing on extremely-low-frequencies, radio- and microwaves. Possible mechanisms of these interactions are also mentioned. Finally, we present a short overview of current theories which explain how electromagnetic couplings may control an open and dissipative structure, namely the living organism. The theory of electromagnetic bioinformation seems to explain how different physiological processes are triggered and controlled, as well as how long-range interactions may possibly occur within the complex biological system. The review points out that the presented research data must be assessed very carefully since its evaluation is crucial to set the proper limits of EMF exposure, both occupational and environmental. The study of biological effects of non-ioinizing radiation may also contribute to the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic

  19. Radiation Effects and Protection for Moon and Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parnell, Thomas A.; Watts, John W., Jr.; Armstrong, Tony W.

    1998-01-01

    Manned and robotic missions to the Earth's moon and Mars are exposed to a continuous flux of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and occasional, but intense, fluxes of Solar Energetic Particles (SEP). These natural radiations impose hazards to manned exploration, but also present some constraints to the design of robotic missions. The hazards to interplanetary flight crews and their uncertainties have been studied recently by a National Research Council Committee (Space Studies Board 1996). Considering the present uncertainty estimates, thick spacecraft shielding would be needed for manned missions, some of which could be accomplished with onboard equipment and expendables. For manned and robotic missions, the effects of radiation on electronics, sensors, and controls require special consideration in spacecraft design. This paper describes the GCR and SEP particle fluxes, secondary particles behind shielding, uncertainties in radiobiological effects and their impact on manned spacecraft design, as well as the major effects on spacecraft equipment. The principal calculational tools and considerations to mitigate the radiation effects are discussed, and work in progress to reduce uncertainties is included.

  20. NEW APPLICATIONS OF ADAPTOGENS TO REDUCE RADIATION SIDE EFFECTS.

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, S N; Antipina, U D; Arzhakova, L I; Protodyakonov, S V

    2015-01-01

    One of the live medical issues today is to find medication to prevent adverse effects of ionizing radiation on the immune and hematopoietic systems. In Yakutia where in most of its regions the overall environmental situation is getting worse due to the development of natural deposits including radioactive deposits, this problem remains vital. The purpose of this work is to study radioprotective properties of adaptogens in the case of the hematopoietic system under irradiation. The studies were conducted on certain groups of hybrid mice. We used the methods of radiation exposure by a radiological apparatus RUM-25 on hybrid mice followed by studying the cellularity of bone marrow, spleen and thymus. The functional activity of all compartments of early hematopoiesis (bone marrow hematopoiesis) was identified by the exogenous colony forming method. The study found that the extracts of reindeer and moose antlers have a stimulating effect on the functional activity of the hematopoietic precursors in response to radiation. The study medication stimulates regeneration processes in the thymus and bone marrow after irradiation. Further, the adaptogens stimulatory effect on CFU functional activity was identified. The most pronounced effect has the extracts of reindeer antlers "Epsorin".

  1. Water vapor radiative effects on short-wave radiation in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquero-Martínez, Javier; Antón, Manuel; Ortiz de Galisteo, José Pablo; Román, Roberto; Cachorro, Victoria E.

    2018-06-01

    In this work, water vapor radiative effect (WVRE) is studied by means of the Santa Barbara's Disort Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model, fed with integrated water vapor (IWV) data from 20 ground-based GPS stations in Spain. Only IWV data recorded during cloud-free days (selected using daily insolation data) were used in this study. Typically, for SZA = 60.0 ± 0.5° WVRE values are around - 82 and - 66 Wm-2 (first and third quartile), although it can reach up - 100 Wm-2 or decrease to - 39 Wm-2. A power dependence of WVRE on IWV and cosine of solar zenith angle (SZA) was found by an empirical fit. This relation is used to determine the water vapor radiative efficiency (WVEFF = ∂WVRE/∂IWV). Obtained WVEFF values range from - 9 and 0 Wm-2 mm-1 (- 2.2 and 0% mm-1 in relative terms). It is observed that WVEFF decreases as IWV increases, but also as SZA increases. On the other hand, when relative WVEFF is calculated from normalized WVRE, an increase of SZA results in an increase of relative WVEFF. Heating rates were also calculated, ranging from 0.2 Kday-1 to 1.7 Kday-1. WVRE was also calculated at top of atmosphere, where values ranged from 4 Wm-2 to 37 Wm-2.

  2. Protection effects of condensed bromoacenaphthylene on radiation deterioration of ethylene-propylene-diene rubber. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Y.; Hagiwara, M.; Kasai, N.

    1982-09-01

    As a continuation of a series of the studies on the flame and ..gamma..-radiation resistant modification of ethylene-propylene-diene rubber (EPDM), condensed bromoacenaphthylene (con-BACN) as a newly developed flame retardant was synthesized and its effects on the radiation resistance of EPDM were investigated. The radiation resistance evaluated by measuring tensile properties of irradiated sheets of 2 mm thick was found improved greatly by adding con-BACN together with ordinary rubber ingredients but decreased by decabromodiphenylether (DBDPE) that has bromins in aromatic rings as con-BACN. When EPDM sheets of 1 mm thick were irradiated in oxygen at a dose rate of 1 Xmore » 10/sup 5/ rad/h, the weight swelling ratio increased with increasing dose, indicating that oxidative main chain scission is predominant under the irradiation conditions. On the other hand, crosslinking was shown to be predominant in nitrogen. From the results of the swelling experiments with different additives, it was concluded that DBDPE accelerates both the main chain scission in oxygen and the crosslinking in nitrogen. In contrast to this, con-BACN reduced the chain scission in oxygen. This observation was accounted by the assumption that the influence of the oxidative chain scission is partly compensated by the concurrent crosslinking which takes place through additions of con-BACN to substrate polymers even in the presence of oxygen.« less

  3. Radiation effects in materials for optical interferometric devices

    SciTech Connect

    Koumvakalis, N.; Jani, M.G.; Halliburton, L.E.

    The effects of ionizing radiation have been investigated in a series of materials commonly used in optical interferometric devices. Included in the study were three glass-ceramics (Zerodur, Cer-Vit 101, and Cer-Vit 142) and one Faraday-rotator glass (SF-57). Each glass-ceramic was irradiated at room temperature with 1.5-MeV electrons from a Van De Graaff accelerator. Similar irradiations were done on the Faraday-rotator glass at room temperature and 77 K. Optical absorption and electron spin resonance measurements provided a monitor of the radiation-induced point defects in all cases. The spectral characteristics and the production and thermal annealing behavior of these defects are described,more » and their possible effect on the performance of optical devices which incorporate these materials is considered.« less

  4. Effects of low-dose radiation - a correlation study.

    PubMed

    Edling, C; Comba, P; Axelson, O; Flodin, U

    1982-01-01

    The effects of low-dose radiation have been a matter of controversy over the years, and the epidemiologic results have been conflicting. A couple of recent studies have indicated a possible impact on lung cancer mortality from exposure to indoor levels of radon and radon daughters. In this study, selected mortality rates, ie, lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, breast cancer (females only), leukemia, and multiple myeloma were correlated for the counties of Sweden with estimates of average background radiation exposure in these areas. Significant correlations were obtained for lung cancer (males, r = 0.46; females r = 0.55) and pancreatic cancer (males, r = 0.59; females, r = 0.40) , and there was a borderline correlation (r = 0.36; p = 0.04) for leukemia in males. In all, there were positive correlations for eight out of the nine computations made. Since background radiation correlates with urbanization and therefore with smoking, air pollution, etc, the correlations might be spurious due to confounding; on the other hand confounding is a reciprocal phenomenon which suggests that background radiation should to be taken into consideration when widespread risk factors like smoking, coffee drinking, general air pollution, etc, are studied.

  5. Effect of bevacizumab on radiation necrosis of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Javier; Kumar, Ashok J.; Conrad, Charles A.

    Purpose: Because blocking vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from reaching leaky capillaries is a logical strategy for the treatment of radiation necrosis, we reasoned that bevacizumab might be an effective treatment of radiation necrosis. Patients and Methods: Fifteen patients with malignant brain tumors were treated with bevacizumab or bevacizumab combination for their tumor on either a 5 mg/kg/2-week or 7.5 mg/kg/3-week schedule. Radiation necrosis was diagnosed in 8 of these patients on the basis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and biopsy. MRI studies were obtained before treatment and at 6-week to 8-week intervals. Results: Of the 8 patients with radiationmore » necrosis, posttreatment MRI performed an average of 8.1 weeks after the start of bevacizumab therapy showed a reduction in all 8 patients in both the MRI fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) abnormalities and T1-weighted post-Gd-contrast abnormalities. The average area change in the T1-weighted post-Gd-contrast abnormalities was 48% ({+-}22 SD), and the average change in the FLAIR images was 60% ({+-}18 SD). The average reduction in daily dexamethasone requirements was 8.6 mg ({+-}3.6). Conclusion: Bevacizumab, alone and in combination with other agents, can reduce radiation necrosis by decreasing capillary leakage and the associated brain edema. Our findings will need to be confirmed in a randomized trial to determine the optimal duration of treatment.« less

  6. Stochastic Effects in Computational Biology of Space Radiation Cancer Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Pluth, Janis; Harper, Jane; O'Neill, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Estimating risk from space radiation poses important questions on the radiobiology of protons and heavy ions. We are considering systems biology models to study radiation induced repair foci (RIRF) at low doses, in which less than one-track on average transverses the cell, and the subsequent DNA damage processing and signal transduction events. Computational approaches for describing protein regulatory networks coupled to DNA and oxidative damage sites include systems of differential equations, stochastic equations, and Monte-Carlo simulations. We review recent developments in the mathematical description of protein regulatory networks and possible approaches to radiation effects simulation. These include robustness, which states that regulatory networks maintain their functions against external and internal perturbations due to compensating properties of redundancy and molecular feedback controls, and modularity, which leads to general theorems for considering molecules that interact through a regulatory mechanism without exchange of matter leading to a block diagonal reduction of the connecting pathways. Identifying rate-limiting steps, robustness, and modularity in pathways perturbed by radiation damage are shown to be valid techniques for reducing large molecular systems to realistic computer simulations. Other techniques studied are the use of steady-state analysis, and the introduction of composite molecules or rate-constants to represent small collections of reactants. Applications of these techniques to describe spatial and temporal distributions of RIRF and cell populations following low dose irradiation are described.

  7. Improved Method for Simulating Total Radiation Dose Effects on Single and Composite Operational Amplifiers Using PSPICE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    sensitive to the effects of radiation, but are arranged in unique circuits that make their system sensitivity to the ef- fects of radiation less apparent...earth with particle radia- tion. The earth is protected from this particle radiation by its magnetosphere. [Refs. 9, 14] The core of the Earth is...en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiation], last accessed 06 April 04. 8. Messenger, G. S. and Ash, M. S., The Effects of Radiation on Electronic Systems , Van

  8. Radiation Effects in III-V Nanowire Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    Nanowire Devices Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. September 2016 HDTRA1-11-1-0021 Steven R...Name: Prof. S. R. J. Brueck Organization/Institution: University of New Mexico Project Title: Radiation Effects in III-V Nanowire Devices What are...the agency approved application or plan. The objectives of this program were to: a) develop a new nanowire transistor technology based on nanoscale

  9. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Arylesterase and Cholinesterase.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustinsson, Klas-Bertil; Jonsson, Gunnel; Sparrman, Berndt

    1961-01-01

    The effects of Co 60 gamma radiation on arylesterase and cholinesterase of human blood plasma were compared using solid preparations of purified enzymes containing various amounts of water. In the case of cholinesterase a water content of 12% exerted maximum protection against irradiation. Such a protection by water was not observed with arylesterase. Finally, in aqueous solutions cholinesterase was more resistant to irradiation by gamma rays than was arylesterase when irradiation was performed in an atmosphere of nitrogen.

  10. Radiation Effects On Emerging Electronic Materials And Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-17

    RADIATION EFFECTS ON EMERGING ELECTRONIC MATERIALS AND DEVICES FINAL PERFORMANCE REPORT PREPARED FOR: Kitt Reinhardt AFOSR/NE 875 N...and the other with metal gates and a high-K gate dielectric. These devices were programmed using both back-gate pulse and gate induced drain leakage... metal gate process GIDL method Fig. 1. Sensing margin as a function of total ionizing dose for nMOS 1T-DRAM cells programmed by back-gate pulse and

  11. Investigation of Radiation Effects on Semiconductor Devices and Integrated Circuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-16

    qualitativelysimilar to, and consistent with, findings at the two higher energies .) Results for irradiation of eightwhere q is the electronic charge, ni is the...COMMUNICATIONS R&D COMMAND ATTN: R BROWN ASSISTANT TO THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE ATOMIC ENERGY U S ARMY ELECTRONIC TECH DEV LAB ATTN: EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT...Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) Results of a study of radiation effects on electronic materials, devices, and integrated

  12. Radiation Effects of Commercial Resistive Random Access Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dakai; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie; Wilcox, Edward; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Figueiredo, Marco; Buchner, Stephen; Khachatrian, Ani; Roche, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    We present results for the single-event effect response of commercial production-level resistive random access memories. We found that the resistive memory arrays are immune to heavy ion-induced upsets. However, the devices were susceptible to single-event functional interrupts, due to upsets from the control circuits. The intrinsic radiation tolerant nature of resistive memory makes the technology an attractive consideration for future space applications.

  13. Effect of microwave radiation on Jayadhar cotton fibers: WAXS studies

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjana, A. R., E-mail: arnphysics@gmail.com; Mahesh, S. S., E-mail: arnphysics@gmail.com; Divakara, S., E-mail: arnphysics@gmail.com

    Thermal effect in the form of micro wave energy on Jayadhar cotton fiber has been investigated. Microstructural parameters have been estimated using wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) data and line profile analysis program developed by us. Physical properties like tensile strength are correlated with X-ray results. We observe that the microwave radiation do affect significantly many parameters and we have suggested a multivariate analysis of these parameters to arrive at a significant result.

  14. Effects of Radiation on the Microbiota and Intestinal Inflammatory Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    completion of initial experiments investigating the effect of whole body and focal (GI tract) irradiation of mice on the bacterial and fungal microbiota. We...acute symptoms, will develop long-term consequences of irradiation including permanent changes to bowel function and intestinal fibrosis, which can...exposed to total body irradiation (TBI) or focal radiation to the GI tract. Timeline Status Site 1 (Stephen Shiao, MD, PhD) Site 2

  15. Biological effects and medical applications of infrared radiation

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shang-Ru; Hamblin, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    Infrared (IR) radiation is electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths between 760 nm and 100,000 nm. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) or photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy generally employs light at red and near-infrared wavelengths (600–100 nm) to modulate biological activity. Many factors, conditions, and parameters influence the therapeutic effects of IR, including fluence, irradiance, treatment timing and repetition, pulsing, and wavelength. Increasing evidence suggests that IR can carry out photostimulation and photobiomodulation effects particularly benefiting neural stimulation, wound healing, and cancer treatment. Nerve cells respond particularly well to IR, which has been proposed for a range of neurostimulation and neuromodulation applications, and recent progress in neural stimulation and regeneration are discussed in this review. The applications of IR therapy have moved on rapidly in recent years. For example, IR therapy has been developed that does not actually require an external power source, such as IR-emitting materials, and garments that can be powered by body heat alone. Another area of interest is the possible involvement of solar IR radiation in photoaging or photorejuvenation as opposites sides of the coin, and whether sunscreens should protect against solar IR? A better understanding of new developments and biological implications of IR could help us to improve therapeutic effectiveness or develop new methods of PBM using IR wavelengths. PMID:28441605

  16. Biological effects and medical applications of infrared radiation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Ru; Hamblin, Michael R

    2017-05-01

    Infrared (IR) radiation is electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths between 760nm and 100,000nm. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) or photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy generally employs light at red and near-infrared wavelengths (600-100nm) to modulate biological activity. Many factors, conditions, and parameters influence the therapeutic effects of IR, including fluence, irradiance, treatment timing and repetition, pulsing, and wavelength. Increasing evidence suggests that IR can carry out photostimulation and photobiomodulation effects particularly benefiting neural stimulation, wound healing, and cancer treatment. Nerve cells respond particularly well to IR, which has been proposed for a range of neurostimulation and neuromodulation applications, and recent progress in neural stimulation and regeneration are discussed in this review. The applications of IR therapy have moved on rapidly in recent years. For example, IR therapy has been developed that does not actually require an external power source, such as IR-emitting materials, and garments that can be powered by body heat alone. Another area of interest is the possible involvement of solar IR radiation in photoaging or photorejuvenation as opposites sides of the coin, and whether sunscreens should protect against solar IR? A better understanding of new developments and biological implications of IR could help us to improve therapeutic effectiveness or develop new methods of PBM using IR wavelengths. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Low dose radiation damage effects in silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation damage effects in silicon segmented detectors caused by X-rays have become recently an important research topic driven mainly by development of new detectors for applications at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL). However, radiation damage in silicon strip is observed not only after extreme doses up to 1 GGy expected at E-XFEL, but also at doses in the range of tens of Gy, to which the detectors in laboratory instruments like X-ray diffractometers or X-ray spectrometers can be exposed. In this paper we report on investigation of radiation damage effects in a custom developed silicon strip detector used in laboratory diffractometers equipped with X-ray tubes. Our results show that significant degradation of detector performance occurs at low doses, well below 200 Gy, which can be reached during normal operation of laboratory instruments. Degradation of the detector energy resolution can be explained by increasing leakage current and increasing interstrip capacitance of the sensor. Another observed effect caused by accumulation of charge trapped in the surface oxide layer is change of charge division between adjacent strips. In addition, we have observed unexpected anomalies in the annealing process.

  18. Exploring the Radiative Effect and Climate Impact of Contaminated Contrails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, B.; Yang, P.; Minnis, P.; Duda, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    As an impact of human aviation activities, contrails have drawn a great deal of attention. There have been numerous investigations into the contrail properties, radiative effects, and climate impact. However, very little effort has been focused on the impact of contaminated contrails. Generated by the combustion process within the aircraft engine, the aerosols and exhaust gases frequently influence contrail formation. Contrail ice crystals contaminated by soot particles have been found to exhibit dramatically different light scattering properties from those of pristine crystals. In this study, we employ state-of-the-art light scattering computational capabilities to calculate the single-scattering properties of soot-contaminated contrails. The contaminated contrail particle is assumed to be a hexagonal ice column containing several soot particles. The invariant imbedding T-matrix method and the Ray-by-Ray geometry optics method are combined to construct a simplified yet novel set of contaminated contrail optical properties. The bulk optical properties are calculated based on the data set and are parameterized for use in the Community Atmospheric Model. Using global contrail retrievals from satellite remote sensing observations in 2006 and 2012, simulations are conducted using the general circulation model to analyze contaminated contrail radiative effects as well as their climatic sensitivities. Our results show that the contaminated contrail is significantly more absorbing than pristine contrail in the shortwave spectrum. As a result, much stronger contrail radiative impact and climate feedback are found. Several sensitivity studies are also implemented to quantify the effect of contrail contamination.

  19. Effects of radiation and creep on viscoelastic damping materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, John P.; Lewis, Tom M.; Murrell, Fred H.; Mangra, Danny

    1995-05-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), under construction at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), requires precise alignment of several large magnets. Submicron vibratory displacements of the magnets can degrade the performance of this important facility. Viscoelastic materials (VEM) have been shown to be effective in the control of the vibration of these magnets. Damping pads, placed under the magnet support structures in the APS storage ring, use thin layers of VEM. These soft VEM layers are subject to both high-energy radiation environment and continuous through-the-thickness compressive loads. Material experiments were conducted to answer concerns over the long term effects of the radiation environment and creep in the viscoelastic damping layers. The effects of exposure to radiation as high as 108 rad on the complex modulus were measured. Through-the-thickness creep displacements of VEM thin layers subjected to static loads of 50 psi were measured. Creep tests were conducted at elevated temperatures. Time-temperature equivalence principles were used to project creep displacements at room temperatures over several years. These damping material measurements should be of interest to vibration control engineers working with a variety of applications of fields ranging from aerospace to industrial machinery.

  20. Topological magnetoelectric effects in microwave far-field radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Berezin, M.; Kamenetskii, E. O.; Shavit, R.

    2016-07-21

    Similar to electromagnetism, described by the Maxwell equations, the physics of magnetoelectric (ME) phenomena deals with the fundamental problem of the relationship between electric and magnetic fields. Despite a formal resemblance between the two notions, they concern effects of different natures. In general, ME-coupling effects manifest in numerous macroscopic phenomena in solids with space and time symmetry breakings. Recently, it was shown that the near fields in the proximity of a small ferrite particle with magnetic-dipolar-mode (MDM) oscillations have the space and time symmetry breakings and the topological properties of these fields are different from the topological properties of themore » free-space electromagnetic fields. Such MDM-originated fields—called magnetoelectric (ME) fields—carry both spin and orbital angular momenta. They are characterized by power-flow vortices and non-zero helicity. In this paper, we report on observation of the topological ME effects in far-field microwave radiation based on a small microwave antenna with a MDM ferrite resonator. We show that the microwave far-field radiation can be manifested with a torsion structure where an angle between the electric and magnetic field vectors varies. We discuss the question on observation of the regions of localized ME energy in far-field microwave radiation.« less

  1. Development of Technologies to Utilize Laser Plasma Radiations Sources for Radiation Effects Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J F

    2007-01-31

    This final report will cover work performed over the period of November 11, 2005 to September 30, 2006 on the contract to develop technologies using laser sources for radiation effects sciences. The report will discuss four topic areas; the laser source experiments on the Gekko Laser at Osaka, Japan, planning for the Charge State Freeze Out experiments to be performed in calendar year 2007, a review of previous xenon gasbags on the LANL Trident laser to provide planning support to the May-June 2007 HELEN experiments.

  2. A Model for Shear Layer Effects on Engine Noise Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Farassat, F.; Pope, D. Stuart; Vatsa, V.

    2004-01-01

    Prediction of aircraft engine noise is an important aspect of addressing the issues of community noise and cabin noise control. The development of physics based methodologies for performing such predictions has been a focus of Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA). A recent example of code development in this area is the ducted fan noise propagation and radiation code CDUCT-LaRC. Included within the code is a duct radiation model that is based on the solution of FfowcsWilliams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation with a penetrable data surface. Testing of this equation for many acoustic problems has shown it to provide generally better results than the Kirchhoff formula for moving surfaces. Currently, the data surface is taken to be the inlet or exhaust plane for inlet or aft-fan cases, respectively. While this provides reasonable results in many situations, these choices of data surface location lead to a few limitations. For example, the shear layer between the bypass ow and external stream can refract the sound waves radiated to the far field. Radiation results can be improved by including this effect, as well as the rejection of the sound in the bypass region from the solid surface external to the bypass duct surrounding the core ow. This work describes the implementation, and possible approximation, of a shear layer boundary condition within CDUCT-LaRC. An example application also illustrates the improvements that this extension offers for predicting noise radiation from complex inlet and bypass duct geometries, thereby providing a means to evaluate external treatments in the vicinity of the bypass duct exhaust plane.

  3. Radiation sterilization of medical devices. Effects of ionizing radiation on ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchalla, R.; Schüttler, C.; Bögl, K. W.

    1995-02-01

    Sterilization by ionizing radiation has become, next to ethylene oxide treament, the most important "cold" sterilization process for medical devices made from plastics. The effects of ionizing radiation on the most important polymer for medical devices, ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene, are briefly described in this review.

  4. [Creation of a crystalline lens radiation exposure defense cover and the effect of radiation exposure decrease on neuro-interventions].

    PubMed

    Take, Toshio; Sato, Kaori; Kiuchi, Katsunori; Nakazawa, Yasuo

    2007-11-20

    A variety of radiation hazards resulting from interventional radiology (IVR) have been reported in recent years. Particularly affected are the skin and the crystalline lens, with their high radiation sensitivity. During neurological interventions, the radiological technologist should consider decreasing radiation exposure. We found exposure projections where the exposure dose became a radiation hazard for the crystalline lens, and examined an efficient method of cover for the exposure projections used for neurological interventions. The exposure projection for maximum crystalline lens radiation exposure was a lateral projection. In the crystalline lens the maximum exposure to radiation was on the X-ray tube side. The method of defense adopted was that of installing a lead plate of the appropriate shape on the surface of the X-ray tube collimator. In other exposure projections, this cover did not become a redundant shadow. With the cover that was created, the X-ray side crystalline lens lateral projection could be defended effectively.

  5. Aerosol direct and indirect radiative effect over Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulias, Aristeidis; Alexandri, Georgia; Zanis, Prodromos; Ntogras, Christos; Poeschl, Ulrich; Kourtidis, Kostas

    In this work, we present results from the QUADIEEMS project which is focused on the aerosol-cloud relations and the aerosol direct and indirect radiative effect over the region of Eastern Mediterranean. First, a gridded dataset at a resolution of 0.1x0.1 degrees (~10km) with aerosol and cloud related parameters was compiled, using level-2 satellite observations from MODIS TERRA (3/2000-12/2012) and AQUA (7/2002-12/2012). The aerosol gridded dataset has been validated against sunphotometric measurements from 12 AERONET ground stations, showing that generally MODIS overestimates aerosol optical depth (AOD550). Then, the AOD550 and fine mode ratio (FMR550) data from MODIS were combined with aerosol index (AI) data from the Earth Probe TOMS and OMI satellite sensors, wind field data from the ERA-interim reanalysis and AOD550 data for various aerosol types from the GOCART model and the MACC reanalysis to quantify the relative contribution of different aerosol types (marine, dust, anthropogenic, fine-mode natural) to the total AOD550. The aerosol-cloud relations over the region were investigated with the use of the joint high resolution aerosol-cloud gridded dataset. Specifically, we focused on the seasonal relations between the cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and AOD550. The aerosol direct and first indirect radiative effect was then calculated for each aerosol type separately making use of the aerosol relative contribution to the total AOD550, the CDND-AOD550 relations and satellite-based parameterizations. The direct radiative effect was also quantified using simulations from a regional climate model (REGCM4), simulations with a radiative transfer model (SBDART) and the three methods were finally intervalidated.

