Science.gov

Sample records for absolute age constraints

  1. Revised Age Constraints on Absolute Age Limits for Mercury's Kuiperian and Mansurian Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Maria E.; Zhiyong, Xiao; Braden, Sarah E.; Marchi, Simone S.; Barlow, Nadine G.; Chapman, Clark R.; Fassett, Caleb I.

    2015-11-01

    On the basis of morphologically distinct basin and crater deposits, Mercury’s surface units have been subdivided into five time-stratigraphic systems (youngest to oldest): Kuiperian, Mansurian, Calorian, Tolstojan, and pre-Tolstojan. Approximate age limits were initially suggested for these systems on the basis of the lunar-derived impact-flux history. High-resolution and multi-band image data obtained by the MErcury Surface, Space ENviroment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft were used to catalogue fresh impact craters interpreted to have formed during the Mansurian and Kuiperian systems. Mansurian and Kuiperian craters are characterized as morphologically fresh with crisp morphologies, well-preserved rims, few or no superposed craters, continuous ejecta with radial lineaments, and well-defined secondary craters; Kuiperian craters have bright ray systems while Mansurian craters maintain fresh morphologies but no longer have discernable ray systems.The density of fresh craters in these datasets, along with the recent production and chronology function of Marchi et al. [2009], are used to estimate new limits for the boundaries of the two most recent of Mercury’s systems. Given the effects of strength and other parameters (such as density), we estimate a model age for the population of craters that have formed since the onset of the Mansurian of ~1.9 ±0.3 Gyr. Likewise we estimate a model age for the population of craters that have formed since the onset of the Kuiperian of ~300 ±40 Myr. A particularly good fit for the Mansurian crater size frequency distribution (SFD) was found for the NEO-derived crater distribution. The same is true for the Kuiperian SFD, although the fit is not as robust as for the Mansurian SFD.

  2. Least absolute value state estimation with equality and inequality constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Abur, A. ); Celik, M.K. )

    1993-05-01

    A least absolute value (LAV) state estimator, which can handle both equality and inequality constraints on measurements, is developed. It is shown that, the use of equality constraints will actually reduce the number of Simplex iterations and thus the overall cpu time. The constraints can be used to enhance the reliability of the state estimator without affecting the computational efficiency of the estimator. The developed estimation program is tested using 14 through 1,000 bus power systems.

  3. Age Dependent Absolute Plate and Plume Motion Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, D. E.; Koppers, A. A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Current absolute plate motion (APM) models from 80 - 0 Ma are constrained by the location of mantle plume related hotspot seamounts, in particular those of the Hawaiian-Emperor and Louisville seamount trails. Originally the 'fixed' hotspot hypothesis was developed to explain past plate motion based on linear age progressive intra-plate volcanism. However, now that 'moving' hotspots are accepted, it is becoming clear that APM models need to be corrected for individual plume motion vectors. For older seamount trails that were active between roughly 50 and 80 Ma the APM models that use 'fixed' hotspots overestimate the measured age progression in those trails, while APM models corrected for 'moving' hotspots underestimate those age progressions. These mismatches are due to both a lack of reliable ages in the older portions of both the Hawaii and Louisville seamount trails and insufficient APM modeling constraints from other seamount trails in the Pacific Basin. Seamounts are difficult to sample and analyze because many are hydrothermally altered and have low potassium concentrations. New 40Ar/39Ar Age results from International Ocean Drilling Project (IODP) Expedition 330 Sites U1372 (n=18), U1375 (n=3), U1376 (n=15) and U1377 (n=7) aid in constraining the oldest end of the Louisville Seamount trail. A significant observation in this study is that the age range recovered in the drill cores match the range of ages that were acquired on dredging cruises at the same seamounts (e.g. Koppers et al., 2011). This is important for determining the inception age of a seamount. The sections recovered from IODP EXP 330 are in-situ volcanoclastic breccia and lava flows. Comparing the seismic interpretations of Louisville guyots (Contreras-Reyes et al., 2010), Holes U1372, U1373 and U1374 penetrated the extrusive and volcanoclastic sections of the seamount. The ages obtained are consistent over stratigraphic intervals >100-450 m thick, providing evidence that these seamounts

  4. Passive absolute age and temperature history sensor

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex; Vianco, Paul T.

    2015-11-10

    A passive sensor for historic age and temperature sensing, including a first member formed of a first material, the first material being either a metal or a semiconductor material and a second member formed of a second material, the second material being either a metal or a semiconductor material. A surface of the second member is in contact with a surface of the first member such that, over time, the second material of the second member diffuses into the first material of the first member. The rate of diffusion for the second material to diffuse into the first material depends on a temperature of the passive sensor. One of the electrical conductance, the electrical capacitance, the electrical inductance, the optical transmission, the optical reflectance, or the crystalline structure of the passive sensor depends on the amount of the second material that has diffused into the first member.

  5. Toward The Absolute Age of M92 With MIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jieun; Conroy, Charlie; Dotter, Aaron; Weisz, Daniel; Rosenfield, Philip; Dolphin, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Globular clusters provide a fundamental link between stars and galaxies. For example, it has been suggested that ultra faint dwarf galaxies formed all of their stars prior to the epoch of reionization, but this conclusion hinges entirely on the striking similarity of their stellar populations to the ancient, metal-poor globular cluster M92. The accurate measurement of absolute ages of ancient globular clusters therefore has direct implications for the formation histories of the smallest galaxies in the Universe. However, a reliable determination of the absolute ages of globular clusters has proven to be a challenge due to uncertainties in stellar physics and complications in how the models are compared to observations. I will present preliminary results from a comprehensive study to measure the absolute age of M92 using high-quality HST archival imaging data. We pair our new MESA Isochrones and Stellar Tracks (MIST) models with a full CMD fitting framework to jointly fit multi-color CMDs, taking into account the uncertainties in abundances, distance, and stellar physics. The goal of this project is two-fold. First, we aim to provide the most secure absolute age of M92 to date with robustly estimated uncertainties. Second, we explore and quantify the degeneracies between uncertain physical quantities and model variables, such as the distance, mixing-length-alpha parameter, and helium abundance, with the ultimate goal of better constraining these unknowns with data from ongoing and future surveys such as K2, Gaia, TESS, JWST, and WFIRST.

  6. Urey: to measure the absolute age of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randolph, J. E.; Plescia, J.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Bartlett, P.; Bickler, D.; Carlson, R.; Carr, G.; Fong, M.; Gronroos, H.; Guske, P. J.; Herring, M.; Javadi, H.; Johnson, D. W.; Larson, T.; Malaviarachchi, K.; Sherrit, S.; Stride, S.; Trebi-Ollennu, A.; Warwick, R.

    2003-01-01

    UREY, a proposed NASA Mars Scout mission will, for the first time, measure the absolute age of an identified igneous rock formation on Mars. By extension to relatively older and younger rock formations dated by remote sensing, these results will enable a new and better understanding of Martian geologic history.

  7. Age and forgetfulness: absolute versus comparison decisions about capability.

    PubMed

    Erber, J T; Prager, I G

    1997-01-01

    Perceivers were assigned to one of two decision conditions. In an absolute decision condition, perceivers rated how likely they would be to allow a young or old highly forgetful, slightly forgetful, or nonforgetful target to perform a challenging task. In a comparison decision condition, perceivers rated two targets, one young and one old, who had a similar level of forgetfulness. Separate Decision Type x Target Forgetfulness analyses of variance were conducted on ratings of the two target age groups. Young targets received higher ratings in the comparison than in the absolute condition, whereas old targets were rated the same in the two conditions. There was some preference for young targets in a comparison situation, but it was concluded that forgetfulness was a more important factor than age in perceivers' ratings.

  8. Observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: Constraints and correlations from world neutrino data

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G.L.; Lisi, E.; Marrone, A.; Palazzo, A.; Melchiorri, A.; Serra, P.; Silk, J.

    2004-12-01

    In the context of three-flavor neutrino mixing, we present a thorough study of the phenomenological constraints applicable to three observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: The effective neutrino mass in Tritium beta-decay (m{sub {beta}}); the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta-decay (m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}}); and the sum of neutrino masses in cosmology ({sigma}). We discuss the correlations among these variables which arise from the combination of all the available neutrino oscillation data, in both normal and inverse neutrino mass hierarchy. We set upper limits on m{sub {beta}} by combining updated results from the Mainz and Troitsk experiments. We also consider the latest results on m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} from the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment, both with and without the lower bound claimed by such experiment. We derive upper limits on {sigma} from an updated combination of data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite and the two degrees Fields (2dF) Galaxy Redshifts Survey, with and without Lyman-{alpha} forest data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), in models with a nonzero running of the spectral index of primordial inflationary perturbations. The results are discussed in terms of two-dimensional projections of the globally allowed region in the (m{sub {beta}},m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}},{sigma}) parameter space, which neatly show the relative impact of each data set. In particular, the (in)compatibility between {sigma} and m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} constraints is highlighted for various combinations of data. We also briefly discuss how future neutrino data (both oscillatory and nonoscillatory) can further probe the currently allowed regions.

  9. Absolute Gravity Datum in the Age of Cold Atom Gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, V. A.; Eckl, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The international gravity datum is defined today by the International Gravity Standardization Net of 1971 (IGSN-71). The data supporting this network was measured in the 1950s and 60s using pendulum and spring-based gravimeter ties (plus some new ballistic absolute meters) to replace the prior protocol of referencing all gravity values to the earlier Potsdam value. Since this time, gravimeter technology has advanced significantly with the development and refinement of the FG-5 (the current standard of the industry) and again with the soon-to-be-available cold atom interferometric absolute gravimeters. This latest development is anticipated to provide improvement in the range of two orders of magnitude as compared to the measurement accuracy of technology utilized to develop ISGN-71. In this presentation, we will explore how the IGSN-71 might best be "modernized" given today's requirements and available instruments and resources. The National Geodetic Survey (NGS), along with other relevant US Government agencies, is concerned about establishing gravity control to establish and maintain high order geodetic networks as part of the nation's essential infrastructure. The need to modernize the nation's geodetic infrastructure was highlighted in "Precise Geodetic Infrastructure, National Requirements for a Shared Resource" National Academy of Science, 2010. The NGS mission, as dictated by Congress, is to establish and maintain the National Spatial Reference System, which includes gravity measurements. Absolute gravimeters measure the total gravity field directly and do not involve ties to other measurements. Periodic "intercomparisons" of multiple absolute gravimeters at reference gravity sites are used to constrain the behavior of the instruments to ensure that each would yield reasonably similar measurements of the same location (i.e. yield a sufficiently consistent datum when measured in disparate locales). New atomic interferometric gravimeters promise a significant

  10. Constraint on Absolute Accuracy of Metacomprehension Assessments: The Anchoring and Adjustment Model vs. the Standards Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Heekyung

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a systematic account of three typical phenomena surrounding absolute accuracy of metacomprehension assessments: (1) the absolute accuracy of predictions is typically quite low; (2) there exist individual differences in absolute accuracy of predictions as a function of reading skill; and (3) postdictions…

  11. Observational constraints on atmospheric radiaitve feedbacks: absolute accuracy and next-generation observing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykema, J. A.; Hanssen, L. M.; Mekhontsev, S.; Anderson, J.

    2012-12-01

    The central role of atmospheric radiative feedbacks to understanding and projecting climate change calls for a robust observational system. Recent studies have shown the value of space-based measurements for putting quantitative constraints on a range of radiative feedback processes through a fingerprinting method applied to long-term observational records. More recent work has suggested the value of demonstrably accurate measurements to disentangle model error from observational uncertainties within reanalysis systems, potentially yielding improved representations of feedback processes within just a few years. Both of these methods rely on space-based measurements that can be objectively tested for accuracy on-orbit. A new class of mission has been proposed that incorporates the same type of empirical tests for accuracy as used in the laboratory into a space-based sensor. One example of such a mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO), a new mission suggested by the 2006 National Research Council Decadal Survey. CLARREO includes three sensor types: thermal infrared, microwave, and reflected shortwave. This paper presents a laboratory demonstration of prototype systems for testing the on-orbit accuracy of a thermal infrared sensor for CLARREO. These systems utilize infrared lasers to provide monochromatic light sources to quantitatively determine the optical properties of materials. These infrared optical properties are major determinants of the on-orbit radiometric performance of a thermal infrared sensor. For this reason, reliable quantitative information (including uncertainty) that tracks any changes in relevant infrared materials over the mission lifetime is essential to objective assessment of instrument accuracy. The practicality of mid-infrared lasers for these applications is due to the availability and continued evolution of compact, high-efficiency Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs). These lasers can provide over 100 m

  12. On the Absolute Age of the Globular Cluster M92

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Cecco, A.; Becucci, R.; Bono, G.; Monelli, M.; Stetson, P. B.; Degl’Innocenti, S.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Nonino, M.; Weiss, A.; Buonanno, R.; Calamida, A.; Caputo, F.; Corsi, C. E.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Pulone, L.; Romaniello, M.; Walker, A. R.

    2010-09-01

    We present precise and deep optical photometry of the globular M92. Data were collected in three different photometric systems: Sloan Digital Sky Survey (g‧, r‧, i‧, and z‧ MegaCam at CFHT), Johnson-Kron-Cousins (B, V, and I; various ground-based telescopes), and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Vegamag (F475W, F555W, and F814W; Hubble Space Telescope). Special attention was given to the photometric calibration, and the precision of the ground-based data is generally better than 0.01 mag. We computed a new set of α-enhanced evolutionary models accounting for the gravitational settling of heavy elements at fixed chemical composition ([α/Fe] = +0.3, [Fe/H] = -2.32 dex, and Y = 0.248). The isochrones—assuming the same true distance modulus (μ = 14.74 mag), the same reddening [E(B - V) = 0.025 ± 0.010 mag], and the same reddening law—account for the stellar distribution along the main sequence and the red giant branch in different color-magnitude diagrams (i‧, g‧ - i‧ i‧, and g‧ - r‧ i‧, g‧ - z‧ I, and B - I and F814W and F475W–F814W). The same outcome applies to the comparison between the predicted zero-age horizontal-branch (ZAHB) and the HB stars. We also found a cluster age of 11 ± 1.5 Gyr, in good agreement with previous estimates. The error budget accounts for uncertainties in the input physics and the photometry. To test the possible occurrence of CNO-enhanced stars, we also computed two sets of α- and CNO-enhanced (by a factor of 3) models, both at fixed total metallicity ([M/H] = -2.10 dex) and at fixed iron abundance. We found that the isochrones based on the former set give the same cluster age (11 ± 1.5 Gyr) as the canonical α-enhanced isochrones. The isochrones based on the latter set also give a similar cluster age (10 ± 1.5 Gyr). These findings support previous results concerning the weak sensitivity of cluster isochrones to CNO-enhanced chemical mixtures. This paper makes use of data obtained from the Isaac

  13. Young asteroidal fluid activity revealed by absolute age from apatite in carbonaceous chondrite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-Cheng; Li, Qiu-Li; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Li, Xian-Hua; Hu, Sen; Lin, Yang-Ting; Wang, Ru-Cheng

    2016-09-29

    Chondritic meteorites, consisting of the materials that have formed in the early solar system (ESS), have been affected by late thermal events and fluid activity to various degrees. Determining the timing of fluid activity in ESS is of fundamental importance for understanding the nature, formation, evolution and significance of fluid activity in ESS. Previous investigations have determined the relative ages of fluid activity with short-lived isotope systematics. Here we report an absolute (207)Pb/(206)Pb isochron age (4,450±50 Ma) of apatite from Dar al Gani (DaG) 978, a type ∼3.5, ungrouped carbonaceous chondrite. The petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical features suggest that the apatite in DaG 978 should have formed during metamorphism in the presence of a fluid. Therefore, the apatite age represents an absolute age for fluid activity in an asteroidal setting. An impact event could have provided the heat to activate this young fluid activity in ESS.

  14. Young asteroidal fluid activity revealed by absolute age from apatite in carbonaceous chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ai-Cheng; Li, Qiu-Li; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Li, Xian-Hua; Hu, Sen; Lin, Yang-Ting; Wang, Ru-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Chondritic meteorites, consisting of the materials that have formed in the early solar system (ESS), have been affected by late thermal events and fluid activity to various degrees. Determining the timing of fluid activity in ESS is of fundamental importance for understanding the nature, formation, evolution and significance of fluid activity in ESS. Previous investigations have determined the relative ages of fluid activity with short-lived isotope systematics. Here we report an absolute 207Pb/206Pb isochron age (4,450+/-50 Ma) of apatite from Dar al Gani (DaG) 978, a type ~3.5, ungrouped carbonaceous chondrite. The petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical features suggest that the apatite in DaG 978 should have formed during metamorphism in the presence of a fluid. Therefore, the apatite age represents an absolute age for fluid activity in an asteroidal setting. An impact event could have provided the heat to activate this young fluid activity in ESS.

  15. GeMS MCAO observations of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 2808: the absolute age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massari, D.; Fiorentino, G.; McConnachie, A.; Bono, G.; Dall'Ora, M.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Stetson, P. B.; Turri, P.; Tolstoy, E.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Globular clusters are the oldest stellar systems in the Milky Way, and they probe the early epoch of the Galaxy formation. However, the uncertainties on their absolute age are still too large to soundly constrain how the Galactic structures have assembled. Aims: The aim of this work is to obtain an accurate estimate of the absolute age of the globular cluster NGC 2808 using deep IR data obtained with the multi-conjugate adaptive optics system operating at the Gemini South telescope (GeMS). Methods: This exquisite photometry, combined with that obtained in V and I-bands with HST, allowed us to detect the faint Main Sequence Knee feature in NGC 2808 colour magnitude diagram. The difference between this point and the main sequence turn-off is a good age estimator that provides ages with unprecedented accuracy. Results: We find that NGC 2808 has an age of t = 10.9 ± 0.7 (intrinsic) ±0.45 (metallicity term) Gyr. A possible contamination by He-enhanced population could make the cluster up to 0.25 Gyr older. Although this age estimate agrees with the age coming from the classical turn-off method (t = 11.0 Gyr), its uncertainty is a factor ~3 better, since it avoids systematics in reddening, distance assumptions, and photometric zero point determination. The final absolute age indicates that NGC 2808 is slightly younger than other Galactic globular clusters with similar metallicity. Tables of the photometry are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/586/A51

  16. Rhenium-osmium-isotope constraints on the age of iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horan, M. F.; Morgan, J. W.; Walker, R. J.; Grossman, J. N.

    1992-01-01

    Rhenium and osmium concentrations and the osmium isotopic compositions of iron meteorites were determined by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Data for the IIA iron meteorites define an isochron with an uncertainty of approximately +/-31 million years for meteorites about 4500 million years old. Although an absolute rhenium-osmium closure age for this iron group cannot be as precisely constrained because of uncertainty in the decay constant of Re-187, an age of 4460 million years ago is the minimum permitted by combined uncertainties. These age constraints imply that the parent body of the IIAB magmatic irons melted and subsequently cooled within 100 million years after the formation of the oldest portions of chondrites. Other iron meteorites plot above the IIA isochron, indicating that the planetary bodies represented by these iron groups may have cooled significantly later than the parent body of the IIA irons.

  17. Rhenium-osmium isotope constraints on the age of iron meteorites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horan, M.F.; Morgan, J.W.; Walker, R.J.; Grossman, J.N.

    1992-01-01

    Rhenium and osmium concentrations and the osmium isotopic compositions of iron meteorites were determined by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Data for the IIA iron meteorites define an isochron with an uncertainty of approximately ??31 million years for meteorites ???4500 million years old. Although an absolute rhenium-osmium closure age for this iron group cannot be as precisely constrained because of uncertainty in the decay constant of 187Re, an age of 4460 million years ago is the minimum permitted by combined uncertainties. These age constraints imply that the parent body of the IIAB magmatic irons melted and subsequently cooled within 100 million years after the formation of the oldest portions of chondrites. Other iron meteorites plot above the IIA isochron, indicating that the planetary bodies represented by these iron groups may have cooled significantly later than the parent body of the IIA irons.

  18. Absolute age of lunar regolith material from the Sea of Fertility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinogradov, A. P.; Artemov, Y. M.

    1974-01-01

    By averaging the absolute age of lunar regolith materials from the Sea of Fertility for the fine regolith fraction from the core zone V, an age of 4.65 10 to the 9th power + 0.4 10 to the 9th power years was obtained, employing as the primordial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio 0.69884 (ADOR). Also close to this age value is the age estimate based on the Pb-207/Pb-206 ratio. Using the value 0.69898 (BABI) as a primordial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio reduces the calculated age of the fine regolith fraction to 4.25 X 10 to the 9th power years. The fine fraction of lunar regolith from the Sea of Fertility is also characterized by a minimum addition of radiogenic Sr-87, a minimum Rb/Sr ratio, and a maximum K/Rb ratio compared with analogous lunar material from other points.

  19. A self-consistent, absolute isochronal age scale for young moving groups in the solar neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Cameron P. M.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Naylor, Tim

    2015-11-01

    We present a self-consistent, absolute isochronal age scale for young ( ≲ 200 Myr), nearby ( ≲ 100 pc) moving groups in the solar neighbourhood based on homogeneous fitting of semi-empirical pre-main-sequence model isochrones using the τ2 maximum-likelihood fitting statistic of Naylor & Jeffries in the MV, V - J colour-magnitude diagram. The final adopted ages for the groups are as follows: 149^{+51}_{-19} {Myr} for the AB Dor moving group, 24 ± 3 Myr for the β Pic moving group (BPMG), 45^{+11}_{-7} {Myr} for the Carina association, 42^{+6}_{-4} {Myr} for the Columba association, 11 ± 3 Myr for the η Cha cluster, 45 ± 4 Myr for the Tucana-Horologium moving group (Tuc-Hor), 10 ± 3 Myr for the TW Hya association and 22^{+4}_{-3} {Myr} for the 32 Ori group. At this stage we are uncomfortable assigning a final, unambiguous age to the Argus association as our membership list for the association appears to suffer from a high level of contamination, and therefore it remains unclear whether these stars represent a single population of coeval stars. Our isochronal ages for both the BPMG and Tuc-Hor are consistent with recent lithium depletion boundary (LDB) ages, which unlike isochronal ages, are relatively insensitive to the choice of low-mass evolutionary models. This consistency between the isochronal and LDB ages instils confidence that our self-consistent, absolute age scale for young, nearby moving groups is robust, and hence we suggest that these ages be adopted for future studies of these groups. Software implementing the methods described in this study is available from http://www.astro.ex.ac.uk/people/timn/tau-squared/.

  20. Absolute ages from crater statistics: Using radiometric ages of Martian samples for determining the Martian cratering chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neukum, G.

    1988-01-01

    In the absence of dates derived from rock samples, impact crater frequencies are commonly used to date Martian surface units. All models for absolute dating rely on the lunar cratering chronology and on the validity of its extrapolation to Martian conditions. Starting from somewhat different lunar chronologies, rather different Martian cratering chronologies are found in the literature. Currently favored models are compared. The differences at old ages are significant, the differences at younger ages are considerable and give absolute ages for the same crater frequencies as different as a factor of 3. The total uncertainty could be much higher, though, since the ratio of lunar to Martian cratering rate which is of basic importance in the models is believed to be known no better than within a factor of 2. Thus, it is of crucial importance for understanding the the evolution of Mars and determining the sequence of events to establish an unambiguous Martian cratering chronology from crater statistics in combination with clean radiometric ages of returned Martian samples. For the dating goal, rocks should be as pristine as possible from a geologically simple area with a one-stage emplacement history of the local formation. A minimum of at least one highland site for old ages, two intermediate-aged sites, and one very young site is needed.

  1. Age-specific absolute and relative organ weight distributions for Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Marino, Dale J

    2012-01-01

    The Fischer 344 (F344) rat has been the standard rat strain used in toxicology studies conducted by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Toxicology Program (NTP). However, the numerous reports published to date on growth, survival, and tumor incidence have not included an overall compilation of organ weight data. Notably, dose-related organ weight effects are endpoints used by regulatory agencies to develop toxicity reference values (TRVs) for use in human health risk assessments. In addition, physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models, which utilize relative organ weights, are increasingly being used to develop TRVs. Because a compilation of organ weights for F344 rats could prove beneficial for TRV development and PBPK modeling, all available absolute and relative organ weight data for untreated control F344 rats were collected from NCI/NTP feed, drinking-water, and inhalation studies in order to develop age-specific distributions. Results showed that organ weights were collected more frequently at 2-wk (59 studies), 3-mo (148 studies), and 15-mo (38 studies) intervals than at other intervals and more frequently from feeding and inhalation than from drinking-water studies. Liver, right kidney, lung, heart, thymus, and brain weights were most frequently collected. From the collected data, the mean and standard deviation for absolute and relative organ weights were calculated. Findings showed age-related increases in absolute weights and decreases in relative weights for brain, liver, right kidney, lung, heart, thyroid, and right testis. The results suggest a general variability trend in absolute organ weights of brain < right testis < heart < right kidney < liver < lung < thymus < thyroid.

  2. Young asteroidal fluid activity revealed by absolute age from apatite in carbonaceous chondrite

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ai-Cheng; Li, Qiu-Li; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Li, Xian-Hua; Hu, Sen; Lin, Yang-Ting; Wang, Ru-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Chondritic meteorites, consisting of the materials that have formed in the early solar system (ESS), have been affected by late thermal events and fluid activity to various degrees. Determining the timing of fluid activity in ESS is of fundamental importance for understanding the nature, formation, evolution and significance of fluid activity in ESS. Previous investigations have determined the relative ages of fluid activity with short-lived isotope systematics. Here we report an absolute 207Pb/206Pb isochron age (4,450±50 Ma) of apatite from Dar al Gani (DaG) 978, a type ∼3.5, ungrouped carbonaceous chondrite. The petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical features suggest that the apatite in DaG 978 should have formed during metamorphism in the presence of a fluid. Therefore, the apatite age represents an absolute age for fluid activity in an asteroidal setting. An impact event could have provided the heat to activate this young fluid activity in ESS. PMID:27682449

  3. Absolute Ages and Distances of 22 GCs Using Monte Carlo Main-sequence Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, Erin M.; Gilligan, Christina; Chaboyer, Brian

    2017-04-01

    The recent Gaia Data Release 1 of stellar parallaxes provides ample opportunity to find metal-poor main-sequence stars with precise parallaxes. We select 21 such stars with parallax uncertainties better than σ π /π ≤ 0.10 and accurate abundance determinations suitable for testing metal-poor stellar evolution models and determining the distance to Galactic globular clusters (GCs). A Monte Carlo analysis was used, taking into account uncertainties in the model construction parameters, to generate stellar models and isochrones to fit to the calibration stars. The isochrones that fit the calibration stars best were then used to determine the distances and ages of 22 GCs with metallicities ranging from ‑2.4 dex to ‑0.7 dex. We find distances with an average uncertainty of 0.15 mag and absolute ages ranging from 10.8 to 13.6 Gyr with an average uncertainty of 1.6 Gyr. Using literature proper motion data, we calculate orbits for the clusters, finding six that reside within the Galactic disk/bulge, while the rest are considered halo clusters. We find no strong evidence for a relationship between age and Galactocentric distance, but we do find a decreasing age–[Fe/H] relation.

  4. Absolute age Determinations on Diamond by Radioisotopic Methods: NOT the way to Accurately Identify Diamond Provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirey, S. B.

    2002-05-01

    Gem-quality diamond contains such low abundances of parent-daughter radionuclides that dating the diamond lattice directly by isotopic measurements has been and will be impossible. Absolute ages on diamonds typically are obtained through measurements of their syngenetic mineral inclusions: Rb-Sr in garnet; Sm-Nd in garnet and pyroxene; Re-Os and U-Th-Pb in sulfide; K-Ar in pyroxene; and U-Pb in zircon. The application of the first two isotope schemes in the list requires putting together many inclusions from many diamonds whereas the latter isotope schemes permit ages on single diamonds. The key limitations on the application of these decay pairs are the availability and size of the inclusions, the abundance levels of the radionuclides, and instrumental sensitivity. Practical complications of radioisotope dating of inclusions are fatal to the application of the technique for diamond provenance. In all mines, the ratio of gem-quality diamonds to stones with datable inclusions is very high. Thus there is no way to date the valuable, marketable stones that are part of the conflict diamond problem, just their rare, flawed cousins. Each analysis destroys the diamond host plus the inclusion and can only be carried out in research labs by highly trained scientists. Thus, these methods can not be automated or applied to the bulk of diamond production. The geological problems with age dating are equally fatal to its application to diamond provenance. From the geological perspective, for age determination to work as a tool for diamond provenance studies, diamond ages would have to be specific to particular kimberlites or kimberlite fields and different between fields. The southern African Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe Craton and Limpopo Mobile Belt is the only cratonic region where age determinations have been applied on a large enough scale to a number of kimberlites to illustrate the geological problems in age measurements for diamond provenance. However, this southern African example

  5. Distant Secondary Craters and Age Constraints on Young Martian Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEwen, A.; Preblich, B.; Turtle, E.; Studer, D.; Artemieva, N.; Golombek, M.; Hurst, M.; Kirk, R.; Burr, D.

    2005-01-01

    Are small (less than approx. 1 km diameter) craters on Mars and the Moon dominated by primary impacts, by secondary impacts of much larger primary craters, or are both primaries and secondaries significant? This question is critical to age constraints for young terrains and for older terrains covering small areas, where only small craters are superimposed on the unit. If the martian rayed crater Zunil is representative of large impact events on Mars, then the density of secondaries should exceed the density of primaries at diameters a factor of 1000 smaller than that of the largest contributing primary crater. On the basis of morphology and depth/diameter measurements, most small craters on Mars could be secondaries. Two additional observations (discussed below) suggest that the production functions of Hartmann and Neukum predict too many primary craters smaller than a few hundred meters in diameter. Fewer small, high-velocity impacts may explain why there appears to be little impact regolith over Amazonian terrains. Martian terrains dated by small craters could be older than reported in recent publications.

  6. Redefinition of the crater-density and absolute-age boundaries for the chronostratigraphic system of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, S.C.; Tanaka, K.L.

    2011-01-01

    For the boundaries of each chronostratigraphic epoch on Mars, we present systematically derived crater-size frequencies based on crater counts of geologic referent surfaces and three proposed " standard" crater size-frequency production distributions as defined by (a) a simple -2 power law, (b) Neukum and Ivanov, (c) Hartmann. In turn, these crater count values are converted to model-absolute ages based on the inferred cratering rate histories. We present a new boundary definition for the Late Hesperian-Early Amazonian transition. Our fitting of crater size-frequency distributions to the chronostratigraphic record of Mars permits the assignment of cumulative counts of craters down to 100. m, 1. km, 2. km, 5. km, and 16. km diameters to martian epochs. Due to differences in the " standard" crater size-frequency production distributions, a generalized crater-density-based definition to the chronostratigraphic system cannot be provided. For the diameter range used for the boundary definitions, the resulting model absolute age fits vary within 1.5% for a given set of production function and chronology model ages. Crater distributions translated to absolute ages utilizing different curve descriptions can result in absolute age differences exceeding 10%. ?? 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  7. Problems determining relative and absolute ages using the small crater population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhiyong; Strom, Robert G.

    2012-07-01

    The small crater populations (diameter smaller than 1 km) are widely used to date planetary surfaces. The reliability of small crater counts is tested by counting small craters at several young and old lunar surfaces, including Mare Nubium and craters Alphonsus, Tycho and Giordano Bruno. Based on high-resolution images from both the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera and Kaguya Terrain Camera, small craters in two different diameter ranges are counted for each counting area. Large discrepancies exist in both the cumulative (absolute model ages) and relative plots for the two different size ranges of the same counting areas. The results indicate that dating planetary surfaces using small crater populations is highly unreliable because the contamination of secondaries may invalidate the results of small crater counts. A comparison of the size-frequency distributions of the small crater populations and impact ejected boulders around fresh lunar craters shows the same upturn as typical martian secondaries, which supports the argument that secondaries dominate the small crater populations on the Moon and Mars. Also, the size-frequency distributions of small rayed lunar and martian craters of probable primary origin are similar to that of the Population 2 craters on the inner Solar System bodies post-dating Late Heavy Bombardment. Dating planetary surfaces using the small crater populations requires the separation of primaries from secondaries which is extremely difficult. The results also show that other factors, such as different target properties and the subjective identification of impact craters by different crater counters, may also affect crater counting results. We suggest that dating planetary surfaces using small crater populations should be with highly cautious.

  8. Locus of Control, Perceived Constraint, and Morale among Institutionalized Aged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fawcett, Gayle; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Contrary to an earlier report, this study showed that life satisfaction of 56 institutionalized elderly women was associated with internality. Satisfaction was inversely related to their perception of institutional constraints, its most powerful determinant. (Author)

  9. On the Absolute Age of the Metal-rich Globular M71 (NGC 6838). I. Optical Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Cecco, A.; Bono, G.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Tognelli, E.; Allard, F.; Stetson, P. B.; Buonanno, R.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Monelli, M.; Nonino, M.; Pulone, L.

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the absolute age of the Galactic globular cluster M71 (NGC 6838) using optical ground-based images (u\\prime ,g\\prime ,r\\prime ,i\\prime ,z\\prime ) collected with the MegaCam camera at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). We performed a robust selection of field and cluster stars by applying a new method based on the 3D (r\\prime ,u\\prime -g\\prime ,g\\prime -r\\prime ) color-color-magnitude diagram. A comparison between the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of the candidate cluster stars and a new set of isochrones at the locus of the main sequence turn-off (MSTO) suggests an absolute age of 12 ± 2 Gyr. The absolute age was also estimated using the difference in magnitude between the MSTO and the so-called main sequence knee, a well-defined bending occurring in the lower main sequence. This feature was originally detected in the near-infrared bands and explained as a consequence of an opacity mechanism (collisionally induced absorption of molecular hydrogen) in the atmosphere of cool low-mass stars. The same feature was also detected in the r‧, u\\prime -g\\prime , and in the r\\prime ,g\\prime -r\\prime CMD, thus supporting previous theoretical predictions by Borysow et al. The key advantage in using the {{{Δ }}}{TO}{Knee} as an age diagnostic is that it is independent of uncertainties affecting the distance, the reddening, and the photometric zero point. We found an absolute age of 12 ± 1 Gyr that agrees, within the errors, with similar age estimates, but the uncertainty is on average a factor of two smaller. We also found that the {{{Δ }}}{TO}{Knee} is more sensitive to the metallicity than the MSTO, but the dependence vanishes when using the difference in color between the MSK and the MSTO.

  10. Age-specific absolute and relative organ weight distributions for B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Marino, Dale J

    2012-01-01

    The B6C3F1 mouse is the standard mouse strain used in toxicology studies conducted by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Toxicology Program (NTP). While numerous reports have been published on growth, survival, and tumor incidence, no overall compilation of organ weight data is available. Importantly, organ weight change is an endpoint used by regulatory agencies to develop toxicity reference values (TRVs) for use in human health risk assessments. Furthermore, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models, which utilize relative organ weights, are increasingly being used to develop TRVs. Therefore, all available absolute and relative organ weight data for untreated control B6C3F1 mice were collected from NCI/NTP studies in order to develop age-specific distributions. Results show that organ weights were collected more frequently in NCI/NTP studies at 2-wk (60 studies), 3-mo (147 studies), and 15-mo (40 studies) intervals than at other intervals, and more frequently from feeding and inhalation than drinking water studies. Liver, right kidney, lung, heart, thymus, and brain weights were most frequently collected. From the collected data, the mean and standard deviation for absolute and relative organ weights were calculated. Results show age-related increases in absolute liver, right kidney, lung, and heart weights and relatively stable brain and right testis weights. The results suggest a general variability trend in absolute organ weights of brain < right testis < right kidney < heart < liver < lung < spleen < thymus. This report describes the results of this effort.

  11. Absolute model ages of mantled surfaces in Malea Planum and Utopia Planitia, Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmes, M.; Hiesinger, H.; Reiss, D.; Zanetti, M.

    2009-04-01

    The surface of Mars is partially covered by a latitude-dependent ice-rich smooth mantle in the middle and high latitudes (±30-60°) [1, 2]. These deposits relate to changes in the obliquity of Mars which have led to major shifts in the Martian climate and repeated global episodes of deposition [3]. The deposits vary in thickness and are usually independent of local geology, topography and elevation. In this study we have determined absolute model ages for the mantled surface units in Utopia Planitia (northern hemisphere) and Malea Planum (southern hemisphere) using crater statistics [4]. These regions show a specific type of mantle degradation called scalloped terrain, and modelled crater retention ages of the easily eroded mantle in these regions reveal the time since the last resurfacing. Images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) (25-50 cm/pixel spatial resolution) on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) were analyzed, continuous areas of smooth mantle were mapped, and small, fresh, unmodified craters were counted. Both regions show degradation features of the mantle in varying degrees. The mantle in Utopia Planitia appears heavily modified by polygonal fractures and scalloped depressions [5]. Scalloped depressions are also found in Malea Planum, but the mantle appears much smoother and less modified by periglacial processes [5, 6]. The study areas totalled 722 km² in Utopia Planitia, and 296 km² in Malea Planum. Model ages for these regions were determined using the chronology function of Hartmann and Neukum [4] and the production function Ivanov [7]. The model ages show that the mantle unit for the area mapped in Utopia Planitia is 0.65 (+0.35/-0.41) to 2.9 (+0.69/-0.75) Myr old and Malea Planum is 3.0 (+1.5/-1.7) to 4.5 (+1.3/-1.4) Myr old, and that both regions represent very recent Amazonian terrain. This is also in agreement with the observed young degradation features described by [6, 8]. We acknowledge that the

  12. 40Ar-39Ar Age Constraints on Volcanism and Tectonism in the Terror Rift of the Ross Sea, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2007-01-01

    Volcanic sills and dikes inferred from seismic reflection profiles and geophysical studies of the Ross Sea are thought to be related to the rift basins in the region, and their emplacement to be coeval with extension. However, lack of precise geochronology in the Terror Rift of the Ross Sea region has left these inferred relationships poorly constrained and has hindered neotectonic studies, because of the large temporal gaps between seismic reflectors of known ages. New 40Ar/39Ar geochronology presented here for submarine volcanic rocks provides better age constraints for neotectonic interpretations within the Terror Rift. Several samples from seamounts yielded young ages between 156 ± 21 and 122 ± 26 Ka. These ages support interpretations that extension within the Terror Rift was active at least through the Pleistocene. Three evenly spaced samples from the lowermost 100 m of Franklin Island range in age from 3.28 ± 0.04 to 3.73 ± 0.05 Ma. These age determinations demonstrate that construction of a small volcanic edifice such as Franklin Island took at least several hundred thousand years, and therefore that much larger ones in the Erebus Volcanic Province are likely to have taken considerably longer than previously inferred. This warrants caution in applying a limited number of age determinations to define the absolute ages of events in the Ross Sea region

  13. Absolute age constraints on the age and tectonics of the Middle and Late Proterozoic Pahrump Group, southern Death Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Calzia, J.P. ); Troxel, B.W.

    1993-04-01

    The Pahrump Group unconformably overlies 1.35 Ga granite, is unconformably overlain by the Late Proterozoic Noonday Dolomite, and is divided into the Crystal Spring Formation, the Beck Spring Dolomite, and the Kingston Peak Formation. Contacts between these formations are gradational through several meters of interbedded clastic and carbonate rocks. Lithologic data, sedimentary structures, and fossil assemblages suggest that the Pahrump Group, from middle Crystal Spring to lower Kingston Peak time, was deposited in an intratidal to supratidal environment. Diamictite, volcanic ash, and mono lithologic megabreccia suggest that the middle and the upper members of the Kingston Peak Formation were deposited in a higher energy sedimentary and tectonic environment. Dikes and sills of 1.08 Ga diabase intrude the gneiss and all members of the Crystal Spring Formation; erosional clasts of diabase first appear in the middle Kingston Peak Formation. The diabase sills are up to 450 m thick and have caused at least 20 percent inflation of the Crystal Spring, Beck Spring, and lower Kingston Peak formations. If these sedimentary rocks were deposited at or above wave base, evidence of intraplate rifting or gross stratigraphic inflation is not recorded in the Pahrump stratigraphy until middle and upper Kingston Peak time. Therefore, the stratigraphic and petrologic data suggest that the diabase was emplaced in the Crystal Spring Formation during post-lower but pre-middle Kingston Peak time. The Beck Spring Dolomite and the lower Kingston Peak Formation are older than 1.08 Ga; the contact between the lower and the middle Kingston Peak Formation is a regional disconformity that marks significant changes in the depositional and the tectonic environments of the Pahrump Group at about 1.08 Ga.

  14. Nuclear constraints on the age of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    A review is made of how one can use nuclear physics to put rather stringent limits on the age of the universe and thus the cosmic distance scale. The age can be estimated to a fair degree of accuracy. No single measurement of the time since the Big Bang gives a specific, unambiguous age. There are several methods that together fix the age with surprising precision. In particular, there are three totally independent techniques for estimating an age and a fourth technique which involves finding consistency of the other three in the framework of the standard Big Bang cosmological model. The three independent methods are: cosmological dynamics, the age of the oldest stars, and radioactive dating. This paper concentrates on the third of the three methods, and the consistency technique. Previously announced in STAR as N83-34868

  15. Nuclear constraints on the age of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, D. N.

    1982-01-01

    A review is made of how one can use nuclear physics to put rather stringent limits on the age of the universe and thus the cosmic distance scale. The age can be estimated to a fair degree of accuracy. No single measurement of the time since the Big Bang gives a specific, unambiguous age. There are several methods that together fix the age with surprising precision. In particular, there are three totally independent techniques for estimating an age and a fourth technique which involves finding consistency of the other three in the framework of the standard Big Bang cosmological model. The three independent methods are: cosmological dynamics, the age of the oldest stars, and radioactive dating. This paper concentrates on the third of the three methods, and the consistency technique.

  16. Nuclear constraints on the age of the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.

    1982-12-01

    In this paper a review is made of how one can use nuclear physics to put rather stringent limits on the age of the universe and thus the cosmic distance scale. As the other papers in this session have demonstrated there is some disagreement on the distance scale and thus the limits on the age of the universe (if the cosmological constant ..lambda.. = 0). However, the disagreement is only over the last factor of 2, the basic timescale seems to really be remarkably well agreed upon. The universe is billions of years old - not thousands, not quintillions but bilions of years. That our universe has a finite age is philosophically intriguing. That we can estimate that age to a fair degree of accuracy is truly impressive. No single measurement of the time since the Big Bang gives a specific, unambiguous age. Fortunately, we have at our disposal several methods that together fix the age with surprising precision. In particular, as the other papers show, there are three totally independent techniques for estimating an age and a fourth technique which involves finding consistency of the other three in the framework of the standard Big Bang cosmological model. The three independent methods are: cosmological dynamics, the age of the oldest stars, and radioactive dating. This paper concentrates on the third of the three methods, as well as go into the consistency technique.

  17. Predicting Absolute Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Using Age and Waist Circumference Values in an Aboriginal Australian Community

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To predict in an Australian Aboriginal community, the 10-year absolute risk of type 2 diabetes associated with waist circumference and age on baseline examination. Method A sample of 803 diabetes-free adults (82.3% of the age-eligible population) from baseline data of participants collected from 1992 to 1998 were followed-up for up to 20 years till 2012. The Cox-proportional hazard model was used to estimate the effects of waist circumference and other risk factors, including age, smoking and alcohol consumption status, of males and females on prediction of type 2 diabetes, identified through subsequent hospitalisation data during the follow-up period. The Weibull regression model was used to calculate the absolute risk estimates of type 2 diabetes with waist circumference and age as predictors. Results Of 803 participants, 110 were recorded as having developed type 2 diabetes, in subsequent hospitalizations over a follow-up of 12633.4 person-years. Waist circumference was strongly associated with subsequent diagnosis of type 2 diabetes with P<0.0001 for both genders and remained statistically significant after adjusting for confounding factors. Hazard ratios of type 2 diabetes associated with 1 standard deviation increase in waist circumference were 1.7 (95%CI 1.3 to 2.2) for males and 2.1 (95%CI 1.7 to 2.6) for females. At 45 years of age with baseline waist circumference of 100 cm, a male had an absolute diabetic risk of 10.9%, while a female had a 14.3% risk of the disease. Conclusions The constructed model predicts the 10-year absolute diabetes risk in an Aboriginal Australian community. It is simple and easily understood and will help identify individuals at risk of diabetes in relation to waist circumference values. Our findings on the relationship between waist circumference and diabetes on gender will be useful for clinical consultation, public health education and establishing WC cut-off points for Aboriginal Australians. PMID:25876058

  18. Towards an absolute chronology for the Aegean iron age: new radiocarbon dates from Lefkandi, Kalapodi and Corinth.

    PubMed

    Toffolo, Michael B; Fantalkin, Alexander; Lemos, Irene S; Felsch, Rainer C S; Niemeier, Wolf-Dietrich; Sanders, Guy D R; Finkelstein, Israel; Boaretto, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    The relative chronology of the Aegean Iron Age is robust. It is based on minute stylistic changes in the Submycenaean, Protogeometric and Geometric styles and their sub-phases. Yet, the absolute chronology of the time-span between the final stages of Late Helladic IIIC in the late second millennium BCE and the archaic colonization of Italy and Sicily toward the end of the 8(th) century BCE lacks archaeological contexts that can be directly related to events carrying absolute dates mentioned in Egyptian/Near Eastern historical sources, or to well-dated Egyptian/Near Eastern rulers. The small number of radiocarbon dates available for this time span is not sufficient to establish an absolute chronological sequence. Here we present a new set of short-lived radiocarbon dates from the sites of Lefkandi, Kalapodi and Corinth in Greece. We focus on the crucial transition from the Submycenaean to the Protogeometric periods. This transition is placed in the late 11(th) century BCE according to the Conventional Aegean Chronology and in the late 12(th) century BCE according to the High Aegean Chronology. Our results place it in the second half of the 11(th) century BCE.

  19. Towards an Absolute Chronology for the Aegean Iron Age: New Radiocarbon Dates from Lefkandi, Kalapodi and Corinth

    PubMed Central

    Toffolo, Michael B.; Fantalkin, Alexander; Lemos, Irene S.; Felsch, Rainer C. S.; Niemeier, Wolf-Dietrich; Sanders, Guy D. R.; Finkelstein, Israel; Boaretto, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    The relative chronology of the Aegean Iron Age is robust. It is based on minute stylistic changes in the Submycenaean, Protogeometric and Geometric styles and their sub-phases. Yet, the absolute chronology of the time-span between the final stages of Late Helladic IIIC in the late second millennium BCE and the archaic colonization of Italy and Sicily toward the end of the 8th century BCE lacks archaeological contexts that can be directly related to events carrying absolute dates mentioned in Egyptian/Near Eastern historical sources, or to well-dated Egyptian/Near Eastern rulers. The small number of radiocarbon dates available for this time span is not sufficient to establish an absolute chronological sequence. Here we present a new set of short-lived radiocarbon dates from the sites of Lefkandi, Kalapodi and Corinth in Greece. We focus on the crucial transition from the Submycenaean to the Protogeometric periods. This transition is placed in the late 11th century BCE according to the Conventional Aegean Chronology and in the late 12th century BCE according to the High Aegean Chronology. Our results place it in the second half of the 11th century BCE. PMID:24386150

  20. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  1. Constraints on Exposure Ages of Lunar and Asteroidal Regolith Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P

    2014-01-01

    Mineral grains in lunar and asteroidal regolith samples provide a unique record of their interaction with the space environment. Exposure to the solar wind results in implantation effects that are preserved in the rims of grains (typically the outermost 100 nm), while impact processes result in the accumulation of vapor-deposited elements, impact melts and adhering grains on particle surfaces. These processes are collectively referred to as space weathering. A critical element in the study of these processes is to determine the rate at which these effects accumulate in the grains during their space exposure. For small particulate samples, one can use the density of solar flare particle tracks to infer the length of time the particle was at the regolith surface (i.e., its exposure age). We have developed a new technique that enables more accurate determination of solar flare particle track densities in mineral grains <50 micron in size that utilizes focused ion beam (FIB) sample preparation combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging. We have applied this technique to lunar soil grains from the Apollo 16 site (soil 64501) and most recently to samples from asteroid 25143 Itokawa returned by the Hayabusa mission. Our preliminary results show that the Hayabusa grains have shorter exposure ages compared to typical lunar soil grains. We will use these techniques to re-examine the track density-exposure age calibration from lunar samples reported by Blanford et al. (1975).

  2. The Relative and Absolute Ages of Old Globular Clusters in the LCDM Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenti, Michele; Padoan, Paolo; Jimenez, Raul

    2015-08-01

    Old globular clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way have ages of about 13 Gyr, placing their formation time in the reionization epoch. We propose a novel scenario for the formation of these systems based on the merger of two or more atomic cooling halos at high redshift (z\\gt 6). First-generation stars are formed as an intense burst in the center of a minihalo that grows above the threshold for hydrogen cooling (halo mass {M}{{h}}˜ {10}8 {M}⊙ ) by undergoing a major merger within its cooling timescale (˜150 Myr). Subsequent minor mergers and sustained gas infall bring a new supply of pristine gas to the halo center, creating conditions that can trigger new episodes of star formation. The dark-matter halo around the GC is then stripped during assembly of the host-galaxy halo. Minihalo merging is efficient only in a short redshift window, set by the {{Λ }}{CDM} parameters, allowing us to make a strong prediction on the age distribution for old GCs. From cosmological simulations, we derive an average merging redshift < z> =9 and a narrow distribution {{Δ }}z=2, implying average GC age < {t}{age}> =13.0+/- 0.2 {Gyr} including ˜0.2 Gyr of star formation delay. Qualitatively, our scenario reproduces other general old GC properties (characteristic masses and number of objects, metallicity versus galactocentric radius anticorrelation, radial distribution), but unlike age, these generally depend on details of baryonic physics. In addition to improved age measurements, direct validation of the model at z˜ 10 may be within reach with ultradeep gravitationally lensed observations with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  3. Deciphering relative timing of fabric development in granitoids with similar absolute ages based on AMS study (Dharwar Craton, South India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Sandeep; Rana, Virendra; Mamtani, Manish A.

    2017-01-01

    Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) data are presented from the Koppal Granitoid (Dharwar Craton, South India) that has U-Pb zircon age of 2528 ± 9 Ma. The magnetic fabric is oriented in NNE-SSW direction. This is parallel to the planar structures that developed during regional D3 deformation, but oblique to the NNW-SSE oriented magnetic foliation as well as field foliation (D1/D2 deformation) recorded in the country rock Peninsular Gneiss. Variation in the intensity of fabric within the granitoid is mapped. It is inferred that the emplacement of Koppal Granitoid took place by ballooning and fabric development within the pluton was syntectonic with regional D3. These results are compared with the time-relationship between emplacement/fabric development and regional deformation reported from the Mulgund Granite (2555 ± 6 Ma; U-Pb zircon), which is also located in the Dharwar Craton and is equivalent to the Koppal Granitoid in age. This granite is known to have emplaced syntectonically with regional D1/D2 deformation, and is thus not related to the same deformation event as the Koppal Granitoid, despite their similar absolute ages. It is argued that in the study area, D3 is ≤2537 Ma, while D1/D2 is ≥2549 Ma in age. Thus, this study highlights the use of AMS in (a) deciphering the relative timing of regional deformation and emplacement of granitoids of equivalent age and (b) constraining the timing of regional superposed deformation events.

  4. Premises and physical mechanisms to explain plateau boundaries in marine planktic 14C records as absolute age markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnthein, Michael; Grootes, Pieter M.

    2010-05-01

    resultant sedimentation rate changes to a minimum, minimizing resultant planktic reservoir ages, and monitoring strict criteria regarding realistic paired benthic reservoir ages, e.g., by testing alternative models of 14C plateau tuning. Being applied to eight cores this approach led to realistic estimates of absolute and 14C reservoir ages as well as of sedimentation rates for various key regions of the ocean. Refs.: Reimer, P. et al., 2010, Radiocarbon, 51 (4), 1111-1150. Sarnthein et al., 2007, in: A. Schmittner et al., AGU Monograph 173, 175-196.

  5. New Radiometric Age Constraints for the Matuyama-Bruhnes Reversal and Santa Rosa Excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbas, A.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Kent, D. V.; Coe, R. S.; Konrad, K.; Clark, P. U.

    2015-12-01

    The coupling of the timing of the virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) position and the absolute paleointensities for geomagnetic events is vital for understanding the Earth's geodynamo. Here we present new high-precision 40Ar/39Ar age determinations using an ARGUS-VI multi-collector mass spectrometer for lava flows on Floreana Island, Galapagos, and Tahiti Nui, Society Islands. New Galapagos ages (n=6) place the GA-79 lava flow on Floreana Island, which records an excursional VGP from an equatorial region (Cox and Dalrymple, 1966), within the Santa Rosa excursion. This flow contains extremely low paleointesity values of 1.1 x 1022 Am2 (n=11; Wang and Kent, 2013). We also present 52 new ages on 18 lava flows from the Punaruu valley, Tahiti, which record the Matuyama-Bruhnes reversal. The new ages confirm that the lavas record this reversal, but the ages differ from the original stratigraphy presented in Mochizuki et al. (2011). Our new ages using the Kuiper et al. (2008) fish canyon sanidine ages for Punaruu valley lava flows are concordant with previous astronomically tuned ages (Channell et al. 2002, 2009) and represent the highest precision radiometric ages for the most recent reversal. Here we show that paleointensity lows associated with excursional events can be comparable to or less than those associated with reversals. In addition, such field strength reductions can occur in time intervals as short as 3 thousand years.

  6. Improving age constraints on Patagonian glaciations using a new luminescence dating method for feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedley, R. K.; Glasser, N. F.; Duller, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    Multiple moraine ridges are preserved in the Lago Buenos Aires and Lago Pueyrrédon valleys, east of the Northern Patagonian Icefield and offer a unique perspective on understanding past environmental change in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Previous age constraints provided for the moraine ridges relies on cosmogenic isotope dating and constraining radiocarbon and 40Ar/36Ar ages. Providing age constraints using luminescence dating of the glaciofluvial landforms associated with the moraine ridges offers great potential to contribute towards improving the accuracy and precision of age constraints in such challenging glacial settings. This is the first study to use a new luminescence dating method recently developed for feldspars (Thomsen et al. 2008) to constrain the ages of moraine deposition. A range of sediments were sampled from the outwash plains and glaciofluvial channels that are associated with moraine deposition in the Lago Buenos Aires and Lago Pueyrrédon valleys. Elevation measurements and the geomorphological context of the outwash plains and glaciofluvial channels are used to relate the sampled material to the associated moraine ridges, and therefore constrain the ages of moraine deposition in the valleys. Moraine ridges dated using cosmogenic isotope dating to the Last Glacial Maximum are the main focus of this study, but the overall aim is to provide a new dating technique that can be used to understand the temporal and spatial extent of terrestrial environmental change during past glaciations of the mid-latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. Thomsen, K.J., Murray, A.S., Jain, M. and Bøtter-Jensen, L. 2008. Laboratory fading rates of various luminescence signals from feldspar-rich sediment extracts. Radiation Measurements 43, 1474 - 1486.

  7. Age constraints from northwest Russia on the global accumulation of carbon during the Palaeoproterozoic Shunga event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. P.; Condon, D. J.; Prave, A. R.; Lepland, A.; Melezhik, V. A.

    2012-04-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic Shunga event records significant organic-carbon accumulation in sediments correlated between the type-locality in northwest Russia's Onega Basin, the Francevillian series of Gabon, and Indian Palaeoproterozoic sections. The estimated burial of >25 x 10E +10 tonnes of C in the Shunga event is significant and hypotheses have suggested this accumulation as one causal mechanism to the large positive Lomagundi-Jatuli positive carbon isotope excursion (CIE) of marine carbonates. Conversely, is has been suggested that the Shunga event post-dates the termination (at c. 2060 Ma) of the Lomagundi-Jatuli CIE and the two are not overlapping in time. Discrimination between these competing theories requires precise and accurate chronologies for the stratigraphic successions hosting the proxy records. We present new age constraints from a combination of primary volcanic rocks and sedimentary units recording the Shunga event, from the well preserved Palaeoproterozoic sections in the Pechenga Greenstone Belt (Kola craton) and Onega Paleo Basin (Karelia craton) northwest Russia, to further elucidate the unresolved question of timing between the Shunga event and the Lomagundi-Jatuli CIE. Carbon accumulations of the Shunga event are recorded in the Pilgujärvi Sedimentary Formation of the Pechenga Greenstone Belt. Felsic lava flows and pyroclastic rocks, and mafic pyroclastic rocks, in the Pilgujärvi Volcanic Formation overlying the Pilgujärvi sediments yield zircons with concordant U-Pb ages between c. 1970 and 1903 Ma. In the Pilgujärvi Sedimentary Formation detrital zircons yield a minimum age of c. 1922 Ma, equivalent to a minimum c. 1915 Ma age of detrital zircons in the underlying Kolosjoki Sedimentary Formation. Thrust over the main units of the Pechenga Greenstone Belt is a tectonic melange known as the South Pechenga Zone where zircons from an intermediate volcanic rock yield the first age from this zone at c. 1930 Ma. Samples from the Onega Basin are

  8. Linguistic Constraints on Children's Overt Marking of BE by Dialect and Age

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Joseph; Oetting, Janna B.; Moland, Christy Wynn

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Overt marking of BE in nonmainstream adult dialects of English is influenced by a number of linguistic constraints, including the structure's person, number, tense, contractibility, and grammatical function. In the current study, we examined the effects of these constraints on overt marking of BE in children as a function of their nonmainstream English dialect and age. Methods The data were language samples from 62 children, aged four to six years; 24 spoke African American English (AAE) and 38 spoke Southern White English (SWE). Analyses included analysis of variance and logistic regression. Results Rates of overt marking varied by the children's dialect but not their age. Although the person, number, tense, and grammatical function of BE influenced the children's rates of marking, the nature and magnitude of the influence differed by the children's dialect. For AAE-speaking children, contractibility also influenced their marking of BE. Conclusions Consistent with the adult literature, the AAE- and SWE-speaking children marked BE in ways that differed from each other and from what has been documented for child speakers of Mainstream American English. These findings show stability in the use of BE in AAE and SWE that spans different generations and different dialect communities. PMID:23275400

  9. Luminescence dating and palaeomagnetic age constraint on hominins from Sima de los Huesos, Atapuerca, Spain.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lee J; Demuro, Martina; Parés, Josep M; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Aranburu, Arantza; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2014-02-01

    Establishing a reliable chronology on the extensive hominin remains at Sima de los Huesos is critical for an improved understanding of the complex evolutionary histories and phylogenetic relationships of the European Middle Pleistocene hominin record. In this study, we use a combination of 'extended-range' luminescence dating techniques and palaeomagnetism to provide new age constraint on sedimentary infills that are unambiguously associated with the Sima fossil assemblage. Post-infrared-infrared stimulated luminescence (pIR-IR) dating of K-feldspars and thermally transferred optically stimulated luminescence (TT-OSL) dating of individual quartz grains provide weighted mean ages of 433 ± 15 ka (thousands of years) and 416 ± 19 ka, respectively, for allochthonous sedimentary horizons overlying the hominin-bearing clay breccia. The six replicate luminescence ages obtained for this deposit are reproducible and provide a combined minimum age estimate of 427 ± 12 ka for the underlying hominin fossils. Palaeomagnetic directions for the luminescence dated sediment horizon and underlying fossiliferous clays display exclusively normal polarities. These findings are consistent with the luminescence dating results and confirm that the hominin fossil horizon accumulated during the Brunhes Chron, i.e., within the last 780 ka. The new bracketing age constraint for the Sima hominins is in broad agreement with radiometrically dated Homo heidelbergensis fossil sites, such as Mauer and Arago, and suggests that the split of the H. neanderthalensis and H. sapiens lineages took place during the early Middle Pleistocene. More widespread numerical dating of key Early and Middle Pleistocene fossil sites across Europe is needed to test and refine competing models of hominin evolution. The new luminescence chronologies presented in this study demonstrate the versatility of TT-OSL and pIR-IR techniques and the potential role they could play in helping to refine evolutionary

  10. Age constraints of the Wassa and Benso mesothermal gold deposits, Ashanti Belt, Ghana, West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Avila, Luis A.; Bourassa, Yan; Miller, John; Perrouty, Stéphane; Fiorentini, Marco L.; Campbell McCuaig, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Ashanti Belt in Ghana hosts numerous multi-million ounce gold deposits and is one of the most richly gold endowed Paleoproterozoic belts of the West African Craton. This work shows that the Wassa mineralized intrusion is part of the Sefwi Group. This unit at Wassa is strongly magnetic and show a distinctly high response in regional magnetic data sets compared to other units of equivalent age within the belt. The unit is inferred to be a lateral extension of an exposed fragment of what defines the substrate to the Tarkwa Basin sediments. The Wassa deposit, located in the eastern limb of the belt, is hosted within mafic to intermediate volcanic flows that are interbedded with minor horizons of volcaniclastics, clastic sediments. The clastic sediments include wackes and magnetite rich sedimentary layers, presumably derived from banded iron formations. The previously described sequence is intruded by syn-volcanic mafic intrusives and felsic porphyries rocks that are all part of the Birimian stratigraphy. Two new key SHRIMP II U-Pb ages were determined as part of this study: a new age of 2191 ± 6 Ma was determined on magmatic zircon grains of the Wassa porphyry host rock, which now represents the oldest known felsic intrusion hosting gold mineralization in the Ashanti Belt region. The Benso gold deposit system, which is located in the eastern limb of the Ashanti Belt approximately 38 km southwest of Wassa is hosted within a series of volcanic units intruded by mafic to intermediate units. A SHRIMP II U-Pb age of 2157 ± 5 Ma was determined from magmatic zircons obtained from a granodiorite of the G-Zone of the Benso deposit. This granodiorite is the main host rock for gold mineralization and thus the age provides an upper constraint for mineral emplacement. The newly determined ages provide an upper constraint for the gold mineralization within this region of the Ashanti Belt. They also support recent structural studies that have interpreted that the Wassa

  11. Constraints on Pacific midplate swells from global depth-age and heat flow-age models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    Oceanic midplate swells are identified by shallow seafloor depths. In turn, models of the processes giving rise to these regions rely on assessments of how their depths, surface heat flow, and flexural properties differ from those for lithosphere which is presumed not to have been affected by these processes. Such comparisons have been inhibited because reference thermal models, which are assumed to describe unperturbed lithosphere, predict deeper depths and lower heat flow than typically observed for lithosphere older than 70 Ma. As a result, both depth and heat flow anomalies can be overestimated. To address this difficulty, we have derived model GDH1 (Global Depth and Heat flow) by joint fitting of heat flow and bathymetry. GDH1, which has a hotter and thinner lithosphere than previous models, fits the depth and heat flow data significantly better, including the data from older lithosphere previously treated as anomalous. It also provides an improved fit to depth-to-basement data for ocean drilling sites, and to geoid offsets across fracture zones. The improved fit occurs for depth-age data from both the DBDB-5 digital bathymetry, and from regional medians from ship tracks, which yield comparable depth-age curves. We use GDH1 to study three classes of midplate swells: the Hawaiian and other hot spot swells, the Darwin Rise area of widespread Cretaceous volcanism, and the Superswell, considered a present analogue to the Darwin Rise. Heat flow on the Hawaiian swell, though anomalously high with respect to previous reference models, is at most slightly high relative to GDH1. The situation is similar for the Bermuda, Cape Verde, and Crozet hot spots. The absence of a significant heat flow anomaly favors a primarily dynamic, rather than thermal, origin for these swells. Similarly, the present depths and heat flow for the Darwin Rise are consistent with GDH1, although they were anomalous with respect to previous reference models. The depth and heat flow data thus

  12. Fine structure of the age-chromospheric activity relation in solar-type stars. I. The Ca II infrared triplet: Absolute flux calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo-Oliveira, D.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; Dutra-Ferreira, L.; Ribas, I.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Strong spectral lines are useful indicators of stellar chromospheric activity. They are physically linked to the convection efficiency, differential rotation, and angular momentum evolution and are a potential indicator of age. However, for ages > 2 Gyr, the age-activity relationship remains poorly constrained thus hampering its full application. Aims: The Ca II infrared triplet (IRT lines, λλ 8498, 8542, and 8662) has been poorly studied compared to classical chromospheric indicators. We report in this paper absolute chromospheric fluxes in the three Ca II IRT lines, based on a new calibration tied to up-to-date model atmospheres. Methods: We obtain the Ca II IRT absolute fluxes for 113 FGK stars from high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and high-resolution spectra covering an extensive domain of chromospheric activity levels. We perform an absolute continuum flux calibration for the Ca II IRT lines anchored in atmospheric models calculated as an explicit function of effective temperatures (Teff), metallicity ([Fe/H]), and gravities (log g) avoiding the degeneracy usually present in photometric continuum calibrations based solely on color indices. Results: The internal uncertainties achieved for continuum absolute flux calculations are ≈2% of the solar chromospheric flux, one order of magnitude lower than for photometric calibrations. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we gauge the impact of observational errors on the final chromospheric fluxes due to the absolute continuum flux calibration and find that Teffuncertainties are properly mitigated by the photospheric correction leaving [Fe/H] as the dominating factor in the chromospheric flux uncertainty. Conclusions: Across the FGK spectral types, the Ca II IRT lines are sensitive to chromospheric activity. The reduced internal uncertainties reported here enable us to build a new chromospheric absolute flux scale and explore the age-activity relation from the active regime down to very low activity levels and

  13. Neighbourhood socioeconomic inequalities in incidence of acute myocardial infarction: a cohort study quantifying age- and gender-specific differences in relative and absolute terms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Socioeconomic status has a profound effect on the risk of having a first acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Information on socioeconomic inequalities in AMI incidence across age- gender-groups is lacking. Our objective was to examine socioeconomic inequalities in the incidence of AMI considering both relative and absolute measures of risk differences, with a particular focus on age and gender. Methods We identified all patients with a first AMI from 1997 to 2007 through linked hospital discharge and death records covering the Dutch population. Relative risks (RR) of AMI incidence were estimated by mean equivalent household income at neighbourhood-level for strata of age and gender using Poisson regression models. Socioeconomic inequalities were also shown within the stratified age-gender groups by calculating the total number of events attributable to socioeconomic disadvantage. Results Between 1997 and 2007, 317,564 people had a first AMI. When comparing the most deprived socioeconomic quintile with the most affluent quintile, the overall RR for AMI was 1.34 (95 % confidence interval (CI): 1.32 – 1.36) in men and 1.44 (95 % CI: 1.42 – 1.47) in women. The socioeconomic gradient decreased with age. Relative socioeconomic inequalities were most apparent in men under 35 years and in women under 65 years. The largest number of events attributable to socioeconomic inequalities was found in men aged 45–74 years and in women aged 65–84 years. The total proportion of AMIs that was attributable to socioeconomic inequalities in the Dutch population of 1997 to 2007 was 14 % in men and 18 % in women. Conclusions Neighbourhood socioeconomic inequalities were observed in AMI incidence in the Netherlands, but the magnitude across age-gender groups depended on whether inequality was expressed in relative or absolute terms. Relative socioeconomic inequalities were high in young persons and women, where the absolute burden of AMI was low. Absolute

  14. Absolute vs. Weight-Related Maximum Oxygen Uptake in Firefighters: Fitness Evaluation with and without Protective Clothing and Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus among Age Group

    PubMed Central

    Perroni, Fabrizio; Guidetti, Laura; Cignitti, Lamberto; Baldari, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    During fire emergencies, firefighters wear personal protective devices (PC) and a self-contained breathing apparatus (S.C.B.A.) to be protected from injuries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences of aerobic level in 197 firefighters (age: 34±7 yr; BMI: 24.4±2.3 kg.m-2), evaluated by a Queen’s College Step field Test (QCST), performed with and without fire protective garments, and to analyze the differences among age groups (<25 yr; 26-30 yr, 31-35 yr, 36-40 yr and >40 yr). Variance analysis was applied to assess differences (p < 0.05) between tests and age groups observed in absolute and weight-related values, while a correlation was examined between QCST with and without PC+S.C.B.A. The results have shown that a 13% of firefighters failed to complete the test with PC+S.C.B.A. and significant differences between QCST performed with and without PC+S.C.B.A. in absolute (F(1,169) = 42.6, p < 0.0001) and weight-related (F(1,169) = 339.9, p < 0.0001) terms. A better correlation has been found in L•min-1 (r=0.67) than in ml•kg-1•min-1 (r=0.54). Moreover, we found significant differences among age groups both in absolute and weight-related values. The assessment of maximum oxygen uptake of firefighters in absolute term can be a useful tool to evaluate the firefighters' cardiovascular strain. PMID:25764201

  15. Absolute vs. weight-related maximum oxygen uptake in firefighters: fitness evaluation with and without protective clothing and self-contained breathing apparatus among age group.