  6. Effect of respiratory motion on internal radiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib, E-mail: habib.zaidi@hcuge.ch; Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva University, Geneva CH-1205

    Purpose: Estimation of the radiation dose to internal organs is essential for the assessment of radiation risks and benefits to patients undergoing diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine procedures including PET. Respiratory motion induces notable internal organ displacement, which influences the absorbed dose for external exposure to radiation. However, to their knowledge, the effect of respiratory motion on internal radiation dosimetry has never been reported before. Methods: Thirteen computational models representing the adult male at different respiratory phases corresponding to the normal respiratory cycle were generated from the 4D dynamic XCAT phantom. Monte Carlo calculations were performed using the MCNP transportmore » code to estimate the specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) of monoenergetic photons/electrons, the S-values of common positron-emitting radionuclides (C-11, N-13, O-15, F-18, Cu-64, Ga-68, Rb-82, Y-86, and I-124), and the absorbed dose of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) in 28 target regions for both the static (average of dynamic frames) and dynamic phantoms. Results: The self-absorbed dose for most organs/tissues is only slightly influenced by respiratory motion. However, for the lung, the self-absorbed SAF is about 11.5% higher at the peak exhale phase than the peak inhale phase for photon energies above 50 keV. The cross-absorbed dose is obviously affected by respiratory motion for many combinations of source-target pairs. The cross-absorbed S-values for the heart contents irradiating the lung are about 7.5% higher in the peak exhale phase than the peak inhale phase for different positron-emitting radionuclides. For {sup 18}F-FDG, organ absorbed doses are less influenced by respiratory motion. Conclusions: Respiration-induced volume variations of the lungs and the repositioning of internal organs affect the self-absorbed dose of the lungs and cross-absorbed dose between organs in internal radiation dosimetry. The dynamic

  7. Gamma radiation effects on siloxane-based additive manufactured structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalzer, Andrew M.; Cady, Carl M.; Geller, Drew; Ortiz-Acosta, Denisse; Zocco, Adam T.; Stull, Jamie; Labouriau, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Siloxane-basedadditive manufactured structures prepared by the direct ink write (DIW) technology were exposed to ionizing irradiation in order to gauge radiolysis effects on structure-property relationships. These well-defined 3-D structures were subjected to moderate doses of gamma irradiation in an inert atmosphere and characterized by a suite of experimental methods. Changes in thermal, chemical, microstructure, and mechanical properties were evaluated by DSC, TGA, FT-IR, mass spectroscopy, EPR, solvent swelling, SEM, and uniaxial compressive load techniques. Our results demonstrated that 3-D structures made from aromatic-free siloxane resins exhibited hardening after being exposed to gamma radiation. This effect was accompanied by gas evolution, decreasing in crystallization levels, decreasing in solvent swelling and damage to the microstructure. Furthermore, long-lived radiation-induced radicals were not detected by EPR methods. Our results are consistent with cross-link formation being the dominant degradation mechanism over chain scission reactions. On the other hand, 3-D structures made from high phenyl content siloxane resins showed little radiation damage as evidenced by low off gassing.

  8. EFFECT OF IONIZING RADIATION OF THE HEMOLYSIS OF ERYTHROCYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Belousov, A.P.

    1957-05-01

    The saponin hemolysis method is a very effective way of determining the resistance of erythrocytes to radiolysis. The irradiation of rabbits with a dose of 700 r induces the formation of erythrocytes resistant to chemical hemolysis and the rapid disappearance from the blood stream of non-resistant ones. In the case of burns produced by boiling water, blood cell hemolysis is temporarily increased during a period of acute toxicosis. In rabbits irradiated with a dose of 1000 to 1300 r, intensive hemolysis of erythrocytes starts immediately and continues for up to 30 days. The appearance of resistant erythrocytes in the bloodmore » is preceded by a period of active hemopoiesis and the restoration of hemoglobin. Increased resistance of erythrocytes to saponin hemolysis has been observed in rabbits who suffered loss of blood and were subsequently irradiated. Irradiation of the blood in vitro in large doses, as contrasted to small doses, lowers the resistance of erythrocytes to chemical hemolysis. Changes in the resistance of erythrocytes to saponin hemolysis are conditioned by the direct action of radiation on the blood cells and the secondary effect of hemolysins. Thus, knowing the mechanism of the hemolysis of erythrocytes under the influence of ionizing radiation allows a better insight into the pathogenesis of radiation sickness and helps the development of protective means to prevent the onset of hemolysis. (auth)« less

  9. Plasma Radiation and Acceleration Effectiveness of CME-driven Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Schmidt, J. M.

    2008-05-01

    CME-driven shocks are effective radio radiation generators and accelerators for Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs). We present simulated 3 D time-dependent radio maps of second order plasma radiation generated by CME- driven shocks. The CME with its shock is simulated with the 3 D BATS-R-US CME model developed at the University of Michigan. The radiation is simulated using a kinetic plasma model that includes shock drift acceleration of electrons and stochastic growth theory of Langmuir waves. We find that in a realistic 3 D environment of magnetic field and solar wind outflow of the Sun the CME-driven shock shows a detailed spatial structure of the density, which is responsible for the fine structure of type II radio bursts. We also show realistic 3 D reconstructions of the magnetic cloud field of the CME, which is accelerated outward by magnetic buoyancy forces in the diverging magnetic field of the Sun. The CME-driven shock is reconstructed by tomography using the maximum jump in the gradient of the entropy. In the vicinity of the shock we determine the Alfven speed of the plasma. This speed profile controls how steep the shock can grow and how stable the shock remains while propagating away from the Sun. Only a steep shock can provide for an effective particle acceleration.

  10. Plasma radiation and acceleration effectiveness of CME-driven shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Joachim

    CME-driven shocks are effective radio radiation generators and accelerators for Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs). We present simulated 3 D time-dependent radio maps of second order plasma radiation generated by CME-driven shocks. The CME with its shock is simulated with the 3 D BATS-R-US CME model developed at the University of Michigan. The radiation is simulated using a kinetic plasma model that includes shock drift acceleration of electrons and stochastic growth theory of Langmuir waves. We find that in a realistic 3 D environment of magnetic field and solar wind outflow of the Sun the CME-driven shock shows a detailed spatial structure of the density, which is responsible for the fine structure of type II radio bursts. We also show realistic 3 D reconstructions of the magnetic cloud field of the CME, which is accelerated outward by magnetic buoyancy forces in the diverging magnetic field of the Sun. The CME-driven shock is reconstructed by tomography using the maximum jump in the gradient of the entropy. In the vicinity of the shock we determine the Alfven speed of the plasma. This speed profile controls how steep the shock can grow and how stable the shock remains while propagating away from the Sun. Only a steep shock can provide for an effective particle acceleration.

  11. Effect of Low Level Subchronic Microwave Radiation on Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Megha, Kanu; Nasare, Namita; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Ahmed, Rafat Sultana; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Mediratta, Pramod Kumari

    2016-12-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of subchronic low level microwave radiation (MWR) on cognitive function, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) level and DNA damage in brain of Fischer rats. Experiments were performed on male Fischer rats exposed to microwave radiation for 90 days at three different frequencies: 900, 1800, and 2450 MHz. Animals were divided into 4 groups: Group I: Sham exposed, Group II: animals exposed to microwave radiation at 900 MHz and specific absorption rate (SAR) 5.953 × 10-4 W/kg, Group III: animals exposed to 1800 MHz at SAR 5.835 × 10-4 W/kg and Group IV: animals exposed to 2450 MHz at SAR 6.672 × 10-4 W/kg. All the animals were tested for cognitive function using elevated plus maze and Morris water maze at the end of the exposure period and subsequently sacrificed to collect brain tissues. HSP70 levels were estimated by ELISA and DNA damage was assessed using alkaline comet assay. Microwave exposure at 900-2450 MHz with SAR values as mentioned above lead to decline in cognitive function, increase in HSP70 level and DNA damage in brain. The results of the present study suggest that low level microwave exposure at frequencies 900, 1800, and 2450 MHz may lead to hazardous effects on brain. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanisms of the effect of VUV radiation on the microfungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvereva, Galina; Kirtsideli, Irina; Machs, Eduard; Vangonen, Albert

    2018-04-01

    The mechanisms of the effect of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation (λ = 172 nm) on various types of microfungi spores were investigated. It is found that there are several parallel direct and indirect mechanisms, which lead to spores inactivation, including destruction of the cell wall and DNA by means of direct absorption of VUV radiation and by VUV photolysis reactive products. IR transmission spectra indicate the etching of the spore cell wall material with the predominant degradation of the polysaccharides. Electrophoresis of irradiated spores DNA shows heavy (about 20 000 pairs of nucleotides) and light fragments appearance. Experiments using an antioxidant (iodine) indicate the participation of reactive radicals in inactivation, which provide not less than 10% of inactivated cells

  13. Radiation effects on hole drift mobility in polysilanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Shu; Shibata, Hiromi; Yoshida, Yoichi; Ishigure, Kenkichi; Tagawa, Seiichi

    1997-03-01

    The radiation effects on hole drift mobility in polysilane derivatives were studied in the present paper. The values of hole drift mobility (about 10 -4 cm 2/V·s) obtained by the DC Time-of-Flight (TOF) measurement were improved by ion beam irradiation for poly(methylphenylsilane) (PMPS) and poly(di-n-hexylsilane) (PDHS). The irradiated PMPS showed five times higher values of hole drift mobility than the non irradiated one. Their low photo-induced carrier yield, one of the highest barrier to use polysilanes as photoconductors, was also improved by the irradiation. The mechanism of the mobility improvement will be discussed in relation to the model of changes in the silicon skeleton structure induced by the radiation.

  14. DOSE-RATE DEPENDENCE OF INSTANTANEOUS PHYSIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hug, O.

    Nastic movements in Mimosa pudica were induced by x radiation. Using short radiation impulses of 10 to 30 sec and doses up to 120 kr/min, the leaflets were observed to close and the stem to bend in the main joint during the first minute. After irradiation of parts of the leaflet, the reaction spreads along the physiological pathways as in any other stimulus. When the action potential is completed, slow depolarization continues and reaches a maximum, finally returning to the initial value in about two hr. The effect was found to be dose- dependent. It is hypothesized that either amore » direct physicochemical change of the cell membrane or a damage of substances which influence the function of the cell membrane is induced by the irradiation. (H.M.G.)« less

  15. EFFECT OF POLONIUM /cap alpha/ RADIATION ON GELATINE (in French)

    SciTech Connect

    Ader, M.

    1962-08-01

    When a nuclear plate, which has been exposed to radiation, developed, and dried, is exposed to a Po source, no effect can be detected by either the eye or the microscope. However if the plate is placed in distilled water, the emulsion thickness of the irradiated region is reduced by approximately 20 mu . A ridge'' separates this region from the nonirradiated region. The ridge contains piles of silver grains, very deformed traces of the old radiation, and some gelatin fragments. It appears that the alpha particles penetrating the gelatine transforms this gelatin, reversible protein, into a substance soluble'' inmore » distilled water or entrained by the distilled water. (J.S.R.)« less

  16. The effect of radiation on the anaerobic corrosion of steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, N. R.; Rance, A. P.; Werme, L. O.

    2008-09-01

    To ensure the safe encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel elements for geological disposal, SKB of Sweden are considering using a canister, which consists of an outer copper canister and a cast iron insert. Previous work has investigated the rate of gas generation due to the anaerobic corrosion of ferrous materials over a range of conditions. This paper examines the effect of radiation on the corrosion of steel in repository environments. Tests were carried out at two temperatures (30 °C and 50 °C), two dose rates (11 Gray h -1 and 300 Gray h -1) and in two different artificial groundwaters, for exposure periods of several months. Radiation was found to enhance the corrosion rate at both dose rates but the greatest enhancement occurred at the higher dose rate. The corrosion products were predominantly magnetite, with some indications of unidentified higher oxidation state corrosion products being formed at the higher dose rates.

  17. Astrobiological Effects of Stellar Radiation in Circumstellar Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Gurdemir, Levent; Guinan, Edward F.; Kurucz, Robert L.

    2006-10-01

    The centerpiece of all life on Earth is carbon-based biochemistry. Previous scientific research has suggested that biochemistry based on carbon may also play a decisive role in extraterrestrial life forms, i.e., alien life outside of Earth, if existent. In the following, we explore if carbon-based macromolecules (such as DNA) in the environments of stars other than the Sun are able to survive the effects of energetic stellar radiation, such as UV-C in the wavelength band between 200 and 290 nm. We focus on main-sequence stars akin to the Sun, but of hotter (F-type stars) and cooler (K- and M-type stars) surface temperature. Emphasis is placed on investigating the radiative environment in stellar habitable zones (HZs). Stellar habitable zones have an important relevance in astrobiology because they constitute circumstellar regions in which a planet of suitable size can have surface temperatures for water to exist in liquid form.

  18. Multi-dimensional effects in radiation pressure acceleration of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, V. K., E-mail: tripathivipin@yahoo.co.in

    A laser carries momentum. On reflection from an ultra-thin overdense plasma foil, it deposits recoil momentum on the foil, i.e. exerts radiation pressure on the foil electrons and pushes them to the rear. The space charge field thus created takes the ions along, accelerating the electron-ion double layer as a single unit. When the foil has surface ripple, of wavelength comparable to laser wavelength, the radiation pressure acts non-uniformly on the foil and the perturbation grows as Reyleigh-Taylor (RT) instability as the foil moves. The finite spot size of the laser causes foil to bend. These effects limit the quasi-monomore » energy acceleration of ions. Multi-ion foils, e.g., diamond like carbon foil embedded with protons offer the possibility of suppressing RT instability.« less

  19. Radiation effects in a glass-ceramic (Zerodur)

    SciTech Connect

    Koumvakalis, N.; Jani, M.G.; Halliburton, L.E.

    1985-04-01

    Zerodur is a low-expansion glass-ceramic with important applications in laser-gyro guidance systems. The material contains by weight 70-75% crystalline quartz in the form of crystallites approximately 50 nm in diameter which are embedded in a glass matrix. The glass-crystal ratio is adjusted so that the resultant expansion coefficient at room temperature is near zero. Ionizing radiation causes numerous effects in Zerodur. The most obvious is a change in the optical absorption, and this will have possible consequences in the thermal expansion behavior. Thus, characterization of radiation-induced defects will help solve problems affecting Zerodur's performance in guidance systems and will providemore » an understanding of the basic properties of this unique class of materials.« less

  20. Radiation effects on ALICE V0 detector components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheynis, B.; Ducroux, L.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Guichard, A.; Pillot, P.; Rapp, B.; Tieulent, R.; Tromeur, W.; Zoccarato, Y.

    2006-12-01

    The 60 MeV proton beam delivered by the RADEF facility of the University of Jyväskylä (Finland) was used to measure the radiation effects on the counter components of the V0 detector of ALICE. There are the scintillator BC404, the wavelength shifting fibres BCF9929A and the optical fibres BCF98 from Bicron (Saint-Gobain). The light yield and the time resolution given by a counter of the inner ring of the V0C array, mounted within a dedicated device, were measured as a function of the radiation dose up to about 300 krad. A global light attenuation of the order of 30% can be anticipated during 10 years of ALICE running.

  1. Vitamin D protects keratinocytes from deleterious effects of ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Langberg, M; Rotem, C; Fenig, E; Koren, R; Ravid, A

    2009-01-01

    Radiotherapy can induce severe skin responses that may limit the clinically acceptable radiation dose. The responses include erythema, dry and moist desquamation, erosions and dermal-epidermal blister formation. These effects reflect injury to, and reproductive failure of, epidermal cells and may also be due to dysregulation of the tissue remodelling process caused by excessive proteolytic activity. Calcitriol, the hormonally active vitamin D metabolite, protects keratinocytes from programmed cell death induced by various noxious stimuli. To examine whether calcitriol protects proliferating keratinocytes from the damage inflicted by ionizing radiation under conditions similar to those employed during radiotherapy. Autonomously proliferating HaCaT keratinocytes, used as a model for basal layer keratinocytes, were irradiated using a linear accelerator. Cell death was monitored by vital staining, executioner caspase activation, lactic dehydrogenase release and colony formation assay. Induction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 was assessed by gelatinase activity assay and mRNA determination. Levels of specific proteins were determined by immunoblotting. Treatment with calcitriol inhibited both caspase-dependent and -independent programmed cell death occurring within 48 h of irradiation and increased the colony formation capacity of irradiated cells. These effects may be attributable to inhibition of the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase cascade and to upregulation of the truncated antiapoptotic isoform of p63. Treatment with the hormone also attenuated radiation-induced increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 protein and mRNA levels. The results of this study suggest that active vitamin D derivatives may attenuate cell death and excessive proteolytic activity in the epidermis due to exposure to ionizing radiation in the course of radiotherapy.

  2. Aerosol Radiative Effects on Deep Convective Clouds and Associated Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, J.; Zhang, R.; Tao, W.-K.; Mohr, I.

    2007-01-01

    The aerosol radiative effects (ARE) on the deep convective clouds are investigated by using a spectral-bin cloud-resolving model (CRM) coupled with a radiation scheme and an explicit land surface model. The sensitivity of cloud properties and the associated radiative forcing to aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA) are examined. The ARE on cloud properties is pronounced for mid-visible SSA of 0.85. Relative to the case excluding the ARE, cloud fraction and optical depth decrease by about 18% and 20%, respectively. Cloud droplet and ice particle number concentrations, liquid water path (LWP), ice water path (IWP), and droplet size decrease significantly when the ARE is introduced. The ARE causes a surface cooling of about 0.35 K and significantly high heating rates in the lower troposphere (about 0.6K/day higher at 2 km), both of which lead to a more stable atmosphere and hence weaker convection. The weaker convection and the more desiccation of cloud layers explain the less cloudiness, lower cloud optical depth, LWP and IWP, smaller droplet size, and less precipitation. The daytime-mean direct forcing induced by black carbon is about 2.2 W/sq m at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and -17.4 W/sq m at the surface for SSA of 0.85. The semi-direct forcing is positive, about 10 and 11.2 W/sq m at the TOA and surface, respectively. Both the TOA and surface total radiative forcing values are strongly negative for the deep convective clouds, attributed mostly to aerosol indirect forcing. Aerosol direct and semi-direct effects are very sensitive to SSA. Because the positive semi-direct forcing compensates the negative direct forcing at the surface, the surface temperature and heat fluxes decrease less significantly with the increase of aerosol absorption (decreasing SSA). The cloud fraction, optical depth, convective strength, and precipitation decrease with the increase of absorption, resulting from a more stable and dryer atmosphere due to enhanced surface cooling and

  3. Medical-biological aspects of radiation effects in Daphnia magna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarapultseva, E.; Uskalova, D.; Savina, N.; Ustenko, K.

    2017-01-01

    We have shown that γ-irradiation at doses of 100 and 1000 mGy significantly compromised fecundity and reproductive success of the directly exposed D. magna. These effects were also observed among the non-exposed first-generation progeny of irradiated parents, thus implying the manifestation of transgenerational effects in Daphnia. We have also shown that compromised viability of irradiated D. magna can be attributed cytotoxic effects of irradiation. It would therefore appear that the compromised viability may be attributed to the cytotoxic effects resulted from epigenetic changes affecting some metabolic pathways involved in detoxification of free-radicals. Additionally we have analyzed more distant progeny of irradiated at doses of 10, 100 and 1000 mGy Daphnia. Our data demonstrated that multicellular crustacean D. magna represent a very useful experimental model for analyse of long-term effects of ionising radiation at the organismal level.

  4. Effect of ionizing radiation on human skeletal muscle precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Jurdana, Mihaela; Cemazar, Maja; Pegan, Katarina; Mars, Tomaz

    2013-01-01

    Background Long term effects of different doses of ionizing radiation on human skeletal muscle myoblast proliferation, cytokine signalling and stress response capacity were studied in primary cell cultures. Materials and methods Human skeletal muscle myoblasts obtained from muscle biopsies were cultured and irradiated with a Darpac 2000 X-ray unit at doses of 4, 6 and 8 Gy. Acute effects of radiation were studied by interleukin – 6 (IL-6) release and stress response detected by the heat shock protein (HSP) level, while long term effects were followed by proliferation capacity and cell death. Results Compared with non-irradiated control and cells treated with inhibitor of cell proliferation Ara C, myoblast proliferation decreased 72 h post-irradiation, this effect was more pronounced with increasing doses. Post-irradiation myoblast survival determined by measurement of released LDH enzyme activity revealed increased activity after exposure to irradiation. The acute response of myoblasts to lower doses of irradiation (4 and 6 Gy) was decreased secretion of constitutive IL-6. Higher doses of irradiation triggered a stress response in myoblasts, determined by increased levels of stress markers (HSPs 27 and 70). Conclusions Our results show that myoblasts are sensitive to irradiation in terms of their proliferation capacity and capacity to secret IL-6. Since myoblast proliferation and differentiation are a key stage in muscle regeneration, this effect of irradiation needs to be taken in account, particularly in certain clinical conditions. PMID:24294183

  5. Effects of radiation reaction in the interaction between cluster media and high intensity lasers in the radiation dominant regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Natsumi; Nagatomo, Hideo; Fukuda, Yuji; Matsui, Ryutaro; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2016-06-01

    Interaction between media composed of clusters and high intensity lasers in the radiation dominant regime, i.e., intensity of 10 22 - 23 W / cm 2 , is studied based on the particle-in-cell simulation that includes the radiation reaction. By introducing target materials that have the same total mass but different internal structures, i.e., uniform plasma and cluster media with different cluster radii, we investigate the effect of the internal structure on the interaction dynamics, high energy radiation emission, and its reaction. Intense radiation emission is found in the cluster media where electrons exhibit non-ballistic motions suffering from strong accelerations by both the penetrated laser field and charge separation field of clusters. As a result, the clustered structure increases the energy conversion into high energy radiations significantly at the expense of the conversion into particles, while the total absorption rate into radiation and particles remains unchanged from the absorption rate into particles in the case without radiation reaction. The maximum ion energy achieved in the interaction with cluster media is found to be decreased through the radiation reaction to electrons into the same level with that achieved in the interaction with the uniform plasma. The clustered structure thus enhances high energy radiation emission rather than the ion acceleration in the considered intensity regime.

  6. Estimation of Asian Dust Aerosol Effect on Cloud Radiation Forcing Using Fu-Liou Radiative Model and CERES Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Jing; Huang, Jianping; Fu, Qiang; Minnis, Patrick; Ge, Jinming; Bi, Jianrong

    2008-01-01

    The impact of Asian dust on cloud radiative forcing during 2003-2006 is studied by using the Earth's Radiant Energy Budget Scanner (CERES) data and the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model. Analysis of satellite data shows that the dust aerosol significantly reduced the cloud cooling effect at TOA. In dust contaminated cloudy regions, the 4-year mean values of the instantaneous shortwave, longwave and net cloud radiative forcing are -138.9, 69.1, and -69.7 Wm(sup -2), which are 57.0, 74.2, and 46.3%, respectively, of the corresponding values in more pristine cloudy regions. The satellite-retrieved cloud properties are significantly different in the dusty regions and can influence the radiative forcing indirectly. The contributions to the cloud radiation forcing by the dust direct, indirect and semi-direct effects are estimated using combined satellite observations and Fu-Liou model simulation. The 4-year mean value of combination of indirect and semi-direct shortwave radiative forcing (SWRF) is 82.2 Wm(sup -2), which is 78.4% of the total dust effect. The direct effect is only 22.7 Wm(sup -2), which is 21.6% of the total effect. Because both first and second indirect effects enhance cloud cooling, the aerosol-induced cloud warming is mainly the result of the semi-direct effect of dust.

  7. Effects of heavy ion radiation on digital micromirror device performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travinsky, Anton; Vorobiev, Dmitry; Ninkov, Zoran; Raisanen, Alan D.; Pellish, Jonny; Robberto, Massimo; Heap, Sara

    2016-09-01

    There is a pressing need in the astronomical community for space-suitable multiobject spectrometers (MOSs). Several digital micromirror device (DMD)-based prototype MOSs have been developed for ground-based observatories; however, their main use will come with deployment on a space-based mission. Therefore, the performance of DMDs under exoatmospheric radiation needs to be evaluated. DMDs were rewindowed with 2-μm thick pellicle and tested under accelerated heavy-ion radiation (control electronics shielded from radiation), with a focus on the detection of single-event effects (SEEs) including latch-up events. Testing showed that while DMDs are sensitive to nondestructive ion-induced state changes, all SEEs are cleared with a soft reset (i.e., sending a pattern to the device). The DMDs did not experience single-event induced permanent damage or functional changes that required a hard reset (power cycle), even at high ion fluences. This suggests that the SSE rate burden will be manageable for a DMD-based instrument when exposed to solar particle fluxes and cosmic rays in orbit.

  8. The effect of ultraviolet radiation on the cornea - experimental study.

    PubMed

    Golu, Andreea; Gheorghişor, Irina; Bălăşoiu, A T; Baltă, Fl; Osiac, E; Mogoantă, L; Bold, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation in high doses may have harmful effects on the eye. The sources of UV radiation are the sun, as well as some artificial sources such as UV lamps or voltaic arcs. Chronic exposure to UV can cause damage to the anterior pole of the eye, ranging from minor (pterygium) to serious photokeratitis. In our study, we applied a UV dose of 6.5 J/cm(2) in the wavelength range of 290-400 nm, for five consecutive days per rat anterior pole of the eye. Seven days after the last dose of radiation, the animals were sacrificed, harvesting both the irradiated and the non-irradiated eye. Histological and immunohistochemical examination of the lesions revealed that the greatest damage to the epithelium was recorded prior to and 2/3 of the remaining corneal stroma. The epithelial lesions we found varied from pseudokeratosis and detachment of the Bowman epithelium membrane to deep epithelial necrosis. Within the corneal stroma, we observed the formation of interstitial edema with disruption of the collagen structure. We also noticed the presence of an inflammatory infiltrate composed mainly of lymphocytes and CD68+ and CD163+ macrophages, as well as the occurrence of vascular devices. These consisted of angiogenesis capillaries with structured wall composed mainly of endothelial CD34+ precursor cells and a basal membrane rich in collagen IV fibers.

  9. Effects of 900 MHz radiofrequency radiation on skin hydroxyproline contents.

    PubMed

    Çam, Semra Tepe; Seyhan, Nesrin; Kavaklı, Cengiz; Çelikbıçak, Ömür

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the possible effect of pulse-modulated radiofrequency radiation (RFR) on rat skin hydroxyproline content, since skin is the first target of external electromagnetic fields. Skin hydroxyproline content was measured using liquid chromatography mass spectrometer method. Two months old male wistar rats were exposed to a 900 MHz pulse-modulated RFR at an average whole body specific absorption rate (SAR) of 1.35 W/kg for 20 min/day for 3 weeks. The radiofrequency (RF) signals were pulse modulated by rectangular pulses with a repetition frequency of 217 Hz and a duty cycle of 1:8 (pulse width 0.576 ms). A skin biopsy was taken at the upper part of the abdominal costa after the exposure. The data indicated that whole body exposure to a pulse-modulated RF radiation that is similar to that emitted by the global system for mobile communications (GSM) mobile phones caused a statistically significant increase in the skin hydroxyproline level (p = 0.049, Mann-Whitney U test). Under our experimental conditions, at a SAR less than the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection safety limit recommendation, there was evidence that GSM signals could alter hydroxyproline concentration in the rat skin.

  10. Studying effects of non-equilibrium radiative transfer via HPC

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Daniel

    This report presents slides on Ph.D. Research Goals; Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) Implications; Calculating an Opacity; Opacity: Pictographic Representation; Opacity: Pictographic Representation; Opacity: Pictographic Representation; Collisional Radiative Modeling; Radiative and Collisional Excitation; Photo and Electron Impact Ionization; Autoionization; The Rate Matrix; Example: Total Photoionization rate; The Rate Coefficients; inlinlte version 1.1; inlinlte: Verification; New capabilities: Rate Matrix – Flexibility; Memory Option Comparison; Improvements over previous DCA solver; Inter- and intra-node load balancing; Load Balance – Full Picture; Load Balance – Full Picture; Load Balance – Internode; Load Balance – Scaling; Description; Performance; xRAGE Simulation; Post-process @ 2hr; Post-process @ 4hr;more » Post-process @ 8hr; Takeaways; Performance for 1 realization; Motivation for QOI; Multigroup Er; Transport and NLTE large effects (1mm, 1keV); Transport large effect, NLTE lesser (1mm, 750eV); Blastwave Diagnostici – Description & Performance; Temperature Comparison; NLTE has effect on dynamics at wall; NLTE has lesser effect in the foam; Global Takeaways; The end.« less

  11. Characterization of a novel epigenetic effect of ionizing radiation: the death-inducing effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagar, Shruti; Smith, Leslie E.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    The detrimental effects associated with exposure to ionizing radiation have long been thought to result from the direct targeting of the nucleus leading to DNA damage; however, the emergence of concepts such as radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects have challenged this dogma. After cellular exposure to ionizing radiation, we have isolated a number of clones of Chinese hamster-human hybrid GM10115 cells that demonstrate genomic instability as measured by chromosomal destabilization. These clones show dynamic and persistent generation of chromosomal rearrangements multiple generations after the original insult. We hypothesize that these unstable clones maintain this delayed instability phenotype by secreting factors into the culture medium. To test this hypothesis we transferred filtered medium from unstable cells to unirradiated GM10115 cells. No GM10115 cells were able to survive this medium. This phenomenon by which GM10115 cells die when cultured in medium from chromosomally unstable GM10115 clones is the death-inducing effect. Medium transfer experiments indicate that a factor or factors is/are secreted by unstable cells within 8 h of growth in fresh medium and result in cell killing within 24 h. These factors are stable at ambient temperature but do not survive heating or freezing, and are biologically active when diluted with fresh medium. We present the initial description and characterization of the death-inducing effect. This novel epigenetic effect of radiation has implications for radiation risk assessment and for health risks associated with radiation exposure.

  12. Comparative proteomic analysis of rice after seed ground simulated radiation and spaceflight explains the radiation effects of space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Shi, Jinming; Liang, Shujian; Lei, Huang; Shenyi, Zhang; Sun, Yeqing

    In previous work, we compared the proteomic profiles of rice plants growing after seed space-flights with ground controls by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and found that the protein expression profiles were changed after seed space environment exposures. Spaceflight represents a complex environmental condition in which several interacting factors such as cosmic radiation, microgravity and space magnetic fields are involved. Rice seed is in the process of dormant of plant development, showing high resistance against stresses, so the highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects to seeds. To further investigate the radiation effects of space environment, we performed on-ground simulated HZE particle radiation and compared between the proteomes of seed irra-diated plants and seed spaceflight (20th recoverable satellite) plants from the same rice variety. Space ionization shows low-dose but high energy particle effects, for searching the particle effects, ground radiations with the same low-dose (2mGy) but different liner energy transfer (LET) values (13.3KeV/µm-C, 30KeV/µm-C, 31KeV/µm-Ne, 62.2KeV/µm-C, 500Kev/µm-Fe) were performed; using 2-D DIGE coupled with clustering and principle component analysis (PCA) for data process and comparison, we found that the holistic protein expression patterns of plants irradiated by LET-62.2KeV/µm carbon particles were most similar to spaceflight. In addition, although space environment presents a low-dose radiation (0.177 mGy/day on the satellite), the equivalent simulated radiation dose effects should still be evaluated: radiations of LET-62.2KeV/µm carbon particles with different cumulative doses (2mGy, 20mGy, 200mGy, 2000mGy) were further carried out and resulted that the 2mGy radiation still shared most similar proteomic profiles with spaceflight, confirming the low-dose effects of space radiation. Therefore, in the protein expression level

  13. Mathematical modeling the radiation effects on humoral immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, O.

    One of the biological processes affecting the carcinogenesis is a response of humoral immune system to an antigen of malignant cells. Humoral immunity involves the production of protein molecules, antibodies, which can specifically bind to a certain antigen. This body system is radiosensitive. Therefore when simulating the radiation carcinogenesis, it is important to take into account the radiation effects on humoral immunity. To this end, a model of humoral immune response in irradiated mammals is developed. It is based on conventional theories and experimental facts. The model represents a system of nonlinear differential equations whose variables are the concentrations of antigen-sensitive immuno-competent cells carrying surface receptors and their bone-marrow precursor cells, as well as the concentrations of antibody-producing cells, antibodies, and an antigen. The dose of acute exposure and the dose rate of chronic exposure are the variable parameters in our approach. The model quantitatively reproduces the dynamics of the humoral immune response to the T-independent antigen (capsular antigen of Pasteurella pestis) in nonirradiated mammals (CBA mice). The model simulates the processes of the damage and recovery of the system of humoral immunity after acute exposure and predicts an adaptation of this system to low-level long-term chronic irradiation. These results give evidence that the developed model, after the appropriate identification, can be incorporated into a model of radiation carcinogenesis in humans. Together with a model of cellular immunity, such joined model will give capability to estimate the risk of radiation carcinogenesis for cosmonauts and astronauts on long space missions such as a voyage to Mars or a lunar colony.

  14. Effectiveness of radiation processing in elimination of Aeromonas from food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagar, Vandan; Bandekar, Jayant R.

    2011-08-01

    Genus Aeromonas has emerged as an important human pathogen because it causes a variety of diseases including gastroenteritis and extra-intestinal infections. Contaminated water, sprouts, vegetables, seafood and food of animal origin have been considered to be the important sources of Aeromonas infection. In the present study, radiation sensitivity of indigenous strains of Aeromonas spp. from different food samples was evaluated. The decimal reduction dose (D10) values of different Aeromonas isolates in saline at 0-4 °C were in the range of 0.031-0.046 kGy. The mixed sprouts, chicken and fish samples were inoculated with a cocktail of five most resistant isolates (A. salmonicida Y567, A. caviae A85, A. jandaei A514A, A. hydrophila CECT 839T and A. veronii Y47) and exposed to γ radiation to study the effectiveness of radiation treatment in elimination of Aeromonas. D10 values of Aeromonas cocktail in mixed sprouts, chicken and fish samples were found to be 0.081±0.001, 0.089±0.003 and 0.091±0.003 kGy, respectively. Radiation treatment with a 1.5 kGy dose resulted in complete elimination of 105 CFU/g of Aeromonas spp. from mixed sprouts, chicken and fish samples. No recovery of Aeromonas was observed in the 1.5 kGy treated samples stored at 4 °C up to 12 (mixed sprouts) and 7 days (chicken and fish samples), even after enrichment and selective plating. This study demonstrates that a 1.5 kGy dose of irradiation treatment could result in complete elimination of 105 CFU/g of Aeromonas spp. from mixed sprouts, chicken and fish samples.

  15. Effect of solar radiation on severity of soybean rust.

    PubMed

    Young, Heather M; George, Sheeja; Narváez, Dario F; Srivastava, Pratibha; Schuerger, Andrew C; Wright, David L; Marois, James J

    2012-08-01

    Soybean rust (SBR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is a damaging fungal disease of soybean (Glycine max). Although solar radiation can reduce SBR urediniospore survival, limited information is available on how solar radiation affects SBR progress within soybean canopies. Such information can aid in developing accurate SBR prediction models. To manipulate light penetration into soybean canopies, structures of shade cloth attenuating 30, 40, and 60% sunlight were constructed over soybean plots. In each plot, weekly evaluations of severity in lower, middle, and upper canopies, and daily temperature and relative humidity were recorded. Final plant height and leaf area index were also recorded for each plot. The correlation between amount of epicuticular wax and susceptibility of leaves in the lower, middle, and upper canopies was assessed with a detached leaf assay. Final disease severity was 46 to 150% greater in the lower canopy of all plots and in the middle canopy of 40 and 60% shaded plots. While daytime temperature within the canopy of nonshaded soybean was greater than shaded soybean by 2 to 3°C, temperatures recorded throughout typical evenings and mornings of the growing season in all treatments were within the range (10 to 28.5°C) for SBR development as was relative humidity. This indicates temperature and relative humidity were not limiting factors in this experiment. Epicuticular wax and disease severity in detached leaf assays from the upper canopy had significant negative correlation (P = 0.009, R = -0.84) regardless of shade treatment. In laboratory experiments, increasing simulated total solar radiation (UVA, UVB, and PAR) from 0.15 to 11.66 MJ m(-2) increased mortality of urediniospores from 2 to 91%. Variability in disease development across canopy heights in early planted soybean may be attributed to the effects of solar radiation not only on urediniospore viability, but also on plant height, leaf area index, and epicuticular wax, which influence

  16. Specific electromagnetic effects of microwave radiation on Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shamis, Yury; Taube, Alex; Mitik-Dineva, Natasa; Croft, Rodney; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2011-05-01

    The present study investigated the effects of microwave (MW) radiation applied under a sublethal temperature on Escherichia coli. The experiments were conducted at a frequency of 18 GHz and at a temperature below 40°C to avoid the thermal degradation of bacterial cells during exposure. The absorbed power was calculated to be 1,500 kW/m(3), and the electric field was determined to be 300 V/m. Both values were theoretically confirmed using CST Microwave Studio 3D Electromagnetic Simulation Software. As a negative control, E. coli cells were also thermally heated to temperatures up to 40°C using Peltier plate heating. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis performed immediately after MW exposure revealed that the E. coli cells exhibited a cell morphology significantly different from that of the negative controls. This MW effect, however, appeared to be temporary, as following a further 10-min elapsed period, the cell morphology appeared to revert to a state that was identical to that of the untreated controls. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed that fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated dextran (150 kDa) was taken up by the MW-treated cells, suggesting that pores had formed within the cell membrane. Cell viability experiments revealed that the MW treatment was not bactericidal, since 88% of the cells were recovered after radiation. It is proposed that one of the effects of exposing E. coli cells to MW radiation under sublethal temperature conditions is that the cell surface undergoes a modification that is electrokinetic in nature, resulting in a reversible MW-induced poration of the cell membrane.

  17. Specific Electromagnetic Effects of Microwave Radiation on Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Shamis, Yury; Taube, Alex; Mitik-Dineva, Natasa; Croft, Rodney; Crawford, Russell J.; Ivanova, Elena P.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of microwave (MW) radiation applied under a sublethal temperature on Escherichia coli. The experiments were conducted at a frequency of 18 GHz and at a temperature below 40°C to avoid the thermal degradation of bacterial cells during exposure. The absorbed power was calculated to be 1,500 kW/m3, and the electric field was determined to be 300 V/m. Both values were theoretically confirmed using CST Microwave Studio 3D Electromagnetic Simulation Software. As a negative control, E. coli cells were also thermally heated to temperatures up to 40°C using Peltier plate heating. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis performed immediately after MW exposure revealed that the E. coli cells exhibited a cell morphology significantly different from that of the negative controls. This MW effect, however, appeared to be temporary, as following a further 10-min elapsed period, the cell morphology appeared to revert to a state that was identical to that of the untreated controls. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed that fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated dextran (150 kDa) was taken up by the MW-treated cells, suggesting that pores had formed within the cell membrane. Cell viability experiments revealed that the MW treatment was not bactericidal, since 88% of the cells were recovered after radiation. It is proposed that one of the effects of exposing E. coli cells to MW radiation under sublethal temperature conditions is that the cell surface undergoes a modification that is electrokinetic in nature, resulting in a reversible MW-induced poration of the cell membrane. PMID:21378041

  18. Combined effects of space flight factors and radiation on humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, P.; Pecaut, M. J.; Fleshner, M.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The probability that a dose of ionizing radiation kills a cell is about 10,000 times the probability that the cell will be transformed to malignancy. On the other hand, the number of cells killed required to significantly impact health is about 10,000 times the number that must be transformed to cause a late malignancy. If these two risks, cell killing and malignant transformation, are about equal, then the risk that occurs during a mission is more significant than the risk that occurs after a mission. The latent period for acute irradiation effects (cell killing) is about 2-4 weeks; the latent period for malignancy is 10-20 years. If these statements are approximately true, then the impact of cell killing on health in the low-gravity environment of space flight should be examined to establish an estimate of risk. The objective of this study is to synthesize data and conclusions from three areas of space biology and environmental health to arrive at rational risk assessment for radiations received by spacecraft crews: (1) the increased physiological demands of the space flight environment; (2) the effects of the space flight environment on physiological systems; and (3) the effects of radiation on physiological systems. One physiological system has been chosen: the immune response and its components, consisting of myeloid and lymphoid proliferative cell compartments. Best-case and worst-case scenarios are considered. In the worst case, a doubling of immune-function demand, accompanied by a halving of immune capacity, would reduce the endangering dose to a crew member to around 1 Gy.

  19. AED INFORMATION SERVICE. SERIES C: BIBLIOGRAPHIES. SECTION 02: RADIATION EFFECTS ON FOOD (INCL. RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION)

    SciTech Connect

    Lueck, H. comp.

    Eleven hundred and fifty-eight references are presented to the world literature on radiation effects on food. References to related biological and chemical studies and studies on radiation dosimetry are included. Emphasis is placed on radiation processing of foods and food products to increase storage life and the effects of fallout fission products on radioactivity in food chains. (C.H.)

  20. Advanced Electronics Technologies: Challenges for Radiation Effects Testing, Modeling, and Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2005-01-01

    Emerging Electronics Technologies include: 1) Changes in the commercial semiconductor world; 2) Radiation Effects Sources (A sample test constraint); and 3) Challenges to Radiation Testing and Modeling: a) IC Attributes-Radiation Effects Implication b) Fault Isolation c) Scaled Geometry d) Speed e) Modeling Shortfall f) Knowledge Status

  1. Radiation effects in x-irradiated hydroxy compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzinski, Edwin E.; Potter, William R.; Box, Harold C.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation effects are compared in single crystals of xylitol, sorbitol, and dulcitol x-irradiated at 4.2 °K. In xylitol and dulcitol, but not in sorbitol, a primary oxidation product is identified as an alkoxy radical. ENDOR measurements detected three proton hyperfine couplings associated with the alkoxy ESR absorption, one of which is attributed to a proton three bond lengths removed from the seat of unpaired spin density. Intermolecular trapping of electrons is observed in all three crystals. ENDOR measurements were made of the hyperfine couplings between the trapped electron and the hydroxy protons forming the trap.

  2. aerosol radiative effects and forcing: spatial and temporal distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinne, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    A monthly climatology for aerosol optical properties based on a synthesis from global modeling and observational data has been applied to illustrate spatial distributions and global averages of aerosol radiative impacts. With the help of a pre-industrial reference for aerosol optical properties from global modeling, also the aerosol direct forcing (ca -0.35W/m2 globally and annual averaged) and their spatial and seasonal distributions and contributions by individual aerosol components are estimated. Finally, CCN and IN concentrations associated with this climatology are applied to estimate aerosol indirect effects and forcing.

  3. Computer program for pulsed thermocouples with corrections for radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, H. A.

    1981-01-01

    A pulsed thermocouple was used for measuring gas temperatures above the melting point of common thermocouples. This was done by allowing the thermocouple to heat until it approaches its melting point and then turning on the protective cooling gas. This method required a computer to extrapolate the thermocouple data to the higher gas temperatures. A method that includes the effect of radiation in the extrapolation is described. Computations of gas temperature are provided, along with the estimate of the final thermocouple wire temperature. Results from tests on high temperature combustor research rigs are presented.

  4. Determination of the effective sample thickness via radiative capture

    DOE PAGES

    Hurst, A. M.; Summers, N. C.; Szentmiklosi, L.; ...

    2015-09-14

    Our procedure for determining the effective thickness of non-uniform irregular-shaped samples via radiative capture is described. In this technique, partial γ-ray production cross sections of a compound nucleus produced in a neutron-capture reaction are measured using Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis and compared to their corresponding standardized absolute values. For the low-energy transitions, the measured cross sections are lower than their standard values due to significant photoelectric absorption of the γ rays within the bulk-sample volume itself. Using standard theoretical techniques, the amount of γ-ray self absorption and neutron self shielding can then be calculated by iteratively varying the sample thicknessmore » until the observed cross sections converge with the known standards. The overall attenuation provides a measure of the effective sample thickness illuminated by the neutron beam. This procedure is illustrated through radiative neutron capture using powdered oxide samples comprising enriched 186W and 182W from which their tungsten-equivalent effective thicknesses are deduced to be 0.077(3) mm and 0.042(8) mm, respectively.« less

  5. Heat effect of pulsed Er:YAG laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibst, Raimund; Keller, Ulrich

    1990-06-01

    Pulsed Er:YAG laser radiation has been found to be effective for dental enamel and dentin removal. Damage to the surrounding hard tissue is little, but before testing the Er:YAG laser clinically for the preparation of cavities, possible effects on the soft tissue of the pulp must be known. In order to estimate pulp damage , temperature rise in dentin caused by the laser radiation was measured by a thermocouple. Additionally, temperature distributions were observed by means of a thermal imaging system. The heat effect of a single Er:YAG laser pulse is little and limited to the vicinity of the impact side. Because heat energy is added with each additional pulse , the temperature distribution depends not only on the radiant energy, but also on the number of pulses and the repetition rate. Both irradiation conditions can be found , making irreversible pulp damage either likely or unlikely. The experimental observations can be explained qualitatively by a simple model of the ablation process.

  6. Radiation reaction for spinning bodies in effective field theory. I. Spin-orbit effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Natália T.; Galley, Chad R.; Leibovich, Adam K.; Porto, Rafael A.

    2017-10-01

    We compute the leading post-Newtonian (PN) contributions at linear order in the spin to the radiation-reaction acceleration and spin evolution for binary systems, which enter at fourth PN order. The calculation is carried out, from first principles, using the effective field theory framework for spinning compact objects, in both the Newton-Wigner and covariant spin supplementary conditions. A nontrivial consistency check is performed on our results by showing that the energy loss induced by the resulting radiation-reaction force is equivalent to the total emitted power in the far zone, up to so-called "Schott terms." We also find that, at this order, the radiation reaction has no net effect on the evolution of the spins. The spin-spin contributions to radiation reaction are reported in a companion paper.

  7. Effect of mobile phone radiation on heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, V I Thajudin; Karthick, N G; Joseph, Paul K

    2008-06-01

    The rapid increase in the use of mobile phones (MPs) in recent years has raised the problem of health risk connected with high-frequency electromagnetic fields. There are reports of headache, dizziness, numbness in the thigh, and heaviness in the chest among MP users. This paper deals with the neurological effect of electromagnetic fields radiated from MPs, by studies on heart rate variability (HRV) of 14 male volunteers. As heart rate is modulated by the autonomic nervous system, study of HRV can be used for assessing the neurological effect. The parameters used in this study for quantifying the effect on HRV are scaling exponent and sample entropy. The result indicates an increase in both the parameters when MP is kept close to the chest and a decrease when kept close to the head. MP has caused changes in HRV indices and the change varied with its position, but the changes cannot be considered significant as the p values are high.

  8. Global radiative effects of solid fuel cookstove aerosol emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yaoxian; Unger, Nadine; Storelvmo, Trude; Harper, Kandice; Zheng, Yiqi; Heyes, Chris

    2018-04-01

    We apply the NCAR CAM5-Chem global aerosol-climate model to quantify the net global radiative effects of black and organic carbon aerosols from global and Indian solid fuel cookstove emissions for the year 2010. Our assessment accounts for the direct radiative effects, changes to cloud albedo and lifetime (aerosol indirect effect, AIE), impacts on clouds via the vertical temperature profile (semi-direct effect, SDE) and changes in the surface albedo of snow and ice (surface albedo effect). In addition, we provide the first estimate of household solid fuel black carbon emission effects on ice clouds. Anthropogenic emissions are from the IIASA GAINS ECLIPSE V5a inventory. A global dataset of black carbon (BC) and organic aerosol (OA) measurements from surface sites and aerosol optical depth (AOD) from AERONET is used to evaluate the model skill. Compared with observations, the model successfully reproduces the spatial patterns of atmospheric BC and OA concentrations, and agrees with measurements to within a factor of 2. Globally, the simulated AOD agrees well with observations, with a normalized mean bias close to zero. However, the model tends to underestimate AOD over India and China by ˜ 19 ± 4 % but overestimate it over Africa by ˜ 25 ± 11 % (± represents modeled temporal standard deviations for n = 5 run years). Without BC serving as ice nuclei (IN), global and Indian solid fuel cookstove aerosol emissions have net global cooling radiative effects of -141 ± 4 mW m-2 and -12 ± 4 mW m-2, respectively (± represents modeled temporal standard deviations for n = 5 run years). The net radiative impacts are dominated by the AIE and SDE mechanisms, which originate from enhanced cloud condensation nuclei concentrations for the formation of liquid and mixed-phase clouds, and a suppression of convective transport of water vapor from the lower troposphere to the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere that in turn leads to reduced ice cloud formation. When BC is allowed

  9. Characterizations of and Radiation Effects in Several Emerging CMOS Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shufeng Ren

    the total ionizing dose (TID) effect, to understand the associated physical mechanisms, and to help to inspire ideas to improve radiation immunity of these novel devices. The experimental methods used in this thesis research include the measurements of C-V, I-V characteristics, where novel gate stack and interface characterization techniques are employed, such as AC Gm method, 1/f low frequency noise method, inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) for chemical bonding and defects detection, and carrier transport modeling. Sentaurus TCAD simulations are also carried out to obtain more physical insight in the complex, extremely scaled, device structures.

  10. Radiation Effects on LWS Detectors and Deglitching of LWS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgdorf, M.; Harwood, A.; Sidher, S. D.

    Glitches are caused by the effects of ionising particles (either a primary cosmic ray, interplanetary or belt electron, or a secondary generated in the spacecraft structure) on the detectors. There was roughly one glitch per ten seconds per detector during the normal period of LWS operation. These energetic particles cause a sudden jump in the ramp voltage, due to a quantity of charge being dumped on the integrating amplifier. They also cause a change in the detector responsivity which affects the following ramps. Glitches were detected in the automatic pipeline processing for each observation with the LWS that was performed with a standard Astronomical Observation Template. We describe the method with which this deglitching was carried out. Based on the findings from the deglitching algorithms we compare proton and electron fluences with average glitch rates and look for correlations. >From the glitch statistics one can also derive the energy distribution of the ionising radiation that hit the detectors. This energy spectrum agrees roughly with model predictions and therefore shows that it is in principle possible to predict the properties of the ionising radiation to which the detectors of future missions will be exposed. This is important, because for the LWS we found that the effect of an ionising radiation hit on the detectors was rather different, and more severe, than had been predicted before launch: An ionising particle could cause the detector to become unstable and spike spontaneously for some seconds following a hit, resulting in a strongly increased noise and requiring a re-adjustment of the bias levels.

  11. THE EFFECT OF IONIZING RADIATION ON PREGNANCY AND FETAL DEVELOPMENT (in Russian)

    SciTech Connect

    Pobedinskii, N.M.

    1961-01-01

    A review is presented on the reactions of pregnant animais to radiation, the effect of ionizing radiation on the fetus and offspring of man and animal, the mechanism of the action of ionizing radiation on the fetus, and the protective action of agents such as mercamine and heroin. It is stressed that the effect of a dose of ionizing radiation varies with the stage of pregnancy at the time of irradiation (80 references). (TTT)

  12. Clastogenic effects of radiofrequency radiations on chromosomes of Tradescantia.

    PubMed

    Haider, T; Knasmueller, S; Kundi, M; Haider, M

    1994-06-01

    The clastogenicity of electromagnetic fields (EMF) has so far been studied only under laboratory conditions. We used the Tradescantia-micronucleus (Trad-MCN) bioassay in an in situ experiment to find out whether short-wave electromagnetic fields used for broadcasting (10-21 MHz) may show genotoxic effects. Plant cuttings bearing young flower buds were exposed (30 h) on both sides of a slewable curtain antenna (300/500 kW, 40-170 V/m) and 15 m (90 V/m) and 30 m (70 V/m) distant from a vertical cage antenna (100 kW) as well as at the neighbors living near the broadcasting station (200 m, 1-3 V/m). The exposure at both sides of the slewable curtain antenna was performed simultaneously within cages, one of the Faraday type shielding the field and one non-shielding mesh cage. Laboratory controls were maintained for comparison. Higher MCN frequencies than in laboratory controls were found for all exposure sites in the immediate vicinity of the antennae, where the exposure standards of the electric field strength of the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) were exceeded. The results at all exposure sites except one were statistically significant. Since the parallel exposure in a non-shielding and a shielding cage also revealed significant differences in MCN frequencies (the latter showing no significant differences from laboratory controls), the clastogenic effects are clearly attributable to the short-wave radiation from the antennae.

  13. Errors and Uncertainties in Dose Reconstruction for Radiation Effects Research

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    Dose reconstruction for studies of the health effects of ionizing radiation have been carried out for many decades. Major studies have included Japanese bomb survivors, atomic veterans, downwinders of the Nevada Test Site and Hanford, underground uranium miners, and populations of nuclear workers. For such studies to be credible, significant effort must be put into applying the best science to reconstructing unbiased absorbed doses to tissues and organs as a function of time. In many cases, more and more sophisticated dose reconstruction methods have been developed as studies progressed. For the example of the Japanese bomb survivors, the dose surrogatemore » “distance from the hypocenter” was replaced by slant range, and then by TD65 doses, DS86 doses, and more recently DS02 doses. Over the years, it has become increasingly clear that an equal level of effort must be expended on the quantitative assessment of uncertainty in such doses, and to reducing and managing uncertainty. In this context, this paper reviews difficulties in terminology, explores the nature of Berkson and classical uncertainties in dose reconstruction through examples, and proposes a path forward for Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) Project 2.4 that requires a reasonably small level of effort for DOSES-2008.« less

  14. Effect of radiation-induced amorphization on smectite dissolution.

    PubMed

    Fourdrin, C; Allard, T; Monnet, I; Menguy, N; Benedetti, M; Calas, G

    2010-04-01

    Effects of radiation-induced amorphization of smectite were investigated using artificial irradiation. Beams of 925 MeV Xenon ions with radiation dose reaching 73 MGy were used to simulate the effects generated by alpha recoil nuclei or fission products in the context of high level nuclear waste repository. Amorphization was controlled by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. An important coalescence of the smectite sheets was observed which lead to a loss of interparticle porosity. The amorphization is revealed by a loss of long-range structure and accompanied by dehydroxylation. The dissolution rate far-from-equilibrium shows that the amount of silica in solution is two times larger in the amorphous sample than in the reference clay, a value which may be enhanced by orders of magnitude when considering the relative surface area of the samples. Irradiation-induced amorphization thus facilitates dissolution of the clay-derived material. This has to be taken into account for the safety assessment of high level nuclear waste repository, particularly in a scenario of leakage of the waste package which would deliver alpha emitters able to amorphize smectite after a limited period of time.