    PubMed

    Perroni, Fabrizio; Guidetti, Laura; Cignitti, Lamberto; Baldari, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    During fire emergencies, firefighters wear personal protective devices (PC) and a self-contained breathing apparatus (S.C.B.A.) to be protected from injuries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences of aerobic level in 197 firefighters (age: 34±7 yr; BMI: 24.4±2.3 kg.m-2), evaluated by a Queen's College Step field Test (QCST), performed with and without fire protective garments, and to analyze the differences among age groups (<25 yr; 26-30 yr, 31-35 yr, 36-40 yr and >40 yr). Variance analysis was applied to assess differences (p < 0.05) between tests and age groups observed in absolute and weight-related values, while a correlation was examined between QCST with and without PC+S.C.B.A. The results have shown that a 13% of firefighters failed to complete the test with PC+S.C.B.A. and significant differences between QCST performed with and without PC+S.C.B.A. in absolute (F(1,169) = 42.6, p < 0.0001) and weight-related (F(1,169) = 339.9, p < 0.0001) terms. A better correlation has been found in L•min-1 (r=0.67) than in ml•kg-1•min-1 (r=0.54). Moreover, we found significant differences among age groups both in absolute and weight-related values. The assessment of maximum oxygen uptake of firefighters in absolute term can be a useful tool to evaluate the firefighters' cardiovascular strain.

  16. Age constraints for Palaeolithic cave art by U-Th dating of thin carbonate crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Dirk; Pike, Alistair; Garcia-Diez, Marcos; Pettitt, Paul; Zilhão, João

    2015-04-01

    U-series dating is an important geochronological tool which is widely applied for instance in speleothem based palaeoclimate research. It has also great potential to provide age constraints for Archaeology, especially for sites or artefacts in cave environments. We present our methods to conduct precise U-Th dating of calcite crusts that formed on top of cave paintings. Recent developments in multi-collector (MC) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) U-series dating greatly improved the precision of this method, and sample sizes needed to obtain reliable results were significantly reduced. Based on these developments the U-series technique can be applied for accurate dating of thin calcite crusts covering cave art at many sites, while taking care not to harm the art underneath. The method provides minimum ages for the covered art and, where possible, also maximum ages by dating the flowstone layer the art is painted on. The U-Th method has been used in a number of recent projects to date calcite precipitates above and occasionally below cave paintings in Spain. Initial results from Cantabria have shown that the earliest dated paintings are older than 41.4 ± 0.6 ka, dating at least to the Early Aurignacian period and present a far longer chronology than that based so far on radiocarbon dating. Here we outline our methodology and the steps we take to demonstrate the reliability of U-Th dates, and present some recent results of our ongoing U-Th dating programme.

  17. The κ Andromedae system: new constraints on the companion mass, system age, and further multiplicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkley, Sasha; David, Trevor; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Pueyo, Laurent; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Brenner, Douglas; Veicht, Aaron; Nilsson, Ricky; Mamajek, Eric E.; Kraus, Adam L.; Rice, Emily L.; Ireland, Michael J.; Vasisht, Gautam; Cady, Eric; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Zimmerman, Neil; Parry, Ian R.; Beichman, Charles; Dekany, Richard; and others

    2013-12-20

    κ Andromedae is a B9IVn star at 52 pc for which a faint substellar companion separated by 55 ± 2 AU was recently announced. In this work, we present the first spectrum of the companion, 'κ And B,' using the Project 1640 high-contrast imaging platform. Comparison of our low-resolution YJH-band spectra to empirical brown dwarf spectra suggests an early-L spectral type. Fitting synthetic spectra from PHOENIX model atmospheres to our observed spectrum allows us to constrain the effective temperature to ∼2000 K as well as place constraints on the companion surface gravity. Further, we use previously reported log(g) and T {sub eff} measurements of the host star to argue that the κ And system has an isochronal age of 220 ± 100 Myr, older than the 30 Myr age reported previously. This interpretation of an older age is corroborated by the photometric properties of κ And B, which appear to be marginally inconsistent with other 10-100 Myr low-gravity L-dwarfs for the spectral type range we derive. In addition, we use Keck aperture masking interferometry combined with published radial velocity measurements to rule out the existence of any tight stellar companions to κ And A that might be responsible for the system's overluminosity. Further, we show that luminosity enhancements due to a nearly 'pole-on' viewing angle coupled with extremely rapid rotation is unlikely. κ And A is thus consistent with its slightly evolved luminosity class (IV), and we propose here that κ And, with a revised age of 220 ± 100 Myr, is an interloper to the 30 Myr Columba association with which it was previously associated. The photometric and spectroscopic evidence for κ And B combined with our reassessment of the system age implies a substellar companion mass of 50{sub −13}{sup +16} M {sub Jup}, consistent with a brown dwarf rather than a planetary-mass companion.

  18. Filling a 30 Million Year Gap: Radioisotopic Age Constraints for the Late Triassic Timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irmis, R. B.; Mundil, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Triassic Period records a critical interval of Phanerozoic Earth history, including major paleoenvironmental changes in a greenhouse world, recovery from one mass extinction and the onset of another, and the origin of modern terrestrial ecosystems. Recent efforts have been instrumental in calibrating the timing of these events by producing numerous high resolution radioisotopic ages from Early and Middle Triassic marine strata that facilitate building of a robust 20 Ma chronostratigraphic framework. This contrasts starkly with the Late Triassic (Carnian, Norian, and Rhaetian stages), where ~30 Ma of the timescale is virtually uncalibrated by high-resolution radioisotopic data. This is the only interval of such long duration in the Mesozoic or Cenozoic that remains so poorly constrained by reliable absolute ages, despite the occurrence of major events such as the origin and early diversification of dinosaurs, major reef building episodes in marine ecosystems, key paleoenvironmental changes (e.g., Carnian Pluvial Event), and large extraterrestrial bolide impacts (e.g., Manicouagan). An additional challenge is that the biostratigraphically-defined marine timescale cannot be applied globally, so that other areas (e.g., New Zealand) have independent timescales that cannot be confidently correlated to classic Laurasian sections. All of these problems preclude formulating robust first-order hypotheses about the Late Triassic world. We present new CA-TIMS U-Pb zircon data from volcaniclastic units within both marine and terrestrial strata that aim at calibrating the timescale itself and as a result constrain the timing of some of these major events in Earth history. Several preliminary ages support the hypothesis that the Norian Stage was very long, ~20 Ma. Our new data from marine sequences in New Zealand demonstrate that the timescale divisions there do not correlate directly with biostratigraphic boundaries in the Tethys; specifically, the Ladinian-Carnian boundary

  19. Ascertaining year of birth/age at death in forensic cases: A review of conventional methods and methods allowing for absolute chronology.

    PubMed

    Lynnerup, Niels; Kjeldsen, Henrik; Zweihoff, Ralf; Heegaard, Steffen; Jacobsen, Christina; Heinemeier, Jan

    2010-09-10

    Based on an actual case, where we were able to ascertain the year of birth of three dead babies found in a deep-freezer to within 1-2 years (1986, 1988 and 2004, respectively), we review the current state of forensic age determination/year of birth determination. The age of an individual (year of birth) is often a fundamental piece of data in connection with forensic identification of unidentified bodies. The methods most often used are based on determining various morphological, age-related, changes on the skeleton (or teeth, although odontological methods are not reviewed in this paper). As such, these methods are all relative, i.e. they do not furnish calendar ages or years, but an estimate of the age at death, with a rather large range, i.e. the methods rely on biological aging following the chronological aging. More recently, methods have been proposed using more direct ascertainment of age at death, e.g. protein racemisation, or, as in our case, radiocarbon methods. Especially the latter method may in fact yield absolute ages (years of birth), because (14)C activity, as measured in specific proteins in specific cells or tissues in the body, were in equilibrium with the so-called bomb-pulse, when these proteins were formed (at birth). The bomb pulse reflects a dramatic change in atmospheric (14)C content due to nuclear bomb testing, and these dramatic changes can be rather tightly related to single calendar years.

  20. An expansion of age constraints for microbial clades that lack a conventional fossil record using phylogenomic dating.

    PubMed

    Blank, Carrine E

    2011-10-01

    Most microbial taxa lack a conventional microfossil or biomarker record, and so we currently have little information regarding how old most microbial clades and their associated traits are. Building on the previously published oxygen age constraint, two new age constraints are proposed based on the ability of microbial clades to metabolize chitin and aromatic compounds derived from lignin. Using the archaeal domain of life as a test case, phylogenetic analyses, along with published metabolic and genetic data, showed that members of the Halobacteriales and Thermococcales are able to metabolize chitin. Ancestral state reconstruction combined with phylogenetic analysis of the genes underlying chitin degradation predicted that the ancestors of these two groups were also likely able to metabolize chitin or chitin-related compounds. These two clades were therefore assigned a maximum age of 1.0 Ga (when chitin likely first appeared). Similar analyses also predicted that the ancestor to the Sulfolobus solfataricus-Sulfolobus islandicus clade was able to metabolize phenol using catechol dioxygenase, so this clade was assigned a maximum age of 475 Ma. Inferred ages of archaeal clades using relaxed molecular clocks with the new age constraints were consistent with those inferred with the oxygen age constraints. This work expands our current toolkit to include Paleoproterozoic, Neoproterozoic, and Paleozoic age constraints, and should aid in our ability to phylogenetically reconstruct the antiquity of a wide array of microbial clades and their associated morphological and biogeochemical traits, spanning deep geologic time. Such hypotheses-although built upon evolutionary inferences-are fundamentally testable.

  1. Isotopic constraints on the age and early differentiation of the Earth.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, M T

    1996-03-01

    The Earth's age and early differentiation history are re-evaluated using updated isotopic constraints. From the most primitive terrestrial Pb isotopic compositions found at Isua Greenland, and the Pilbara of Western Australia, combined with precise geochronology of these localities, an age 4.49 +/- 0.02 Ga is obtained. This is interpreted as the mean age of core formation as U/Pb is fractionated due to sequestering of Pb into the Earth's core. The long-lived Rb-Sr isotopic system provides constraints on the time interval for the accretion of the Earth as Rb underwent significant depletion by volatile loss during accretion of the Earth or its precursor planetesimals. A primitive measured 87Sr/86Sr initial ratio of 0.700502 +/- 10 has been obtained for an early Archean (3.46 Ga) barite from the Pilbara Block of Western Australia. Using conservative models for the evolution of Rb/Sr in the early Archean mantle allows an estimate to be placed on the Earth's initial Sr ratio at approximately 4.50 Ga, of 0.69940 +/- 10. This is significantly higher than that measured for the Moon (0.69900 +/- 2) or in the achondrite, Angra dos Reis (0.69894 +/- 2) and for a Rb/Sr ratio of approximately 1/2 of chondrites corresponds to a mean age for accretion of the Earth of 4.48 + /- 0.04 Ga. The now extinct 146Sm-142Nd (T1/2(146)=103 l0(6)yrs) combined with the long-lived 147Sm-143Nd isotopic systematics can also be used to provide limits on the time of early differentiation of the Earth. High precision analyses of the oldest (3.8-3.9 Ga) Archean gneisses from Greenland (Amitsoq and Akilia gneisses), and Canada (Acasta gneiss) do not show measurable (> +/- l0ppm) variations of 142Nd, in contrast to the 33 ppm 142Nd excess reported for an Archean sample. The general lack of 142Nd variations, combined with the presence of highly positive epsilon 143 values (+4.0) at 3.9 Ga, indicates that the record of large-scale Sm/Nd fractionation events was not preserved in the early-Earth from 4

  2. Age constraints for the northernmost outcrops of the Triassic Cuyana Basin, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, A. C.; Chemale, F.; Barredo, S.; Ávila, J. N.; Ottone, E. G.; Marsicano, C.

    2010-11-01

    Age constraints on the Cerro Puntudo Formation at the northernmost exposures of the continental Triassic Cuyana Basin are presented based on palynological data and U-Pb zircon dating. The lacustrine facies of the upper part of the Cerro Puntudo Formation contains a palynological assemblage with low diversity that is dominated by spores of ferns and lycopsids with subordinated inaperturated forms of uncertain affinity. The U-Pb SHRIMP zircon age of 243.8 ± 1.9 Ma (Anisian), obtained from juvenile magmatic zircons in a tuff interbedded in the same beds, provides the first chronostratigraphic date of the Cuyana Basin infilling at its northernmost exposures. According to additional dates already known from the southern part of the basin, a new stratigraphic correlation is proposed thus restricting the first tectono-sedimentary sequence (Synrift I depositional event of Kokogian et al. (1993)) to the Anisian. This depositional event has already been recorded in the Cacheuta and Rincón Blanco sub-basins, but it is for the first time now constrained across the whole basin.

  3. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  4. Combined 238U/235U and Pb Isotopics of Planetary Core Material: The Absolute Age of the IVA Iron Muonionalusta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennecka, G. A.; Amelin, Y.; Kleine, T.

    2016-08-01

    We report a measured 238U/235U for the IVA iron Muonionalusta. This measured value requires an age correction of ~7 Myr to the previously published Pb-Pb age. This has major implications for our understanding of planetary core formation and cooling.

  5. Titan's Timescales: Constraints On The Age of The Methane-Supported Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Mandt, K.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2012-12-01

    Titan's atmosphere, unique amongst moons in the solar system presents a persistent riddle: how can it survive over geologic time if its methane is being rapidly destroyed by solar radiation and will last only another ~20 Myr? (Yung et al. 1984; Krasnopolsky 2010) Methane, the second most abundant (CH4, 2-6%) atmospheric gas after nitrogen (N2, 98-94%) supports the entire atmosphere via its greenhouse effect (McKay 1991) and total loss of methane could theoretically lead to atmospheric collapse (Lorenz et al. 1997). In this presentation we will review the available evidence constraining methane's prior lifetime in the atmosphere, including (i) isotopic constraints, especially D/H and 12C/13C in CH4 (Nixon et al. 2012; Mandt et al. 2012), 40Ar and 36Ar abundances, and 14N/15N in N2 (Niemann et al. 2010); (ii) the surface hydrocarbon inventory (Lorenz et al. 2008); (iii) the time to chemically produce Titan's CO (Hörst et al. 2008); (iv) the crater retention age of the surface (Neish and Lorenz 2012); (v) interior models (Tobie et al. 2006); (vi) changes in Titan's shape (Choukroun and Sotin 2012). Each of these independent lines of evidence yields a time estimate that, although individually ambiguous, combine to provide context for a cohesive understanding of the history of Titan's methane. We will conclude by summarizing the current constraints on the age of Titan's atmosphere in its present form, and highlight the key remaining challenges and critical measurements and modeling work needed to further refine our understanding of Titan's perplexing atmospheric history. References: Choukroun, M. and Sotin, C., Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L04201, 2012. Hörst, S. M., R. V. Yelle and V. Vuitton, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E10006, 2008. Krasnopolsky, V. A., Plan. and Space Sci., 58, 1507-1515, 2010. Lorenz, R. D., C. P. McKay and J. I. Lunine, Science, 275, 642-644, 1997. Lorenz, R. D. et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L02206, 2008. McKay, C. P., J. B. Pollack and R

  6. Southernmost Andes and South Georgia Island, North Scotia Ridge: Zircon U-Pb and muscovite {40Ar }/{39Ar } age constraints on tectonic evolution of Southwestern Gondwanaland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukasa, Samuel B.; Dalziel, Ian W. D.

    1996-11-01

    Zircon U-Pb and muscovite {40Ar }/{39Ar } isotopic ages have been determined on rocks from the southernmost Andes and South Georgia Island, North Scotia Ridge, to provide absolute time constraints on the kinematic evolution of southwestern Gondwanaland, until now known mainly from stratigraphic relations. The U-Pb systematics of four zircon fractions from one sample show that proto-marginal basin magmatism in the northern Scotia arc, creating the peraluminous Darwin granite suite and submarine rhyolite sequences of the Tobifera Formation, had begun by the Middle Jurassic (164.1 ± 1.7 Ma). Seven zircon fractions from two other Darwin granites are discordant with non-linear patterns, suggesting a complex history of inheritances and Pb loss. Reference lines drawn through these points on concordia diagrams give upper intercept ages of ca. 1500 Ma, interpreted as a minimum age for the inherited zircon component. This component is believed to have been derived from sedimentary rocks in the Gondwanaland margin accretionary wedge that forms the basement of the region, or else directly from the cratonic "back stop" of that wedge. Ophiolitic remnants of the Rocas Verdes marginal basin preserved in the Larsen Harbour complex on South Georgia yield the first clear evidence that Gondwanaland fragmentation had resulted in the formation of oceanic crust in the Weddell Sea region by the Late Jurassic (150 ± 1 Ma). The geographic pattern in the observed age range of 8 to 13 million years in these ophiolitic materials, while not definitive, is in keeping with propagation of the marginal basin floor northwestward from South Georgia Island to the Sarmiento Complex in southern Chile. Rocks of the Beagle granite suite, emplaced post-tectonically within the uplifted marginal basin floor, have complex zircon U-Pb systematics with gross discordances dominated by inheritances in some samples and Pb loss in others. Of eleven samples processed, only two had sufficient amounts of zircon for

  7. Using a Novel Absolute Ontogenetic Age Determination Technique to Calculate the Timing of Tooth Eruption in the Saber-Toothed Cat, Smilodon fatalis

    PubMed Central

    Wysocki, M. Aleksander; Feranec, Robert S.; Tseng, Zhijie Jack; Bjornsson, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the superb fossil record of the saber-toothed cat, Smilodon fatalis, ontogenetic age determination for this and other ancient species remains a challenge. The present study utilizes a new technique, a combination of data from stable oxygen isotope analyses and micro-computed tomography, to establish the eruption rate for the permanent upper canines in Smilodon fatalis. The results imply an eruption rate of 6.0 millimeters per month, which is similar to a previously published average enamel growth rate of the S. fatalis upper canines (5.8 millimeters per month). Utilizing the upper canine growth rate, the upper canine eruption rate, and a previously published tooth replacement sequence, this study calculates absolute ontogenetic age ranges of tooth development and eruption in S. fatalis. The timing of tooth eruption is compared between S. fatalis and several extant conical-toothed felids, such as the African lion (Panthera leo). Results suggest that the permanent dentition of S. fatalis, except for the upper canines, was fully erupted by 14 to 22 months, and that the upper canines finished erupting at about 34 to 41 months. Based on these developmental age calculations, S. fatalis individuals less than 4 to 7 months of age were not typically preserved at Rancho La Brea. On the whole, S. fatalis appears to have had delayed dental development compared to dental development in similar-sized extant felids. This technique for absolute ontogenetic age determination can be replicated in other ancient species, including non-saber-toothed taxa, as long as the timing of growth initiation and growth rate can be determined for a specific feature, such as a tooth, and that growth period overlaps with the development of the other features under investigation. PMID:26132165

  8. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  9. Absolute Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, George

    1990-12-01

    The absolute sensitivity of the FOS will be determined in SV by observing 2 stars at 3 epochs, first in 3 apertures (1.0", 0.5", and 0.3" circular) and then in 1 aperture (1.0" circular). In cycle 1, one star, BD+28D4211 will be observed in the 1.0" aperture to establish the stability of the sensitivity and flat field characteristics and improve the accuracy obtained in SV. This star will also be observed through the paired apertures since these are not calibrated in SV. The stars will be observed in most detector/grating combinations. The data will be averaged to form the inverse sensitivity functions required by RSDP.

  10. Constraints on Statistical Computations at 10 Months of Age: The Use of Phonological Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Nayeli; Nazzi, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Recently, several studies have argued that infants capitalize on the statistical properties of natural languages to acquire the linguistic structure of their native language, but the kinds of constraints which apply to statistical computations remain largely unknown. Here we explored French-learning infants' perceptual preference for…

  11. Constraints on ages of Taconian and Acadian deformation from zircon evaporation ages of felsic plutons from western Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, B.F.; Karabinos, P. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    New dates on three felsic plutons constrain the age of Taconian and Acadian deformation in western Massachusetts. The tonalitic Hallockville Pond Gneiss intrudes the Moretown Formation of the Rowe-Hawley belt and shows deformation comparable in degree and orientation to that of the surrounding rocks. The Middlefield Granite, a quartz monzonite, intrudes the Rowe and Moretown Formations at their contact. The Williamsburg Granodiorite, of minimum-melt composition, intrudes Silurian and Devonian formations of the Connecticut Valley Synclinorium, east of the Row-Hawley belt, and contains no obvious deformation fabric. [sup 207]Pb/[sup 206]Pb single-grain zircon evaporation ages for these plutons are as follows: the Hallockville Pond Gneiss, 484 [plus minus] 7 Ma; the Middlefield Granite, 447 [plus minus] 3 Ma (weighted average of 4 grains); and the Williamsburg Granodiorite, 373 [plus minus] 5 Ma (weighted average of 3 grains). The Moretown Formation, presently correlated with the Middle Ordovician Beauceville Formation in Quebec, must be older than 484 Ma (Early Ordovician), the age of the intruding Hallockville Pond Gneiss, which might be related to rocks in the proposed Shelburne Falls arc of similar age (Karabinos and Tucker, 1992). Field relations and the age of the Middlefield Granite show that if the Rowe-Moretown contact is a fault, one interpretation suggested by Stanley and Hatch (1988) and advocated by Ratcliffe et al. (1992), then Taconian thrusting in this area ended by 447 Ma because the pluton is not offset by faults. The 373 Ma age of the unfoliated Williamsburg Granodiorite, together with a U-Pb zircon age on a strongly deformed sill in the Granville dome of 376 [plus minus] 4 Ma, tightly constrains the timing of the main phase of Acadian deformation in western Massachusetts.

  12. Interpretation of 40Ar/39Ar Age-spectra in Low-grade Polymetamorphic Rocks: The Importance of Petrologic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunk, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar age-spectra of white micas from low-grade polymetamorphic terranes can be difficult to interpret, because these low-grade rocks frequently have multiple generations of cleavage-forming white mica that grew at temperatures below their closure for diffusion of argon (~350°C). Under such conditions, each generation of cleavage-forming white mica will retain its original growth age. In addition, rocks from metamorphic terranes can also contain populations of detrital and diagenetic white micas which also have distinct ages associated with them. A final complication, frequently found in these low-grade polymetamorphic samples is the presence of inseparable, intergrown chlorite and the problems with associated 39Ar recoil during irradiation of the samples, prior to sample analysis. The shapes of 40Ar/39Ar age spectra of white micas separated from such samples are frequently complex and are quite variable in shape. Some age spectra show a steady increase in age with increase in the temperature of release, while others have sigmoidal or saddle-shaped patterns. The age of most of the steps in such age spectra are mixtures of the various age populations of white mica in the sample, and as such are geologically meaningless. Nonetheless, useful constraints on the ages of at least some events recorded in these complex low-grade polymetamorphic rocks can be discerned with the help of petrographic observations, and by placing the results in a spatial context to test for reproducibility and/or the occurrence of meaningful patterns. If no chlorite is present and the sample contains no detrital white mica, an estimate of the maximum age of the youngest component and the minimum age of the oldest cleavage forming white mica populations can frequently be discerned. If the sample contains detrital white mica, a minimum age for its cooling or crystallization can be estimated. The presence of a small amount of intimately intergrown chlorite masks the age of the youngest white

  13. Social pairing of Seychelles warblers under reduced constraints: MHC, neutral heterozygosity, and age

    PubMed Central

    Wright, David J.; Brouwer, Lyanne; Mannarelli, Maria-Elena; Burke, Terry; Komdeur, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence and significance of precopulatory mate choice remains keenly debated. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a key role in vertebrate adaptive immunity, and variation at the MHC influences individual survival. Although MHC-dependent mate choice has been documented in certain species, many other studies find no such pattern. This may be, at least in part, because in natural systems constraints may reduce the choices available to individuals and prevent full expression of underlying preferences. We used translocations to previously unoccupied islands to experimentally reduce constraints on female social mate choice in the Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis), a species in which patterns of MHC-dependent extrapair paternity (EPP), but not social mate choice, have been observed. We find no evidence of MHC-dependent social mate choice in the new populations. Instead, we find that older males and males with more microsatellite heterozygosity are more likely to have successfully paired. Our data cannot resolve whether these patterns in pairing were due to male–male competition or female choice. However, our research does suggest that female Seychelles warblers do not choose social mates using MHC class I to increase fitness. It may also indicate that the MHC-dependent EPP observed in the source population is probably due to mechanisms other than female precopulatory mate choice based on MHC cues. PMID:26792973

  14. Constraints on Past Plate and Mantle Motion from New Ages for the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. M.; Steinberger, B. M.; Regelous, M.; Koppers, A. A.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Haase, K. M.; Stoffers, P.; Jokat, W.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.

    2013-12-01

    Estimates of the relative motion between the Hawaiian and Louisville hotspots have consequences for understanding the role and character of deep Pacific-mantle return flow. The relative motion between these primary hotspots can be inferred by comparing the age records for their seamount trails. Our new 40Ar/39Ar ages for 18 lavas from 10 seamounts along the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain (HESC) show that volcanism started in the sharp portion of the Hawaiian-Emperor Bend (HEB) at ≥47.5 Ma and continued for ≥5 Myr (O'Connor et al., 2013). The slope of the along-track distance from the currently active Hawaiian hotspot plotted versus age is remarkably linear between ~57 and 25 Ma in the central ˜1900 km of the seamount chain, including the HEB. This model predicts an age for the oldest Emperor Seamounts that matches published ages, implying that a linear age-distance relationship might extend back to at least 82 Ma. In contrast, Hawaiian age progression was much faster since at least ~15 Ma and possibly as early as ~27 Ma. Linear age-distance relations for the Hawaii-Emperor and Louisville seamount chains predict ~300 km overall hotspot relative motion between 80 and 47.5 Ma, in broad agreement with numerical models of plumes in a convecting mantle, and paleomagnetic data. We show that a change in hotspot relative motion may also have occurred between ~55 Ma and ~50 Ma. We interpret this change in hotspot motion as evidence that the HEB reflects a combination of hotspot and plate motion changes driven by the same plate/mantle reorganization. O'Connor et al. (2013), Constraints on past plate and mantle motion from new ages for the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., in press.

  15. Age estimates of globular clusters in the Milky Way: constraints on cosmology.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Lawrence M; Chaboyer, Brian

    2003-01-03

    Recent observations of stellar globular clusters in the Milky Way Galaxy, combined with revised ranges of parameters in stellar evolution codes and new estimates of the earliest epoch of globular cluster formation, result in a 95% confidence level lower limit on the age of the Universe of 11.2 billion years. This age is inconsistent with the expansion age for a flat Universe for the currently allowed range of the Hubble constant, unless the cosmic equation of state is dominated by a component that violates the strong energy condition. This means that the three fundamental observables in cosmology-the age of the Universe, the distance-redshift relation, and the geometry of the Universe-now independently support the case for a dark energy-dominated Universe.

  16. On the age of human footprints in Central Mexico: paleomagnetic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha Fernandez, J.; Gogichaishvili, A.; Martin Del Pozo, A.; Urrutia Fucugauchi, J.

    2007-05-01

    Until recently, we thought we knew where ancestral Native Americans came from (central Siberia, then across Beringia), and when they arrived (about 13 000 cal BP, after a trek between the recently separated Canadian ice sheets after Fiedel, 2006). Recent theories of American origins postulate multiple pre-Clovis migrations including Transpacific or coastal voyages by Australians, Melanesians, or Ainu, and even a Transatlantic migrations by Caucasoid Solutreans from Iberia. Thus, timing, route and origin of the first colonization to the Americas remains one of the most important topics in human evolution. Human and animal footprints have been found within the upper bedding surfaces of the Xalnene volcanic ash layer that outcrops in the Valsequillo Basin, south of Puebla, Mexico (Gonzalez et al., 2005). The ash has been dated to at least 40 ka BP. Paleomagnetic investigation yielded an intermediate magnetic polarity for Xalnene ash deposits while nearby Toluquilla volcano is reversely magnetized. Moreover, the absolute geomagnetic paleointensity derived from the volcanic lava flow is significantly reduced with respect to the present day geomagnetic field strength. It is quite possible that the ash as well as volcanic lava flow formed during worldwide observed Laschamp geomagnetic event.

  17. New Age Constraints on the Eruptive History of the Northern Galápagos Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, C. W.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Harpp, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Northern Galápagos Volcanic Province, located north of the Galápagos Archipelago and centered west of the 90° 50'W Galápagos transform fault (GTF), and the region east of the GTF are represented by a complex set of islands, seamount chains and ridges. To improve our understanding of the dynamics of ridge-hotspot interaction in this unique region, we present new 40Ar/39Ar ages from the lavas collected during the 2010 FLAMINGO (MV1007) cruise of the R/V Melville. Lava samples were recovered by dredge on both the Nazca Plate and Cocos Plate. The bathymetry shows that the region on the Nazca Plate west of the GTF is dominated by numerous seamounts aligned in three volcanic lineaments. A previously uncharted seamount southeast of Isla Marchena, with a strikingly flat, shallow surface and terraced flanks, shows eruption ages ranging from 2.0 ± 0.5 to 1.1 ± 0.5 Ma. Using standard subsidence rates, such ages place the seamount above sea level at 2 Ma, which is supported by apparent erosional features on some of the dredged lavas. The best age for a rhyolite and associated basalt from an east-west trending ridge on the Nazca plate is 4.71 ± 0.06 Ma. This age agrees well with a recent magnetic reconstruction that suggests that this ridge is a pseudofault, marking the propagation of a new ridge segment subsequent to a southward ridge jump. East of the GTF, on the Cocos Plate, there is little evidence of constructional volcanism; instead, there are several linear, nearly ridge-parallel, faulted features with up to 1km of relief. Ages along a transect striking approximately perpendicular to the ridge axis are older than expected near the current axis (3.4 ± 0.6 Ma) and younger than expected further to the north (1.4 ± 0.3 Ma). These anomalous ages closely match those predicted by both sediment thicknesses and a magnetic reconstruction, which predicts a fossil ridge axis in this area. To the northeast of the GTF, the age of lavas dredged from ridges and a small

  18. Observational Constraints on the Age-Metallicity Relation from White Dwarf-Main Sequence Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Anguiano, B.; García-Berro, E.; Freeman, K. C.; Cojocaru, R.; Manser, C. J.; Pala, A. F.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Liu, X.-W.

    2017-03-01

    The age-metallicity relation (AMR) is a fundamental observational property to understand how the Galactic disc formed and evolved chemically in time. However, there is not yet a consensus on the observed properties of the AMR for the solar neighbourhood. This is due primarily to the difficulty of obtaining precise stellar ages for individual field stars. We have started an observational campaign to provide the much needed observational AMR by using white dwarf-main sequence (WDMS) binaries. White dwarfs are natural clocks and can be used to derive accurate ages. Metallicities can be obtained from the main sequence companions. Since white dwarfs and main sequence stars in these binary systems are coeval, these binaries provide an unique opportunity to observationally determine in a robust way the AMR. Here we present the AMR derived from the analysis of a sample of 23 WDMS binaries.

  19. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  20. Cosmogenic 10Be constraints on Little Ice Age glacial advances in the eastern Tian Shan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanan; Li, Yingkui; Harbor, Jon; Liu, Gengnian; Yi, Chaolu; Caffee, Marc W.

    2016-04-01

    Presumed Little Ice Age (LIA) glacial advances, represented by a set of fresh, sharp-crested, boulder covered and compact moraines a few hundred meters downstream from modern glaciers, have been widely recognized in the Central Asian highlands. However, few studies have constrained the formation ages of these moraines. We report 31 10Be exposure ages from presumed LIA moraines in six glacial valleys in the Urumqi River headwater area and the Haxilegen Pass area of the eastern Tian Shan, China. Our results reveal that the maximum LIA glacial extent occurred mainly around 430 ± 100 yr, a cold and wet period as indicated by proxy data from ice cores, tree rings, and lake sediments in Central Asia. We also dated a later glacial advance to 270 ± 55 yr. However, 10Be exposure ages on several presumed LIA moraines in front of small, thin glaciers are widely scattered and much older than the globally recognized timing of the LIA. Historical topographic maps indicate that most glaciers were more extensive in the early 1960s, and two of our 10Be sample sites were located close to the ice front at that time. Boulders transported by these small and thin glaciers may be reworked from deposits originally formed prior to the LIA glacial advances, producing apparently old and widely scattered exposure ages due to varied nuclide inheritance. Other published ages indicated an earlier LIA advance around 790 ± 300 yr in the easternmost Tian Shan, but in our study area the more extensive advance around 430 ± 100 yr likely reworked or covered deposits from this earlier event.

  1. TOWARD PRECISE AGES FOR SINGLE STARS IN THE FIELD. GYROCHRONOLOGY CONSTRAINTS AT SEVERAL Gyr USING WIDE BINARIES. I. AGES FOR INITIAL SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Chaname, Julio; Ramirez, Ivan

    2012-02-10

    We present a program designed to obtain age-rotation measurements of solar-type dwarfs to be used in the calibration of gyrochronology relations at ages of several Gyr. This is a region of parameter space crucial for the large-scale study of the Milky Way, and where the only constraint available today is that provided by the Sun. Our program takes advantage of a set of wide binaries selected so that one component is an evolved star and the other is a main-sequence star of FGK type. In this way, we obtain the age of the system from the evolved star, while the rotational properties of the main-sequence component provide the information relevant for gyrochronology regarding the spin-down of solar-type stars. By mining currently available catalogs of wide binaries, we assemble a sample of 37 pairs well positioned for our purposes: 19 with turnoff or subgiant primaries and 18 with white dwarf components. Using high-resolution optical spectroscopy, we measure precise stellar parameters for a subset of 15 of the pairs with turnoff/subgiant components and use these to derive isochronal ages for the corresponding systems. Ages for 16 of the 18 pairs with white dwarf components are taken from the literature. The ages of this initial sample of 31 wide binaries range from 1 to 9 Gyr, with precisions better than {approx}20% for almost half of these systems. When combined with measurements of the rotation period of their main-sequence components, these wide binary systems would potentially provide a similar number of points useful for the calibration of gyrochronology relations at very old ages.

  2. Age constraints for Paleoproterozoic glaciation in the Lake Superior Region: Detrital zircon and hydrothermal xenotime ages for the Chocolay Group, Marquette Range Supergroup

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallini, D.A.; Cannon, W.F.; Schulz, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    A geochronological study of the Chocolay Group at the base of the Paleoproterozoic Marquette Range Supergroup in Michigan, Lake Superior Region, is attempted for the first time, Age data from detrital zircon grains and hydrothermal xenotime from the basal glaciogenic formation, the Enchantment Lake Formation, and the stratigraphically higher Sturgeon Quartzite and its equivalent, the Sunday Quartzite, provide maximum and minimum age constraints for the Chocolay Group. The youngest detrital zircon population in the Enchantment Lake Formation is 2317 ?? 6 Ma; in the Sturgeon Quartzite, it is 2306 ?? 9 Ma, and in the Sunday Quartzite, it is 2647 ?? 5 Ma. The oldest hydrothermal xenotime age in the Enchantment Lake Formation is 2133 ?? 11 Ma; in the Sturgeon Quartzite, it is 2115 ?? 5 Ma, and in the Sunday Quartzite, it is 2207 ?? 5 Ma. The radiometric age data in this study implies the depositional age of the Chocolay Group is constrained to ???2.3-2.2 Ga, which proves its correlation with part of the Huronian Supergroup in the Lake Huron Region, Ontario, and reveals the unconformity that separates the Chocolay Group from the overlying Menominee Group is up to 325 million years in duration. The source(s) of the ??? 2.3 Ga detrital zircon populations in the Enchantment Lake Formation and Sturgeon Quartzite remains an enigma because no known rock units of this age are known in the Michigan area. It is speculated that once widespread volcano-sedimentary cover sequences in Michigan were removed or concealed prior to Chocolay Group deposition. The hydrothermal xenotime ages probably reflect basinal hydrothermal fluid flow associated with the period of extension involving rifting and major dyke formation, that affected the North American provinces between 2.2 and 2.1 Ga. ?? 2006 NRC Canada.

  3. Sedimentation processes and new age constraints on rifting stages in Lake Baikal: results of deep-water drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, M. I.; Karabanov, E. B.; Prokopenko, A. A.; Gelety, V. F.; Antipin, V. S.; Williams, D. F.; Gvozdkov, A. N.

    With this paper we present a first attempt to combine the direct results on lithology, composition and age dating in the boreholes BDP-93, BDP-96 and BDP-97 with geological and seismic data from the areas where those sections were drilled. The sedimentary environments represented by the BDP boreholes are markedly different and possess characteristic lithological features. The results of the deep drilling provide the essential means for testing numerous age models used in geological reconstructions of the Lake Baikal rifting dynamics. Neither the basin-wide unconformity interpreted from seismic data, nor the interpreted change from shallow-water to deep-water facies at the boundary of the seismic stratigraphic complexes were found in the BDP-96 boreholes on Academician Ridge. Also, lithology does not support the proposed reconstructions of intense lake level fluctuations and transgressions during the Pliocene at Academician Ridge. The continuous deep-water hemipelagic sedimentation at Academician Ridge has existed for the past 5Ma. The beginning of an intense rifting phase of the Neobaikalian sub-stage and related drastic changes in sedimentation processes were interpreted on seismic sections as the basin-wide unconformity B10. Different age estimates for this boundary ranged from Late Pliocene (3.5Ma) to Plio-Pleistocene boundary. As shown by BDP-96 borehole, B10 is associated with a lithological change from diatomaceous ooze to dense silty clay and not with an erosional contact. The new age for this boundary in BDP-96 is approximately 2.5Ma. This new age constraint suggests that the upper sedimentary strata of Northern Baikal (1.5-1.7km thick) have formed during the past 2.5Ma with average sedimentation rates of 60-70cm/ka. The BDP-93 boreholes at Buguldeika suggest that uplift in Primorsky Range took place prior to 1.07-1.31Ma, a date which exceeds the age of previous geological models.

  4. Exposure age and ice-sheet model constraints on Pliocene East Antarctic ice sheet dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Masako; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Obrochta, Stephen; Saito, Fuyuki; Moriwaki, Kiichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-24

    The Late Pliocene epoch is a potential analogue for future climate in a warming world. Here we reconstruct Plio-Pleistocene East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) variability using cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages and model simulations to better understand ice sheet behaviour under such warm conditions. New and previously published exposure ages indicate interior-thickening during the Pliocene. An ice sheet model with mid-Pliocene boundary conditions also results in interior thickening and suggests that both the Wilkes Subglacial and Aurora Basins largely melted, offsetting increased ice volume. Considering contributions from West Antarctica and Greenland, this is consistent with the most recent IPCC AR5 estimate, which indicates that the Pliocene sea level likely did not exceed +20 m on Milankovitch timescales. The inception of colder climate since ∼3 Myr has increased the sea ice cover and inhibited active moisture transport to Antarctica, resulting in reduced ice sheet thickness, at least in coastal areas.

  5. Exposure age and ice-sheet model constraints on Pliocene East Antarctic ice sheet dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Masako; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Obrochta, Stephen; Saito, Fuyuki; Moriwaki, Kiichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    The Late Pliocene epoch is a potential analogue for future climate in a warming world. Here we reconstruct Plio-Pleistocene East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) variability using cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages and model simulations to better understand ice sheet behaviour under such warm conditions. New and previously published exposure ages indicate interior-thickening during the Pliocene. An ice sheet model with mid-Pliocene boundary conditions also results in interior thickening and suggests that both the Wilkes Subglacial and Aurora Basins largely melted, offsetting increased ice volume. Considering contributions from West Antarctica and Greenland, this is consistent with the most recent IPCC AR5 estimate, which indicates that the Pliocene sea level likely did not exceed +20 m on Milankovitch timescales. The inception of colder climate since ∼3 Myr has increased the sea ice cover and inhibited active moisture transport to Antarctica, resulting in reduced ice sheet thickness, at least in coastal areas. PMID:25908601

  6. Quantifying Age-Related Hydraulic and Biochemical Constraints on Tree Photosynthesis in the Southern Appalachian Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missik, J.; Benson, M. C.; Oishi, A. C.; Novick, K. A.; Miniat, C.

    2015-12-01

    Forest carbon accumulation generally declines with age, a trend largely attributed to reductions in gross primary production (GPP). However, for many species, uncertainty remains about the specific mechanisms limiting GPP. We examine both tree hydraulic and biochemical parameters affecting carbon uptake across a successional gradient in the southern Appalachian Mountains, utilizing a chronosequence approach with 5-, 10-, and 85-year old forest stands. We conducted measurements on four of the dominant species in the region: Liriodendron tulipifera, Betula lenta, Acer rubrum, and Quercus alba. To assess biochemical photosynthetic capacity, we estimated Vcmax and Jmax from over 140 gas exchange A/Ci curves. We determined that leaf gas exchange measurements performed on excised branches of A. saccharum, L. tulipifera, and Q. alba significantly underestimated assimilation by 35, 26, and 63% on average, respectively. Therefore, A/Ci measurements were performed on in situ canopy branches, using an 18 m boom lift to access the tallest trees. We examine how these photosynthetic parameters vary with age, height, and foliar nitrogen content among tree species and canopy positions. In order to investigate hydraulic factors driving stomatal behavior and therefore carbon uptake, we collected measurements of mid-day and pre-dawn leaf water potential (ψmd and ψpd) and xylem cavitation vulnerability. Preliminary results suggest that ψmd-ψpd decreases with along the chronosequence in anisohydric species, whereas ψmd-ψpd increases or remains stable with age/height in isohydric species. These data will be analyzed together with site- and species-specific hydraulic vulnerability data to assess whether the hydraulic safety margin changes with tree age/height, and explore how these patterns vary among species representing different xylem anatomies and a range of isohydric/anisohydric water management strategies. These results will provide improved estimates of common parameters in

  7. Theoretical constraints on the precision and age range of rehydroxylation dating

    PubMed Central

    Hare, V. J.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and precise dating methods are of central importance to archaeology, palaeontology and earth science. This paper investigates the expected precision and age range of rehydroxylation dating, a recently proposed technique for fired clays. An expression for combined measurement uncertainty is presented, which takes into account all significant sources of experimental uncertainty. Numerical simulations are performed for comparison. Combined measurement uncertainties of approximately 5% with respect to the age of the ceramic should be possible given well-designed experiments. In this case, the most significant contribution to combined measurement uncertainty is from effective lifetime temperature. In addition, it is shown that precision should be acceptable for recently fired material (less than 1 year). Mismatch of balance resolution to sample mass results in large variation in combined relative uncertainties, which vary by four orders of magnitude (approx. 1–1160%) across recent experimental studies, rendering some recently reported dates meaningless. It is recommended that this ratio be less than 10−6 for a combined relative uncertainty of less than 1%. The age limits of the technique are set by the value of the rate constant and individual sample mineralogy. This theoretical framework should help future interlaboratory comparison as well as optimizing instrument design. PMID:26064631

  8. Constraint on radiocarbon age correction in Lake Biwa environment from the middle to late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Y.; Minami, M.; Onbe, S.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakamura, T.; Imamura, M.

    2013-01-01

    Using data from previous studies and newly collected data, we compared the measured radiocarbon ages of molluscan shells, common reed (Phragmites australis) and pine needles (Pinus thunbergii) collected in 1966, 1970, 1990 and 2008 at Lake Biwa in Japan, and of archaeological samples, to examine radiocarbon reservoir effects at Lake Biwa. We also tested for differences in the radiocarbon reservoir effect between species and locations in the lake. The effects of nuclear bomb tests conducted in the 1950s and 1960s are clear, the offset between atmospheric 14C and the Lake Biwa freshwater 14C is larger for this period because the atmospheric 14C is so high. The semiclosed Lake Biwa system is in dynamic equilibrium with the atmosphere, resulting in the 14C content of the water following the changes in atmospheric 14C caused by nuclear testing. The shells collected after 1990 had radiocarbon ages that were 330-450 14C years older than those of the coeval atmosphere. The apparent differences in radiocarbon age (about 300 14C years) between shell fossils and wood samples excavated from the same layer of the submerged Awazu shell midden at Lake Biwa suggest that the radiocarbon reservoir effect also existed in the middle Holocene (the Middle Jomon period, about 5000 years ago). Because the present-day average residence time of Lake Biwa water is 3-6 years, its direct influence on the radiocarbon reservoir effect is small, which suggests that old carbon has been supplied into Lake Biwa.

  9. Theoretical constraints on the precision and age range of rehydroxylation dating.

    PubMed

    Hare, V J

    2015-04-01

    Accurate and precise dating methods are of central importance to archaeology, palaeontology and earth science. This paper investigates the expected precision and age range of rehydroxylation dating, a recently proposed technique for fired clays. An expression for combined measurement uncertainty is presented, which takes into account all significant sources of experimental uncertainty. Numerical simulations are performed for comparison. Combined measurement uncertainties of approximately 5% with respect to the age of the ceramic should be possible given well-designed experiments. In this case, the most significant contribution to combined measurement uncertainty is from effective lifetime temperature. In addition, it is shown that precision should be acceptable for recently fired material (less than 1 year). Mismatch of balance resolution to sample mass results in large variation in combined relative uncertainties, which vary by four orders of magnitude (approx. 1-1160%) across recent experimental studies, rendering some recently reported dates meaningless. It is recommended that this ratio be less than 10(-6) for a combined relative uncertainty of less than 1%. The age limits of the technique are set by the value of the rate constant and individual sample mineralogy. This theoretical framework should help future interlaboratory comparison as well as optimizing instrument design.

  10. Constraints on crustal rheology and age of deformation from models of gravitational spreading in Ishtar Terra, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Soloman, Sean C.

    1992-01-01

    Gravitational spreading is expected to lead to rapid relaxation of high relief due to the high surface temperature and associated weak crust on Venus. In this study, we use new Magellan radar and altimetry data to determine the extent of gravitational relaxation in Ishtar Terra, which contains the highest relief on Venus as well as areas of extremely high topographic slope. Within Ishtar Terra the only mountain belts found on Venus, Akna, Danu, Freyja, and Maxwell Montes, nearly encircle the smooth, high (3-4 km) plateau of Lakshmi Planum. Finite-element models of this process give expected timescales for relaxation of relief and failure at the surface. From these modeling results we attempt to constrain the strength of the crust and timescales of deformation in Ishtar Terra. Below we discuss observational evidence for gravitational spreading in Ishtar Terra, results from the finite-element modeling, independent age constraints, and implications for the rheology and timing of deformation.

  11. Relatively Recent Volcanism on Oahu, Hawaii: New U-series and Paleomagnetic Age Constraints on the Hanauma Bay Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, K. H.; Jurado-Chichay, Z.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2002-12-01

    The Koko Rift Zone (KRZ), eastern Oahu, is generally regarded as among the youngest volcanic features on the island. Previous workers have suggested that the 9 or 10 vents of this rift erupted near-simultaneously. However, K-Ar data in the literature (32-39 ka vs 320 ka) provide only general guidance on the youthfulness of these eruptions. We present new age constraints on KRZ volcanism using deposits of the phreatomagmatic eruption that produced Hanauma Bay (a popular snorkeling spot) and spatially associated lava flows. Numerous continuous basaltic ash units within the walls of Hanauma crater contain lithic fragments of well-preserved coral reef, beach rock, and marine mollusks, indicating that the eruption occurred in a near shore environment. 238U-234U-230Th dating of coral clasts in the deposit demonstrates that the eruption breached reef of MIS stage 7 age (200 +/- 30 ka), thereby ruling out the K-Ar age of 320 ka. U-series nuclides in "normal" MIS 7 coral lithics are indistinguishable from those in the island encircling Waianae Reef of the same age. However, U-series components in some originally aragonitic coral clasts were offset during the eruption when the rims recrystallized to calcite. 87Sr/86Sr, 234U/238U and Sr and U concentration indicate chemical mixing with host basaltic ash during this event, from which potential ages of the eruption can be constructed using isochron methods. More modeling of the data remains to be done but our preliminary estimate places the eruption at less than 100 ka. This result is consistent with new data on paleointensity and paleomagnetic secular variation within the lava flows exposed in or around the crater. This U-series dating approach should prove useful for eruptions in other locales where carbonate bioclast lithics are present in the deposits.

  12. Age and isotopic constraints on pleistocene pluvial episodes in the Western Desert, Egypt.

    SciTech Connect

    Crombie, M. K.; Arvidson, R. E.; Sturchio, N. C.; El Alfy, Z.; Abu Zeid, K.; Environmental Research; Washington Univ.; Egyptian Geological Survey and Mining Authority

    1997-01-01

    North Africa has undergone drastic climatic changes over the past several hundred thousand years. The timing of humid intervals called pluvials was investigated by uranium-series disequilibrium dating of travertines from the Kurkur Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt. The youngest and best dated travertines (70-160 ka) are found in Wadi Kurkur and include spring and lacustrine units exposed as 2 to 3 m high terraces. Travertines having an age of approximately 191-220 ka are exposed by differential erosion as linear mounds produced by spring systems over fracture zones in ancient wadis. The oldest travertines, having ages >260 ka, are extensive, cap limestone units above the oasis, and were deposited in paludal and lacustrine environments. Oxygen isotope ratios were measured for the wadi travertines ({delta}{sup 18}O values ranging from 16.7 to 19.1{per_thousand} SMOW) and for spring mound travertines (18.5-20.5{per_thousand}). Equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionation calculations indicate that the Kurkur travertines were deposited from waters having {delta}{sup 18}O values similar to ancient Western Desert groundwaters ({approx} -11{per_thousand}). The ages of the travertines correspond to times of monsoonal maxima, eustatic sea level high stands and interglacial maxima. Rainfall producing these groundwaters (and travertines) was significantly fractionated during atmospheric transport, in contrast to modern meteoric waters (-2.09{per_thousand}), implying a distant source for the pluvial waters. Increased precipitation, recharge of Western Desert groundwaters, and resultant travertine deposition are interpreted to be consequences of Milankovitch insolation cycle forcing, through enhanced Atlantic and Indian Ocean monsoons during interglacial time periods.

  13. Isotopic age constraints on middle Paleozoic deformation in the northern Sierra Nevada, California

    SciTech Connect

    Saleeby, J.; Hannah, J.L.; Varga, R.J.

    1987-08-01

    Allochthons of the lower Paleozoic Shoo Fly Complex in the northern Sierra Nevada were assembled and internally deformed prior to formation of a Devonian-Permian island-arc sequence. U/Pb data on zircons indicate ages of 423 +5/-15 Ma for a submarine tuff within the uppermost thrust slice of the Shoo Fly Complex and 378 +5/-10 Ma for a granitic intrusion that may be cogenetic with the lower part of the arc sequence. These data indicate late Early Silurian Shoo Fly deposition and proximity to active volcanism, as well as late Middle Devonian initiation of arc-related magmatism.

  14. Age constraints on the proposed Plio-Pleistocene boundary stratotype at Vrica, Italy.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obradovich, J.D.; Naeser, C.W.; Izett, G.A.; Pasini, G.; Bigazzi, G.

    1982-01-01

    Estimates of the age of the stratotype Plio-Pleistocene boundary in Italy range from 1.65 to 2.5 Myr. We aim here to clarify this dating confusion, and we present new radiometric data on ashes from the proposed stratotype section, Vrica, Italy, which indicate that the Plio-Pleistocene boundary must be less than 2 Myr old. Biostratigraphical criteria - the first appearance datums (FADs) and the last appearance datums (LADs) of planktonic foraminifera and calcareous nannoplankton tied to the magnetic reversal chronology - suggest that this boundary may be nearer to 1.7 Myr.-from Authors

  15. Constraints on the age of the Great Sand Dunes, Colorado, from subsurface stratigraphy and OSL dates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madole, Richard F.; Mahan, Shannon; Romig, Joseph H.; Havens, Jeremy C.

    2013-01-01

    The age of the Great Sand Dunes has been debated for nearly 150 yr. Seven ages ranging from Miocene to late Holocene have been proposed for them. This paper presents new information—chiefly subsurface stratigraphic data, OSL dates, and geomorphic evidence—that indicates that the Great Sand Dunes began to form in the latter part of the middle Pleistocene. The dunes overlie a thick wedge of piedmont-slope deposits, which in turn overlies sediment of Lake Alamosa, a paleolake that began to drain about 440 ka. The wedge of piedmont-slope deposits extends westward for at least 23 km and is as much as 60 m thick at a distance of 10 km from the Sangre de Cristo Range. Ostracodes from one well indicate that the eastern shoreline of Lake Alamosa extended to within 4.3 km of where the Great Sand Dunes eventually formed. The time represented by the wedge of piedmont-slope deposits is not known exactly, but the wedge post-dates 440 ka and was in place prior to 130 ka because by then the dunes overlying it were sufficiently close and tall enough to obstruct streams draining from the Sangre de Cristo Range.

  16. Age Constraints on the Eruptive History of the Northern Galapagos Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, C. W.; Harpp, K. S.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Soule, S. A.; Mv1007 Flamingo Science Team

    2011-12-01

    The Northern Galápagos Volcanic Province, located north of the Galápagos Archipelago and centered near the 90° 50'W Galápagos transform fault (GTF), is represented by a complex set of islands, seamount chains and ridges. To better understand the dynamics of ridge-hotspot interaction in this unique region, we collected bathymetry, sidescan sonar, magnetic, sub-bottom seismic, and gravity data during the 2010 FLAMINGO (MV1007) cruise of the R/V Melville. In addition to the geophysical studies, lava samples were recovered by dredge at 43 locations on both the Nazca Plate and Cocos Plate. The bathymetric mapping shows that region on the Nazca Plate west of the GTF is dominated by numerous seamounts aligned in three volcanic lineaments, the largest of which is the Wolf-Darwin Lineament. Faulting patterns and seamount morphology suggest that the locations and orientations of the lineaments may be partly controlled by the lithospheric stress field associated with the GTF. In contrast, east of the GTF on the Cocos Plate, there is little evidence of constructional volcanism - instead, there are several linear, nearly ridge-parallel, faulted features with up to 1km of relief. In this paper, we present new 40Ar/39Ar ages from the lavas collected in this region. These data allow us to constrain the age and duration of volcanism, thereby testing different models for interactions between the Galápagos plume and the Galápagos Spreading Center.

  17. Impact Constraints on the Age and Origin of the Crustal Dichotomy on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H. V.

    2004-01-01

    MOLA data have revealed a large population of "Quasi-Circular Depressions" (QCDs) with little or no visible expression in image data. These likely buried impact basins have important implications for the age of the lowland crust, how that compares with original highland crust, and when and how the crustal dichotomy may have formed. The buried lowlands are of Early Noachian age, likely slightly younger than the buried highlands but older than the exposed (visible) highland surface. A depopulation of large visible basins at diameters 800 to 1300 km suggests some global scale event early in martian history, maybe related to the formation of the lowlands andor the development of Tharsis. A suggested early disappearance of the global magnetic field can be placed within a temporal sequence of formation of the very largest impact basins. The global field appears to have disappeared at about the time the lowlands formed. It seems likely the topographic crustal dichotomy was produced very early in martian history by processes which operated very quickly. This and the preservation of large relic impact basins in the north- em hemisphere, which themselves can account for the lowland topography, suggest that large impacts played the major role in the origin Mars fundamental crustal feature.

  18. Impact Constraints on the Age and Origin of the Crustal Dichotomy on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Herbert V.

    2004-01-01

    MOLA data have revealed a large population of 'Quasi-Circular Depressions' (QCDs) with little or no visible expression in image data. These likely buried impact basins have important implications for the age of the lowland crust, how that compares with original highland crust, and when and how the crustal dichotomy may have formed. The buried lowlands are of Early Noachian age, likely slightly younger than the buried highlands but older than the exposed (visible) highland surface. A depopulation of large visible basins at diameters 800 to 1300 km suggests some global scale event early in martian history, maybe related to the formation of the lowlands and/or the development of Tharsis. A suggested early disappearance of the global magnetic field can be placed within a temporal sequence of formation of the very largest impact basins. The global field appears to have disappeared at about the time the lowlands formed. It seems likely the topographic crustal dichotomy was produced very early in martian history by processes which operated very quickly. This and the preservation of large relic impact basins in the northern hemisphere, which themselves can account for the lowland topography, suggest that large impacts played the major role in the origin Mars fundamental crustal feature.

  19. I-Xe systematics of the impact plume produced chondrules from the CB carbonaceous chondrites: Implications for the half-life value of 129I and absolute age normalization of 129I-129Xe chronometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravdivtseva, O.; Meshik, A.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Krot, A. N.

    2017-03-01

    It is inferred that magnesian non-porphyritic chondrules in the CB (Bencubbin-type) carbonaceous chondrites formed in an impact generated plume of gas and melt at 4562.49 ± 0.21 Ma (Bollard et al., 2015) and could be suitable for the absolute age normalization of relative chronometers. Here xenon isotopic compositions of neutron irradiated chondrules from the CB chondrites Gujba and Hammadah al Hamra (HH) 237 have been analyzed in an attempt to determine closure time of their I-Xe isotope systematics. One of the HH 237 chondrules, #1, yielded a well-defined I-Xe isochron that corresponds to a closure time of 0.29 ± 0.16 Ma after the Shallowater aubrite standard. Release profiles and diffusion properties of radiogenic 129*Xe and 128*Xe, extracted from this chondrule by step-wise pyrolysis, indicate presence of two iodine host phases with distinct activation energies of 73 and 120 kcal/mol. In spite of the activation energy differences, the I-Xe isotope systematics of these two phases closed simultaneously, suggesting rapid heating and cooling (possibly quenching) of the CB chondrules. The release profiles of U-fission Xe and I-derived Xe correlate in the high temperature host phase supporting simultaneous closure of 129I-129Xe and 207Pb-206Pb systematics. The absolute I-Xe age of Shallowater standard is derived from the observed correlation between I-Xe and Pb-Pb ages in a number of samples. It is re-evaluated here using Pb-Pb ages adjusted for an updated 238U/235U ratio of 137.794 and meteorite specific U-isotope ratios. With the addition of the new data for HH 237 chondrule #1, the re-evaluated absolute I-Xe age of Shallowater is 4562.4 ± 0.2 Ma. The absolute I-Xe age of the HH 237 chondrule #1 is 4562.1 ± 0.3 Ma, in good agreement with U-corrected Pb-Pb ages of the Gujba chondrules (Bollard et al., 2015) and HH 237 silicates (Krot et al., 2005). All I-Xe data used here, and in previous estimates of the absolute age of Shallowater, are calculated using 15.7

  20. Paleomagnetic Constraints on the age of the Lisheen Zn-Pb Deposit, Ireland: A Pre- Variscan Metamorphosed "MVT" Versus an Epigenetic Variscan Model for Ore Genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannalal, S. J.; Symons, D. T.; Sangster, D. F.

    2009-05-01

    Lower Carboniferous carbonate units in the Irish Midlands host major Zn-Pb ore deposits in two units, the Navan Group and the Waulsortian Limestone. The age and, therefore, the genesis of these ore deposits remains controversial because of the lack of absolute geochronological constraints. In addition, the effect of the Early Permian Variscan thermal episode, observed by elevated conodont color alteration indices in all Carboniferous strata in Ireland, on the Zn-Pb ore deposits is not clearly understood. This paleomagnetic study was undertaken to date and, thereby, constrain the genesis of the Waulsortian Limestone-hosted Lisheen Zn- Pb ore deposit. Specimens (432) from 12 sites in ore mineralization and 10 sites in host rocks at Lisheen were subjected to alternating-field and thermal step demagnetization protocols. Analysis of these specimens isolated a well-defined stable shallow and southerly-up paleomagnetic characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) direction. Saturation remanence tests, thermal decay data, and a paleomagnetic tilt test indicate a post-folding ChRM that is carried dominantly by single-domain magnetite. The ChRM directions from 8 host rock and 11 Zn-Pb mineralized sites are indistinguishable at 95% confidence, and give a mean paleopole at 41.6° S, 18.8° W (dp = 1.7°, dm = 3.3° ) with a paleomagnetic age of 277 ± 7 (2 σ) Ma on the apparent polar wander path for Laurentia in European coordinates. This Early Permian magnetization postdates peak-Variscan orogenic heating to ˜ 350° C in the surrounding region, suggesting two basic genetic models for Lisheen's Zn-Pb mineralization i.e. Variscan and metamorphosed pre-Variscan. The Variscan model, our preferred interpretation, suggests that the Zn-Pb mineralizing event occurred at 277 Ma during cooling from the regional Variscan thermal episode. This model, in conjunction with other thermal data, supports an entirely epigenetic origin that invokes a topographically-driven fluid flow, either

  1. Age constraints on first versus second language acquisition: evidence for linguistic plasticity and epigenesis.

    PubMed

    Mayberry, Rachel I; Lock, Elizabeth

    2003-12-01

    Does age constrain the outcome of all language acquisition equally regardless of whether the language is a first or second one? To test this hypothesis, the English grammatical abilities of deaf and hearing adults who either did or did not have linguistic experience (spoken or signed) during early childhood were investigated with two tasks, timed grammatical judgement and untimed sentence to picture matching. Findings showed that adults who acquired a language in early life performed at near-native levels on a second language regardless of whether they were hearing or deaf or whether the early language was spoken or signed. By contrast, deaf adults who experienced little or no accessible language in early life performed poorly. These results indicate that the onset of language acquisition in early human development dramatically alters the capacity to learn language throughout life, independent of the sensory-motor form of the early experience.

  2. Age constraints on the proposed Plio-Pleistocene boundary stratotype at Vrica, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obradovich, J.D.; Naeser, C.W.; Izett, G.A.; Pasini, G.; Bigazzi, G.

    1982-01-01

    Estimates1-4 of the age of the stratotype Plio-Pleistocene boundary in Italy range from 1.65 to 2.5 Myr. We aim here to clarify this dating confusion, and we present new radiometric data on ashes from the proposed stratotype section, Vrica, Italy which indicate that the Plio-Pleistocene boundary must be less than 2 Myr old. Biostratigraphical criteria - The first appearance datums (FADs) and last appearance datums (LADs) of plank-tonic foraminifera and calcareous nannoplankton tied to the magnetic reversal chronology - Suggest that this boundary may be nearer to 1.7 Myr. Attempts to make the boundary far older than this are without basis. ?? 1982 Nature Publishing Group.

  3. Age constraints on the hydrothermal history of the Prominent Hill iron oxide copper-gold deposit, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Bryan; Fraser, Geoff; Davidson, Garry J.; Meffre, Sebastien; Skirrow, Roger; Bull, Stuart; Thompson, Jay

    2016-12-01

    The Mesoproterozoic Prominent Hill iron-oxide copper-gold deposit lies on the fault-bound southern edge of the Mt Woods Domain, Gawler Craton, South Australia. Chalcocite-bornite-chalcopyrite ores occur in a hematitic breccia complex that has similarities to the Olympic Dam deposit, but were emplaced in a shallow water clastic-carbonate package overlying a thick andesite-dacite pile. The sequence has been overturned against the major, steep, east-west, Hangingwall Fault, beyond which lies the clastic to potentially evaporitic Blue Duck Metasediments. Immediately north of the deposit, these metasediments have been intruded by dacite porphyry and granitoid and metasomatised to form magnetite-calc-silicate skarn ± pyrite-chalcopyrite. The hematitic breccia complex is strongly sericitised and silicified, has a large sericite ± chlorite halo, and was intruded by dykes during and after sericitisation. This paper evaluates the age of sericite formation in the mineralised breccias and provides constraints on the timing of granitoid intrusion and skarn formation in the terrain adjoining the mineralisation. The breccia complex contains fragments of granitoid and porphyry that are found here to be part of the Gawler Range Volcanics/Hiltaba Suite magmatic event at 1600-1570 Ma. This indicates that some breccia formation post-dated granitoid intrusion. Monazite and apatite in Fe-P-REE-albite metasomatised granitoid, paragenetically linked with magnetite skarn formation north of the Hangingwall Fault, grew soon after granitoid intrusion, although the apatite experienced U-Pb-LREE loss during later fluid-mineral interaction; this accounts for its calculated age of 1544 ± 39 Ma. To the south of the fault, within the breccia, 40Ar-39Ar ages yield a minimum age of sericitisation (+Cu+Fe+REE) of dykes and volcanics of ˜1575 Ma, firmly placing Prominent Hill ore formation as part of the Gawler Range Volcanics/Hiltaba Suite magmatic event within the Olympic Cu-Au province of the

  4. Microfossil biostratigraphy of prograding Neogene platform-margin carbonates, Bahamas: Age constraints and alternatives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lidz, B.H.; Bralower, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    Benthic and planktic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils were recovered in shallow-water carbonate rock cores from two continuous boreholes drilled 7.5 km apart on the west platform margin of the Great Bahama Bank. The microfossils define six biostratigraphic units in each hole. One unit in each hole represents a correlative condensed section. Seven foraminiferal biozones are recognized in 11 of the units between the holes: middle Miocene Globorotalia fohsi robusta Zone N12, late Miocene G. acostaensis Zone N16 and G. humerosa Zone N17, early Pliocene G. margaritae evoluta Subzone N19, late Pliocene G. exilis Subzone N21 and, tentatively, G. tosaensis tosaensis Zone N21, and early Pleistocene G. crassaformis viola Subzone N22. The twelfth unit is inferred to be of G. crassaformis viola Subzone N22 age. The oldest unit is onshore, the youngest is offshore. As presently interpreted, the nannofossil and foraminiferal zonations are partially correlative. Although the microfossils unequivocally constrain the series ages of the sediments, the incompleteness of the fossil record allows for alternative biozonal age models within the series. The Miocene and Pliocene biozones are common to both holes, but the greatest similarities between the holes are the significant mixing of middle and late Miocene, and late Miocene-early Pliocene faunas, the greatly condensed intervals at the Miocene/Pliocene boundary, and the early Pliocene influx of deep-water benthic and pelagic foraminifera. Of particular importance is the tentative recognition of late Pliocene G. tosaensis tosaensis Zone N21 in one borehole. Subsequent data not available to this phase of the study indicate that much of the zone is likely missing. Its absence will lend support to speculations of a regional unconformity in the Bahamas. The microfossils indicate that (1) several transgressions occurred from the middle Miocene to at least the earliest Pleistocene (> 11.5-> 0.46 Ma), during which banktop

  5. Constraints on the formation age and evolution of the Moon from 142Nd-143Nd systematics of Apollo 12 basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Claire L.; Brandon, Alan D.; Armytage, Rosalind M. G.

    2014-06-01

    The Moon likely formed as a result of a giant impact between proto-Earth and another large body. The timing of this event and the subsequent lunar differentiation timescales are actively debated. New high-precision Nd isotope data of Apollo mare basalts are used to evaluate the Low-Ti, High-Ti and KREEP mantle source reservoirs within the context of lunar formation and evolution. The resulting models are assessed using both reported 146Sm half-lives (68 and 103 Myr). The linear relationship defined by 142Nd-143Nd systematics does not represent multi-component mixing and is interpreted as an isochron recording a mantle closure age for the Sm-Nd system in the Moon. Using a chondritic source model with present day μ142Nd of -7.3, the mare basalt mantle source reservoirs closed at 4.45-09+10 Ga (t Sm146=68 Myr) or 4.39-14+16 Ga (t Sm146=103 Myr). In a superchondritic, 2-stage evolution model with present day μNd142 of 0, mantle source closure ages are constrained to 4.41-08+10 (t Sm146=68 Myr) or 4.34-14+15 Ga (t Sm146=103 Myr). The lunar mantle source reservoir closure ages <4.5 Ga may be reconciled by 3 potential scenarios. First, the Moon formed later than currently favored models indicate, such that the lunar mantle closure age is near or at the time of lunar formation. Second, the Moon formed ca. 4.55 to 4.47 Ga and small amounts of residual melts were sustained within a crystallizing lunar magma ocean (LMO) for up to ca. 200 Myr from tidal heating or asymmetric LMO evolution. Third, the LMO crystallized rapidly after early Moon formation. Thus the Sm-Nd mantle closure age represents a later resetting of isotope systematics. This may have resulted from a global wide remelting event. While current Earth-Moon formation constraints cannot exclusively advocate or dismiss any of these models, the fact that U-Pb ages and Hf isotopes for Jack Hills zircons from Australia are best explained by an Earth that re-equilibrated at 4.4 Ga or earlier following the Moon

  6. [Which vaccination schedule, which vaccines? The constraints of time and age].

    PubMed

    Goujon, C

    1997-01-01

    Several factors must be taken into account in planning vaccination schedules for overseas travelers. The first factor is to determine requirements mandated by applicable laws in the destination country and in France governing professional travel such as by military personnel. The other factors involve risk assessment including local health and epidemiological conditions, living conditions during the stay, and personal profile of the traveler (e.g. age and previous vaccination). Tropical areas are not the only destinations where infectious risks requiring vaccinations are found. Vaccination against diseases such as diphtheria and tick-borne encephalitis is necessary for several countries in Europe. Pre-travel planning provides a timely opportunity for updating basic vaccination requirements (e.g. tetanus and polio). For the growing number of elderly travelers, accurate evaluation of immune status may be difficult either because these subjects may never been vaccinated but only exposed to the wild germ during childhood or because their vaccinations may have been performed long ago. In both cases one cannot be sure of the quality of the anamnestic response to booster injections. A frequent limitation on vaccination planning for travelers is time available before departure.

  7. Age constraints on the evolution of the Quetico belt, Superior Province, Ontario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Percival, J. A.; Sullivan, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Much attention has been focused on the nature of Archean tectonic processes and the extent to which they were different from modern rigid-plate tectonics. The Archean Superior Province has linear metavolcanic and metasediment-dominated subprovinces of similar scale to cenozoic island arc-trench systems of the western Pacific, suggesting an origin by accreting arcs. Models of the evolution of metavolcanic belts in parts of the Superior Province suggest an arc setting but the tectonic environment and evolution of the intervening metasedimentary belts are poorly understood. In addition to explaining the setting giving rise to a linear sedimentary basin, models must account for subsequent shortening and high-temperature, low-pressure metamorphism. Correlation of rock units and events in adjacent metavolcanic and metasedimentary belts is a first step toward understanding large-scale crustal interactions. To this end, zircon geochronology has been applied to metavolcanic belts of the western Superior Province; new age data for the Quetico metasedimentary belt is reported, permitting correlation with the adjacent Wabigoon and Wawa metavolcanic subprovinces.

  8. Palaeomagnetic constraints on the age of Lomo Negro volcanic eruption (El Hierro, Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villasante-Marcos, Víctor; Pavón-Carrasco, Francisco Javier

    2014-12-01

    A palaeomagnetic study has been carried out in 29 cores drilled at six different sites from the volcanic products of Lomo Negro eruption (El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain). Systematic thermal and alternating field demagnetization of the samples' natural remanent magnetization revealed a northward, stable palaeomagnetic direction similar in all the samples. Rock magnetic experiments indicate that this palaeomagnetic component is carried by a mixture of high-Ti and low-Ti titanomagnetite crystals typical of basaltic lithologies that have experienced a significant degree of oxyexsolution during subaerial cooling. The well constrained palaeomagnetic direction of Lomo Negro lavas was used to perform a palaeomagnetic dating of the volcanic event, using the SHA.DIF.14k global geomagnetic model restricted for the last 3000 yr. It can be unambiguously concluded that Lomo Negro eruption occurred well before the previously proposed date of 1793 AD, with three different age ranges being statistically possible during the last 3 ka: 115 BC-7 AD, 410-626 AD and 1499-1602 AD. The calibration of a previously published non-calibrated 14C dating suggests a XVI c. date for Lomo Negro eruption. This conclusion leaves open the possibility that the seismic crisis occurred at El Hierro in 1793 AD was related to an intrusive magmatic event that either did not reach the surface or either culminated in an unregistered submarine eruption similar to the one occurred in 2011-2012 at the southern off-shore ridge of the island.

  9. Absolutely classical spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

  10. 40Ar/ 39Ar mineral age constraints for the tectonothermal evolution of a Variscan suture in southwest Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallmeyer, R. D.; Fonseca, P. E.; Quesada, C.; Ribeiro, A.

    1993-06-01

    Dallmeyer, R.D., Fonseca, P.E., Quesada, C. and Ribeiro, A., 1993. 40Ar/ 39Ar mineral age constraints for the tectonothermal evolution of a Variscan suture in southwest Iberia. Tectonophysics, 222: 177-194. Mafic units interpreted to represent an internally disrupted ophiolite succession are exposed along a Variscan suture situated between the South Portuguese and Ossa-Morena zones in southern Iberia. Structural characteristics of various units adjacent to the suture zone suggest maintainence of an oblique (transpressional), sinistral tectonic regime during late Paleozoic plate convergence. This involved initial, limited, north-directed subduction beneath the Ossa-Morena zone, and was followed by oblique collision of the South Portuguese Terrane. Metamorphic evolution of rocks adjacent to the suture occurred during maintainence of a moderately high geothermal regime. Five samples of amphibolite were collected within the hanging wall of the suture. These included samples from the ophiolitic terrane and from the Ossa-Morena zone. Two samples were also collected within the post-kinematic Beja Gabbro which intruded the other two tectonic units following their structural juxtaposition and penetrative ductile deformation. Hornblende concentrates from these seven samples record well-defined 40Ar/ 39Ar plateau ages which range between c. 342 and 335 Ma. These results imply that the regional tectonostratigraphic units were maintained at moderate crustal levels until the Visean, and that their juxtaposition and internal ductile deformation occurred in the late Devonian. Subsequent cooling was probably effected by transpressional uplift during oblique collision following closure of intervening oceanic elements.

  11. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  12. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  13. New 40Ar/ 39Ar dating results from the Shanwang Basin, eastern China: Constraints on the age of the Shanwang Formation and associated biota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Huaiyu; Deng, Chenglong; Pan, Yongxin; Deng, Tao; Luo, Zhaohua; Sun, Jimin; Zhu, Rixiang

    2011-07-01

    The fluvio-lacustrine sequence of the Shanwang Basin, eastern China, preserves a rich and important terrestrial fossil fauna and flora; the exceptional preservation of these fossils reveals the dynamics of ancient mammalian ecosystems and plant biology. However, the timing of this sedimentary sequence has been the subject of debate for decades. Here we contribute to this debate by presenting the detailed results of 40Ar/ 39Ar analysis of the basalts above, below, and within the Shanwang Formation. These dates place stringent constraints on the age of Shanwang Formation and associated biota. 40Ar/ 39Ar ages obtained from basalts of the Niushan and Yaoshan Formations, which underlie and overlie the Shanwang Formation, are 21.0 ± 2.5 Ma (2σ, full external error) and 17.3 ± 1.5 Ma (2σ, full external error), respectively. The 40Ar/ 39Ar age of the basalt in the Shanwang Formation is 17-18 Ma. Given the age constraints of the basalts of the Yaoshan and Shanwang Formations, the age of the Shanwang biota is estimated to be ca. 17 Ma, late Burdigalian of the Early Miocene, indicating that the deposition of this fauna coincided with the onset of the mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum. The results provide new age constraints on the Shanwang mammal fauna, and independently support interpretations that this fauna can be assigned to chronozone MN4, and correlated with middle Orleanian of the European Land Mammal Age, and to late Hemingfordian of the North American Land Mammal Age. Biological diversity of the Shanwang Formation could reflect the global-scale mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum.

  14. Testing LTB void models without the cosmic microwave background or large scale structure: new constraints from galaxy ages

    SciTech Connect

    Putter, Roland de; Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu

    2013-02-01

    We present new observational constraints on inhomogeneous models based on observables independent of the CMB and large-scale structure. Using Bayesian evidence we find very strong evidence for the homogeneous LCDM model, thus disfavouring inhomogeneous models. Our new constraints are based on quantities independent of the growth of perturbations and rely on cosmic clocks based on atomic physics and on the local density of matter.

  15. Osmium isotope and highly siderophile element constraints on ages and nature of meteoritic components in ancient lunar impact rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer-Gödde, Mario; Becker, Harry

    2012-01-01

    The concentrations of highly siderophile elements (HSE: Re, Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Rh, Pd, Au) and 187Os/188Os isotope compositions have been determined for 67 subsamples of six lunar impact rocks from the Apollo 14, 16 and 17 landing sites, and the lunar meteorite Dar al Gani (DaG) 400 using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry (N-TIMS). We report the first Re-Os isochron age on a lunar impact melt rock. 187Re-187Os isotope systematics for Apollo 16 sample 67935 define an isochron age of 4.21 ± 0.13 Ga (MSWD = 1.5), which is interpreted to reflect localized partitioning processes between solid metal-liquid metal as this rock melted. The new age adds further constraints on the significance of pre-4.0 Ga basin forming impacts on the Moon and possible mixing of ancient impactor compositions in lunar impact rocks. Linear correlations displayed by subsamples of a given impact rock in plots of HSE versus Ir concentrations are explained by dilution processes through essentially HSE-free anorthositic lunar crustal target rocks or binary mixing between a high HSE meteoritic end-member and a low HSE end-member composition. Slope-derived HSE ratios and 187Os/188Os of the meteoritic component in granulitic impactites 67915, 67955 and 79215 are similar to slightly volatile element depleted carbonaceous chondrites. Suprachondritic ratios of Ru/Ir, Pt/Ir, Rh/Ir, and Pd/Ir for Apollo 14 impact melt rock 14310 are similar to ratios observed for other Apollo 14 samples and Apollo 17 poikilitic impact melt rocks. Apollo 16 poikilitic and subophitic impact melt rocks 60315 and 67935 show slightly subchondritic Os/Ir and suprachondritic ratios of 187Os/188Os, Ru/Ir, Pt/Ir, Rh/Ir, Pd/Ir and Au/Ir. Their strongly fractionated HSE compositions are similar to some members of the IVA iron meteorite group and provide further evidence for an iron meteorite impactor component in Apollo 16 impact melt rocks. The range of chondritic

  16. Heritability of white matter microstructure in late middle age: A twin study of tract-based fractional anisotropy and absolute diffusivity indices.

    PubMed

    Vuoksimaa, Eero; Panizzon, Matthew S; Hagler, Donald J; Hatton, Sean N; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Rinker, Daniel; Eyler, Lisa T; Franz, Carol E; Lyons, Michael J; Neale, Michael C; Tsuang, Ming T; Dale, Anders M; Kremen, William S

    2017-04-01

    There is evidence that differences among individuals in white matter microstructure, as measured with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), are under genetic control. However, little is known about the relative contribution of genetic and environmental effects on different diffusivity indices among late middle-aged adults. Here, we examined the magnitude of genetic influences for fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean (MD), axial (AD), and radial (RD) diffusivities in male twins aged 56-66 years old. Using an atlas-based registration approach to delineate individual white matter tracts, we investigated mean DTI-based indices within the corpus callosum, 12 bilateral tracts and all these regions of interest combined. All four diffusivity indices had high heritability at the global level (72%-80%). The magnitude of genetic effects in individual tracts varied from 0% to 82% for FA, 0% to 81% for MD, 8% to 77% for AD, and 0% to 80% for RD with most of the tracts showing significant heritability estimates. Despite the narrow age range of this community-based sample, age was correlated with all four diffusivity indices at the global level. In sum, all diffusion indices proved to have substantial heritability for most of the tracts and the heritability estimates were similar in magnitude for different diffusivity measures. Future studies could aim to discover the particular set of genes that underlie the significant heritability of white matter microstructure. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2026-2036, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Absolute and relative blindsight.

    PubMed

    Balsdon, Tarryn; Azzopardi, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The concept of relative blindsight, referring to a difference in conscious awareness between conditions otherwise matched for performance, was introduced by Lau and Passingham (2006) as a way of identifying the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) in fMRI experiments. By analogy, absolute blindsight refers to a difference between performance and awareness regardless of whether it is possible to match performance across conditions. Here, we address the question of whether relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers can be accounted for by response bias. In our replication of Lau and Passingham's experiment, the relative blindsight effect was abolished when performance was assessed by means of a bias-free 2AFC task or when the criterion for awareness was varied. Furthermore, there was no evidence of either relative or absolute blindsight when both performance and awareness were assessed with bias-free measures derived from confidence ratings using signal detection theory. This suggests that both relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers amount to no more than variations in response bias in the assessment of performance and awareness. Consideration of the properties of psychometric functions reveals a number of ways in which relative and absolute blindsight could arise trivially and elucidates a basis for the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 blindsight.

  18. The 238U/235U isotope ratio of the Earth and the solar system: Constrains from a gravimetrically calibrated U double spike and implications for absolute Pb-Pb ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyer, Stefan; Noordmann, Janine; Brennecka, Greg; Richter, Stephan

    2010-05-01

    The ratio of 238U and 235U, the two primordial U isotopes, has been assumed to be constant on Earth and in the solar system. The commonly accepted value for the 238U/235U ratio, which has been used in Pb-Pb dating for the last ~ 30 years, was 137.88. Within the last few years, it has been shown that 1) there are considerable U isotope variations (~1.3‰) within terrestrial material produced by isotope fractionation during chemical reactions [1-3] and 2) there are even larger isotope variations (at least 3.5‰) in calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) in meoteorites that define the currently accepted age of the solar system [4]. These findings are dramatic for geochronology, as a known 238U/235U is a requirement for Pb-Pb dating, the most precise dating technique for absolute ages. As 238U/235U variations can greatly affect the reported absolute Pb-Pb age, understanding and accurately measuring variation of the 238U/235U ratio in various materials is critical, With these new findings, the questions also arises of "How well do we know the average U isotope composition of the Earth and the solar system?" and "How accurate can absolute Pb-Pb ages be?" Our results using a gravimetrically calibrated 233U/236U double spike IRMM 3636 [5] indicate that the U standard NBL 950a, which was commonly used to define the excepted "natural" 238U/235U isotope ratio, has a slightly lower 238U/235U of 137.836 ± 0.024. This value is indistinguishable from the U isotope compositions for NBL 960 and NBL112A, which have been determined by several laboratories, also using the newly calibrated U double spike IRMM 3636 [6]. These findings provide new implications about the average U isotope composition of the Earth and the solar system. Basalts display a very tight range of U isotope variations (~0.25-0.32‰ relative to SRM 950a). Their U isotope composition is also very similar to that of chondrites [4], which however appear to show a slightly larger spread. Accepting terrestrial

  19. Absolute neutrino mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Silvia; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2013-04-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments firmly established non-vanishing neutrino masses, a result that can be regarded as a strong motivation to extend the Standard Model. In spite of being the lightest massive particles, neutrinos likely represent an important bridge to new physics at very high energies and offer new opportunities to address some of the current cosmological puzzles, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter. In this context, the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale is a key issue within modern High Energy Physics. The talks in this parallel session well describe the current exciting experimental activity aiming to determining the absolute neutrino mass scale and offer an overview of a few models beyond the Standard Model that have been proposed in order to explain the neutrino masses giving a prediction for the absolute neutrino mass scale and solving the cosmological puzzles.

  20. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  1. Age constraints on felsic intrusions, metamorphism and gold mineralisation in the Palaeoproterozoic Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt, NE Bahia State, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mello, E.F.; Xavier, R.P.; McNaughton, N.J.; Hagemann, S.G.; Fletcher, I.; Snee, L.

    2006-01-01

    U-Pb sensitive high resolution ion microprobe mass spectrometer (SHRIMP) ages of zircon, monazite and xenotime crystals from felsic intrusive rocks from the Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt show two development stages between 2,152 and 2,130 Ma, and between 2,130 and 2,080 Ma. The older intrusions yielded ages of 2,152??6 Ma in monazite crystals and 2,155??9 Ma in zircon crystals derived from the Trilhado granodiorite, and ages of 2,130??7 Ma and 2,128??8 Ma in zircon crystals derived from the Teofila??ndia tonalite. The emplacement age of the syntectonic Ambro??sio dome as indicated by a 2,080??2-Ma xenotime age for a granite dyke probably marks the end of the felsic magmatism. This age shows good agreement with the Ar-Ar plateau age of 2,080??5 Ma obtained in hornblendes from an amphibolite and with a U-Pb SHRIMP age of 2,076??10 Ma in detrital zircon crystals from a quartzite, interpreted as the age of the peak of the metamorphism. The predominance of inherited zircons in the syntectonic Ambro??sio dome suggests that the basement of the supracrustal rocks was composed of Archaean continental crust with components of 2,937??16, 3,111??13 and 3,162??13 Ma. Ar-Ar plateau ages of 2,050??4 Ma and 2,054??2 Ma on hydrothermal muscovite samples from the Fazenda Brasileiro gold deposit are interpreted as minimum ages for gold mineralisation and close to the true age of gold deposition. The Ar-Ar data indicate that the mineralisation must have occurred less than 30 million years after the peak of the metamorphism, or episodically between 2,080 Ma and 2,050 Ma, during uplift and exhumation of the orogen. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  2. A Microphysics-Based Black Carbon Aging Scheme in a Global Chemical Transport Model: Constraints from HIPPO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, C.; Li, Q.; Liou, K. N.; Qi, L.; Tao, S.; Schwarz, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aging significantly affects its distributions and radiative properties, which is an important uncertainty source in estimating BC climatic effects. Global models often use a fixed aging timescale for the hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic BC conversion or a simple parameterization. We have developed and implemented a microphysics-based BC aging scheme that accounts for condensation and coagulation processes into a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). Model results are systematically evaluated by comparing with the HIPPO observations across the Pacific (67°S-85°N) during 2009-2011. We find that the microphysics-based scheme substantially increases the BC aging rate over source regions as compared with the fixed aging timescale (1.2 days), due to the condensation of sulfate and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and coagulation with pre-existing hydrophilic aerosols. However, the microphysics-based scheme slows down BC aging over Polar regions where condensation and coagulation are rather weak. We find that BC aging is primarily dominated by condensation process that accounts for ~75% of global BC aging, while the coagulation process is important over source regions where a large amount of pre-existing aerosols are available. Model results show that the fixed aging scheme tends to overestimate BC concentrations over the Pacific throughout the troposphere by a factor of 2-5 at different latitudes, while the microphysics-based scheme reduces the discrepancies by up to a factor of 2, particularly in the middle troposphere. The microphysics-based scheme developed in this work decreases BC column total concentrations at all latitudes and seasons, especially over tropical regions, leading to large improvement in model simulations. We are presently analyzing the impact of this scheme on global BC budget and lifetime, quantifying its uncertainty associated with key parameters, and investigating the effects of heterogeneous chemical oxidation on BC aging.

  3. 'We're in the sandwich': Aged care staff members' negotiation of constraints and the role of the organisation in enacting and supporting an ethic of care.

    PubMed

    Petriwskyj, Andrea; Gibson, Alexandra; Webby, Glenys

    2015-12-01

    Aged care staff are often seen as holding power in care relationships, particularly in client engagement. Such a perception, however, may limit our understanding and analysis of the dynamics and politics within care spaces. This paper uses interview and focus group data from both staff and clients of an Australian aged care provider to identify the positions given to, and taken up by, staff in client engagement. Focusing on one of these positions, in which staff are seen as managing and negotiating constraints, the paper uses an ethic of care lens to examine the context in which engagement - and this position taking - occurs. Findings reflect the importance of the organisational and systemic context to the practice of care ethics and the potential vulnerability and disempowerment of care giving staff. Implications for the support of staff in client engagement and the role of care organisations beyond structures and processes to an active participant in an ethic of care are discussed.

  4. U-Pb zircon constraints on the age and provenance of the Rocas Verdes basin fill, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbeau, David L.; Gombosi, David J.; Zahid, Khandaker M.; Bizimis, Michael; Swanson-Hysell, Nicholas; Valencia, Victor; Gehrels, George E.

    2009-12-01

    The Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous Rocas Verdes basin constitutes one of the most poorly understood components of the southernmost Andes. As a result, accurate reconstructions and interpretations of deformation associated with the Andean orogeny and the kinematics of Scotia arc development also remain poorly constrained. In this data brief, we report U-Pb zircon ages from sandstones of the Rocas Verdes basin fill and from a crosscutting pluton in the southernmost Andes of Argentine Tierra del Fuego. Detrital samples contain predominant Early to early Middle Cretaceous (circa 130-105 Ma) U-Pb zircon age populations, with very small or single-grain middle Mesozoic and Proterozoic subpopulations. A very small subpopulation of Late Cretaceous ages in one sample raises the unlikely possibility that parts of the Rocas Verdes basin are younger than perceived. A sample from a crosscutting syenitic pegmatite yields a crystallization age of 74.7 +2.2/-2.0 Ma. The data presented herein encourage further geochronologic evaluation of the Rocas Verdes basin in order to better constrain the depositional ages and provenance of its contents.

  5. SHRIMP and 40Ar/39Ar age constraints for timing of plutonism and mineralization in the Boulder batholith

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lund, K.D.; Aleinikoff, John N.; Kunk, Michael J.; Unruh, Dan M.; Zeihen, G.D.; Hodges, W.C.; du Bray, Edward A.; O'Neill, J Michael

    2002-01-01

    The 66 Ma age for the quartz monzodiorite of Boulder Baldy and consideration of previous dating studies in the region indicate that small ca. 66 Ma plutonic systems may be common in the Boulder batholith region and especially to the east. The approximately 64 Ma porphyry copper systems at Butte and gold mineralization at Miller Mountain are indicative of regionally important mineralizing systems of this age in the Boulder batholith region. Resolution of the age and probable magmatic source of the Butte pre-Main Stage porphyry copper-molybdenum system and of the silver-rich polymetallic quartz vein systems in the northern part of the Boulder batholith documents that these deposits formed from two discrete periods of hydrothermal mineralization related to two discrete magmatic events.

  6. Early Precambrian mantle derived rocks in the southern Prince Charles Mountains, East Antarctica: age and isotopic constraints

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mikhalsky, E.V.; Henjes-Kunst, F.; Roland, N.W.

    2007-01-01

    Mafic and ultramafic rocks occurring as lenses, boudins, and tectonic slabs within metamorphic units in the southern Mawson Escarpment display mantle characteristics of either a highly enriched, or highly depleted nature. Fractionation of these mantle rocks from their sources may be as old as Eoarchaean (ca 3850 Ma) while their tectonic emplacement probably occurred prior to 2550 Ma (U-Pb SHRIMP data). These results provide for the first time evidence for Archaean suturing within East Antarctica. Similar upper mantle sources are likely present in the northern Mawson Escarpment. A younger age limit of these rocks is 2200 Ma, as indicated by presumably metamorphic zircon ages while their magmatic age may be constrained by single zircon dates at 2450-2250 Ma. The area of the northern Mawson Escarpment is most likely of ensimatic origin and includes mafic rocks which were derived from distinct mantle source(s) during Palaeoproterozoic time.

  7. Late Quaternary sedimentological and climate changes at Lake Bosumtwi Ghana: new constraints from laminae analysis and radiocarbon age modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanahan, Timothy M.; Beck, J. Warren; Overpeck, Jonathan T.; McKay, Nicholas P.; Pigati, Jeffrey S.; Peck, John A.; Scholz, Christopher A.; Heil, Clifford W.; King, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The Lake Bosumtwi sediment record represents one of the longest and highest-resolution terrestrial records of paleoclimate change available from sub-Saharan Africa. Here we report a new sediment age model framework for the last ~ 45 cal kyr of sedimentation using a combination of high-resolution radiocarbon dating, Bayesian age-depth modeling and lamination counting. Our results highlight the practical limits of these methods for reducing age model uncertainties and suggest that even with very high sampling densities, radiocarbon uncertainties of at least a few hundred years are unavoidable. Age model uncertainties are smallest during the Holocene (205 yr) and the glacial (360 yr) but are large at the base of the record (1660 yr), due to a combination of decreasing sample density, larger calibration uncertainties and increases in radiocarbon age scatter. For portions of the chronology older than ~ 35 cal kyr, additional considerations, such as the use of a low-blank graphitization system and more rigorous sample pretreatment were necessary to generate a reliable age depth model because of the incorporation of small amounts of younger carbon. A comparison of radiocarbon age model results and lamination counts over the time interval ~ 15–30 cal kyr agree with an overall discrepancy of ~ 10% and display similar changes in sedimentation rate, supporting the annual nature of sediment laminations in the early part of the record. Changes in sedimentation rates reconstructed from the age-depth model indicate that intervals of enhanced sediment delivery occurred at 16–19, 24 and 29–31 cal kyr, broadly synchronous with reconstructed drought episodes elsewhere in northern West Africa and potentially, with changes in Atlantic meridional heat transport during North Atlantic Heinrich events. These data suggest that millennial-scale drought events in the West African monsoon region were latitudinally extensive, reaching within several hundred kilometers of the Guinea coast

  8. Age constraints on Tarkwaian palaeoplacer and lode-gold formation in the Tarkwa-Damang district, SW Ghana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigois, J.-P.; Groves, D.I.; Fletcher, I.R.; McNaughton, N.J.; Snee, L.W.

    2003-01-01

    Two major epigenetic gold-forming events are recorded in the world-class gold province of southwest Ghana. A pre-Tarkwaian event was the source of the world-class Tarkwa palaeoplacers whereas post-Birimian and Tarkwaian deformation, which was related to the Eburnean orogeny, gave rise to the world-class (e.g. Prestea) to giant (e.g. Obuasi) orogenic gold deposits which have made the region famous for more than 2,500 years. A maximum age of 2133 ?? 4 Ma for Tarkwaian sedimentation is provided by 71 of 111 concordant SHRIMP II U Pb dates from detrital zircons in Tarkwaian clastic rocks from Damang and Bippo Bin, northeast of Tarkwa. The overall data distribution broadly overlaps the relatively poorly constrained ages of Birimian volcanism and associated Dixcove-type granitoid emplacement, indicating syntectonic development of the Tarkwaian sedimentary basin. These zircon ages argue against derivation of the palaeoplacer gold from an orogenic gold source related to the compressional phase of an orogeny significantly older than the Eburnean orogeny. Instead, they suggest that the gold source was either orogenic gold lodes related to an earlier compressional phase of a diachronous Eburnean orogeny or ca. 2200-2100 Ma intrusion-related gold lode. The CO2-rich fluid inclusions in associated vein-quartz pebbles are permissive of either source. At the Damang deposit, an epigenetic, orogenic lode-gold system clearly overprinted, and sulphidised low-grade palaeoplacer hematite magnetite gold occurrences in the Banket Series conglomerate within the Tarkwaian sedimentary sequence. Gold mineralisation is demonstrably post-peak metamorphism, as gold-related alteration assemblages overprint metamorphic assemblages in host rocks. In alteration zones surrounding the dominant, subhorizontal auriferous quartz veins, there are rare occurrences of hydrothermal xenotime which give a SHRIMP U Pb age of 2063 ?? 9 Ma for gold mineralisation. The similar structural timing of epigenetic gold

  9. Early to Middle Miocene cooling ages on Kea and Kythnos: timing constraints on crustal extension in the western Cyclades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. A.; Stockli, D.; Grasemann, B.; Iglseder, Ch.; Rice, A. H. N.; Heizler, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Cyclades are known for their extensional tectonics and recently recognized as having significant bivergence with top-to-NNE and top-to-SSW kinematics. Crustal extension and exhumation of the Attic-Cycladic massif, and in some instances metamorphic core complex formation are the result of back arc extension in the wake of Hellenic subduction retreat. Of the western islands, Kea and Kythnos have remained relatively little investigated even given their critical juncture between mainland Attica and the other Cyclades. Mapping by Team ACCEL indicates the islands are dominated by highly-strained middle greenschist facies Chl-Ep schists, calc-silicates and marbles, folded into open structural domes. Characterizing the tectonostratigraphy is a dominant, meter to decameter thick layer of ultramylonitic marble which is preserved in klippen scattered along the edges of the domes. The most recent brittle deformation is recorded as a number of low-angle normal faults which truncate the domal structure; both these brittle and other ductile (e.g. boudinage) kinematics indicate a consistent SW-directed stretching direction. No unequivocal hanging wall rocks have been identified and neither dome contains evidence of Alpine or younger magmatism. Ar-Ar thermochronometry performed on white mica from various lithologies at different structural levels on Kea yield consistent Early to Middle Miocene (21 Ma to 13 Ma) cooling ages. (U-Th)/He apatite cooling ages are between 14 Ma and 7.5 Ma. Although poorly defined, the older cooling ages are in the middle of the dome and along the geomorphic 'spine' which defines the dome's long axis. White mica from Kythnos yield poor age spectra with integrated ages between 22 Ma and 17 Ma, likely indicating mixed mineral populations were analyzed. The (U-Th)/He apatite cooling ages from this dome are all consistently Middle Miocene, with no evident spatial pattern. We interpret the Early to Middle Miocene cooling ages of the Kea and Kythnos

  10. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  11. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  12. Ice-age Ice-sheet Rheology: Constraints from the Last Glacial Maximum Form of the Laurentide Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, W. Richard; Goldsby, David L.; Kohlstedt, David L.; Tarasov, Lev

    2000-01-01

    State-ot-the-art thermomechanical models of the modern Greenland ice and the ancient Laurenticle ice sheet that covered Canada at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are not able to explain simultaneously the observed forms of these cryospheric structures when the same, anisotropy-enhanced, version of the conventional Glen flow law is employed to describe their rheology. The LGM Laurenticle ice sheet. predicted to develop in response to orbital climate forcing, is such that the ratio of its thickness to its horizontal extent is extremely large compared to the aspect ratio inferred on the basis of surface-geomorphological and solid-earth-geophysical constraints. We show that if the Glen flow law representation of the rheology is replaced with a new rheology based upon very high quality laboratory measurements of the stress-strain-rate relation, then the aspect ratios of both the modern Greenland ice sheet and the Laurenticle ice sheet, that existed at the LGM, are simultaneously explained with little or no retuning of the flow law.

  13. Syn- and post-tectonic granite plutonism in the Sausar Fold Belt, central India: Age constraints and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Anupam; Das, Kaushik; Hayasaka, Yasutaka; Sarkar, Arindam

    2015-08-01

    Sausar Fold Belt (SFB) in central India forms the southern part of the Central Indian Tectonic Zone (CITZ) - a crustal scale Proterozoic mobile belt dissecting the Indian craton, whose tectonothermal history and age is important for understanding the Proterozoic crustal history of the Indian craton. SFB comprises a gneissic basement (TBG: Tirodi Biotite Gneiss) overlain by a supracrustal sequence of quartzite-pelite-carbonate (SSG: Sausar Group). SSG and TBG are deformed and metamorphosed in greenschist to amphibolite facies. Two phases of granite intrusion are observed in the SSG - a syntectonic foliated granite and a post-tectonic massive granite, with clear structural relationship with the host rocks. Monazite chemical dating (U-Th-total Pb) of the foliated and massive granites yield Neoproterozoic (ca. 945-928 Ma) ages that contradict many earlier geochronological interpretations. Foliated granites and the immediately adjacent TBG show monazite grains with ca. 945 Ma mean age, interpreted as the timing of D2 deformation and amphibolite facies metamorphism of SSG. The post tectonic granites intruded these rocks around 928 Ma, and were largely undeformed. A terminal thermal overprint is found in some monazite grain rims at ca. 785 Ma age. The younger Sausar tectonothermal events have overprinted the adjacent high-grade granulites of Ramakona-Katangi Granulite (RKG) belt, and should not be considered as parts of the same tectonothermal event representing different depth sections only.

  14. Single zircon age constraints on the tectonic juxtaposition of the Archean Abitibi greenstone belt and Pontiac subprovince, Quebec, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, R.; Kerrich, R. )

    1991-11-01

    Zircons from metasediments and granitoids in the high-grade Lacorne block within the low-grade Archean Abitibi greenstone belt have been dated by single zircon Pb-evaporation technique, yielding {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb minimum ages. Detrital zircons in the mature clastic metasediments of the Lacorne block display a range of ages from 2,691 {plus minus} 8 Ma to 3,042 {plus minus} 6 Ma. The younger zircon ages thus impose an upper limit for deposition and indicate that the high-grade Lacorne block is not basement to the Abitibi supracrustal sequence (2,747-2,680 Ma). Existence of abundant (69%) older detrital zircons (> 2,750 Ma) suggest in turn that the Abitibi supracrustal rocks are not the source of the Lacorne sediments. Two generations of granitoids occur in the Lacorne block, an early monosodiorite-monzonite-granodiorite-syenite series and a younger S-type garnet-muscovite granite series. This contrasts with granitoid magmatism in the Abitibi greenstone belt which ended at {approximately}2675 Ma. The Pontiac subprovince to the south of the Abitibi greenstone belt shares all of the above features of the Lacorne block, including detrital zircon ages as well as the composition and timing of granitoid magmatism. This is interpreted detrital zircon ages as well as the composition and timing of granitoid magmatism. This is interpreted to indicate that the Lacorne block was originally part of the same tectonic terrane as the Pontiac subprovince. After development of the MMGS magmatism (21,670-2,680 Ma), the Pontiac subprovince locally underthrust the Abitibi greenstone belt, and crustal thickening promoted partial melting of underthrust Pontiac metasediments to form the {approximately}2,644 {plus minus} 13 Ma S-type granites.

  15. Late Permian age of ammonium-bearing illite in Pennsylvania anthracites: Temporal constraints on coalification in the central Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, E.J. )

    1996-01-01

    K/Ar dating of authigenic NH4-bearing illite in coal from the Anthracite region of eastern Pennsylvania yields apparent ages of 253-236 Ma ([+-]8 m.y.). The oldest K/Ar date of 253 Ma ([+-]8 m.y.) is a minimum age for the thermal event associated with anthracite formation and illite authigenesis. This date is probably within [approx]10 m.y. of the time at which coal-bearing rocks experienced peak temperatures, which suggests an age range of 265-255 Ma for this event. Age dates for authigenic NH[sub 4]-bearing illite reflect the approximate age of late-stage coalification (formation of anthracite-rank coal) because this mineral formed only during late-stage coalification (T=200-275[degrees]C) from a kaolinite (potassium-free) precursor, and the K/Ar data suggest that NH[sub 4] does not significantly influence the closure temperature of illite. K/Ar dates, in conjunction with paleomagnetic and vitrinite reflectance data, constrain the thermal pulse and deformation associated with the Alleghanian orogenic episode to a time period of 25-35 m.y., beginning in Early Permian time ([approx]285 Ma) after coal deposition, and concluding by Late Permian time ([approx]260-250 Ma). Syn- and post-folding secondary chemical remanent magnetizations constrain Alleghanian folding in the Central Appalachians to Late Permian time, which coincides with the postulated time range of 265-255 Ma for NH[sub 4]-bearing illite authigenesis and anthracite formation derived from the K/Ar data. The similar time range for anthracite formation and Alleghanian folding is consistent with vitrinite reflectance data that suggests anthracite formation was a syn-folding thermal event.

  16. Late Permian age of ammonium-bearing illite in Pennsylvania anthracites: Temporal constraints on coalification in the central Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, E.J.

    1996-12-31

    K/Ar dating of authigenic NH4-bearing illite in coal from the Anthracite region of eastern Pennsylvania yields apparent ages of 253-236 Ma ({+-}8 m.y.). The oldest K/Ar date of 253 Ma ({+-}8 m.y.) is a minimum age for the thermal event associated with anthracite formation and illite authigenesis. This date is probably within {approx}10 m.y. of the time at which coal-bearing rocks experienced peak temperatures, which suggests an age range of 265-255 Ma for this event. Age dates for authigenic NH{sub 4}-bearing illite reflect the approximate age of late-stage coalification (formation of anthracite-rank coal) because this mineral formed only during late-stage coalification (T=200-275{degrees}C) from a kaolinite (potassium-free) precursor, and the K/Ar data suggest that NH{sub 4} does not significantly influence the closure temperature of illite. K/Ar dates, in conjunction with paleomagnetic and vitrinite reflectance data, constrain the thermal pulse and deformation associated with the Alleghanian orogenic episode to a time period of 25-35 m.y., beginning in Early Permian time ({approx}285 Ma) after coal deposition, and concluding by Late Permian time ({approx}260-250 Ma). Syn- and post-folding secondary chemical remanent magnetizations constrain Alleghanian folding in the Central Appalachians to Late Permian time, which coincides with the postulated time range of 265-255 Ma for NH{sub 4}-bearing illite authigenesis and anthracite formation derived from the K/Ar data. The similar time range for anthracite formation and Alleghanian folding is consistent with vitrinite reflectance data that suggests anthracite formation was a syn-folding thermal event.

  17. U Pb zircon age constraints on the Dongwanzi ultramafic mafic body, North China, confirm it is not an Archean ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guochun; Wilde, Simon A.; Li, Sanzhong; Sun, Min; Grant, Matthew L.; Li, Xuping

    2007-03-01

    In Science May 11 2001 (p.1142-1145), Kusky et al. reported an ophiolite complex of late Archean age in the Dongwanzi area of the North China Craton, which has subsequently been considered a hallmark for Archean plate tectonics. However, this interpretation has been questioned because no convincing pillow lavas or sheeted dikes have been found in the Dongwanzi complex and, more importantly, as a major part of the ophiolite complex, the Dongwanzi ultramafic-mafic body has not previously been dated and it therefore remains unknown whether it is of Archean age. In this study, we carried out detailed field investigations and SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating on the rocks of the Dongwanzi ultramafic-mafic body, as recognized by Kusky et al. Our field observations reveal that in several places along the boundaries of the Dongwanzi body, mafic dikes emanating from the main body intrude the country rocks of the unmetamorphosed Mesoproterozoic sedimentary successions of the Changcheng-Jixian 'System'. One of these dikes yielded a SHRIMP U-Pb zircon age of 306 ± 6 Ma, similar to the SHRIMP U-Pb zircon age of 308 ± 4 Ma obtained from a plagioclase-bearing pyroxenite from the Dongwanzi ultramafic-mafic body. Four other samples collected from various parts of the ultramafic-mafic body (gabbro, leucogabbro or pyroxenite) record similar SHRIMP U-Pb zircon ages around ˜ 300 Ma. Therefore, both field relationships and SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating results unequivocally demonstrate that the Dongwanzi ultramafic-mafic body is not part of an Archean ophiolite.

  18. A Novel Method for Predicting Late Genitourinary Toxicity After Prostate Radiation Therapy and the Need for Age-Based Risk-Adapted Dose Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Awad A.; Egleston, Brian; Alcantara, Pino; Li, Linna; Pollack, Alan; Horwitz, Eric M.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2013-07-15

    Background: There are no well-established normal tissue sparing dose–volume histogram (DVH) criteria that limit the risk of urinary toxicity from prostate radiation therapy (RT). The aim of this study was to determine which criteria predict late toxicity among various DVH parameters when contouring the entire solid bladder and its contents versus the bladder wall. The area under the histogram curve (AUHC) was also analyzed. Methods and Materials: From 1993 to 2000, 503 men with prostate cancer received 3-dimensional conformal RT (median follow-up time, 71 months). The whole bladder and the bladder wall were contoured in all patients. The primary endpoint was grade ≥2 genitourinary (GU) toxicity occurring ≥3 months after completion of RT. Cox regressions of time to grade ≥2 toxicity were estimated separately for the entire bladder and bladder wall. Concordance probability estimates (CPE) assessed model discriminative ability. Before training the models, an external random test group of 100 men was set aside for testing. Separate analyses were performed based on the mean age (≤ 68 vs >68 years). Results: Age, pretreatment urinary symptoms, mean dose (entire bladder and bladder wall), and AUHC (entire bladder and bladder wall) were significant (P<.05) in multivariable analysis. Overall, bladder wall CPE values were higher than solid bladder values. The AUHC for bladder wall provided the greatest discrimination for late bladder toxicity when compared with alternative DVH points, with CPE values of 0.68 for age ≤68 years and 0.81 for age >68 years. Conclusion: The AUHC method based on bladder wall volumes was superior for predicting late GU toxicity. Age >68 years was associated with late grade ≥2 GU toxicity, which suggests that risk-adapted dose constraints based on age should be explored.

  19. Absolute-structure reports.

    PubMed

    Flack, Howard D

    2013-08-01

    All the 139 noncentrosymmetric crystal structures published in Acta Crystallographica Section C between January 2011 and November 2012 inclusive have been used as the basis of a detailed study of the reporting of absolute structure. These structure determinations cover a wide range of space groups, chemical composition and resonant-scattering contribution. Defining A and D as the average and difference of the intensities of Friedel opposites, their level of fit has been examined using 2AD and selected-D plots. It was found, regardless of the expected resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, that the Friedel-difference intensities are often dominated by random uncertainty and systematic error. An analysis of data collection strategy is provided. It is found that crystal-structure determinations resulting in a Flack parameter close to 0.5 may not necessarily be from crystals twinned by inversion. Friedifstat is shown to be a robust estimator of the resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, very little affected by the particular space group of a structure nor by the occupation of special positions. There is considerable confusion in the text of papers presenting achiral noncentrosymmetric crystal structures. Recommendations are provided for the optimal way of treating noncentrosymmetric crystal structures for which the experimenter has no interest in determining the absolute structure.

  20. Age and correlation of volcanism in central Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands: K-Ar and geochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smellie, J. L.; Pallàs, R.; Sàbat, F.; Zheng, X.

    1996-07-01

    Volcanic sequences in central Livingston Island can be divided into two broad groups. The older group consists of basalt-dacite lavas, clastic rocks and associated hypabyssal intrusions. The lavas are lithologically and compositionally similar to other pre-Pliocene, volcanic arc lavas in the South Shetland Islands. The outcrops vary from relatively fresh (at Cape Shirreff, Hannah Point and Siddons Point) to indurated and pervasively altered (at Mount Bowles, Burdick Peak and Hurd Peninsula). Samples from the fresh outcrops yielded Late Cretaceous ages for eruption or intrusion, ranging from 90.2 ± 5.6 Ma at Cape Shirreff, to 73.0 ± 2.3 at Siddons Point. Chemical analyses of the lavas suggest that the sequences at these two outcrops can probably be correlated stratigraphically with the Byers Group and Coppermine Formation, respectively. Two samples from Hannah Point yielded conflicting ages of 87.9 ± 2.6 Ma and 67.5 ± 2.5 Ma from the centre and top of the sequence, respectively. The stratigraphical affinities of the Hannah Point sequence cannot yet be determined unambiguously but it is unlikely to be part of the Byers Group. All of the samples from the altered outcrops (which correspond to the Mount Bowles Formation) yielded Eocene-Oligocene K-Ar ages (44.4 to 35.0 Ma), interpreted as reset ages related to the emplacement and cooling of a nearby Eocene tonalite pluton responsible for much of the alteration, and also dated in this study (43.3 ± 2.8 Ma). A Cretaceous eruptive age (possibly Late Cretaceous) for the altered outcrops is likely but cannot yet be proven. By contrast, the younger group consists of degraded basalt lava flows, tuff cone and tuff ring remnants, which are part of the Inott Point Formation. The lavas are very fresh and Pleistocene or Recent in age (≤ 1 Ma). They are compositionally distinctive and are indistinguishable from supra-subduction alkali basalts preserved elsewhere in Livingston, Greenwich and Penguin islands.

  1. The tectonic evolution of Cenozoic extensional basins, northeast Brazil: Geochronological constraints from continental basalt 40Ar/39Ar ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Zorano Sérgio; Vasconcelos, Paulo Marcos; Knesel, Kurt Michael; da Silveira Dias, Luiz Gustavo; Roesner, Eduardo Henrique; Cordeiro de Farias, Paulo Roberto; de Morais Neto, João Marinho

    2013-12-01

    The Boa Vista and Cubati Basins, Paraíba, Brazil, are NW-SE extension-related intracratonic basins that resulted from tectonic stresses after the opening of the South Atlantic. These basins contain lacustrine fossiliferous sediments, bentonite beds, and basalt flows that preserve Cenozoic continental records. 40Ar/39Ar ages for six whole-rocks from two distinct basaltic flows underlying the sediments in the Boa Vista basin are 27.3 ± 0.8 and 25.4 ± 1.3 Ma, while three grains from a basaltic flow overlying the sediments yield 22.0 ± 0.2 Ma. The sediments at the nearby Cubati Basin are overlain by a basalt flow with ages of ˜25.4 Ma. Three whole-rocks from an NE-SW-trending trachytic dyke cross cutting the sediments at the Boa Vista Basin yield 40Ar/39Ar ages of ˜12.45 ± 0.06, 12.59 ± 0.07, and 12.58 ± 0.07 Ma. Three whole-rocks from a nearby volcanic plug (Chupador) yield an age of 23.4 ± 0.1 Ma. The geochronological results combined with stratigraphic correlations between the two basins allow bracketing the age of the main sedimentary and bentonic units within the Boa Vista and Cubati Basins between 25.5 ± 1.3 and 24.9 ± 0.1 Ma. The ages, combined with field observations reveal that the formation of the Boa Vista and Cubati basins is associated with mantle-derived magmas channelled through reactivated Precambrian shear zones. Our geochronological results suggest that a temporal link with the Fernando de Noronha and Saint Helena hot spots can be excluded as possible sources of the Boa Vista and Cubati magmas. Rather, the extensional tectonics in the 30-20 Ma interval, long after Gondwana break-up, may be associated with the re-activation of continental-scale shear zones that channelled small batches of mantle-derived magmas.

  2. Age constraints on pre and synextensional Tertiary strata and normal faulting in the Windermere Hills, northeast Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, K.J. . Dept. of Geology); Cerveny, P.F. ); Snee, L.W. ); Brown, F.H. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Tertiary strata exposed in the eastern Windermere Hills and northern Pequop Mountains define the development of a widespread late eocene volcanic landscape and multiple generations of Oligocene-Miocene extensional half-grabens. 28 new [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar and fission-track age determinations and tephrachronology analyses on ash-flow and air fall tuffs suggest a complex history of extensional strain. The oldest Tertiary rocks exposed in the region consist of a diverse suite of calc alkaline volcanic rocks and volcaniclastic sediments. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar age determinations of volcanic strata in this sequence indicate that it ranges from 39.18 [+-] .12 to 40.38 [+-] 0.6 Ma in age; strata exposed in the Deadman Creek area include 260 meters of rhyolitic ash-flow tuff, andesitic flow breccia, a rhyodacite lava flow and volcaniclastic conglomerate and sandstone. Subsequent extension is defined by the development of west-tilted, extensional half-grabens between 34.79 [+-] .18 to 39.18 [+-] .12 Ma ([sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar). These basins evolved during the development of the Black Mountain fault (BMF), an east-rooted low-angle normal fault overlain by an array of synthetic tilt-blocks. Subsequent extension is defined by a poorly constrained, north-dipping normal fault of Oligocene or Miocene age. Both the BMF and the north-dipping normal fault are overprinted by two east-dipping listric normal faults which bound 1--3 km deep half-grabens filled with 11.9 [+-] 0.3 to about 15 Ma strata (zircon fission track, tephrachronology analyses and mammalian fossils). An important aspect of the thermal history of the Windermere Hills includes a middle Miocene (ca. 11--16 Ma) thermal event (200 [+-] 50 C > T > 280 C), which annealed, or partially annealed fission tracks in zircon grains in several of the extensional basins discussed above.

  3. Age constraints on the dispersal of dinosaurs in the Late Triassic from magnetochronology of the Los Colorados Formation (Argentina).

    PubMed

    Kent, Dennis V; Santi Malnis, Paula; Colombi, Carina E; Alcober, Oscar A; Martínez, Ricardo N

    2014-06-03

    A measured magnetozone sequence defined by 24 sampling sites with normal polarity and 28 sites with reverse polarity characteristic magnetizations was established for the heretofore poorly age-constrained Los Colorados Formation and its dinosaur-bearing vertebrate fauna in the Ischigualasto-Villa Union continental rift basin of Argentina. The polarity pattern in this ∼600-m-thick red-bed section can be correlated to Chrons E7r to E15n of the Newark astrochronological polarity time scale. This represents a time interval from 227 to 213 Ma, indicating that the Los Colorados Formation is predominantly Norian in age, ending more than 11 My before the onset of the Jurassic. The magnetochronology confirms that the underlying Ischigualasto Formation and its vertebrate assemblages including some of the earliest known dinosaurs are of Carnian age. The oldest dated occurrences of vertebrate assemblages with dinosaurs in North America (Chinle Formation) are younger (Norian), and thus the rise of dinosaurs was diachronous across the Americas. Paleogeography of the Ischigualasto and Los Colorados Formations indicates prolonged residence in the austral temperate humid belt where a provincial vertebrate fauna with early dinosaurs may have incubated. Faunal dispersal across the Pangean supercontinent in the development of more cosmopolitan vertebrate assemblages later in the Norian may have been in response to reduced contrasts between climate zones and lowered barriers resulting from decreasing atmospheric pCO2 levels.

  4. Age constraints on the dispersal of dinosaurs in the Late Triassic from magnetochronology of the Los Colorados Formation (Argentina)

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Dennis V.; Santi Malnis, Paula; Colombi, Carina E.; Alcober, Oscar A.; Martínez, Ricardo N.

    2014-01-01

    A measured magnetozone sequence defined by 24 sampling sites with normal polarity and 28 sites with reverse polarity characteristic magnetizations was established for the heretofore poorly age-constrained Los Colorados Formation and its dinosaur-bearing vertebrate fauna in the Ischigualasto–Villa Union continental rift basin of Argentina. The polarity pattern in this ∼600-m-thick red-bed section can be correlated to Chrons E7r to E15n of the Newark astrochronological polarity time scale. This represents a time interval from 227 to 213 Ma, indicating that the Los Colorados Formation is predominantly Norian in age, ending more than 11 My before the onset of the Jurassic. The magnetochronology confirms that the underlying Ischigualasto Formation and its vertebrate assemblages including some of the earliest known dinosaurs are of Carnian age. The oldest dated occurrences of vertebrate assemblages with dinosaurs in North America (Chinle Formation) are younger (Norian), and thus the rise of dinosaurs was diachronous across the Americas. Paleogeography of the Ischigualasto and Los Colorados Formations indicates prolonged residence in the austral temperate humid belt where a provincial vertebrate fauna with early dinosaurs may have incubated. Faunal dispersal across the Pangean supercontinent in the development of more cosmopolitan vertebrate assemblages later in the Norian may have been in response to reduced contrasts between climate zones and lowered barriers resulting from decreasing atmospheric pCO2 levels. PMID:24843149

  5. Multiple constraints on the age of a Pleistocene lava dam across the Little Colorado River at Grand Falls, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.; Riggs, N.; Kaufman, D.; Champion, D.; Fenton, C.; Forman, S.; McIntosh, W.; Hereford, R.; Plescia, J.; Ort, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Grand Falls basalt lava flow in northern Arizona was emplaced in late Pleistocene time. It flowed 10 km from its vent area to the Little Colorado River, where it cascaded into and filled a 65-m-deep canyon to form the Grand Falls lava dam. Lava continued ???25 km downstream and ???1 km onto the far rim beyond where the canyon was filled. Subsequent fluvial sedimentation filled the reservoir behind the dam, and eventually the river established a channel along the margin of the lava flow to the site where water falls back into the pre-eruption canyon. The ca. 150 ka age of the Grand Falls flow provided by whole-rock K-Ar analysis in the 1970s is inconsistent with the preservation of centimeter-scale flow-top features on the surface of the flow and the near absence of physical and chemical weathering on the flow downstream of the falls. The buried Little Colorado River channel and the present-day channel are at nearly the same elevation, indicating that very little, if any, regional downcutting has occurred since emplacement of the flow. Newly applied dating techniques better define the age of the lava dam. Infrared-stimulated luminescence dating of silty mudstone baked by the lava yielded an age of 19.6 ?? 1.2 ka. Samples from three noneroded or slightly eroded outcrops at the top of the lava flow yielded 3He cosmogenic ages of 16 ?? 1 ka, 17 ?? 1 ka, and 20 ?? 1 ka. A mean age of 8 ?? 19 ka was obtained from averaging four samples using the 40Ar/39Ar step-heating method. Finally, paleomagnetic directions in lava samples from two sites at Grand Falls and one at the vent area are nearly identical and match the curve of magnetic secular variation at ca. 15 ka, 19 ka, 23 ka, and 28 ka. We conclude that the Grand Falls flow was emplaced at ca. 20 ka. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  6. Constraints on thermal histories of magmas from combined U-series crystal ages, trace-element diffusion, and textural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, K. M.; Kent, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Developing a better understanding of the thermal and chemical evolution of magmas within crustal reservoirs has implications both in terms of the mechanisms of generation of chemically diverse magmas and in terms of the development, size and longevity of bodies of eruptible magma. The physical and thermal states of the system are intimately linked, going from mostly liquid to mushy to potentially solid or almost-solid systems as a function largely of temperature. Crystal-scale records show evidence of long-term storage and recycling of crystals within a reservoir system, but the extent to which storage of these antecrysts occurs in mostly-liquid vs. mostly-solid or solid bodies is unclear. Numerical models can provide insights into thermal histories at a reservoir scale, and crystal and liquid thermometry can provide insights into the thermal state of the crystals at snapshots in time, but developing thermal histories from the record in erupted products has been elusive. We present a new approach to quantifying thermal histories of magma bodies using the crystal record by combining information from multiple analytical approaches. U-series crystal ages provide the total time since crystals grew (albeit averaged). In contrast, trace-element zoning provides an uppper limit to the duration of storage at high temperatures, and crystal sizes and CSDs provide insights into the total growth time of crystals (modified by dissolution). Thus, by combining information from all of these sources, we can link the crystal growth and diffusion ages to thermal states and therefore constrain thermal histories. We use recent eruptive products at Mt Hood as a case study, building off of previous 238U-230Th-226Ra crystal age, CSD, and diffusion modeling results. 230Th-226Ra ages of crystals from the silicic endmember of the most recent Mt Hood eruptions both have average ages of >4.5 ka and likely have cores with ages >10 ka (Eppich et al., EPSL, 2012 v. 317-318). Diffusion of Sr in

  7. U-Pb Detrital Zircon Geochronologic Constraints on Depositional Age and Sediment Source Terrains of the Late Paleozoic Tepuel-Genoa Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffis, N. P.; Montanez, I. P.; Isbell, J.; Gulbranson, E. L.; Wimpenny, J.; Yin, Q. Z.; Cúneo, N. R.; Pagani, M. A.; Taboada, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    The late Paleozoic Ice Age (LPIA) is the longest-lived icehouse of the Phanerozoic and the only time a metazoan dominated and vegetated world transitioned from an icehouse climate into a greenhouse. Despite several decades of research, the timing, extent of glaciation and the location of ice centers remain unresolved, which prohibits reconstruction of ice volume. The Permo-Carboniferous sediments in the Tepuel-Genoa Basin, Patagonia contains a near complete record of sedimentation from the lower Carboniferous through lower Permian. Outsized clasts, thin pebble-rich diamictites and slumps represent the last of the late Paleozoic glacially influenced deep-water marine sediments in the Mojón de Hierro Fm. and the Paleozoic of Patagonia. U-Pb analysis of detrital zircons separated from slope sediments reveal groupings (20 myr bins, n≥5 zircons) with peak depositional ages of 420, 540 to 660 and 1040 Ma. Zircon age populations recovered from the Mojón de Hierro Fm. compare well with bedrock ages of the Deseado Massif of SE Patagonia, suggesting this may be a potential source of sediments. The maximum depositional age of the sediments is 306.05 ± 3.7 Ma (2σ) as determined by the median age of the two youngest concordant zircons that overlap in error. The youngest zircon from the analysis yields a 238U/206Pb age of 301.3 ± 4.5 Ma (2σ; MSWD = 2.3). Younger zircons from the analysis compare well with the age of granite bedrock exposed along the basin margin to the E-NE suggesting they may reflect a more proximal source. These data, which indicate a maximum age of late Carboniferous for the Mojón de Hierro Fm, provide the first geochemical constraints for the timing of final deposition of glaciomarine sediments in the Tepuel-Genoa Basin, and contributes to the biostratigraphic correlation of the late Paleozoic succession in Patagonia with other key LPIA basins that has thus far been hindered by faunal provincialism.

  8. Age-related body weight constraints on prenatal and milk provisioning in Iberian red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) affect allocation of maternal resources.

    PubMed

    Landete-Castillejos, T; García, A; Carrión, D; Estevez, J A; Ceacero, F; Gaspar-López, E; Gallego, L

    2009-02-01

    Maternal phenotypic characteristics can influence key life history variables of their offspring through maternal effects. In this study, we examined how body size constraints on maternal weight in yearling and subadult compared to adult hinds (age class effects) affected prenatal (calf birth weight, calf to hind weight ratio) and postnatal (milk) provisioning of Iberian red deer calves. Age correlated with all prenatal and postnatal investment traits except calf gains, although correlations were weaker than those with maternal weight. Once the effect of linear increase in weight with age was removed from models, yearlings showed additional reductions in calf birth weight, calf gains, and milk provisioning. The low-calf birth weight might increase the risk of calf mortality during lactation, as this occurs primarily during the first day of life and is strongly related to birth weight. Yearlings showed a greater prenatal allocation of resources in terms of greater calf to hind weight ratio probably as an extra effort by yearling mothers to balance calf neonatal mortality. It might compensate young mothers to produce low-quality calves while still growing rather than waiting for the uncertain possibility of surviving to the next reproductive season.

  9. Age constraints on basalt samples from a transect across the Lau Basin: supporting evidence for modification by multiple mantle sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conatser, C. S.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Jackson, M. G.; Konter, J. G.; Price, A. A.; Konrad, K.

    2014-12-01

    The tectonic activity of the Lau and North Fiji backarc basins in the South Pacific is complex and not well delimited. Rapid subduction of the Pacific plate at the Tonga trench, together with rifting between the Tonga and Australian plates and Niuafo'ou microplate, has created multiple types of volcanic activity as a function of this complex tectonic setting (1). In addition to extensional volcanism producing depleted mantle melt (2), a number of hotspots (Samoa, Rurutu, Rarotonga, Macdonald and Louisville) have passed near the area, each at distinct time periods, possibly contributing mantle plume components to the magmatism of the Lau Basin. During the summer of 2013, three transects in the Lau Basin and southwest of Samoa were dredged onboard the R/V Roger Revelle (Expedition RR1310). We present here the results of 10 new step heating experiments by the 40Ar/39Ar method using the ARGUS-VI multi-collector mass spectrometer, comprising groundmass and plagioclase separates from 9 basalt samples. These high-precision 40Ar/39Ar ages will allow us to determine whether some of the volcanic activity in the Lau Basin correlates with known ages of hotspot transits through the area, clarifying evidence from corresponding geochemical analyses for a subset of these samples, which support incorporation of Samoan (EMII), Rurutu (HIMU), and Rarotonga (EMI) mantle components into spreading center volcanism across a larger area than previously reported (presented by Price et al., this volume). These ages thus provide insights into the complex construction of the Lau Basin through time. 1. Zellmer, K.E.; Taylor, B. (2001). "A three-plate kinematic model for Lau Basin opening." Geochem., Geophys., Geosyst. 2 (5): 1020 2. F. and B. Taylor. 2002. "Mantle Wedge Control on Back-Arc Crustal Accretion." Nature 416 (6879): 417-420.

  10. Age and chemical constraints of Volcán Tunupa: Implications for behind arc volcanism in the Bolivian central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    salisbury, M. J.; Kent, A. J.; Jiménez, N.; Jicha, B. R.

    2011-12-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations of groundmass separates and whole-rock geochemical data constrain the Pleistocene eruptive history of Volcán Tunupa, a glacially-dissected composite volcano (~50 km3) situated between the Salar de Uyuni and Salar de Coipasa. Tunupa erupted ~110 km east of the arc front of the Western Cordillera of the central Andes near the eastern edge of the Intersalar Volcanic Field, an arc-perpendicular expression of volcanism that extends to the central Altiplano basin of Bolivia. 40Ar/39Ar age determinations indicate that the edifice was constructed between ~1.40 and 1.55 Ma, whereas nearby Cerro Huayrana lavas erupted ~ 11 Ma. Published ages from the Western Cordillera that are concordant with both Tunupa and Huayrana lavas demonstrate that the central Altiplano lavas are a long-lived expression of behind arc volcanism. The Tunupa lavas define a calc-alkaline trend from trachyandesite to trachydacite (wt.% SiO2 = 60.6 - 63.6; wt.% K2O + Na2O = 7.5 - 8.3) and are overlain by younger, more silicic (wt.% SiO2 = 66) trachydacitic domes. Major element compositions of Tunupa and Huayrana are enriched in FeO and TiO2 compared to the arc front. These lavas are also enriched in high field strength elements, notably Nb and Ta, and are characterized by considerably lower Ba/Nb and La/Ta ratios than arc front lavas in northern Chile. The geochemical and spatiotemporal patterns of the behind arc Tunupa and Huayrana lavas suggest different petrogenetic histories from typical central Andean arc lavas.