  15. Neurobehavioral Effects of Space Radiation on Psychomotor Vigilance Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hienz, Robert; Davis, Catherine; Weed, Michael; Guida, Peter; Gooden, Virginia; Brady, Joseph; Roma, Peter

    Neurobehavioral Effects of Space Radiation on Psychomotor Vigilance Tests INTRODUCTION Risk assessment of the biological consequences of living in the space radiation environment represents one of the highest priority areas of NASA radiation research. Of critical importance is the need for a risk assessment of damage to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to functional cognitive/behavioral changes during long-term space missions, and the development of effective shielding or biological countermeasures to such risks. The present research focuses on the use of an animal model that employs neurobehavioral tests identical or homologous to those currently in use in human models of risk assessment by U.S. agencies such as the Depart-ment of Defense and Federal Aviation and Federal Railroad Administrations for monitoring performance and estimating accident risks associated with such variables as fatigue and/or alcohol or drug abuse. As a first approximation for establishing human risk assessments due to exposure to space radiation, the present work provides animal performance data obtained with the rPVT (rat Psychomotor Vigilance Test), an animal analog of the human PVT that is currently employed for human risk assessments via quantification of sustained attention (e.g., 'vigilance' or 'readiness to perform' tasks). Ground-based studies indicate that radiation can induce neurobehavioral changes in rodents, including impaired performance on motor tasks and deficits in spatial learning and memory. The present study is testing the hypothesis that radiation exposure impairs motor function, performance accuracy, vigilance, motivation, and memory in adult male rats. METHODS The psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) was originally developed as a human cognitive neurobe-havioral assay for tracking the temporally dynamic changes in sustained attention, and has also been used to track changes in circadian rhythm. In humans the test requires responding to a small, bright

  16. Effects of solar ultraviolet radiation on coral reef organisms.

    PubMed

    Banaszak, Anastazia T; Lesser, Michael P

    2009-09-01

    Organisms living in shallow-water tropical coral reef environments are exposed to high UVR irradiances due to the low solar zenith angles (the angle of the sun from the vertical), the natural thinness of the ozone layer over tropical latitudes, and the high transparency of the water column. The hypothesis that solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 290-400 nm) is an important factor that affects the biology and ecology of coral reef organisms dates only to about 1980. It has been previously suggested that increased levels of biologically effective ultraviolet B radiation (UVB, 290-320 nm), which is the waveband primarily affected by ozone depletion, would have relatively small effects on corals and coral reefs and that these effects might be observed as changes in the minimum depths of occurrence of important reef taxa such as corals. This conclusion was based on predictions of increases in UVR as well as its attenuation with depth using the available data on UVR irradiances, ozone levels, and optical properties of the water overlying coral reefs. Here, we review the experimental evidence demonstrating the direct and indirect effects of UVR, both UVB and ultraviolet A (UVA, 320-400 nm) on corals and other reef associated biota, with emphasis on those studies conducted since 1996. Additionally, we re-examine the predictions made in 1996 for the increase in UVB on reefs with currently available data, assess whether those predictions were reasonable, and look at what changes might occur on coral reefs in the future as the multiple effects (i.e. increased temperature, hypercapnia, and ocean acidification) of global climate change continue.

  17. Effects of solar UV-B radiation on aquatic ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, D.-P.

    phytoplankton will be exposed to solar ultraviolet radiation. This radiation has been shown to affect growth, photosynthesis, nitrogen incorporation and enzyme activity. Other targets of solar UV irradiation are proteins and pigments involved in photosynthesis. Whether or not screening pigments can be induced in phytoplankton to effectively shield the organisms from excessive UV irradiation needs to be determined. Macroalgae show a distinct pattern of vertical distribution in their habitat. They have developed mechanisms to regulate their photosynthetic activity to adapt to the changing light regime and protect themselves from excessive radiation. A broad survey was carried out to understand photosynthesis in aquatic ecosystems and the different adaptation strategies to solar radiation of ecologically important species of green, red and brown algae from the North Sea, Baltic Sea, Mediterranean, Atlantic, polar and tropical oceans. Photoinhibition was quantified by oxygen exchange and by PAM (pulse amplitude modulated) fluorescence measurements based on transient changes of chlorophyll fluorescence.

  18. Effects of solar UV-B radiation on aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Hader, D P

    2000-01-01

    phytoplankton will be exposed to solar ultraviolet radiation. This radiation has been shown to affect growth, photosynthesis, nitrogen incorporation and enzyme activity. Other targets of solar UV irradiation are proteins and pigments involved in photosynthesis. Whether or not screening pigments can be induced in phytoplankton to effectively shield the organisms from excessive UV irradiation needs to be determined. Macroalgae show a distinct pattern of vertical distribution in their habitat. They have developed mechanisms to regulate their photosynthetic activity to adapt to the changing light regime and protect themselves from excessive radiation. A broad survey was carried out to understand photosynthesis in aquatic ecosystems and the different adaptation strategies to solar radiation of ecologically important species of green, red and brown algae from the North Sea, Baltic Sea, Mediterranean, Atlantic, polar and tropical oceans. Photoinhibition was quantified by oxygen exchange and by PAM (pulse amplitude modulated) fluorescence measurements based on transient changes of chlorophyll fluorescence. c2001 COSPAR Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation reaction for spinning bodies in effective field theory. II. Spin-spin effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Natália T.; Galley, Chad R.; Leibovich, Adam K.; Porto, Rafael A.

    2017-10-01

    We compute the leading post-Newtonian (PN) contributions at quadratic order in the spins to the radiation-reaction acceleration and spin evolution for binary systems, entering at four-and-a-half PN order. Our calculation includes the backreaction from finite-size spin effects, which is presented for the first time. The computation is carried out, from first principles, using the effective field theory framework for spinning extended objects. At this order, nonconservative effects in the spin-spin sector are independent of the spin supplementary conditions. A nontrivial consistency check is performed by showing that the energy loss induced by the resulting radiation-reaction force is equivalent to the total emitted power in the far zone. We find that, in contrast to the spin-orbit contributions (reported in a companion paper), the radiation reaction affects the evolution of the spin vectors once spin-spin effects are incorporated.

  20. The Effect of Intense Laser Radiation on Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stephen Michael Radley

    1991-02-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. We have carried out theoretical and experimental studies into the effect of intense laser radiation on atomic collisions. The first experiment used neon. Excitation by electron impact in a gas discharge demanded a pressure of at least 0.075 Torr. Measurement of the intensity of 3^1S_0to 3^1P_1 fluorescence has been made for the case where high intensity ASE wings in the laser profile and background laser scatter are unimportant, with the laser tuned to resonance. The field intensity required to produce strong field fluorescence (exemplified by the Mollow triplet) was found to give rise to complications capable of screening the effects sought. Our theoretical model has suggested that at finite detunings, line-centre fluorescence will dominate Rayleigh scatter and omega_3 fluorescence. Our measurements provide information on the saturation of neon fluorescence but not of the variation of the intense field collision rate. Absorption of weak field 253.7 nm laser photons by ground state mercury atoms yielded a high 6 ^3P_1 population at a lower pressure of 0.02 Torr. The Mollow triplet has been observed in the self-broadened mercury system. Dressing of the upper transition (6^3P_1rightarrow 7^3S_1) by an intense laser close to 435.8 nm yielded the strong field signal. Polarisation studies were made possible by the 3-level mercury system (radiation trapping in a 2-level system would depolarise fluorescence) perturbed by argon. The studies yielded results that were explainable in terms of the selective population of Stark shifted dressed states by a detuned, weak probe field. Use has been made of the electric-dipole radiation selection rule m_{J}=0 rightarrow m_{J^' } = 0 unless J=J^' to devise a 'Stark shift collision switch'. The competition between collision and radiation induced transitions within the mercury atom has then been studied. The resonant, strong lambda 435.8 nm field was used

  1. Study on the biological effect of cosmic radiation and the development of radiation protection technology (L-11)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagaoka, Shunji

    1993-01-01

    NASDA is now participating in a series of flight experiments on Spacelab missions. The first experiment was carried out on the first International Microgravity Laboratory Mission (IML-1) January 1992, and the second experiment will be conducted on the Spacelab-J Mission, First Materials Processing Test (FMPT). The equipment or Radiation Monitoring Container Devices (RMCD) includes passive dosimeter systems and biological specimens. The experiments using this hardware are designed by NASDA to measure and investigate the radiation levels inside spacecraft like space shuttle and to look at the basic effects of the space environment from the aspect of radiation biology. The data gathered will be analyzed to understand the details of biological effects as well as the physical nature of space radiation registered in the sensitive Solid-State Track Detectors (SSTD).

  2. Spatial storage effect promotes biodiversity during adaptive radiation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jiaqi; Rattray, Jennifer B; Yang, Xian; Jiang, Lin

    2017-07-12

    Many ecological communities are enormously diverse. Variation in environmental conditions over time and space provides opportunities for temporal and spatial storage effects to operate, potentially promoting species coexistence and biodiversity. While several studies have provided empirical evidence supporting the significance of the temporal storage effect for coexistence, empirical tests of the role of the spatial storage effect are rare. In particular, we know little about how the spatial storage effect contributes to biodiversity over evolutionary timescales. Here, we report the first experimental study on the role of the spatial storage effect in the maintenance of biodiversity in evolving metacommunities, using the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 as a laboratory model of adaptive radiation. We found that intercommunity spatial heterogeneity promoted phenotypic diversity of P. fluorescens in the presence of dispersal among local communities, by allowing the spatial storage effect to operate. Mechanistically, greater niche differences among P. fluorescens phenotypes arose in metacommunities with intercommunity spatial heterogeneity, facilitating negative frequency-dependent selection, and thus, the coexistence among P. fluorescens phenotypes. These results highlight the importance of the spatial storage effect for biodiversity over evolutionary timescales. © 2017 The Author(s).

  3. What Reliability Engineers Should Know about Space Radiation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiBari, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Space radiation in space systems present unique failure modes and considerations for reliability engineers. Radiation effects is not a one size fits all field. Threat conditions that must be addressed for a given mission depend on the mission orbital profile, the technologies of parts used in critical functions and on application considerations, such as supply voltages, temperature, duty cycle, and redundancy. In general, the threats that must be addressed are of two types-the cumulative degradation mechanisms of total ionizing dose (TID) and displacement damage (DD). and the prompt responses of components to ionizing particles (protons and heavy ions) falling under the heading of single-event effects. Generally degradation mechanisms behave like wear-out mechanisms on any active components in a system: Total Ionizing Dose (TID) and Displacement Damage: (1) TID affects all active devices over time. Devices can fail either because of parametric shifts that prevent the device from fulfilling its application or due to device failures where the device stops functioning altogether. Since this failure mode varies from part to part and lot to lot, lot qualification testing with sufficient statistics is vital. Displacement damage failures are caused by the displacement of semiconductor atoms from their lattice positions. As with TID, failures can be either parametric or catastrophic, although parametric degradation is more common for displacement damage. Lot testing is critical not just to assure proper device fi.mctionality throughout the mission. It can also suggest remediation strategies when a device fails. This paper will look at these effects on a variety of devices in a variety of applications. This paper will look at these effects on a variety of devices in a variety of applications. (2) On the NEAR mission a functional failure was traced to a PIN diode failure caused by TID induced high leakage currents. NEAR was able to recover from the failure by reversing the

  4. On the Effects of Bremsstrahlung Radiation During Energetic Electron Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Marshall, Robert A.; Fang, Xiaohua; Turunen, Esa; Kero, Antti

    2018-01-01

    Precipitation of energetic particles into the Earth's atmosphere can significantly change the properties, dynamics, as well as the chemical composition of the upper and middle atmosphere. In this paper, using Monte Carlo models, we simulate, from first principles, the interaction of monoenergetic beams of precipitating electrons with the atmosphere, with particular emphasis on the process of bremsstrahlung radiation and its resultant ionization production and atmospheric effects. The pitch angle dependence of the ionization rate profile has been quantified: the altitude of peak ionization rate depends on the pitch angle by a few kilometers. We also demonstrate that the transport of precipitating electron energy in the form of bremsstrahlung photons leads to ionization at altitudes significantly lower than the direct impact ionization, as low as ˜20 km for 1 MeV precipitating electrons. Moreover, chemical modeling results suggest that the chemical effects in the atmosphere due to bremsstrahlung-induced ionization production during energetic electron precipitation are likely insignificant.

  5. Casimir effect and radiative heat transfer between Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Lopez, Pablo; Grushin, Adolfo; Tse, Wang-Kong; Dalvit, Diego

    2015-03-01

    Chern Insulators are a class of two-dimensional topological materials. Their electronic properties are different from conventional materials, and lead to interesting new physics as quantum Hall effect in absence of an external magnetic field. Here we will review some of their special properties and, in particular, we will discuss the radiative heat transfer and the Casimir effect between two planar Chern Insulators sheets. Finally, we will see how to control the intensity and sign of this Casimir force and the requirements to observe a repulsive Casimir force in the lab with those materials. The research leading to these results has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA Grant Agreement No. 302005.

  6. Cloud-radiation interactions - Effects of cirrus optical thickness feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, Richard C. J.; Iacobellis, Sam

    1987-01-01

    The paper is concerned with a cloud-radiation feedback mechanism which may be an important component of the climate changes expected from increased atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other trace greenhouse gases. A major result of the study is that cirrus cloud optical thickness feedbacks may indeed tend to increase the surface warming due to trace gas increases. However, the positive feedback from cirrus appears to be generally weaker than the negative effects due to lower clouds. The results just confirm those of earlier research indicating that the net effect of cloud optical thickness feedbacks may be a negative feedback which may substantially (by a factor of about 2) reduce the surface warming due to the doubling of CO2, even in the presence of cirrus clouds.

  7. Total-dose radiation effects data for semiconductor devices, volume 1. [radiation resistance of components for the Galileo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, W. E.; Martin, K. E.; Nichols, D. K.; Gauthier, M. K.; Brown, S. F.

    1981-01-01

    Steady-state, total-dose radiation test data are provided in graphic format, for use by electronic designers and other personnel using semiconductor devices in a radiation environment. Data are presented by JPL for various NASA space programs on diodes, bipolar transistors, field effect transistors, silicon-controlled rectifiers, and optical devices. A vendor identification code list is included along with semiconductor device electrical parameter symbols and abbreviations.

  8. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER: Spectrum of the barium atom in a laser radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar', I. I.; Suran, V. V.

    1990-08-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the influence of a laser radiation field on the spectrum of barium atoms. The investigation was carried out by the method of three-photon ionization spectroscopy using dye laser radiation (ω = 14 800-18 700 cm - 1). The electric field intensity of the laser radiation was 103-106 V/cm. This laser radiation field had a strong influence on a number of bound and autoionizing states. The nature of this influence depended on the ratio of the excitation frequencies of bound and autoionizing states.

  9. The effect of space radiation of the nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauger, Grant E.; Tobias, Cornelius A.; Yang, Tracy; Whitney, Monroe

    The long-term effects of irradiation by accelerated heavy ions on the structure and function of the nervous system have not been studied extensively. Although the adult brain is relatively resistant to low LET radiation, cellular studies indicate that individual heavy ions can produce serious membrane lesions and multiple chromatin breaks. Capillary hemorrhages may follow high LET particle irradiation of the developing brain as high RBE effects. Evidence has been accumulating that the glial system and blood-brain barrier (BBB) are relatively sensitive to injury by ionizing radiation. While DNA repair is active in neural systems, it may be assumed that a significant portion of this molecular process is misrepair. Since the expression of cell lethality usually requires cell division, and nerve cells have an extremely low rate of division, it is possible that some of the characteristic changes of premature aging may represent a delayed effect of chromatin misrepair in brain. Altered microcirculation, decreased local metabolism, entanglement and reduction in synaptic density, premature loss of neurons, myelin degeneration, and glial proliferation are late signs of such injuries. HZE particles are very efficient in producing carcinogenic cell transformation, reaching a peak for iron particles. The promotion of viral transformation is also efficient up to an energy transfer of approximately 300 keV/micron. The RBE for carcinogenesis in nerve tissues remains unknown. On the basis of available information concerning HZE particle flux in interplanetary space, only general estimates of the magnitude of the effects of long-term spaceflight on some nervous system parameters may be constructed.

  10. Hydraulic effects in a radiative atmosphere with ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, P.; Brandenburg, A.

    2016-03-01

    Context. In his 1978 paper, Eugene Parker postulated the need for hydraulic downward motion to explain magnetic flux concentrations at the solar surface. A similar process has also recently been seen in simplified (e.g., isothermal) models of flux concentrations from the negative effective magnetic pressure instability (NEMPI). Aims: We study the effects of partial ionization near the radiative surface on the formation of these magnetic flux concentrations. Methods: We first obtain one-dimensional (1D) equilibrium solutions using either a Kramers-like opacity or the H- opacity. The resulting atmospheres are then used as initial conditions in two-dimensional (2D) models where flows are driven by an imposed gradient force that resembles a localized negative pressure in the form of a blob. To isolate the effects of partial ionization and radiation, we ignore turbulence and convection. Results: Because of partial ionization, an unstable stratification always forms near the surface. We show that the extrema in the specific entropy profiles correspond to the extrema in the degree of ionization. In the 2D models without partial ionization, strong flux concentrations form just above the height where the blob is placed. Interestingly, in models with partial ionization, such flux concentrations always form at the surface well above the blob. This is due to the corresponding negative gradient in specific entropy. Owing to the absence of turbulence, the downflows reach transonic speeds. Conclusions: We demonstrate that, together with density stratification, the imposed source of negative pressure drives the formation of flux concentrations. We find that the inclusion of partial ionization affects the entropy profile dramatically, causing strong flux concentrations to form closer to the surface. We speculate that turbulence effects are needed to limit the strength of flux concentrations and homogenize the specific entropy to a stratification that is close to marginal.

  11. Radiation and Its Health Effects. AIO Red Paper #19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duda, Terrie

    Radiation has been a serious concern to individuals for over 100 years. A process by which an atomic nucleus emits particles to reach a more stable energy state, radiation harms living cells (usually by inhalation and absorption into the lungs) by causing abnormal cell function and structure. Man is constantly exposed to background radiation, both…

  12. Space Radiation Effects on Graphite-Epoxy Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milkovich, S. M.; Herakovich, C. T.; Sykes, G. F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation effects on engineering properties, dimensional stability, and chemistry on state of the art composite systems were characterized. T300/934 graphite-epoxy composite was subjected to 1.0 MeV electron radiation for a total dose of 1.0 x 10(10) rads at a rate of 5.0 x 10(7) rads/hour. This simulates a worst case exposure equivalent to 30 years in space. Mechanical testing was performed on he 4-ply unidirectional laminates over the temperature range of -250 F (116K) to +250 F (394K). A complete set of in-plane tensile elastic and strength properties were obtained (E sub 1, E sub 2, nu sub 12, G sub 12, X sub T, Y sub T, and S). In addition electron microscopy was used to study and analyze the fracture surfaces of all specimens tested. Results indicate that little difference in properties is noted at room temperature, but significant differences are observed at both low and elevated temperatures.

  13. Mathematical modeling the radiation effects on humoral immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, O. A.

    A mathematical model of humoral immune response in nonirradiated and irradiated mammals is developed. It is based on conventional theories and experimental facts in this field. The model is a system of nonlinear differential equations which describe the dynamics of concentrations of antibody and antigen molecules, immunocompetent B lymphocytes, and the rest blood lymphocytes, as well as the bone-marrow lymphocyte precursors. The interaction of antigen molecules with antibodies and with antibody-like receptors on immunocompetent cells is also incorporated. The model quantitatively reproduces the dynamics of the humoral immune response to the T-independent antigen (capsular antigen of plague microbe) in nonirradiated mammals (CBA mice). It describes the peculiarities of the humoral immune response in CBA mice exposed to acute radiation before or after introducing antigen. The model predicts an adaptation of humoral immune system to low dose rate chronic irradiation in the result of which the intensity of immune response relaxes to a new, lower than normal, stable level. The mechanisms of this phenomenon are revealed. The results obtained show that the developed model, after the appropriate identification, can be used to predict the effects of acute and low-level long-term irradiation on the system of humoral immunity in humans. Employment of the mathematical model identified in the proper way should be important in estimating the radiation risk for cosmonauts and astronauts on long space missions such as a voyage to Mars or a lunar colony.

  14. Geometrical Effects on the Electromagnetic Radiation from Lightning Return Strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willett, John C.; Smith, David A.; LeVine, David M.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Sferic Array has recorded electric-field-change waveforms simultaneously at several stations surrounding the ground-strike points of numerous return strokes in cloud-to-ground lightning flashes. Such data are available from the five-station sub-networks in both Florida and New Mexico. With these data it has been possible for the first time to compare the waveforms radiated in different directions by a given stroke. Such comparisons are of interest to assess both the effects of channel geometry on the fine structure of subsequent-stroke radiation fields and the role of branches in the more jagged appearance of first-stroke waveforms. This paper presents multiple-station, time-domain waveforms with a 200 Hz to 500 kHz pass-band from both first and subsequent return strokes at ranges generally between 100 and 200 km. The differences among waveforms of the same stroke received at stations in different directions from the lightning channel are often obvious. These differences are illustrated and interpreted in the context of channel tortuosity and branches.

  15. Effects of ionization radiation on BICMOS components for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rancoita, P. G.; Croitoru, N.; D'Angelo, P.; de Marchi, M.; Favalli, A.; Seidman, A.; Colder, A.; Levalois, M.; Marie, P.; Fallica, G.; Leonardi, S.; Modica, R.

    2002-12-01

    In this paper experimental results on radiation effects on a BICMOS high-speed standard commercial technology, manufactured by ST-Microelectronics, are reported. Bipolar transistors were irradiated by neutrons, ions, or by both of them. Fast neutrons, as well as other types of particles, produce defects, mainly by displacing silicon atoms from their lattice positions to interstitial locations, i.e. generating vacancy-interstitial pairs, the so-called Frenkel pairs. Defects introduce trapping energy states which degrade the common emitter current gain . The gain degradation has bee investigated for collector current, Ic, between 1 μA and1 mA. It was found a linear dependence of Δ(1/β) = 1/β- 1/βi(where βi and β are the gain after and before tirradiation) as a function of the concentration of Frenkel pairs. The bipolar transistors made on this technology have shown to be particularly radiation resistant. For instance, npn small area transistors have a gain variation (-i)/, lower than 10% for doses of about 0.5 MRad and collector currents of 1 μA, well suited for low power consumption space application

  16. Effect of individual blade control on noise radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, S. M.; Jacklin, Stephen A.; Niesl, G.; Blaas, Achim; Kube, R.

    1995-01-01

    In a joint research program of NASA Ames Research Center, ZF Luftfahrttechnik, the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR), and EUROCOPTER Deutschland, a wind tunnel test was performed to evaluate the effects of Individual Blade Control (IBC) on rotor noise. This test was conducted in the 40x80 ft wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center, utilizing a full scale MBB-BO 105 four-bladed rotor system. Three microphones were installed for determination of the radiated noise, two of them on a moveable traverse below the advancing blade side and one in a fixed location below the retreating side. Acoustic results are presented for flight conditions with Blade-Vortex-Interaction (BVI) noise radiation. High noise level reductions were measured for single harmonic control inputs. In addition to the single harmonic inputs, multi-harmonic inputs were evaluated by superimposing 2/rev to 6/rev harmonics. For the first time the efficiency of sharp wavelets (60 deg and 90 deg width) on acoustic noise were measured. In order to achieve an adequate wavelet shape at the blade tip, corrections were made to account for the blade torsional behavior. In parallel with the acoustic measurements, vibratory loads were measured during the BVI flight condition to correlate the effects of IBC on noise and vibrations. It is shown how noise levels and vibrations are affected by specific IBC control inputs. In addition, correlations are made between noise levels and acoustic time histories with IBC phase and amplitude variations. For one IBC input mode with high noise reducing efficiency, a sweep of the moveable microphone traverse below the advancing side shows the effect on BVI noise directivity.

  17. The effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation on sperm function.

    PubMed

    Houston, B J; Nixon, B; King, B V; De Iuliis, G N; Aitken, R J

    2016-12-01

    Mobile phone usage has become an integral part of our lives. However, the effects of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR) emitted by these devices on biological systems and specifically the reproductive systems are currently under active debate. A fundamental hindrance to the current debate is that there is no clear mechanism of how such non-ionising radiation influences biological systems. Therefore, we explored the documented impacts of RF-EMR on the male reproductive system and considered any common observations that could provide insights on a potential mechanism. Among a total of 27 studies investigating the effects of RF-EMR on the male reproductive system, negative consequences of exposure were reported in 21. Within these 21 studies, 11 of the 15 that investigated sperm motility reported significant declines, 7 of 7 that measured the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) documented elevated levels and 4 of 5 studies that probed for DNA damage highlighted increased damage due to RF-EMR exposure. Associated with this, RF-EMR treatment reduced the antioxidant levels in 6 of 6 studies that discussed this phenomenon, whereas consequences of RF-EMR were successfully ameliorated with the supplementation of antioxidants in all 3 studies that carried out these experiments. In light of this, we envisage a two-step mechanism whereby RF-EMR is able to induce mitochondrial dysfunction leading to elevated ROS production. A continued focus on research, which aims to shed light on the biological effects of RF-EMR will allow us to test and assess this proposed mechanism in a variety of cell types. © 2016 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  18. Metabolomic applications in radiation biodosimetry: exploring radiation effects through small molecules.

    PubMed

    Pannkuk, Evan L; Fornace, Albert J; Laiakis, Evagelia C

    2017-10-01

    Exposure of the general population to ionizing radiation has increased in the past decades, primarily due to long distance travel and medical procedures. On the other hand, accidental exposures, nuclear accidents, and elevated threats of terrorism with the potential detonation of a radiological dispersal device or improvised nuclear device in a major city, all have led to increased needs for rapid biodosimetry and assessment of exposure to different radiation qualities and scenarios. Metabolomics, the qualitative and quantitative assessment of small molecules in a given biological specimen, has emerged as a promising technology to allow for rapid determination of an individual's exposure level and metabolic phenotype. Advancements in mass spectrometry techniques have led to untargeted (discovery phase, global assessment) and targeted (quantitative phase) methods not only to identify biomarkers of radiation exposure, but also to assess general perturbations of metabolism with potential long-term consequences, such as cancer, cardiovascular, and pulmonary disease. Metabolomics of radiation exposure has provided a highly informative snapshot of metabolic dysregulation. Biomarkers in easily accessible biofluids and biospecimens (urine, blood, saliva, sebum, fecal material) from mouse, rat, and minipig models, to non-human primates and humans have provided the basis for determination of a radiation signature to assess the need for medical intervention. Here we provide a comprehensive description of the current status of radiation metabolomic studies for the purpose of rapid high-throughput radiation biodosimetry in easily accessible biofluids and discuss future directions of radiation metabolomics research.