  11. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  12. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m‑1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  13. The Aggradational Successions of the Aniene River Valley in Rome: Age Constraints to Early Neanderthal Presence in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Ceruleo, Piero; Pandolfi, Luca; Petronio, Carmelo; Rolfo, Mario F.; Salari, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    We revise the chronostratigraphy of several sedimentary successions cropping out along a 5 km-long tract of the Aniene River Valley in Rome (Italy), which yielded six hominin remains previously attributed to proto- or archaic Neanderthal individuals, as well as a large number of lithic artefacts showing intermediate characteristics somewhere between the local Acheulean and Mousterian cultures. Through a method of correlation of aggradational successions with post-glacial sea-level rises, relying on a large set of published 40Ar/39Ar ages of interbedded volcanic deposits, we demonstrate that deposition of the sediments hosting the human remains spans the interval 295–220 ka. This is consistent with other well constrained ages for lithic industries recovered in England, displaying transitional features from Lower to Middle Paleolithic, suggesting the appearance of Mode 3 during the MIS 9-MIS 8 transition. Moreover, the six human bone fragments recovered in the Aniene Valley should be regarded as the most precisely dated and oldest hominin remains ascribable to Neanderthal-type individuals in Europe, discovered to date. The chronostratigraphic study presented here constitutes the groundwork for addressing re-analysis of these remains and of their associated lithic industries, in the light of their well-constrained chronological picture. PMID:28125602

  14. The Aggradational Successions of the Aniene River Valley in Rome: Age Constraints to Early Neanderthal Presence in Europe.

    PubMed

    Marra, Fabrizio; Ceruleo, Piero; Pandolfi, Luca; Petronio, Carmelo; Rolfo, Mario F; Salari, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    We revise the chronostratigraphy of several sedimentary successions cropping out along a 5 km-long tract of the Aniene River Valley in Rome (Italy), which yielded six hominin remains previously attributed to proto- or archaic Neanderthal individuals, as well as a large number of lithic artefacts showing intermediate characteristics somewhere between the local Acheulean and Mousterian cultures. Through a method of correlation of aggradational successions with post-glacial sea-level rises, relying on a large set of published 40Ar/39Ar ages of interbedded volcanic deposits, we demonstrate that deposition of the sediments hosting the human remains spans the interval 295-220 ka. This is consistent with other well constrained ages for lithic industries recovered in England, displaying transitional features from Lower to Middle Paleolithic, suggesting the appearance of Mode 3 during the MIS 9-MIS 8 transition. Moreover, the six human bone fragments recovered in the Aniene Valley should be regarded as the most precisely dated and oldest hominin remains ascribable to Neanderthal-type individuals in Europe, discovered to date. The chronostratigraphic study presented here constitutes the groundwork for addressing re-analysis of these remains and of their associated lithic industries, in the light of their well-constrained chronological picture.

  15. Multiple Basinal Fluid Events in the Lower Belt Supergroup, Montana: Constraints From CHIME Ages and REE Patterns of Monazites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Alvarez, I.; Kusiak, M. A.

    2004-05-01

    Chemical dates (CHIME) on 105 spots and REE patterns of monazites were obtained from coarse sandstones and siltstones in the Mesoproterozoic siliciclastic Appekunny and Grinnell formations, lower Belt Supergroup, Montana, by EMPA. At least three post-depositional events induced by basinal fluids can be recognized: (a) red coloration accompanied by a major K-addition; (b) a green overprint of red siltstones; and (c) dolomitization. Fluid advection in the unmineralized lower Belt is pervasive and may have been alkaline and oxidizing. These three events progressively modified the primary geochemical characteristics of the siliciclastic rocks. Calculated ages show similar ranges in the fine and coarse-grained facies. For siltstones there are two age clusters: (1) at 1,801 ± 21 to 1,968 ± 26 Ma, as well as (2) at 854 ± 7 to 962 ± 13 Ma. Coarse sandstones show similar age clusters (3) at 1,831 ± 14 to 1,982 ± 12 Ma, and (4) at 803 ± 6 to 944 ± 9 Ma. A wide range of dates plots between the clusters for both facies. Clusters (1) and (3) are interpreted as the result of detrital monazites from a source area ~1.8 to 1.9 Ga old. Mineralogical variations and trace element systematic reveal basinal brines, which mobilized MREE and HREE, locally generating secondary monazites, influencing large domains of the lower Belt. The lower Belt Supergroup is estimated to have been deposited between 1.47 Ga and 1.45 Ga; consequently, the second age cluster for sandstones and siltstones is viewed as constraining the timeframe of a major basinal fluid event at ~0.80 to 0.96 Ga. That event is clearly distinct from the hydrothermal system associated with the Sullivan sedex base metal deposit at the base of the Belt. Ages between the clusters are interpreted either as secondary, formed during additional basinal fluid events or as reset of detrital monazites. Accordingly, the Belt basin was intermittently an open system to fluids from ~1.47 to ~0.80 Ga. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns

  16. Constraints on Age of India-Asia Collision and Pre-Collisional Subduction Metamorphism from the Sangsang Region, South Central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borneman, N.; Hodges, K. V.; Van Soest, M. C.; Wartho, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    A common feature of continental collision zones is the entrainment of ophiolitic and subduction complex rock units. The crystallization and metamorphic ages of these units provide important constraints on both subduction zone evolution and the maximum age of ophiolite obduction. Ophiolites and subduction complexes have been well described in the Yarlung Tsangpo suture zone (YTSZ), but thus far relatively few high-pressure, low-temperature metamorphic assemblages from within the suture zone have been documented and successfully dated. Here we present structural, petrologic, and chronologic data from a recently discovered subduction complex occurrence of high-pressure (blueschist facies) rocks along the YTSZ in south central Tibet (29.31º N, 86.68º E). Mapping of the complex based on ASTER satellite image analysis as well as field work enabled the identification of four major lithostratigaphic units; from structurally highest to lowest, they are: 1) forarc affinity Chengdoi sandstones 2) a variably serpentinized ophiolitic fragment; 3) a structural mélange of blueschist-facies metabasic and metaclastic rocks; and 4) sandstones containing serpentinite and rutile detritus. The second and third of these tectonostratigraphic units are separated by thrust faults, whereas the Chengdoi sandstones unconformably overlie the ophiolitic fragment. We interpret the thrust separating the blueschists from the ophiolites as a paleo-subduction zone that dips northward when the entire section is rotated to restore the Chengdoi formation to horizontal. The subduction complex is further disrupted by oblique faults, including some with apparent normal sense offset that may be pre-collisional, intraoceanic normal faults. U/Pb zircon dating of the blueschist facies metavlocanic rocks implies a ca. 111 Ma protolith age, while a ca. 65 Ma 40Ar/39Ar amphibole date from one blueschist sample is interpreted as representing a close approximation of the timing of high-pressure metamorphism

  17. Magmatism and Eurekan deformation in the High Arctic Large Igneous Province: Age and geological constraints from North Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegner, C.; Storey, M.; Holm, P. M.; Thorarinsson, S. B.; Zhao, X.; Tappe, S.; Heaman, L.; Knudsen, M. F.

    2013-12-01

    Age, compositional and geological data show the High Arctic Large Igneous Province is unusual on two counts: first, magmatism was prolonged and include an initial tholeiitic phase (130-80 Ma) and a second alkaline phase (85-60 Ma); second, it was subsequently deformed during the Eurekan orogeny. New 40Ar-39Ar and U-Pb dating provides emplacement ages of 71-68 Ma for most of the Kap Washington alkaline volcanics of North Greenland, but with activity continuing down to 61 Ma. A thermal resetting age of 49-47 Ma is also identified in 40Ar-39Ar whole-rock data for trachyte flows. Patch perthite feldspars and coeval resetting of Rb-Sr isotopes by hydrothermal fluids provide further support for thermal overprinting, interpreted as a result of Eurekan compressional tectonism. The formation of the tholeiitic suite (130-80 Ma) appears to be associated with the opening of the Canada Basin and may have involved mantle plume action. Formation of the alkaline suite (85-60 Ma) is attributed to continental rifting in the Lincoln Sea area linked to seafloor spreading in the Labrador Sea and the Baffin Bay. The alkaline and tholeiitic suites of the High Arctic may therefore be unrelated. It is striking that High Arctic volcanism terminates at about the same time (c. 60 Ma) as magmatism in the North Atlantic Large Igneous Province begins. We suggest this is a corollary of a change from extensional to compressional tectonism in the High Arctic. In the period when Greenland moved together with Eurasia (>60 Ma), the separation from North America resulted in rift-related alkaline magmatism in the High Arctic. When Greenland subsequently moved as a separate plate (60-35 Ma), overlapping spreading on both sides pushed it northwards and volcanism in the High Arctic stopped due to compression. Evaluation of plate kinematic models shows that the relative northwards movement of Greenland culminated in the Eocene, coinciding with thermal resetting. We conclude that compression in North

  18. Zircon U-Pb age constraints from Iran on the magmatic evolution related to Neotethyan subduction and Zagros orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Han-Yi; Chung, Sun-Lin; Zarrinkoub, Mohammad Hossein; Mohammadi, Seyyed Saeid; Khatib, Mohammad Mahdi; Iizuka, Yoshiyuki

    2013-03-01

    This study reports zircon LA-ICPMS U-Pb ages of 50 igneous rock samples from the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic arc (UDMA) and Sanandaj-Sirjan structural zone (SSZ) in Iran. These results, together with literatures and our unpublished age data, better delineate the magmatic evolution related to the Neotethyan subduction and subsequent Zagros orogeny that resulted from the Arabia-Eurasia collision. Subduction-related magmatism was active during Jurassic time, as evidenced by the presence of widespread I-type granitoids from the Middle to Late Jurassic (176-144 Ma) in the SSZ. After a protracted magmatic quiescence in the Early Cretaceous, igneous activity renewed inland in the UDMA from which we identify Late Cretaceous granitoids (81-72 Ma) in Jiroft and Bazman areas, the southeastern segment of the UDMA. The UDMA volcanism was most active and widespread during the Eocene and Oligocene (55-25 Ma), much longer lasting than previously thought as just an Eocene pulse. Such a prolonged igneous "flare-up" event in the UDMA can be correlated to Armenia where coeval calc-alkaline rocks are common. The UDMA magmatism ceased progressively from northwest to southeast, with magmatic activities ending the Early Miocene (ca. 22 Ma) in Meghri, the Middle Miocene (ca. 16 Ma) in Kashan and the Late Miocene (ca. 10-6 Ma) in Anar, respectively. The southeastward magmatic cessation is consistent with the notion of oblique and diachronous collision between Arabia and Eurasia. Post-collisional volcanism started ca. 11 Ma in Saray, east off the Urumieh Lake, which, along with later eruptions in Sahand (6.5-4.2 Ma) and Sabalan (≤ 0.4 Ma) volcanoes, forms a compositionally unique component of the vast volcanic field covering much of the Lesser Caucasus, NW Iran and eastern Anatolia regions.

  19. Origin, age, and paleoclimatic setting of the Late Quaternary deposits in Wadi Feiran, Sinai Peninsula: Geomorphologic, geochronologic, and isotopic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, A. Z. A.; Sultan, M.; Forman, S. L.; Krishnamurthy, R. V.

    2015-12-01

    There is considerable debate on the origin, age, and paleoclimatic setting of Late Quaternary deposits within the basement complex of the Sinai Peninsula. Our research in Wadi Feiran focused on documenting the sedimentology, stratigraphy, geochemistry and chronology of Late Quaternary deposits in the Feiran (lat. 28.706 N; long. 33.665; elevation: 715 to 772 m a.m.s.l) and Tarfa (lat. 28.692 N; long. 33.933 E; elevation: 1160 to 1244 m a.m.s.l) oases. Sequence stratigraphy, analysis of remote sensed images, and groundwater levels in these two areas indicate that the investigated deposits are structurally-controlled as they are found in areas with anomalously elevated groundwater levels and upstream from shear zone/wadi intersections. Sediments are largely arenaceous upstream and transition downstream to marly successions. We infer that these sediments were not deposited in lake settings because of the absence of shorelines and associated littoral, sublittoral and deeper water facies, and the presence of rhizoliths, secondary calcite veins and gastropods, all of which suggest deposition in a spring or wetland environment. A short hydrologic residence time and/or deposition in an open water system is supported by the lack of correlation (R = 0.08) between δ18O and δ13C values in carbonate deposits. Our findings are consistent with deposition of sediments by alluvial, fluvial and paludal processes under variable hydrologic conditions and higher water table conditions. Quartz extracts from these sediments yielded optically stimulated luminescence ages between ca. 27 and 11 ka and place these wetter conditions during the last glacial period and extend the "greening" of North Africa further eastward. Our findings are consistent with models which identify the wet periods in the Late Quaternary in the Sinai Peninsula and in North Africa as being glacial periods.

  20. A developmental study of latent absolute pitch memory.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Müllensiefen, Daniel; Stewart, Lauren

    2017-03-01

    The ability to recall the absolute pitch level of familiar music (latent absolute pitch memory) is widespread in adults, in contrast to the rare ability to label single pitches without a reference tone (overt absolute pitch memory). The present research investigated the developmental profile of latent absolute pitch (AP) memory and explored individual differences related to this ability. In two experiments, 288 children from 4 to12 years of age performed significantly above chance at recognizing the absolute pitch level of familiar melodies. No age-related improvement or decline, nor effects of musical training, gender, or familiarity with the stimuli were found in regard to latent AP task performance. These findings suggest that latent AP memory is a stable ability that is developed from as early as age 4 and persists into adulthood.

  1. Mn-Cr ages and formation conditions of fayalite in CV3 carbonaceous chondrites: Constraints on the accretion ages of chondritic asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jogo, Kaori; Nakamura, Tomoki; Ito, Motoo; Wakita, Shigeru; Zolotov, Mikhail Yu.; Messenger, Scott R.

    2017-02-01

    Chondritic planetesimals are among the first planetary bodies that accreted inside and outside water snow line in the protoplanetary disk. CV3 carbonaceous chondrite parent body accreted relatively small amount of water ice, probably near the snow line, and experienced water-assisted metasomatic alteration that resulted in formation of diverse secondary minerals, including fayalite (Fa80-100). Chemical compositions of the CV3 fayalite and its Mn-Cr isotope systematics indicate that it formed at different temperature (10-300 °C) and fluid pressure (3-300 bars) but within a relatively short period of time. Thermal modeling of the CV3 parent body suggests that it accreted ∼3.2-3.3 Ma after CV3 CAIs formation and had a radius of >110-150 km. The inferred formation age of the CV3 parent body is similar to that of the CM2 chondrite parent body that probably accreted beyond the snow line, but appears to have postdated accretion of the CO and ordinary chondrite parent bodies that most likely formed inside the snow line. The inferred differences in the accretion ages of chondrite parent bodies that formed inside and outside snow line are consistent with planetesimal formation by gravitational/streaming instability.

  2. Multi-stage uplift of the Rocky Mountains: new age constraints on the Telluride Conglomerate and regional compilation of apatite fission track ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, M. S.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Gonzales, D. A.; Pecha, M.; McKeon, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Telluride Conglomerate, exposed on the western flanks of Oligocene caldera complexes of the San Juan Mountains of Colorado, has historically been considered an Eocene alluvial deposit overlying the "Rocky Mountain erosion surface" and pre-dating Oligocene volcanism. Measured sections show that the Telluride preserves an unroofing sequence with basal units dominated by Paleozoic sedimentary clasts transitioning into upper units dominated by locally derived Proterozoic basement mixed with previously unrecognized andesitic Oligocene volcanics. Paleoflow directions and thicknesses of the preserved unit indicate the Telluride Conglomerate was deposited by a large, high-energy WNW- flowing braided river system. Detrital zircon analysis indicates minimum ages for individual grains within the Telluride Conglomerate of 28.0 to 31.5 Ma. This, plus the entrained volcanic clasts, redefines the unit as being of Oligocene age and indicates that conglomeratic deposition overlapped with regional San Juan volcanism and just predated major caldera eruptions at 28.4 Ma (San Juan and Uncompahgre) and 27.6 Ma (Silverton). We interpret the deposition of the Telluride Conglomerate to be the depositional response to regional uplift and erosion related to early stages of San Juan magmatism. These units have undergone significant post-depositional tectonism: the Telluride Conglomerate is found at ~9,000ft elevation near Telluride, CO, but is at ~13,000' at its westernmost exposure at Mt. Wilson. We attribute this differential uplift to be associated with faulting, pluton emplacement, and additional mantle driven uplift associated with the emplacement and cooling of the Wilson Stock in the last 20-22 Ma as documented by Miocene cooling seen in apatite helium (AHe) ages. This cooling fits into our regional compilation of published apatite fission track (AFT) and AHe data showing temporally and spatially partitioned Cenozoic cooling indicative of multistage uplift of the Rocky Mountain

  3. U-Pb geochronology on detrital zircons from FAR-DEEP cores, Fennoscandian Shield - age constraints for events of the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic transition and provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, C.; Martin, A.; Bahlburg, H.; Lepland, A.; Melezhik, V.; Prave, A. R.; Condon, D. J.; Berndt, J.; Kooijman, E.; Far-Deep Scientists

    2010-12-01

    The Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic transition is marked by several environmental events that were important for the evolution of the Earth system and occurred coeval with plate tectonic reorganisations including the break-up of the supercontinent Kenorland. We applied U-Pb-geochronology on detrital zircons by LA-ICP-MS and ID-TIMS to improve age constraints of these events, recorded in the 2.5-2.0 Ga rock successions of the Fennoscandian Shield and including the Huronian glaciation and the Lomagundi-Jatuli positive excursion of δ13C in sedimentary carbonates. The detrital zircons provided ages ranging from 3.5 to 1.9 Ga with dominant age populations in the range of 2.9-2.5 Ga for most samples. Youngest zircon ages from the Seidorechka Sedimentary and Polisarka formations in the Imandra-Varzuga Greenstone Belt and the Neverskrukk Formation in the Pechenga Greenstone Belt constrain, for the first time, the deposition of glacial diamictites on the Fennoscandian Shield to between 2.43 and 2.2 Ga. Similar ages have been reported for glacial deposits in Canada and South Africa, consistent with a global glaciation at that time. The youngest detrital zircon ages derived from the Kuetsjärvi Sedimentary Fm, containing isotopically heavy carbonates, and from the overlying Kolasjoki Sedimentary Fm in the Pechenga Greenstone Belt indicate that deposition of carbonates corresponding to the Lomagundi-Jatuli δ13C excursion took place between 2.3 Ga and 2.06 Ga, in agreement with previous ages from these formations. Detrital zircon populations of c. 2.06 Ga and c. 1.92 Ga characterise the lower and upper parts of the Kolasjoki Sedimentary Fm, respectively. These units are separated by an unconformity of unknown duration, but the age distributions may indicate a significant hiatus because these are considerably younger than the 2.0-1.97 Ga ages reported from the overlying Pilgujärvi Sedimentary and Volcanic fms. Alternatively, the younger cluster of ages may record deformation

  4. U-Pb ages on single detrital zircon grains from the Witwatersrand Basin, South Africa: Constraints on the age of sedimentation and on the evolution of granites adjacent to the basin

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, L.J. ); Davis, D.W.; Kamo, S.L. )

    1990-05-01

    U-Pb ages of single detrital zircon grains from various stratigraphic horizons in the Dominion and Witwatersrand sequences provide constraints on the maximum age of sedimentation as well as indicating the pattern of age distribution in the (granitoid) source area providing detritus into the basin. Zircon ages in the Dominion sediments range from 3,191-3,105 Ma with a geometric mean ({bar X}) t 3,153 Ma. Those from the lower Witwatersrand sediments (West Rand Group) range from 3,305-3,044 Ma with {bar X} = 3,097 Ma, and zircons in the upper Witwatersrand sediments (Central Rand Group) are between 3,207-2,894 Ma old with {bar X} = 3,053 Ma. Ages of detrital zircons generally decrease upward in the stratigraphic record, and <3,000 Ma old zircons are only found in the Central Rand Group. This trend implies that younger granites may have formed at some time subsequent to lower Witwatersrand deposition, or that continued erosion of the hinterland resulted in the unroofing of successively younger granites. The wide spread of zircon ages (411 Ma) evident in the data set indicates that granites formed virtually continuously between circa 3,300-2.900 Ma in the Witwatersrand source area. Of the zircon ages 45% fall within 30 m.y. of the geometric mean of the total data set, suggesting that a major crust-forming event occurred at 3,073 {plus minus} 30 Ma. Granitoids in the source area can be divided into (i) pre-Dominion basement; (ii) Dominion granites, whose emplacement coincided with the extrusion of Dominion volcanics, and (iii) Randian granites, which were emplaced synchronously with Witwatersrand deposition. This sequence of events supports recent tectonic models that view the Witwatersrand sequence as having been deposited in a foreland basin.

  5. 31+/-17 ka 40Ar/39Ar Plateau Age on the Very Low-Potassium Hat Creek Basalt Fits Stratigraphic and Geochronologic Constraints of Contiguous Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clynne, M. A.; Turrin, B. D.; Champion, D. E.; Muffler, L. P.

    2003-12-01

    The Hat Creek Basalt is a late Pleistocene low-K olivine tholeiite that floors much of the Hat Creek Valley, north of the Lassen volcanic highland in NE California. The flow erupted from a fissure trending N 10° W located 0.5 to 4.0 km SSE of Old Station and flowed north nearly 30 km, mainly through lava tubes. Paleomagnetic data indicate that the Hat Creek Basalt is a single eruptive unit with an inclination of 64.3° and a declination of 1.0° . The Hat Creek Basalt is overlain by gravel related to the last major glaciation, which ended about 15 to 17 ky ago. The Hat Creek Basalt overlies numerous andesite and basaltic andesite lava flows that are closely related geographically, stratigraphically, petrographically and geochemically and probably represent the same eruptive episode (although not necessarily the same year or century). Three of these flows have been dated by the 40Ar/39Ar method and yield concordant plateau, integrated (total fusion), and isochron ages: Little Potato Butte (1.42% K2O; 67+/-4 ka), Sugarloaf (1.85% K2O; 55+/-7 ka), and Big Potato Butte (1.62% K2O; 73+/-14 ka). The Hat Creek Basalt also overlies the basaltic andesite of Cinder Butte (1.65% K2O) with a 40Ar/39Ar plateau age of 38+/-7 ka. Given that the age of the Hat Creek Basalt is thus firmly bracketed between ˜15 ka and 38+/-7 ka, we attempted to date this low-potassium tholeiitic basalt directly. One sample produced 40Ar/39Ar data that cannot be interpreted, but a second sample (0.17% K2O) yielded concordant plateau, integrated (total fusion), and isochron ages of 31+/-17 ka, 30+/-20 ka, and 24+/-6 ka; within the time bracket determined by stratigraphic relations. These data indicate that samples of latest Pleistocene tholeiitic basalt with very low K2O can give useful 40Ar/39Ar ages. As with all isotopically determined ages, the confidence of the results are significantly enhanced when additional constraints imposed by other isotopic ages within a stratigraphic context are taken

  6. New constraints on the age and evolution of the Wishbone Ridge, southwest Pacific Cretaceous microplates, and Zealandia West Antarctica breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortimer, N.; Hoernle, K.; Hauff, F.; Palin, J. M.; Dunlap, W. J.; Werner, R.; Faure, K.

    2006-03-01

    We present analytical results from four dredge locations across the eastern Zealandia continental margin and adjacent ocean crust. The 115 Ma dacites dredged from the West Wishbone Ridge (WWR) are isotopically primitive, weakly adakitic, slab-derived lavas. The 97 Ma A-type granites and a basalt from the easternmost Chatham Rise enlarge the known area of postsubduction Gondwana magmatism. Amphibolite-grade schists from a fault block south of the Chatham Rise provide a critical bridge between the Zealandia and West Antarctica belts of Jurassic Cretaceous accretionary prism rocks. The new recognition of the WWR as a remnant of a 115 Ma intraoceanic subduction system means that previous hypotheses of the WWR as a fracture zone or spreading ridge require modification. The dacite ages constrain the start of Osbourn Trough spreading, which caused breakup of the Hikurangi-Manihiki igneous plateau, to before 115 Ma. We speculate that, after 115 Ma, the WWR was rifted by an intraoceanic spreading center that developed along its southeast side. Impingement of this spreading center against the Gondwana margin led to widespread 95 100 Ma postsubduction magmatism, variable lithospheric stretching, and ultimately continental splitting of Zealandia and West Antarctica across basement trends.

  7. Neodymium and strontium isotopic study of Australasian tektites - New constraints on the provenance and age of target materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, Joel D.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Koeberl, C.

    1992-01-01

    The Nd and Sr isotopic compositions of Australasian tectites (including two flanged Australian tectites, two low-SiO2 Muong Nong-type tectites, and three high-SiO2 Muong Nong-type tectites) and the Nd, Sm, Sr, and Rb concentrations were investigated by isotope-dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry, and the Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotope systematics were used to study the characteristics of the parental material. It is shown that the Nd and Sr isotopic data provide evidence that all Australasian tektites were derived from a single sedimentary formation with a narrow range of stratigraphic ages close to 170 Ma. It is suggested that all of the Australasian tektites were derived from a single impact event and that the australites represent the upper part of a melt sheet ejected at high velocity, whereas the indochinites represent melts formed at a lower level in the target material distributed closer to the area of the impact.

  8. ~100 Ma Lu-Hf eclogite ages from Koralpe and Saualpe (Austroalpine nappes, Austria): New constraints for the kinematics of Eoalpine subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miladinova, Irena; Froitzheim, Nikolaus; Nagel, Thorsten; Janák, Marian; Münker, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    The Koralpe and Saualpe complexes are part of the Austroalpine basement nappe system. They represent the largest region in the Eastern Alps exposing high-pressure metamorphic rocks from the Cretaceous Eoalpine orogenic event and also contain the type locality for eclogite. The grade of the Cretaceous metamorphism in the Eastern Alps increases to the southeast, with maximum pressures and temperatures reaching up to 3.5 GPa and 850 °C in the Pohorje Mountains (Janak et al., 2015). The estimated P-T-conditions for the eclogites from Saualpe and Koralpe are 2-2.2 GPa and 600-740 °C (Miller & Thöni 1997, Thöni et al. 2008). Here we present a new Lu-Hf isotopic study of the eclogites from the Hohl locality in the southern Koralpe, and from the Grünburgerbach and Wolfsberger Hütte localities in the southern Saualpe. Two-point isochrones from samples of Hohl and Wolfsberger Hütte based on one whole rock and one garnet separate yield ages of 99.2 ± 1.1 Ma and 101.7 ± 2 Ma, respectively. Two eclogite samples from Grünburgerbach give garnet-omphacite-whole rock ages of 100.3 ± 1 Ma and 101.79 ± 0.92 Ma, identical within error. The garnets in the eclogite from Hohl display a homogenous composition with no zoning of major elements, whereas the garnets of the samples from Grünburgerbach show an enrichment of Mn in the cores and lower contents towards the rims, which indicates prograde garnet growth during increasing P and T. The ages are therefore related to burial during subduction. These new Lu-Hf garnet ages are slightly older than the Lu-Hf garnet age data from Pohorje (~95 Ma; Sandmann et al. 2011, Thöni et al. 2008), which also date burial. If Koralpe/Saualpe and Pohorje would belong to one continuous crustal unit subducted and exhumed "en bloc" in a southeast-dipping subduction zone, the opposite age difference would be expected. Our results show that this is not the case and represent important constraints for a more realistic kinematic model. Janak, M

  9. Identification of possible recent water/lava source fissures in the Cerberus Plains: stratigraphic and crater count age constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Rebecca J.

    2013-04-01

    The Cerberus plains are one of the youngest surfaces on Mars. They are thought to have been formed by lava and/or water flows, but there is considerable debate regarding the source of this material. Much of the material forming the western plains, including the Athabasca Valles outflow channels, appears to have flowed from the region of the Cerberus Fossae graben system [1,2,3] and limited areas forming the eastern plains may have been erupted by low shield volcanoes [4,5]. However, flow of material from west to east is obstructed by a ridge centred on 157°E, 7°N and, prior to this study, vents which might be the source of fluid of a low enough viscosity to form the majority of the flat eastern plains had not been identified. We studied new HiRISE (25cm/px, High Resolution Science Imaging Experiment) images of the ridge between the east and west plains and observed possible source vents for this material: the ridge is cut by a series of pits and fissures which lie at the heads of flows and channels extending towards the surrounding plains. In order to establish the stratigraphic relationships between the vents and plains, this study produced large scale geomorphological maps based on the HiRISE images. The mapping showed that both incised channels and leveed flows extend onto the plain to the south of the ridge and that these were the final phase of plains-forming activity in that region. Conversely, to the north, ridge-sourced deposits only form the plains surface close to the ridge - beyond that, they are overlain by large-scale regional flows that appear to have originated from the direction of Athabasca Valles. In the southeast, a large-scale flow which does not emanate from this ridge forms the plains surface, but there is evidence that the youngest outflow activity from the ridge was contemporaneous with emplacement of this unit. We also performed crater counts to age-date the surfaces and these indicate that plains-forming and ridge-sourced units are of a

  10. Constrained Least Absolute Deviation Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhishun; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that least absolute deviation (LAD) criterion or L1-norm used for estimation of parameters is characterized by robustness, i.e., the estimated parameters are totally resistant (insensitive) to large changes in the sampled data. This is an extremely useful feature, especially, when the sampled data are known to be contaminated by occasionally occurring outliers or by spiky noise. In our previous works, we have proposed the least absolute deviation neural network (LADNN) to solve unconstrained LAD problems. The theoretical proofs and numerical simulations have shown that the LADNN is Lyapunov-stable and it can globally converge to the exact solution to a given unconstrained LAD problem. We have also demonstrated its excellent application value in time-delay estimation. More generally, a practical LAD application problem may contain some linear constraints, such as a set of equalities and/or inequalities, which is called constrained LAD problem, whereas the unconstrained LAD can be considered as a special form of the constrained LAD. In this paper, we present a new neural network called constrained least absolute deviation neural network (CLADNN) to solve general constrained LAD problems. Theoretical proofs and numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed CLADNN is Lyapunov stable and globally converges to the exact solution to a given constrained LAD problem, independent of initial values. The numerical simulations have also illustrated that the proposed CLADNN can be used to robustly estimate parameters for nonlinear curve fitting, which is extensively used in signal and image processing. PMID:18269958

  11. Constraints on the timing of Co-Cu ± Au mineralization in the Blackbird district, Idaho, using SHRIMP U-Pb ages of monazite and xenotime plus zircon ages of related Mesoproterozoic orthogneisses and metasedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, John N.; Slack, John F.; Lund, Karen; Evans, Karl V.; Fanning, C. Mark; Mazdab, Frank K.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Pillers, Renee M.

    2012-01-01

    The Blackbird district, east-central Idaho, contains the largest known Co reserves in the United States. The origin of strata-hosted Co-Cu ± Au mineralization at Blackbird has been a matter of controversy for decades. In order to differentiate among possible genetic models for the deposits, including various combinations of volcanic, sedimentary, magmatic, and metamorphic processes, we used U-Pb geochronology of xenotime, monazite, and zircon to establish time constraints for ore formation. New age data reported here were obtained using sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) microanalysis of (1) detrital zircons from a sample of Mesoproterozoic siliciclastic metasedimentary country rock in the Blackbird district, (2) igneous zircons from Mesoproterozoic intrusions, and (3) xenotime and monazite from the Merle and Sunshine prospects at Blackbird. Detrital zircon from metasandstone of the biotite phyllite-schist unit has ages mostly in the range of 1900 to 1600 Ma, plus a few Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic grains. Age data for the six youngest grains form a coherent group at 1409 ± 10 Ma, regarded as the maximum age of deposition of metasedimentary country rocks of the central structural domain. Igneous zircons from nine samples of megacrystic granite, granite augen gneiss, and granodiorite augen gneiss that crop out north and east of the Blackbird district yield ages between 1383 ± 4 and 1359 ± 7 Ma. Emplacement of the Big Deer Creek megacrystic granite (1377 ± 4 Ma), structurally juxtaposed with host rocks in the Late Cretaceous ca. 5 km north of Blackbird, may have been involved in initial deposition of rare earth elements (REE) minerals and, possibly, sulfides. In situ SHRIMP ages of xenotime and monazite in Co-rich samples from the Merle and Sunshine prospects, plus backscattered electron imagery and SHRIMP analyses of trace elements, indicate a complex sequence of Mesoproterozoic and Cretaceous events. On the basis of textural relationships

  12. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency) by removing the source spectrum (moment-rate spectrum) from

  13. Testing Absolute Plate Reference Frames and the Implications for the Generation of Geodynamic Mantle Heterogeneity Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, G. E.; Bunge, H.; Schuberth, B. S.; Müller, D.; Talsma, A.; Moder, C.

    2010-12-01

    Several absolute reference frames for Cretaceous-Tertiary plate tectonic reconstructions have been proposed over the last decade. They include reference frames based on hotspot tracks displaying age progression, and assuming either fixed or moving hotspots, as well as palaeomagnetically-based reference frames, a subduction reference frame and hybrid reference frames. All these alternative reference frames imply a particular history of the location of subduction zones through time, the associated subduction history, and the evolution of mantle heterogeneity via the mixing of subducted slab material with the mantle. Therefore it is possible to evaluate the observed distribution of subducted slab material in the mantle versus that predicted by a forward geodynamic model in which the plate kinematic history given by a particular absolute plate is coupled with a mantle convection model. We present a comparison of five alternative absolute plate motion models in terms of their consequences for global deep mantle structure by utilizing the 3-D spherical finite element mantle convection code TERRA, coupled with the global plate tectonic reconstruction software GPlates. We impose global palaeo-plate boundaries and plate velocities back to 140 Ma as surface boundary conditions for each absolute rotation model and forward model the associated subduction history. The correlation of seismic tomography with the predicted present-day mantle structure from each of plate models is then assessed using well-imaged slabs. We will present and discuss a comparison of geodynamically predicted mantle heterogeneity and seismic tomography to infer the robustness of each absolute reference frame through time, thus providing additional constraints for the integration of plate tectonics and mantle dynamics.

  14. Independent 40Ar/39Ar and 14C age constraints on the last five glacial terminations from the aggradational successions of the Tiber River, Rome (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, F.; Rohling, E. J.; Florindo, F.; Jicha, B.; Nomade, S.; Pereira, A.; Renne, P. R.

    2016-09-01

    We use 13 new 40Ar/39Ar and 4 new 14C datings of volcanic deposits and organic material found within near-coastal aggradational successions deposited by the Tiber River near Rome, Italy, to integrate a larger dataset previously achieved in order to offer independent age constraints to the sea-level fluctuations associated with Late Quaternary glacial cycles during the last 450 ka. Results are compared with the chronologically independently constrained Red Sea relative sea-level curve, and with the astronomically tuned deep-sea benthic δ18O record. We find good agreements for the timings of change, and in several cases for both the amplitudes and timings of change during glacial terminations T-1, T-2, T-3, and T-5. There is one striking exception, namely for glacial termination T-4 that led into interglacial Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 9. T-4 in our results is dated a full 18 ka earlier than in the Red Sea and deep-sea benthic δ18O records (which are in good agreement with each other in spite of their independent chronological constraints). The observed discrepancy is beyond the scale of the combined age uncertainties. One possible explanation is that the documented aggradation represents an early phase, triggered by a smaller event in the sea-level record, but the thickness of the aggradational sediment sequence then suggests that the amplitude of this earlier sea-level rise is underestimated in the Red Sea and benthic δ18O records. Also, this would imply that the aggradational succession of the main T-4 deglaciation has not yet been located in the study region, which is hard to reconcile with our extensive fieldwork and borehole coverage, unless unlikely non-deposition or complete erosion. Resolving this discrepancy will improve understanding of the timing of deglaciations relative to the orbitally modulated insolation forcing of climate and will require further focused research, both into the nature and chronology of the Tiber sequences of this period, and into

  15. Metamorphic and age constraints on tectono-thermal reworking in the western H.U. Sverdrupfjella: A new crustal evolution model for Western Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosch, Eugene; Frimmel, Hartwig; Abu-Alam, Tamer; Košler, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Western Dronning Maud Land (WDML) of East Antarctica is argued to consist of two major crustal domains, namely the low-grade Archaean Kalahari-Grunehogna Craton and the high-grade Maud belt (e.g. Grantham et al., 1995; Jacobs et al. 2008). The geodynamic and tectono-thermal crustal evolution histories of these two proposed domains remain a debated topic in Rodinia and Gondwana reconstructions. In this study we conducted a petrological and metamorphic comparison of Mesoproterozoic metabasic rocks on the eastern margin of the Archaean Grunehogna Craton and the adjacent westernmost Maud Belt, across a major structural discontinuity known as the Pencksökket-Jutulstraumen Discontinuity (PJD). As such we evaluate to what extent the two domains of WDML represent independent crustal growth and metamorphic histories. Metamorphic constraints on low-grade rocks on the eastern Grunehogna craton record greenschist facies conditions of T = 340 ± 25oC and P = 2.9 ± 0.8 kbar. The high-grade PT-constraint of T =700 ± 30oC and P = 9.0 ± 2 kbar for the western extreme of the Maud Belt, derived from garnet-hornblende-plagioclase-quartz geothermobarometry and phase diagram modeling in PERPLEX, is very similar to that reported for the eastern Maud Belt and thus, does not support the concept of a westward decreasing metamorphic field gradient within the Maud Belt as previously proposed. Laser-ablation-ICP-MS U-Pb dating of titanite in a hornblende-plagioclase-quartz symplectite (after garnet breakdown), yielded a Pan-African age for high-grade metamorphism in the westernmost Maud belt, which overlaps with the age of tectonic decompression in the eastern Maud Belt. The new U-Pb age data argues against previous models that invoke only late-Mesoproterozoic high-grade metamorphism in the western Maud Belt. The new petrological data indicate that the inferred sub-glacial boundary (PJD) between the Grunehogna Craton and the Maud Belt, represents a major metamorphic hiatus as a Pan

  16. 40Ar 39Ar age constraints on neogene sedimentary beds, Upper Ramparts, half-way Pillar and Canyon village sites, Porcupine river, east-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunk, M.J.; Rieck, H.; Fouch, T.D.; Carter, L.D.

    1994-01-01

    40Ar 39Ar ages of volcanic rocks are used to provide numerical constraints on the age of middle and upper Miocene sedimentary strata collected along the Porcupine River. Intercalated sedimentary rocks north of latitude 67??10???N in the Porcupine terrane of east-central Alaska contain a rich record of plant fossils. The fossils are valuable indicators of this interior region's paleoclimate during the time of their deposition. Integration of the 40Ar 39Ar results with paleomagnetic and sedimentological data allows for refinements in estimating the timing of deposition and duration of selected sedimentary intervals. 40Ar 39Ar plateau age spectra, from whole rock basalt samples, collected along the Upper Ramparts and near Half-way Pillar on the Porcupine River, range from 15.7 ?? 0.1 Ma at site 90-6 to 14.4 ?? 0.1 Ma at site 90-2. With exception of the youngest basalt flow at site 90-2, all of the samples are of reversed magnetic polarity, and all 40Ar 39Ar age spectrum results are consistent with the deposition of the entire stratigraphic section during a single interval of reversed magnetic polarity. The youngest flow at site 90-2 was emplaced during an interval of normal polarity. With age, paleomagnetic and sedimentological data, the ages of the Middle Miocene sedimentary rocks between the basalt flows at sites 90-1 and 90-2 can be assigned to an interval within the limits of analytical precision of 15.2 ?? 0.1 Ma; thus, the sediments were deposited during the peak of the Middle Miocene thermal maximum. Sediments in the upper parts of sites 90-1 and 90-2 were probably deposited during cooling from the Middle Miocene thermal maximum. 40Ar 39Ar results of plagioclase and biotite from a single tephra, collected at sites 90-7 and 90-8 along the Canyon Village section of the Porcupine River, indicate an age of 6.57 ?? 0.02 Ma for its time of eruption and deposition. These results, together with sedimentological and paleomagnetic data, suggest that all of the Upper

  17. New constraints on the age and depositional rates of initial flysch sedimentation in the Stanley Group, Ouachita Mountains, Oklahoma and Arkansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaulis, B. J.; Lapen, T. J.; Casey, J. F.; Reid, D.

    2011-12-01

    The transition from a 'starved basin' to classic orogenic flysch deposition of Paleozoic strata in the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma and Arkansas and the absolute timing of mountain building events associated with the Ouachita Orogeny have long been unresolved problems in the region. The Mississippian Stanley Group is an important sedimentary unit within the Paleozoic strata because, unlike the other Paleozoic units in the Ouachita Mountains, the Stanley Group contains several dateable tuffaceous units. LA-ICPMS analyses of zircons from 5 tuffaceous units show progressively younger weighted average ages: Beaver's Bend Tuff (328.3±2.9 Ma), Hatton Tuff (327.5±3.8 Ma), lower Mud Creek Tuff (321.9±2.0 Ma), upper Mud Creek Tuff (326±3.2Ma) and Chickasaw Creek Tuff (320.6±2.7Ma). The exception is the upper Mud Creek Tuff (326 Ma), which has a more significant detrital component when compared to the other tuffaceous units. The ages of the Beaver's Bend, Hatton, lower and upper Mud Creek tuffs agree with previously reported biostratigraphic data found in the lower 500m of the Stanley Group (Ethington, 1989), which suggest an early Mississippian age for its lower boundary. The top 250 meters contain the Chickasaw Creek tuff (320.6±2.7 Ma) which indicates a late Mississippian age for the top of the Stanley Group. The transition from a 'starved basin' is marked by a sudden increase in clastic detritus entering the Ouachita Trough. A regional hiatus (Noble, 1993) is known to exist at the boundary between the base of the Stanley Group and the upper Devonian Arkansas Novaculite. The tuff ages, coupled with the biostratigraphic data, indicate that sedimentation rates were low (<20m/Ma) through the deposition of the Beaver's Bend tuff (328.3±2.9 Ma), after which sedimentation rates increased to >2500m/Ma by the time the Chickasaw Creek tuff (320.6±2.7Ma) was deposited. The sedimentation rates remain high (~900m/Ma) through the deposition of the stratigraphically higher

  18. Absolute Stability Analysis of a Phase Plane Controlled Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Jiann-Woei; Plummer, Michael; Bedrossian, Nazareth; Hall, Charles; Jackson, Mark; Spanos, Pol

    2010-01-01

    Many aerospace attitude control systems utilize phase plane control schemes that include nonlinear elements such as dead zone and ideal relay. To evaluate phase plane control robustness, stability margin prediction methods must be developed. Absolute stability is extended to predict stability margins and to define an abort condition. A constrained optimization approach is also used to design flex filters for roll control. The design goal is to optimize vehicle tracking performance while maintaining adequate stability margins. Absolute stability is shown to provide satisfactory stability constraints for the optimization.

  19. Absolute nonlocality via distributed computing without communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekaj, Ł.; Pawłowski, M.; Vértesi, T.; Grudka, A.; Horodecki, M.; Horodecki, R.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the role that quantum entanglement plays as a resource in various information processing tasks is one of the crucial goals of quantum information theory. Here we propose an alternative perspective for studying quantum entanglement: distributed computation of functions without communication between nodes. To formalize this approach, we propose identity games. Surprisingly, despite no signaling, we obtain that nonlocal quantum strategies beat classical ones in terms of winning probability for identity games originating from certain bipartite and multipartite functions. Moreover we show that, for a majority of functions, access to general nonsignaling resources boosts success probability two times in comparison to classical ones for a number of large enough outputs. Because there are no constraints on the inputs and no processing of the outputs in the identity games, they detect very strong types of correlations: absolute nonlocality.

  20. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  1. Significance of the whole rock Re-Os ages in cryptically and modally metasomatised cratonic peridotites: Constraints from HSE-Se-Te systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luguet, Ambre; Behrens, Melanie; Pearson, D. Graham; König, Stephan; Herwartz, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    the 187Os/188Os signatures, indicating TRD eruption ages identical with those of the SP. By contrast, the PP and GP, which suffered significant BMS ± PGM addition, have 187Os/188Os considerably shifted toward more radiogenic values. As a result, unrealistically young TRD eruption ages are obtained that cannot be used to constrain the time frame of the stabilisation of the cratonic roots and the mechanisms of craton formation. The Se-Te and incompatible HSE (i.e., Pt, Pd) are powerful geochemical tools to assess the robustness of the Re-Os isotopic system in mantle peridotites. Specifically, Se/Te and Pd/Ir ratios provide complementary insights into the complex metasomatic history of mantle peridotites. The Se/Te ratio is very sensitive to Os-free PGM metasomatism producing highly variable Se/Te >15 at low, relatively constant Pd/Ir< 0.4 but does not affect the 187Os/188Os systematics. This contrasts with BMS metasomatism, where Pd/Ir becomes more variable (>0.4), at constant but low Se/Te <10 and which is accompanied by modification of the Os isotopic composition of the host peridotite. As they are sensitive indicators of BMS ± PGM metasomatism, HSE, Se and Te should be systematically considered when investigating the timing of stabilisation of lithospheric mantle and its petrogenetic history. This would allow a more robust assessment of the Re-Os ages obtained and provide firmer constraints on the evolution and formation of Archean cratons and early Earth dynamics.

  2. Database applicaton for absolute spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, Valery V.; Shumko, Sergiy

    2002-12-01

    32-bit database application with multidocument interface for Windows has been developed to calculate absolute energy distributions of observed spectra. The original database contains wavelength calibrated observed spectra which had been already passed through apparatus reductions such as flatfielding, background and apparatus noise subtracting. Absolute energy distributions of observed spectra are defined in unique scale by means of registering them simultaneously with artificial intensity standard. Observations of sequence of spectrophotometric standards are used to define absolute energy of the artificial standard. Observations of spectrophotometric standards are used to define optical extinction in selected moments. FFT algorithm implemented in the application allows performing convolution (deconvolution) spectra with user-defined PSF. The object-oriented interface has been created using facilities of C++ libraries. Client/server model with Windows Socket functionality based on TCP/IP protocol is used to develop the application. It supports Dynamic Data Exchange conversation in server mode and uses Microsoft Exchange communication facilities.

  3. Absolute classification with unsupervised clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An absolute classification algorithm is proposed in which the class definition through training samples or otherwise is required only for a particular class of interest. The absolute classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering when one cluster is known initially. The definitions and statistics of the other classes are automatically developed through the weighted unsupervised clustering procedure, which is developed to keep the cluster corresponding to the class of interest from losing its identity as the class of interest. Once all the classes are developed, a conventional relative classifier such as the maximum-likelihood classifier is used in the classification.

  4. Age constraints on Jerritt Canyon and other Carlin-type gold deposits in the western United States-relationship to mid-Tertiary extension and magmatism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hofstra, A.H.; Snee, L.W.; Rye, R.O.; Folger, H.W.; Phinisey, J.D.; Loranger, R.J.; Dahl, A.R.; Naeser, C.W.; Stein, H.J.; Lewchuk, M.

    1999-01-01

    Carlin-type gold deposits are difficult to date and a wide range of ages has been reported for individual deposits. Therefore, several methods were employed to constrain the age of the gold deposits in the Jerritt Canyon district. Dated igneous rocks with well-documented crosscutting relationships to ore provided the most reliable constraints. K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dates on igneous rocks are as follows: andesite dikes 324 Ma, sericitic alteration in andesite dikes 118 Ma, basalt dikes 40.8 Ma, quartz monzonite dikes 39.2 Ma, and calc-alkaline ignimbrites 43.1 to 40.1 Ma. Of these, only the andesite and basalt dikes are clearly altered and mineralized. The gold deposits are, therefore, younger than the 40.8 Ma basalt dikes. The sericitic alteration in the andesite dikes is unrelated to the gold deposits. A number of dating techniques did not work. K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dates on mica from mineralized Ordovician to Devonian sedimentary rocks gave misleading results. The youngest date of 149 Ma from the smallest <0.1-??m-size fraction shows that the temperature (120??-260??C) and duration (?) of hydrothermal activity was insufficient to reset preexisting fine-grained micas in the host rocks. The temperature and duration was also insufficient to anneal fission tracks in zircon from Ordovician quartzites as they yield Middle Proterozoic dates in both mineralized and barren samples. Apatites were too small for fission track dating. Hydrothermal sulfides have pronounced crustal osmium isotope signatures (187Os/188Os(initial) = 0.9-3.6) but did not yield a meaningful isochron due to very low Re and Os concentrations and large analytical uncertainties. Paleomagnetic dating techniques failed because the hydrothermal fluids sulfidized nearly all of the iron in the host rocks leaving no remnant magnetism. When published isotopic dates from other Carlin-type deposits in Nevada and Utah are subject to the rigorous evaluation developed for the Jerritt Canyon study, most deposits can be

  5. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  6. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  7. Absolute Standards for Climate Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, J.

    2016-10-01

    In a world of changing climate, political uncertainty, and ever-changing budgets, the benefit of measurements traceable to SI standards increases by the day. To truly resolve climate change trends on a decadal time scale, on-orbit measurements need to be referenced to something that is both absolute and unchanging. One such mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to definitively quantify climate change. In the CLARREO mission, we will utilize phase change cells in which a material is melted to calibrate the temperature of a blackbody that can then be observed by a spectrometer. A material's melting point is an unchanging physical constant that, through a series of transfers, can ultimately calibrate a spectrometer on an absolute scale. CLARREO consists of two primary instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer and a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy to calibrate other space-based instrumentation and thus transferring the absolute traceability. The status of various mission options will be presented.

  8. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  9. A New Absolute Plate Motion Model for Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, S. M.; Wessel, P.; Müller, D.; Harada, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The India-Eurasia collision, a change in relative plate motion between Australia and Antarctica, and the coeval ages of the Hawaiian Emperor Bend (HEB) and Louisville Bend of ~Chron 22-21 all provide convincing evidence of a global tectonic plate reorganization at ~50 Ma. Yet if it were a truly global event, then there should be a contemporaneous change in Africa absolute plate motion (APM) reflected by physical evidence somewhere on the Africa plate. This evidence might be visible in the Reunion-Mascarene bend, which exhibits many HEB-like features such as a large angular change close to ~50 Ma. Recently, the Reunion hotpot trail has been interpreted as a continental feature with incidental hotspot volcanism. Here we propose the alternative hypothesis that the northern portion of the chain between Saya de Malha and the Seychelles (Mascarene Plateau) formed as the Reunion hotspot was situated on the Carlsberg Ridge, contemporaneously forming the Chagos-Laccadive Ridge on the India plate. We have created a 4-stage model that explores how a simple APM model fitting the Mascarene Plateau can also satisfy the age progressions and geometry of other hotspot trails on the Africa plate. This type of model could explain the apparent bifurcation of the Tristan hotspot chain, the age reversals seen along the Walvis Ridge and the diffuse nature of the St. Helena chain. To test this hypothesis we have made a new African APM model that goes back to ~80 Ma using a modified version of the Hybrid Polygonal Finite Rotation Method. This method uses seamount chains and their associated hotspots as geometric constraints for the model, and seamount age dates to determine its motion through time. The positions of the hotspots can be moved to get the best fit for the model and to explore the possibility that the ~50 Ma bend in the Reunion-Mascarene chain reflects Africa plate motion. We will examine how well this model can predict the key features reflecting Africa plate motion and

  10. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  11. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  12. Physics of negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  13. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  14. Absolute plate motions since 130 Ma constrained by subduction zone kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Simon; Flament, Nicolas; Dietmar Müller, R.; Butterworth, Nathaniel

    2015-05-01

    The absolute motions of the lithospheric plates relative to the Earth's deep interior are commonly constrained using observations from paleomagnetism and age-progressive seamount trails. In contrast, an absolute plate motion (APM) model linking surface plate motions to subducted slab remnants mapped from seismic tomography has recently been proposed. Absolute plate motion models (or "reference frames") derived using different methodologies, different subsets of hotspots, or differing assumptions of hotspot motion, have contrasting implications for parameters that describe the long term state of the plate-mantle system, such as the balance between advance and retreat of subduction zones, plate velocities, and net lithospheric rotation. Previous studies of contemporary plate motions have used subduction zone kinematics as a constraint on the most likely APM model. Here we use a relative plate motion model to compute these values for the last 130 Myr for a range of alternative reference frames, and quantitatively compare the results. We find that hotspot and tomographic slab-remnant reference frames yield similar results for the last 70 Myr. For the 130-70 Ma period, where hotspot reference frames are less well constrained, these models yield a much more dispersed distribution of slab advance and retreat velocities. By contrast, plate motions calculated using the slab-remnant reference frame, or using a reference frame designed to minimise net rotation, yield more consistent subduction zone kinematics for times older than 70 Ma. Introducing the global optimisation of trench migration characteristics as a key criterion in the construction of APM models forms the foundation of a new method of constraining APMs (and in particular paleolongitude) in deep geological time.

  15. Elevation correction factor for absolute pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, Joseph W.; Sorrells, Mark R.

    1996-01-01

    With the arrival of highly accurate multi-port pressure measurement systems, conditions that previously did not affect overall system accuracy must now be scrutinized closely. Errors caused by elevation differences between pressure sensing elements and model pressure taps can be quantified and corrected. With multi-port pressure measurement systems, the sensing elements are connected to pressure taps that may be many feet away. The measurement system may be at a different elevation than the pressure taps due to laboratory space or test article constraints. This difference produces a pressure gradient that is inversely proportional to height within the interface tube. The pressure at the bottom of the tube will be higher than the pressure at the top due to the weight of the tube's column of air. Tubes with higher pressures will exhibit larger absolute errors due to the higher air density. The above effect is well documented but has generally been taken into account with large elevations only. With error analysis techniques, the loss in accuracy from elevation can be easily quantified. Correction factors can be applied to maintain the high accuracies of new pressure measurement systems.

  16. [Estimation of absolute risk for fracture].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2009-03-01

    Osteoporosis treatment aims to prevent fractures and maintain the QOL of the elderly. However, persons at high risk of future fracture cannot be effectively identified on the basis of bone density (BMD) alone, although BMD is used as an diagnostic criterion. Therefore, the WHO recommended that absolute risk for fracture (10-year probability of fracture) for each individual be evaluated and used as an index for intervention threshold. The 10-year probability of fracture is calculated based on age, sex, BMD at the femoral neck (body mass index if BMD is not available), history of previous fractures, parental hip fracture history, smoking, steroid use, rheumatoid arthritis, secondary osteoporosis and alcohol consumption. The WHO has just announced the development of a calculation tool (FRAX: WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool) in February this year. Fractures could be prevented more effectively if, based on each country's medical circumstances, an absolute risk value for fracture to determine when to start medical treatment is established and persons at high risk of fracture are identified and treated accordingly.

  17. Constraints on the age and provenance of the Chugach accretionary complex from detrital zircons in the Sitka Graywacke near Sitka, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeussler, Peter J.; Gehrels, George E.; Karl, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    The Sitka Graywacke is the westernmost and youngest unit of the Chugach accretionary complex in southeastern Alaska. Using laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy, we obtained 492 detrital-zircon ages on seven typical samples of Sitka Graywacke turbidites, which were collected in a transect across much of the unit near Sitka, Alaska. Individual grains range in age from 66 to 1,802 m.y. The youngest peak ages on relative-probability plots of the western four samples (74, 72, 74, and 74 m.y., from west to east) are distinctly younger than the youngest peak ages of the eastern three samples (105, 103, and 97 m.y., from west to east). These youngest peak ages set maximum depositional ages for each sample. We suggest that these peak ages are not significantly older (within ~5 m.y.) than the depositional age of the Sitka Graywacke because the deposits accumulated in a trench along a convergent margin, where magmatic sources likely continuously introduced juvenile zircons. The differences in the youngest cluster of detrital-zircon ages between the eastern and western sample localities is likely due to both a change in provenance and a fault. The similarity of the youngest peak ages in the Sitka Graywacke to fossil ages in the Valdez Group, in Prince William Sound, implies that the western part of the Sitka Graywacke is correlative with the Valdez Group, as previously inferred. However, the eastern part of the Sitka Graywacke has youngest detrital-zircon ages older than fossil ages in the Valdez Group and younger than fossil ages in the McHugh Complex, which in south-central Alaska is the oldest part of the accretionary complex. The age distribution of zircons in the older, eastern sequence suggests sources along the British Columbia margin. The detrital-zircon ages in the younger, western sequence are similar to igneous ages from south-central Alaska to southern British Columbia. Right-lateral strike slip on various fault systems inboard of the Sitka

  18. Absolute calibration of optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Viana, N.B.; Mazolli, A.; Maia Neto, P.A.; Nussenzveig, H.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Mesquita, O.N.

    2006-03-27

    As a step toward absolute calibration of optical tweezers, a first-principles theory of trapping forces with no adjustable parameters, corrected for spherical aberration, is experimentally tested. Employing two very different setups, we find generally very good agreement for the transverse trap stiffness as a function of microsphere radius for a broad range of radii, including the values employed in practice, and at different sample chamber depths. The domain of validity of the WKB ('geometrical optics') approximation to the theory is verified. Theoretical predictions for the trapping threshold, peak position, depth variation, multiple equilibria, and 'jump' effects are also confirmed.

  19. Absolute limit on rotation of gravitationally bound stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1994-03-01

    The authors seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein`s theory of relativity, Le Chatelier`s principle, causality and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass-shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a M = 1.442 M{circle_dot} neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). If the limit were found to be broken by any pulsar, it would signal that the confined hadronic phase of ordinary nucleons and nuclei is only metastable, an extraordinary conclusion.

  20. Absolute limit on rotation of gravitationally bound stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendenning, N. K.

    1994-03-01

    The authors seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein's theory of relativity, Le Chatelier's principle, causality, and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass-shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a M = 1.442 solar mass neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). If the limit were found to be broken by any pulsar, it would signal that the confined hadronic phase of ordinary nucleons and nuclei is only metastable.

  1. Aging, Maturation and Growth of Sauropodomorph Dinosaurs as Deduced from Growth Curves Using Long Bone Histological Data: An Assessment of Methodological Constraints and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Griebeler, Eva Maria; Klein, Nicole; Sander, P. Martin

    2013-01-01

    Information on aging, maturation, and growth is important for understanding life histories of organisms. In extinct dinosaurs, such information can be derived from the histological growth record preserved in the mid-shaft cortex of long bones. Here, we construct growth models to estimate ages at death, ages at sexual maturity, ages at which individuals were fully-grown, and maximum growth rates from the growth record preserved in long bones of six sauropod dinosaur individuals (one indeterminate mamenchisaurid, two Apatosaurus sp., two indeterminate diplodocids, and one Camarasaurus sp.) and one basal sauropodomorph dinosaur individual (Plateosaurus engelhardti). Using these estimates, we establish allometries between body mass and each of these traits and compare these to extant taxa. Growth models considered for each dinosaur individual were the von Bertalanffy model, the Gompertz model, and the logistic model (LGM), all of which have inherently fixed inflection points, and the Chapman-Richards model in which the point is not fixed. We use the arithmetic mean of the age at the inflection point and of the age at which 90% of asymptotic mass is reached to assess respectively the age at sexual maturity or the age at onset of reproduction, because unambiguous indicators of maturity in Sauropodomorpha are lacking. According to an AIC-based model selection process, the LGM was the best model for our sauropodomorph sample. Allometries established are consistent with literature data on other Sauropodomorpha. All Sauropodomorpha reached full size within a time span similar to scaled-up modern mammalian megaherbivores and had similar maximum growth rates to scaled-up modern megaherbivores and ratites, but growth rates of Sauropodomorpha were lower than of an average mammal. Sauropodomorph ages at death probably were lower than that of average scaled-up ratites and megaherbivores. Sauropodomorpha were older at maturation than scaled-up ratites and average mammals, but

  2. Tracking the late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic margin of northern Gondwana in the Hellenides: paleotectonic constraints from U-Pb detrital zircon ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzaras, Vasileios; Dörr, Wolfgang; Gerdes, Axel; Krahl, Jochen; Xypolias, Paraskevas; Zulauf, Gernold

    2016-10-01

    We report new detrital zircon U-Pb ages of nine quartzites sampled along the Phyllite-Quartzite unit sensu stricto (PQ unit s.s.), in the high-pressure belt of the southern Hellenides. The detrital zircon age spectra are dominated by two significant age peaks at ca. 600 and ca. 1000 Ma, which are typical for an east Gondwana provenance. The absence of zircons of Carboniferous-Triassic ages suggests that the depositional environment was isolated from Variscan and early Mesozoic sources. Our data are in support of paleogeographic configurations placing the protolith of the PQ unit s.s. south of the Paleotethys ocean and along the northern Gondwana margin. The zircon age spectra do not show significant variations with respect to the tectonostratigraphic position within the PQ unit s.s. and the position along the high-pressure belt. Combining the new (this study) with published detrital zircon ages, we suggest that the siliciclastic metasediments of the PQ unit s.s. on Crete, Kythera, and the Peloponnesus have a common paleogeographic origin.

  3. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  4. Evidence for multi-cycle sedimentation and provenance constraints from detrital zircon U-Pb ages: Triassic strata of the Lusitanian basin (western Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, M. F.; Gama, C.; Chichorro, M.; Silva, J. B.; Gutiérrez-Alonso, G.; Hofmann, M.; Linnemann, U.; Gärtner, A.

    2016-06-01

    Laser ablation ICP-MS U-Pb analyses were conducted on detrital zircons of Triassic sandstone and conglomerate from the Lusitanian basin in order to: i) document the age spectra of detrital zircon; ii) compare U-Pb detrital zircon ages with previous published data obtained from Upper Carboniferous, Ordovician, Cambrian and Ediacaran sedimentary rocks of the pre-Mesozoic basement of western Iberia; iii) discuss potential sources; and iv) test the hypothesis of sedimentary recycling. U-Pb dating of zircons established a maximum depositional age for this deposit as Permian (ca. 296 Ma), which is about sixty million years older compared to the fossil content recognized in previous studies (Upper Triassic). The distribution of detrital zircon ages obtained points to common source areas: the Ossa-Morena and Central Iberian zones that outcrop in and close to the Porto-Tomar fault zone. The high degree of immaturity and evidence of little transport of the Triassic sediment suggests that granite may constitute primary crystalline sources. The Carboniferous age of ca. 330 Ma for the best estimate of crystallization for a granite pebble in a Triassic conglomerate and the Permian-Carboniferous ages (< ca. 315 Ma) found in detrital zircons provide evidence of the denudation of Variscan and Cimmerian granites during the infilling of continental rift basins in western Iberia. The zircon age spectra found in Triassic strata are also the result of recycling from the Upper Carboniferous Buçaco basin, which probably acted as an intermediate sediment repository. U-Pb data in this study suggest that the detritus from the Triassic sandstone and conglomerate of the Lusitanian basin is derived from local source areas with features typical of Gondwana, with no sediment from external sources from Laurussia or southwestern Iberia.

  5. Isotopic age constraints on provenance of exotic terranes, latest Permian collision and fast Late Triassic post-collisional cooling and tectonic exhumation of the Korean collision belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Koenraad; Han, Seokyoung; Ruffet, Gilles; Yi, Keewook

    2016-04-01

    The Korean peninsula is located in the eastern margin of the Eurasian continent where major late Palaeozoic to early Mesozoic continental collision zones, like the Central Asian Orogenic Belt and the Central China Orogen, merge with circum-Pacific subduction-accretion systems. We present an integrated view of the Korean collision belt using recent Ar/Ar laser-probe step-heating single grain ages from the uppermost Gyeonggi Massif, central Korea's Palaeoproterozoic high-grade granite-gneiss terrane affected by Permo-Triassic metamorphism, the bordering Hongseong zone and the overlying Imjingang belt and the correlative Taean Formation, as well as SHRIMP isotopic ages of detrital zircons from meta-sandstones from the latter metamorphic marine turbidite sequences. We show that early Paleozoic isolated exotic terranes form part of the collision belt and were reworked in Permo-Triassic time. Age spectra of zircons from mature meta-sandstones in the Misan Formation (Imjingang Belt) and Taean Formation do not match the age distribution of the Gyeonggi Massif, to which both are usually assigned, as they show only subordinate 1.9-1.8 Ga and ~2.5 Ga age modes but dominant 441-426 Ma and 978-919 Ma peaks. Much of the sediment appears to have been derived from distant, exotic middle Paleozoic and Early Neoproterozoic magmatic sources, not present in Gyeonggi or other Korean basement massifs. The youngest concordant zircon ages are: 394, 398 and 402 Ma, showing that both formations are at least of Early Devonian age. Terranes with a substratum with Early Neoproterozoic and Silurian-Devonian granitoids are present in the South Chinese Cathaysia Terrane and in the Qinling Terrane (Central China Orogen). Both formations may, hence, represent the submarine fan part of a routing system and a delta-shelf system originally situated in China. The Taean Formation and Imjingang Belt are thus exotic Paleozoic terranes tectonically emplaced in the Korean collision belt. Muscovite, biotite

  6. U-Pb geochronologic constraints on the age of thrusting, crustal extension, peraluminous plutonism in the Little Rincon Mountains, southern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrels, G.E.; Smith, C.H. )

    1991-03-01

    The Little Rincon thrust fault is a mylonitic shear zone that juxtaposes Middle Proterozoic Continental Granodiorite over metasedimentary rocks of Proterozoic and early Paleozoic age. This fault is structurally beneath the San Pedro detachment fault and associated ductile deformational fabrics, which formed during early Oligocene to early Miocene time. A syntectonic leucogranite sill within the Little Rincon shear zone yields a U-Pb concordia-intercept age 66{plus minus}10 Ma for zircon and a concordant age 51{plus minus}2 Ma for fractions composed of monazite and xenotime. This demonstrates that compressional deformation in the Catalina and Rincon mountains is generally coeval with Laramide thrust faults that extend at least from southeastern California to southeastern Arizona. A peraluminous granite pluton that truncates the shear zone but displays extension-related fabrics yields a lower-intercept age 24{plus minus}12 Ma for zircon and an age of 30{plus minus}6 Ma for monazite. This indicates that some peraluminous plutons in the region were emplaced during regional crustal extension.

  7. U-Pb ages of detrital zircon of the Paleozoic sedimentary rocks: New constraints on the emplacement time of the Hegenshan ophiolite, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Sheng-Hui; Zhou, Jian-Bo; Li, Long

    2016-11-01

    The Hegenshan ophiolite in the Solonker-Hegenshan belt is the largest ophiolite in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). Despite its significance in constraining regional tectonic evolution, the emplacement time of the Hegenshan ophiolite is still under debate. In this study, we provide new detrital zircon ages of the Paleozoic sedimentary rocks that unconformably overlie the Wusinihei ophiolite (northeastern part of the Hegenshan ophiolite) to constrain the lower limit emplacement time of the Hegenshan ophiolite. The zircon ages obtained from the Paleozoic sedimentary rocks range from 298 ± 8 to 363 ± 7 Ma, and show bimodal distribution at 300-320 Ma (peak at 308 Ma) and 320-360 Ma (peak at 330 Ma). The age group of 300-320 Ma coincides with the age range of the volcanic rocks of the Late Paleozoic Gegenaobao Formation. The age group of 320-360 Ma with a peak at 330 Ma may be linked to local mafic-ultramafic rocks of the Hegenshan ophiolite. Accordingly, we suggest that the emplacement time of the Hegenshan ophiolite should have occurred earlier than the deposition of the Gegenaobao Formation, most likely during the time between 308 and 330 Ma, instead of the Silurian, Devonian or Mesozoic as previously considered.

  8. Absolute and relative family affluence and psychosomatic symptoms in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Elgar, Frank J; De Clercq, Bart; Schnohr, Christina W; Bird, Phillippa; Pickett, Kate E; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Hofmann, Felix; Currie, Candace

    2013-08-01

    Previous research on the links between income inequality and health and socioeconomic differences in health suggests that relative differences in affluence impact health and well-being more than absolute affluence. This study explored whether self-reported psychosomatic symptoms in adolescents relate more closely to relative affluence (i.e., relative deprivation or rank affluence within regions or schools) than to absolute affluence. Data on family material assets and psychosomatic symptoms were collected from 48,523 adolescents in eight countries (Austria, Belgium, Canada, Norway, Scotland, Poland, Turkey, and Ukraine) as part of the 2009/10 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study. Multilevel regression analyses of the data showed that relative deprivation (Yitzhaki Index, calculated in regions and in schools) and rank affluence (in regions) (1) related more closely to symptoms than absolute affluence, and (2) related to symptoms after differences in absolute affluence were held constant. However, differences in family material assets, whether they are measured in absolute or relative terms, account for a significant variation in adolescent psychosomatic symptoms. Conceptual and empirical issues relating to the use of material affluence indices to estimate socioeconomic position are discussed.

  9. Age constraints for the present fault configuration in the Imperial Valley, California - Evidence for northwestward propagation of the Gulf of California rift system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Releveling and other geophysical data for the Imperial Valley of southern California suggest the northern section of the Imperial-Brawley fault system, which includes the Mesquite Basin and Brawley Seismic Zone, is much younger than the 4 to 5 million year age of the valley itself. A minimum age of 3000 years is calculated for the northern segment of the Imperial fault from correlations between surface topography and geodetically observed seismic/interseismic vertical movements. Calculations of a maximum age of 80,000 years is based upon displacements in the crystalline basement along the Imperial fault, inferred from seismic refraction surveys. This young age supports recent interpretations of heat flow measurements, which also suggest that the current patterns of seismicity and faults in the Imperial Valley are not long lived. The current fault geometry and basement morphology suggest northwestward growth of the Imperial fault and migration of the Brawley Seismic Zone. It is suggested that this migration is a manifestation of the propagation of the Gulf of California rift system into the North American continent.

  10. Age constraints for the present fault configuration in the Imperial Valley, California: Evidence for northwestward propagation of the Gulf of California rift system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Releveling and other geophysical data for the Imperial Valley of southern California suggest the northern section of the Imperial-Brawley fault system, which includes the Mesquite Basin and Brawley Seismic Zone, is much younger than the 4 to 5 million year age of the valley itself. A minimum age of 3000 years is calculated for the northern segment of the Imperial fault from correlations between surface topography and geodetically observed seismic/interseismic vertical movements. Calculations of a maximum age of 80,000 years is based upon displacements in the crystalline basement along the Imperial fault, inferred from seismic refraction surveys. This young age supports recent interpretations of heat flow measurements, which also suggest that the current patterns of seismicity and faults in the Imperial Valley are not long lived. The current fault geometry and basement morphology suggest northwestward growth of the Imperial fault and migration of the Brawley Seismic Zone. It is suggested that this migration is a manifestation of the propagation of the Gulf of California rift system into the North American continent.

  11. Re-Os and 40Ar/ 39Ar isotope measurements of inclusions in alluvial diamonds from the Ural Mountains: Constraints on diamond genesis and eruption ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiginhas, Fernando; Pearson, D. Graham; Phillips, David; Burgess, Ray; Harris, Jeff W.

    2009-11-01

    The Re-Os isotope data for 20 syngenetic sulphide inclusions, recovered from 15 diamonds and the 40Ar/ 39Ar laser probe eruption ages of 7 syngenetic clinopyroxenes recovered from 5 diamonds, all from alluvial placer deposits in the Ural Mountains, have been determined. Six eclogitic sulphide inclusions, two of which coexist in the same diamond, yield an isochron age of 1280 ± 310 Ma (2 σ), with an unusually high initial 187Os/ 188Os ratio of 2.10 ± 0.58 (2 σ). The age is interpreted to date remobilisation of carbon and sulphur, and homogenisation of Os, during rift-related thermal-magmatic events that affected the East European Craton (EEC) at ca. 1.3 Ga. The high initial Os ratio suggests Re-Os evolution over a 100 to 500 Ma period within previously metasomatised lithosphere, most likely the EEC. Five eclogitic clinopyroxenes recovered from four diamonds yielded similar 40Ar/ 39Ar ages averaging 472 ± 28 Ma, which likely approximate the time of source kimberlite/lamproite eruption. This age suggests that the Ural diamonds are not likely to have derived either from the well known diamond-bearing kimberlites of the Siberian craton, nor from presently known Russian and Finnish kimberlite provinces on the EEC. The Urals placer deposits are mainly confined to 397-407 Ma sedimentary rocks along the western side of these mountains, with sediment transportation at that time generally from the north-west. Present evidence suggests the existence of an undiscovered kimberlite/lamproite source, probably on the Volgo-Uralia crustal segment of the EEC, which gave rise to the Urals diamond deposits.

  12. CONSTRAINTS ON THE SURFACE MAGNETIC FIELDS AND AGE OF A COOL HYPERGIANT: XMM-NEWTON X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF VY CMa

    SciTech Connect

    Montez, Rodolfo Jr.; Kastner, Joel H.; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Davidson, Kris; Turok, Rebecca L. E-mail: jhk@cis.rit.edu

    2015-02-10

    The complex circumstellar ejecta of highly evolved, cool hypergiants are indicative of multiple, asymmetric mass-loss events. To explore whether such episodic, non-isotropic mass loss may be driven by surface magnetic activity, we have observed the archetypical cool hypergiant VY CMa with the XMM-Newton X-ray satellite observatory. The hypergiant itself is not detected in these observations. From the upper limit on the X-ray flux from VY CMa at the time of our observations (F {sub X,} {sub UL} ≈ 8 × 10{sup –14} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}, corresponding to log L{sub X} /L {sub bol} ≤ –8), we estimate an average surface magnetic field strength fB ≤ 2 × 10{sup –3} G (where f is the filling factor of magnetically active surface regions). These X-ray results for VY CMa represent the most stringent constraints to date on the magnetic field strength near the surface of a hypergiant. VY CMa's mass loss is episodic, however, and the hypergiant may have been in a state of low surface magnetic activity during the XMM observations. The XMM observations also yield detections of more than 100 X-ray sources within ∼15' of VY CMa, roughly 50 of which have near-infrared counterparts. Analysis of X-ray hardness ratios and IR colors indicates that some of these field sources may be young, late-type stars associated with VY CMa, its adjacent molecular cloud complex, and the young cluster NGC 2362. Further study of the VY CMa field is warranted, given the potential to ascertain the evolutionary timescale of this enigmatic, massive star.

  13. Constraints on the Surface Magnetic Fields and Age of a Cool Hypergiant: XMM-Newton X-Ray Observations of VY CMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montez, Rodolfo, Jr.; Kastner, Joel H.; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Turok, Rebecca L.; Davidson, Kris

    2015-02-01

    The complex circumstellar ejecta of highly evolved, cool hypergiants are indicative of multiple, asymmetric mass-loss events. To explore whether such episodic, non-isotropic mass loss may be driven by surface magnetic activity, we have observed the archetypical cool hypergiant VY CMa with the XMM-Newton X-ray satellite observatory. The hypergiant itself is not detected in these observations. From the upper limit on the X-ray flux from VY CMa at the time of our observations (F X, UL ≈ 8 × 10-14 erg cm-2 s-1, corresponding to log LX /L bol <= -8), we estimate an average surface magnetic field strength fB <= 2 × 10-3 G (where f is the filling factor of magnetically active surface regions). These X-ray results for VY CMa represent the most stringent constraints to date on the magnetic field strength near the surface of a hypergiant. VY CMa's mass loss is episodic, however, and the hypergiant may have been in a state of low surface magnetic activity during the XMM observations. The XMM observations also yield detections of more than 100 X-ray sources within ~15' of VY CMa, roughly 50 of which have near-infrared counterparts. Analysis of X-ray hardness ratios and IR colors indicates that some of these field sources may be young, late-type stars associated with VY CMa, its adjacent molecular cloud complex, and the young cluster NGC 2362. Further study of the VY CMa field is warranted, given the potential to ascertain the evolutionary timescale of this enigmatic, massive star.

  14. The Southern Urals Large Igneous Province with an age of approximately 1380 Ma: Precision U-Pb ID-TIMS constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronkin, Yu. L.; Tichomirowa, M.; Maslov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    The formation of the Large Igneous Province (LIP) approximately 1380 Ma old in the South Urals was related to the Mashak riftogenic event in the Bashkir meganticlinorium, which was synchronous with the emplacement of different magmatic bodies (the Berdyaush pluton of rapakivi granites and associated rocks, the Main dike of the Bakal ore field, and the Medvedev, Guben, and Kusa massifs, among others) localized among sedimentary deposits of the Burzyan and Yurmatin Groups representing Lower and Middle Riphean type units of northern Eurasia. The U-Pb ID-TIMS age of 1379.6 Ma (MSWD = 1.3) obtained with an accuracy of ±2.9 Ma (confidence interval 95%) combined with the available published U-Pb ID-TIMS data constrain the age and duration of the Early-Middle Riphean pulse in the LIP formation in the Southern Urals.

  15. Color-Magnitude Diagram Constraints on the Metallicities, Ages, and Star Formation History of the Stellar Populations in the Carina Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VandenBerg, Don A.; Stetson, Peter B.; Brown, Thomas M.

    2015-06-01

    Victoria-Regina isochrones for -0.4{\\mkern 1mu} ≤slant [α/Fe] ≤slant +0.4 and a wide range in [Fe/H], along with complementary zero-age horizontal branch (ZAHB) loci, have been applied to the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of Carina. The color transformations that we have used have been “calibrated” so that isochrones provide excellent fits to the [{{(B-V)}0},{{M}V}] diagrams of M3 and M92 when well supported estimates of the globular cluster (GC) reddenings and metallicities are assumed. The adopted distance moduli, for both the GCs and Carina, are based on our ZAHB models, which are able to reproduce the old horizontal branch (HB) component (as well as the luminosity of the HB clump) of the dwarf spheroidal galaxy quite well—even if it spans a range in [Fe/H] of ˜1.5 dex, provided that [α/Fe] varies with [Fe/H] in approximately the way that has been derived spectroscopically. Ages derived here agree reasonably well with those found previously for the old and intermediate-age turnoff (TO) stars, as well as for the period of negligible star formation (SF) activity (˜6-10 Gyr ago). CMD simulations have been carried out for the faintest TO and subgiant stars. They indicate a clear preference for SF that lasted several Gyr instead of a short burst, with some indication that ages decrease with increasing [Fe/H]. In general, stellar models that assume spectroscopic metallicities provide satisfactory fits to the observations, including the thin giant branch of Carina, though higher oxygen abundances than those implied by the adopted values of [α/Fe] would have favorable consequences.

  16. New Constraints on the Energetics, Progenitor Mass, and Age of the Supernova Remnant G292.0+1.8 Containing PSR J1124-5916

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Marjorie; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2003-02-01

    We present spatially resolved spectroscopy of the supernova remnant (SNR) G292.0+1.8 with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. This composite-type SNR contains the 135 ms pulsar, J1124-5916, recently discovered by Camilo and coworkers. We apply nonequilibrium ionization models to fit the ejecta-dominated regions and to identify the blast wave of the supernova explosion. By comparing the derived abundances with those predicted from nucleosynthesis models, we estimate a progenitor mass of 30-40 Msolar. We derive the intrinsic parameters of the supernova explosion such as its energy, the age of the SNR, the blast wave velocity, and the swept-up mass. In the Sedov interpretation, our estimated SNR age of 2600+250-200 yr is close to the pulsar's characteristic age of 2900 yr. This confirms the pulsar/SNR association and relaxes the need for the pulsar to have a noncanonical value for the braking index, a large period at birth, or a large transverse velocity. We discuss the properties of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the light of the Kennel & Coroniti model and estimate the pulsar wind magnetization parameter. We also report the first evidence for steepening of the power-law spectral index with increasing radius from the pulsar, a result that is expected from synchrotron losses and is reminiscent of Crab-like PWNe.

  17. Magmatism along the high Paraguay River at the border of Brazil and Paraguay: A review and new constraints on emplacement ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comin-Chiaramonti, P.; Gomes, C. B.; De Min, A.; Ernesto, M.; Gasparon, M.

    2015-03-01

    The magmatic rocks from Alto Paraguay (High Paraguay River extensional lineament), western Apa craton, mainly consist of several major circular alkaline complexes and some rhyolitic domes and ignimbrites. The former are characterized by intrusive Na-alkaline rock-types (nepheline syenites and syenites and effusive equivalents) topped by lava flows and ignimbrites. Two main evolved suites were defined using petrochemical and Sr- isotope data: an agpaitic suite in the north and a miaskitic suite in the south. The domes of subalkaline rhyolitic lavas and ignimbrites occur to the north of the alkaline complexes, along the Paraguay River, near the town of Fuerte Olimpo. The emplacement ages of the alkaline complexes were constrained using the K-Ar, Ar-Ar, Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd dating methods on whole rocks and/or mineral separates (amphibole, alkali feldspar and biotite). Ages are quite variable (Upper Permian to Middle Triassic), with average K-Ar and Ar-Ar ages of 248.8 ± 4.8 and 241.8 ± 1.1 Ma, respectively, and Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd age data giving best values from 248 ± 4 to 244 ± 27 Ma and from 256 ± 3 to 257 ± 3 Ma, respectively. In contrast, the Fuerte Olimpo volcanics show a Mesoproterozoic age (1.3 Ga, K-Ar and Ar-Ar radiometric methods; and 1.42 ± 0.24 to 1.30 ± 0.03 Ga, Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd methods, respectively). Rb-Sr systematics (87Sr/86Sr initial ratios ≤ 0.7038) highlight a relatively "primitive" character of the Na-alkaline magmatic source(s), in contrast with the "crustal" values (87Sr/86Sr initial ratio ˜ 0.7105) of the Fuerte Olimpo rhyolites. Thus, magmatism in the Alto Paraguay area is related to two extensional events: a younger event corresponding to the Permian-Triassic alkaline rocks, and an older event connected to the Precambrian volcanic acidic rocks.

  18. Geochemical and isotopic constraints on the age and origin of the Nidar Ophiolitic Complex, Ladakh, India: Implications for the Neo-Tethyan subduction along the Indus suture zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, T.; Tanaka, T.; Sachan, H. K.; Asahara, Y.; Islam, R.; Khanna, P. P.

    2008-04-01

    The Nidar ophiolite complex is exposed within the Indus suture zone in eastern Ladakh, India. The suture zone is considered to represent remnant Neo-Tethyan Ocean that closed via subduction as the Indian plate moved northward with respect to the Asian plate. The two plates ultimately collided during the Middle Eocene. The Nidar ophiolite complex comprises a sequence of ultra-mafic rocks at the base, gabbroic rocks in the middle and volcano-sedimentary assemblage on the top. Earlier studies considered the Nidar ophiolite complex to represent an oceanic floor sequence based on lithological assemblage. However, present study, based on new mineral and whole rock geochemical and isotopic data (on bulk rocks and mineral separates) indicate their generation and emplacement in an intra-oceanic subduction environment. The plutonic and volcanic rocks have nearly flat to slightly depleted rare earth element (REE) patterns. The gabbroic rocks, in particular, show strong positive Sr and Eu anomalies in their REE and spidergram patterns, probably indicating plagioclase accumulation. Depletion in high field strength elements (HFSE) in the spidergram patterns may be related to stabilization of phases retaining the HFSE in the subducting slab and / or fractional crystallization of titano-magnetite phases. The high radiogenic Nd- and low radiogenic Sr-isotopic ratios for these rocks exclude any influence of continental material in their genesis, implying an intra-oceanic environment. Nine point mineral-whole rock Sm-Nd isochron corresponds to an age of 140 ± 32 Ma with an initial 143Nd/ 144Nd of 0.513835 ± 0.000053 ( ENdt = + 7.4). This age is consistent with the precise Early Cretaceous age of Hauterivian (132 ± 2 to 127 ± 1.6 Ma) to Aptian (121 ± 1.4 to 112 ±1.1 Ma) for the overlying volcano-sedimentary (radiolarian bearing chert) sequences based on well-preserved radiolarian fossils (Kojima, S., Ahmad, T., Tanaka, T., Bagati, T.N., Mishra, M., Kumar, R. Islam, R., Khanna, P

  19. Petrogenesis of synorogenic diorite-granodiorite-granite complexes in the Damara Belt, Namibia: Constraints from U-Pb zircon ages and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, S.; Kröner, A.; Hauff, F.; Masberg, P.

    2015-01-01

    The synorogenic Palmental complex (central Damara Belt, Nambia) consists of ca. 545 Ma old quartz diorites and rare granodiorites and ca. 520 Ma-old leucogranites, representing one of the earliest and most primitive phase of crustal plutonism predating the main high-T regional metamorphism. Most quartz diorites and one granodiorite evolved through multistage, polybaric evolutionary processes involving fractionation from a lithospheric mantle-derived melt, followed by fractional crystallization of mainly hornblende, plagioclase and apatite which is shown by decreasing MgO, FeO, CaO, TiO2 and P2O5 with increasing SiO2. Assimilation of felsic basement gneisses was also important during formation of these granitoids. Although their chemical characteristics (high LILE, low HFSE) resemble those of quartz diorites and granodiorites with calc-alkaline affinity, they differ in their enriched Sr (initial 87Sr/86Sr: 0.7061-0.7098) and Nd (initial εNd: -2.7 to -9.9) isotopic composition. Neodymium depleted mantle mean crustal residence ages range from 1.3 to 1.9 Ga for the quartz diorites including the granodiorite. These model ages correlate with major and trace element abundances, further substantiating that AFC processes modified the initial isotopic systematics. Lead (206Pb/204Pb: 17.43-17.68, 207Pb/204Pb: 15.61-15.66, 208Pb/204Pb: 38.19-38.49) isotopic composition are unradiogenic relative to other Damaran intrusive rocks but plot above the Stacey and Kramers (1975) reference line, indicating that the source underwent an ancient (pre Pan-African) increase in U/Pb and Th/U, followed by more recent U-depletion. Some variation in 206Pb/204Pb at high 207Pb/204Pb further indicates involvement of ancient crustal material, most likely through AFC processes. A cross-cutting leucogranite dyke has also evolved isotopic compositions (initial 87Sr/86Sr: 0.7326; initial εNd: -15.6; 206Pb/204Pb: 17.42, 207Pb/204Pb: 15.62, 208Pb/204Pb: 38.16) but in view of the apparent younger age of

  20. Geochemistry, geology, and isotopic (Sr, S, and B) composition of evaporites in the Lake St. Martin impact structure: New constraints on the age of melt rock formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leybourne, Matthew I.; Denison, Rodger E.; Cousens, Brian L.; Bezys, Ruth K.; Gregoire, D. Conrad; Boyle, Dan R.; Dobrzanski, Ed

    2007-03-01

    We report new Sr, S, and B isotopic data for evaporites (gypsum, anhydrite), carbonates, melt rocks, gneisses, and groundwaters recovered in and around the Lake St. Martin (LSM) impact structure, Interlake Region, Manitoba, Canada. The LSM meteorite impacted Devonian to Ordovician carbonates and sandstones of the eastern Williston Basin, resulting in partial melting of underlying Superior Province (~2.5 Ga) gneisses of the Canadian Shield. Overlying the LSM melt rocks are red beds and evaporites (anhydrite/gypsum/glauberite) previously inferred to have been deposited during the Jurassic. The 87Sr/86Sr (lowest values cluster at 0.70836) and δ 34SCDT (+23.7 +/- 0.9‰) of the evaporites, combined with B isotope compositions of associated groundwaters (δ 11BNBS951 = +25 to +28‰), are consistent with evaporite deposition within the impact structure near the edge of an ocean-connected salina. The establishment of a marine origin for the evaporites offers a method of age assignment using the secular variation of S and Sr isotopes in seawater. Comparison of Sr and S isotope results with the seawater curves precludes Jurassic deposition for the evaporites or correlation with Watrous and Amaranth formation evaporites, previously considered correlative with those at LSM. The lowest Sr and mean of S isotope values from the LSM evaporites are similar to seawater in the latest Devonian, consistent with conodonts recovered from carbonate breccia overlying melt rocks, and we suggest this as an alternative age of the evaporites. Data presented here preclude a Jurassic age for the evaporites and therefore for the impact event.

  1. Multi-system geochronological and isotopic constraints on age and evolution of the Gaoligongshan metamorphic belt and shear zone system in western Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eroğlu, Sümeyya; Siebel, Wolfgang; Danišík, Martin; Pfänder, Jörg A.; Chen, Fukun

    2013-09-01

    The Gaoligongshan metamorphic belt, located east of the Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis (EHS) in the Yunnan province, southwestern China, is a compelling region in which to determine temporal constrains on crustal dynamic processes related to the Himalayan orogeny. We applied multi-system geo- and thermochronology (900 °C to <50 °C) to orthogneiss and mylonites from a major shear zone in the southern Gaoligongshan in order to elucidate the magmatic, cooling and exhumation history of this belt. Zircon U/Pb data reveal three magmatic events at ∼486 Ma, ∼136 Ma and ∼76 Ma. Similar ages are found in orthoderivative rocks of the neighboring Tengchong and Baoshan blocks, and the Gangdese batholith, suggesting that the southern Gaoligongshan is composed of an assemblage of Lhasa and Qiangtang terrane derived rocks. Muscovite Rb/Sr ages of 35-21 Ma are coeval with the onset of lateral crustal displacement along major shear zones in Eastern Tibet and Indochina, and with the post-collision volcanic activity in western Yunnan. Biotite Rb/Sr and mica 40Ar/39Ar ages provide evidence that mylonitization along the Gaoligongshan shear zone and crustal rotation of the Tengchong and Baoshan blocks proceeded during the Miocene, between 19 and 12 Ma, when the rocks rapidly cooled through the 350-280 °C temperature range. Almost identical 40Ar/39Ar ages reported for the Karakorum-Jiali-Parlung Fault system in Western Tibet suggest that the Gaoligongshan shear zone is the southeastern continuation of this fault, recording the eastward extrusion of Tibet and crustal movement around the EHS. The final stage of exhumation of the Gaoligongshan occurred between 8 and 5 Ma at an average exhumation rate of ∼3 km/Ma as documented by apatite fission-track and apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He data. This rapid exhumation was triggered by crustal root delamination and opening of the Andaman sea. Our results clearly show that the complex tectonothermal evolution of the Gaoligongshan was influenced by

  2. U-series zircon age constraints on the plumbing system and magma residence times of the Changbai volcano, China/North Korea border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Haibo; Fan, Qicheng; Zhang, Hongfu; Schmitt, Axel K.

    2014-07-01

    The Changbai (or Baitoushan, Paektu) volcano on the China/North Korea border is best known for its climactic caldera-forming eruption of 100 km3 of comendite materials 1000 years (1 ka) ago. The polygenetic Changbai volcano also erupted moderate-volume pre-caldera comendite lava at ~ 4 ka and small-volume post-caldera trachyte ignimbrite at ~ 0.3 ka. Here we report 238U-230Th disequilibrium ages of zircons from lavas and ignimbrites of the pre-caldera (~ 4 ka), syn-caldera (1 ka), and post-caldera (~ 0.3 ka) events. The zircon isochron ages are 12.2 ± 1.1 ka (2σ) for the 4-ka comendite lava and 12.2 ± 1.7 ka for the 1-ka comendite ignimbrite. Zircons from the 0.3-ka trachyte ignimbrite exhibit 3 respective peaks at 2.6 ± 1.8 ka, 130 ± 10 ka and > 230 ka. The indistinguishable zircon ages for the 4-ka pre-caldera eruption of comendite lava and the 1-ka caldera-forming eruption of comendite pumice and ignimbrite suggest that the 4-ka lava provides an early sampling of a much larger magma body at depth and thus serves as a kind of petrologic early-warning signal. In addition, the 4-ka lava may represent the lowest-temperature magma in the roof zone of a thermally zoned magma chamber that usually escapes first. The distinctive multi-modal zircon age distributions of the 0.3-ka trachytic eruption, however, reveal that this post-caldera eruption tapped a different magma body and indicate that Changbai's magmatic plumbing system had changed after the 1-ka caldera-forming climactic eruption. Our results suggest very short zircon and magma residence times for the Changbai volcano (8 kyr for the 4-ka eruption, 11-12 kyr for the 1-ka eruption and 2.3 kyr for the 0.3-ka eruption).

  3. Detrital zircon U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic constraints on the terrigenous flexural basins of the Western Alps and their paleogeographic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Y.; Lin, W.; Faure, M.; Wang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Detrital zircons from Cretaceous mica schist, Eocene sandstone and Oligocene siltstone of the Western Alps fall into three main separable age clusters at 610-540 Ma, 490-430 Ma, and 340-280 Ma that correspond to the Cadomian, Caledonian (Ordovician) and Variscan (Carboniferous) events widespread in Western and Central Europe. Hf isotopic results indicate that these three magmatic and tectonic episodes did not give rise to significant production of juvenile crust. A small but distinguishable group of Triassic zircon, around 250-200 Ma which is considered to derive from the Southern Alps, has been detected in the Oligocene "Schistes à Blocs" formation and the Brianconnais flysch. In contrast, this age group is absent in Eocene sandstones. In agreement with sedimentological studies, our results show that the main source areas of the Eocene flysch were probably located in the European continent. The arrival of detritus from the Internal Zone occurred in Early Oligocene, coeval with the tectonic rotation from northwestward to westward in the propoagation of allochthonous units. Based on previous studies and our new data, the Penninic Frontal Thrust zone was likely a paleorelief during the Eocene that accounts for the lack of detritus from the Internal Zone. Contemporary sediments were accumulated in the foredeep of the Adriatic Plate. From Oligocene time onwards, the blockage was cut through after a regional uplifting, and thus the Internal Zone started to provide detritus into the western flexural basins.

  4. Detrital zircon U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic constraints on the terrigenous sediments of the Western Alps and their paleogeographic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Yang; Lin, Wei; Faure, Michel; Wang, Qingchen

    2016-11-01

    Detrital zircons from Cretaceous micaschist, late Eocene-earliest Oligocene sandstone and early Oligocene siltstone of the Western Alps fall into three main separable age clusters at 610-540 Ma, 490-430 Ma, and 340-280 Ma that correspond to the Cadomian (Neoproterozoic), Ordovician, and Variscan (Carboniferous) events widespread in western and central Europe. Hf isotopic results indicate that these three magmatic and tectonic episodes did not give rise to significant production of juvenile crust. A distinguishable group of Triassic zircons, around 250-200 Ma which is considered to derive from the Southern Alps, has been detected in the early Oligocene "Schistes à Blocs" formation and the Briançonnais "Flysch Noir". In contrast, this age group is absent in late Eocene to earliest Oligocene sandstones. In agreement with sedimentological studies, our results show that the main source areas of the Eocene sandstone were probably located in the European continent. The arrival of detritus from the Internal Zone occurred in early Oligocene, coeval with the tectonic rotation from northwestward to westward in the propagation of allochthonous units. Based on previous studies and our new data, we argue that the Briançonnais Zone was likely a paleorelief since the middle Eocene that accounts for the lack of detritus from the Adriatic units. Contemporary sediments were accumulated in the foredeep of the Adriatic plate. From Oligocene time onward, the blockage was cut through after a regional uplifting, and thus, the Internal Zone started to provide detritus into the western flexural basins.

  5. Sex-Age Related Rumination Behavior of Père David’s Deer under Constraints of Feeding Habitat and Rainfall

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongqiu

    2013-01-01

    Extensive studies have been conducted on the rumination behavior of domestic herbivores. However, studies on wild animals are limited, particularly wild animals with specific ruminating parameters. In this study, Père David’s deer, a previously extirpated species, was observed to analyze the effects of sex-age, feeding habitat, and rainfall on rumination behavior in the Dafeng Nature Reserve, China. Rumination behavior was investigated based on four parameters: proportion of bedding time spent chewing, bolus processing time (s/bolus), chewing frequency (chews/bolus), and chewing rate (chews/s). Results showed that all three factors affect rumination behavior. The extent of their effects varied based on the four rumination parameters. Chewing rate and frequency decreased based on sex–age levels, i.e., from fawns to juvenile female, juvenile male, adult female, stag, and harem holder. Therefore, body size played a major role in shaping rumination behavior. Deer found in grasslands could chew faster compared with deer found in woodlands. This result might be caused by the effects of dietary composition and sunlight intensity. A deer spends a longer time ruminating while bedding during rainy days compared with rainless days to maximize energy and nutrition intake and compensate for the loss of feeding time during rainy days. Therefore, rumination behavior is plastic and is shaped by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. PMID:23823072

  6. THE ABSOLUTE MAGNITUDES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IN THE ULTRAVIOLET

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Peter J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Hoversten, Erik A.; Pritchard, Tyler; Milne, Peter; Bufano, Filomena; Mazzali, Paolo; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li Weidong; Foley, Ryan J.; Hicken, Malcolm; Kirshner, Robert P.; Gehrels, Neil; Holland, Stephen T.; Immler, Stefan; Phillips, Mark M.; Still, Martin

    2010-10-01

    We examine the absolute magnitudes and light-curve shapes of 14 nearby (redshift z = 0.004-0.027) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed in the ultraviolet (UV) with the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. Colors and absolute magnitudes are calculated using both a standard Milky Way extinction law and one for the Large Magellanic Cloud that has been modified by circumstellar scattering. We find very different behavior in the near-UV filters (uvw1{sub rc} covering {approx}2600-3300 A after removing optical light, and u {approx} 3000-4000 A) compared to a mid-UV filter (uvm2 {approx}2000-2400 A). The uvw1{sub rc} - b colors show a scatter of {approx}0.3 mag while uvm2-b scatters by nearly 0.9 mag. Similarly, while the scatter in colors between neighboring filters is small in the optical and somewhat larger in the near-UV, the large scatter in the uvm2 - uvw1 colors implies significantly larger spectral variability below 2600 A. We find that in the near-UV the absolute magnitudes at peak brightness of normal SNe Ia in our sample are correlated with the optical decay rate with a scatter of 0.4 mag, comparable to that found for the optical in our sample. However, in the mid-UV the scatter is larger, {approx}1 mag, possibly indicating differences in metallicity. We find no strong correlation between either the UV light-curve shapes or the UV colors and the UV absolute magnitudes. With larger samples, the UV luminosity might be useful as an additional constraint to help determine distance, extinction, and metallicity in order to improve the utility of SNe Ia as standardized candles.

  7. Dynamic Constraint Satisfaction with Reasonable Global Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy

    2003-01-01

    Previously studied theoretical frameworks for dynamic constraint satisfaction problems (DCSPs) employ a small set of primitive operators to modify a problem instance. They do not address the desire to model problems using sophisticated global constraints, and do not address efficiency questions related to incremental constraint enforcement. In this paper, we extend a DCSP framework to incorporate global constraints with flexible scope. A simple approach to incremental propagation after scope modification can be inefficient under some circumstances. We characterize the cases when this inefficiency can occur, and discuss two ways to alleviate this problem: adding rejection variables to the scope of flexible constraints, and adding new features to constraints that permit increased control over incremental propagation.

  8. SHRIMP U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar age constraints for relating plutonism and mineralization in the Boulder batholith region, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lund, K.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Kunk, M.J.; Unruh, D.M.; Zeihen, G.D.; Hodges, W.C.; du Bray, E.A.; O'Neill, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    The composite Boulder batholith, Montana, hosts a variety of mineral deposit types, including important silver-rich polymetallic quartz vein districts in the northern part of the batholith and the giant Butte porphyry copper-molybdenum pre-Main Stage system and crosscutting copper-rich Main Stage vein system in the southern part of the batholith. Previous dating studies have identified ambiguous relationships among igneous and mineralizing events. Mineralizing hydrothermal fluids for these types of deposits and magma for quartz porphyry dikes at Butte have all been considered to be late-stage differentiates of the Boulder batholith. However, previous dating studies indicated that the Boulder batholith plutons cooled from about 78 to 72 Ma, whereas copper-rich Main Stage veins at Butte were dated at about 61 Ma. Recent efforts to date the porphyry copper-molybdenum pre-Main Stage deposits at Butte resulted in conflicting estimates of both 64 and 76 Ma for the mineralizing events. Silver-rich polymetallic quartz vein deposits elsewhere in the batholith have not been dated previously. To resolve this controversy, we used the U.S. Geological Survey, Stanford, SHRIMP RG ion mic??roprobe to date single-age domains within zircons from plutonic rock samples and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to date white mica, biotite, and K-feldspar from mineral deposits. U-Pb zircon ages are Rader Creek Granodiorite, 80.4 ?? 1.2 Ma; Unionville Granodiorite, 78.2 ?? 0.8 Ma; Pulpit Rock granite, 76.5 ?? 0.8 Ma; Butte Granite, 74.5 ?? 0.9 Ma; altered Steward-type quartz porphyry dike (I-15 roadcut), 66.5 ?? 1.0 Ma; altered Steward-type quartz porphyry dike (Continental pit), 65.7 ?? 0.9 Ma; and quartz monzodiorite of Boulder Baldy (Big Belt Mountains), 66.2 ?? 0.9 Ma. Zircons from Rader Creek Granodiorite and quartz porphyry dike samples contain Archean inheritance. The 40Ar/39Ar ages are muscovite, silver-rich polymetallic quartz vein (Basin district), 74.4 ?? 0.3 Ma; muscovite, silver

  9. Zircon U-Pb ages, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic constraints on petrogenesis of the Tarom-Olya pluton, Alborz magmatic belt, NW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabatian, Ghasem; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Honarmand, Maryam; Neubauer, Franz

    2016-02-01

    A petrological, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic study was carried out on the Tarom-Olya pluton, Iran, in the central part of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt. The pluton is composed of diorite, monzonite, quartz-monzonite and monzogranite, which form part of the Western Alborz magmatic belt. LA-ICP-MS analyses of zircons yield ages from 35.7 ± 0.8 Ma to 37.7 ± 0.5 Ma, interpreted as the ages of crystallization of magmas. Rocks from the pluton have SiO2 contents ranging from 57.0 to 69.9 wt.%, high K2O + Na2O (5.5 to 10.3 wt.%) and K2O/Na2O ratio of 0.9 to 2.0. Geochemical discrimination criteria show I-type and shoshonitic features for the studied rocks. All investigated rocks are enriched in light rare earth elements (LREEs), large ion lithophile elements (LILEs), depleted in high-field strength elements (HFSEs), and show weak or insignificant Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.57-1.02) in chondrite-normalized trace element patterns. The Tarom-Olya pluton samples also show depletions in Nb, Ta and Ti typical of subduction-related arc magmatic signatures. The samples have relatively low ISr (0.7047-0.7051) and positive εNd(36 Ma) (+ 0.39 to + 2.10) values. The Pb isotopic ratios show a (206Pb/204Pb)i ratio of 18.49-18.67, (207Pb/204Pb)i ratio of 15.58-15.61 and (208Pb/204Pb)i ratio of 38.33-38.77. The εHf(t) values of the Tarom-Olya pluton zircons vary from - 5.9 to + 8.4, with a peak at + 2 to + 4. The depleted mantle Hf model ages for the Tarom-Olya samples are close to 600 Ma. These isotope evidences indicate contribution of juvenile sources in petrogenesis of the Tarom-Olya pluton. Geochemical and isotopic data suggest that the parental magma of the Tarom-Olya pluton was mainly derived from a sub-continental lithospheric mantle source, which was metasomatized by fluids and melts from the subducted Neotethyan slab with a minor crustal contribution. Subsequent hot asthenospheric upwelling and lithospheric extension caused decompression melting in the final stage of

  10. Constraints on Braneworld Gravity Models from a Kinematic Limit on the Age of the Black Hole XTE J1118+480

    SciTech Connect

    Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2007-05-04

    In braneworld gravity models with a finite anti-de Sitter space (AdS) curvature in the extra dimension, the AdS/conformal field theory correspondence leads to a prediction for the lifetime of astrophysical black holes that is significantly smaller than the Hubble time, for asymptotic curvatures that are consistent with current experiments. Using the recent measurements of the position, three-dimensional spatial velocity, and mass of the black hole XTE J1118+480, I calculate a lower limit on its kinematic age of {>=}11 Myr (95% confidence). This translates into an upper limit for the asymptotic AdS curvature in the extra dimensions of <0.08 mm, which significantly improves the limit obtained by table top experiments of sub mm gravity.

  11. Provenance and tectonic-paleogeographic evolution: Constraints from detrital zircon U-Pb ages of Late Triassic-Early Jurassic deposits in the northern Sichuan basin, central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Tongbin; Cheng, Nanfei; Song, Maoshuang

    2016-09-01

    U-Pb ages of 290 new detrital zircons from five Late Triassic-Early Jurassic sandstone samples in the northern Sichuan basin, along with other geological data, are used to constrain the sediment provenance and evaluate tectonic-paleogeographic evolution for the adjacent orogens through/from which these sediments were potentially derived. The Upper Triassic depocenter was located at the front of the Longmen Shan belt, and sediments in the western, southern and eastern Sichuan basin shared the southern North China block (NCB) and Qinling belt with the eastern Songpan-Ganzi terrane of Middle-Upper Triassic via the Longmen Shan belt, whereas the northern part of the basin was fed by dominant South Qinling belt (SQB) and northern Yangtze block and possibly subordinate southern NCB. Also, the youngest population in the northern Sichuan basin has a slightly younger age peak (∼235 Ma) than those (∼270 Ma) in other parts of the basin. During the Early Jurassic, the depocenter was still at the front of the Longmen Shan belt but only northern regions (e.g., SQB and northern Yangtze block) fed the basin. The northern Sichuan basin received less sediments from the southern NCB and more from the SQB and northern Yangtze block during the Early Jurassic than during the Late Triassic. The middle Mesoproterozoic detrital zircons, which likely originated from the North Qinling belt and northern Yangtze block where rocks with these zircons may be unexposed, occur more widely in the Lower Jurassic than in the Upper Triassic. These facts suggest that from the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic, it was increasingly difficult for sediments to transport from the NCB into the northern Sichuan basin and the provenance transferred progressively from the southern NCB to both the SQB and northern Yangtze block, implying the continuous South China block-NCB collision during that time.

  12. Zircon U-Pb age and geochemical constraints on the origin and tectonic implication of Cadomian (Ediacaran-Early Cambrian) magmatism in SE Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyarslan, Melahat; Lın, Yu-Chin; Bingöl, A. Feyzi; Chung, Sun-Lin

    2016-11-01

    The Bitlis-Pütürge Massifs and Derik volcanics that crop out in the Southeast Anatolian Belt are parts of the Cadomian domain in Anatolia where relicts of the oldest continental crust of Turkey are exposed. The Bitlis-Pütürge Massifs contain a Neoproterozoic basement, with overlying Phanerozoic rocks that were imbricated, metamorphosed and thrust over the edge of Arabia during the Alpine orogeny. The basement consists mainly of granitic to tonalitic augen gneisses and metagranites, associated with schists, amphibolites and paragneisses. Based on whole-rock geochemical data, the augen gneisses are interpreted to have protoliths crystallized from subduction zone magmas. This study conducted the first zircon dating on two augen gneisses that gave 206Pb/238U dates of 551 ± 6 and 544 ± 4 Ma, interpreted as the formation ages of the Pütürge Massif, broadly coeval to those of the Bitlis metagranites and the Derik volcanics that occurred from ca. 581 to 529 Ma (the Ediacaran-early Cambrian). The ɛHf(t) values (+1.2 to -5.3) of the dated zircons, with crustal model ages (TDMC) from 1.4 to 1.8 Ga, indicate that formation of the Pütürge Massif involves an older, most likely the Mesoproterozoic, continental crust component. Similar to the Bitlis-Pütürge gneisses, coeval basement rocks are widespread in the Tauride-Anatolide platform (e.g., the Menderes Massif). All these dispersed Cadomian basement rocks are interpreted as fragments of the Ediacaran-Early Cambrian continental arcs bordering the active margin of northern Gondwana.

  13. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  14. ON A SUFFICIENT CONDITION FOR ABSOLUTE CONTINUITY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The formulation of a condition which yields absolute continuity when combined with continuity and bounded variation is the problem considered in the...Briefly, the formulation is achieved through a discussion which develops a proof by contradiction of a sufficiently theorem for absolute continuity which uses in its hypothesis the condition of continuity and bounded variation .

  15. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  16. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  17. The Cognitive Constraints of Lifelong Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morais, Jose; Kolinsky, Regine

    1996-01-01

    Acquisition of linguistic and perceptual abilities takes place at a very early age, and later learning involves knowledge and information processing strategies. Aging has greater impact on retention of the latter. Lifelong learning must accommodate the constraints of aging on cognitive abilities. (SK)

  18. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  19. The transition zone between the Pernambuco-Alagoas Domain and the Sergipano Belt (Borborema Province, NE Brazil): Geochronological constraints on the ages of deposition, tectonic setting and metamorphism of metasedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Sérgio P.; Rangel da Silva, José Maurício; Bruguier, Olivier

    2016-12-01

    Metasedimentary rocks in the transition zone between the Pernambuco-Alagoas Domain and the Sergipano Belt (southern Borborema Province, NE Brazil) were studied in order to place constraints on the geological evolution of this portion of West Gondwana. High-grade metamorphic conditions are recorded by the garnet-sillimanite assemblage and common anatexis in pelitic paragneisses. Two samples dated by LA-ICP-MS in the north yielded a predominance of early Neoproterozoic detrital zircons, with age peaks between 990 Ma and 827 Ma, with the youngest grain suggesting deposition after 670 Ma. Low Th/U zircons (Th/U < 0.1) in these samples display a significant spread in ages, from 691 to 568 Ma. One sample in the south is dominated by a homogenous population of Paleoproterozoic grains, with a 2200 Ma peak. The southernmost sample also contains Paleoproterozoic zircons but the most abundant population is Neoproterozoic, and characterized by age peaks at c. 670, 647 and 623 Ma. These results show that deposition of sediments in the southern PEAL Domain and in the northern Sergipano Belt occurred in the Late Neoproterozoic. The differing age spectra between samples are correlated with potential source rocks in the study area or in its proximity, reflecting variable input from local sources. The data are interpreted to indicate that during the course of an extensional event at c. 673-647 Ma, Tonian granitic intrusions and synextensional metamorphic rocks were unroofed and eroded to provide zircons for sediments deposited in the north, whereas Paleoproterozoic and synextensional magmatic rocks were the main sources for sediments in the south. Peak metamorphic conditions and contractional deformation are constrained to c. 630-600 Ma.

  20. Geochronology and geochemistry of Eocene-aged volcanic rocks around the Bafra (Samsun, N Turkey) area: Constraints for the interaction of lithospheric mantle and crustal melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temizel, İrfan; Arslan, Mehmet; Yücel, Cem; Abdioğlu, Emel; Ruffet, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    40Ar-39Ar age, whole-rock chemical, and Sr-Nd isotope data are presented for the post-collisional, Eocene (51.3-44.1 Ma)-aged volcanic rocks from the Bafra (Samsun) area in the western part of the Eastern Pontides (N Turkey) aiming to unravel their sources and evolutionary history. The studied Eocene volcanic rocks can be divided into two groups: analcime-bearing (tephritic lava flows and dykes) and analcime-free (basaltic to trachytic lava flows and basaltic dykes). The analcime-bearing volcanic rocks have a fine-grained porphyritic texture with clinopyroxene phenocrysts, whereas analcime-free volcanic rocks show a variety of textures including hyalo-microlitic microgranular porphyritic, intersertal, trachytic, fluidal, and glomeroporphyritic. The volcanic rocks also show evidence of mineral-melt disequilibrium textures such as sieved, rounded, and corroded plagioclases, partially melted and dissolved clinopyroxenes and poikilitic texture. Petrochemically, the parental magmas of the volcanic rocks evolved from alkaline to calc-alkaline lava suites and include high-K and shoshonitic compositions. They display enrichments in light rare earth and large ion lithophile elements such as Sr, K, and Rb, as well as depletions in high field strength elements such as Nb, Ta, Zr, and Ti, resembling subduction-related magmas. The analcime-bearing and -free volcanic rocks share similar incompatible element ratios and chondrite-normalised rare rearth element patterns, indicating that they originated from similar sources. They also have relatively low to moderate initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.7042-0.7051), high positive εNd(t) values (+ 0.20 to + 3.32), and depleted mantle Nd model ages (TDM1 = 0.63-0.93 Ga, TDM2 = 0.58-0.84 Ga). The bulk-rock chemical and Sr-Nd isotope features as well as the high Rb/Y and Th/Zr, but low Nb/Zr and Nb/Y ratios, indicate that the volcanic rocks were derived from a lithospheric mantle source that had been metasomatised by slab-derived fluids. Trace element

  1. Paleoproterozoic high-sulfidation mineralization in the Tapajós gold province, Amazonian Craton, Brazil: geology, mineralogy, alunite argon age, and stable-isotope constraints

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juliani, Caetano; Rye, Robert O.; Nunes, Carmen M.D.; Snee, Lawrence W.; Correa, Rafael H.; Monteiro, Lena V.S.; Bettencourt, Jorge S.; Neumann, Rainer; Neto, Arnaldo A.

    2005-01-01

    The Brazilian Tapajós gold province contains the first evidence of high-sulfidation gold mineralization in the Amazonian Craton. The mineralization appears to be in large nested calderas. The Tapajós–Parima (or Ventuari–Tapajós) geological province consists of a metamorphic, igneous, and sedimentary sequence formed during a 2.10 to 1.87 Ga ocean−continent orogeny. The high-sulfidation mineralization with magmatic-hydrothermal alunite is related to hydrothermal breccias hosted in a rhyolitic volcanic ring complex that contains granitic stocks ranging in age from 1.89 to 1.87 Ga. Cone-shaped hydrothermal breccias, which flare upward, contain vuggy silica and have an overlying brecciated cap of massive silica; the deposits are located in the uppermost part of a ring-structure volcanic cone. Drill cores of one of the hydrothermal breccias contain alunite, natroalunite, pyrophyllite, andalusite, quartz, rutile, diaspore, woodhouseite–svanbergite, kaolinite, and pyrite along with inclusions of enargite–luzonite, chalcopyrite, bornite, and covellite. The siliceous core of this alteration center is surrounded by advanced argillic and argillic alteration zones that grade outward into large areas of propylitically altered rocks with sericitic alteration assemblages at depth. Several occurrences and generations of alunite are observed. Alunite is disseminated in the advanced argillic haloes that envelop massive and vuggy silica or that underlie the brecciated silica cap. Coarse-grained alunite also occurs in branching veins and locally is partly replaced by a later generation of fine-grained alunite. Silicified hydrothermal breccias associated with the alunite contain an estimated reserve of 30 tonnes of gold in rock that grades up to 4.5 g t−1 Au. Seven alunite samples gave 40Ar/39Ar ages of 1.869 to 1.846 Ga, with various degrees of apparent minor Ar loss. Stable isotopic data require a magmatic-hydrothermal origin for the alunite, typical for high

  2. U-Pb (zircon) and geochemical constraints on the age, origin, and evolution of Paleozoic arc magmas in the Oyu Tolgoi porphyry Cu-Au district, southern Mongolia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wainwright, A.J.; Tosdal, R.M.; Wooden, J.L.; Mazdab, F.K.; Friedman, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    Uranium-Pb (zircon) ages are linked with geochemical data for porphyry intrusions associated with giant porphyry Cu-Au systems at Oyu Tolgoi to place those rocks within the petrochemical framework of Devonian and Carboniferous rocks of southern Mongolia. In this part of the Gurvansayhan terrane within the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, the transition from Devonian tholeiitic marine rocks to unconformably overlying Carboniferous calc-alkaline subaerial to shallow marine volcanic rocks reflects volcanic arc thickening and maturation. Radiogenic Nd and Pb isotopic compositions (??Nd(t) range from +3.1 to +7.5 and 206Pb/204Pb values for feldspars range from 17.97 to 18.72), as well as low high-field strength element (HFSE) contents of most rocks (mafic rocks typically have <1.5% TiO2) are consistent with magma derivation from depleted mantle in an intra-oceanic volcanic arc. The Late Devonian and Carboniferous felsic rocks are dominantly medium- to high-K calc-alkaline and characterized by a decrease in Sr/Y ratios through time, with the Carboniferous rocks being more felsic than those of Devonian age. Porphyry Cu-Au related intrusions were emplaced in the Late Devonian during the transition from tholeiitic to calc-alkaline arc magmatism. Uranium-Pb (zircon) geochronology indicates that the Late Devonian pre- to syn-mineral quartz monzodiorite intrusions associated with the porphyry Cu-Au deposits are ~372Ma, whereas granodiorite intrusions that post-date major shortening and are associated with less well-developed porphyry Cu-Au mineralization are ~366Ma. Trace element geochemistry of zircons in the Late Devonian intrusions associated with the porphyry Cu-Au systems contain distinct Th/U and Yb/Gd ratios, as well as Hf and Y concentrations that reflect mixing of magma of distinct compositions. These characteristics are missing in the unmineralized Carboniferous intrusions. High Sr/Y and evidence for magma mixing in syn- to late-mineral intrusions distinguish the Late

  3. Nd, Sr, Pb, Ar, and O isotopic systematics of Sturgeon Lake kimberlite, Saskatchewan, Canada: constraints on emplacement age, alteration, and source composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegner, E.; Roddick, J. C.; Fortier, S. M.; Hulbert, L.

    1995-06-01

    Rb-Sr isotopic dating of phlogopite megacryst samples separated from Sturgeon Lake kimberlite, Saskatchewan, yields a crystallization age of 98±1 Ma (2 σ, MSWD=1.2; 87Sr/86Sr( t)=0.7059). The 40Ar/39Ar analyses of a phlogopite megacryst sample indicate the presence of large amounts of excess 40Ar and yield an excessively old age of ˜410 Ma. Assessment of the Ar data using isotope correlation plots indicates clustering of the data points about a mixing line between the radiogenic 40Ar component at 98 Ma and a trapped component with uniform 36Ar/40Ar and Cl/40Ar. Values of δ 18O as high as +20‰ (VSMOW) for calcite from the groundmass and a whole-rock sample indicate pervasive low-temperature alteration. The δ 13C of matrix carbonate is -11.3‰ (PDB), slightly lighter than typical values from the literature. The δ 18O values of about +5‰ (VSMOW) for brown phlogopite megacrysts may be primary, green phlogopites are interpreted to be an alteration product of the brown variety and are 2‰ heavier. Initial Nd-Sr-Pb isotopic ratios for a whole-rock sample ( ɛ Nd=+0.8; 87Sr/86Sr=0.7063, 206Pb/204Pb=18.67, 207Pb/204Pb=15.54, 208Pb/204Pb=38.97) suggest an affinity with group I kimberlites. Initial ɛ Nd values of +1.7 and +0.5 (87Sr/86Sr( t)=0.7053 and 0.7050) for eclogitic and lherzolitic garnet megacryst samples, and values of 0.0 for two phlogopite megacryst samples reflect an origin from an isotopically evolving melt due to assimilation of heterogeneous mantle. Lilac high-Cr lherzolitic garnet megacrysts give an unusually high ɛ Nd(98. Ma) of +28.6 (87Sr/86Sr=0.7046) indicating a xenocrystic origin probably from the lithospheric mantle. The very radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr and 206Pb/204Pb ratios of the kimberlite are consistent with melting of EM II (enriched) mantle components.

  4. New age and geochemical constraints on the origin of Quaternary adakite-like lavas in the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Kwan-Nang; Chung, Sun-Lin; Zarrinkoub, Mohammad Hossein; Li, Xian-Hua; Lee, Hao-Yang; Lin, Te-Hsien; Chiu, Han-Yi

    2016-11-01

    Adakite-like lavas from the Iranian segment of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone have been considered as partial melts derived from a subducted Neotethyan slab, a hypothesis that cannot be further evaluated due to the lack of systematic age and radiogenic isotopic data. Here, we revisit the Anar region, Iran where such lavas were reported by providing these data to examine their probable origin as slab melts. New SIMS zircon U-Pb ages attest to eruption at ca. 1 to 2 Ma, postdating the Arabia-Eurasia collision. The lavas are characterized by dacitic to rhyolitic, metaluminous to slightly peraluminous and trondhjemitic compositions, and incompatible element patterns similar to continental crustal rocks. Extreme depletion in Nb, Ta, Y and the heavy REE relative to the light and middle REEs reflects control by garnet and rutile. Except one sample presumably affected by secondary gain of radiogenic Sr, the depleted Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions relative to the Bulk Silicate Earth [(87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.7040 to 0.7043; εNd(t) = + 3.2 to + 5.3; εHf(t) = + 10.5 to + 11.3] indicate magma genesis from juvenile source rocks. A slab melt origin for the Anar lavas is very unlikely and the reason is twofold. First, the Y and HREE of the source rocks estimated by inversed batch melting models assuming garnet pyroxenite residue are far too low compared with MORB-like lithologies and subducted sediments. Second, the low MgO, Ni and Cr of the lavas point to limited interaction with peridotites in a mantle wedge. Fractionation-related models are also unlikely due to the apparent lack of broadly coeval, mafic precursor magmas without adakitic signature. The low-Y and low-HREE source rocks revealed by the melting models, together with the low MgO, Ni and Cr of the Anar lavas, can be explained by lower crustal melting under eclogite-facies conditions. These source rocks were most likely high-pressure cumulates in the root of the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic arc, a Neotethyan arc that was

  5. Re-Os and Lu-Hf isotopic constraints on the formation and age of mantle pyroxenites from the Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Bizimis, Michael; Haluzová, Eva; Sláma, Jiří; Svojtka, Martin; Hirajima, Takao; Erban, Vojtěch

    2016-07-01

    We report on the Lu-Hf and Re-Os isotope systematics of a well-characterized suite of spinel and garnet pyroxenites from the Gföhl Unit of the Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic, Austria). Lu-Hf mineral isochrons of three pyroxenites yield undistinguishable values in the range of 336-338 Ma. Similarly, the slope of Re-Os regression for most samples yields an age of 327 ± 31 Ma. These values overlap previously reported Sm-Nd ages on pyroxenites, eclogites and associated peridotites from the Gföhl Unit, suggesting contemporaneous evolution of all these HT-HP rocks. The whole-rock Hf isotopic compositions are highly variable with initial εHf values ranging from - 6.4 to + 66. Most samples show a negative correlation between bulk rock Sm/Hf and εHf and, when taking into account other characteristics (e.g., high 87Sr/86Sr), this may be explained by the presence of recycled oceanic sediments in the source of the pyroxenite parental melts. A pyroxenite from Horní Kounice has decoupled Hf-Nd systematics with highly radiogenic initial εHf of + 66 for a given εNd of + 7.8. This decoupling is consistent with the presence of a melt derived from a depleted mantle component with high Lu/Hf. Finally, one sample from Bečváry plots close to the MORB field in Hf-Nd isotope space consistent with its previously proposed origin as metamorphosed oceanic gabbro. Some of the websterites and thin-layered pyroxenites have variable, but high Os concentrations paralleled by low initial γOs. This reflects the interaction of the parental pyroxenitic melts with a depleted peridotite wall rock. In turn, the radiogenic Os isotope compositions observed in most pyroxenite samples is best explained by mixing between unradiogenic Os derived from peridotites and a low-Os sedimentary precursor with highly radiogenic 187Os/188Os. Steep increase of 187Os/188Os at nearly uniform 187Re/188Os found in a few pyroxenites may be connected with the absence of primary sulfides, but the presence of minor

  6. Palaeomagnetism and K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages in the Ali Sabieh area (Republic of Djibouti and Ethiopia): constraints on the mechanism of Aden ridge propagation into southeastern Afar during the last 10 Myr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audin, L.; Quidelleur, X.; Coulié, E.; Courtillot, V.; Gilder, S.; Manighetti, I.; Gillot, P.-Y.; Tapponnier, P.; Kidane, T.

    2004-07-01

    A new detailed palaeomagnetic study of Tertiary volcanics, including extensive K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating, helps constrain the deformation mechanisms related to the opening processes of the Afar depression (Ethiopia and Djibouti). Much of the Afar depression is bounded by 30 Myr old flood basalts and floored by the ca 2 Myr old Stratoid basalts, and evidence for pre-2 Ma deformation processes is accessible only on its borders. K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating of several mineral phases from rhyolitic samples from the Ali Sabieh block shows indistinguishable ages around 20 Myr. These ages can be linked to separation of this block in relation to continental breakup. Different amounts of rotation are found to the north and south of the Holhol fault zone, which cuts across the northern part of the Ali Sabieh block. The southern domain did not record any rotation for the last 8 Myr, whereas the northern domain experienced approximately 12 +/- 9° of clockwise rotation. We propose to link this rotation to the counter-clockwise rotation observed in the Danakil block since 7 Ma. This provides new constraints on the early phases of rifting and opening of the southern Afar depression in connection with the propagation of the Aden ridge. A kinematic model of propagation and transfer of extension within southern Afar is proposed, with particular emphasis on the previously poorly-known period from 10 to 4 Ma.

  7. Propagating Resource Constraints Using Mutual Exclusion Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy; Sanchez, Romeo; Do, Minh B.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of the most recent techniques for propagating resource constraints in Constraint Based scheduling is Energy Constraint. This technique focuses in precedence based scheduling, where precedence relations are taken into account rather than the absolute position of activities. Although, this particular technique proved to be efficient on discrete unary resources, it provides only loose bounds for jobs using discrete multi-capacity resources. In this paper we show how mutual exclusion reasoning can be used to propagate time bounds for activities using discrete resources. We show that our technique based on critical path analysis and mutex reasoning is just as effective on unary resources, and also shows that it is more effective on multi-capacity resources, through both examples and empirical study.

  8. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM

  9. Geochronogy of leucogranites in Yadong region: constraints on the age of the South Tibetan Detachment System in central-eastern Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-Chao; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Ji, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Jian-Gang; Liu, Xiao-Chi

    2016-04-01

    . Field relations indicate that after intrusion of the leucogranites, there was no significant movement of the shear zone. Monazite from the main body and dykes were analyzed for Th-Pb isotopes to constrain the time of intrusions. Three samples from the main body of Dingga pluton show fairly homogeneous 208Pb/232Th data, with weighted average dates of 19.3 ± 0.2 Ma, 20.0 ± 0.3 Ma, and 20.8 ± 0.1 Ma, respectively. These dates indicate an Early Miocene emplacement and crystallization age of ca. 20 Ma. Dykes structurally adjacent to the main bodies of Dingga pluton and Gaowu pluton gave final crystallization age of 16.4 ± 0.3 Ma and 16.3 ± 0.3 Ma, respectively. From monazite geochronology and field relationships, we can conclude that the undeformed Dingga and Gaowu leucogranites crosscuted the boundary between the GHS and THS at ca. 20 Ma and ca. 16 Ma, and constrained the end of motion of the STDS in Yadong region at least prior to 20 Ma.

  10. Zircon age and geochemistry of the Tost bimodal volcanic rocks: Constraints on the Early Carboniferous tectonic evolution of the South Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shunhu; Miao, Laicheng; Zhang, Fochin; Meng, Qingren; Zhu, Mingshuai; Baatar, Munkhtsengel; Anaad, Chimedtseren

    2016-04-01

    SIMS zircon U-Pb dating, geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic data are presented for the Late Paleozoic volcanic rocks from Tost area in Mongolia, the southern portion of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). The Tost volcanic rocks show a bimodal feature characterized by a mafic member of basalt and a felsic component of rhyolite, which are temporally and spatially related each other, implying a genetic relationship. Zircon U-Pb isotopic data of the rhyolite constrain the Tost bimodal magmatism occurring from 355 Ma to 320 Ma. The Tost basalt is characterized by high abundances in Th, U and Pb, slightly enriched LREE patterns and low HFSE/LREE ratios. These features, together with their OIB-like isotopic signature ((87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.7039378-0.704397, εNd(t) = 3.55-5.02), suggest that they were likely derived from low-degree partial melting of a metasomatized asthenospheric mantle source with subordinate input of subduction components. The Tost rhyolite, which displays an intimate affinity to Tost basalt, with enrichment in Th, U and Pb, depleted in Nb, Ta and Ti, and gently right-tilted REE patterns, is inferred to be generated by partial melting of a juvenile lower crustal source heated by underplating mafic magmas which rise from asthenosphere during continued rifting. The Tost bimodal volcanic rocks are comparable both in age and composition with those in the East Tianshan, which together constitute an E-W-oriented belt of bimodal volcanic rocks, marking an Early Carboniferous rifting event. Considering regional geology, we propose that the rifting took place in a back-arc extensional setting, probably induced by the subduction of the Dzungaria Ocean between the East Tianshan and Junggar-Kazakhstan plate during the Early Carboniferous.

  11. Chemical, Isotopic and Remote Sensing Constraints on the Age, Origin, and Groundwater Potentiality in the Rub Al Khali Aquifer System, Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, M.; Sturchio, N. C.; Sefry, S.; Ahmed, M.; AboAbdallah, M.; Emil, M.; Chouinard, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Rub Al Khali (RAK) region of southern Saudi Arabia is underlain by a large aquifer system having three main aquifer groups. Large-scale groundwater flow is recharged mainly from precipitation falling on higher elevations in the southwest Red Sea Hills and flows toward the Arabian Gulf. The average annual precipitation was estimated at 55 x109 m3 from 3-hourly Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data acquired (1998-2012) over the RAK and a surface drainage network was delineated across the RAK from digital elevation models. Fourteen groundwater samples were collected from wells in the western portion of the RAK and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. Analysis of the water samples indicate the presence of relatively fresh (Total Dissolved Solids [TDS] ranging from 800-2,800 mg/L in deeper wells) groundwater resource that is suitable for direct use in irrigation and, with minor treatment, for drinking purposes. Major ions are Na, Ca, Cl, SO4 and HCO3. Radiocarbon model ages of the waters span a range from 1,400 to 30,600 years before present. Stable isotopic compositions indicate origin as meteoric precipitation with little or no evaporation except where sampled in open-pit wells. The waters are generally non-radioactive with the exception of samples collected from the Eocene aquifer in the eastern part of the study area; these were found to have 226Ra activities exceeding the US EPA's limit for drinking water. Examination of the inter-annual trends extracted from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) monthly (01/2003 - 09/2012) solutions over the RAK system shows near steady conditions. Sustainable use of groundwater in the western RAK is feasible, but requires additional study in the recharge area to quantify the locations and rates of modern recharge.