  19. The design of a monopole radiator to investigate the effect of microwave radiation in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Bigu-del-Blanco, J; Romero-Sierra, C

    1977-08-01

    The design of a microwave monopole radiator, using a hollow hypodermic needle, is described. This radiator has two unique features. It allows both i) irradiation of deep biological structures by simple needle injection and ii) simultaneous chemotherapic treatment of tissue. The matching characteristics of the monopole in saline solutions are given.

  20. Beta radiation shielding with lead and plastic: effect on bremsstrahlung radiation when switching the shielding order.

    PubMed

    Van Pelt, Wesley R; Drzyzga, Michael

    2007-02-01

    Lead and plastic are commonly used to shield beta radiation. Radiation protection literature is ubiquitous in advising the placement of plastic first to absorb all the beta particles before any lead shielding is used. This advice is based on the well established theory that radiative losses (bremsstrahlung production) are more prevalent in higher atomic number (Z) materials than in low Z materials. Using 32P beta radiation, we measured bremsstrahlung photons transmitted through lead and plastic (Lucite) shielding in different test configurations to determine the relative efficacy of lead alone, plastic alone, and the positional order of lead and plastic. With the source (32P) and detector held at a constant separation distance, we inserted lead and/or plastic absorbers and measured the reduction in bremsstrahlung radiation level measured by the detector. With these test conditions, analysis of measured bremsstrahlung radiation in various thicknesses and configurations of lead and plastic shielding shows the following: placing plastic first vs. lead first reduces the transmitted radiation level only marginally (10% to 40%); 2 mm of additional lead is sufficient to correct the "mistake" of placing the lead first; and for equal thicknesses or weights of lead and plastic, lead is a more efficient radiation shield than plastic.

  1. Radiation Effects on Flow Characteristics in Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewster, M. Q.; Gross, Klaus W.

    1989-01-01

    A JANNAF sponsored workshop was held to discuss the importance and role of radiative heat transfer in rocket combustion chambers. The potential impact of radiative transfer on hardware design, reliability, and performance was discussed. The current state of radiative transfer prediction capability in CFD modeling was reviewed and concluded to be substantially lacking in both the physical models used and the radiative property data available. There is a clear need to begin to establish a data base for making radiation calculations in rocket combustion chambers. A natural starting point for this effort would be the NASA thermochemical equilibrium code (CEC).

  2. Design considerations for combined radiation effects facilities for twelve year outer planet spacecraft voyages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    1972-01-01

    The design considerations influencing the choice and utility of environmental simulation methods and facilities are described, insofar as they relate to the requirements imposed on outer planet spacecraft because of radiation environments to be expected. Possible means for duplicating the radioisotope thermoelectric generator radiation environment, and for duplicating the effects of the trapped radiation belt environment are described, together with an assessment of radiation levels to be expected in the vicinity of an environmental testing chamber when in use.

  3. 1988 IEEE Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 25th, Portland, OR, July 12-15, 1988, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, Peter G. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The effects of nuclear and space radiation on the performance of electronic devices are discussed in reviews and reports of recent investigations. Topics addressed include the basic mechanisms of radiation effects, dosimetry and energy-dependent effects, sensors in and for radiation environments, EMP/SGEMP/IEMP phenomena, radiation effects on isolation technologies, and spacecraft charging and space radiation effects. Consideration is given to device radiation effects and hardening, hardness assurance and testing techniques, IC radiation effects and hardening, and single-event phenomena.

  4. Compensating effect of the coherent synchrotron radiation in bunch compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Yichao; Hao, Yue; Litvinenko, Vladimir N.

    2013-06-01

    Typical bunch compression for a high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) requires a large compression ratio. Frequently, this compression is distributed in multiple stages along the beam transport line. However, for a high-gain FEL driven by an energy recovery linac (ERL), compression must be accomplished in a single strong compressor located at the beam line’s end; otherwise the electron beam would be affected severely by coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the ERL’s arcs. In such a scheme, the CSR originating from the strong compressors could greatly degrade the quality of the electron beam. In this paper, we present our design for a bunch compressor that will limit the effect of CSR on the e-beam’s quality. We discuss our findings from a study of such a compressor, and detail its potential for an FEL driven by a multipass ERL developed for the electron-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  5. Comparative effectiveness research in practice and policy for radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, William F

    2014-01-01

    Interest in comparative effectiveness research (CER) has increased dramatically over the past decade, yet perceptions about what comprises CER varies. CER has several attributes relevant to practice and policy: (1) The goal of CER is to inform decisions about health care. (2) Literature synthesis is used in addition to primary research. (3) CER evaluates not only overall outcomes for the population but also evaluates subgroups that may have heterogeneous outcomes. (4) Research places an emphasis on outcomes in the "real-world" settings. (5) Outcomes studied should be relevant to patients. In radiation oncology, where many of the traditional clinical trials are comparative in nature, the line between CER and "traditional" research may be blurred, but an increased emphasis on CER can help to bridge the research enterprise and clinical practice, helping to inform decision making at the patient, clinician, and policy levels. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Radiation-induced effects and the immune system in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Punit; Asea, Alexzander

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) are standard therapeutic modalities for patients with cancers, and could induce various tumor cell death modalities, releasing tumor-derived antigens as well as danger signals that could either be captured for triggering anti-tumor immune response. Historic studies examining tissue and cellular responses to RT have predominantly focused on damage caused to proliferating malignant cells leading to their death. However, there is increasing evidence that RT also leads to significant alterations in the tumor microenvironment, particularly with respect to effects on immune cells and infiltrating tumors. This review will focus on immunologic consequences of RT and discuss the therapeutic reprogramming of immune responses in tumors and how it regulates efficacy and durability to RT. PMID:23251903

  7. Radiation-induced effects and the immune system in cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Punit; Asea, Alexzander

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) are standard therapeutic modalities for patients with cancers, and could induce various tumor cell death modalities, releasing tumor-derived antigens as well as danger signals that could either be captured for triggering anti-tumor immune response. Historic studies examining tissue and cellular responses to RT have predominantly focused on damage caused to proliferating malignant cells leading to their death. However, there is increasing evidence that RT also leads to significant alterations in the tumor microenvironment, particularly with respect to effects on immune cells and infiltrating tumors. This review will focus on immunologic consequences of RT and discuss the therapeutic reprogramming of immune responses in tumors and how it regulates efficacy and durability to RT.

  8. Effects of the Effect of Ultra High Frequency Mobile Phone Radiation on Human Health.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Mosa; Naghdi, Nasrollah; Hemmati, Hamidreza; Asadi-Samani, Majid; Bahmani, Mahmoud

    2016-05-01

    Public and occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields due to the growing trend of electronic devices may cause adverse effects on human health. This paper describes the risk of mutation and sexual trauma and infertility in masculine sexual cell by mobile phone radiations. In this study, we measured the emitted dose from a radiofrequency device, such as switching high voltage at different frequencies using a scintillation detector. The switching high voltage power supply (HVPS) was built for the Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) system. For radiation dosimetry, we used an ALNOR scintillator that can measure gamma radiation. The simulation was performed by MATLAB software, and data from the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) were used to verify the simulation. We investigated the risks that result from the waves, according to a report by International Commission on Non Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), to every organ of the body is defined by the beam and electromagnetic radiation from this electronic device on people. The results showed that the maximum personal dose over a 15-min period working at the mentioned HVPS did not exceed 0.31 μSV/h (with an aluminum shield). So, according to other sources of radiation, continuous working time of the system should not be more than 10 hours. Finally, a characteristic curve for secure working with modules at different frequencies was reported. The RF input signal to the body for maximum penetration depth (δ) and electromagnetic energy absorption rate (SAR) of biological tissue were obtained for each tissue. The results of this study and International Commission of Non Ionization Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) reports showed the people who spend more than 50 minutes a day using a cell phone could have early dementia or other thermal damage due to the burning of glucose in the brain.

  9. Stratus Cloud Radiative Effects from Cloud Processed Bimodal CCN Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, S. R., Jr.; Hudson, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    Inability to understand cloud processes is a large component of climate uncertainty. Increases in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations are known to increase cloud droplet number concentrations (Nc). This aerosol-cloud interaction (ACI) produces greater Nc at smaller sizes, which brightens clouds. A lesser understood ACI is cloud processing of CCN. This improves CCN that then more easily activate at lower cloud supersaturations (S). Bimodal CCN distributions thus ensue from these evaporated cloud droplets. Hudson et al. (2015) related CCN bimodality to Nc. In stratus clouds, bimodal CCN created greater Nc whereas in cumulus less Nc. Thus, CCN distribution shape influences cloud properties; microphysics and radiative properties. Measured uni- and bimodal CCN distributions were input into an adiabatic droplet growth model using various specified vertical wind speeds (W). Bimodal CCN produced greater Nc (Fig. 1a) and smaller mean diameters (MD; Fig. 1b) at lower W typical of stratus clouds (<70 cm/s). Improved CCN (low critical S) were more easily activated at the lower S of stratus from low W, thus, creating greater Nc. Competition for condensate thus reduced MD and drizzle. At greater W, typical of cumulus clouds (>70 cm/s), bimodal CCN made lower Nc with larger MD thus enhancing drizzle whereas unimodal CCN made greater Nc with smaller MD, thus reducing drizzle. Thus, theoretical predictions of Nc and MD for uni- and bimodal CCN agree with the sense of the observations. Radiative effects were determined using a cloud grown to a 250-meter thickness. Bimodal CCN at low W reduced cloud effective radius (re), made greater cloud optical thickness (COT), and made greater cloud albedo (Fig. 1c). At very low W changes were as much as +9% for albedo, +17% for COT, and -12% for re. Stratus clouds typically have low W and cover large areas. Thus, these changes in cloud radiative properties at low W impact climate. Stratus cloud susceptibility to CCN distribution thus

  10. Low dose radiation effects on the brain - from mechanisms and behavioral outcomes to mitigation strategies.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Kolb, Bryan

    2017-07-03

    Based on the most recent estimates by the Canadian Cancer Society, 2 in 5 Canadians will develop cancer in their lifetimes. More than half of all cancer patients receive some type of radiation therapy, and all patients undergo radiation-based diagnostics. While radiation is one of the most important diagnostic and treatments modalities, high-dose cranial radiation therapy causes numerous central nervous system side-effects, including declines in cognitive function, memory, and attention. While the mechanisms of these effects have been studies, they still need to be further elucidated. On the other hand, the effects of low dose radiation as well as indirect radiation bystander effects on the brain remain elusive. We pioneered analysis of the molecular and cellular effects of low dose direct, bystander and scatter radiation on the brain. Using a rat model, we showed that low dose radiation exposures cause molecular and cellular changes in the brain and impacts animal behavior. Here we reflect upon our recent findings and current state of knowledge in the field, and suggest novel radiation effect biomarkers and means of prevention. We propose strategies and interventions to prevent and mitigate radiation effects on the brain.

  11. Uncertainties in radiation effect predictions for the natural radiation environments of space.

    PubMed

    McNulty, P J; Stassinopoulos, E G

    1994-10-01

    Future manned missions beyond low earth orbit require accurate predictions of the risk to astronauts and to critical systems from exposure to ionizing radiation. For low-level exposures, the hazards are dominated by rare single-event phenomena where individual cosmic-ray particles or spallation reactions result in potentially catastrophic changes in critical components. Examples might be a biological lesion leading to cancer in an astronaut or a memory upset leading to an undesired rocket firing. The risks of such events appears to depend on the amount of energy deposited within critical sensitive volumes of biological cells and microelectronic components. The critical environmental information needed to estimate the risks posed by the natural space environments, including solar flares, is the number of times more than a threshold amount of energy for an event will be deposited in the critical microvolumes. These predictions are complicated by uncertainties in the natural environments, particularly the composition of flares, and by the effects of shielding. Microdosimetric data for large numbers of orbits are needed to improve the environmental models and to test the transport codes used to predict event rates.

  12. Uncertainties in radiation effect predictions for the natural radiation environments of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnulty, P. J.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1994-01-01

    Future manned missions beyond low earth orbit require accurate predictions of the risk to astronauts and to critical systems from exposure to ionizing radiation. For low-level exposures, the hazards are dominated by rare single-event phenomena where individual cosmic-ray particles or spallation reactions result in potentially catastrophic changes in critical components. Examples might be a biological lesion leading to cancer in an astronaut or a memory upset leading to an undesired rocket firing. The risks of such events appears to depend on the amount of energy deposited within critical sensitive volumes of biological cells and microelectronic components. The critical environmental information needed to estimate the risks posed by the natural space environments, including solar flares, is the number of times more than a threshold amount of energy for an event will be deposited in the critical microvolumes. These predictions are complicated by uncertainties in the natural environments, particularly the composition of flares, and by the effects of shielding. Microdosimetric data for large numbers of orbits are needed to improve the environmental models and to test the transport codes used to predict event rates.

  13. Aerosol Climate Effects: Local Radiative Forcing and Column Closure Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, Robert W.; Kinne, S. A.

    2000-01-01

    In an effort to reduce uncertainties in climate change predictions, experiments are being planned and conducted to measure anthropogenic aerosol properties and effects, including effects on radiative fields. The global average, direct anthropogenic aerosol effect on upwelling shortwave fluxes is estimated to be about +1/2 W/sq m, whereas errors in flux changes measured with airborne and spaceborne radiometers are 2 to 8 W/sq m or larger. This poses the question of whether flux changes expected in field experiments will be large enough to measure accurately. This paper obtains a new expression for the aerosol-induced change in upwelling flux, compares it to two-stream and adding-doubling (AD) results, and uses all three methods to estimate expected flux changes. The new expression accounts for the solar zenith angle dependences of aerosol transmission and reflection, as well as of surface albedo, all of which can have a strong effect in determining flux changes measured in field experiments. Despite its relative simplicity, the new expression gives results similar to previous two-stream results. Relative to AD results, it agrees within a few watts per square meter for the intermediate solar elevation angles where the flux changes peak (roughly 10 to 30 degrees), but it has negative errors for higher Sun and positive errors for lower Sun. All three techniques yield aerosol-induced changes in upwelling flux of +8 to +50 W/sq m for aerosol midvisible optical depths of 0.1 to 0.5. Because such aerosol optical depths occur frequently off the U.S. and European Atlantic coasts in summer, the flux changes they induce should be measurable by airborne, and possibly by spaceborne, radiometers, provided sufficient care is taken in experiment design (including measurements to separate aerosol radiative effects from those of absorbing gases). The expected flux changes are about 15 to 100 times larger than the global average flux change expected for the global average

  14. The Seasonal Cycle of the Radiation Budget and Cloud Radiative Effect in the Amazon Rainforest of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collow, A.; Miller, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Amazon Rainforest of Brazil is a region with potential climate sensitivities, especially with ongoing land surface changes and biomass burning aerosols due to deforestation. Ubiquitous moisture in the area make clouds a common feature over the Amazon Rainforest and along with the influences from deforestation have a significant impact on the radiation budget. This region experiences a seasonal contrast in clouds, precipitation, and aerosols making it an ideal location to study the relationship between these variables and the radiation budget. An internationally sponsored campaign entitled GOAmazon2014/15 included a deployment of an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility, which collected comprehensive measurements using in situ and remote sensors. Observations of clouds, aerosols, and radiative fluxes from the first year of the deployment are analyzed in conjunction with top of the atmosphere (TOA) observations from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and analyses from the newly released Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications Version-2 (MERRA-2). The combination of surface and TOA observations allows for the calculation of radiative flux divergence and cloud radiative effect (CRE) within the column, while the comparison to MERRA-2 enables the verification of a new reanalysis product and a view of the spatial variation of the radiation budget. Clouds are very reflective in the area, creating a cooling effect in the shortwave (SW) at the surface, with some seasonality present due to the reduction of optically thick clouds in the dry season. Clouds have little effect on the column itself in the SW due to the balance between the reflective and absorbing properties of the clouds with the majority of the impact on the atmosphere from clouds warming in the longwave. Influences of aerosols are seen in the dry season, and an increase in moisture above the Amazon River and its tributaries enhance the CRE.

  15. IEEE Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects Conference: Notes on the Early Conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Galloway, Kenneth F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper gathers the remembrances of several key contributors who participated in the earliest Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects Conferences (NSREC).

  16. Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, Gatlinburg, TN, July 18-21, 1983, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Topics discussed include radiation effects in devices; the basic mechanisms of radiation effects in structures and materials; radiation effects in integrated circuits; spacecraft charging and space radiation effects; hardness assurance for devices and systems; and radiation transport, energy deposition and charge collection. Papers are presented on the mechanisms of small instabilities in irradiated MOS transistors, on the radiation effects on oxynitride gate dielectrics, on the discharge characteristics of a simulated solar cell array, and on latchup in CMOS devices from heavy ions. Attention is also given to proton upsets in orbit, to the modeling of single-event upset in bipolar integrated circuits, to high-resolution studies of the electrical breakdown of soil, and to a finite-difference solution of Maxwell's equations in generalized nonorthogonal coordinates.

  17. Assessment of the effects of environmental radiation on wind chill equivalent temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2008-09-01

    Combinations of wind-driven convection and environmental radiation in cold weather, make the environment "feel" colder. The relative contributions of these mechanisms, which form the basis for estimating wind chill equivalent temperatures (WCETs), are studied over a wide range of environmental conditions. Distinction is made between direct solar radiation and environmental radiation. Solar radiation, which is not included in the analysis, has beneficial effects, as it counters and offsets some of the effects due to wind and low air temperatures. Environmental radiation effects, which are included, have detrimental effects in enhancing heat loss from the human body, thus affecting the overall thermal sensation due to the environment. The analysis is performed by a simple, steady-state analytical model of human-environment thermal interaction using upper and lower bounds of environmental radiation heat exchange. It is shown that, over a wide range of relevant air temperatures and reported wind speeds, convection heat losses dominate over environmental radiation. At low wind speeds radiation contributes up to about 23% of the overall heat loss from exposed skin areas. Its relative contributions reduce considerably as the time of the exposure prolongs and exposed skin temperatures drop. At still higher wind speeds, environmental radiation effects become much smaller contributing about 5% of the total heat loss. These values fall well within the uncertainties associated with the parameter values assumed in the computation of WCETs. It is also shown that environmental radiation effects may be accommodated by adjusting reported wind speeds slightly above their reported values.

  18. Argon laser phototherapy could eliminate the damage effects induced by the ionizing radiation "gamma radiation" in irradiated rabbits.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Aziz, Karolin Kamel; Tuorkey, M J

    2010-04-02

    The ionizing radiations could be taken in considerate as an integral part in our life, since, living organisms are actually exposed to a constant shower of ionizing radiations whether from the natural or artificial resources. The radio-protective efficiency of several chemicals has been confirmed in animal trails, whereas, due to their accumulative toxicity, their clinical utility is limited. Therefore, we aimed in the present work to investigate the possibility of using argon laser to recuperate the damaged tissues due to exposing to the ionizing radiation. The rabbits were used in this study, and they were designed as control, gamma irradiated, laser, and gamma plus laser groups. Lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) in blood and liver were evaluated. As well as, the level of protein thiol was evaluated in the plasma among each group. Results of this study revealed the potential therapeutic performance of the treatment by laser argon to decline the damaging effect of the ionized radiation whether at systematic or local levels. In conclusion, argon laser therapy appears propitious protective effect against the hazard effects of gamma radiation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Placement and efficiency effects on radiative forcing of solar installations

    SciTech Connect

    Burg, Brian R.; Ruch, Patrick; Paredes, Stephan

    2015-09-28

    The promise for harnessing solar energy being hampered by cost, triggered efforts to reduce them. As a consequence low-efficiency, low-cost photovoltaics (PV) panels prevail. Conversely, in the traditional energy sector efficiency is extremely important due to the direct costs associated to fuels. This also affects solar energy due to the radiative forcing caused by the dark solar panels. In this paper we extend the concept of energy payback time by including the effect of albedo change, which gives a better assessment of the system sustainability. We present an analysis on the short and medium term climate forcing effects of differentmore » solar collectors in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and demonstrate that efficiency is important to reduce the collector area and cost. This also influences the embodied energy and the global warming potential. We show that a placement of a high concentration photovoltaic thermal solar power station outside of the city using a district cooling system has a double beneficial effect since it improves the solar conversion efficiency and reduces the energy demand for cooling in the city. We also explain the mechanisms of the current economic development of solar technologies and anticipate changes.« less

  20. War Induced Aerosol Optical, Microphysical and Radiative Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munshi, Pavel; Tiwari, Shubhansh

    2017-01-01

    The effect of war on air pollution and climate is assessed in this communication. War today in respect of civil wars and armed conflict in the Middle East area is taken into consideration. Impacts of war are not only in loss of human life and property, but also in the environment. It is well known that war effects air pollution and in the long run contribute to anthropogenic climate change, but general studies on this subject are few because of the difficulties of observations involved. In the current scenario of the ongoing conflict in the Middle East regions, deductions in parameters of atmosphere are discussed. Aerosol Optical Depth, Aerosol loads, Black Carbon, Ozone,Dust, regional haze and many more are analyzed using various satellite data. Multi-model analysis is also studied to verify the analysis. Type segregation of aerosols, in-depth constraints to atmospheric chemistry, biological effects and particularly atmospheric physics in terms of radiative forcing, etc. are discussed. Undergraduate in Earth Sciences.

  1. Imaging and radiation effects of gold nanoparticles in tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    McQuaid, Harold N.; Muir, Mark F.; Taggart, Laura E.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.; Hirst, David G.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Currell, Fred J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization represents a novel technique in enhancement of ionising radiation dose and its effect on biological systems. Variation between theoretical predictions and experimental measurement is significant enough that the mechanism leading to an increase in cell killing and DNA damage is still not clear. We present the first experimental results that take into account both the measured biodistribution of gold nanoparticles at the cellular level and the range of the product electrons responsible for energy deposition. Combining synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays, intracellular gold particle imaging and DNA damage assays, has enabled a DNA damage model to be generated that includes the production of intermediate electrons. We can therefore show for the first time good agreement between the prediction of biological outcomes from both the Local Effect Model and a DNA damage model with experimentally observed cell killing and DNA damage induction via the combination of X-rays and GNPs. However, the requirement of two distinct models as indicated by this mechanistic study, one for short-term DNA damage and another for cell survival, indicates that, at least for nanoparticle enhancement, it is not safe to equate the lethal lesions invoked in the local effect model with DNA damage events. PMID:26787230

  2. Post-Fukushima radiation education for Japanese high school students in affected areas and its positive effects on their radiation literacy.

    PubMed

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kitamura, Yuto; Yoshida, Megumi

    2018-04-01

    In post-Fukushima Japan, radiation education is very important, and the subject is being actively discussed. However, little information is available about the amount of knowledge students initially had about radiation or about how well radiation education improves their understanding. Using the questionnaire results of 717 students completed before and after radiation lectures held in three high schools in Fukushima, we examined the number of answers to the questionnaire aligned with the evidence base, and classified the students into clusters based on radiation-related behavior and attitudes to assess the effectiveness of the lecture. The contents of the lectures consisted of (i) scientific knowledge relating to radiation, (ii) results of radiation examinations conducted locally following the disaster and (iii) measures and precautions for daily radiation protection. Associations between the type of knowledge and radiation-related behavior and attitude were also examined to determine which type of knowledge was more important for deepening students' understanding of radiation. This study revealed that radiation education in high schools was effective for students with respect to acquiring relevant basic and practical knowledge; however, the effects of the radiation lecture differed greatly between schools, presumably due to differences in the delivery and atmosphere of the lecture. The present study also suggested that radiation education may positively transform student attitudes and behaviors related to radiation. To enable such a change in awareness, the acquisition of scientific knowledge is essential, for it enables individuals to make better decisions about important matters in their daily lives.

  3. Post-Fukushima radiation education for Japanese high school students in affected areas and its positive effects on their radiation literacy

    PubMed Central

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kitamura, Yuto; Yoshida, Megumi

    2018-01-01

    Abstract In post-Fukushima Japan, radiation education is very important, and the subject is being actively discussed. However, little information is available about the amount of knowledge students initially had about radiation or about how well radiation education improves their understanding. Using the questionnaire results of 717 students completed before and after radiation lectures held in three high schools in Fukushima, we examined the number of answers to the questionnaire aligned with the evidence base, and classified the students into clusters based on radiation-related behavior and attitudes to assess the effectiveness of the lecture. The contents of the lectures consisted of (i) scientific knowledge relating to radiation, (ii) results of radiation examinations conducted locally following the disaster and (iii) measures and precautions for daily radiation protection. Associations between the type of knowledge and radiation-related behavior and attitude were also examined to determine which type of knowledge was more important for deepening students’ understanding of radiation. This study revealed that radiation education in high schools was effective for students with respect to acquiring relevant basic and practical knowledge; however, the effects of the radiation lecture differed greatly between schools, presumably due to differences in the delivery and atmosphere of the lecture. The present study also suggested that radiation education may positively transform student attitudes and behaviors related to radiation. To enable such a change in awareness, the acquisition of scientific knowledge is essential, for it enables individuals to make better decisions about important matters in their daily lives. PMID:29746688

  4. IAEA activities related to radiation biology and health effects of radiation.

    PubMed

    Wondergem, Jan; Rosenblatt, Eduardo

    2012-03-01

    The IAEA is involved in capacity building with regard to the radiobiological sciences in its member states through its technical cooperation programme. Research projects/programmes are normally carried out within the framework of coordinated research projects (CRPs). Under this programme, two CRPs have been approved which are relevant to nuclear/radiation accidents: (1) stem cell therapeutics to modify radiation-induced damage to normal tissue, and (2) strengthening biological dosimetry in IAEA member states.

  5. The chemical and radiative effects of the Mount Pinatubo eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinneson, Douglas E.; Grant, Keith E.; Connell, Peter S.; Rotman, Douglas A.; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    1994-01-01

    To clarify the mechanisms leading to effects on stratospheric ozone, time-dependent stratospheric aerosol and gas experiment II (SAGE II) and cryogenic limb array elaton spectrometer (CLAES) aerosol optical extinction data and SAGE II surface area density are used as parameters in a two-dimensional (2-D) zonally averaged chemical radiative transport model. The model was integrated with time from before the eruption through December 1993. The modeled impact on global ozone results from increased rates of heterogeneous reactions on sulfate aerosols and from the increased radiative heating and scattering caused by these aerosols. When the aerosol heating is allowed to modify the temperature distribution, the maximum change calculated in equatorial column ozone is -1.6%. The calculated equatorial temperature change and peak local ozone change in October 1991 are +6K and -4%, respectively. When aerosol heating perturbs the circulation in the model, the maximum change in equatorial column ozone is -6%. Increased heterogeneous processing on sulfate aerosols is calculated to have changed equatorial column ozone in late 1991 by -1.5%. Global column ozone in the model in 1992 and 1993 changed by -2.8% and -2.4%, respectively. The relationship of ozone-controlling processes in the lower stratosphere is altered as well; HO(x) becomes the most important catalytic cycle, followed by ClO(x) and NO(x). This is driven by significant changes in trace gas concentrations. In October 1991, lower stratospheric, equatorial NO(x) decreased by 40%, ClO(x) increased by 60%, and HO(x) increased by 25%. When the effect of heterogeneous chemical processing on sulfate aerosols is combined with aerosol heating, modifying either circulation or temperature, dramatically different ozone fingerprints with time and latitude are predicted. Model-derived changes in the equatorial region in column ozone best represented the observed data when perturbed circulation was combined with heterogeneous

  6. Effects of Microwave Radiation on Selected Mechanical Properties of Silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Emily Jane

    Impressive mechanical properties have served to peak interest in silk as an engineering material. In addition, the ease with which silk can be altered through processing has led to its use in various biomaterial applications. As the uses of silk branch into new territory, it is imperative (and inevitable) to discover the boundary conditions beyond which silk no longer performs as expected. These boundary conditions include factors as familiar as temperature and humidity, but may also include other less familiar contributions, such as exposure to different types of radiation. The inherent variations in mechanical properties of silk, as well as its sensitivity to moisture, suggest that in an engineering context silk is best suited for use in composite materials; that way, silk can be shielded from ambient moisture fluctuations, and the surrounding matrix allows efficient load transfer from weaker fibers to stronger ones. One such application is to use silk as a reinforcing fiber in epoxy composites. When used in this way, there are several instances in which exposure to microwave radiation is likely (for example, as a means of speeding epoxy cure rates), the effects of which remain mostly unstudied. It will be the purpose of this dissertation to determine whether selected mechanical properties of B. mori cocoon silk are affected by exposure to microwave radiation, under specified temperature and humidity conditions. Results of our analyses are directly applicable wherever exposure of silk to microwave radiation is possible, including in fiber reinforced epoxy composites (the entire composite may be microwaved to speed epoxy cure time), or when silk is used as a component in the material used to construct the radome of an aircraft (RADAR units use frequencies in the microwave range of the electromagnetic spectrum), or when microwave energy is used to sterilize biomaterials (such as cell scaffolds) made of silk. In general, we find that microwave exposure does not

  7. Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 16th, Santa Cruz, Calif., July 17-20, 1979, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bombardt, J.

    1979-01-01

    Papers are presented on the following topics: radiation effects in bipolar microcircuits; basic radiation mechanisms in materials and devices; energy deposition and dosimetry; and system responses from SGEMP, IEMP, and EMP. Also considered are basic processes in SGEMP and IEMP, radiation effects in MOS microcircuits, and space radiation effects and spacecraft charging.

  8. DNA damage induced by the direct effect of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoya, A.; Shikazono, N.; Fujii, K.; Urushibara, A.; Akamatsu, K.; Watanabe, R.

    2008-10-01

    We have studied the nature of DNA damage induced by the direct effect of radiation. The yields of single- (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DSB), base lesions and clustered damage were measured using the agarose gel electrophoresis method after exposing to various kinds of radiations to a simple model DNA molecule, fully hydrated closed-circular plasmid DNA (pUC18). The yield of SSB does not show significant dependence on linear energy transfer (LET) values. On the other hand, the yields of base lesions revealed by enzymatic probes, endonuclease III (Nth) and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg), which excise base lesions and leave a nick at the damage site, strongly depend on LET values. Soft X-ray photon (150 kVp) irradiation gives a maximum yield of the base lesions detected by the enzymatic probes as SSB and clustered damage, which is composed of one base lesion and proximate other base lesions or SSBs. The clustered damage is visualized as an enzymatically induced DSB. The yields of the enzymatically additional damages strikingly decrease with increasing levels of LET. These results suggest that in higher LET regions, the repair enzymes used as probes are compromised because of the dense damage clustering. The studies using simple plasmid DNA as a irradiation sample, however, have a technical difficulty to detect multiple SSBs in a plasmid DNA. To detect the additional SSBs induced in opposite strand of the first SSB, we have also developed a novel technique of DNA-denaturation assay. This allows us to detect multiply induced SSBs in both strand of DNA, but not induced DSB.

  9. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  10. RADIATION GENETICS IN WHEAT. VII. COMPARISON OF RADIATION EFFECTS OF BETA- AND GAMMA-RAYS ON DIPLOID WHEAT

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, S.

    1962-01-01

    Seeds of Triticum monococcum flavescens were soaked in P/sup 32/ and I/ sup 131/solutions for 2 days before sowing, to compare the effects of beta and gamma radiations. Radioactive solutions of pH 6-7 contained 0.05-0.8 mc/gr P/sup 32/ and 0.2--0.8 mc/g I/sup 131/. For comparison, seeds soaked in water for 2 days were exposed to gamma radiation with Co/sup 60/ at the dosages 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 kr. The growth of seedlings, height of mature plants, single-spike fertility, and chromosome aberrations of treated plants in X/sub 1/ and chlorophyll mutations in X/sub 2/ were compared for beta and gammamore » irradiation. The higher the dosage of beta and gamma rays, the more delayed were emergence and growth of seedlings and the lower were survival rate, height of mature plants, and fertility. The relation between the inhibition of seedling growth and dosage of beta and gamma radiations coincides roughly with that between the decrease of survival rate or- fertility and dosage. There was no emergence of seedlings at 20 kr gamma radiation and 0.8 mc/g P/sup 32/ beta radiation. The effects of beta radiation from 0.15-0.2 mc/g P/sup 32/ and 0.8 mc/g I/sup 131/ solutions correspond roughly to those of 2.5 kr gamma radiation. As to chromosome aberrations and chlorophyll mutations, the effects of 2.5 kr gamma radiation coincide roughly with those of 0.1 mc/g P/sup 32/ and 0.6-0.8 mc/g I/sup 131/ solution. If it is assumed that the effects of beta radiation are confined only to the embryo, then a 0.2 mc/g P/sup 32/ solution equals about 2.4 krad. This will account for the present data. (auth)« less

  11. Quantifying Diurnal Cloud Radiative Effects by Cloud Type in the Tropical Western Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Burleyson, Casey D.; Long, Charles N.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2015-06-01

    Cloud radiative effects are examined using long-term datasets collected at the three Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities in the tropical western Pacific. We quantify the surface radiation budget, cloud populations, and cloud radiative effects by partitioning the data by cloud type, time of day, and as a function of large scale modes of variability such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phase and wet/dry seasons at Darwin. The novel facet of our analysis is that we break aggregate cloud radiative effects down by cloud type across the diurnal cycle. The Nauru cloud populations andmore » subsequently the surface radiation budget are strongly impacted by ENSO variability whereas the cloud populations over Manus only shift slightly in response to changes in ENSO phase. The Darwin site exhibits large seasonal monsoon related variations. We show that while deeper convective clouds have a strong conditional influence on the radiation reaching the surface, their limited frequency reduces their aggregate radiative impact. The largest source of shortwave cloud radiative effects at all three sites comes from low clouds. We use the observations to demonstrate that potential model biases in the amplitude of the diurnal cycle and mean cloud frequency would lead to larger errors in the surface energy budget compared to biases in the timing of the diurnal cycle of cloud frequency. Our results provide solid benchmarks to evaluate model simulations of cloud radiative effects in the tropics.« less

  12. Determining the infrared radiative effects of Saharan dust: a radiative transfer modelling study based on vertically resolved measurements at Lampedusa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meloni, Daniela; di Sarra, Alcide; Brogniez, Gérard; Denjean, Cyrielle; De Silvestri, Lorenzo; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Formenti, Paola; Gómez-Amo, José L.; Gröbner, Julian; Kouremeti, Natalia; Liuzzi, Giuliano; Mallet, Marc; Pace, Giandomenico; Sferlazzo, Damiano M.

    2018-03-01

    Detailed measurements of radiation, atmospheric and aerosol properties were carried out in summer 2013 during the Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region (ADRIMED) campaign in the framework of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx) experiment. This study focusses on the characterization of infrared (IR) optical properties and direct radiative effects of mineral dust, based on three vertical profiles of atmospheric and aerosol properties and IR broadband and narrowband radiation from airborne measurements, made in conjunction with radiosonde and ground-based observations at Lampedusa, in the central Mediterranean. Satellite IR spectra from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI) are also included in the analysis. The atmospheric and aerosol properties are used as input to a radiative transfer model, and various IR radiation parameters (upward and downward irradiance, nadir and zenith brightness temperature at different altitudes) are calculated and compared with observations. The model calculations are made for different sets of dust particle size distribution (PSD) and refractive index (RI), derived from observations and from the literature. The main results of the analysis are that the IR dust radiative forcing is non-negligible and strongly depends on PSD and RI. When calculations are made using the in situ measured size distribution, it is possible to identify the refractive index that produces the best match with observed IR irradiances and brightness temperatures (BTs). The most appropriate refractive indices correspond to those determined from independent measurements of mineral dust aerosols from the source regions (Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco) of dust transported over Lampedusa, suggesting that differences in the source properties should be taken into account. With the in situ size distribution and the most appropriate refractive index the estimated dust IR radiative forcing

  13. Exploring the Longwave Radiative Effects of Dust Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansell, Richard A., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Dust aerosols not only affect air quality and visibility where they pose a significant health and safety risk, but they can also play a role in modulating the energy balance of the Earth-atmosphere system by directly interacting with local radiative fields. Consequently, dust aerosols can impact regional climate patterns such as changes in precipitation and the evolution of the hydrological cycle. Assessing the direct effect of dust aerosols at the solar wavelengths is fairly straightforward due in part to the relatively large signal-to-noise ratio in broadband irradiance measurements. The longwave (LW) impacts, on the other hand, are rather difficult to ascertain since the measured dust signal level (10 Wm-2) is on the same order as the instrumental uncertainties. Moreover, compared to the shortwave (SW), limited experimental data on the LW optical properties of dust makes it a difficult challenge for constraining the LW impacts. Owing to the strong absorption features found in many terrestrial minerals (e.g., silicates and clays), the LW effects, although much smaller in magnitude compared to the SW, can still have a sizeable impact on the energetics of the Earth-atmosphere system, which can potentially trigger changes in the heat and moisture surface budgets, and dynamics of the atmosphere. The current endeavor is an integral part of an on-going research study to perform detailed assessments of dust direct aerosol radiative effects (DARE) using comprehensive global datasets from NASA Goddards mobile ground-based facility (cf. http://smartlabs.gsfc.nasa.gov/) during previous field experiments near key dust source regions. Here we examine and compare the results from two of these studies: the 2006 NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Activities and the 2008 Asian Monsoon Years. The former study focused on transported Saharan dust at Sal Island (16.73N, 22.93W), Cape Verde along the west coast of Africa while the latter focused on Asian dust at Zhangye China (39

  14. An Assessment of the Radiative Effects of Ice Supersaturation Based on in Situ Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Xiaoxiao; Huang, i; Diao, Minghui; Bansemer, Aaron; Zondlo, Mark A.; DiGangi, Joshua P.; Volkamer, Rainer; Hu, Yongyun

    2016-01-01

    We use aircraft observations combined with the reanalysis data to investigate the radiative effects of ice supersaturation (ISS). Our results show that although the excess water vapor over ice saturation itself has relatively small radiative effects, mistaking it as ice crystals in climate models would lead to considerable impacts: on average, +2.49 W/m(exp 2) change in the top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiation, -2.7 W/m(exp 2) change in surface radiation, and 1.47 K/d change in heating rates. The radiative effects of ISS generally increase with the magnitudes of supersaturation. However, there is a strong dependence on the preexisting ice water path, which can even change the sign of the TOA radiative effect. It is therefore important to consider coexistence between ISS and ice clouds and to validate their relationship in the parameterizations of ISS in climate models.

  15. Estimation of Effective Doses for Radiation Cancer Risks on ISS, Lunar, and Mars Missions with Space Radiation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, M.Y.; Cucinotta, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation protection practices define the effective dose as a weighted sum of equivalent dose over major sites for radiation cancer risks. Since a crew personnel dosimeter does not make direct measurement of effective dose, it has been estimated with skin-dose measurements and radiation transport codes for ISS and STS missions. The Phantom Torso Experiment (PTE) of NASA s Operational Radiation Protection Program has provided the actual flight measurements of active and passive dosimeters which were placed throughout the phantom on STS-91 mission for 10 days and on ISS Increment 2 mission. For the PTE, the variation in organ doses, which is resulted by the absorption and the changes in radiation quality with tissue shielding, was considered by measuring doses at many tissue sites and at several critical body organs including brain, colon, heart, stomach, thyroid, and skins. These measurements have been compared with the organ dose calculations obtained from the transport models. Active TEPC measurements of lineal energy spectra at the surface of the PTE also provided the direct comparison of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) or trapped proton dose and dose equivalent. It is shown that orienting the phantom body as actual in ISS is needed for the direct comparison of the transport models to the ISS data. One of the most important observations for organ dose equivalent of effective dose estimates on ISS is the fractional contribution from trapped protons and GCR. We show that for most organs over 80% is from GCR. The improved estimation of effective doses for radiation cancer risks will be made with the resultant tissue weighting factors and the modified codes.

  16. Effect of Index of Refraction on Radiation Characteristics in a Heated Absorbing, Emitting, and Scattering Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the index of refraction on the temperature distribution and radiative heat flux in semitransparent materials, such as some ceramics, is investigated analytically. In the case considered here, a plane layer of a ceramic material is subjected to external radiative heating incident on each of its surfaces; the material emits, absorbs, and isotropically scatters radiation. It is shown that, for radiative equilibrium in a gray layer with diffuse interfaces, the temperature distribution and radiative heat flux for any index of refraction can be obtained in a simple manner from the results for an index of refraction of unity.

  17. Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 21st, Colorado Springs, CO, July 23-25, 1984, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winokur, P. S. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Radiation effects on electronic systems and devices (particularly spacecraft systems) are examined with attention given to such topics as radiation transport, energy deposition, and charge collection; single-event phenomena; basic mechanisms of radiation effects in structures and materials; and EMP phenomena. Also considered are radiation effects in integrated circuits, spacecraft charging and space radiation effects, hardness assurance for devices and systems, and SGEMP/IEMP phenomena.

  18. Electron Radiation Effects on Candidate Solar Sail Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Hollerman, William A.; Hubbs, Whitney S.; Gray, Perry A.; Wertz, George E.; Hoppe, David T.; Nehls, Mary K.; Semmel, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion where a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. Solar sails are not limited by reaction mass and provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the lightweight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Once thought to be difficult or impossible, solar sailing has come out of science fiction and into the realm of possibility. Any spacecraft using this propulsion method would need to deploy a thin sail that could be as large as many kilometers in extent. The availability of strong, ultra lightweight, and radiation resistant materials will determine the future of solar sailing. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is concentrating research into the utilization of ultra lightweight materials for spacecraft propulsion. The Space Environmental Effects Team at MSFC is actively characterizing candidate solar sail material to evaluate the thermo-optical and mechanical properties after exposure to space environmental effects. This paper will describe the irradiation of candidate solar sail materials to energetic electrons, in vacuum, to determine the hardness of several candidate sail materials.

  19. Gamma radiation effects on commercial Mexican bread making wheat flour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agúndez-Arvizu, Z.; Fernández-Ramírez, M. V.; Arce-Corrales, M. E.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Meléndrez, R.; Chernov, V.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    2006-04-01

    Gamma irradiation is considered to be an alternative method for food preservation to prevent food spoilage, insect infestation and capable of reducing the microbial load. In the present investigation, commercial Mexican bread making wheat flour was irradiated at 1.0 kGy using a 60C Gammabeam 651 PT irradiator facility. No changes were detected in moisture, protein and ashes in gamma irradiated samples as compared to those of non-irradiated samples. Slight radiation effects were observed in the alveogram values and farinograph properties; the falling number decreased 11%, the absorption as well as the mixing tolerance were practically unchanged by irradiation. An increase of 15% in the stability value and a 29% in the dough development time were observed. Also the deformation energy decreased 7% with no change at all in the tenacity/extensibility factor. Total aerobic, yeast and mold counts were reduced 96%, 25% and 75%; respectively by the irradiation process. The obtained results confirm that gamma irradiation is effective in reducing the microbial load in bread making wheat flour without a significant change in the physicochemical and baking properties.

  20. Genomic instability and bystander effects: a paradigm shift in radiation biology?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.

    2002-01-01

    A basic paradigm in radiobiology is that, following exposure to ionizing radiation, the deposition of energy in the cell nucleus and the resulting damage to DNA, the principal target, are responsible for the radiation's deleterious biological effects. Findings in two rapidly expanding fields of research--radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects--have caused us to reevaluate these central tenets. In this article, the potential influence of induced genomic instability and bystander effects on cellular injury after exposure to low-level radiation will be reviewed.

  1. EFFECTS OF IONIZING RADIATION IN CHIMPANZEES. Final Report, February 28, 1962-October 31, 1962

    SciTech Connect

    Riopelle, A.J.; Rogers, C.M.

    1963-10-31

    Results are reported from studies of the psychological, hematological, and pathological effects of a second dose of radiation to a group of chimpanzees irradiated several years before. The effects of a large dose of radiation to the head alone on previously nonirradiated animals were evaluated in 4 animals. Findings are summarized for each animal. No evidence of damage to neural tissue was seen following exposure to the head to 2000 r gamma radiation. (C.H.)

  2. Side Effects of Chemotherapy and Radiation (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... weight based on his or her medical needs. Hair Loss During chemo, hair thinning and hair loss may occur all over the body. Radiation therapy to the head and neck may cause hair loss in that area; however, radiation anywhere else ...

  3. Radiation effects on moisture variation in ponderosa pine litter

    Treesearch

    Clive M. Countryman

    1977-01-01

    This exploratory study indicated that considerable variation in the moisture content of litter can occur within short horizontal distances. The variations ere found to be caused primarily by differences in the amount of solar radiation received by the litter and in the degree of cooling by radiation at night. Because actual fuel moisture lags behind equilibrium...

  4. Interference Effects of Radiation Emitted from Nuclear Excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potzel, W.; van Bürck, U.; Schindelmann, P.; Hagn, H.; Smirnov, G. V.; Popov, S. L.; Gerdau, E.; Shvyd'Ko, Yu. V.; Jäschke, J.; Rüter, H. D.; Chumakov, A. I.; Rüffer, R.

    2003-12-01

    Interference effects in nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation (NFSSR) from two spatially separated stainless-steel foils A and B mounted downstream behind each other have been investigated. Target A can be sinusoidally vibrated by high-frequency (MHz) ultrasound (US), target B is moved at a constant Doppler velocity which is large compared to the natural width of the nuclear transition. Due to this large Doppler shift radiative coupling between both targets is disrupted and the nuclear excitons in A and B develop independently in space and time after the SR pulse. As a consequence, the emission from the whole system (A&B) is dominated by the interference of the emissions from A and B. The application of US to target A is a powerful method to change the relative phasing of the emissions and thus to investigate interference effects originating from the two nuclear excitons in detail. Four distinct cases were studied: (a) If target A is kept stationary and only B is moved at large constant velocity v, the interference pattern exhibits a Quantum Beat (QB) whose period is determined by v. (b) If, in addition, target A is sinusoidally vibrated in a piston-like motion by US and the initial US phase Φ0 is locked to the SR pulse, the QB is frequency modulated by the US. The variation of the QB frequency increases with the US modulation index m. (c) In the case that Φ0 is not synchronized to the SR pulse (phase averaging over Φ0) drastic changes of the amplitude and phase reversals of the QB pattern occur in the time regions around odd multiples of half of the US period. (d) If Φ0 is not synchronized to the SR pulse and the US motion is no longer pistonlike, the NFSSR intensity has to be averaged over both Φ0 and m (amplitude) of the US motion. Surprisingly the QB interference pattern does not vanish completely but a short QB signal remains at times of the full US period even at high values of m. All NFSSR patterns investigated are interpreted and

  5. OPERATION CROSSROADS. A COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF TEST ABLE ATOMIC BOMB IONIZING RADIATION AND X-RAYS ON SEEDS OF BARLEY, WHEAT AND OATS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SEEDS ), (*RADIATION EFFECTS, (*NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS, RADIATION HAZARDS), X RAYS, WHEAT, RADIATION DOSAGE, MUTATIONS, RADIOBIOLOGY, GROWTH(PHYSIOLOGY), CEREALS, SENSITIVITY, AGING(PHYSIOLOGY), EXPERIMENTAL DATA, NUCLEAR BOMBS.

  6. Radiation Synovectomy: an effective alternative treatment for inflamed small joints.

    PubMed

    Karavida, N; Notopoulos, A

    2010-01-01

    An inflamed painful joint is one of the most common indications for the patient to be referred to a rheumatologist or an orthopedician. In relation to the aetiology, the therapeutic approach might be systemic, local or a combination of them in some cases, always with the thought of balancing risk with benefit for the patient. In all cases, independently of the cause, the goal of therapy is to improve the quality of life through the reduction of pain, improvement of mobility and preservation of function. Nuclear Medicine has to offer Radiosynoviorthesis, an effective alternative procedure for treating inflamed small joints. Various radionuclides are available for radiosynoviorthesis. Their selection depends on the size of the joint to be treated. Small joints are mainly treated with [169Er] erbium under a fluoroscopic or sonographic guidance, usually with a simultaneous instillation of a corticoid. Candidates for radiosynoviorthesis should have been under a six-month systemic treatment without encouraging results or should have undergone at least one unsuccessful intra-articular injection of a long acting glucocorticoid. Since 1973, when [169Er] erbium was firstly suggested as a therapeutic agent for radiosynoviorthesis of the finger joints, there has been quite enough experience in its' application. It has been found to be cost effective in providing long term relief of pain and deformity of the inflamed joints in comparison to other therapeutic approaches. Additionally, there is no radiation risk and can be performed on an out patient basis. Therefore it can stand as an effective alternative procedure for treating early stages of chronic synovitis in RA (rheumatoid arthritis) patients, with minor damage of the cartilage and the adjacent bones, and for synovitis secondary to inflammatory arthropathies.

  7. Analysis of low-dose radiation shield effectiveness of multi-gate polymeric sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. C.; Lee, H. K.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) uses a high dose of radiation to create images of the body. As patients are exposed to radiation during a CT scan, the use of shielding materials becomes essential in CT scanning. This study was focused on the radiation shielding materials used for patients during a CT scan. In this study, sheets were manufactured to shield the eyes and the thyroid, the most sensitive parts of the body, against radiation exposure during a CT scan. These sheets are manufactured using silicone polymers, barium sulfate (BaSO4) and tungsten, with the aim of making these sheets equally or more effective in radiation shielding and more cost-effective than lead sheets. The use of barium sulfate drew more attention than tungsten due to its higher cost-effectiveness. The barium sulfate sheets were coated to form a multigate structure by applying the maximum charge rate during the agitator and subsequent mixing processes and creating multilayered structures on the surface. To measure radiation shielding effectiveness, the radiation dose was measured around both eyes and the thyroid gland using sheets in three different thicknesses (1, 2 and 3 mm). Among the 1 and 2 mm sheets, the Pb sheets exhibited greater effectiveness in radiation shielding around both eyes, but the W sheets were more effective in radiation shielding around the thyroid gland. In the 3 mm sheets, the Pb sheet also attenuated a higher amount of radiation around both eyes while the W sheet was more effective around the thyroid gland. In conclusion, the sheets made from barium sulfate and tungsten proved highly effective in shielding against low-dose radiation in CT scans without causing ill-health effects, unlike lead.

  8. THE USE OF RADIATION-INDUCED MUTATIONS IN CROP BREEDING IN LATIN AMERICA AND SOME BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF RADIATION IN COFFEE

    SciTech Connect

    Moh, C.C.

    1962-07-01

    Results are summarized from a study on the genetic effects of radiation in coffee as observed in R/sub 1/ plants grown from seeds exposed to x radiation, gamma radiation, or thermal neutrons. A high frequency of morphological mutants was observed in the young plants. Possible reaction mechanisms involved in the induction of the mutants are discussed. (C.H.)

  9. One minute after the detonation of the atomic bomb: the erased effects of residual radiation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroko

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Government's official narrative denies the effects of residual radiation which appeared one minute after the atomic bomb detonations in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This paper explores declassified documents from the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, the Atomic Bomb Casualties Commission, and others and shows that these documents actually suggested the existence of serious effects from residual radiation.

  10. Lower thresholds for lifetime health effects in mammals from high-LET radiation - Comparison with chronic low-LET radiation.

    PubMed

    Sazykina, Tatiana G; Kryshev, Alexander I

    2016-12-01

    Lower threshold dose rates and confidence limits are quantified for lifetime radiation effects in mammalian animals from internally deposited alpha-emitting radionuclides. Extensive datasets on effects from internal alpha-emitters are compiled from the International Radiobiological Archives. In total, the compiled database includes 257 records, which are analyzed by means of non-parametric order statistics. The generic lower threshold for alpha-emitters in mammalian animals (combined datasets) is 6.6·10 -5  Gy day -1 . Thresholds for individual alpha-emitting elements differ considerably: plutonium and americium - 2.0·10 -5  Gy day -1 ; radium - 2.1·10 -4  Gy day -1 . Threshold for chronic low-LET radiation is previously estimated at 1·10 -3  Gy day -1 . For low exposures, the following values of alpha radiation weighting factor w R for internally deposited alpha-emitters in mammals are quantified: w R (α) = 15 as a generic value for the whole group of alpha-emitters; w R (Pu) = 50 for plutonium; w R (Am) = 50 for americium; w R (Ra) = 5 for radium. These values are proposed to serve as radiation weighting factors in calculations of equivalent doses to non-human biota. The lower threshold dose rate for long-lived mammals (dogs) is significantly lower than comparing with the threshold for short-lived mammals (mice): 2.7·10 -5  Gy day -1 , and 2.0·10 -4  Gy day -1 , respectively. The difference in thresholds is exactly reflecting the relationship between the natural longevity of these two species. Graded scale of severity in lifetime radiation effects in mammals is developed, based on compiled datasets. Being placed on the severity scale, the effects of internal alpha-emitters are situated in the zones of considerably lower dose rates than effects of the same severity caused by low-LET radiation. RBE values, calculated for effects of equal severity, are found to depend on the intensity of chronic exposure: different RBE values are characteristic

  11. Vacuum ultraviolet radiation effects on two-dimensional MoS2 field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMorrow, Julian J.; Cress, Cory D.; Arnold, Heather N.; Sangwan, Vinod K.; Jariwala, Deep; Schmucker, Scott W.; Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2017-02-01

    Atomically thin MoS2 has generated intense interest for emerging electronics applications. Its two-dimensional nature and potential for low-power electronics are particularly appealing for space-bound electronics, motivating the need for a fundamental understanding of MoS2 electronic device response to the space radiation environment. In this letter, we quantify the response of MoS2 field-effect transistors (FETs) to vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) total ionizing dose radiation. Single-layer (SL) and multilayer (ML) MoS2 FETs are compared to identify differences that arise from thickness and band structure variations. The measured evolution of the FET transport properties is leveraged to identify the nature of VUV-induced trapped charge, isolating the effects of the interface and bulk oxide dielectric. In both the SL and ML cases, oxide trapped holes compete with interface trapped electrons, exhibiting an overall shift toward negative gate bias. Raman spectroscopy shows no variation in the MoS2 signatures as a result of VUV exposure, eliminating significant crystalline damage or oxidation as possible radiation degradation mechanisms. Overall, this work presents avenues for achieving radiation-hard MoS2 devices through dielectric engineering that reduces oxide and interface trapped charge.