  12. Geological and 40Ar/39Ar age constraints on late-stage Deccan rhyolitic volcanism, inter-volcanic sedimentation, and the Panvel flexure from the Dongri area, Mumbai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Hetu C.; Pande, Kanchan

    2014-04-01

    Post-K-Pg Boundary Deccan magmatism is well known from the Mumbai area in the Panvel flexure zone. Represented by the Salsette Subgroup, it shows characters atypical of much of the Deccan Traps, including rhyolite lavas and tuffs, mafic tuffs and breccias, spilitic pillow basalts, and "intertrappean" sedimentary or volcanosedimentary deposits, with mafic intrusions as well as trachyte intrusions containing basaltic enclaves. The intertrappean deposits have been interpreted as formed in shallow marine or lagoonal environments in small fault-bounded basins due to syn-volcanic subsidence. We report a previously unknown sedimentary deposit underlying the Dongri rhyolite flow from the upper part of the Salsette Subgroup, with a westerly tectonic dip due to the Panvel flexure. We have obtained concordant 40Ar/39Ar ages of 62.6 ± 0.6 Ma (2σ) and 62.9 ± 0.2 Ma (2σ) for samples taken from two separate outcrops of this rhyolite. The results are significant in showing that (i) Danian inter-volcanic sedimentary deposits formed throughout Mumbai, (ii) the rock units are consistent with the stratigraphy postulated earlier for Mumbai, (iii) shale fragments known in some Dongri tuffs were likely derived from the sedimentary deposit under the Dongri rhyolite, (iv) the total duration of extrusive and intrusive Deccan magmatism was at least 8-9 million years, and (v) Panvel flexure formed, or continued to form, after 63 Ma, possibly even 62 Ma, and could not have formed by 65-64 Ma as concluded in a recent study.

  13. Timing and tectonic implications of the Pan-African Bangangte syenomonzonite, West Cameroon: Constraints from in-situ zircon U-Pb age and Hf-O isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchouankoue, Jean Pierre; Li, Xian-Hua; Belnoun, Rose Noel Ngo; Mouafo, Lucas; Ferreira, Valderez Pinto

    2016-12-01

    The Bangangte pluton is a SW-NE elongated (5 × 20 km) massif located in the southeastern part of the Pan-African North Equatorial Fold Belt in Cameroon, consisting of two units with dominant monzonites in the south and syenites in the north. SIMS U-Pb zircon dating yields consistent emplacement ages of 585 ± 4 Ma and 583 ± 4 Ma for the southern unit and the northern unit, respectively. The Bangangte rocks display typical shoshonitic compositions characterized by Na2O + K2O > 5 wt%, K2O/Na2O ∼2, enrichment in LILE and LREE, but depletion in HFSE. Rocks from both units have similar O-Hf isotopes, with the monzonite zircons from the southern unit showing slightly higher δ18O (7.0 ± 0.4‰) but lower εHf(t) (-15.3 ± 1.4) value than the syenite zircons from southern unit (δ18O = 6.0 ± 0.4‰; εHf(t) = -14.0 ± 2.0). They were generated by partial melting of an enriched mantle source metasomatized by previous subduction processes, accompanied by crystal fractionation of pyroxene, Ti-Fe oxides and apatite, as well as crustal contamination to varying degrees. These rocks display a transitional geochemical feature of the subduction-related and within-plate shoshonites, suggesting that they were most likely emplaced in a post-collisional setting at the waning stage of the Pan-African orogeny.

  14. Constraint monitoring in TOSCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Howard

    1992-01-01

    The Job-Shop Scheduling Problem (JSSP) deals with the allocation of resources over time to factory operations. Allocations are subject to various constraints (e.g., production precedence relationships, factory capacity constraints, and limits on the allowable number of machine setups) which must be satisfied for a schedule to be valid. The identification of constraint violations and the monitoring of constraint threats plays a vital role in schedule generation in terms of the following: (1) directing the scheduling process; and (2) informing scheduling decisions. This paper describes a general mechanism for identifying constraint violations and monitoring threats to the satisfaction of constraints throughout schedule generation.

  15. Differences in absolute and relative growth between two shell forms of Pinna nobilis (Mollusca: Bivalvia) along the Tunisian coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaoui, Lotfi; Tlig-Zouari, Sabiha; Katsanevakis, Stelios; Belgacem, Walid; Hassine, Oum Kalthoum Ben

    2011-08-01

    This study investigated the absolute and relative growth patterns of the fan mussel Pinna nobilis along the Tunisian coastline, taking into consideration both the variability among different areas and between the two shell forms "combed" and "straight and wide". Five subpopulations of the species were sampled, one from northern, two from eastern and two from southern Tunisia. Various assumptions on the growth patterns were tested based on an information theory approach and multi-model inference. For absolute growth, the assumption of different growth patterns between the two shell forms of P. nobilis and no difference among subpopulations was the most supported by the data. For the same age, "straight and wide" individuals gained on average greater lengths than the "combed" individuals. The absolute growth of the species was found to be asymptotic and the logistic model was the one most supported by the data. As for the relative growth, apart from the classical allometric model Y = aXb, more complicated models of the form ln Y = f(ln X) that either assumed non-linearities or breakpoints were tested in combination with assumptions for possible differences between the two forms and among subpopulations. Among the eight studied relationships between morphometric characters, the classical allometric model was supported in only two cases, while in all other cases more complicated models were supported. Moreover, the assumption of different growth patterns between the two forms was supported in three cases and the assumption of different growth patterns among subpopulations in four cases. Although precise relationships between the morphometric plasticity of the fan mussel and environmental factors have not been proven in this paper, local small scale constraints might be responsible of the different growth patterns observed in the same locality. A possible co-action of genetic factors should be evaluated in the future.

  16. Absolute realization of low BRDF value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zilong; Liao, Ningfang; Li, Ping; Wang, Yu

    2010-10-01

    Low BRDF value is widespread used in many critical domains such as space and military fairs. These values below 0.1 Sr-1 . So the Absolute realization of these value is the most critical issue in the absolute measurement of BRDF. To develop the Absolute value realization theory of BRDF , defining an arithmetic operators of BRDF , achieving an absolute measurement Eq. of BRDF based on radiance. This is a new theory method to solve the realization problem of low BRDF value. This theory method is realized on a self-designed common double orientation structure in space. By designing an adding structure to extend the range of the measurement system and a control and processing software, Absolute realization of low BRDF value is achieved. A material of low BRDF value is measured in this measurement system and the spectral BRDF value are showed within different angles allover the space. All these values are below 0.4 Sr-1 . This process is a representative procedure about the measurement of low BRDF value. A corresponding uncertainty analysis of this measurement data is given depend on the new theory of absolute realization and the performance of the measurement system. The relative expand uncertainty of the measurement data is 0.078. This uncertainty analysis is suitable for all measurements using the new theory of absolute realization and the corresponding measurement system.

  17. Integration of offshore seismic data, exploration wells, and onland outcrops as constraints on the tectonics and uplift age of metamorphic core complexes, eastern Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitz, G. G.; Mann, P.; Campos Aguiniga, H.

    2009-12-01

    High-grade metamorphic domes of the D’Entrecasteaux Islands (DEI) of eastern Papua New Guinea are located within continental crust at the tip of the westward propagating Woodlark spreading ridge. Multi-channel seismic data collected by the RV Maurice Ewing in 1992 was integrated with seismic data from 1974 and two wells drilled by the oil industry in 1973 to understand pattern and age of faults and clastic wedges in offshore basins surrounding the 2-2.5-km high DEI. The WNW-trending line of the DEI demarcates two areas of contrasting deformational and depositional histories. In the area of the Kiribisi and Trobriand basins north of the DEI, normal faults occupy a WNW-striking basin that began to rift in the early Miocene and continued to rift sporadically until the early Pliocene when all normal faults were buried by ~650 m of undeformed Plio-Pleistocene sediments. We infer that these basins formed as sub-basins within a larger forearc basin bounded to the north by the forearc high of the Trobriand Islands and to the south by the DEI. Uplift of the forearc high and inversion of normal faults near the high during the Pleistocene and suggests the possibility of present-day, southward subduction along the Trobriand trench. To the south of the DEI in the Goodenough basin, the Pleistocene section is thicker and deformed by active, WNW-striking normal faults with seafloor scarps and high-angle dips. Wedging of the Pleistocene clastic fill in a half-graben geometry along the Owen-Stanley fault in the Southern part of the Goodenough basin along the southern coastline of the bay indicates that most normal motion has now shifted to this fault system. The shift in extension from north of the DEI to the Owen-Stanley fault zone in post-Pliocene time likely signals the arrival of the propagating rift tip of the Woodlark basin. The presence of conglomerate with high-grade metamorphic clasts in the Pliocene section north of the DEI supports the idea that the uplift and erosion

  18. Magnetostratigraphy of sediments from Lake El'gygytgyn ICDP Site 5011-1: paleomagnetic age constraints for the longest paleoclimate record from the continental Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haltia, E. M.; Nowaczyk, N. R.

    2014-03-01

    deposition rate is approximately 44 cm kyr-1. Sediment deposition decelerates upcore and it is an order of magnitude lower during the Brunhes chron in comparison with the early Gauss chron. Decrease in sediment deposition in the late Pliocene probably relates to atmospheric and oceanic reorganization heralding the onset of Quaternary climate change. The high-quality magnetostratigraphy reconstructed from Lake El'gygytgyn sediments provides 12 first-order tie points to pin down the age of the longest paleoclimate record from the continental Arctic.

  19. Magnetostratigraphy of sediments from Lake El'gygytgyn ICDP Site 5011-1: paleomagnetic age constraints for the longest paleoclimate record from the continental Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haltia, E. M.; Nowaczyk, N. R.

    2013-09-01

    44 cm kyr-1. Sediment deposition decelerates upcore and it is an order of magnitude lower during the Brunhes chron when compared to that in early the Gauss chron. Decrease in sediment deposition in late Pliocene probably relates to atmospheric and oceanic reorganization heralding the onset of Quaternary climate change. The high-quality magnetostratigraphy reconstructed from Lake El'gygytgyn sediments provides 12 tie-points to pin down the age of the longest paleoclimate record from the continental Arctic.

  20. The Paleozoic tectonothermal evolution of the Bachu Uplift of the Tarim Basin, NW China: Constraints from (U-Th)/He ages, apatite fission track and vitrinite reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Nansheng; Jiang, Guang; Mei, Qinghua; Chang, Jian; Wang, Shengjun; Wang, Jiyang

    2011-06-01

    This study uses a new application of the apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronometry technique to investigate the thermal history and tectonic uplift of sedimentary basins. Based on measured apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He ages, apatite fission track data and equivalent vitrinite reflectance measurements of borehole core samples, the thermal history of the Bachu Uplift of the Tarim Basin was modeled. Our analysis indicates a complicated thermal history in the Bachu Uplift region during the Paleozoic. The thermal gradient initially increased from 28-30 °C/km in the Cambrian period to 30-33 °C/km in the Ordovician period and increased up to 33-34 °C/km in the Silurian period. The thermal gradient began to decrease during the Devonian period and was estimated to be approximately 30 °C/km during the Late Devonian and the Early Carboniferous periods. The low thermal gradient phase was followed by an additional high gradient phase from the Late Carboniferous to the Early Permian when the gradient was approximately 32 °C/km. Thermal gradients in the Paleozoic were substantially different than the present-day gradient (21 °C/km). Tectonothermal modeling results also revealed uplift events in the Bachu Uplift region that shifted from south to north (e.g., ˜150 Ma to ˜100 Ma) and from west to east (e.g., ˜250 Ma to ˜150 Ma). This thermal evolution of the Bachu Uplift is consistent with its tectonic progression. The thermal spike in the Late Carboniferous and Early Permian periods could be related to magmatic activities in the Early Permian period. The Paleozoic thermal history of the Bachu Uplift region of the Tarim Basin could not be reconstructed properly due to a lack of reliable thermal indicators in the Lower Paleozoic successions, and a poor understanding of the thermal evolution of Lower Paleozoic source rocks during the Paleozoic has hindered petroleum exploration in this area. This study provides a new Paleozoic thermal history and shows that the Paleozoic

  1. Internal time marker (Q1) of the Cretaceous super chron in the Bay of Bengal - a new age constraint for the oceanic crust evolved between India and Elan Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, K. S.; Ismaiel, M.; Karlapati, S.; Saha, D.; Mishra, J.

    2014-12-01

    Analysis of marine magnetic data of the Bay of Bengal (BOB) led to suggest two different tectonic models for the evolution of lithosphere between India and East Antarctica. The first model explains the presence of M-series (M11 to M0) magnetic anomalies in BOB with a small room leaving for accommodating the crust evolved during the long Cretaceous Magnetic Quiet Period. Second model explains in other way that most part of the crust in BOB was evolved during the quite period together with the possible presence of oldest magnetic chron M1/ M0 in close vicinity of ECMI. It is with this perspective we have reinvestigated the existing and recently acquired magnetic data together with regional magnetic model of BOB for identification of new tectonic constraints, thereby to better understand the evolution of lithosphere. Analysis of magnetic data revealed the presence of spreading anomalies C33 and C34 in the vicinity of 8°N, and internal time marker (Q1) corresponding to the age 92 Ma at 12°N in a corridor between 85°E and Ninetyeast ridges. The new time marker and its location, indeed, become a point of reference and benchmark in BOB for estimating the age of oceanic crust towards ECMI. The magnetic model further reveals the presence of network of fracture zones (FZs) with different orientations. Between 85°E and Ninetyeast ridges, two near N-S FZs, approximately followed 87°E and 89.5°E are found to extend into BOB up to 12°N, from there the FZs reorient in N60°W direction and reach to the continental margin region. Along ECMI two sets of FZs are identified with a northern set oriented in N60°W and southern one in N40°W direction. This suggests that both north and south segments of the ECMI were evolved in two different tectonic settings. The bend in FZs marks the timing (92 Ma) of occurrence of first major plate reorganisation of the Indian Ocean and becomes a very critical constraint for understanding the plate tectonic process in early opening of the

  2. Luminescence Chronology for the Formation of Glacial Lake Calgary, Southern Alberta, Canada: Age Constraints for the Initiation of the Late Pleistocene Retreat of the Laurentide Ice Sheet from its Western Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munyikwa, K.; Rittenour, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Glacial Lake Calgary in southern Alberta, Canada, was a Late Pleistocene proglacial lake that formed along the southwest margin of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS), dammed by the retreating ice sheet margin. Attempts to constrain the age of the lake using radiocarbon methods have been hampered by the lack of datable organic material. In an effort to apply an alternative chronometer, this study uses two optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating approaches to date fine grained sand and silt that were deposited in the lake during its existence. OSL dating determines the depositional ages of sediments by measuring the energy from ionizing radiation that is stored in mineral grains such as quartz and feldspar. Dividing the stored energy, also referred to as the paleodose, by the rate at which the dose accumulated, allows an age to be ascertained. In one method applied in this study, the paleodose stored in the feldspar component of the sediment is determined using normalized infrared stimulated luminescence signals acquired using a portable OSL reader. In the second method, blue optically stimulated luminescence signals obtained from quartz separates from the sediment by employing a regular OSL reader and standard protocols are used to determine the paleodose. After correcting the feldspar data for anomalous fading, the age results from the two dating approaches are compared. The ages signify a time period by which the LIS had retreated from the study area and, hence, serve as constraints for the initiation of the retreat of the ice sheet from its western limit. Advantages and limitations of the dating methods are briefly discussed. Constraining the chronology of the retreat of the LIS from western Canada allows for a better understanding of the driving forces behind ice sheet retreat. Secondly, assigning a temporal scale to the postglacial evolution of the environment of the region permits a better insight into the dynamics of the physical and biological

  3. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  4. Magnifying absolute instruments for optically homogeneous regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tyc, Tomas

    2011-09-15

    We propose a class of magnifying absolute optical instruments with a positive isotropic refractive index. They create magnified stigmatic images, either virtual or real, of optically homogeneous three-dimensional spatial regions within geometrical optics.

  5. The Simplicity Argument and Absolute Morality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the author has maintained that there is a similarity of thought to be found in the writings of Cudworth, Emerson, and Husserl in his investigation of an absolute system of morality. (Author/RK)

  6. Orion Absolute Navigation System Progress and Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The absolute navigation design of NASA's Orion vehicle is described. It has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to benchmark the current state of the design and some of the rationale and analysis behind it. There are specific challenges to address when preparing a timely and effective design for the Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1), while still looking ahead and providing software extensibility for future exploration missions. The primary onboard measurements in a Near-Earth or Mid-Earth environment consist of GPS pseudo-range and delta-range, but for future explorations missions the use of star-tracker and optical navigation sources need to be considered. Discussions are presented for state size and composition, processing techniques, and consider states. A presentation is given for the processing technique using the computationally stable and robust UDU formulation with an Agee-Turner Rank-One update. This allows for computational savings when dealing with many parameters which are modeled as slowly varying Gauss-Markov processes. Preliminary analysis shows up to a 50% reduction in computation versus a more traditional formulation. Several state elements are discussed and evaluated, including position, velocity, attitude, clock bias/drift, and GPS measurement biases in addition to bias, scale factor, misalignment, and non-orthogonalities of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Another consideration is the initialization of the EKF in various scenarios. Scenarios such as single-event upset, ground command, and cold start are discussed as are strategies for whole and partial state updates as well as covariance considerations. Strategies are given for dealing with latent measurements and high-rate propagation using multi-rate architecture. The details of the rate groups and the data ow between the elements is discussed and evaluated.

  7. Absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, O. A.

    1993-11-01

    The program SEEF is a Fortran IV computer code for the extraction of absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions. When the evaporation residue is fed by its parents, only cumulative cross sections will be obtained from off-line gamma ray measurements. But, if one has the parent excitation function (experimental or calculated), this code will make it possible to determine absolute cross sections of any exit channel.

  8. Kelvin and the absolute temperature scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlichson, Herman

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the absolute temperature scale of Kelvin (William Thomson). Kelvin found that Carnot's axiom about heat being a conserved quantity had to be abandoned. Nevertheless, he found that Carnot's fundamental work on heat engines was correct. Using the concept of a Carnot engine Kelvin found that Q1/Q2 = T1/T2. Thermometers are not used to obtain absolute temperatures since they are calculated temperatures.

  9. Application of U-Th-Pb phosphate geochronology to young orogenic gold deposits: New age constraints on the formation of the Grass Valley gold district, Sierra Foothills province, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Ryan D.; Goldfarb, Richard J.; Monecke, Thomas; Fletcher, Ian R.; Cosca, Michael A.; Kelly, Nigel M.

    2015-01-01

    The Grass Valley orogenic gold district in the Sierra Nevada foothills province, central California, the largest historic gold producer of the North American Cordillera, comprises both steeply dipping east-west (E-W) veins located along lithologic contacts in accreted ca. 300 and 200 Ma oceanic rocks and shallowly dipping north-south (N-S) veins hosted by the Grass Valley granodiorite; the latter have yielded about 70 percent of the 13 million ounces of historic lode gold production in the district. The oceanic host rocks were accreted to the western margin of North America between 200 and 170 Ma, metamorphosed to greenschist and amphibolite facies, and uplifted between 175 and 160 Ma. Large-scale magmatism in the Sierra Nevada occurred between 170-140 Ma and 120-80 Ma, with the Grass Valley granodiorite being emplaced during the older episode of magmatism. Uranium-lead isotopic dating of hydrothermal xenotime yielded the first absolute age of 162±5 Ma for the economically more significant N-S veins. The vein-hosted xenotime, as well as associated monazite, are unequivocally of hydrothermal origin as indicated by textural and chemical characteristics, including grain shape, lack of truncated growth banding, lack of a Eu anomaly, and low U and Th concentrations. Furthermore, the crack-seal texture of the veins, with abundant wallrock slivers, suggests their formation as a result of episodic fluid flow possibly related to reoccurring seismic events, rather than a period of fluid exsolution from an evolving magma. The N-S veins are temporally distinct from a younger 153-151 Ma gold event that was previously reported for the E-W veins. Overlapping U-Pb zircon (159.9±2.2 Ma) and 40Ar/39Ar biotite and hornblende (159.7±0.6 to 161.9±1.4 Ma) ages and geothermobarometric calculations indicate that the Grass Valley granodiorite was emplaced at ca. 160 Ma at elevated temperatures (~800°C) within approximately 3 km of the paleosurface and rapidly cooled to the ambient

  10. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed.

  11. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  12. Strong thermal leptogenesis and the absolute neutrino mass scale

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, Pasquale Di; King, Sophie E.; Fiorentin, Michele Re E-mail: sk1806@soton.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We show that successful strong thermal leptogenesis, where the final asymmetry is independent of the initial conditions and in particular a large pre-existing asymmetry is efficiently washed-out, favours values of the lightest neutrino mass m{sub 1}∼>10 meV for normal ordering (NO) and m{sub 1}∼>3 meV for inverted ordering (IO) for models with orthogonal matrix entries respecting |Ω{sub ij}{sup 2}|∼<2. We show analytically why lower values of m{sub 1} require a higher level of fine tuning in the seesaw formula and/or in the flavoured decay parameters (in the electronic for NO, in the muonic for IO). We also show how this constraint exists thanks to the measured values of the neutrino mixing angles and could be tightened by a future determination of the Dirac phase. Our analysis also allows us to place a more stringent constraint for a specific model or class of models, such as SO(10)-inspired models, and shows that some models cannot realise strong thermal leptogenesis for any value of m{sub 1}. A scatter plot analysis fully supports the analytical results. We also briefly discuss the interplay with absolute neutrino mass scale experiments concluding that they will be able in the coming years to either corner strong thermal leptogenesis or find positive signals pointing to a non-vanishing m{sub 1}. Since the constraint is much stronger for NO than for IO, it is very important that new data from planned neutrino oscillation experiments will be able to solve the ambiguity.

  13. Zircon U-Pb ages and geochemistry of newly discovered Neoproterozoic orthogneisses in the Mishan region, NE China: Constraints on the high-grade metamorphism and tectonic affinity of the Jiamusi-Khanka Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Ge, Wen-chun; Zhao, Guo-chun; Bi, Jun-hui; Wang, Zhi-hui; Dong, Yu; Xu, Wen-liang

    2017-01-01

    The Jiamusi-Khanka Block, located in the easternmost segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), is one of the least understood blocks in northeastern China. The age of its basement, the timing of the high-grade metamorphism, and the tectonic affinity of this block have all been subjects of controversy. Here we describe newly discovered Neoproterozoic orthogneisses from the Mishan region in the central Jiamusi-Khanka Block. SIMS and LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating of the magmatic cores of zircons from three of these high-grade orthogneisses yielded weighted mean ages that range from 898 ± 4 to 891 ± 13 Ma, indicating that early Neoproterozoic magmatism did occur in the Jiamusi-Khanka Block. Twenty-two analyses of metamorphic zircons (rims as well as some grains) gave two groups of concordant ages, one at ca. 563 Ma, interpreted as the timing of the high-grade metamorphism, and the other around 518-496 Ma, interpreted as representing a subsequent retrograde metamorphism. The orthogneisses represent metamorphosed peraluminous syn-collisional syenogranites with SiO2 = 71.29-78.08 wt%, A/CNK = 1.06-1.99, and Na2O/K2O = 0.03-1.49, and they belong chemically to the high-potassium calc-alkaline series. They have low Sr (32-134 ppm) contents and Sr/Y ratios (1.6-16.9), and display strongly fractionated to nearly flat REE patterns with negative Eu anomalies (δEu = 0.22-0.95) and depletions in Nb-Ta. These geochemical characteristics suggest that the syenogranitic rocks were derived under low pressures from a crustal source with a high proportion of sedimentary rocks, perhaps in a subduction-related setting that was undergoing transition from compression to extension. In the context of the reconstruction of Gondwana, the ca. 898-891 Ma magmatic activity and the ca. 563 Ma high-grade metamorphism in the Mishan region provide constraints on the possible linkages between the Jiamusi-Khanka Block and East Gondwana during the Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic.

  14. Quantitative standards for absolute linguistic universals.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Steven T; Gibson, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Absolute linguistic universals are often justified by cross-linguistic analysis: If all observed languages exhibit a property, the property is taken to be a likely universal, perhaps specified in the cognitive or linguistic systems of language learners and users. In many cases, these patterns are then taken to motivate linguistic theory. Here, we show that cross-linguistic analysis will very rarely be able to statistically justify absolute, inviolable patterns in language. We formalize two statistical methods--frequentist and Bayesian--and show that in both it is possible to find strict linguistic universals, but that the numbers of independent languages necessary to do so is generally unachievable. This suggests that methods other than typological statistics are necessary to establish absolute properties of human language, and thus that many of the purported universals in linguistics have not received sufficient empirical justification.

  15. Absolute Distance Measurement with the MSTAR Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Peters, Robert; Burger, Johan; Ahn, Seh-Won; Steier, William H.; Fetterman, Harrold R.; Chang, Yian

    2003-01-01

    The MSTAR sensor (Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging) is a new system for measuring absolute distance, capable of resolving the integer cycle ambiguity of standard interferometers, and making it possible to measure distance with sub-nanometer accuracy. The sensor uses a single laser in conjunction with fast phase modulators and low frequency detectors. We describe the design of the system - the principle of operation, the metrology source, beamlaunching optics, and signal processing - and show results for target distances up to 1 meter. We then demonstrate how the system can be scaled to kilometer-scale distances.

  16. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed.

  17. Pixel-by-pixel absolute phase retrieval using three phase-shifted fringe patterns without markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chufan; Li, Beiwen; Zhang, Song

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a method that can recover absolute phase pixel by pixel without embedding markers on three phase-shifted fringe patterns, acquiring additional images, or introducing additional hardware component(s). The proposed three-dimensional (3D) absolute shape measurement technique includes the following major steps: (1) segment the measured object into different regions using rough priori knowledge of surface geometry; (2) artificially create phase maps at different z planes using geometric constraints of structured light system; (3) unwrap the phase pixel by pixel for each region by properly referring to the artificially created phase map; and (4) merge unwrapped phases from all regions into a complete absolute phase map for 3D reconstruction. We demonstrate that conventional three-step phase-shifted fringe patterns can be used to create absolute phase map pixel by pixel even for large depth range objects. We have successfully implemented our proposed computational framework to achieve absolute 3D shape measurement at 40 Hz.

  18. Comparative vs. Absolute Judgments of Trait Desirability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstee, Willem K. B.

    1970-01-01

    Reversals of trait desirability are studied. Terms indicating conservativw behavior appeared to be judged relatively desirable in comparative judgement, while traits indicating dynamic and expansive behavior benefited from absolute judgement. The reversal effect was shown to be a general one, i.e. reversals were not dependent upon the specific…

  19. New Techniques for Absolute Gravity Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-07

    Hammond, J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J. A., and Iliff, R. L. (1979) The AFGL absolute gravity system...International Gravimetric Bureau, No. L:I-43. 7. Hammond. J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J.A., and

  20. An Absolute Electrometer for the Physics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.; Cartacci, A.

    2009-01-01

    A low-cost, easy-to-use absolute electrometer is presented: two thin metallic plates and an electronic balance, usually available in a laboratory, are used. We report on the very good performance of the device that allows precise measurements of the force acting between two charged plates. (Contains 5 footnotes, 2 tables, and 6 figures.)

  1. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  2. Absolute Positioning Using the Global Positioning System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has becom a useful tool In providing relativ survey...Includes the development of a low cost navigator for wheeled vehicles. ABSTRACT The Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has become a useful tool In providing...technique of absolute or point positioning involves the use of a single Global Positioning System ( GPS ) receiver to determine the three-dimenslonal

  3. On Random Betweenness Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerdt, Andreas

    Ordering constraints are analogous to instances of the satisfiability problem in conjunctive normalform, but instead of a boolean assignment we consider a linear ordering of the variables in question. A clause becomes true given a linear ordering iff the relative ordering of its variables obeys the constraint considered.

  4. Creating Positive Task Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mally, Kristi K.

    2006-01-01

    Constraints are characteristics of the individual, the task, or the environment that mold and shape movement choices and performances. Constraints can be positive--encouraging proficient movements or negative--discouraging movement or promoting ineffective movements. Physical educators must analyze, evaluate, and determine the effect various…

  5. Credit Constraints in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochner, Lance; Monge-Naranjo, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We review studies of the impact of credit constraints on the accumulation of human capital. Evidence suggests that credit constraints have recently become important for schooling and other aspects of households' behavior. We highlight the importance of early childhood investments, as their response largely determines the impact of credit…

  6. Constraint Reasoning Over Strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Golden, Keith; Pang, Wanlin

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses an approach to representing and reasoning about constraints over strings. We discuss how many string domains can often be concisely represented using regular languages, and how constraints over strings, and domain operations on sets of strings, can be carried out using this representation.

  7. Absolute Radiation Thermometry in the NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünger, L.; Taubert, R. D.; Gutschwager, B.; Anhalt, K.; Briaudeau, S.; Sadli, M.

    2017-04-01

    A near infrared (NIR) radiation thermometer (RT) for temperature measurements in the range from 773 K up to 1235 K was characterized and calibrated in terms of the "Mise en Pratique for the definition of the Kelvin" (MeP-K) by measuring its absolute spectral radiance responsivity. Using Planck's law of thermal radiation allows the direct measurement of the thermodynamic temperature independently of any ITS-90 fixed-point. To determine the absolute spectral radiance responsivity of the radiation thermometer in the NIR spectral region, an existing PTB monochromator-based calibration setup was upgraded with a supercontinuum laser system (0.45 μm to 2.4 μm) resulting in a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio. The RT was characterized with respect to its nonlinearity, size-of-source effect, distance effect, and the consistency of its individual temperature measuring ranges. To further improve the calibration setup, a new tool for the aperture alignment and distance measurement was developed. Furthermore, the diffraction correction as well as the impedance correction of the current-to-voltage converter is considered. The calibration scheme and the corresponding uncertainty budget of the absolute spectral responsivity are presented. A relative standard uncertainty of 0.1 % (k=1) for the absolute spectral radiance responsivity was achieved. The absolute radiometric calibration was validated at four temperature values with respect to the ITS-90 via a variable temperature heatpipe blackbody (773 K ...1235 K) and at a gold fixed-point blackbody radiator (1337.33 K).

  8. A method to estimate the absolute ultrasonic nonlinearity parameter from relative measurements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongbeom; Song, Dong-Gi; Jhang, Kyung-Young

    2017-02-17

    The ultrasonic nonlinearity parameter, β, is determined from the displacement amplitude of the second-order harmonic frequency component generated during the propagation of ultrasonic waves through a material. This parameter is generally referred to as the absolute parameter. Meanwhile, it is difficult to measure the small displacement amplitude of the second-order harmonic component; therefore, most studies measure the relative parameter determined from the detected signal amplitude. However, for quantitative assessment of material degradation, the absolute parameter is still required. This study proposes a method to estimate the absolute parameter for damaged material by measuring the relative parameter. This method is based on the fact that the fractional ratio of the relative parameters between different materials is identical to that of the absolute parameters after compensation for material dependent differences such as the wavenumber and detection-sensitivity. In order to experimentally verify the method, the relative parameters of heat-treated Al6061-T6 alloy specimens with different aging times were measured to compare with absolute parameters directly measured by piezo-electric detection. The results show that the fluctuations of both parameters with respect to aging time were very similar to each other, and that the absolute parameters estimated by the proposed method were in good agreement with those measured directly.

  9. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR V335 SERPENTIS

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Fekel, Francis C.; Claret, Antonio E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu

    2012-08-15

    V335 Ser is now known to be an eccentric double-lined A1+A3 binary star with fairly deep (0.5 mag) partial eclipses. Previous studies of the system are improved with 7456 differential photometric observations from the URSA WebScope and 5666 from the NFO WebScope, and 67 high-resolution spectroscopic observations from the Tennessee State University 2 m automatic spectroscopic telescope. From dates of minima, the apsidal period is about 880 years. Accurate (better than 2%) masses and radii are determined from analysis of the two new light curves and the radial velocity curve. Theoretical models match the absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 380 Myr, though the age agreement for the two components is poor. Tidal theory correctly confirms that the orbit should still be eccentric, but we find that standard tidal theory is unable to match the observed asynchronous rotation rates of the components' surface layers.

  10. Geomagnetic paleointensity constraints on eruption timing at the Galapagos Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, J. A.; Ab Fatah, A.; Colman, A.; McClinton, J. T.; Sinton, J. M.; White, S. M.; Rubin, K. H.

    2011-12-01

    The intermediate-spreading-rate Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) experiences decreasing magma supply along axis with increasing distance from the nearby Galapagos hotspot. This allows us to explore the effects of variable magma supply on eruptive frequency, size, and style. Two contrasting sites on the GSC were mapped using high-resolution swath bathymetry, submersible observations, and camera tow photography. Individual eruptive units have been identified on the basis of these data and observations, as well sample geochemistry. In order to construct an eruptive history and to make broader interpretations regarding eruptive processes, it is necessary to place relative and absolute age constraints on these units. We present age determinations derived from geomagnetic paleointensity experiments at one of the study sites, centered at ~91°55'W, where increased magma supply from the hotspot results in an axial high. Due to the near monotonic decrease in geomagnetic paleointensity over the past ~500+ years, it is possible to infer relative age and to place approximate age constraints on eruptive units on the basis of their experimentally-determined paleointensity. Four of the largest identified units have been selected as a test case. Results suggest that the youngest flow is approximately 40 ± 30 years old. This flow unit is ~5 km long by 1 km wide, centered on the rise axis. An older flow (~180 ± 30 years old), also centered along the rise axis, lies to the west and its ~7 km along-axis exposure is interrupted by a large, flat-topped seamount. A number of active hydrothermal chimneys sit atop this flow unit, the heat source for which we infer to be related to the younger flow to the east or to a more recent shallow intrusion. The oldest documented flow is roughly 400 years old and is exposed slightly off-axis to the north of the two younger flows. The paleointensity-derived flow ages are consistent with available geological constraints on relative age. Based on

  11. Absolute plate motion of Africa around Hawaii-Emperor bend time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, S. M.; Wessel, P.; Müller, R. D.; Williams, S. E.; Harada, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Numerous regional plate reorganizations and the coeval ages of the Hawaiian Emperor bend (HEB) and Louisville bend of 50-47 Ma have been interpreted as a possible global tectonic plate reorganization at ˜chron 21 (47.9 Ma). Yet for a truly global event we would expect a contemporaneous change in Africa absolute plate motion (APM) reflected by physical evidence distributed on the Africa Plate. This evidence has been postulated to take the form of the Réunion-Mascarene bend which exhibits many HEB-like features, such as a large angular change close to ˜chron 21. However, the Réunion hotspot trail has recently been interpreted as a sequence of continental fragments with incidental hotspot volcanism. Here we show that the alternative Réunion-Mascarene Plateau trail can also satisfy the age progressions and geometry of other hotspot trails on the Africa Plate. The implied motion, suggesting a pivoting of Africa from 67 to 50 Ma, could explain the apparent bifurcation of the Tristan hotspot chain, the age reversals seen along the Walvis Ridge, the sharp curve of the Canary trail, and the diffuse nature of the St. Helena chain. To test this hypothesis further we made a new Africa APM model that extends back to ˜80 Ma using a modified version of the Hybrid Polygonal Finite Rotation Method. This method uses seamount chains and their associated hotspots as geometric constraints for the model, and seamount age dates to determine APM through time. While this model successfully explains many of the volcanic features, it implies an unrealistically fast global lithospheric net rotation, as well as improbable APM trajectories for many other plates, including the Americas, Eurasia and Australia. We contrast this speculative model with a more conventional model in which the Mascarene Plateau is excluded in favour of the Chagos-Laccadive Ridge rotated into the Africa reference frame. This second model implies more realistic net lithospheric rotation and far-field APMs, but

  12. Constraints from Seamounts on Pacific Plate or Plume Motion Prior to 80 Ma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konter, J. G.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Jackson, M. G.; Finlayson, V.; Konrad, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Hawaii-Emperor and Louisville hotspot tracks have long dominated the data set constraining absolute plate motion models. However, prior to ~80 Ma, multiple shorter, discontinuous hotspot trails and oceanic plateaus have been used to constrain absolute plate motion. Based on this earlier work, a clear Hawaii-Emperor style bend seems apparent around 100 Ma in the West Pacific Seamount Province (WPSP). More importantly, the ongoing debate on a plate versus plume motion origin for the Hawaii-Emperor Bend is applicable here, as the ~100 Ma bend may correspond to a global plate reorganization (Matthews et al., EPSL, 2012). Data for a comparison of bends comes from three groups with similar geographic patterns: 1) Mid-Pacific Mountains, Line Islands; 2) Shatsky Rise, Hess Rise, Musician and Wentworth Seamounts; and 3) Wake Seamounts, Marshall Islands, Magellan Seamounts. Both groups 1 and 2 feature a large igneous province (LIP) at their oldest end: Shatsky Rise and the Mid-Pacific Mountains. According to plate reconstructions these LIPs were constructed near all-ridge triple junctions, thus potential plume-ridge interactions need to be clarified before these LIPs can be used to define an absolute mantle reference frame. In contrast, the volcanoes of the third group (Wake, Marshall, Magellan) did erupt truly intra-plate and we therefore argue that this group provides a constraint on plate motion beyond 80 Ma that is independent of plume-ridge interactions. Since the volcanoes in this group are part of the WPSP, which is densely populated with seamounts, a combination of 40Ar/39Ar ages and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes is needed to distinguish different hotspot tracks in this region. Backtracking each volcano through its age to its original eruptive location and using compositional color-coding, reveals groupings and patterns that vary by plate motion model, while the temporal patterns of backtracked locations inform us about potential plume motions.

  13. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  14. Consistent thermostatistics forbids negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hilbert, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, a considerable number of theories and experiments have claimed the existence of negative absolute temperature in spin systems and ultracold quantum gases. This has led to speculation that ultracold gases may be dark-energy analogues and also suggests the feasibility of heat engines with efficiencies larger than one. Here, we prove that all previous negative temperature claims and their implications are invalid as they arise from the use of an entropy definition that is inconsistent both mathematically and thermodynamically. We show that the underlying conceptual deficiencies can be overcome if one adopts a microcanonical entropy functional originally derived by Gibbs. The resulting thermodynamic framework is self-consistent and implies that absolute temperature remains positive even for systems with a bounded spectrum. In addition, we propose a minimal quantum thermometer that can be implemented with available experimental techniques.

  15. Absolute measurement of length with nanometric resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, D.; Garoi, F.; Timcu, A.; Damian, V.; Logofatu, P. C.; Nascov, V.

    2005-08-01

    Laser interferometer displacement measuring transducers have a well-defined traceability route to the definition of the meter. The laser interferometer is de-facto length scale for applications in micro and nano technologies. However their physical unit -half lambda is too large for nanometric resolution. Fringe interpolation-usual technique to improve the resolution-lack of reproducibility could be avoided using the principles of absolute distance measurement. Absolute distance refers to the use of interferometric techniques for determining the position of an object without the necessity of measuring continuous displacements between points. The interference pattern as produced by the interference of two point-like coherent sources is fitted to a geometric model so as to determine the longitudinal location of the target by minimizing least square errors. The longitudinal coordinate of the target was measured with accuracy better than 1 nm, for a target position range of 0.4μm.

  16. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  17. Computer processing of spectrograms for absolute intensities.

    PubMed

    Guttman, A; Golden, J; Galbraith, H J

    1967-09-01

    A computer program was developed to process photographically recorded spectra for absolute intensity. Test and calibration films are subjected to densitometric scans that provide digitally recorded densities on magnetic tapes. The nonlinear calibration data are fitted by least-squares cubic polynomials to yield a good approximation to the monochromatic H&D curves for commonly used emulsions (2475 recording film, Royal-X, Tri-X, 4-X). Several test cases were made. Results of these cases show that the machine processed absolute intensities are accurate to within 15%o. Arbitrarily raising the sensitivity threshold by 0.1 density units above gross fog yields cubic polynomial fits to the H&D curves that are radiometrically accurate within 10%. In addition, curves of gamma vs wavelength for 2475, Tri-X, and 4-X emulsions were made. These data show slight evidence of the photographic Purkinje effect in the 2475 emulsion.

  18. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  19. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum.

  20. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Raffaele, L.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Marchetto, F.; Sacchi, R.; Giordanengo, S.; Monaco, V.

    2013-07-01

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  1. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  2. Negative absolute temperature for mobile particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Simon; Ronzheimer, Philipp; Schreiber, Michael; Hodgman, Sean; Bloch, Immanuel; Schneider, Ulrich

    2013-05-01

    Absolute temperature is usually bound to be strictly positive. However, negative absolute temperature states, where the occupation probability of states increases with their energy, are possible in systems with an upper energy bound. So far, such states have only been demonstrated in localized spin systems with finite, discrete spectra. We realized a negative absolute temperature state for motional degrees of freedom with ultracold bosonic 39K atoms in an optical lattice, by implementing the attractive Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. This new state strikingly revealed itself by a quasimomentum distribution that is peaked at maximum kinetic energy. The measured kinetic energy distribution and the extracted negative temperature indicate that the ensemble is close to degeneracy, with coherence over several lattice sites. The state is as stable as a corresponding positive temperature state: The negative temperature stabilizes the system against mean-field collapse driven by negative pressure. Negative temperatures open up new parameter regimes for cold atoms, enabling fundamentally new many-body states. Additionally, they give rise to several counterintuitive effects such as heat engines with above unity efficiency.

  3. Measurement of absolute gravity acceleration in Firenze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, M.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the University of Firenze (Italy). In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the Newtonian law at short distances are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. The only available datum, pertaining to the italian zero-order gravity network, was taken more than 20 years ago at a distance of more than 60 km from the study site. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 absolute gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The absolute accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are (980 492 160.6 ± 4.0) μGal and (980 492 048.3 ± 3.0) μGal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the absolute value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.

  4. System for absolute measurements by interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Douglas A.

    1993-03-01

    The most common problem of interferometric sensors is their inability to measure absolute path imbalance. Presented in this paper is a signal processing system that gives absolute, unambiguous reading of optical path difference for almost any style of interferometric sensor. Key components are a wide band (incoherent) optical source, a polychromator, and FFT electronics. Advantages include no moving parts in the signal processor, no active components at the sensor location, and the use of standard single mode fiber for sensor illumination and signal transmission. Actual absolute path imbalance of the interferometer is determined without using fringe counting or other inferential techniques. The polychromator extracts the interference information that occurs at each discrete wavelength within the spectral band of the optical source. The signal processing consists of analog and digital filtering, Fast Fourier analysis, and a peak detection and interpolation algorithm. This system was originally designed for use in a remote pressure sensing application that employed a totally passive fiber optic interferometer. A performance qualification was made using a Fabry-Perot interferometer and a commercially available laser interferometer to measure the reference displacement.

  5. Chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil.

    PubMed

    Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-10

    Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) absolute oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the absolute oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound.

  6. Is a 50 Ma Event Recorded in the Absolute Plate Motion of Africa?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, S. M.; Wessel, P.; Müller, R.; Harada, Y.

    2012-12-01

    There is considerable evidence for a global plate tectonic reorganization at ~Chron 21, as suggested by observed changes in global relative plate motion (RPM). The timings of these events appear to coincide with the age of the Hawaiian Emperor Bend (HEB), i.e., ~47-50 Ma. This 120° bend has traditionally been the poster child for the fixed hotspot hypothesis, suggesting the Pacific plate underwent a change in absolute plate motion (APM) as it moved over a more or less stationary Hawaiian hotspot. However, palaeomagnetic evidence favors southward motion of the Hawaii hotspot during the Emperor stage, limiting the amount of APM change required. In the Indo-Atlantic realm, RPMs involving Africa all seem compatible with a change in Africa APM around ~50 Ma. If this global plate reorganization took place there should also be physical evidence on the Africa plate itself due to the change in Africa APM. A candidate for such evidence may be the Réunion-Mascarene bend, which exhibits many HEB-like features. However, the Réunion hotspot also created the Chagos-Laccadive ridge as it encountered (and later crossed) the Carlsberg Ridge, and the oldest Mascarene section closest to the Seychelles may be continental in origin; thus there is some uncertainty in how to interpret the geometry. Furthermore, published APM models have had difficulty modeling this abrupt change in orientation. To reexamine this problem we derived a new Africa APM model that goes back to ~65 Ma using the Hybrid Polygonal Finite Rotation Method. The modeling incorporates the geometry and ages of seamount chains on the Africa plate and their associated hotspots as suitable constraints on an Africa APM model. The present as well as earlier positions of hotspots can be adjusted to get the best fit for the model. We examine how models with or without a ~50 Ma bend satisfy the geometries and age progressions of hotspot chains on the Africa plate and how well the predictions match observed paleolatitudes.

  7. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  8. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  9. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  10. Absolute Power Spectral Density Changes in the Magnetoencephalographic Activity During the Transition from Childhood to Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Carlos M; Rodríguez-Martínez, Elena I; Fernández, Alberto; Maestú, Fernando; Poza, Jesús; Gómez, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the pattern of reduction in absolute power spectral density (PSD) of magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals throughout development. Specifically, we wanted to explore whether the human skull's high permeability for electromagnetic fields would allow us to question whether the pattern of absolute PSD reduction observed in the human electroencephalogram is due to an increase in the skull's resistive properties with age. Furthermore, the topography of the MEG signals during maturation was explored, providing additional insights about the areas and brain rhythms related to late maturation in the human brain. To attain these goals, spontaneous MEG activity was recorded from 148 sensors in a sample of 59 subjects divided into three age groups: children/adolescents (7-14 years), young adults (17-20 years) and adults (21-26 years). Statistical testing was carried out by means of an analysis of variance (ANOVA), with "age group" as between-subject factor and "sensor group" as within-subject factor. Additionally, correlations of absolute PSD with age were computed to assess the influence of age on the spectral content of MEG signals. Results showed a broadband PSD decrease in frontal areas, which suggests the late maturation of this region, but also a mild increase in high frequency PSD with age in posterior areas. These findings suggest that the intensity of the neural sources during spontaneous brain activity decreases with age, which may be related to synaptic pruning.

  11. Brownian motion: Absolute negative particle mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Alexandra; Eichhorn, Ralf; Regtmeier, Jan; Duong, Thanh Tu; Reimann, Peter; Anselmetti, Dario

    2005-08-01

    Noise effects in technological applications, far from being a nuisance, can be exploited with advantage - for example, unavoidable thermal fluctuations have found application in the transport and sorting of colloidal particles and biomolecules. Here we use a microfluidic system to demonstrate a paradoxical migration mechanism in which particles always move in a direction opposite to the net acting force (`absolute negative mobility') as a result of an interplay between thermal noise, a periodic and symmetric microstructure, and a biased alternating-current electric field. This counterintuitive phenomenon could be used for bioanalytical purposes, for example in the separation and fractionation of colloids, biological molecules and cells.

  12. Arbitrary segments of absolute negative mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruyin; Nie, Linru; Chen, Chongyang; Wang, Chaojie

    2017-01-01

    In previous research work, investigators have reported only one or two segments of absolute negative mobility (ANM) in a periodic potential. In fact, many segments of ANM also occur in the system considered here. We investigate transport of an inertial particle in a gating ratchet periodic potential subjected to a constant bias force. Our numerical results show that its mean velocity can decrease with the bias force increasing, i.e. ANM phenomenon. Furthermore, the ANM can take place arbitrary segments, even up to more than thirty. Intrinsic physical mechanism and conditions for arbitrary segments of ANM to occur are discussed in detail.

  13. Absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-07-21

    With the increasing availability of positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging, the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) has become popular in clinical settings. Quantitative MBF provides an important additional diagnostic or prognostic information over conventional visual assessment. The success of MBF quantification using PET/computed tomography (CT) has increased the demand for this quantitative diagnostic approach to be more accessible. In this regard, MBF quantification approaches have been developed using several other diagnostic imaging modalities including single-photon emission computed tomography, CT, and cardiac magnetic resonance. This review will address the clinical aspects of PET MBF quantification and the new approaches to MBF quantification.

  14. An absolute radius scale for Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Cooke, Maren L.; Pelton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Radio and stellar occultation observations of Saturn's rings made by the Voyager spacecraft are discussed. The data reveal systematic discrepancies of almost 10 km in some parts of the rings, limiting some of the investigations. A revised solution for Saturn's rotation pole has been proposed which removes the discrepancies between the stellar and radio occultation profiles. Corrections to previously published radii vary from -2 to -10 km for the radio occultation, and +5 to -6 km for the stellar occultation. An examination of spiral density waves in the outer A Ring supports that the revised absolute radii are in error by no more than 2 km.

  15. Absolute Rate Theories of Epigenetic Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, Jose N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2006-03-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape, and the transmission factor, depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates.

  16. Absolute rate theories of epigenetic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-12-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape and the transmission factor depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic, and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates. rate theory | stochastic gene expression | gene switches

  17. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  18. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  19. Constraints in Genetic Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janikow, Cezary Z.

    1996-01-01

    Genetic programming refers to a class of genetic algorithms utilizing generic representation in the form of program trees. For a particular application, one needs to provide the set of functions, whose compositions determine the space of program structures being evolved, and the set of terminals, which determine the space of specific instances of those programs. The algorithm searches the space for the best program for a given problem, applying evolutionary mechanisms borrowed from nature. Genetic algorithms have shown great capabilities in approximately solving optimization problems which could not be approximated or solved with other methods. Genetic programming extends their capabilities to deal with a broader variety of problems. However, it also extends the size of the search space, which often becomes too large to be effectively searched even by evolutionary methods. Therefore, our objective is to utilize problem constraints, if such can be identified, to restrict this space. In this publication, we propose a generic constraint specification language, powerful enough for a broad class of problem constraints. This language has two elements -- one reduces only the number of program instances, the other reduces both the space of program structures as well as their instances. With this language, we define the minimal set of complete constraints, and a set of operators guaranteeing offspring validity from valid parents. We also show that these operators are not less efficient than the standard genetic programming operators if one preprocesses the constraints - the necessary mechanisms are identified.

  20. Absolute properties of the triple star HP Aurigae

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Burks, Charles L.; Torres, Guillermo; Wolf, Marek E-mail: clburks@email.uark.edu E-mail: wolf@cesnet.cz

    2014-01-01

    New photometric, spectroscopic, and eclipse timing observations of the eclipsing binary star HP Aur allow for very accurate orbital determinations, even in the presence of a third body and transient starspot activity. The eclipsing binary masses are determined to an accuracy of ±0.4% and the radii to ±0.6%. The masses are 0.9543 ± 0.0041 and 0.8094 ± 0.0036 solar masses, and the radii are 1.0278 ± 0.0042 and 0.7758 ± 0.0034 solar radii, respectively. The orbital period in the outer orbit is accurately determined for the first time: 4.332 ± 0.011 yr. A comparison with current theories of stellar evolution shows that the components' absolute properties can be well-matched by the current models at an age of about 7 billion years.

  1. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR HY VIRGINIS

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg Lacy, Claud H.; Fekel, Francis C. E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu

    2011-12-15

    HY Vir is found to be a double-lined F0m+F5 binary star with relatively shallow (0.3 mag) partial eclipses. Previous studies of the system are improved with 7509 differential photometric observations from the URSA WebScope and 8862 from the NFO WebScope, and 68 high-resolution spectroscopic observations from the Tennessee State University 2 m automatic spectroscopic telescope, and the 1 m coude-feed spectrometer at Kitt Peak National Observatory. Very accurate (better than 0.5%) masses and radii are determined from analysis of the new light curves and radial velocity curves. Theoretical models match the absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 1.35 Gy.

  2. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE TRIPLE STAR CF TAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Torres, Guillermo; Claret, Antonio E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu

    2012-12-01

    CF Tau is now known to be an eclipsing triple star with relatively deep total and annular eclipses. New light and radial velocity curves as well as new times of minima were obtained and used for further modeling of the system. Very accurate (better than 0.9%) masses and radii of the eclipsing pair are determined from analysis of the two new light curves, the radial velocity curve, and the times of minimum light. The mass and luminosity of the distant third component is accurately determined as well. Theoretical models of the detached, evolved eclipsing pair match the observed absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 4.3 Gyr and [Fe/H] = -0.14.

  3. The importance of calculating absolute rather than relative fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Graeme; Metcalfe, Andrew; Pearce, Charles; Need, Allan G; Dick, Ian M; Prince, Richard L; Nordin, B E Christopher

    2007-12-01

    The relation between fracture risk and bone mineral density (BMD) is commonly expressed as a multiplicative factor which is said to represent the increase in risk for each standard deviation fall in BMD. This practice assumes that risk increases multiplicatively with each unit fall in bone density, which is not correct. Although odds increase multiplicatively, absolute risk, which lies between 0 and 1, cannot do so though it can be derived from odds by the term Odds/(1+Odds). This concept is illustrated in a prospective study of 1098 women over age 69 followed for 6 years in a calcium trial in which hip BMD was measured in the second year. 304 Women (27.6%) had prevalent fractures and 198 (18.1%) incident fractures with a significant association between them (P 0.005). Age-adjusted hip BMD and T-score were significantly lower in those with prevalent fractures than in those without (P 0.003) and significantly lower in those with incident fractures than in those without (P 0.001). When the data were analysed by univariate logistic regression, the fracture odds at zero T-score were 0.130 and the rise in odds for each unit fall in hip T-score was 1.55. When these odds were converted to risks, there was a progressive divergence between odds and risk at T-scores below zero. Multiple logistic regression yielded significant odds ratios of 1.47 for each 5-year increase in age, 1.47 for prevalent fracture and 1.49 for each unit fall in hip T-score. Calcium therapy was not significant. Poisson regression, logistic regression and Cox's proportional hazards yielded very similar outcomes when converted into absolute risks. A nomogram was constructed to enable clinicians to estimate the approximate 6-year fracture risk from hip T-score, age and prevalent fracture which can probably be applied (with appropriate correction) to men as well as to women. We conclude that multiplicative factors can be applied to odds but not to risk and that multipliers of risk tend to overstate the

  4. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  5. Linear ultrasonic motor for absolute gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yue; Yao, Zhiyuan; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2017-02-01

    Thanks to their compactness and suitability for vacuum applications, linear ultrasonic motors are considered as substitutes for classical electromagnetic motors as driving elements in absolute gravimeters. Still, their application is prevented by relatively low power output. To overcome this limitation and provide better stability, a V-type linear ultrasonic motor with a new clamping method is proposed for a gravimeter. In this paper, a mechanical model of stators with flexible clamping components is suggested, according to a design criterion for clamps of linear ultrasonic motors. After that, an effect of tangential and normal rigidity of the clamping components on mechanical output is studied. It is followed by discussion of a new clamping method with sufficient tangential rigidity and a capability to facilitate pre-load. Additionally, a prototype of the motor with the proposed clamping method was fabricated and the performance tests in vertical direction were implemented. Experimental results show that the suggested motor has structural stability and high dynamic performance, such as no-load speed of 1.4m/s and maximal thrust of 43N, meeting the requirements for absolute gravimeters.

  6. Why to compare absolute numbers of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the absolute number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to absolute mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations.

  7. The absolute threshold of cone vision

    PubMed Central

    Koeing, Darran; Hofer, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of the absolute threshold of cone vision, which has been previously underestimated due to sub-optimal conditions or overly strict subjective response criteria. We avoided these limitations by using optimized stimuli and experimental conditions while having subjects respond within a rating scale framework. Small (1′ fwhm), brief (34 msec), monochromatic (550 nm) stimuli were foveally presented at multiple intensities in dark-adapted retina for 5 subjects. For comparison, 4 subjects underwent similar testing with rod-optimized stimuli. Cone absolute threshold, that is, the minimum light energy for which subjects were just able to detect a visual stimulus with any response criterion, was 203 ± 38 photons at the cornea, ∼0.47 log units lower than previously reported. Two-alternative forced-choice measurements in a subset of subjects yielded consistent results. Cone thresholds were less responsive to criterion changes than rod thresholds, suggesting a limit to the stimulus information recoverable from the cone mosaic in addition to the limit imposed by Poisson noise. Results were consistent with expectations for detection in the face of stimulus uncertainty. We discuss implications of these findings for modeling the first stages of human cone vision and interpreting psychophysical data acquired with adaptive optics at the spatial scale of the receptor mosaic. PMID:21270115

  8. Absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A and alterporriols.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Saki; Honma, Miho; Murakami, Takanori; Tsushima, Taro; Kudo, Shinji; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Nihei, Ken-Ichi; Nehira, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Masaru

    2012-02-01

    The absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A (1) was established by observing a positive exciton couplet in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of the C3,C4-O-bis(2-naphthoyl) derivative 10 and by chemical correlations with known compound 8. Before the discussion, the relative stereochemistry of 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The shielding effect at C7'-OMe group by C1-O-benzoylation established the relative stereochemical relationship between the C8-C8' axial bonding and the C1-C4/C1'-C4' polyol moieties of alterporriols E (3), an atropisomer of the C8-C8' dimer of 1. As 3 could be obtained by dimerization of 1 in vitro, the absolute configuration of its central chirality elements (C1-C4) must be identical to those of 1. Spectral comparison between the experimental and theoretical CD spectra supported the above conclusion. Axial stereochemistry of novel C4-O-deoxy dimeric derivatives, alterporriols F (4) and G (5), were also revealed by comparison of their CD spectra to those of 2 and 3.

  9. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  10. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. )

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  11. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometers Burst Mode Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, P.; Vigneron, P.; Hulot, G.; Crespo Grau, R.; Brocco, L.; Lalanne, X.; Sirol, O.; Leger, J. M.; Jager, T.; Bertrand, F.; Boness, A.; Fratter, I.

    2014-12-01

    Each of the three Swarm satellites embarks an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) to provide absolute scalar measurements of the magnetic field with high accuracy and stability. Nominal data acquisition of these ASMs is 1 Hz. But they can also run in a so-called "burst mode" and provide data at 250 Hz. During the commissioning phase of the mission, seven burst mode acquisition campaigns have been run simultaneously for all satellites, obtaining a total of ten days of burs-mode data. These campaigns allowed the identification of issues related to the operations of the piezo-electric motor and the heaters connected to the ASM, that do not impact the nominal 1 Hz scalar data. We analyze the burst mode data to identify high frequency geomagnetic signals, focusing the analysis in two regions: the low latitudes, where we seek signatures of ionospheric irregularities, and the high latitudes, to identify high frequency signals related to polar region currents. Since these campaigns have been conducted during the initial months of the mission, the three satellites where still close to each other, allowing to analyze the spatial coherency of the signals. Wavelet analysis have revealed 31 Hz signals appearing in the night-side in the equatorial region.

  12. Constraints on relaxion windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kiwoon; Im, Sang Hui

    2016-12-01

    We examine the low energy phenomenology of the relaxion solution to the weak scale hierarchy problem. Assuming that the Hubble friction is responsible for a dissipation of the relaxion energy, we identify the cosmological relaxion window which corresponds to the parameter region compatible with a given value of the acceptable number of inflationary e-foldings. We then discuss a variety of observational constraints on the relaxion window, including those from astrophysical and cosmological considerations. We find that majority of the parameter space with a relaxion mass m ϕ ≳ 100 eV or a relaxion decay constant f ≲107GeV is excluded by existing constraints. There is an interesting parameter region with m ϕ ˜ 0 .2 - 10 GeV and f ˜ few - 200 TeV, which is allowed by existing constraints, but can be probed soon by future beam dump experiments such as the SHiP experiment, or by improved EDM experiments.

  13. Extracting infrared absolute reflectance from relative reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Berets, Susan L; Milosevic, Milan

    2012-06-01

    Absolute reflectance measurements are valuable to the optics industry for development of new materials and optical coatings. Yet, absolute reflectance measurements are notoriously difficult to make. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of extracting the absolute reflectance from a relative reflectance measurement using a reference material with known refractive index.

  14. A Conceptual Approach to Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. When absolute value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…

  15. Cosmological constraints on the properties of weakly interacting massive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Steigman, G.; Turner, M.S.

    1984-10-01

    Considerations of the age and density of, as well as the evolution of structure in, the Universe lead to constraints on the masses and lifetimes of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). 26 references.

  16. Use of Absolute and Comparative Performance Feedback in Absolute and Comparative Judgments and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Don A.; Klein, William M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Which matters more--beliefs about absolute ability or ability relative to others? This study set out to compare the effects of such beliefs on satisfaction with performance, self-evaluations, and bets on future performance. In Experiment 1, undergraduate participants were told they had answered 20% correct, 80% correct, or were not given their…

  17. Observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses. II

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G. L.; Marrone, A.; Rotunno, A. M.; Lisi, E.; Melchiorri, A.; Palazzo, A.; Silk, J.; Slosar, A.

    2008-08-01

    In this followup to Phys. Rev. D 75, 053001 (2007) , we report updated constraints on neutrino mass-mixing parameters, in light of recent neutrino oscillation data (KamLAND, SNO, and MINOS) and cosmological observations (WMAP 5-year and other data). We discuss their interplay with the final 0{nu}2{beta} decay results in {sup 76}Ge claimed by part of the Heidelberg-Moscow Collaboration, using recent evaluations of the corresponding nuclear matrix elements, and their uncertainties. We also comment on the 0{nu}2{beta} limits in {sup 130}Te recently set by Cuoricino and on prospective limits or signals from the Karlsruhe tritium neutrino experiment.

  18. In vivo absorption spectroscopy for absolute measurement.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiromitsu; Fukuda, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    In in vivo spectroscopy, there are differences between individual subjects in parameters such as tissue scattering and sample concentration. We propose a method that can provide the absolute value of a particular substance concentration, independent of these individual differences. Thus, it is not necessary to use the typical statistical calibration curve, which assumes an average level of scattering and an averaged concentration over individual subjects. This method is expected to greatly reduce the difficulties encountered during in vivo measurements. As an example, for in vivo absorption spectroscopy, the method was applied to the reflectance measurement in retinal vessels to monitor their oxygen saturation levels. This method was then validated by applying it to the tissue phantom under a variety of absorbance values and scattering efficiencies.

  19. Determining Absolute Zero Using a Tuning Fork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldader, Jeffrey D.

    2008-04-01

    The Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales, we tell our students, are related. We explain that a change in temperature of 1°C corresponds to a change of 1 Kelvin and that atoms and molecules have zero kinetic energy at zero Kelvin, -273°C. In this paper, we will show how students can derive the relationship between the Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales using a simple, well-known physics experiment. By making multiple measurements of the speed of sound at different temperatures, using the classic physics experiment of determining the speed of sound with a tuning fork and variable-length tube, they can determine the temperature at which the speed of sound is zero—absolute zero.

  20. MAGSAT: Vector magnetometer absolute sensor alignment determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for accurately determining the absolute alignment of the magnetic axes of a triaxial magnetometer sensor with respect to an external, fixed, reference coordinate system. The method does not require that the magnetic field vector orientation, as generated by a triaxial calibration coil system, be known to better than a few degrees from its true position, and minimizes the number of positions through which a sensor assembly must be rotated to obtain a solution. Computer simulations show that accuracies of better than 0.4 seconds of arc can be achieved under typical test conditions associated with existing magnetic test facilities. The basic approach is similar in nature to that presented by McPherron and Snare (1978) except that only three sensor positions are required and the system of equations to be solved is considerably simplified. Applications of the method to the case of the MAGSAT Vector Magnetometer are presented and the problems encountered discussed.

  1. An estimate of global absolute dynamic topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, C.-K.; Wunsch, C.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute dynamic topography of the world ocean is estimated from the largest scales to a short-wavelength cutoff of about 6700 km for the period July through September, 1978. The data base consisted of the time-averaged sea-surface topography determined by Seasat and geoid estimates made at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The issues are those of accuracy and resolution. Use of the altimetric surface as a geoid estimate beyond the short-wavelength cutoff reduces the spectral leakage in the estimated dynamic topography from erroneous small-scale geoid estimates without contaminating the low wavenumbers. Comparison of the result with a similarly filtered version of Levitus' (1982) historical average dynamic topography shows good qualitative agreement. There is quantitative disagreement, but it is within the estimated errors of both methods of calculation.

  2. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  3. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium.

    PubMed

    Roshan, M V; Springham, S V; Rawat, R S; Lee, P; Krishnan, M

    2010-08-01

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f(n) approximately 4.1x10(-4) with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10(8) neutrons per discharge.

  4. Measured and modelled absolute gravity in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, E.; Forsberg, R.; Strykowski, G.

    2012-12-01

    Present day changes in the ice volume in glaciated areas like Greenland will change the load on the Earth and to this change the lithosphere will respond elastically. The Earth also responds to changes in the ice volume over a millennial time scale. This response is due to the viscous properties of the mantle and is known as Glaical Isostatic Adjustment (GIA). Both signals are present in GPS and absolute gravity (AG) measurements and they will give an uncertainty in mass balance estimates calculated from these data types. It is possible to separate the two signals if both gravity and Global Positioning System (GPS) time series are available. DTU Space acquired an A10 absolute gravimeter in 2008. One purpose of this instrument is to establish AG time series in Greenland and the first measurements were conducted in 2009. Since then are 18 different Greenland GPS Network (GNET) stations visited and six of these are visited more then once. The gravity signal consists of three signals; the elastic signal, the viscous signal and the direct attraction from the ice masses. All of these signals can be modelled using various techniques. The viscous signal is modelled by solving the Sea Level Equation with an appropriate ice history and Earth model. The free code SELEN is used for this. The elastic signal is modelled as a convolution of the elastic Greens function for gravity and a model of present day ice mass changes. The direct attraction is the same as the Newtonian attraction and is calculated as this. Here we will present the preliminary results of the AG measurements in Greenland. We will also present modelled estimates of the direct attraction, the elastic and the viscous signals.