  12. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation.

  13. γ-Secretase inhibitor enhances antitumour effect of radiation in Notch-expressing lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mizugaki, H; Sakakibara-Konishi, J; Ikezawa, Y; Kikuchi, J; Kikuchi, E; Oizumi, S; Dang, T P; Nishimura, M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Notch receptor has an important role in both development and cancer. We previously reported that inhibition of the Notch3 by γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) induces apoptosis and suppresses tumour proliferation in non-small-cell lung cancer. Although radiation is reported to induce Notch activation, little is known about the relationship between radiation and Notch pathway. Methods: We examined the effect of combining GSI and radiation at different dosing in three Notch expressing lung cancer cell lines. The cytotoxic effect of GSI and radiation was evaluated using MTT assay and clonogenic assay in vitro and xenograft models. Expressions of Notch pathway, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and Bcl-2 family proteins were investigated using western blot analysis. Results: We discovered that the antitumour effect of combining GSI and radiation was dependent on treatment schedule. γ-Secretase inhibitor administration after radiation had the greatest growth inhibition of lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. We showed that the combination induced apoptosis of lung cancer cell lines through the regulation of MAPK and Bcl-2 family proteins. Furthermore, activation of Notch after radiation was ameliorated by GSI administration, suggesting that treatment with GSI prevents Notch-induced radiation resistance. Conclusion: Notch has an important role in lung cancer. Treatment with GSI after radiation can significantly enhance radiation-mediated tumour cytotoxicity. PMID:22596234

  14. Effects of the specular Orbiter forward radiators on a typical Spacelab payload thermal environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, L. D.; Humphries, W. R.; Littles, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Orbiter radiators, having a specular reflection, must be considered when determining the design environment for payloads which can view the forward deployed radiators. Unlike most surfaces on the Orbiter, which reflect energy diffusely, the radiators are covered with a highly specular silverized Teflon material, with high emissivity, and have a concave contour, producing a local concentration of reflected energy towards the region of angle incidence. The combined effects of radiator specularity and geometry were analyzed using the Thermal Radiation Analysis System (TRASYS II), a specialized ray trace program, and a generalized Monte-Carlo-based thermal radiation program. Data given for a 0 deg payload inclination angle at orbital noon at 3.454 m indicate that the maximum total flux and average flux can increase 173% and 63%, respectively, when compared to diffuse radiators.

  15. Non-thermal continuous and modulated electromagnetic radiation fields effects on sleep EEG of rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Haitham S.; Fahmy, Heba M.; Radwan, Nasr M.; Elsayed, Anwar A.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the alteration in the sleep EEG in rats due to chronic exposure to low-level non-thermal electromagnetic radiation was investigated. Two types of radiation fields were used; 900 MHz unmodulated wave and 900 MHz modulated at 8 and 16 Hz waves. Animals has exposed to radiation fields for 1 month (1 h/day). EEG power spectral analyses of exposed and control animals during slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep) revealed that the REM sleep is more susceptible to modulated radiofrequency radiation fields (RFR) than the SWS. The latency of REM sleep increased due to radiation exposure indicating a change in the ultradian rhythm of normal sleep cycles. The cumulative and irreversible effect of radiation exposure was proposed and the interaction of the extremely low frequency radiation with the similar EEG frequencies was suggested. PMID:25685416

  16. Aerosol radiative effects and their trends under clear-sky situations over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartok, Blanka

    2017-04-01

    In the literature great uncertainties ca be found regarding radiative effects of aerosols on the energy budget of the atmosphere (IPCC, 2013). In the study the aerosols radiative effects on clear-sky solar radiation are quantified over Europe using empirical and physical modelling approaches. The values of aerosol radiation effect are determined by the MAGIC radiation code. In the first run clear-sky radiation is calculated integrating KINEE/MPI/Aerocom aerosol climatology and ERA-INTERIM water vapour multiannual monthly means. In the next run the clear-sky radiation are also calculated ignoring aerosol data (adjusted to 0) from the algorithm. Both runs were carried out for each months of the year, taking into account the varying astrological factors. The difference between the aerosol-included and aerosol-free clear-sky radiation is equal to the absolute aerosol radiative effect in W/m2. The annual mean of the surface aerosol radiative effects in clear-sky situations over Europe is -7.1 ± 2.9 W/m2, high values are representing the central part of the continent and the Mediterranean Basin. Furthermore the trends of the aerosol radiative effects are also determined for the period of 2001-2012. First a linear fitting is elaborated between the aerosol optical depth (AOT) built in the MAGIC code and its aerosol radiative effect calculated by the code. Next, based on these linear functions a radiative effect values are assigned to each monthly AOT500 value available from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra Level-3 experiment. In this way a new dataset of aerosol radiative effect for the period of 2001-2012 has been created. Beside of this approach the changes in aerosol radiative effects are also calculated based on ground-based clear-sky radiation trends. This approach is used as a validation of the method applied in earlier stage, mainly for the linear fitting. The starting point of this approach is to elaborate the trends of clear

  17. Combined release and radiation effects satellite (CRRES) - Spacecraft and mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. H.; Kierein, John

    1992-08-01

    The CRRES mission is a joint NASA and U.S. Department of Defense undertaking to study the near-Earth space environment and the effects of the Earth's radiation environment on state-of-the-art microelectronic components. To perform these studies, CRRES was launched with a complex array of scientific payloads. These included 24 chemical canisters which were released during the first 13 months of the mission at various altitudes over ground observation sites and diagnostic facilities. The CRRES system was launched on July 25, 1990, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on an Atlas I expendable launch vehicle into a low-inclination geosynchronous transfer orbit. The specified mission duration was 1 year with a goal of 3 years. The satellite subsystems support the instrument payloads by providing them with electrical power, command and data handling, and thermal control. This review briefly describes the CRRES observatory and mission, and provides an introduction to the CRRES instrumentation technical notes contained within this issue.

  18. Photochemical effects in the lens from near infrared radiation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderberg, Per G.; Al-Saqry, Riyadh; Schulmeister, Karl; Gallichanin, Konstantin; Kronschläger, Martin; Yu, Zhaohua

    2009-02-01

    Conclusion: The current data are consistent with a potential photochemical effect of in vivo exposure of the crystalline lens to near infrared radiation since the onset of cataract after in just above threshold dose was at least 18 hrs delayed after the exposure. Materials and methods: The eyes of 6 weeks old Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed unilaterally in vivo to 1090 nm, 6.2 W quasi-top hat spatial distribution with a 3 mm spot on the anterior lens surface within the dilated pupil. First, four exposure time groups of rats were exposed to increasing exposure times. At 24 hrs after exposure, the difference of light scattering between the lenses from the same animal was measured. Then, based on the first experiment, four post-exposure time groups were exposed unilaterally in vivo to 8 s of 1090 nm, 6.2 W quasi-top hat spatial distribution with a 3 mm spot on the anterior lens surface within the dilated pupil. After, the intended post-exposure time, the difference of light scattering between the lenses from the same animal was measured. Results: A 3 mm spot of 6.2 W induces light scattering in the lens with exposures of at least 8 s. Further, after 8 s of 6.2 W within a 3 mm spot on the lens surface, the light scattering increase in the lens was delayed at least 18 hrs after the exposure.

  19. Simulations of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Effects in Electron Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorati, M.; Schiavi, A.; Dattoli, G.

    2007-09-01

    Coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) generated by high intensity electron beams can be a source of undesirable effects limiting the performance of storage rings. The complexity of the physical mechanisms underlying the interplay between the electron beam and the CSR demands for reliable simulation codes. In the past, codes based on Lie algebraic techniques have been very efficient to treat transport problems in accelerators. The extension of these methods to the non linear case is ideally suited to treat wakefields - beam interaction. In this paper we report on the development of a numerical code, based on the solution of the Vlasov equation, which includes the non linear contribution due to wakefields. The proposed solution method exploits an algebraic technique that uses the exponential operators. We show that, in the case of CSR wakefields, the integration procedure is capable of reproducing the onset of an instability which leads to microbunching of the beam thus increasing the CSR at short wavelengths. In addition, considerations on the threshold of the instability for Gaussian bunches is also reported.

  20. Simulations of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Effects in Electron Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorati, M.; Schiavi, A.; Dattoli, G.

    Coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) generated by high intensity electron beams can be a source of undesirable effects limiting the performance of storage rings. The complexity of the physical mechanisms underlying the interplay between the electron beam and the CSR demands for reliable simulation codes. In the past, codes based on Lie algebraic techniques have been very efficient to treat transport problems in accelerators. The extension of these methods to the non linear case is ideally suited to treat wakefields - beam interaction. In this paper we report on the development of a numerical code, based on the solution of the Vlasov equation, which includes the non linear contribution due to wakefields. The proposed solution method exploits an algebraic technique that uses the exponential operators. We show that, in the case of CSR wakefields, the integration procedure is capable of reproducing the onset of an instability which leads to microbunching of the beam thus increasing the CSR at short wavelengths. In addition, considerations on the threshold of the instability for Gaussian bunches is also reported.

  1. Modeling Natural Space Ionizing Radiation Effects on External Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alstatt, Richard L.; Edwards, David L.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Predicting the effective life of materials for space applications has become increasingly critical with the drive to reduce mission cost. Programs have considered many solutions to reduce launch costs including novel, low mass materials and thin thermal blankets to reduce spacecraft mass. Determining the long-term survivability of these materials before launch is critical for mission success. This presentation will describe an analysis performed on the outer layer of the passive thermal control blanket of the Hubble Space Telescope. This layer had degraded for unknown reasons during the mission, however ionizing radiation (IR) induced embrittlement was suspected. A methodology was developed which allowed direct comparison between the energy deposition of the natural environment and that of the laboratory generated environment. Commercial codes were used to predict the natural space IR environment model energy deposition in the material from both natural and laboratory IR sources, and design the most efficient test. Results were optimized for total and local energy deposition with an iterative spreadsheet. This method has been used successfully for several laboratory tests at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The study showed that the natural space IR environment, by itself, did not cause the premature degradation observed in the thermal blanket.

  2. Modeling natural space ionizing radiation effects on external materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altstatt, Richard L.; Edwards, David L.

    2000-10-01

    Predicting the effective life of materials for space applications has become increasingly critical with the drive to reduce mission cost. Programs have considered many solutions to reduce launch costs including novel, low mass materials and thin thermal blankets to reduce spacecraft mass. Determining the long-term survivability of these materials before launch is critical for mission success. This presentation will describe an analysis performed on the outer layer of the passive thermal control blanket of the Hubble Space Telescope. This layer had degraded for unknown reasons during the mission, however ionizing radiation (IR) induced embrittlement was suspected. A methodology was developed which allowed direct comparison between the energy deposition of the natural environment and that of the laboratory generated environment. Commercial codes were used to predict the natural space IR environment, model energy deposition in the material from both natural and laboratory IR sources, and design the most efficient test. Results were optimized for total and local energy deposition with an iterative spreadsheet. This method has been used successfully for several laboratory tests at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The study showed that the natural space IR environment, by itself, did not cause the premature degradation observed in the thermal blanket.

  3. Investigating the effects of terahertz radiation on Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, Jillian P.; Raitt, Brittany J.; Joseph, Cecil S.; Hines, Mark E.; Giles, Robert H.

    2012-03-01

    Medical and security sensing applications of Terahertz (THz) imaging are currently being developed. As a result, there is a need to further investigate the effects of THz radiation on biological systems. In this study, a 94 GHz mechanically tuned Gunn Oscillator was used to irradiate Bacillus subtilis at 94 GHz. The bacteria were cultured in trypticase soy broth (TSB) and placed in polystyrene 96 well plates. The samples where irradiated during the exponential growth phase for 1, 2, and 24 hours. Both the experimental and control plates were kept at room temperature (~25°C) and were monitored for the duration of the experiment using thermocouples interfaced with a computer via Labview software. By evaluating the absorption of each well at 600nm immediately before and after irradiation, the population density within each well was assessed. Following this, the metabolic activity of each well was measured after irradiation by adding tetrazolium dye, XTT, to the wells and evaluating the absorption of each well at 490nm after 2 hours of incubation.

  4. Effects of ionizing radiations on a pharmaceutical compound, chloramphenicol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, L.; Patel, K. M.

    1994-05-01

    Chloramphenicol, a broad spectrum antibiotic, has been irradiated using Cobalt-60 γ radiation and electron beam at graded radiation doses upto 100 kGy. Several degradation products and free radicals are formed on irradiation. Purity, degradation products, free radicals, discolouration, crystallinity, solubility and entropy of radiation processing have been investigated. Aqueous solutions undergo extensive radiolysis even at low doses. Physico-chemical, microbiological and toxicological tests do not show significant degradation at sterilization dose. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), UV-spectrophotometry, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) techniques were employed for the investigations.

  5. Space Radiation Effects in Inflatable and Composite Habitat Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Rojdev, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    This Year 2 project provides much needed risk reduction data to assess solar particle event (SPE) and galactic cosmic ray (GCR) space radiation damage in existing and emerging materials used in manned low-earth orbit, lunar, interplanetary, and Martian surface missions. More specifically, long duration (up to 50 years) space radiation damage is quantified for materials used in inflatable structures (1st priority), and habitable composite structures and space suits materials (2nd priority). The data collected has relevance for nonmetallic materials (polymers and composites) used in NASA missions where long duration reliability is needed in continuous or intermittent radiation fluxes.

  6. The Impenetrable Barrier Revisited - Anthroprogenic Effects on Earth's Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. C.; Baker, D. N.; Erickson, P. J.; Albert, J.; Fennell, J. F.; Mishin, E. V.; Starks, M. J.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S. G.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes are contributing significantly to the understanding of processes effecting Earth's radiation belts. It has been noted that the earthward extent of the outer zone highly-relativistic electrons encounters a nearly impenetrable barrier at a radial distance (L) near 2.8 RE inside of which they are not observed. Modeling suggests that this is the result of a balance between slow inward diffusion and hiss-induced precipitation. The large storm of 17 March 2015 afforded an excellent opportunity to investigate the impenetrable barrier using the full complement of sensors carried by the Van Allen Probes. The storm was marked by the rapid reappearance of strong fluxes of MeV electrons directly outside the barrier with the formation of very steep MeV flux gradients. In spite of the strong rapid recovery of MeV electron fluxes immediately outside the barrier, the sharpness and constancy of the gradient at the barrier is strongly suggestive of a previously unrecognized fast-acting and spatially localized mechanism responsible for the formation of such a well-defined feature during these dramatic circumstances. The Van Allen Probes regularly observe a magnetically confined bubble of VLF emissions of terrestrial origin filling the inner magnetosphere. Strongest signals are from US Navy VLF transmitters used for one-way communication to submarines. These signals largely are confined to the region of L space where their frequency is < ½ fce. The strong signal from station NAA at 24 kHz is confined to L < 2.8 where it encounters the ½ fce limit. During the event, the flux of MeV electrons decreased by 1000x across 0.5 RE outside L = 2.8 simultaneous with a 6 order of magnitude increase in the VLF wave intensity as the Probes entered the VLF bubble. The VLF transmitter frequencies are amplified at the point where they overlap natural chorus band near ½ fce suggestive of transmitter-induced triggered emissions. MeV radiation belt electrons encounter this

  7. Effects of gamma radiation on raspberries: safety and quality issues.

    PubMed

    Verde, S Cabo; Trigo, M J; Sousa, M B; Ferreira, A; Ramos, A C; Nunes, I; Junqueira, C; Melo, R; Santos, P M P; Botelho, M L

    2013-01-01

    There is an ever-increasing global demand from consumers for high-quality foods with major emphasis placed on quality and safety attributes. One of the main demands that consumers display is for minimally processed, high-nutrition/low-energy natural foods with no or minimal chemical preservatives. The nutritional value of raspberry fruit is widely recognized. In particular, red raspberries are known to demonstrate a strong antioxidant capacity that might prove beneficial to human health by preventing free radical-induced oxidative stress. However, food products that are consumed raw, are increasingly being recognized as important vehicles for transmission of human pathogens. Food irradiation is one of the few technologies that address both food quality and safety by virtue of its ability to control spoilage and foodborne pathogenic microorganisms without significantly affecting sensory or other organoleptic attributes of the food. Food irradiation is well established as a physical, nonthermal treatment (cold pasteurization) that processes foods at or nearly at ambient temperature in the final packaging, reducing the possibility of cross contamination until the food is actually used by the consumer. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of gamma radiation on raspberries in order to assess consequences of irradiation. Freshly packed raspberries (Rubus idaeus L.) were irradiated in a (60)Co source at several doses (0.5, 1, or 1.5 kGy). Bioburden, total phenolic content, antioxidant activity, physicochemical properties such as texture, color, pH, soluble solids content, and acidity, and sensorial parameters were assessed before and after irradiation and during storage time up to 14 d at 4°C. Characterization of raspberries microbiota showed an average bioburden value of 10(4) colony-forming units (CFU)/g and a diverse microbial population predominantly composed of two morphological types (gram-negative, oxidase-negative rods, 35%, and filamentous fungi, 41

  8. Mathematical Modeling and Numerical Analysis of Thermal Distribution in Arch Dams considering Solar Radiation Effect

    PubMed Central

    Mirzabozorg, H.; Hariri-Ardebili, M. A.; Shirkhan, M.; Seyed-Kolbadi, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of solar radiation on thermal distribution in thin high arch dams is investigated. The differential equation governing thermal behavior of mass concrete in three-dimensional space is solved applying appropriate boundary conditions. Solar radiation is implemented considering the dam face direction relative to the sun, the slop relative to horizon, the region cloud cover, and the surrounding topography. It has been observed that solar radiation changes the surface temperature drastically and leads to nonuniform temperature distribution. Solar radiation effects should be considered in thermal transient analysis of thin arch dams. PMID:24695817

  9. Mathematical modeling and numerical analysis of thermal distribution in arch dams considering solar radiation effect.

    PubMed

    Mirzabozorg, H; Hariri-Ardebili, M A; Shirkhan, M; Seyed-Kolbadi, S M

    2014-01-01

    The effect of solar radiation on thermal distribution in thin high arch dams is investigated. The differential equation governing thermal behavior of mass concrete in three-dimensional space is solved applying appropriate boundary conditions. Solar radiation is implemented considering the dam face direction relative to the sun, the slop relative to horizon, the region cloud cover, and the surrounding topography. It has been observed that solar radiation changes the surface temperature drastically and leads to nonuniform temperature distribution. Solar radiation effects should be considered in thermal transient analysis of thin arch dams.

  10. Effects of nuclear cross sections at different energies on the radiation hazard from galactic cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z W; Adams, J H

    2007-03-01

    The radiation hazard for astronauts from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major obstacle to long-duration human space exploration. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate the radiation environment on missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. We have studied how uncertainties in fragmentation cross sections at different energies affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport calculations. We find that, in deep space, cross sections at energies between 0.3 and 0.85 GeV/nucleon have the largest effect in solar maximum GCR environments. At the International Space Station, cross sections at higher energies have the largest effect due to the geomagnetic cutoff.

  11. The effect of radiation on a variety of pharmaceuticals and materials containing polymers.

    PubMed

    Silindir, Mine; Ozer, Yekta

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of radiation, whether it has natural or artificial, electromagnetic or particle-type characterizations, with materials causes different effects depending on the dose and type of radiation and physicochemical properties of the material. In the medical field, understanding the effect of radiation on a variety of materials including pharmaceuticals, medical devices, polymers as biomaterials, and packaging is crucial. Although there are many kinds of sterilization methods, the use of radiation in sterilization has many advantages such as being a substantially less toxic, safer terminal sterilization method. Radiosterilization is sterilization with an ionizing radiation such as gamma rays or electron beam (e-beam), the latter being a newer but less-frequently used technique. However, the need for large facilities with proper radiation protections for personnel and the environment from the effects of radiation and radioactive wastes makes this procedure highly costly. The effects of radiation on materials, especially pharmaceuticals and polymer-containing medical devices, cause degradation or chemical changes. The effects of radiation on a variety of different materials is a growing research area that can create safer techniques that reduce radiation damage and increase cost-effectiveness in the future. Radiation can be used for positive purposes such as medical applications and the sterilization of pharmaceutical products, medical devices, and food and agricultural products as well as clinical applications such as diagnosis and/or therapy of a variety of diseases. The dose rate, time, type and emitted energy of the radiation are critical issues for determining its benefit/damage ratio. The sterilization of pharmaceuticals and medical devices that contain polymers can be achieved safely and effectively by irradiation. The sterilization of materials at the terminal phase-that is, in its final packaging materials-and its suitability to a variety of

  12. A case study of the radiative effect of aerosols over Europe: EUCAARI-LONGREX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteve, Anna R.; Highwood, Eleanor J.; Ryder, Claire L.

    2016-06-01

    The radiative effect of anthropogenic aerosols over Europe during the 2008 European Integrated Project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions Long Range Experiment (EUCAARI-LONGREX) campaign has been calculated using measurements collected by the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 aircraft and radiative transfer modelling. The aircraft sampled anthropogenically perturbed air masses across north-western Europe under anticyclonic conditions with aerosol optical depths ranging from 0.047 to 0.357. For one specially designed "radiative closure" flight, simulated irradiances have been compared to radiation measurements for a case of aged European aerosol in order to explore the validity of model assumptions and the degree of radiative closure that can be attained given the spatial and temporal variability of the observations and their measurement uncertainties. Secondly, the diurnally averaged aerosol radiative effect throughout EUCAARI-LONGREX has been calculated. The surface radiative effect ranged between -3.9 and -22.8 W m-2 (mean -11 ± 5 W m-2), whilst top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) values were between -2.1 and -12.0 W m-2 (mean -5 ± 3 W m-2). We have quantified the uncertainties in our calculations due to the way in which aerosols and other parameters are represented in a radiative transfer model. The largest uncertainty in the aerosol radiative effect at both the surface and the TOA comes from the spectral resolution of the information used in the radiative transfer model (˜ 17 %) and the aerosol description (composition and size distribution) used in the Mie calculations of the aerosol optical properties included in the radiative transfer model (˜ 7 %). The aerosol radiative effect at the TOA is also highly sensitive to the surface albedo (˜ 12 %).

  13. Radiation Quality Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in 3-D Cultures After Charged Particle Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Kidane, Yared H.; Huff, Janice L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluated the differential effects of low- and high-LET radiation on 3-D organotypic cultures in order to investigate radiation quality impacts on gene expression and cellular responses. Current risk models for assessment of space radiation-induced cancer have large uncertainties because the models for adverse health effects following radiation exposure are founded on epidemiological analyses of human populations exposed to low-LET radiation. Reducing these uncertainties requires new knowledge on the fundamental differences in biological responses (the so-called radiation quality effects) triggered by heavy ion particle radiation versus low-LET radiation associated with Earth-based exposures. In order to better quantify these radiation quality effects in biological systems, we are utilizing novel 3-D organotypic human tissue models for space radiation research. These models hold promise for risk assessment as they provide a format for study of human cells within a realistic tissue framework, thereby bridging the gap between 2-D monolayer culture and animal models for risk extrapolation to humans. To identify biological pathway signatures unique to heavy ion particle exposure, functional gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used with whole transcriptome profiling. GSEA has been used extensively as a method to garner biological information in a variety of model systems but has not been commonly used to analyze radiation effects. It is a powerful approach for assessing the functional significance of radiation quality-dependent changes from datasets where the changes are subtle but broad, and where single gene based analysis using rankings of fold-change may not reveal important biological information.

  14. Uncertainties in Projecting Risks of Late Effects from Space Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucinotta, F.; Schimmerling, W.; Peterson, L.; Wilson, J.; Saganti, P.; Dicello, J.

    The health risks faced by astronauts from space radiation include cancer, cataracts, hereditary effects, CNS risks, and non - cancer morbidity and mortality risks related to the diseases of the old age. Methods used to project risks in low -Earth orbit are of questionable merit for exploration missions because of the limited radiobiology data and knowledge of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) heavy ions, which causes estimates of the risk of late effects to be highly uncertain. Risk projections involve a product of many biological and physical factors, each of which has a differential range of uncertainty due to lack of data and knowledge. Within the linear-additivity model, we use Monte-Carlo sampling from subjective uncertainty distributions in each factor to obtain a maximum likelihood estimate of the overall uncertainty in risk projections. The resulting methodology is applied to several human space exploration mission scenarios including ISS, lunar station, deep space outpost, and Mar's missions of duration of 360, 660, and 1000 days. The major results are the quantification of the uncertainties in current risk estimates, the identification of the primary factors that dominate risk projection uncertainties, and the development of a method to quantify candidate approaches to reduce uncertainties or mitigate risks. The large uncertainties in GCR risk projections lead to probability distributions of risk that mask any potential risk reduction using the "optimization" of shielding materials or configurations. In contrast, the design of shielding optimization approaches for solar particle events and trapped protons can be made at this time, and promising technologies can be shown to have merit using our approach. The methods used also make it possible to express risk management objectives in terms of quantitative objectives, i.e., number of days in space without exceeding a given risk level within well defined confidence limits

  15. 1989 IEEE Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 26th, Marco Island, FL, July 25-29, 1989, Proceedings. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochoa, Agustin, Jr. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on nuclear science are presented. The general topics addressed include: basic mechanics of radiation effects, dosimetry and energy-dependent effects, hardness assurance and testing techniques, spacecraft charging and space radiation effects, EMP/SGEMP/IEMP phenomena, device radiation effects and hardening, radiation effects on isolation technologies, IC radiation effects and hardening, and single-event phenomena.

  16. A Study of Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect and Its Impacts on Global Terrestrial Ecosystem Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Shao, S.; Zhou, L.

    2017-12-01

    Aerosols can absorb and scatter solar radiation, thus cause the total solar radiation reaching the surface to drop and the fraction of diffuse radiation to increase, which influence the surface radiation budget. The global surface radiation with and without consideration of aerosols are calculated by the Fu-Liou atmospheric radiative transfer model based on the MODIS aerosol products, CERES cloud products and other remote sensing data. The aerosol direct radiative effect is calculated based on the two scenarios of aerosols. Our calculation showed that in 2007, aerosols decreased the global total radiation by 9.16 W m-2 on average. Large decrease generally occurred in places with high AOD. As for the diffuse radiation, aerosol-induced changes were either positive or negative. Large increase generally occurred in places with high surface albedo, while large decrease generally occurred in places with high cloud fraction. The global aerosol-induced diffuse radiation change averaged 8.17 W m-2 in 2007. The aerosol direct radiative effect causes the photosynthetic active radiation to increase, and its influences on the global carbon cycle of terrestrial ecosystem are studied by using the Community Land Model (CLM). Calculations show that the aerosol direct radiative effects caused the global averages of terrestrial gross primary productivity (GPP), net primary productivity (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (RH), autotrophic respiration (RA), and net ecosystem productivity (Reco) to increase in 2007, with significant spatial variations however. The global average changes of GPP, NPP, NEP, RA, RH and Reco in 2007 were +6.47 gC m-2, +2.23 gC m-2, +0.34 gC m-2, +4.24 gC m-2, +1.89 gC m-2, +6.13 gC m-2, respectively. Examinations of the carbon fluxes show that the aerosol direct radiative effects influence the terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycles via the following two approaches: First, the diffuse fertilization effect, i.e. more diffuse radiation absorbed by vegetation shade

  17. Radiative effects during the assembly of direct collapse black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Aaron; Becerra, Fernando; Bromm, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2017-11-01

    We perform a post-processing radiative feedback analysis on a 3D ab initio cosmological simulation of an atomic cooling halo under the direct collapse black hole (DCBH) scenario. We maintain the spatial resolution of the simulation by incorporating native ray-tracing on unstructured mesh data, including Monte Carlo Lyman α (Ly α) radiative transfer. DCBHs are born in gas-rich, metal-poor environments with the possibility of Compton-thick conditions, NH ≳ 1024 cm-2. Therefore, the surrounding gas is capable of experiencing the full impact of the bottled-up radiation pressure. In particular, we find that multiple scattering of Ly α photons provides an important source of mechanical feedback after the gas in the sub-parsec region becomes partially ionized, avoiding the bottleneck of destruction via the two-photon emission mechanism. We provide detailed discussion of the simulation environment, expansion of the ionization front, emission and escape of Ly α radiation, and Compton scattering. A sink particle prescription allows us to extract approximate limits on the post-formation evolution of the radiative feedback. Fully coupled Ly α radiation hydrodynamics will be crucial to consider in future DCBH simulations.

  18. The effect of clouds on the earth's radiation budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziskin, Daniel; Strobel, Darrell F.

    1991-01-01

    The radiative fluxes from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and the cloud properties from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) over Indonesia for the months of June and July of 1985 and 1986 were analyzed to determine the cloud sensitivity coefficients. The method involved a linear least squares regression between co-incident flux and cloud coverage measurements. The calculated slope is identified as the cloud sensitivity. It was found that the correlations between the total cloud fraction and radiation parameters were modest. However, correlations between cloud fraction and IR flux were improved by separating clouds by height. Likewise, correlations between the visible flux and cloud fractions were improved by distinguishing clouds based on optical depth. Calculating correlations between the net fluxes and either height or optical depth segregated cloud fractions were somewhat improved. When clouds were classified in terms of their height and optical depth, correlations among all the radiation components were improved. Mean cloud sensitivities based on the regression of radiative fluxes against height and optical depth separated cloud types are presented. Results are compared to a one-dimensional radiation model with a simple cloud parameterization scheme.

  19. Evaluation of Spacecraft Shielding Effectiveness for Radiation Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    1999-01-01

    The potential for serious health risks from solar particle events (SPE) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a critical issue in the NASA strategic plan for the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS). The excess cost to protect against the GCR and SPE due to current uncertainties in radiation transmission properties and cancer biology could be exceedingly large based on the excess launch costs to shield against uncertainties. The development of advanced shielding concepts is an important risk mitigation area with the potential to significantly reduce risk below conventional mission designs. A key issue in spacecraft material selection is the understanding of nuclear reactions on the transmission properties of materials. High-energy nuclear particles undergo nuclear reactions in passing through materials and tissue altering their composition and producing new radiation types. Spacecraft and planetary habitat designers can utilize radiation transport codes to identify optimal materials for lowering exposures and to optimize spacecraft design to reduce astronaut exposures. To reach these objectives will require providing design engineers with accurate data bases and computationally efficient software for describing the transmission properties of space radiation in materials. Our program will reduce the uncertainty in the transmission properties of space radiation by improving the theoretical description of nuclear reactions and radiation transport, and provide accurate physical descriptions of the track structure of microscopic energy deposition.

  20. Effects of Cloudiness on the Daily and Annual Radiation Balance: Elaboration on the Shartwave and Longwave Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, E.

    2007-12-01

    Clouds are visible masses of condensed droplets and frozen crystals of water in the atmosphere above the Earth. They make changes in the energy balance at local, regional, and planetary scales. They affect the climate by positive and negative feedback. To study these effects at local scale, we set up a radiation station which uses two CM21 Kipp & Zonen pyranometers (one inverted), and two CG1 Kipp & Zonen pyrgeometers (one inverted) in a semi-arid mountainous valley in Logan, Utah, U.S.A. The pyranometers and pyrgeometers were ventilated using four CV2 Kipp & Zonen ventilation systems. Ventilation of pyranometers and pyrgeometers prevents dew and frost and snow accumulation which otherwise would disturb the measurement. All sensors were installed at about 3 m above the ground, which is covered with natural vegetation during the growing season (May - September). The incoming (Rsi) and outgoing (Rso) solar or shortwave radiation, the incoming (Rli, atmospheric) and outgoing (Rlo, terrestrial) longwave radiation, along with the 2-m air temperature, humidity, and pressure have been continuously measured since 1995. We also measured the 3-m wind speed and direction, the surface temperature (using an IR thermometer) and precipitation (using a heated rain gauge). These parameters have been measured every 2 seconds and averaged into 20 minutes. For this study we chose three days: 6 April (a partially cloudy day), 29 July (a cloudless day), and 29 November (an overcast day), 2005, along with continuous study throughout the year 2005. We developed an algorithm for evaluation of cloudless-sky incoming (atmospheric) longwave radiation. Equations for cloudless-sky incoming shortwave and atmospheric longwave radiation were applied to compare the cloud-free measurements with the actual ones. Cloudless - measured incoming shortwave (solar) radiation is an indication of how much less radiation was received due to cloudiness (if any). Measured - cloudless incoming longwave

  1. 3D Cloud Radiative Effects on Polarized Reflectances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, C.; Matar, C.; C-Labonnote, L.; Szczap, F.; Waquet, F.; Parol, F.; Riedi, J.

    2017-12-01

    As recognized in the last IPCC report, clouds have a major importance in the climate budget and need to be better characterized. Remote sensing observations are a way to obtain either global observations of cloud from satellites or a very fine description of clouds from airborne measurements. An increasing numbers of radiometers plan to measure polarized reflectances in addition to total reflectances, since this information is very helpful to obtain aerosol or cloud properties. In a near future, for example, the Multi-viewing, Multi-channel, Multi-polarization Imager (3MI) will be part the EPS-SG Eumetsat-ESA mission. It will achieve multi-angular polarimetric measurements from visible to shortwave infrared wavelengths. An airborne prototype, OSIRIS (Observing System Including Polarization in the Solar Infrared Spectrum), is also presently developed at the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique and had already participated to several measurements campaigns. In order to analyze suitably the measured signal, it it necessary to have realistic and accurate models able to simulate polarized reflectances. The 3DCLOUD model (Szczap et al., 2014) was used to generate three-dimensional synthetic cloud and the 3D radiative transfer model, 3DMCPOL (Cornet et al., 2010) to compute realistic polarized reflectances. From these simulations, we investigate the effects of 3D cloud structures and heterogeneity on the polarized angular signature often used to retrieve cloud or aerosol properties. We show that 3D effects are weak for flat clouds but become quite significant for fractional clouds above ocean. The 3D effects are quite different according to the observation scale. For the airborne scale (few tens of meter), solar illumination effects can lead to polarized cloud reflectance values higher than the saturation limit predicted by the homogeneous cloud assumption. In the cloud gaps, corresponding to shadowed areas of the total reflectances, polarized signal can also be enhanced

  2. Effect of ultraviolet radiation, smoking and nutrition on hair.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2015-01-01

    Similar to the rest of the skin, the hair is exposed to noxious environmental factors. While ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and smoking are well appreciated as major factors contributing to the extrinsic aging of the skin, their effects on the condition of hair have only lately attracted the attention of the medical community. Terrestrial solar UVR ranges from approximately 290 to 400 nm; UV-B (290-315 nm) reaches only the upper dermis, while the penetration of UV-A (315-400 nm) into the dermis increases with wavelength. The two most important chronic effects of UVR on the skin and bald scalp are photocarcinogenesis and solar elastosis; however, the effects of UVR on hair have largely been ignored. As a consequence of increased leisure time and a growing popularity of outdoor activities and holidays in the sun, the awareness of sun protection of the skin has become important and should also apply to the hair. Besides being the single-most preventable cause of significant cardiovascular and pulmonary morbidity and an important cause of death, the association of tobacco smoking with various adverse effects on the skin and hair has also been recognized. Increasing public awareness of the association between smoking and hair loss seems to offer a good opportunity for the prevention or cessation of smoking, since the appearance of hair plays an important role in the overall physical appearance and self-perception of people. Finally, the quantity and quality of hair are closely related to the nutritional state of an individual. Normal supply, uptake, and transport of proteins, calories, trace elements, and vitamins are of fundamental importance in tissues with high biosynthetic activity, such as the hair follicle. In instances of protein and calorie malnutrition as well as essential amino acid, trace element, and vitamin deficiencies, hair growth and pigmentation may be impaired. Ultimately, important commercial interest lies in the question of whether increasing the

  3. Long-term biological effects induced by ionizing radiation--implications for dose mediated risk.

    PubMed

    Miron, S D; Astărăstoae, V

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiations are considered to be risk agents that are responsible for the effects on interaction with living matter. The occurring biological effects are due to various factors such as: dose, type of radiation, exposure time, type of biological tissue, health condition and the age of the person exposed. The mechanisms involved in the direct modifications of nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA are reviewed. Classical target theory of energy deposition in the nucleus that causes DNA damages, in particular DNA double-strand breaks and that explanation of the biological consequences of ionizing radiation exposure is a paradigm in radiobiology. Recent experimental evidences have demonstrated the existence of a molecular mechanism that explains the non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation exposure. Among these novel data, genomic instability and a variety of bystander effects are discussed here. Those bystander effects of ionizing radiation are fulfilled by cellular communication systems that give rise to non-targeted effects in the neighboring non irradiated cells. This paper provides also a commentary on the synergistic effects induced by the co-exposures to ionizing radiation and various physical agents such as electromagnetic fields and the co-exposures to ionizing radiation and chemical environmental contaminants such as metals. The biological effects of multiple stressors on genomic instability and bystander effects are also discussed. Moreover, a brief presentation of the methods used to characterize cyto- and genotoxic damages is offered.

  4. Signaling pathways underpinning the manifestations of ionizing radiation-induced bystander effects.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Munetoshi; Otsuka, Kensuke; Tomita, Masanori

    2011-06-01

    For nearly a century, ionizing radiation has been indispensable to medical diagnosis. Furthermore, various types of electromagnetic and particulate radiation have also been used in cancer therapy. However, the biological mechanism of radiation action remains incompletely understood. In this regard, a rapidly growing body of experimental evidence indicates that radiation exposure induces biological effects in cells whose nucleus has not been irradiated. This phenomenon termed the 'non-targeted effects' challenges the long-held tenet that radiation traversal through the cell nucleus is a prerequisite to elicit genetic damage and biological responses. The non-targeted effects include biological effects in cytoplasm-irradiated cells, bystander effects that arise in non-irradiated cells having received signals from irradiated cells, and genomic instability occurring in the progeny of irradiated cells. Such non-targeted responses are interrelated, and the bystander effect is further related with an adaptive response that manifests itself as the attenuated stressful biological effects of acute high-dose irradiation in cells that have been pre-exposed to low-dose or low-dose-rate radiation. This paper reviews the current body of knowledge about the bystander effect with emphasis on experimental approaches, in vitro and in vivo manifestations, radiation quality dependence, temporal and spatial dependence, proposed mechanisms, and clinical implications. Relations of bystander responses with the effects in cytoplasm-irradiated cells, genomic instability and adaptive response will also be briefly discussed.

  5. Long-Term Follow-up of the Delayed Effects of Acute Radiation Exposure in Primates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    MV, Katz BP, Smith CP, Jackson W 3rd, Cohen DM, et al. A nonhuman primate model of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome plus medical management...subsyndrome of the acute radiation syndrome : a rhesus macaque model. Health Phys 2012; 103:411–26. 32. Robbins ME, Bourland JD, Cline JM, Wheeler KT, Deadwyler...AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0574 TITLE: Long-Term Follow-up of the Delayed Effects of Acute Radiation Exposure in Primates

  6. [Effect of decimeter polarized electromagnetic radiation on germinating capacity of seeds].

    PubMed

    Polevik, N D

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a polarization structure of electromagnetic radiation on the germinating capacity of seeds of such weeds as Green foxtail (Setaria viridis) and Green amaranth (Amaranthus retroflexus) has been studied. Seeds have been exposed to impulse electromagnetic radiation in a frequency of 896 MHz with linear, elliptical right-handed and elliptical left-handed polarizations at different power flux density levels. It is determined that the effect of the right-handed polarized electromagnetic radiation increases and the influence of the left-handed polarized one reduces the germinating capacity of seeds compared to the effect of the linearly polarized electromagnetic radiation. It is shown that the seeds have an amplitude polarization selectivity as evinced by the major effect of the right-handed polarized radiation on seeds. An electrodynamic model as the right-handed elliptically polarized antenna with the given quantity of the ellipticity of polarization is suggested to use in description of this selectivity.

  7. Effects of High Dietary HEME Iron and Radiation on Cardiovascular Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westby, Christian M.; Brown, A. K.; Platts, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    The radiation related health risks to astronauts is of particular concern to NASA. Data support that exposure to radiation is associated with a number of disorders including a heightened risk for cardiovascular diseases. Independent of radiation, altered nutrient status (e.g. high dietary iron) also increases ones risk for cardiovascular disease. However, it is unknown whether exposure to radiation in combination with high dietary iron further increases ones cardiovascular risk. The intent of our proposal is to generate compulsory data examining the combined effect of radiation exposure and iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury to address HRP risks: 1) Risk Factor of Inadequate Nutrition; 2) Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems; and 3) Risk of Degenerative Tissue or other Health Effects from Space Radiation. Towards our goal we propose two distinct pilot studies using the following specific aims: Vascular Aim 1: To determine the short-term consequences of the independent and combined effects of exposure to gamma radiation and elevated body iron stores on measures of endothelial function and cell viability and integrity. We hypothesize that animals that have high body iron stores and are exposed to gamma radiation will show a greater reduction in endothelial dependent nitric oxid production and larger pathological changes in endothelial integrity than animals that have only 1 of those treatments (either high iron stores or exposure to gamma radiation). Vascular Aim 2: Identify and compare the effects of gamma radiation and elevated body iron stores on the genetic and epigenetic regulation of proteins associated with endothelial cell function. We hypothesize that modifications of epigenetic control and posttranslational expression of proteins associated with endothelial cell function will be differentially altered in rats with high body iron stores and exposed to gamma radiation compared to rats with only 1 type of treatment. Cardiac Aim 1: To determine the

  8. Proceedings of the Symposium on the Protection Against Radiation Hazards in Space Book 1: Radiation Environment in Space. Effects of Space Radiation on Radio Sensitive Objects. Biological Effects of Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    The realization in recent years that outer space is traversed by high-energy radiations has caused man to reevaluate the feasibility of manned or even instrumented exploration outside our atmosphere. Fortunately, it is possible to determine the nature and intensities of these radiations and to produce similar radiations on earth by means of accelerators. Thus we can learn how to attenuate them and to design capsules which afford protection against them. Of course this protection carries a weight penalty so that there is a premium on optimizing the shield design. Many groups in the United states are engaged in research to this end,and it was the purpose of this symposium to bring these groups together so that they could exchange information. To make the meeting more comprehensive, sessions on the nature of the radiations and their effects on people and things were included. However, the major part of the meeting was devoted to discussions on shielding research, comprising theoretical calculations and experiments carried out mainly with high-energy accelerators. The symposium committee feels that the aims of the symposium were met and that progress in space research program was greatly accelerated thereby.

  9. Radiation damage effects by 25 MeV protons and thermal annealing effects on thallium bromide nuclear radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hitomi, K.; Shoji, T.; Suehiro, T.

    1999-06-01

    In this study, TlBr detectors were irradiated with 25 MeV protons accelerated by an AVF cyclotron. Isothermal annealing was performed to restore the performance of the detectors. In order to characterize the radiation damage and thermal annealing effects on the TlBr detectors, the authors measured current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, mobility-lifetime ({mu}{tau}) products and spectrometric responses. The I-V and {mu}{tau} measurements suggest that electron traps have been induced by 25 MeV protons in the TlBr crystals. X- and {gamma}-ray energy spectra were measured for two different electronic conditions: the electric signals induced mainly by electron carriers traversing the crystal were used formore » one case and the signal induced by hole carriers were used in the other case. After irradiation of 25 MeV protons, the {sup 241}Am X- and {gamma}-ray spectra obtained in the former showed significantly degraded energy resolution. No degradation of energy resolution, however, was observed in the latter case. Noticeable improvements of the degraded detector performance have been observed after the thermal annealing.« less

  10. THE EFFECTS OF RADIATION THERAPY ON THE EAR WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO RADIATION OTITIS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Borsanyi, S.J.

    Between l957 and 1961 over l00 patients who were treated by a Co/sup 60/ teletherapy unit for malignant tumors of the head and neck were observed. The ears were included in the field of irradiation (4000 to 6000 r to the region of the inner ear). Between 50 and 60% of the patients developed ear symptoms during or shortly after completion of treatment. The most common symptoms were a sensation of fullness in the ear, some loss of hearing, earache, and tinnitus. Examination of ears revealed mild to moderate hyperemia of ear drums, with slight retraction in eariy stages andmore » bulging at iater stages. There was a moderate conductive hearing loss also. This disease entity is termed radiation otitis media and its pathophysiologic mechanism is similar to that of serous otitis media. Sterile fluid fills the middle ear, containing also some desquamated epithelial cells. Radiation otitis media usually clears up in a few weeks after the completion of treatment. In the management of this condition, vasoconstrictors, mild analgesics, and gentie politzeration were sufficient. However, in a few cases bacterial invasion of the sterile fluid occurred, resulting in purulent otitis media which required the use of antibiotics. Hearing of 20 patients was tested at weekly intervals during and after the completion of radiation. Cut of the 40 ears, 16 showed a conductive hearing loss, averaging 20 db. Six ears showed a worsening of the original loss of preceptive hearing. However, this was also primarily due to the development of a conductive component. There were no microscopicaiiy detectable immediate changes in the cochlea or labyrinth exposed to radiation in cancerocidal doses. (H.H.D.)« less

  11. Numerical study of radiative heat transfer and effects of thermal boundary conditions on CLC fuel reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Mansour, R.; Li, H.; Habib, M. A.; Hossain, M. M.

    2018-02-01

    Global warming has become a worldwide concern due to its severe impacts and consequences on the climate system and ecosystem. As a promising technology proving good carbon capture ability with low-efficiency penalty, Chemical Looping Combustion technology has risen much interest. However, the radiative heat transfer was hardly studied, nor its effects were clearly declared. The present work provides a mathematical model for radiative heat transfer within fuel reactor of chemical looping combustion systems and conducts a numerical research on the effects of boundary conditions, solid particles reflectivity, particles size, and the operating temperature. The results indicate that radiative heat transfer has very limited impacts on the flow pattern. Meanwhile, the temperature variations in the static bed region (where solid particles are dense) brought by radiation are also insignificant. However, the effects of radiation on temperature profiles within free bed region (where solid particles are very sparse) are obvious, especially when convective-radiative (mixed) boundary condition is applied on fuel reactor walls. Smaller oxygen carrier particle size results in larger absorption & scattering coefficients. The consideration of radiative heat transfer within fuel reactor increases the temperature gradient within free bed region. On the other hand, the conversion performance of fuel is nearly not affected by radiation heat transfer within fuel reactor. However, the consideration of radiative heat transfer enhances the heat transfer between the gas phase and solid phase, especially when the operating temperature is low.

  12. Dichromatic laser radiation effects on DNA of Escherichia coli and plasmids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, W. A.; Polignano, G. A. C.; Guimarães, O. R.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Dichromatic and consecutive laser radiations have attracted increased attention for clinical applications as offering new tools for the treatment of dysfunctional tissues in situations where monochromatic radiation is not effective. This work evaluated the survival, filamentation and morphology of Escherichia coli cells, and the induction of DNA lesions, in plasmid DNA exposed to low-intensity consecutive dichromatic laser radiation. Exponential and stationary wild type and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase/MutM protein deficient E. coli cultures were exposed to consecutive low-intensity dichromatic laser radiation (infrared laser immediately after red laser) to study the survival, filamentation and morphology of bacterial cells. Plasmid DNA samples were exposed to dichromatic radiation to study DNA lesions by electrophoretic profile. Dichromatic laser radiation affects the survival, filamentation and morphology of E. coli cultures depending on the growth phase and the functional repair mechanism of oxidizing lesions in DNA, but does not induce single/double strands breaks or alkali-labile DNA lesions. Results show that low-intensity consecutive dichromatic laser radiation induces biological effects that differ from those induced by monochromatic laser radiation, suggesting that other therapeutic effects could be obtained using dichromatic radiation.

  13. Radiation-induced taste aversion: effects of radiation exposure level and the exposure-taste interval

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, A.C.; Smith, J.C.; Hollander, G.R.

    1986-05-01

    Radiation-induced taste aversion has been suggested to possibly play a role in the dietary difficulties observed in some radiotherapy patients. In rats, these aversions can still be formed even when the radiation exposure precedes the taste experience by several hours. This study was conducted to examine whether increasing the radiation exposure level could extend the range of the exposure-taste interval that would still support the formation of a taste aversion. Separate groups of rats received either a 100 or 300 R gamma-ray exposure followed 1, 3, 6, or 24 h later by a 10-min saccharin (0.1% w/v) presentation. A controlmore » group received a sham exposure followed 1 h later by a 10-min saccharin presentation. Twenty-four hours following the saccharin presentation all rats received a series of twelve 23-h two-bottle preference tests between saccharin and water. The results indicated that the duration of the exposure-taste interval plays an increasingly more important role in determining the initial extent of the aversion as the dose decreases. The course of recovery from taste aversion seems more affected by dose than by the temporal parameters of the conditioning trial.« less

  14. Effects of exposure to different types of radiation on behaviors mediated by peripheral or central systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Erat, S.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on behavior may result from effects on peripheral or on central systems. For behavioral endpoints that are mediated by peripheral systems (e.g., radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion or vomiting), the behavioral effects of exposure to heavy particles (56Fe, 600 MeV/n) are qualitatively similar to the effects of exposure to gamma radiation (60Co) and to fission spectrum neutrons. For these endpoints, the only differences between the different types of radiation are in terms of relative behavioral effectiveness. For behavioral endpoints that are mediated by central systems (e.g., amphetamine-induced taste aversion learning), the effects of exposure to 56Fe particles are not seen following exposure to lower LET gamma rays or fission spectrum neutrons. These results indicate that the effects of exposure to heavy particles on behavioral endpoints cannot necessarily be extrapolated from studies using gamma rays, but require the use of heavy particles.

  15. Evaluation of preventive effect of shilajit on radiation-induced apoptosis on ovaries.

    PubMed

    Kececi, Mete; Akpolat, Meryem; Gulle, Kanat; Gencer, Ercan; Sahbaz, Ahmet

    2016-06-01

    Canc er is the second leading cause of death in children in developed countries and most of childhood malignancies can be treated with chemo-radiotherapy. Although radiation therapy is a successful treatment modality in cancer patients, it has various adverse effects. Especially the gonads are very sensitive and prone to radiation-related damage. Radiation impairs the ovaries by triggering apoptosis of follicular cells and chromosomal damage and oxidative stress. Shilajit, a traditional medicinal agent in India, Russia, and other parts of the world, contains various antioxidant agents and has ovogenic effects. To evaluate the ability of shilajit to prevent radiation-induced ovarian damage. Forty Wistar albino female rats were divided into four groups as: Control group, shilajit group, radiation only group, and radiation + shilajit group. Four days after radiation exposure, the rats were sacrificed and the ovaries were removed and evaluated immuno-histopathologically. There was a statistically significant difference in follicle counts (primordial, primary, preantral, antral, and atretic follicles) between the groups (p < 0.001). Almost all follicles at all stages were atretic in the radiation only group whereas normal-looking primordial follicles were detected in the radiation + shilajit group. In radiation + shilajit group, p53, Bax and caspase 3 expression was less intense than that in the radiation only group follicles. This is the first reported study evaluating the effects of shilajit on radiation-related ovarian damage prevention. Shilajit decreased the expression of p53, Bax, and caspase 3, thereby blocking the apoptotic pathways. Shilajit was found to be especially protective of primordial follicles.

  16. Space Weather Effects in the Earth's Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Erickson, P. J.; Fennell, J. F.; Foster, J. C.; Jaynes, A. N.; Verronen, P. T.

    2018-02-01

    The first major scientific discovery of the Space Age was that the Earth is enshrouded in toroids, or belts, of very high-energy magnetically trapped charged particles. Early observations of the radiation environment clearly indicated that the Van Allen belts could be delineated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. The energy distribution, spatial extent and particle species makeup of the Van Allen belts has been subsequently explored by several space missions. Recent observations by the NASA dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission have revealed many novel properties of the radiation belts, especially for electrons at highly relativistic and ultra-relativistic kinetic energies. In this review we summarize the space weather impacts of the radiation belts. We demonstrate that many remarkable features of energetic particle changes are driven by strong solar and solar wind forcings. Recent comprehensive data show broadly and in many ways how high energy particles are accelerated, transported, and lost in the magnetosphere due to interplanetary shock wave interactions, coronal mass ejection impacts, and high-speed solar wind streams. We also discuss how radiation belt particles are intimately tied to other parts of the geospace system through atmosphere, ionosphere, and plasmasphere coupling. The new data have in many ways rewritten the textbooks about the radiation belts as a key space weather threat to human technological systems.

  17. Gamma-radiation effects on luminescence properties of Eu3+ activated LaPO4 phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujčić, Ivica; Gavrilović, Tamara; Sekulić, Milica; Mašić, Slobodan; Putić, Slaviša; Papan, Jelena; Dramićanin, Miroslav D.

    2018-05-01

    Eu3+ activated LaPO4 phosphors were prepared by a high-temperature solid-state method and irradiated to different high-doses gamma-radiation in the 0-4 MGy range. No effects of high-doses of high-energy radiation on phosphor's morphology and structure were observed, as documented by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements. On the other hand, photoluminescence measurements showed that emission properties of phosphor were affected by gamma-radiation; changes in radiative properties being prominent for absorbed radiation doses up to 250 kGy after which no additional changes are observed. Judd-Ofelt analysis of emission spectra is performed to thoroughly investigate radiative properties of phosphors. Analysis showed that radiative transition probability of Eu3+ emission decreases while non-radiative probability increases upon gamma-irradiation. Quantum efficiency of emission is decreased from about 46% to 35% when Eu3+ doped LaPO4 powders are exposed to gamma-radiation of 250 kGy dose, showing no additional decr