  5. Absolute bioavailability of quinine formulations in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Babalola, C P; Bolaji, O O; Ogunbona, F A; Ezeomah, E

    2004-09-01

    This study compared the absolute bioavailability of quinine sulphate as capsule and as tablet against the intravenous (i.v.) infusion of the drug in twelve male volunteers. Six of the volunteers received intravenous infusion over 4 h as well as the capsule formulation of the drug in a cross-over manner, while the other six received the tablet formulation. Blood samples were taken at predetermined time intervals and plasma analysed for quinine (QN) using reversed-phase HPLC method. QN was rapidly absorbed after the two oral formulations with average t(max) of 2.67 h for both capsule and tablet. The mean elimination half-life of QN from the i.v. and oral dosage forms varied between 10 and 13.5 hr and were not statistically different (P > 0.05). On the contrary, the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and area under the curve (AUC) from capsule were comparable to those from i.v. (P > 0.05), while these values were markedly higher than values from tablet formulation (P < 0.05). The therapeutic QN plasma levels were not achieved with the tablet formulation. The absolute bioavailability (F) were 73% (C.l., 53.3 - 92.4%) and 39 % (C.I., 21.7 - 56.6%) for the capsule and tablet respectively and the difference was significant (P < 0.05). The subtherapeutic levels obtained from the tablet form used in this study may cause treatment failure during malaria and caution should be taken when predictions are made from results obtained from different formulations of QN.

  6. Absolute GPS Positioning Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, G.

    A new inverse approach for restoring the absolute coordinates of a ground -based station from three or four observed GPS pseudo-ranges is proposed. This stochastic method is based on simulations of natural evolution named genetic algorithms (GA). These iterative procedures provide fairly good and robust estimates of the absolute positions in the Earth's geocentric reference system. For comparison/validation, GA results are compared to the ones obtained using the classical linearized least-square scheme for the determination of the XYZ location proposed by Bancroft (1985) which is strongly limited by the number of available observations (i.e. here, the number of input pseudo-ranges must be four). The r.m.s. accuracy of the non -linear cost function reached by this latter method is typically ~10-4 m2 corresponding to ~300-500-m accuracies for each geocentric coordinate. However, GA can provide more acceptable solutions (r.m.s. errors < 10-5 m2), even when only three instantaneous pseudo-ranges are used, such as a lost of lock during a GPS survey. Tuned GA parameters used in different simulations are N=1000 starting individuals, as well as Pc=60-70% and Pm=30-40% for the crossover probability and mutation rate, respectively. Statistical tests on the ability of GA to recover acceptable coordinates in presence of important levels of noise are made simulating nearly 3000 random samples of erroneous pseudo-ranges. Here, two main sources of measurement errors are considered in the inversion: (1) typical satellite-clock errors and/or 300-metre variance atmospheric delays, and (2) Geometrical Dilution of Precision (GDOP) due to the particular GPS satellite configuration at the time of acquisition. Extracting valuable information and even from low-quality starting range observations, GA offer an interesting alternative for high -precision GPS positioning.

  7. L{sup {infinity}} Variational Problems with Running Costs and Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Aronsson, G.; Barron, E. N.

    2012-02-15

    Various approaches are used to derive the Aronsson-Euler equations for L{sup {infinity}} calculus of variations problems with constraints. The problems considered involve holonomic, nonholonomic, isoperimetric, and isosupremic constraints on the minimizer. In addition, we derive the Aronsson-Euler equation for the basic L{sup {infinity}} problem with a running cost and then consider properties of an absolute minimizer. Many open problems are introduced for further study.

  8. Transport of absolute angular momentum in quasi-axisymmetric equatorial jet streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Read, P. L.

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that prograde equatorial jet stresses cannot occur in an axisymmetric inviscid fluid, owing to the constraints of local angular momentum conservation. For a viscous fluid, the constraints of mass conservation prevent the formation of any local maximum of absolute angular momentum (m) without a means of transferring m against its gradient (delta m) in the meridional plane. The circumstances under which m can be diffused up-gradient by normal molecular viscosity are derived, and illustrated with reference to numerical simulations of axisymmetric flows in a cylindrical annulus. Viscosity is shown to act so as to tend to expel m from the interior outwards from the rotation axis. Such an effect can produce local super-rotation even in a mechanically isolated fluid. The tendency of viscosity to result in the expulsion of m is shown to be analogous in certain respects to a vorticity-mixing hypothesis for the effects of non-axisymmetric eddies of the zonally-averaged flow. It is shown how the advective and diffusive transport of m by non-axisymmetric eddies can be represented by the Transformed Eulerian Mean meridional circulation and the Eliassen-Palm (EP) flux of Andrews and McIntyre respectively, in the zonal mean. Constraints on the form and direction of the EP flux in an advective/diffusive flow for such eddies are derived, by analogy with similar constraints on the diffusive flux of m due to viscosity.

  9. The Effects of Two Levels of Linguistic Constraint on Echolalia and Generative Language Production in Children with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rydell, Patrick J.; Mirenda, Pat

    1991-01-01

    This study of 3 boys (ages 5-6) with autism found that adult high-constraint antecedent utterances elicited more verbal utterances in general, including subjects' echolalia; adult low-constraint utterances elicited more subject high-constraint utterances; and the degree of adult-utterance constraint did not influence the mean lengths of subjects'…

  10. Particle-physics constraints on multifractal spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagni, Gianluca; Nardelli, Giuseppe; Rodríguez-Fernández, David

    2016-01-01

    We study electroweak interactions in the multiscale theory with q -derivatives, a framework where spacetime has the typical features of a multifractal. In the simplest case with only one characteristic time, length, and energy scale t* , ℓ* , and E* , we consider (i) the muon decay rate and (ii) the Lamb shift in the hydrogen atom, and constrain the corrections to the ordinary results. We obtain the independent absolute upper bounds (i) t*<1 0-13 s and (ii) E*>35 MeV . Under some mild theoretical assumptions, the Lamb shift alone yields the even tighter ranges t*<1 0-27 s , ℓ*<1 0-19 m , and E*>450 GeV . To date, these are the first robust constraints on the scales at which the multifractal features of the geometry can become important in a physical process.

  11. A constraint algorithm for singular Lagrangians subjected to nonholonomic constraints

    SciTech Connect

    de Leon, M.; de Diego, D.M.

    1997-06-01

    We construct a constraint algorithm for singular Lagrangian systems subjected to nonholonomic constraints which generalizes that of Dirac for constrained Hamiltonian systems. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. High quality absolute paleointensity data from Santa Fe, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. A.; Tauxe, L.; Blinman, E.; Genevey, A.

    2015-12-01

    Preliminary paleointensity experiments were conducted using the IZZI protocol on one hundred and fourteen specimens from fifty-seven baked pottery fragments collected from nine archaeological sites near Santa Fe, New Mexico. Twenty of these fragments passed our weakest selection criteria. Seven additional specimens were made from each passing fragment for further paleointensity experiments. The results of these second experiments indicate that the samples are mildly anisotropic, so anisotropy experiments were conducted to correct for this behavior. Experiments to determine the cooling rate correction will be completed to ensure the robustness of the dataset. Stylistic evidence, historical documentation, dendrochronology, and 14C analyses provide age constraints with up to decade resolution for the VADM results. The twenty pottery fragments analyzed span five distinct time periods between 1300 and 1900 AD. Our new results for each fragment differ slightly from those predicted by the cals3k.4b and arch3k models, suggesting the models require refinement. This is expected because there are few archaeomagnetic constraints on the models from this region. Future pottery fragments and burned adobe fragments from the New Mexico area will be analyzed for paleointensity and combined with our pottery fragment data set to create a high-resolution paleointensity curve for the recent archaeological time in the American Southwest.

  13. A Framework for Dynamic Constraint Reasoning Using Procedural Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, Ari K.; Frank, Jeremy D.

    1999-01-01

    Many complex real-world decision and control problems contain an underlying constraint reasoning problem. This is particularly evident in a recently developed approach to planning, where almost all planning decisions are represented by constrained variables. This translates a significant part of the planning problem into a constraint network whose consistency determines the validity of the plan candidate. Since higher-level choices about control actions can add or remove variables and constraints, the underlying constraint network is invariably highly dynamic. Arbitrary domain-dependent constraints may be added to the constraint network and the constraint reasoning mechanism must be able to handle such constraints effectively. Additionally, real problems often require handling constraints over continuous variables. These requirements present a number of significant challenges for a constraint reasoning mechanism. In this paper, we introduce a general framework for handling dynamic constraint networks with real-valued variables, by using procedures to represent and effectively reason about general constraints. The framework is based on a sound theoretical foundation, and can be proven to be sound and complete under well-defined conditions. Furthermore, the framework provides hybrid reasoning capabilities, as alternative solution methods like mathematical programming can be incorporated into the framework, in the form of procedures.

  14. Dichotomy and perceptual distortions in absolute pitch ability

    PubMed Central

    Athos, E. Alexandra; Levinson, Barbara; Kistler, Amy; Zemansky, Jason; Bostrom, Alan; Freimer, Nelson; Gitschier, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the rare ability to identify the pitch of a tone without the aid of a reference tone. Understanding both the nature and genesis of AP can provide insights into neuroplasticity in the auditory system. We explored factors that may influence the accuracy of pitch perception in AP subjects both during the development of the trait and in later age. We used a Web-based survey and a pitch-labeling test to collect perceptual data from 2,213 individuals, 981 (44%) of whom proved to have extraordinary pitch-naming ability. The bimodal distribution in pitch-naming ability signifies AP as a distinct perceptual trait, with possible implications for its genetic basis. The wealth of these data has allowed us to uncover unsuspected note-naming irregularities suggestive of a “perceptual magnet” centered at the note “A.” In addition, we document a gradual decline in pitch-naming accuracy with age, characterized by a perceptual shift in the “sharp” direction. These findings speak both to the process of acquisition of AP and to its stability. PMID:17724340

  15. Dichotomy and perceptual distortions in absolute pitch ability.

    PubMed

    Athos, E Alexandra; Levinson, Barbara; Kistler, Amy; Zemansky, Jason; Bostrom, Alan; Freimer, Nelson; Gitschier, Jane

    2007-09-11

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the rare ability to identify the pitch of a tone without the aid of a reference tone. Understanding both the nature and genesis of AP can provide insights into neuroplasticity in the auditory system. We explored factors that may influence the accuracy of pitch perception in AP subjects both during the development of the trait and in later age. We used a Web-based survey and a pitch-labeling test to collect perceptual data from 2,213 individuals, 981 (44%) of whom proved to have extraordinary pitch-naming ability. The bimodal distribution in pitch-naming ability signifies AP as a distinct perceptual trait, with possible implications for its genetic basis. The wealth of these data has allowed us to uncover unsuspected note-naming irregularities suggestive of a "perceptual magnet" centered at the note "A." In addition, we document a gradual decline in pitch-naming accuracy with age, characterized by a perceptual shift in the "sharp" direction. These findings speak both to the process of acquisition of AP and to its stability.

  16. Digital controller design for absolute value function constrained nonlinear systems via scalar sign function approach.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Singla, Mithun; Olmi, Claudio; Shieh, Leang S; Song, Gangbing

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, a scalar sign function-based digital design methodology is developed for modeling and control of a class of analog nonlinear systems that are restricted by the absolute value function constraints. As is found to be not uncommon, many real systems are subject to the constraints which are described by the non-smooth functions such as absolute value function. The non-smooth and nonlinear nature poses significant challenges to the modeling and control work. To overcome these difficulties, a novel idea proposed in this work is to use a scalar sign function approach to effectively transform the original nonlinear and non-smooth model into a smooth nonlinear rational function model. Upon the resulting smooth model, a systematic digital controller design procedure is established, in which an optimal linearization method, LQR design and digital implementation through an advanced digital redesign technique are sequentially applied. The example of tracking control of a piezoelectric actuator system is utilized throughout the paper for illustrating the proposed methodology.

  17. (non) Emergent Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C. S.; Hattab, M. W.; Huerta, G.

    2014-12-01

    Emergent constraints are observable quantities that provide some physical basis for testing or predicting how a climate model will respond to greenhouse gas forcing. Very few such constraints have been identified for the multi-model CMIP archive. Here we explore the question of whether constraints that apply to a single model, a perturbed parameter ensemble (PPE) of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3.1), can be applied to predicting the climate sensitivities of models within the CMIP archive. In particular we construct our predictive patterns from multivariate EOFs of the CAM3.1 ensemble control climate. Multiple regressive statistical models were created that do an excellent job of predicting CAM3.1 sensitivity to greenhouse gas forcing. However, these same patterns fail spectacularly to predict sensitivities of models within the CMIP archive. We attribute this failure to several factors. First, and perhaps the most important, is that the structures affecting climate sensitivity in CAM3.1 have a unique signature in the space of our multivariate EOF patterns that are unlike any other climate model. That is to say, we should not expect CAM3.1 to represent the way another models within CMIP archive respond to greenhouse gas forcing. The second, perhaps related, reason is that the CAM3.1 PPE does a poor job of spanning the range of climates and responses found within the CMIP archive. We shall discuss the implications of these results for the prospect of finding emergent constraints within the CMIP archive. We will also discuss what this may mean for establishing uncertainties in climate projections.

  18. Constraint-based scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte

    1991-01-01

    The GERRY scheduling system developed by NASA Ames with assistance from the Lockheed Space Operations Company, and the Lockheed Artificial Intelligence Center, uses a method called constraint based iterative repair. Using this technique, one encodes both hard rules and preference criteria into data structures called constraints. GERRY repeatedly attempts to improve schedules by seeking repairs for violated constraints. The system provides a general scheduling framework which is being tested on two NASA applications. The larger of the two is the Space Shuttle Ground Processing problem which entails the scheduling of all inspection, repair, and maintenance tasks required to prepare the orbiter for flight. The other application involves power allocations for the NASA Ames wind tunnels. Here the system will be used to schedule wind tunnel tests with the goal of minimizing power costs. In this paper, we describe the GERRY system and its applications to the Space Shuttle problem. We also speculate as to how the system would be used for manufacturing, transportation, and military problems.

  19. Constraint-based scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte

    1991-01-01

    The GERRY scheduling system developed by NASA Ames with assistance from the Lockheed Space Operations Company, and the Lockheed Artificial Intelligence Center, uses a method called constraint-based iterative repair. Using this technique, one encodes both hard rules and preference criteria into data structures called constraints. GERRY repeatedly attempts to improve schedules by seeking repairs for violated constraints. The system provides a general scheduling framework which is being tested on two NASA applications. The larger of the two is the Space Shuttle Ground Processing problem which entails the scheduling of all the inspection, repair, and maintenance tasks required to prepare the orbiter for flight. The other application involves power allocation for the NASA Ames wind tunnels. Here the system will be used to schedule wind tunnel tests with the goal of minimizing power costs. In this paper, we describe the GERRY system and its application to the Space Shuttle problem. We also speculate as to how the system would be used for manufacturing, transportation, and military problems.

  20. Constraint-based scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte

    1993-01-01

    The GERRY scheduling system developed by NASA Ames with assistance from the Lockheed Space Operations Company, and the Lockheed Artificial Intelligence Center, uses a method called constraint-based iterative repair. Using this technique, one encodes both hard rules and preference criteria into data structures called constraints. GERRY repeatedly attempts to improve schedules by seeking repairs for violated constraints. The system provides a general scheduling framework which is being tested on two NASA applications. The larger of the two is the Space Shuttle Ground Processing problem which entails the scheduling of all the inspection, repair, and maintenance tasks required to prepare the orbiter for flight. The other application involves power allocation for the NASA Ames wind tunnels. Here the system will be used to schedule wind tunnel tests with the goal of minimizing power costs. In this paper, we describe the GERRY system and its application to the Space Shuttle problem. We also speculate as to how the system would be used for manufacturing, transportation, and military problems.

  1. Structure Constraints in a Constraint-Based Planner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Wan-Lin; Golden, Keith

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we report our work on a new constraint domain, where variables can take structured values. Earth-science data processing (ESDP) is a planning domain that requires the ability to represent and reason about complex constraints over structured data, such as satellite images. This paper reports on a constraint-based planner for ESDP and similar domains. We discuss our approach for translating a planning problem into a constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) and for representing and reasoning about structured objects and constraints over structures.

  2. Absolute calibration of forces in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, R. S.; Viana, N. B.; Maia Neto, P. A.; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2014-07-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past 15 years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spot, adapting frequently employed video microscopy techniques. Combined with interface spherical aberration, it reveals a previously unknown window of instability for trapping. Comparison with experimental data leads to an overall agreement within error bars, with no fitting, for a broad range of microsphere radii, from the Rayleigh regime to the ray optics one, for different polarizations and trapping heights, including all commonly employed parameter domains. Besides signaling full first-principles theoretical understanding of optical tweezers operation, the results may lead to improved instrument design and control over experiments, as well as to an extended domain of applicability, allowing reliable force measurements, in principle, from femtonewtons to nanonewtons.

  3. What is Needed for Absolute Paleointensity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Many alternative approaches to the Thellier and Thellier technique for absolute paleointensity have been proposed during the past twenty years. One reason is the time consuming aspect of the experiments. Another reason is to avoid uncertainties in determinations of the paleofield which are mostly linked to the presence of multidomain grains. Despite great care taken by these new techniques, there is no indication that they always provide the right answer and in fact sometimes fail. We are convinced that the most valid approach remains the original double heating Thellier protocol provided that natural remanence is controlled by pure magnetite with a narrow distribution of small grain sizes, mostly single domains. The presence of titanium, even in small amount generates biases which yield incorrect field values. Single domain grains frequently dominate the magnetization of glass samples, which explains the success of this selective approach. They are also present in volcanic lava flows but much less frequently, and therefore contribute to the low success rate of most experiments. However the loss of at least 70% of the magnetization at very high temperatures prior to the Curie point appears to be an essential prerequisite that increases the success rate to almost 100% and has been validated from historical flows and from recent studies. This requirement can easily be tested by thermal demagnetization while low temperature experiments can document the detection of single domain magnetite using the δFC/δZFC parameter as suggested (Moskowitz et al, 1993) for biogenic magnetite.

  4. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  5. Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a mission, led and developed by NASA, that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to quantify and attribute climate change. CLARREO consists of three separate instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer, a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer, and a radio occultation (RO) instrument. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy, including on orbit verification, to calibrate other space-based instrumentation, increasing their respective accuracy by as much as an order of magnitude. The IR spectrometer is a Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) working in the 5 to 50 microns wavelength region with a goal of 0.1 K (k = 3) accuracy. The FTS will achieve this accuracy using phase change cells to verify thermistor accuracy and heated halos to verify blackbody emissivity, both on orbit. The RS spectrometer will measure the reflectance of the atmosphere in the 0.32 to 2.3 microns wavelength region with an accuracy of 0.3% (k = 2). The status of the instrumentation packages and potential mission options will be presented.

  6. Absolute flux measurements for swift atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M.; Kohl, D. A.; Keto, J. W.; Antoniewicz, P.

    1987-01-01

    While a torsion balance in vacuum can easily measure the momentum transfer from a gas beam impinging on a surface attached to the balance, this measurement depends on the accommodation coefficients of the atoms with the surface and the distribution of the recoil. A torsion balance is described for making absolute flux measurements independent of recoil effects. The torsion balance is a conventional taut suspension wire design and the Young modulus of the wire determines the relationship between the displacement and the applied torque. A compensating magnetic field is applied to maintain zero displacement and provide critical damping. The unique feature is to couple the impinging gas beam to the torsion balance via a Wood's horn, i.e., a thin wall tube with a gradual 90 deg bend. Just as light is trapped in a Wood's horn by specular reflection from the curved surfaces, the gas beam diffuses through the tube. Instead of trapping the beam, the end of the tube is open so that the atoms exit the tube at 90 deg to their original direction. Therefore, all of the forward momentum of the gas beam is transferred to the torsion balance independent of the angle of reflection from the surfaces inside the tube.

  7. Geochronological constraints on the age of a Permo-Triassic impact event: U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar results for the 40 km Araguainha structure of central Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohver, E.; Lana, C.; Cawood, P. A.; Fletcher, I. R.; Jourdan, F.; Sherlock, S.; Rasmussen, B.; Trindade, R. I. F.; Yokoyama, E.; Souza Filho, C. R.; Marangoni, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Impact cratering has been a fundamental geological process in Earth history with major ramifications for the biosphere. The complexity of shocked and melted rocks within impact structures presents difficulties for accurate and precise radiogenic isotope age determination, hampering the assessment of the effects of an individual event in the geological record. We demonstrate the utility of a multi-chronometer approach in our study of samples from the 40 km diameter Araguainha impact structure of central Brazil. Samples of uplifted basement granite display abundant evidence of shock deformation, but U/Pb ages of shocked zircons and the 40Ar/39Ar ages of feldspar from the granite largely preserve the igneous crystallization and cooling history. Mixed results are obtained from in situ40Ar/39Ar spot analyses of shocked igneous biotites in the granite, with deformation along kink-bands resulting in highly localized, partial resetting in these grains. Likewise, spot analyses of perlitic glass from pseudotachylitic breccia samples reflect a combination of argon inheritance from wall rock material, the age of the glass itself, and post-impact devitrification. The timing of crater formation is better assessed using samples of impact-generated melt rock where isotopic resetting is associated with textural evidence of melting and in situ crystallization. Granular aggregates of neocrystallized zircon form a cluster of ten U-Pb ages that yield a “Concordia” age of 247.8 ± 3.8 Ma. The possibility of Pb loss from this population suggests that this is a minimum age for the impact event. The best evidence for the age of the impact comes from the U-Th-Pb dating of neocrystallized monazite and 40Ar/39Ar step heating of three separate populations of post-impact, inclusion-rich quartz grains that are derived from the infill of miarolitic cavities. The 206Pb/238U age of 254.5 ± 3.2 Ma (2σ error) and 208Pb/232Th age of 255.2 ± 4.8 Ma (2σ error) of monazite, together with the

  8. Propagating orientation constraints for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Ashim; Gerb, Andy

    1994-01-01

    An observing program on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is described in terms of exposures that are obtained by one or more of the instruments onboard the HST. Many requested exposures might specify orientation requirements and accompanying ranges. Orientation refers to the amount of roll (in degrees) about the line of sight. The range give the permissible tolerance (also in degrees). These requirements may be (1) absolute (in relation to the celestial coordinate system), (2) relative to the nominal roll angle for HST during that exposure, or (3) relative (in relation to other exposures in the observing program). The TRANSformation expert system converts proposals for astronomical observations with HST into detailed observing plans. Part of the conversion involves grouping exposures into higher level structures based on exposure characteristics. Exposures constrained to be at different orientations cannot be grouped together. Because relative orientation requirements cause implicit constraints, orientation constraints have to be propagated. TRANS must also identify any inconsistencies that may exist so they can be corrected. We have designed and implemented an orientation constraint propagator as part of TRANS. The propagator is based on an informal algebra that facilitates the setting up and propagation of the orientation constraints. The constraint propagator generates constraints between directly related exposures, and propagates derived constraints between exposures that are related indirectly. It provides facilities for path-consistency checking, identification of unsatisfiable constraints, and querying of orientation relationships. The system has been successfully operational as part of TRANS for over seven months. The solution has particular significance to space applications in which satellite/telescope pointing and attitude are constrained and relationships exist between multiple configurations.

  9. Propagating orientation constraints for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Ashim; Gerb, Andy

    1994-05-01

    An observing program on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is described in terms of exposures that are obtained by one or more of the instruments onboard the HST. Many requested exposures might specify orientation requirements and accompanying ranges. Orientation refers to the amount of roll (in degrees) about the line of sight. The range give the permissible tolerance (also in degrees). These requirements may be (1) absolute (in relation to the celestial coordinate system), (2) relative to the nominal roll angle for HST during that exposure, or (3) relative (in relation to other exposures in the observing program). The TRANSformation expert system converts proposals for astronomical observations with HST into detailed observing plans. Part of the conversion involves grouping exposures into higher level structures based on exposure characteristics. Exposures constrained to be at different orientations cannot be grouped together. Because relative orientation requirements cause implicit constraints, orientation constraints have to be propagated. TRANS must also identify any inconsistencies that may exist so they can be corrected. We have designed and implemented an orientation constraint propagator as part of TRANS. The propagator is based on an informal algebra that facilitates the setting up and propagation of the orientation constraints. The constraint propagator generates constraints between directly related exposures, and propagates derived constraints between exposures that are related indirectly. It provides facilities for path-consistency checking, identification of unsatisfiable constraints, and querying of orientation relationships. The system has been successfully operational as part of TRANS for over seven months. The solution has particular significance to space applications in which satellite/telescope pointing and attitude are constrained and relationships exist between multiple configurations.

  10. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Mano K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2015-12-01

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  11. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-06-05

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  12. Positioning, alignment and absolute pointing of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, F.; Distefano, C.; Antares Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    A precise detector alignment and absolute pointing is crucial for point-source searches. The ANTARES neutrino telescope utilises an array of hydrophones, tiltmeters and compasses for the relative positioning of the optical sensors. The absolute calibration is accomplished by long-baseline low-frequency triangulation of the acoustic reference devices in the deep-sea with a differential GPS system at the sea surface. The absolute pointing can be independently verified by detecting the shadow of the Moon in cosmic rays.

  13. Absolute and Convective Instability of a Liquid Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Hudman, M.; Chen, J. N.

    1999-01-01

    The existence of absolute instability in a liquid jet has been predicted for some time. The disturbance grows in time and propagates both upstream and downstream in an absolutely unstable liquid jet. The image of absolute instability is captured in the NASA 2.2 sec drop tower and reported here. The transition from convective to absolute instability is observed experimentally. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical predictions on the transition Weber number as functions of the Reynolds number. The role of interfacial shear relative to all other relevant forces which cause the onset of jet breakup is explained.

  14. Usbnd Pb zircon geochronology constraints on the ages of the Tananao Schist Belt and timing of orogenic events in Taiwan: Implications for a new tectonic evolution of the South China Block during the Mesozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Shan; Huang, Yi-Chang; Liu, Chang-Hao; Feng, Han-Ting; Chung, Sun-Lin; Lee, Yuan-Hsi

    2016-08-01

    The Tananao Schist Belt is a low-pressure metamorphic complex comprised of three lithological units of marble, schist formation, and granite, in ascending order of proportion. Previous studies have found that the schist formation was formed during the Mesozoic. However, there is a lack of geochronological data to corroborate the schist protolith and metamorphic ages. In this study, we have used Usbnd Pb zircon geochronology to provide a time frame for the creation of the schist formation and metamorphism, as well as a new tectonic model. Twenty-three schist and eleven meta-magmatic samples were used for Usbnd Pb dating by LA-ICP-MS. Results from the youngest peak age of detrital zircon indicate that the schist formed in a new depositional age of 120-110 Ma and, therefore, is different from the previously estimated age of the Paleozoic-Mesozoic. Additionally, the block-in-matrix schist indicates an age that ranges from 270 to 80 Ma and was inferred from the chaotic deposits to be a metamorphic mélange. The Tananao Schist Belt appears to represent an arc-trench system that formed during the Cretaceous in the South China Block margin. Moreover, the youngest Usbnd Pb age of 80 Ma from the leucogranite dike and schist, constrains the upper age limit for a metamorphism that is younger than the previously accepted age of 100-90 Ma. The contact layer between Permian-Triassic marble and the overlying early Cretaceous schists remains a chloritoid bed that is, therefore, considered to be a paleosol at the unconformity, which formed over an extended duration of 60 ± 30 Ma. The stratigraphic contact indicates a long period of erosion during the Jurassic and suggests that a tectonic event occurred. However, we propose that two important metamorphic events took place prior to, and following, the schist formation during the Jurassic and late Cretaceous orogenic events.

  15. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath plate interiors may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the sub-asthenospheric mantle. Here we analyze two global sets of shear-wave splitting data, that of Kreemer [2009] and an updated and expanded data set, to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. We also explore the effect of using geologically current plate velocities (i.e., the MORVEL set of angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]) compared with geodetically current plate velocities (i.e., the GSRM v1.2 angular velocities [Kreemer et al. 2014]). We demonstrate that the errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. The SKS-MORVEL absolute plate angular velocities (based on the Kreemer [2009] data set) are determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2° ) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6° ). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4° ) than for continental

  16. Evaluation of the Absolute Regional Temperature Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Absolute Regional Temperature Potential (ARTP) is one of the few climate metrics that provides estimates of impacts at a sub-global scale. The ARTP presented here gives the time-dependent temperature response in four latitude bands (90-28degS, 28degS-28degN, 28-60degN and 60-90degN) as a function of emissions based on the forcing in those bands caused by the emissions. It is based on a large set of simulations performed with a single atmosphere-ocean climate model to derive regional forcing/response relationships. Here I evaluate the robustness of those relationships using the forcing/response portion of the ARTP to estimate regional temperature responses to the historic aerosol forcing in three independent climate models. These ARTP results are in good accord with the actual responses in those models. Nearly all ARTP estimates fall within +/-20%of the actual responses, though there are some exceptions for 90-28degS and the Arctic, and in the latter the ARTP may vary with forcing agent. However, for the tropics and the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in particular, the +/-20% range appears to be roughly consistent with the 95% confidence interval. Land areas within these two bands respond 39-45% and 9-39% more than the latitude band as a whole. The ARTP, presented here in a slightly revised form, thus appears to provide a relatively robust estimate for the responses of large-scale latitude bands and land areas within those bands to inhomogeneous radiative forcing and thus potentially to emissions as well. Hence this metric could allow rapid evaluation of the effects of emissions policies at a finer scale than global metrics without requiring use of a full climate model.

  17. Absolute determination of local tropospheric OH concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armerding, Wolfgang; Comes, Franz-Josef

    1994-01-01

    Long path absorption (LPA) according to Lambert Beer's law is a method to determine absolute concentrations of trace gases such as tropospheric OH. We have developed a LPA instrument which is based on a rapid tuning of the light source which is a frequency doubled dye laser. The laser is tuned across two or three OH absorption features around 308 nm with a scanning speed of 0.07 cm(exp -1)/microsecond and a repetition rate of 1.3 kHz. This high scanning speed greatly reduces the fluctuation of the light intensity caused by the atmosphere. To obtain the required high sensitivity the laser output power is additionally made constant and stabilized by an electro-optical modulator. The present sensitivity is of the order of a few times 10(exp 5) OH per cm(exp 3) for an acquisition time of a minute and an absorption path length of only 1200 meters so that a folding of the optical path in a multireflection cell was possible leading to a lateral dimension of the cell of a few meters. This allows local measurements to be made. Tropospheric measurements have been carried out in 1991 resulting in the determination of OH diurnal variation at specific days in late summer. Comparison with model calculations have been made. Interferences are mainly due to SO2 absorption. The problem of OH self generation in the multireflection cell is of minor extent. This could be shown by using different experimental methods. The minimum-maximum signal to noise ratio is about 8 x 10(exp -4) for a single scan. Due to the small size of the absorption cell the realization of an open air laboratory is possible in which by use of an additional UV light source or by additional fluxes of trace gases the chemistry can be changed under controlled conditions allowing kinetic studies of tropospheric photochemistry to be made in open air.

  18. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  19. Asteroseismic constraints for Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creevey, O. L.; Thévenin, F.

    2012-12-01

    Distances from the Gaia mission will no doubt improve our understanding of stellar physics by providing an excellent constraint on the luminosity of the star. However, it is also clear that high precision stellar properties from, for example, asteroseismology, will also provide a needed input constraint in order to calibrate the methods that Gaia will use, e.g. stellar models or GSP_Phot. For solar-like stars (F, G, K IV/V), asteroseismic data delivers at the least two very important quantities: (1) the average large frequency separation < Δ ν > and (2) the frequency corresponding to the maximum of the modulated-amplitude spectrum ν_{max}. Both of these quantities are related directly to stellar parameters (radius and mass) and in particular their combination (gravity and density). We show how the precision in < Δ ν >, ν_{max}, and atmospheric parameters T_{eff} and [Fe/H] affect the determination of gravity (log g) for a sample of well-known stars. We find that log g can be determined within less than 0.02 dex accuracy for our sample while considering precisions in the data expected for V˜12 stars from Kepler data. We also derive masses and radii which are accurate to within 1σ of the accepted values. This study validates the subsequent use of all of the available asteroseismic data on solar-like stars from the Kepler field (>500 IV/V stars) in order to provide a very important constraint for Gaia calibration of GSP_Phot} through the use of log g. We note that while we concentrate on IV/V stars, both the CoRoT and Kepler fields contain asteroseismic data on thousands of giant stars which will also provide useful calibration measures.

  20. Protracted construction of gabbroic crust at a slow spreading ridge: Constraints from 206Pb/238U zircon ages from Atlantis Massif and IODP Hole U1309D (30°N, MAR)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimes, Craig B.; John, Barbara E.; Cheadle, Michael J.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2008-01-01

    Sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb zircon ages of 24 samples from oceanic crust recovered in Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Hole U1309D and from the surface of Atlantis Massif, Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) (30°N) document a protracted history of accretion in the footwall to an oceanic detachment fault. Ages for 18 samples of evolved Fe-Ti oxide gabbro and felsic dikes collected 40–1415 m below seafloor in U1309D yield a weighted mean of 1.20 ± 0.03 Ma (mean square of weighted deviates = 7.1). However, the ages range from 1.08 ± 0.07 Ma and 1.28 ± 0.05 Ma indicating crustal construction occurred over a minimum of 100–200 ka. The zircon ages, along with petrologic observations, indicate at least 2 major periods of intrusive activity with age peaks separated by 70 ka. The oldest ages are observed below 600 mbsf, an observation inconsistent with models requiring constant depth melt intrusion beneath a detachment fault. The data are most consistent with a “multiple sill” model whereby sills intrude at random depths below the ridge axis over a length scale greater than 1.4 km. Zircon ages from broadly spaced samples collected along the southern ridge of Atlantis Massif yield a detachment fault slip rate of 28.7 ± 6.7 mm/a and imply significant asymmetric plate spreading (up to 100% on the North American plate) for at least 200 ka during core complex formation.

  1. Protracted construction of gabbroic crust at a slow-spreading ridge: Constraints from SHRIMP Pb/U zircon ages in IODP hole 1309D, Atlantis Massif, MAR (30°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, C. B.; John, B. E.; Wooden, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    We present U-Pb zircon ages for 18 samples from lower oceanic crust recovered by IODP Hole 1309D in the footwall to an oceanic detachment fault. These samples are evolved oxide gabbros and felsic dikes from between 40-1415 meters below sea floor (mbsf). Ages range from 1.08±0.07 Ma to 1.28±0.05 Ma with errors as low as 1.6%, and reveal a protracted history of accretion. U-Pb zircon dating was performed using the U.S.G.S.-Stanford SHRIMP-RG. Seven ages from both oxide gabbros and felsic dikes above 570 mbsf give a weighted mean of 1.17±0.02 Ma (MSWD=1.03). Oxide gabbros between 620-1040 mbsf are consistently older and give a weighted mean age of 1.24±0.03 (MSWD=1.4). Two felsic dikes within this interval (867 and 1040 mbsf) give younger ages of 1.14±0.05 Ma. In the deepest section (below ~1040 mbsf) oxide gabbros give varied ages of 1.27±0.05 Ma (1175 mbsf) and 1.14±0.04 (1240 and 1327 mbsf). The deepest sample is a felsic dike intruding gabbro at 1415 mbsf, and has an age of 1.28±0.05 Ma. Abrupt changes in the age of the oxide gabbros (at ~600 and below 1040 mbsf) coincide with petrologic and geochemical variations, and indicate the presence of distinct intrusive bodies, which we interpret as sills. The overall weighted mean age of the crust penetrated by 1309D is 1.20±0.02 Ma (MSWD=7.1). However, the range of zircon crystallization ages indicates that this section of crust was constructed over at least ~100-200kyr. This is a minimum estimate because dated samples intrude more primitive olivine-rich rocks and are cut by later diabase. Shallow paleomagnetic remanence inclinations of -38° to -31.5° from below 180 mbsf in Hole 1309D, along with generally steep magmatic fabrics (~40-60°), imply up to 55° of counter- clockwise rotation associated with detachment faulting. The mean age of the hole, together with additional Pb/U zircon ages determined from dive and dredge samples from the southern wall of Atlantis Massif constrain the slip rate of the

  2. Protracted construction of gabbroic crust at a slow-spreading ridge: Constraints from SHRIMP Pb/U zircon ages in IODP hole 1309D, Atlantis Massif, MAR (30°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, C. B.; John, B. E.; Wooden, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    We present U-Pb zircon ages for 18 samples from lower oceanic crust recovered by IODP Hole 1309D in the footwall to an oceanic detachment fault. These samples are evolved oxide gabbros and felsic dikes from between 40-1415 meters below sea floor (mbsf). Ages range from 1.08±0.07 Ma to 1.28±0.05 Ma with errors as low as 1.6%, and reveal a protracted history of accretion. U-Pb zircon dating was performed using the U.S.G.S.-Stanford SHRIMP-RG. Seven ages from both oxide gabbros and felsic dikes above 570 mbsf give a weighted mean of 1.17±0.02 Ma (MSWD=1.03). Oxide gabbros between 620-1040 mbsf are consistently older and give a weighted mean age of 1.24±0.03 (MSWD=1.4). Two felsic dikes within this interval (867 and 1040 mbsf) give younger ages of 1.14±0.05 Ma. In the deepest section (below ~1040 mbsf) oxide gabbros give varied ages of 1.27±0.05 Ma (1175 mbsf) and 1.14±0.04 (1240 and 1327 mbsf). The deepest sample is a felsic dike intruding gabbro at 1415 mbsf, and has an age of 1.28±0.05 Ma. Abrupt changes in the age of the oxide gabbros (at ~600 and below 1040 mbsf) coincide with petrologic and geochemical variations, and indicate the presence of distinct intrusive bodies, which we interpret as sills. The overall weighted mean age of the crust penetrated by 1309D is 1.20±0.02 Ma (MSWD=7.1). However, the range of zircon crystallization ages indicates that this section of crust was constructed over at least ~100-200kyr. This is a minimum estimate because dated samples intrude more primitive olivine-rich rocks and are cut by later diabase. Shallow paleomagnetic remanence inclinations of -38° to -31.5° from below 180 mbsf in Hole 1309D, along with generally steep magmatic fabrics (~40-60°), imply up to 55° of counter- clockwise rotation associated with detachment faulting. The mean age of the hole, together with additional Pb/U zircon ages determined from dive and dredge samples from the southern wall of Atlantis Massif constrain the slip rate of the

  3. The Ages of 55 Globular Clusters as Determined Using an Improved \\Delta V^HB_TO Method along with Color-Magnitude Diagram Constraints, and Their Implications for Broader Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VandenBerg, Don A.; Brogaard, K.; Leaman, R.; Casagrande, L.

    2013-10-01

    Ages have been derived for 55 globular clusters (GCs) for which Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys photometry is publicly available. For most of them, the assumed distances are based on fits of theoretical zero-age horizontal-branch (ZAHB) loci to the lower bound of the observed distributions of HB stars, assuming reddenings from empirical dust maps and metallicities from the latest spectroscopic analyses. The age of the isochrone that provides the best fit to the stars in the vicinity of the turnoff (TO) is taken to be the best estimate of the cluster age. The morphology of isochrones between the TO and the beginning part of the subgiant branch (SGB) is shown to be nearly independent of age and chemical abundances. For well-defined color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), the error bar arising just from the "fitting" of ZAHBs and isochrones is ≈ ± 0.25 Gyr, while that associated with distance and chemical abundance uncertainties is ~ ± 1.5-2 Gyr. The oldest GCs in our sample are predicted to have ages of ≈13.0 Gyr (subject to the aforementioned uncertainties). However, the main focus of this investigation is on relative GC ages. In conflict with recent findings based on the relative main-sequence fitting method, which have been studied in some detail and reconciled with our results, ages are found to vary from mean values of ≈12.5 Gyr at [Fe/H] <~ - 1.7 to ≈11 Gyr at [Fe/H] >~ -1. At intermediate metallicities, the age-metallicity relation (AMR) appears to be bifurcated: one branch apparently contains clusters with disk-like kinematics, whereas the other branch, which is displaced to lower [Fe/H] values by ≈0.6 dex at a fixed age, is populated by clusters with halo-type orbits. The dispersion in age about each component of the AMR is ~ ± 0.5 Gyr. There is no apparent dependence of age on Galactocentric distance (R G) nor is there a clear correlation of HB type with age. As previously discovered in the case of M3 and M13, subtle variations have

  4. Absolute dimensions of eclipsing binaries. XI - V 451 Ophiuchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, J. V.; Gimenez, A.; Scarfe, C.

    1986-10-01

    V451 Oph is a detached eclipsing binary with B9 - A0 main sequence components in a slightly eccentric orbit, and this paper presents accurate absolute dimensions for the system: masses 2.78±0.06 and 2.36±0.05 M_sun;; radii 2.64±0.03 and 2.03±0.05 R_sun;; effective temperatures 10800±800 and 9800±500K. An orbital eccentricity e = 0.0125±0.0015 is obtained and the period of periastron revolution is 180±30 yr. The orbital inclination is 85°.9±0°.5, the relative radii are 0.2155±0.0020 and 0.1655±0.0020, respectively, and secondary eclipse is close to being total. The luminosity ratio between the components is found to be 0.489±0.015 (y), slightly lower than the spectroscopic result 0.60±0.05, which cannot be reproduced from the available photometric information. The components are well-represented by the theoretical evolutionary models by Hejlesen (1980) for an initial chemical composition of (X, Z) = (0.70, 0.02) and a common age of 2×108yr.

  5. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR BF DRACONIS

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg Lacy, Claud H.; Torres, Guillermo; Fekel, Francis C.; Sabby, Jeffrey A.; Claret, Antonio E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: jsabby@siue.edu

    2012-06-15

    BF Dra is now known to be an eccentric double-lined F6+F6 binary star with relatively deep (0.7 mag) partial eclipses. Previous studies of the system are improved with 7494 differential photometric observations from the URSA WebScope and 9700 from the NFO WebScope, 106 high-resolution spectroscopic observations from the Tennessee State University 2 m automatic spectroscopic telescope and the 1 m coude-feed spectrometer at Kitt Peak National Observatory, and 31 accurate radial velocities from the CfA. Very accurate (better than 0.6%) masses and radii are determined from analysis of the two new light curves and four radial velocity curves. Theoretical models match the absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 2.72 Gyr and [Fe/H] = -0.17, and tidal theory correctly confirms that the orbit should still be eccentric. Our observations of BF Dra constrain the convective core overshooting parameter to be larger than about 0.13 H{sub p}. We find, however, that standard tidal theory is unable to match the observed slow rotation rates of the components' surface layers.

  6. Absolute properties of the eclipsing binary star AP Andromedae

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg Lacy, Claud H.; Torres, Guillermo; Fekel, Francis C.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W. E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: matthew1@coe.tsuniv.edu

    2014-06-01

    AP And is a well-detached F5 eclipsing binary star for which only a very limited amount of information was available before this publication. We have obtained very extensive measurements of the light curve (19,097 differential V magnitude observations) and a radial velocity curve (83 spectroscopic observations) which allow us to fit orbits and determine the absolute properties of the components very accurately: masses of 1.277 ± 0.004 and 1.251 ± 0.004 M {sub ☉}, radii of 1.233 ± 0.006 and 1.1953 ± 0.005 R {sub ☉}, and temperatures of 6565 ± 150 K and 6495 ± 150 K. The distance to the system is about 400 ± 30 pc. Comparison with the theoretical properties of the stellar evolutionary models of the Yonsei-Yale series of Yi et al. shows good agreement between the observations and the theory at an age of about 500 Myr and a slightly sub-solar metallicity.

  7. Absolute paleointensity from Hawaiian lavas younger than 35 ka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valet, J.-P.; Tric, E.; Herrero-Bervera, E.; Meynadier, L.; Lockwood, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Paleointensity studies have been conducted in air and in argon atmosphere on nine lava flows with radiocarbon ages distributed between 3.3 and 28.2 ka from the Mauna Loa volcano in the big island of Hawaii. Determinations of paleointensity obtained at eight sites depict the same overall pattern as the previous results for the same period in Hawaii, although the overall average field intensity appears to be lower. Since the present results were determined at higher temperatures than in the previous studies, this discrepancy raises questions regarding the selection of low versus high-temperature segments that are usually made for absolute paleointensity. The virtual dipole moments are similar to those displayed by the worldwide data set obtained from dated lava flows. When averaged within finite time intervals, the worldwide values match nicely the variations of the Sint-200 synthetic record of relative paleointensity and confirm the overall decrease of the dipole field intensity during most of this period. The convergence between the existing records at Hawaii and the rest of the world does not favour the presence of persistent strong non-dipole components beneath Hawaii for this period.

  8. Determination of Absolute Zero Using a Computer-Based Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple computer-based laboratory experiment for evaluating absolute zero in degrees Celsius, which can be performed in college and undergraduate physical sciences laboratory courses. With a computer, absolute zero apparatus can help demonstrators or students to observe the relationship between temperature and pressure and use…

  9. A Global Forecast of Absolute Poverty and Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, M. J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Estimates are made of absolute poverty and employment under the hypothesis that existing trends continue. Concludes that while the number of people in absolute poverty is not likely to decline by 2000, the proportion will fall. Jobs will have to grow 3.9% per year in developing countries to achieve full employment. (JOW)

  10. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonality of Influenza (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaman, J. L.; Pitzer, V.; Viboud, C.; Grenfell, B.; Goldstein, E.; Lipsitch, M.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent re-analysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here we show that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. In addition, we show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility and changes in population mixing and contact rates.

  11. Novalis' Poetic Uncertainty: A "Bildung" with the Absolute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mika, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Novalis, the Early German Romantic poet and philosopher, had at the core of his work a mysterious depiction of the "absolute." The absolute is Novalis' name for a substance that defies precise knowledge yet calls for a tentative and sensitive speculation. How one asserts a truth, represents an object, and sets about encountering things…

  12. THE ABSOLUTE MAGNITUDES OF RED HORIZONTAL BRANCH STARS IN THE ugriz SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. Q.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. K.

    2009-09-10

    Based on photometric data of the central parts of eight globular clusters and one open cluster presented by An and his collaborators, we select red horizontal branch (RHB) stars in the (g - r){sub 0}-g {sub 0} diagram and make a statistical study of the distributions of their colors and absolute magnitudes in the SDSS ugriz system. Meanwhile, absolute magnitudes in the Johnson VRI system are calculated through the translation formulae between gri and VRI in the literature. The calibrations of absolute magnitude as functions of metallicity and age are established by linear regressions of the data. It is found that metallicity coefficients in these calibrations decrease, while age coefficients increase, from the blue u filter to the red z filter. The calibration of M{sub i} = 0.06[Fe/H] + 0.040t + 0.03 has the smallest scatter of 0.04 mag, and thus i is the best filter in the ugriz system when RHB stars are used for distance indicators. The comparison of the M{sub I} calibration from our data with that from red clump stars indicates that the previous suggestion that the I filter is better than the V filter in distance determination may not be true because of its significant dependence on age.

  13. Absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The distinction between the uses of relative and absolute spectroradiometric calibration of remote sensing systems is discussed. The advantages of detector-based absolute calibration are described, and the categories of relative and absolute system calibrations are listed. The limitations and problems associated with three common methods used for the absolute calibration of remote sensing systems are addressed. Two methods are proposed for the in-flight absolute calibration of advanced multispectral linear array systems. One makes use of a sun-illuminated panel in front of the sensor, the radiance of which is monitored by a spectrally flat pyroelectric radiometer. The other uses a large, uniform, high-radiance reference ground surface. The ground and atmospheric measurements required as input to a radiative transfer program to predict the radiance level at the entrance pupil of the orbital sensor are discussed, and the ground instrumentation is described.

  14. Constraints on children's color term acquisition.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Anna

    2006-08-01

    Kowalski and Zimiles (2006) and O'Hanlon and Roberson (2006) address an age-old question: Why do children find it difficult to learn color terms? Here these articles are reflected on, providing a focused examination of the issues central to this question. First, the criteria by which children are said to find color naming difficult are considered. Although the age of color term acquisition is decreasing, and color naming might not be more difficult than other abstract attributes, several stages of difficulty are identified. Second, it is argued that there are potentially multiple constraints (e.g., conceptual, attentional, and linguistic) for these multiple stages of difficulty with color term acquisition. Third, it is argued that the validity and reliability of techniques for identifying constraints need to be considered and that converging evidence for the constraints should be provided. Finally, a series of new questions that need to be asked to provide a well-rounded explanation of the difficulties children face when learning color terms is outlined.

  15. Lifetime of an ocean island volcano feeder zone: constraints from U-Pb dating on coexisting zircon and baddeleyite, and 40/39Ar age determinations, Fuerteventura, Canary Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allibon, James; Ovtcharova, Maria; Bussy, Francois; Cosca, Michael; Schaltegger, Urs; Bussien, Denise; Lewin, Eric

    2011-01-01

    High-precision isotope dilution - thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) U-Pb zircon and baddeleyite ages from the PX1 vertically layered mafic intrusion Fuerteventura, Canary Islands, indicate initiation of magma crystallization at 22.10 ± 0.07 Ma. The magmatic activity lasted a minimum of 0.52 Ma. 40Ar/39Ar amphibole dating yielded ages from 21.9 ± 0.6 to 21.8 ± 0.3, identical within errors to the U-Pb ages, despite the expected 1% theoretical bias between 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb dates. This overlap could result from (i) rapid cooling of the intrusion (i.e., less than the 0.3 to 0.6 Ma 40Ar/39Ar age uncertainties) from closure temperatures (Tc) of zircon (699-988 °C) to amphibole (500-600 °C); (ii) lead loss affecting the youngest zircons; or (iii) excess argon shifting the plateau ages towards older values. The combination of the 40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb datasets implies that the maximum amount of time PX1 intrusion took to cool below amphibole Tc is 0.8 Ma, suggesting PX1 lifetime of 520,000 to 800,000 Ma. Age disparities among coexisting baddeleyite and zircon (22.10 ± 0.07/0.08/0.15 Ma and 21.58 ± 0.15/0.16/0.31 Ma) in a gabbro sample from the pluton margin suggest complex genetic relationships between phases. Baddeleyite is found preserved in plagioclase cores and crystallized early from low silica activity magma. Zircon crystallized later in a higher silica activity environment and is found in secondary scapolite and is found close to calcite veins, in secondary scapolite that recrystallised from plagioclase. close to calcite veins. Oxygen isotope δ18O values of altered plagioclase are high (+7.7), indicating interaction with fluids derived from host-rock carbonatites. The coexistence of baddeleyite and zircon is ascribed to interaction of the PX1 gabbro with CO2-rich carbonatite-derived fluids released during contact metamorphism.

  16. Neural constraints on learning.

    PubMed

    Sadtler, Patrick T; Quick, Kristin M; Golub, Matthew D; Chase, Steven M; Ryu, Stephen I; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Yu, Byron M; Batista, Aaron P

    2014-08-28

    Learning, whether motor, sensory or cognitive, requires networks of neurons to generate new activity patterns. As some behaviours are easier to learn than others, we asked if some neural activity patterns are easier to generate than others. Here we investigate whether an existing network constrains the patterns that a subset of its neurons is capable of exhibiting, and if so, what principles define this constraint. We employed a closed-loop intracortical brain-computer interface learning paradigm in which Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) controlled a computer cursor by modulating neural activity patterns in the primary motor cortex. Using the brain-computer interface paradigm, we could specify and alter how neural activity mapped to cursor velocity. At the start of each session, we observed the characteristic activity patterns of the recorded neural population. The activity of a neural population can be represented in a high-dimensional space (termed the neural space), wherein each dimension corresponds to the activity of one neuron. These characteristic activity patterns comprise a low-dimensional subspace (termed the intrinsic manifold) within the neural space. The intrinsic manifold presumably reflects constraints imposed by the underlying neural circuitry. Here we show that the animals could readily learn to proficiently control the cursor using neural activity patterns that were within the intrinsic manifold. However, animals were less able to learn to proficiently control the cursor using activity patterns that were outside of the intrinsic manifold. These results suggest that the existing structure of a network can shape learning. On a timescale of hours, it seems to be difficult to learn to generate neural activity patterns that are not consistent with the existing network structure. These findings offer a network-level explanation for the observation that we are more readily able to learn new skills when they are related to the skills that we already

  17. High-precision U-Pb geochronology of the Jurassic Yanliao Biota from Jianchang (western Liaoning Province, China): Age constraints on the rise of feathered dinosaurs and eutherian mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Zhuyin; He, Huaiyu; Ramezani, Jahandar; Bowring, Samuel A.; Hu, Dongyu; Zhang, Lijun; Zheng, Shaolin; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Zhonghe; Deng, Chenglong; Guo, Jinghui

    2016-10-01

    The Yanliao Biota of northeastern China comprises the oldest feathered dinosaurs, transitional pterosaurs, as well as the earliest eutherian mammals, multituberculate mammals, and new euharamiyidan species that are key elements of the Mesozoic biotic record. Recent discovery of the Yanliao Biota in the Daxishan section near the town of Linglongta, Jianchang County in western Liaoning Province have greatly enhanced our knowledge of the transition from dinosaurs to birds, primitive to derived pterosaurs, and the early evolution of mammals. Nevertheless, fundamental questions regarding the correlation of fossil-bearing strata, rates of dinosaur and mammalian evolution, and their relationship to environmental change in deep time remain unresolved due to the paucity of precise and accurate temporal constraints. These limitations underscore the importance of placing the rich fossil record of Jianchang within a high-resolution chronostratigraphic framework that has thus far been hampered by the relatively low precision of in situ radioisotopic dating techniques. Here we present high-precision U-Pb zircon geochronology by the chemical abrasion isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (CA-ID-TIMS) from three interstratified ash beds previously dated by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) technique. The results constrain the key fossil horizons of the Daxishan section to an interval spanning 160.89 to 160.25 Ma with 2σ analytical uncertainties that range from ±46 to ±69 kyr. These data place the Yanliao Biota from Jianchang in the Oxfordian Stage of the Late Jurassic, and mark the Daxishan section as the site of Earth's oldest precisely dated feathered dinosaurs and eutherian mammals.

  18. In-situ zircon U-Pb age and Hf-O isotopic constraints on the origin of the Hasan-Robat A-type granite from Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, Iran: implications for reworking of Cadomian arc igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honarmand, Maryam; Li, Xian-Hua; Nabatian, Ghasem; Neubauer, Franz

    2017-01-01

    The Lower Permian Hasan-Robat syenogranite occurs as a single pluton and intruded the Upper Carboniferous-Lower Permian sandstones and dolomitic limestones in the central part of the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone. This syenogranitic intrusion shows A-type granitic affinity and is a good representative of Early Permian igneous activity in Iran. SIMS U-Pb zircon analyses indicate a crystallization age of 294.2 ± 2.5 Ma for the Hasan-Robat A-type granite. In-situ Lu-Hf and oxygen isotope analyses of magmatic zircons were carried out to infer the magma sources and evolution of the Hasan-Robat A-type syenogranite. The Hf-O zircon isotopic compositions are relatively homogeneous, with nearly chondritic ɛHf(t) values of -0.8 to +2.4 corresponding to two-stage zircon Hf model ages of 1.15-1.36 Ga. The δ18O values of zircon range from +7.6 to +8.6‰. The Hf model ages of the Hasan-Robat zircons is within the range of those reported from the Cadomian granitoids in Iran. The isotopic features of the Hasan-Robat syenogranite are in good agreement with Hf isotopic values and Hf and Nd model ages reported from the Cadomian arc magmatic suites in Iran. Thus, partial melting of these Cadomian igneous rocks would be the favorite source for the Hasan-Robat syenogranitic magma during the opening of the Neotethys Ocean and separation of Iranian terranes from the northern margin of Gondwana.

  19. SIMS U-Pb zircon ages and Ni-Mo-PGE geochemistry of the lower Cambrian Niutitang Formation in South China: Constraints on Ni-Mo-PGE mineralization and stratigraphic correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Zhongwu; Li, Xian-Hua; Chu, Xuelei; Tang, Guoqiang; Yang, Saihong; Yang, Hongwei; Liu, Hai; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Teng

    2017-04-01

    In comparison with previous studies on the Ni-Mo-PGE ore deposits within the deep water Lower Cambrian black shales of the Niutitang Formation around Hunan and Guizhou provinces, this study focused on the shallow water Ni-Mo-PGE enriched layer of the Niutitang Formation around Hubei Province by means of an integrated geochronological, PGE, REE and trace element geochemical study. The results suggest the Ni-Mo-PGE enriched layer has a dominant seawater origin, whereas the Ni-Mo-PGE ore deposits have mixed seawater, hydrothermal and terrigenous origins. Trace metals precipitated from ambient seawater under anoxic-suboxic settings at exceedingly slow sedimentation rates with episodic injections of fresh oxidized seawater. Organic matter played an important role in sourcing, transporting and precipitating trace metals. However, decay of organic material by means of sulfate reducing reactions and/or fluid reworking overprinted primary relationships with trace metal contents. However, the positive linear relationships are clearly shown between organic carbon and trace metal contents. New SIMS U-Pb ages constrained the depositional age of the Ni-Mo-PGE enriched layer to be 532-527 Ma, which argues against previous assumption that the anoxic event recorded in the Ni-Mo-PGE took place at the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary. Furthermore, new radiometric ages suggest the Shuijingtuo/Niutitang Formation could be correlated with Shiyantou Formation, Dahai and upper Zhongyicun members, whereas Yanjiahe Formation correlated with Daibu and lower Zhongyicun members in Yunnan Province, respectively.

  20. Mini-implants and miniplates generate sub-absolute and absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Consolaro, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The functional demand imposed on bone promotes changes in the spatial properties of osteocytes as well as in their extensions uniformly distributed throughout the mineralized surface. Once spatial deformation is established, osteocytes create the need for structural adaptations that result in bone formation and resorption that happen to meet the functional demands. The endosteum and the periosteum are the effectors responsible for stimulating adaptive osteocytes in the inner and outer surfaces. Changes in shape, volume and position of the jaws as a result of skeletal correction of the maxilla and mandible require anchorage to allow bone remodeling to redefine morphology, esthetics and function as a result of spatial deformation conducted by orthodontic appliances. Examining the degree of changes in shape, volume and structural relationship of areas where mini-implants and miniplates are placed allows us to classify mini-implants as devices of subabsolute anchorage and miniplates as devices of absolute anchorage.

  1. Absolute dose verifications in small photon fields using BANGTM gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheib, S. G.; Schenkel, Y.; Gianolini, S.

    2004-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters change their magnetic resonance (MR) and optical properties with the absorbed dose when irradiated and are suitable for narrow photon beam dosimetry in radiosurgery. Such dosimeters enable relative and absolute 3D dose verifications in order to check the entire treatment chain from imaging to dose application during commissioning and quality assurance. For absolute 3D dose verifications in radiosurgery using Gamma Knife B, commercially available BANGTM Gels (BANG 25 Gy and BANG 3 Gy) together with dedicated phantoms were chosen in order to determine the potential of absolute gel dosimetry in radiosurgery.

  2. Measuring the absolute magnetic field using high-Tc SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, D. F.; Itozaki, H.

    2006-06-01

    SQUID normally can only measure the change of magnetic field instead of the absolute value of magnetic field. Using a compensation method, a mobile SQUID, which could keep locked when moving in the earth's magnetic field, was developed. Using the mobile SQUID, it was possible to measure the absolute magnetic field. The absolute value of magnetic field could be calculated from the change of the compensation output when changing the direction of the SQUID in a magnetic field. Using this method and the mobile SQUID, we successfully measured the earth's magnetic field in our laboratory.

  3. Absolute Antenna Calibration at the US National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, G. L.; Bilich, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Geodetic GNSS applications routinely demand millimeter precision and extremely high levels of accuracy. To achieve these accuracies, measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level must be understood. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the apparent point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers; additional research suggests that the addition of a radome or the choice of antenna mount can significantly alter those a priori phase center patterns. For the more demanding GNSS positioning applications and especially in cases of mixed-antenna networks, it is all the more important to know antenna phase center variations as a function of both elevation and azimuth in the antenna reference frame and incorporate these models into analysis software. Determination of antenna phase center behavior is known as "antenna calibration". Since 1994, NGS has computed relative antenna calibrations for more than 350 antennas. In recent years, the geodetic community has moved to absolute calibrations - the IGS adopted absolute antenna phase center calibrations in 2006 for use in their orbit and clock products, and NGS's CORS group began using absolute antenna calibration upon the release of the new CORS coordinates in IGS08 epoch 2005.00 and NAD 83(2011,MA11,PA11) epoch 2010.00. Although NGS relative calibrations can be and have been converted to absolute, it is considered best practice to independently measure phase center characteristics in an absolute sense. Consequently, NGS has developed and operates an absolute calibration system. These absolute antenna calibrations accommodate the demand for greater accuracy and for 2-dimensional (elevation and azimuth) parameterization. NGS will continue to provide calibration values via the NGS web site www.ngs.noaa.gov/ANTCAL, and will publish calibrations in the ANTEX format as well as the legacy ANTINFO

  4. [Niger: development under constraints].

    PubMed

    Chippaux, J P

    1998-01-01

    Several nonvenereal treponematoses are or were present in Niger while syphilis has been reported in only the northern, arid zones (Bejel) of the country. While their presence is known in Niger, endemic nonvenereal treponematoses are no longer reported by the country¿s health centers. Results are presented from a serological study using randomized Treponema pallidum Hemagglutination Assay (TPHA) upon a sample of 183 children under age 5 years old living in three areas of Niamey. No clinical exam was performed before testing. In the overall sample, 12% of tests were positive, ranging from 8% to 17% depending upon the neighborhood studied. The differences observed were insignificant according to both place of residence and age. All age groups were affected, although only 3 seropositive cases were identified among the 37 children under age 12 months. The relative levels were too high to be dismissed as serological artifacts. The most likely explanation for the high levels of antitreponemic antibodies is endemic syphilis, which is increasing in the region. Endemic syphilis is re-emerging, while penicillin is being used less systematically. Moreover, economic problems constrain access to health care. Results in children under age 12 months suggest that congenital syphilis is uncommon.

  5. Zirconolite, zircon and monazite-(Ce) U-Th-Pb age constraints on the emplacement, deformation and alteration history of the Cummins Range Carbonatite Complex, Halls Creek Orogen, Kimberley region, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, Peter J.; Dunkley, Daniel J.; Fletcher, Ian R.; McNaughton, Neal J.; Rasmussen, Birger; Jaques, A. Lynton; Verrall, Michael; Sweetapple, Marcus T.

    2016-04-01

    In situ SHRIMP U-Pb dating of zirconolite in clinopyroxenite from the Cummins Range Carbonatite Complex, situated in the southern Halls Creek Orogen, Kimberley region, Western Australia, has provided a reliable 207Pb/206Pb age of emplacement of 1009 ± 16 Ma. Variably metamict and recrystallised zircons from co-magmatic carbonatites, including a megacryst ~1.5 cm long, gave a range of ages from ~1043-998 Ma, reflecting partial isotopic resetting during post-emplacement deformation and alteration. Monazite-(Ce) in a strongly foliated dolomite carbonatite produced U-Th-Pb dates ranging from ~900-590 Ma. Although the monazite-(Ce) data cannot give any definitive ages, they clearly reflect a long history of hydrothermal alteration/recrystallisation, over at least 300 million years. This is consistent with the apparent resetting of the Rb-Sr and K-Ar isotopic systems by a post-emplacement thermal event at ~900 Ma during the intracratonic Yampi Orogeny. The emplacement of the Cummins Range Carbonatite Complex probably resulted from the reactivation of a deep crustal structure within the Halls Creek Orogen during the amalgamation of Proterozoic Australia with Rodinia over the period ~1000-950 Ma. This may have allowed an alkaline carbonated silicate magma that was parental to the Cummins Range carbonatites, and generated by redox and/or decompression partial melting of the asthenospheric mantle, to ascend from the base of the continental lithosphere along the lithospheric discontinuity constituted by the southern edge of the Halls Creek Orogen. There is no evidence of a link between the emplacement of the Cummins Range Carbonatite Complex and mafic large igneous province magmatism indicative of mantle plume activity. Rather, patterns of Proterozoic alkaline magmatism in the Kimberley Craton may have been controlled by changing plate motions during the Nuna-Rodinia supercontinent cycles (~1200-800 Ma).

  6. Plate interactions of Laurussia and Gondwana during the formation of Pangea- Constraints by U-Pb LA-SF-ICP-MS detrital zircon ages of Devonian and Early Carboniferous siliciclastics of the Rheinisches Schiefergebirge (Rhenohercynian zone, Central European

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckelmann, Katja; Nesbor, Heinz-Dieter; Königshof, Peter; Linnemann, Ulf; Hofmann, Mandy; Lange, Jan-Michael; Sagawe, Anja

    2013-04-01

    The Rhenohercynian zone of the Central European Variscides contains top-NW thrusted rock complexes in the area of the Hörre nappe. Further to the north, par-authochthonous volcano-sedimentary complexes of the Lahn and Dill-Eder synclines occur. In our paper, a representative data set of U-Pb LA-SF ICP-MS ages of 1228 detrital zircon grains of Devonian and Lower Carboniferous sandstones from both areas is presented. The data constrain the Middle to Upper Devonian and the Lower Carboniferous siliciclastic and volcano-sedimentary complexes of the Hörre nappe to be allochtonous. The cluster of U-Pb ages of detrital zircon grains point to a provenance of the debris from the Saxo-Thuringian zone and rock complexes of the Mid-German Crystalline zone, which were formerly related to the latter one. A long-distance top-NW directed transport of the nappe complex in the Hörre nappe is required by our new data set. The zircon populations derived from the Saxo-Thuringian zone are representative for a Gondwanan hinterland and characterised by age clusters of ~530-700 Ma, ~1,8-2.2 Ga, ~2.5-2.7 Ga, and ~3.0-3.4 Ga. In a palaeogeographic view, the Saxo-Thuringian zone formed during Devonian to Lower Carboniferous time at the southern margin of the Rheic Ocean. A Lower Devonian sandstone sample from the par-authochtonous Lahn-Dill-Eder syncline shows a provenance, which is representative for Laurussia. Most of that debris seems to be derived from Baltica and Avalonia, two important parts of Laurussia. U-Pb zircon ages cluster at ~ 400-450 Ma, 540-650 Ma, 1.0-1.2 Ga, ~1.4-1.5 Ga, ~1.7-2.2 Ga, and 2.3-2.9 Ga. In terms of a palaeogeographic relation, these samples represent a sedimentary unit which was deposited at the northern margin of the Rheic Ocean at the edge of Laurussia facing to the south. Our data set constrains a top-SE directed subduction of the oceanic crust of the Rheic Ocean during its final closure and the formation of supercontinent Pangea.

  7. 40Ar-39Ar age constraint on deformation and brittle-ductile transition of the Main Central Thrust and the South Tibetan Detachment zone from Dhauliganga valley, Garhwal Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Koushik; Chaudhury, Reetam; Pfänder, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    40Ar-39Ar data from two sets of mylonitic two-mica granites present in the Main Central Thrust (MCT) and one leucogranite from the South Tibetan Detachment (STD) of Dhauliganga valley, Garhwal Himalaya are presented. The MCT and the STD bound the High Himalayan Crystallines (HHC) and are believed to facilitate its extrusion. Field evidence of ductile deformation in the form of tight isoclinal folding and brittle deformation in the form of back thrusts and transverse fractures are observed. The STD zone shows evidence of pervasive migration of leucogranitic melt through north dipping extensional shear zones. The ∼19.5 Ma old Malari Leucogranite, present adjacent to the STD zone, experienced ductile and brittle deformation related to the tectonics of the STD. Muscovite analysis from the Malari leucogranite gives a cooling age of ∼15.2 Ma suggesting that ductile deformation in the STD zone may have ceased by ∼15 Ma. 40Ar-39Ar chronology of biotite from two mylonitic granites of the MCT yields cooling ages of 10.8 Ma and 9.7 Ma, which we correlate with activity of the MCT at ∼10 Ma that caused rapid exhumation of the HHC. 40Ar-39Ar ages of 6.4 Ma and 6.2 Ma from white mica represent newly crystallized white mica post-dating biotite cooling and indicate late stage deformation. It is inferred that, as the HHC wedge started to exhume and erode rapidly along the MCT zone at ∼10 Ma, the taper angle of the Himalayan wedge decreased to a 'sub-critical' stage. To regain the critical taper angle, the wedge underwent internal deformation in the form of back thrusts and duplex structures. Comparison of our data with earlier results from other sections of the MCT helps us envisage that the ∼6 Ma white mica ages can be correlated with this internal deformation event and also with the transition of deformation regime in the MCT zone from ductile to brittle.

  8. Credit Constraints for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solis, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This paper exploits a natural experiment that produces exogenous variation on credit access to determine the effect on college enrollment. The paper assess how important are credit constraints to explain the gap in college enrollment by family income, and what would be the gap if credit constraints are eliminated. Progress in college and dropout…

  9. On Constraints in Assembly Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Calton, T.L.; Jones, R.E.; Wilson, R.H.

    1998-12-17

    Constraints on assembly plans vary depending on product, assembly facility, assembly volume, and many other factors. Assembly costs and other measures to optimize vary just as widely. To be effective, computer-aided assembly planning systems must allow users to express the plan selection criteria that appIy to their products and production environments. We begin this article by surveying the types of user criteria, both constraints and quality measures, that have been accepted by assembly planning systems to date. The survey is organized along several dimensions, including strategic vs. tactical criteria; manufacturing requirements VS. requirements of the automated planning process itself and the information needed to assess compliance with each criterion. The latter strongly influences the efficiency of planning. We then focus on constraints. We describe a framework to support a wide variety of user constraints for intuitive and efficient assembly planning. Our framework expresses all constraints on a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. Constraints are implemented as simple procedures that either accept or reject assembly operations proposed by the planner. For efficiency, some constraints are supplemented with special-purpose modifications to the planner's algorithms. Fast replanning enables an interactive plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constraint discovery and documentation. We describe an implementation of the framework in a computer-aided assembly planning system and experiments applying the system to a number of complex assemblies, including one with 472 parts.

  10. Fixed Costs and Hours Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Hours constraints are typically identified by worker responses to questions asking whether they would prefer a job with more hours and more pay or fewer hours and less pay. Because jobs with different hours but the same rate of pay may be infeasible when there are fixed costs of employment or mandatory overtime premia, the constraint in those…

  11. Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous radiolarian age constraints from the sedimentary cover of the Amasia ophiolite (NW Armenia), at the junction between the Izmir-Ankara-Erzinçan and Sevan-Hakari suture zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danelian, T.; Asatryan, G.; Galoyan, Gh.; Sahakyan, L.; Stepanyan, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Amasia ophiolite, situated at the northernmost corner of Armenia, is part of the Sevan-Hakari suture zone which links with the Izmir-Ankara-Erzinçan suture zone in northern Turkey. Three new radiolarian assemblages have been extracted from siliceous sedimentary rocks that accumulated on the Amasia ophiolite in an oceanic setting. Two of these assemblages were extracted from red-brownish bedded cherts overlying basaltic lavas; one of these is likely to be middle Oxfordian to early Kimmeridgian in age, while the second correlates with the Berriasian. Similar time-equivalent lava-chert sequences have been dated recently using radiolarians from the Stepanavan, Vedi and Sevan ophiolite units, where they are considered to relate to submarine volcanic activity in the back-arc marginal basin in which the Armenian ophiolites were formed. The third radiolarian assemblage, of late Barremian age, was extracted from a more than 15-m-thick volcaniclastic-chert sequence. The related volcanic activity is likely to have been subaerial and probably relates to the formation of an oceanic volcanic plateau; no Cretaceous subaerial volcanism has been previously recorded in the Lesser Caucasus area.

  12. Absolute lower limits on the masses of selectrons and sneutrinos in the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Heister, A.; Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Brunelière, R.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocmé, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugés, E.; Lopez, J.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Pacheco, A.; Paneque, D.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Barklow, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T. C.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J. J.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Leibenguth, G.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R. D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S. A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; White, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Clarke, D. P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Müller, A.-S.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; de Vivie de Régie, J.-B.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M. G.; Jones, L. T.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2002-09-01

    The results of searches for selectrons, charginos and neutralinos performed with the data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV are interpreted in the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model with R-parity conservation. Under the assumptions of gaugino and sfermion mass unification and no sfermion mixing, an absolute lower limit of 73 GeV/c2 is set on the mass of the lighter selectron e~R at the 95% confidence level. Similarly, limits on the masses of the heavier selectron e~L and of the sneutrino ν~e are set at 107 and 84 GeV/c2, respectively. Additional constraints are derived from the results of the searches for Higgs bosons. The results are also interpreted in the framework of minimal supergravity.

  13. Cosmological Constraints from the SDSS maxBCG Cluster Catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Wechsler, Risa H.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Annis, James T.; Becker, Matthew R.; Evrard, August E.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Hansen, Sarah M.; Hao, Jia; Johnston, David E.; Koester, Benjamin P.; McKay, Timothy A.; Sheldon, Erin S.; Weinberg, David H.; /CCAPP /Ohio State U.

    2009-08-03

    We use the abundance and weak lensing mass measurements of the SDSS maxBCG cluster catalog to simultaneously constrain cosmology and the richness-mass relation of the clusters. Assuming a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmology, we find {sigma}{sub 8}({Omega}{sub m}/0.25){sup 0.41} = 0.832 {+-} 0.033 after marginalization over all systematics. In common with previous studies, our error budget is dominated by systematic uncertainties, the primary two being the absolute mass scale of the weak lensing masses of the maxBCG clusters, and uncertainty in the scatter of the richness-mass relation. Our constraints are fully consistent with the WMAP five-year data, and in a joint analysis we find {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.807 {+-} 0.020 and {Omega}{sub m} = 0.265 {+-} 0.016, an improvement of nearly a factor of two relative to WMAP5 alone. Our results are also in excellent agreement with and comparable in precision to the latest cosmological constraints from X-ray cluster abundances. The remarkable consistency among these results demonstrates that cluster abundance constraints are not only tight but also robust, and highlight the power of optically-selected cluster samples to produce precision constraints on cosmological parameters.

  14. Absolute parameters for AI Phoenicis using WASP photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby-Kent, J. A.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Serenelli, A. M.; Turner, O. D.; Evans, D. F.; Anderson, D. R.; Hellier, C.; West, R. G.

    2016-06-01

    Context. AI Phe is a double-lined, detached eclipsing binary, in which a K-type sub-giant star totally eclipses its main-sequence companion every 24.6 days. This configuration makes AI Phe ideal for testing stellar evolutionary models. Difficulties in obtaining a complete lightcurve mean the precision of existing radii measurements could be improved. Aims: Our aim is to improve the precision of the radius measurements for the stars in AI Phe using high-precision photometry from the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP), and use these improved radius measurements together with estimates of the masses, temperatures and composition of the stars to place constraints on the mixing length, helium abundance and age of the system. Methods: A best-fit ebop model is used to obtain lightcurve parameters, with their standard errors calculated using a prayer-bead algorithm. These were combined with previously published spectroscopic orbit results, to obtain masses and radii. A Bayesian method is used to estimate the age of the system for model grids with different mixing lengths and helium abundances. Results: The radii are found to be R1 = 1.835 ± 0.014 R⊙, R2 = 2.912 ± 0.014 R⊙ and the masses M1 = 1.1973 ± 0.0037 M⊙, M2 = 1.2473 ± 0.0039 M⊙. From the best-fit stellar models we infer a mixing length of 1.78, a helium abundance of YAI = 0.26 +0.02-0.01 and an age of 4.39 ± 0.32 Gyr. Times of primary minimum show the period of AI Phe is not constant. Currently, there are insufficient data to determine the cause of this variation. Conclusions: Improved precision in the masses and radii have improved the age estimate, and allowed the mixing length and helium abundance to be constrained. The eccentricity is now the largest source of uncertainty in calculating the masses. Further work is needed to characterise the orbit of AI Phe. Obtaining more binaries with parameters measured to a similar level of precision would allow us to test for relationships between helium

  15. Generalizing Atoms in Constraint Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, C. David, Jr.; Frisch, Alan M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper studies the generalization of atomic formulas, or atoms, that are augmented with constraints on or among their terms. The atoms may also be viewed as definite clauses whose antecedents express the constraints. Atoms are generalized relative to a body of background information about the constraints. This paper first examines generalization of atoms with only monadic constraints. The paper develops an algorithm for the generalization task and discusses algorithm complexity. It then extends the algorithm to apply to atoms with constraints of arbitrary arity. The paper also presents semantic properties of the generalizations computed by the algorithms, making the algorithms applicable to such problems as abduction, induction, and knowledge base verification. The paper emphasizes the application to induction and presents a pac-learning result for constrained atoms.

  16. Monochromator-Based Absolute Calibration of Radiation Thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keawprasert, T.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, D. R.; Hartmann, J.

    2011-08-01

    A monochromator integrating-sphere-based spectral comparator facility has been developed to calibrate standard radiation thermometers in terms of the absolute spectral radiance responsivity, traceable to the PTB cryogenic radiometer. The absolute responsivity calibration has been improved using a 75 W xenon lamp with a reflective mirror and imaging optics to a relative standard uncertainty at the peak wavelength of approximately 0.17 % ( k = 1). Via a relative measurement of the out-of-band responsivity, the spectral responsivity of radiation thermometers can be fully characterized. To verify the calibration accuracy, the absolutely calibrated radiation thermometer is used to measure Au and Cu freezing-point temperatures and then to compare the obtained results with the values obtained by absolute methods, resulting in T - T 90 values of +52 mK and -50 mK for the gold and copper fixed points, respectively.

  17. Gibbs Paradox Revisited from the Fluctuation Theorem with Absolute Irreversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashita, Yûto; Ueda, Masahito

    2017-02-01

    The inclusion of the factor ln (1 /N !) in the thermodynamic entropy proposed by Gibbs is shown to be equivalent to the validity of the fluctuation theorem with absolute irreversibility for gas mixing.

  18. Absolute Value Boundedness, Operator Decomposition, and Stochastic Media and Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adomian, G.; Miao, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    The research accomplished during this period is reported. Published abstracts and technical reports are listed. Articles presented include: boundedness of absolute values of generalized Fourier coefficients, propagation in stochastic media, and stationary conditions for stochastic differential equations.

  19. Petrogenesis of the Yaochong granite and Mo deposit, Western Dabie orogen, eastern-central China: Constraints from zircon U-Pb and molybdenite Re-Os ages, whole-rock geochemistry and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Xu, Zhaowen; Qiu, Wenhong; Li, Chao; Yu, Yang; Wang, Hao; Su, Yang

    2015-05-01

    The Dabie orogen is among the most famous continent-continent collisional orogenic belts in the world, and is characterized by intensive post-collisional extension, magmatism and Mo mineralization. However, the genetic links between the mineralization and the geodynamic evolution of the orogen remain unresolved. In this paper, the Yaochong Mo deposit and its associated granitic stocks were investigated to elucidate this issue. Our new zircon U-Pb ages yielded an Early Cretaceous age (133.3 ± 1.3 Ma) for the Yaochong granite, and our molybdenite Re-Os dating gave a similar age (135 ± 1 Ma) for the Mo deposit. The Yaochong stock is characterized by high silica and alkali but low Mg, Fe and Ca. It is enriched in light rare earth elements (LREEs) and large ion lithophile elements (LILEs: Rb, K, Th and U), but strongly depleted in heavy REEs, and high field strength elements (HFSEs: Nb, Ta, Ti and Y). The Yaochong granite has initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7087-0.7096, and Pb isotopic ratios of (206Pb/204Pb)i = 16.599-16.704, (207Pb/204Pb)i = 15.170-15.618 and (208Pb/204Pb)i = 36.376-38.248. The granite has εNd(t) of -18.0 to -16.3 and εHf(t) values of -26.5 to -20.0. All these data indicate that the Yaochong granite is a high-K calc-alkaline fractionated I-type granite, and may have originated from partial melting of the thickened Yangtze continental crust. The Mo ores also show low radiogenic Pb isotopes similar to the Yaochong stock. Medium Re content in molybdenite (21.8-74.8 ppm) also suggests that the ore-forming materials were derived from the thickened lower crust with possibly minor mixing with the mantle. Similar to the Eastern Dabie orogen, the thickened crust beneath the Western Dabie orogen may also have experienced tectonic collapse, which may have exerted fundamental geodynamic controls on the two-stage Mo mineralization in the region.

  20. Absolute flux calibration of optical spectrophotometric standard stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colina, Luis; Bohlin, Ralph C.

    1994-01-01

    A method based on Landolt photometry in B and V is developed to correct for a wavelength independent offset of the absolute flux level of optical spectrophotometric standards. The method is based on synthetic photometry techniques in B and V and is accurate to approximately 1%. The correction method is verified by Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph absolute fluxes for five calibration stars, which agree with Landolt photometry to 0.5% in B and V.

  1. Petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the early Mesozoic Xitian granitic pluton in the middle Qin-Hang Belt, South China: Constraints from zircon U-Pb ages and bulk-rock trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qianhong; Cao, Jingya; Kong, Hua; Shao, Yongjun; Li, Huan; Xi, Xiaoshuang; Deng, Xuantong

    2016-10-01

    The Xitian pluton in southeast Hunan province is one of the early Mesozoic (Indosinian) granitic plutons in the South China Block. It is composed of biotite adamellite with K-feldspar megacrysts, biotite adamellite, and biotite granite that have U-Pb zircon ages of 229.9 ± 1.4 Ma, 223.6 ± 1.3 Ma, and 224.0 ± 1.4 Ma, respectively. The Indosinian granitoids in the Xitian pluton belong to S-type granites, with highly radiogenic initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.71397-0.71910), negative εNd(t) values ranging from -10.1 to -9.4, and old Nd model ages (1858-1764 Ma). They are enriched in radiogenic Pb isotopes, with (206Pb/204Pb)t ranging from 18.130 to 18.903, (207Pb/204Pb)t from 15.652 to 15.722, and (208Pb/204Pb)t from 38.436 to 39.037, respectively. These features indicate that the granitoidswithin the Xitian pluton were formed from magmas generated by remelting of metapelite and metapsammite of the Paleoproterozoic metamorphic basement at temperatures of ca. 800 °C, with low oxygen fugacity. The Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of the rocks from Xitian pluton indicate that the granitic magmas were mixed with less than 10% mantle-derived magmas. We suggest that the Xitian pluton was emplaced in an extensional tectonic setting related to release of compressional stresses within the thickened crust during the early Mesozoic.

  2. Constraints on the Distance Moduli, Helium and Metal Abundances, and Ages of Globular Clusters from their RR Lyrae and Non-variable Horizontal-branch Stars. I. M3, M15, and M92

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VandenBerg, Don A.; Denissenkov, P. A.; Catelan, Márcio

    2016-08-01

    Up-to-date isochrones, zero-age horizontal-branch (ZAHB) loci, and evolutionary tracks for core He-burning stars are applied to the color-magnitude diagrams of M3, M15, and M92, focusing in particular on their RR Lyrae populations. Periods for the ab- and c-type variables are calculated using the latest theoretical calibrations of {log} {P}{ab} and {log} {P}c as a function of luminosity, mass, effective temperature ({T}{{eff}}), and metallicity. Our models are generally able to reproduce the measured periods to well within the uncertainties implied by the stellar properties on which pulsation periods depend, as well as the mean periods and cluster-to-cluster differences in < {P}{ab}> and < {P}c> , on the assumption of well-supported values of E(B-V), {(m-M)}V, and [Fe/H]. While many of RR Lyrae in M3 lie close to the same ZAHB that fits the faintest horizontal-branch (HB) stars at bluer or redder colors, the M92 variables are all significantly evolved stars from ZAHB locations on the blue side of the instability strip. M15 appears to contain a similar population of HB stars as M92, along with additional helium-enhanced populations not present in the latter which comprise most of its RR Lyrae stars. The large number of variables in M15 and the similarity of the observed values of < {P}{ab}> and < {P}c> in M15 and M92 can be explained by HB models that allow for variations in Y. Similar ages (˜12.5 Gyr) are found for all three clusters, making them significantly younger than the field halo subgiant HD 140283. Our analysis suggests a preference for stellar models that take diffusive processes into account.

  3. Quantifying Cancer Absolute Risk and Cancer Mortality in the Presence of Competing Events after a Myotonic Dystrophy Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gadalla, Shahinaz M.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y.; Björkholm, Magnus; Hilbert, James E.; Moxley, Richard T.; Landgren, Ola; Greene, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies show that patients with myotonic dystrophy (DM) have an increased risk of specific malignancies, but estimates of absolute cancer risk accounting for competing events are lacking. Using the Swedish Patient Registry, we identified 1,081 patients with an inpatient and/or outpatient diagnosis of DM between 1987 and 2007. Date and cause of death and date of cancer diagnosis were extracted from the Swedish Cause of Death and Cancer Registries. We calculated non-parametric estimates of absolute cancer risk and cancer mortality accounting for the high non-cancer competing mortality associated with DM. Absolute cancer risk after DM diagnosis was 1.6% (95% CI=0.4-4%), 5% (95% CI=3-9%) and 9% (95% CI=6-13%) at ages 40, 50 and 60 years, respectively. Females had a higher absolute risk of all cancers combined than males: 9% (95% CI=4-14), and 13% (95% CI=9-20) vs. 2% (95%CI= 0.7-6) and 4% (95%CI=2-8) by ages 50 and 60 years, respectively) and developed cancer at younger ages (median age =51 years, range=22-74 vs. 57, range=43-84, respectively, p=0.02). Cancer deaths accounted for 10% of all deaths, with an absolute cancer mortality risk of 2% (95%CI=1-4.5%), 4% (95%CI=2-6%), and 6% (95%CI=4-9%) by ages 50, 60, and 70 years, respectively. No gender difference in cancer-specific mortality was observed (p=0.6). In conclusion, cancer significantly contributes to morbidity and mortality in DM patients, even after accounting for high competing DM mortality from non-neoplastic causes. It is important to apply population-appropriate, validated cancer screening strategies in DM patients. PMID:24236163

  4. A Hybrid Constraint Representation and Reasoning Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Keith; Pang, Wan-Lin

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces JNET, a novel constraint representation and reasoning framework that supports procedural constraints and constraint attachments, providing a flexible way of integrating the constraint reasoner with a run- time software environment. Attachments in JNET are constraints over arbitrary Java objects, which are defined using Java code, at runtime, with no changes to the JNET source code.

  5. Evolutionary constraints or opportunities?

    PubMed Central

    Sharov, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection is traditionally viewed as a leading factor of evolution, whereas variation is assumed to be random and non-directional. Any order in variation is attributed to epigenetic or developmental constraints that can hinder the action of natural selection. In contrast I consider the positive role of epigenetic mechanisms in evolution because they provide organisms with opportunities for rapid adaptive change. Because the term “constraint” has negative connotations, I use the term “regulated variation” to emphasize the adaptive nature of phenotypic variation, which helps populations and species to survive and evolve in changing environments. The capacity to produce regulated variation is a phenotypic property, which is not described in the genome. Instead, the genome acts as a switchboard, where mostly random mutations switch “on” or “off” preexisting functional capacities of organism components. Thus, there are two channels of heredity: informational (genomic) and structure-functional (phenotypic). Functional capacities of organisms most likely emerged in a chain of modifications and combinations of more simple ancestral functions. The role of DNA has been to keep records of these changes (without describing the result) so that they can be reproduced in the following generations. Evolutionary opportunities include adjustments of individual functions, multitasking, connection between various components of an organism, and interaction between organisms. The adaptive nature of regulated variation can be explained by the differential success of lineages in macro-evolution. Lineages with more advantageous patterns of regulated variation are likely to produce more species and secure more resources (i.e., long-term lineage selection). PMID:24769155

  6. Infrared Kuiper Belt Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Teplitz, V.L.; Stern, S.A.; Anderson, J.D.; Rosenbaum, D.; Scalise, R.J.; Wentzler, P.

    1999-05-01

    We compute the temperature and IR signal of particles of radius {ital a} and albedo {alpha} at heliocentric distance {ital R}, taking into account the emissivity effect, and give an interpolating formula for the result. We compare with analyses of {ital COBE} DIRBE data by others (including recent detection of the cosmic IR background) for various values of heliocentric distance {ital R}, particle radius {ital a}, and particle albedo {alpha}. We then apply these results to a recently developed picture of the Kuiper belt as a two-sector disk with a nearby, low-density sector (40{lt}R{lt}50{endash}90 AU) and a more distant sector with a higher density. We consider the case in which passage through a molecular cloud essentially cleans the solar system of dust. We apply a simple model of dust production by comet collisions and removal by the Poynting-Robertson effect to find limits on total and dust masses in the near and far sectors as a function of time since such a passage. Finally, we compare Kuiper belt IR spectra for various parameter values. Results of this work include: (1) numerical limits on Kuiper belt dust as a function of ({ital R}, {ital a}, {alpha}) on the basis of four alternative sets of constraints, including those following from recent discovery of the cosmic IR background by Hauser et al.; (2) application to the two-sector Kuiper belt model, finding mass limits and spectrum shape for different values of relevant parameters including dependence on time elapsed since last passage through a molecular cloud cleared the outer solar system of dust; and (3) potential use of spectral information to determine time since last passage of the Sun through a giant molecular cloud. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1999.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  7. Orion Absolute Navigation System Progress and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The Orion spacecraft is being designed as NASA's next-generation exploration vehicle for crewed missions beyond Low-Earth Orbit. The navigation system for the Orion spacecraft is being designed in a Multi-Organizational Design Environment (MODE) team including contractor and NASA personnel. The system uses an Extended Kalman Filter to process measurements and determine the state. The design of the navigation system has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to benchmark the current state of the design and some of the rationale and analysis behind it. There are specific challenges to address when preparing a timely and effective design for the Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1), while still looking ahead and providing software extensibility for future exploration missions. The primary measurements in a Near-Earth or Mid-Earth environment consist of GPS pseudorange and deltarange, but for future explorations missions the use of star-tracker and optical navigation sources need to be considered. Discussions are presented for state size and composition, processing techniques, and consider states. A presentation is given for the processing technique using the computationally stable and robust UDU formulation with an Agee-Turner Rank-One update. This allows for computational savings when dealing with many parameters which are modeled as slowly varying Gauss-Markov processes. Preliminary analysis shows up to a 50% reduction in computation versus a more traditional formulation. Several state elements are discussed and evaluated, including position, velocity, attitude, clock bias/drift, and GPS measurement biases in addition to bias, scale factor, misalignment, and non-orthogonalities of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Another consideration is the initialization of the EKF in various scenarios. Scenarios such as single-event upset, ground command, pad alignment, cold start are discussed as are

  8. U-Pb zircon, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf-O isotopic constraints on age and origin of the ore-bearing intrusions from the Nurkazgan porphyry Cu-Au deposit in Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ping; Pan, Hongdi; Seitmuratova, Eleonora; Jakupova, Sholpan

    2016-02-01

    Nurkazgan, located in northeastern Kazakhstan, is a super-large porphyry Cu-Au deposit with 3.9 Mt metal copper and 229 tonnage gold. We report in situ zircon U-Pb age and Hf-O isotope data, whole rock geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic data for the ore-bearing intrusions from the Nurkazgan deposit. The ore-bearing intrusions include the granodiorite porphyry, quartz diorite porphyry, quartz diorite, and diorite. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) zircon U-Pb dating indicates that the granodiorite porphyry and quartz diorite porphyry emplaced at 440 ± 3 Ma and 437 ± 3 Ma, respectively. All host rocks have low initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70338-0.70439), high whole-rock εNd(t) values (+5.9 to +6.3) and very high zircon εHf(t) values (+13.4 to +16.5), young whole-rock Nd and zircon Hf model ages, and consistent and slightly high zircon O values (+5.7 to +6.7), indicating that the ore-bearing magmas derived from the mantle without old continental crust involvement and without marked sediment contamination during magma emplacement. The granodiorite porphyry and quartz diorite porphyry are enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILE) and light rare earth elements (LREE) and depleted in high-field strength elements (HFSE), Eu, Ba, Nb, Sr, P and Ti. The diorite and quartz diorite have also LILE and LREE enrichment and HFSE, Nb and Ti depletion, but have not negative Eu, Ba, Sr, and P anomalies. These features suggest that the parental magma of the granodiorite porphyry and quartz diorite porphyry originated from melting of a lithospheric mantle and experienced fractional crystallization, whereas the diorite and quartz diorite has a relatively deeper lithospheric mantle source region and has not experienced strong fractional crystallization. Based on these, together with the coeval ophiolites in the area, we propose that a subduction of the Balkhash-Junggar oceanic plate took place during the Early Silurian and the ore-bearing intrusions and associated Nurkazgan

  9. The Calabrian in the Western Transcaucasian basin (Georgia): Paleomagnetic constraints from the Gurian regional stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirscher, U.; Oms, O.; Bruch, A. A.; Shatilova, I.; Chochishvili, G.; Bachtadse, V.

    2017-03-01

    The precise Eurasian chronostratigraphy of the Neogene-Quaternary period is still hampered by the existence of numerous regional stages often lacking independent and absolute age constraints. Therefore, detailed paleoclimatic reconstructions of areas like the Caucasus are still poorly constrained and the influence of climate variability on faunal interchange between Africa and Eurasia in the late Neogene-Quaternary is still difficult to address. During the last decades, Quaternary sections from western Georgia have produced a wealth of paleoclimatic proxy data. Unfortunately, these sections do not have a robust age control. This is especially true for the Gurian stage which has been vaguely defined as being coeval with the lower Pleistocene on the basis of poorly documented bio- and magnetostratigraphic data. In order to constrain the age of the Gurian stage, a detailed magnetostratigraphic study has been carried out. All major sections with known Gurian sediments in the former Rioni bay (a marine restricted area to the southeast of the Major Caucasus) have been studied. Our results confirm for the first time the strict correlation between the Gurian succession and the Calabrian stage. In addition, our data provides further information on the tectonic setting of the Rioni bay during the Calabrian in this region: (1) in the north, Gurian sediments were unconformably deposited on older Meotian sediments in a piggy back basin, (2) in the south, Gurian sediments are conformably overlying Kujalnician (Plio-Pleistocene) strata, (3) magnetostratigraphic correlation among sections indicate drastic changes in sediment accumulation rates within the basin, (4) rock magnetic experiments reveal significant magnetomineralogical differences between Gurian and the underlying Miocene sediments likely documenting a transition related to changes in oxic conditions, supply of terrigenous material and sedimentation rate close to the Miocene-Pliocene boundary. These results provide a

  10. Auditory working memory predicts individual differences in absolute pitch learning.

    PubMed

    Van Hedger, Stephen C; Heald, Shannon L M; Koch, Rachelle; Nusbaum, Howard C

    2015-07-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is typically defined as the ability to label an isolated tone as a musical note in the absence of a reference tone. At first glance the acquisition of AP note categories seems like a perceptual learning task, since individuals must assign a category label to a stimulus based on a single perceptual dimension (pitch) while ignoring other perceptual dimensions (e.g., loudness, octave, instrument). AP, however, is rarely discussed in terms of domain-general perceptual learning mechanisms. This is because AP is typically assumed to depend on a critical period of development, in which early exposure to pitches and musical labels is thought to be necessary for the development of AP precluding the possibility of adult acquisition of AP. Despite this view of AP, several previous studies have found evidence that absolute pitch category learning is, to an extent, trainable in a post-critical period adult population, even if the performance typically achieved by this population is below the performance of a "true" AP possessor. The current studies attempt to understand the individual differences in learning to categorize notes using absolute pitch cues by testing a specific prediction regarding cognitive capacity related to categorization - to what extent does an individual's general auditory working memory capacity (WMC) predict the success of absolute pitch category acquisition. Since WMC has been shown to predict performance on a wide variety of other perceptual and category learning tasks, we predict that individuals with higher WMC should be better at learning absolute pitch note categories than individuals with lower WMC. Across two studies, we demonstrate that auditory WMC predicts the efficacy of learning absolute pitch note categories. These results suggest that a higher general auditory WMC might underlie the formation of absolute pitch categories for post-critical period adults. Implications for understanding the mechanisms that underlie the

  11. Zircon U-Pb ages, Hf-O isotopes and trace elements of Mesozoic high Sr/Y porphyries from Ningzhen, eastern China: Constraints on their petrogenesis, tectonic implications and Cu mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fangyue; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Li, Shuguang; Akhtar, Shamim; He, Yongsheng

    2014-07-01

    The relationship between high Sr/Y (adakitic) rocks and Cu mineralization has been long recognized but the mechanism remains unclear. The Cretaceous high Sr/Y porphyries in the Ningzhen area host major Cu polymetallic deposits in the Lower Yangtze River Belt (LYRB) of eastern China. These rocks exhibit some geochemical characteristics (e.g., non-radiogenic Pb isotope ratios) that differ from adakitic rocks from adjacent locations in the LYRB. In this study, we present a study of the zircon U-Pb-Hf-O isotope and trace element compositions for five porphyries from Ningzhen to reveal their petrogenesis and how that correlates with Cu-Fe-Mo mineralization. Zircon U-Pb ages of Anjishan (Cu deposit), Tongshan (Cu-Mo deposit) and Xiangshan (Fe deposit) plutons in the Ningzhen area are 108.8 ± 1.5 Ma, 105-107 Ma and 100-105 Ma, respectively, which are significantly younger than the ore-bearing adakites (140 ± 5 Ma) in the western part of the LYRB. Zircon εHf(t) and δ18O values range from - 23.4 to - 10.6 and from 5.7 to 7.0‰, respectively, falling between subduction-related adakites from the other regions in the LYRB and delamination-related adakitic rocks from the adjacent South Tan-Lu Fault Zone. The similarities of Ce4 +/Ce3 + and Eu/Eu* ratios in zircons from Ningzhen and those from the western LYRB indicate higher oxygen fugacity in their magma sources. Ti-in-zircon thermometer yields magma temperatures of 550 to 700 °C (with an average of ~ 650 °C) for the Ningzhen porphyries, which are significantly lower than those of the South Tan-Lu Fault adakites (> 750 °C), but similar to those for the LYRB adakites (< 700 °C). In summary, the Ningzhen high Sr/Y porphyries have high Mg# (> 50), non-radiogenic Pb, enriched Sr-Nd isotopic compositions, negative zircon εHf(t), mantle-like δ18O values, high oxygen fugacities and low magma temperatures. Mafic rocks that co-exist with ore-bearing porphyries or occur as xenoliths in porphyries are widespread. We proposed

  12. Bushveld-aged fluid flow, peak metamorphism, and gold mobilization in the Witwatersrand basin, South Africa: Constraints from in situ SHRIMP U-Pb dating of monazite and xenotime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Birger; Fletcher, Ian R.; Muhling, Janet R.; Mueller, Andreas G.; Hall, Greg C.

    2007-10-01

    In situ U-Pb dating of monazite and xenotime in gold reefs and unmineralized greenschist facies sedimentary rocks from the Witwatersrand basin, South Africa, reveals two episodes of tectonothermal activity. A major event between 2.06 and 2.03 Ga is recorded in the Wit-watersrand and Transvaal Supergroups in the northwestern and central basin, and broadly coincides with the ca. 2.06 Ga Bushveld event. In the central and southern basin, a previously unrecognized event has been dated between 2.14 and 2.12 Ga. The widespread geographic and stratigraphic occurrence of Bushveld-aged monazite and xenotime, including both auriferous reefs and unmineralized strata, indicates that metamorphism and fluid flow associated with magmatism was pervasive, affecting most of the succession (>10 km thick) in the central and northern parts of the basin. The metamorphic phosphate dates, which are younger away from the complex, indicate a lag of 20-30 m.y. between emplacement and phosphate growth in the central basin (˜100 km south), suggesting that heat related to magmatism was transferred southward at an average rate of 3-5 mm yr-1. The absence of 2.06-2.03 Ga phosphates in the Welkom goldfield at the southern end of the basin implies that Bushveld-related heating and fluid flow did not affect this part of the basin. The intergrowth of ca. 2.045 Ga monazite with gold in quartz-pebble conglomerate from the West Rand goldfield indicates that fluid flow related to the Bushveld event caused mobilization of gold in the Witwatersrand basin.

  13. Regional comparison of absolute gravimeters, EURAMET.M.G-K2 key comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pálinkáš, V.; Francis, O.; Val'ko, M.; Kostelecký, J.; Van Camp, M.; Castelein, S.; Bilker-Koivula, M.; Näränen, J.; Lothhammer, A.; Falk, R.; Schilling, M.; Timmen, L.; Iacovone, D.; Baccaro, F.; Germak, A.; Biolcati, E.; Origlia, C.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; De Plaen, R.; Klein, G.; Seil, M.; Radinovic, R.; Reudink, R.; Dykowski, P.; Sȩkowski, M.; Próchniewicz, D.; Szpunar, R.; Mojzeš, M.; Jańk, J.; Papčo, J.; Engfeldt, A.; Olsson, P. A.; Smith, V.; van Westrum, D.; Ellis, B.; Lucero, B.

    2017-01-01

    In the framework of the regional EURAMET.M.G-K2 comparison of absolute gravimeters, 17 gravimeters were compared in November 2015. Four gravimeters were from different NMIs and DIs, they were used to link the regional comparison to the CCM.G.K2 by means of linking converter. Combined least-squares adjustments with weighted constraint was used to determine KCRV. Several pilot solutions are presented and compared with the official solution to demonstrate influences of different approaches (e.g. definition of weights and the constraint) on results of the adjustment. In case of the official solution, all the gravimeters are in equivalence with declared uncertainties. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  14. Constraint-based stereo matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuan, D. T.

    1987-01-01

    The major difficulty in stereo vision is the correspondence problem that requires matching features in two stereo images. Researchers describe a constraint-based stereo matching technique using local geometric constraints among edge segments to limit the search space and to resolve matching ambiguity. Edge segments are used as image features for stereo matching. Epipolar constraint and individual edge properties are used to determine possible initial matches between edge segments in a stereo image pair. Local edge geometric attributes such as continuity, junction structure, and edge neighborhood relations are used as constraints to guide the stereo matching process. The result is a locally consistent set of edge segment correspondences between stereo images. These locally consistent matches are used to generate higher-level hypotheses on extended edge segments and junctions to form more global contexts to achieve global consistency.

  15. Weighted constraints in generative linguistics.

    PubMed

    Pater, Joe

    2009-08-01

    Harmonic Grammar (HG) and Optimality Theory (OT) are closely related formal frameworks for the study of language. In both, the structure of a given language is determined by the relative strengths of a set of constraints. They differ in how these strengths are represented: as numerical weights (HG) or as ranks (OT). Weighted constraints have advantages for the construction of accounts of language learning and other cognitive processes, partly because they allow for the adaptation of connectionist and statistical models. HG has been little studied in generative linguistics, however, largely due to influential claims that weighted constraints make incorrect predictions about the typology of natural languages, predictions that are not shared by the more popular OT. This paper makes the case that HG is in fact a promising framework for typological research, and reviews and extends the existing arguments for weighted over ranked constraints.

  16. Sulfide mineralization associated with arc magmatism in the Qilian Block, western China: zircon U-Pb age and Sr-Nd-Os-S isotope constraints from the Yulonggou and Yaqu gabbroic intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao-Wei; Li, Wen-Yuan; Gao, Yong-Bao; Li, Chusi; Ripley, Edward M.; Kamo, Sandra

    2014-02-01

    The sulfide-bearing Yulonggou and Yaqu mafic intrusions are located in the southern margin of the Qilian Block, Qinghai Province, western China. They are small dike-like bodies mainly composed of gabbros and diorites. Disseminated sulfides (pyrrhotite, pentlandite, and chalcopyrite) are present as concordant lenses within the intrusions. Precise CA-ID-TIMS zircon U-Pb dating yields the crystallization ages of 443.39 ± 0.42 and 440.74 ± 0.33 Ma for the Yulonggou and Yaqu intrusions, respectively. Whole rock samples from both intrusions show light rare earth element (REE) enrichments relative to heavy REE and pronounced negative Nb-Ta anomalies relative to Th and La, which are consistent with the products of arc basaltic magmatism. The Yulonggou intrusion has negative ɛ Nd values from -5.7 to -7.7 and elevated (87Sr/86Sr) i ratios from 0.711 to 0.714. In contrast, the Yaqu intrusion has higher ɛ Nd values from -4.1 to +8.4 and lower (87Sr/86Sr) i ratios from 0.705 to 0.710. The δ34S values of sulfide separates from the Yulonggou and Yaqu deposits vary from 0.8 to 2.4 ‰ and from 2 to 4.3 ‰, respectively. The γ Os values of sulfide separates from the Yulonggou and Yaqu deposits vary between 80 and 123 and between 963 and 1,191, respectively. Higher γ Os values coupled with higher δ34S values for the Yaqu deposit relative to the Yulonggou deposit indicate that external sulfur played a bigger role in sulfide mineralization in the Yaqu intrusion than in the Yulonggou intrusion. Mixing calculations using Sr-Nd isotope data show that contamination with siliceous crustal materials is more pronounced in the Yulonggou intrusion (up to 20 wt%) than in the Yaqu intrusion (<15 wt%). The distribution of sulfides in both intrusions is consistent with multiple emplacements of sulfide-saturated magmas from depth. The Yulonggou and Yaqu sulfide deposits are not economically valuable under current market condition due to small sizes and low Ni grades, which can be explained

  17. Zircon U-Pb ages and Hf-O isotopes, and whole-rock Sr-Nd isotopes of the Bozhushan granite, Yunnan province, SW China: Constraints on petrogenesis and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao-Cui; Hu, Rui-Zhong; Bi, Xian-Wu; Zhong, Hong; Lan, Jiang-Bo; Zhao, Cheng-Hai; Zhu, Jing-Jing

    2015-03-01

    The Bainiuchang silver-polymetallic ore deposit is a super-large deposit in the western part of the South China tungsten-tin province (or the Nanling tungsten-tin province). The deposit is spatially and temporally associated with the Bozhushan granite pluton. Our new data indicate that the Bozhushan granitoids formed at 86-87 Ma. The granitoids are geochemically consistent with A-type granite. The Bozhushan pluton consists predominantly of biotite granite that is characterized by weakly peraluminous to metaluminous compositions and high alkali contents (Na2O + K2O = 7.51-9.06 wt.%). The granitic rocks are enriched in large-ion lithophile elements (LILE) Rb, Th, U, and K, but relatively depleted in Ba and Sr. In addition, they have high Zr + Nb + Ce + Y contents (310-478 ppm) and high 10,000× Ga/Al ratios (2.7-3.1). The temperatures of the parental magmas for the Bozhushan granites are estimated to be 790-842 °C based on the zircon saturation thermometer. Isotopically, the Bozhushan granites are characterized by elevated initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7126-0.7257) and low εNd values (-11.2 to -12.4), and high δ18O values (7.91-9.58‰) and low εHf values (-9.5 to -6.1) for zircon crystals, which indicate a dominant continental crustal source. The two-stage Hf model ages vary from 1.53 to 1.86 Ga. The isotopic compositions support the interpretation that the granitic rocks formed by melting of the Meso- and Neoproterozoic metasedimentary basements of the Cathaysia block. These results, together with geological records in the other parts of the western Cathaysia block, suggest that the formation of the Bozhushan A-type granites is related to lithospheric extension and asthenospheric upwelling that are associated with the change of plate motion in Late-Cretaceous.

  18. Temporal-spatial distribution and tectonic implications of the batholiths in the Gaoligong-Tengliang-Yingjiang area, western Yunnan: Constraints from zircon U-Pb ages and Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yi-Gang; Yang, Qi-Jun; Lan, Jiang-Bo; Luo, Zhen-Yu; Huang, Xiao-Long; Shi, Yu-Ruo; Xie, Lie-Wen

    2012-07-01

    lithospheric strength and compressive plate-convergence forces and to a less degree to the collision between Burma and Sundaland blocks. The Gaoligong early Cretaceous granites, which bear strong similarities in lithology, geochemistry and emplacement age to those in the northern magmatic belt in the Lhasa Terrane, are also the magmatic expression of crustal thickening. This crustal thickening may have stemmed from the collision between the Lhasa Block and the Qiangtang Block in late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. The magmatism in western Yunnan thus recorded a long-term subduction of the Neo-Tethyan plate, enhanced by continental collisions at different time.

  19. High speed image acquisition system of absolute encoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jianxiang; Chen, Xin; Chen, Xindu; Zhang, Fangjian; Wang, Han

    2017-01-01

    Absolute optical encoder as a product of optical, mechanical and electronic integration has been widely used in displacement measuring fields. However, how to improve the measurement velocity and reduce the manufacturing cost of absolute optical encoder is the key problem to be solved. To improve the measurement speed, a novel absolute optical encoder image acquisition system is proposed. The proposed acquisition system includes a linear CCD sensor is applied for capturing coding pattern images, an optical magnifying system is used for enlarging the grating stripes, an analog-digital conversion(ADC) module is used for processing the CCD analogy signal, a field programmable gate array(FPGA) device and other peripherals perform driving task. An absolute position measurement experiment was set up to verify and evaluate the proposed image acquisition system. The experimental result indicates that the proposed absolute optical encoder image acquisition system has the image acquisition speed of more than 9500fp/s with well reliability and lower manufacture cost.

  20. Absolute irradiance of the Moon for on-orbit calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.; Kieffer, H.H.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The recognized need for on-orbit calibration of remote sensing imaging instruments drives the ROLO project effort to characterize the Moon for use as an absolute radiance source. For over 5 years the ground-based ROLO telescopes have acquired spatially-resolved lunar images in 23 VNIR (Moon diameter ???500 pixels) and 9 SWIR (???250 pixels) passbands at phase angles within ??90 degrees. A numerical model for lunar irradiance has been developed which fits hundreds of ROLO images in each band, corrected for atmospheric extinction and calibrated to absolute radiance, then integrated to irradiance. The band-coupled extinction algorithm uses absorption spectra of several gases and aerosols derived from MODTRAN to fit time-dependent component abundances to nightly observations of standard stars. The absolute radiance scale is based upon independent telescopic measurements of the star Vega. The fitting process yields uncertainties in lunar relative irradiance over small ranges of phase angle and the full range of lunar libration well under 0.5%. A larger source of uncertainty enters in the absolute solar spectral irradiance, especially in the SWIR, where solar models disagree by up to 6%. Results of ROLO model direct comparisons to spacecraft observations demonstrate the ability of the technique to track sensor responsivity drifts to sub-percent precision. Intercomparisons among instruments provide key insights into both calibration issues and the absolute scale for lunar irradiance.

  1. Accurate absolute GPS positioning through satellite clock error estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.-C.; Kwon, J. H.; Jekeli, C.

    2001-05-01

    An algorithm for very accurate absolute positioning through Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite clock estimation has been developed. Using International GPS Service (IGS) precise orbits and measurements, GPS clock errors were estimated at 30-s intervals. Compared to values determined by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the agreement was at the level of about 0.1 ns (3 cm). The clock error estimates were then applied to an absolute positioning algorithm in both static and kinematic modes. For the static case, an IGS station was selected and the coordinates were estimated every 30 s. The estimated absolute position coordinates and the known values had a mean difference of up to 18 cm with standard deviation less than 2 cm. For the kinematic case, data obtained every second from a GPS buoy were tested and the result from the absolute positioning was compared to a differential GPS (DGPS) solution. The mean differences between the coordinates estimated by the two methods are less than 40 cm and the standard deviations are less than 25 cm. It was verified that this poorer standard deviation on 1-s position results is due to the clock error interpolation from 30-s estimates with Selective Availability (SA). After SA was turned off, higher-rate clock error estimates (such as 1 s) could be obtained by a simple interpolation with negligible corruption. Therefore, the proposed absolute positioning technique can be used to within a few centimeters' precision at any rate by estimating 30-s satellite clock errors and interpolating them.

  2. Absolute Instability in Swept Leading-Edge Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R.-S.; Li, F.; Malik, M. R.

    1997-11-01

    Absolute instabilities in the swept Hiemenz flow and flows over Poll's swept cylinder are studied. It is assumed that the span is infinite and the laminar flow field is subjected to a line impulsive excitation so that the spanwise wavenumber (β) is taken to be real, which is akin to the rotating disk study made by Lingwood.footnote Lingwood, R. J., J. Fluid Mech., 299, 17, 1995. We found that these flows can be absolutely unstable in the chordwise (x) direction. The pinch-point singularities formed by the coalescence of two distinct spatial branches can lie either below or above the real α-axis. The pinch points with a positive αi imply the existence of an unstable disturbance propagating against the mainstream, which has never been observed before. It is found that singularities of pinch type occur in a region very close to the leading edge, therefore the attachment-line Reynolds number is used to correlate the onset of absolute instability. The critical Reynolds number for absolute instability is found to be about R=540 compared to 583 for the attachment-line instability. Provided the non-linear behavior of this absolute instability is sufficient to trigger the laminar to turbulent transition, then it would cause a complete loss of laminar flow on a swept wing as does the attachment-line instability.

  3. Observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: A reappraisal after WMAP 3-year and first MINOS results

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G. L.; Lisi, E.; Marrone, A.; Melchiorri, A.; Serra, P.; Palazzo, A.; Silk, J.; Slosar, A.

    2007-03-01

    In the light of recent neutrino oscillation and nonoscillation data, we revisit the phenomenological constraints applicable to three observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: The effective neutrino mass in single beta decay (m{sub {beta}}); the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay (m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}}); and the sum of neutrino masses in cosmology ({sigma}). In particular, we include the constraints coming from the first Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) data and from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) three-year (3y) data, as well as other relevant cosmological data and priors. We find that the largest neutrino squared mass difference is determined with a 15% accuracy (at 2{sigma}) after adding MINOS to world data. We also find upper bounds on the sum of neutrino masses {sigma} ranging from {approx}2 eV (WMAP-3y data only) to {approx}0.2 eV (all cosmological data) at 2{sigma}, in agreement with previous studies. In addition, we discuss the connection of such bounds with those placed on the matter power spectrum normalization parameter {sigma}{sub 8}. We show how the partial degeneracy between {sigma} and {sigma}{sub 8} in WMAP-3y data is broken by adding further cosmological data, and how the overall preference of such data for relatively high values of {sigma}{sub 8} pushes the upper bound of {sigma} in the sub-eV range. Finally, for various combination of data sets, we revisit the (in)compatibility between current {sigma} and m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} constraints (and claims), and derive quantitative predictions for future single and double beta decay experiments.

  4. Foundations of support constraint machines.

    PubMed

    Gnecco, Giorgio; Gori, Marco; Melacci, Stefano; Sanguineti, Marcello

    2015-02-01

    The mathematical foundations of a new theory for the design of intelligent agents are presented. The proposed learning paradigm is centered around the concept of constraint, representing the interactions with the environment, and the parsimony principle. The classical regularization framework of kernel machines is naturally extended to the case in which the agents interact with a richer environment, where abstract granules of knowledge, compactly described by different linguistic formalisms, can be translated into the unified notion of constraint for defining the hypothesis set. Constrained variational calculus is exploited to derive general representation theorems that provide a description of the optimal body of the agent (i.e., the functional structure of the optimal solution to the learning problem), which is the basis for devising new learning algorithms. We show that regardless of the kind of constraints, the optimal body of the agent is a support constraint machine (SCM) based on representer theorems that extend classical results for kernel machines and provide new representations. In a sense, the expressiveness of constraints yields a semantic-based regularization theory, which strongly restricts the hypothesis set of classical regularization. Some guidelines to unify continuous and discrete computational mechanisms are given so as to accommodate in the same framework various kinds of stimuli, for example, supervised examples and logic predicates. The proposed view of learning from constraints incorporates classical learning from examples and extends naturally to the case in which the examples are subsets of the input space, which is related to learning propositional logic clauses.

  5. Thermodynamic constraints for biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Beard, Daniel A; Babson, Eric; Curtis, Edward; Qian, Hong

    2004-06-07

    The constraint-based approach to analysis of biochemical systems has emerged as a useful tool for rational metabolic engineering. Flux balance analysis (FBA) is based on the constraint of mass conservation; energy balance analysis (EBA) is based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The power of these approaches lies in the fact that the constraints are based on physical laws, and do not make use of unknown parameters. Here, we show that the network structure (i.e. the stoichiometric matrix) alone provides a system of constraints on the fluxes in a biochemical network which are feasible according to both mass balance and the laws of thermodynamics. A realistic example shows that these constraints can be sufficient for deriving unambiguous, biologically meaningful results. The thermodynamic constraints are obtained by comparing of the sign pattern of the flux vector to the sign patterns of the cycles of the internal cycle space via connection between stoichiometric network theory (SNT) and the mathematical theory of oriented matroids.

  6. Absolute measurement of cerebral optical coefficients, hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation in old and young adults with near-infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present near-infrared spectroscopy measurement of absolute cerebral hemoglobin concentration and saturation in a large sample of 36 healthy elderly (mean age, 85 ± 6 years) and 19 young adults (mean age, 28 ± 4 years). Non-invasive measurements were obtained on the forehead using a commercially a...

  7. Photogeological constraints on lunar and planetary vulcanism, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Central volcanic constructs were studied as constraints on the thermal evolution and regional tectonics of the Moon and terrestrial planets. The origins of sub-kilometer lunar craters were examined with regards to implications for mare basalt petrogenesis. The morphology, distribution, age, and tectonic setting of the volcanic constructs were studied using Viking Orbiter data.

  8. Changes in quantitative EEG absolute power during the task of catching an object in free fall.

    PubMed

    Machado, Sergio; Portella, Cláudio Elidio; Silva, Julio Guilherme; Velasques, Bruna; Terra, Patrícia; Vorkapic, Camila Ferreira; Silva, Vernon Furtado da; Miana, Luis; Basile, Luis; Cagy, Mauricio; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to verify changes in absolute power (qEEG), in theta, during the catch of a free falling object. The sample consisted of 10 healthy individuals, of both genders, with ages between 25 and 40 years. A three-way ANOVA followed by Post-Hoc analysis was applied. The results demonstrated main effects for time and position. In conclusion, a motor task that involves expectation produces deactivation of non-relevant areas in the ipsilateral hemisphere of the active limb. On the other hand, the patterns of results showed activation in areas responsible for planning and selection of motor repertoires in the contralateral hemisphere.

  9. System and method for calibrating a rotary absolute position sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system includes a rotary device, a rotary absolute position (RAP) sensor generating encoded pairs of voltage signals describing positional data of the rotary device, a host machine, and an algorithm. The algorithm calculates calibration parameters usable to determine an absolute position of the rotary device using the encoded pairs, and is adapted for linearly-mapping an ellipse defined by the encoded pairs to thereby calculate the calibration parameters. A method of calibrating the RAP sensor includes measuring the rotary position as encoded pairs of voltage signals, linearly-mapping an ellipse defined by the encoded pairs to thereby calculate the calibration parameters, and calculating an absolute position of the rotary device using the calibration parameters. The calibration parameters include a positive definite matrix (A) and a center point (q) of the ellipse. The voltage signals may include an encoded sine and cosine of a rotary angle of the rotary device.

  10. Absolute distance sensing by two laser optical interferometry.

    PubMed

    Thurner, Klaus; Braun, Pierre-François; Karrai, Khaled

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a method for absolute distance sensing by two laser optical interferometry. A particularity of this technique is that a target distance is determined in absolute and is no longer limited to within an ambiguity range affecting usually multiple wavelength interferometers. We implemented the technique in a low-finesse Fabry-Pérot miniature fiber based interferometer. We used two diode lasers, both operating in the 1550 nm wavelength range. The wavelength difference is chosen to create a 25 μm long periodic beating interferometric pattern allowing a nanometer precise position measurement but limited to within an ambiguity range of 25 μm. The ambiguity is then eliminated by scanning one of the wavelengths over a small range (3.4 nm). We measured absolute distances in the sub-meter range and this with just few nanometer repeatability.

  11. Method and apparatus for two-dimensional absolute optical encoding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    This invention presents a two-dimensional absolute optical encoder and a method for determining position of an object in accordance with information from the encoder. The encoder of the present invention comprises a scale having a pattern being predetermined to indicate an absolute location on the scale, means for illuminating the scale, means for forming an image of the pattern; and detector means for outputting signals derived from the portion of the image of the pattern which lies within a field of view of the detector means, the field of view defining an image reference coordinate system, and analyzing means, receiving the signals from the detector means, for determining the absolute location of the object. There are two types of scale patterns presented in this invention: grid type and starfield type.

  12. Entrenched Geographical and Socioeconomic Disparities in Child Mortality: Trends in Absolute and Relative Inequalities in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Soto, Eliana; Durham, Jo; Hodge, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Cambodia has made considerable improvements in mortality rates for children under the age of five and neonates. These improvements may, however, mask considerable disparities between subnational populations. In this paper, we examine the extent of the country's child mortality inequalities. Methods Mortality rates for children under-five and neonates were directly estimated using the 2000, 2005 and 2010 waves of the Cambodian Demographic Health Survey. Disparities were measured on both absolute and relative scales using rate differences and ratios, and where applicable, slope and relative indices of inequality by levels of rural/urban location, regions and household wealth. Findings Since 2000, considerable reductions in under-five and to a lesser extent in neonatal mortality rates have been observed. This mortality decline has, however, been accompanied by an increase in relative inequality in both rates of child mortality for geography-related stratifying markers. For absolute inequality amongst regions, most trends are increasing, particularly for neonatal mortality, but are not statistically significant. The only exception to this general pattern is the statistically significant positive trend in absolute inequality for under-five mortality in the Coastal region. For wealth, some evidence for increases in both relative and absolute inequality for neonates is observed. Conclusion Despite considerable gains in reducing under-five and neonatal mortality at a national level, entrenched and increased geographical and wealth-based inequality in mortality, at least on a relative scale, remain. As expected, national progress seems to be associated with the period of political and macroeconomic stability that started in the early 2000s. However, issues of quality of care and potential non-inclusive economic growth might explain remaining disparities, particularly across wealth and geography markers. A focus on further addressing key supply and demand side

  13. The Absolute Gravimeter FG5 - Adjustment and Residual Data Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlob, M.; Braun, A.; Henton, J.; Courtier, N.; Liard, J.

    2009-05-01

    The most widely used method of direct terrestrial gravity determination is performed by using a ballistic absolute gravimeter. Today, the FG5 (Micro-g LaCoste; Lafayette, CO) is the most common free-fall absolute gravimeter. It uses the Michelson-type interferometer to determine the absolute gravity value with accuracies up to one part- per-billion of g. Furthermore, absolute gravimeter measurements can be used to assist in the validation and interpretation of temporal variations of the global gravity field, e.g. from the GRACE mission. In addition, absolute gravimetry allows for monitoring gravity changes which are caused by subsurface mass redistributions and/or vertical displacements. In this study,adjustment software was developed and applied to the raw data sets of FG5#106 and FG5#236, made available by Natural Resources Canada. Both data sets have been collected at the same time and place which leads to an intercomparison of the instruments performance. The adjustment software was validated against the official FG5 software package developed by Micro-g Lacoste. In order to identify potential environmental or instrument disturbances in the observed time series, a Lomb- Scargle periodogram analysis was employed. The absolute gravimeter FG5 is particularly sensitive to low frequencies between 0-3Hz. Hence, the focus of the analysis is to detect signals in the band of 0-100 Hz. An artificial signal was added to the measurements for demonstration purposes. Both the performance of the adjustment software and the Lomb-Scargle analysis will be discussed.

  14. Measurements of the reactor neutron power in absolute units

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, G. V.

    2015-12-15

    The neutron power of the reactor of the Yenisei space nuclear power plant is measured in absolute units using the modernized method of correlation analysis during the ground-based tests of the Yenisei prototypes. Results of the experiments are given. The desired result is obtained in a series of experiments carried out at the stage of the plant preparation for tests. The acceptability of experimental data is confirmed by the results of measuring the reactor neutron power in absolute units at the nominal level by the thermal balance during the life cycle tests of the ground prototypes.

  15. STS-9 Shuttle grow - Ram angle effect and absolute intensities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Clifton, K. S.

    1986-01-01

    Visible imagery from Space Shuttle mission STS-9 (Spacelab 1) has been analyzed for the ram angle effect and the absolute intensity of glow. The data are compared with earlier measurements and the anomalous high intensities at large ram angles are confirmed. Absolute intensities of the ram glow on the shuttle tile, at 6563 A, are observed to be about 20 times more intense than those measured on the AE-E spacecraft. Implications of these observations for an existing theory of glow involving NO2 are presented.

  16. Absolute integrated intensity for the nu-1 sulfur dioxide band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilon, P. J.; Young, C.

    1976-01-01

    The absolute integrated intensity of the IR vibration-rotation nu-1 SO2 band was measured using the linear portion of the curve of growth. Infrared spectroscopic-absorption cell measurements were performed on sulfur dioxide at partial pressures less than 0.15 torr with nitrogen added to give a total pressure of 705 torr, the path length being 4 mm. The absolute integrated intensity was determined to be 112.0 plus or minus 2.6/cm/sq (atm cm) at 296 K at the 95% confidence level.

  17. From Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, S. R.; Lindler, D.

    2016-05-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R˜1000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.03 μ. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsl/. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We have therefore developed an observing procedure, data-reduction procedure, and correction algorithms that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1%.

  18. Absolute configuration determination of angular dihydrocoumarins from Peucedanum praeruptorum.

    PubMed

    Lou, Hong-Xiang; Sun, Long-Ru; Yu, Wen-Tao; Fan, Pei-Hong; Cui, Lei; Gao, Yan-Hui; Ma, Bin; Ren, Dong-Mei; Ji, Mei

    2004-09-01

    From Peucedanum praeruptorum, one new khellactone ester (3'R)-O-acetyl-(4'S)-O-angeloylkhellactone (3), as well as four known angular dihydropyranocoumarins (1, 2, 4, 5) have been isolated. On the basis of NMR spectra and X-ray crystallography, their structures were determined. We have elucidated their absolute configuration by either chiral separation of their alkaline hydrolysis products with Rp-18 HPLC eluted with 5% hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (beta-HCD) or by measurement of their CD spectra. A general rule relating the position and absolute streochemistry of the khellactone esters to the sign of their Cotton effects in CD curves is proposed.

  19. Absolute, Extreme-Ultraviolet, Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor (AESSIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Martin C. E.; Smith, Peter L.; Parkinson, W. H.; Kuehne, M.; Kock, M.

    1988-01-01

    AESSIM, the Absolute, Extreme-Ultraviolet, Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor, is designed to measure the absolute solar spectral irradiance at extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths. The data are required for studies of the processes that occur in the earth's upper atmosphere and for predictions of atmospheric drag on space vehicles. AESSIM is comprised of sun-pointed spectrometers and newly-developed, secondary standards of spectral irradiance for the EUV. Use of the in-orbit standard sources will eliminate the uncertainties caused by changes in spectrometer efficiency that have plagued all previous measurements of the solar spectral EUV flux.

  20. Large-Scale Measurement of Absolute Protein Glycosylation Stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shisheng; Zhang, Hui

    2015-07-07

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most important protein modifications. Glycosylation site occupancy alteration has been implicated in human diseases and cancers. However, current glycoproteomic methods focus on the identification and quantification of glycosylated peptides and glycosylation sites but not glycosylation occupancy or glycoform stoichiometry. Here we describe a method for large-scale determination of the absolute glycosylation stoichiometry using three independent relative ratios. Using this method, we determined 117 absolute N-glycosylation occupancies in OVCAR-3 cells. Finally, we investigated the possible functions and the determinants for partial glycosylation.

  1. Non-Invasive Method of Determining Absolute Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H., Jr. (Inventor); Hargens, Alan E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method is presented for determining absolute intracranial pressure (ICP) in a patient. Skull expansion is monitored while changes in ICP are induced. The patient's blood pressure is measured when skull expansion is approximately zero. The measured blood pressure is indicative of a reference ICP value. Subsequently, the method causes a known change in ICP and measured the change in skull expansion associated therewith. The absolute ICP is a function of the reference ICP value, the known change in ICP and its associated change in skull expansion; and a measured change in skull expansion.

  2. Absolute gain measurement by the image method under mismatched condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Baddour, Maurice F.

    1987-01-01

    Purcell's image method for measuring the absolute gain of an antenna is particularly attractive for small test antennas. The method is simple to use and utilizes only one antenna with a reflecting plane to provide an image for the receiving antenna. However, the method provides accurate results only if the antenna is matched to its waveguide. In this paper, a waveguide junction analysis is developed to determine the gain of an antenna under mismatched condition. Absolute gain measurements for two standard gain horn antennas have been carried out. Experimental results agree closely with published data.

  3. Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Haddad, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet have extended to short wavelengths by use of rare-gas ionization chambers. The technique involves the measurement of the ion current as a function of the gas pressure in the ion chamber. The true value of the ion current, and hence the absolute photon flux, is obtained by extrapolating the ion current to zero gas pressure. Examples are given at 162 and 266 A. The short-wavelength limit is determined only by the sensitivity of the current-measuring apparatus and by present knowledge of the photoionization processes that occur in the rate gases.

  4. Nonexistence of equilibrium states at absolute negative temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Rochín, Víctor

    2013-08-01

    We show that states of macroscopic systems with purported absolute negative temperatures are not stable under small, yet arbitrary, perturbations. We prove the previous statement using the fact that, in equilibrium, the entropy takes its maximum value. We discuss that, while Ramsey theoretical reformulation of the second law for systems with negative temperatures is logically correct, it must be a priori assumed that those states are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Since we argue that those states cannot occur, reversible processes are impossible, and, thus, Ramsey identification of absolute negative temperatures is untenable.

  5. Developmental constraints on behavioural flexibility.

    PubMed

    Holekamp, Kay E; Swanson, Eli M; Van Meter, Page E

    2013-05-19

    We suggest that variation in mammalian behavioural flexibility not accounted for by current socioecological models may be explained in part by developmental constraints. From our own work, we provide examples of constraints affecting variation in behavioural flexibility, not only among individuals, but also among species and higher taxonomic units. We first implicate organizational maternal effects of androgens in shaping individual differences in aggressive behaviour emitted by female spotted hyaenas throughout the lifespan. We then compare carnivores and primates with respect to their locomotor and craniofacial adaptations. We inquire whether antagonistic selection pressures on the skull might impose differential functional constraints on evolvability of skulls and brains in these two orders, thus ultimately affecting behavioural flexibility in each group. We suggest that, even when carnivores and primates would theoretically benefit from the same adaptations with respect to behavioural flexibility, carnivores may nevertheless exhibit less behavioural flexibility than primates because of constraints imposed by past adaptations in the morphology of the limbs and skull. Phylogenetic analysis consistent with this idea suggests greater evolutionary lability in relative brain size within families of primates than carnivores. Thus, consideration of developmental constraints may help elucidate variation in mammalian behavioural flexibility.

  6. Two methods for absolute calibration of dynamic pressure transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, G. W.; Migliori, A.; Garrett, S. L.; Wheatley, J. C.

    1982-12-01

    Two techniques are described for absolute calibration of a dynamic pressure transducer from 0 to 400 Hz in 1-MPa helium gas. One technique is based on a comparison to a mercury manometer; the other is based on the principle of reciprocity. The two techniques agree within the instrumental uncertainties of 1%.

  7. Individual Differences in Absolute and Relative Metacomprehension Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maki, Ruth H.; Shields, Micheal; Wheeler, Amanda Easton; Zacchilli, Tammy Lowery

    2005-01-01

    The authors investigated absolute and relative metacomprehension accuracy as a function of verbal ability in college students. Students read hard texts, revised texts, or a mixed set of texts. They then predicted their performance, took a multiple-choice test on the texts, and made posttest judgments about their performance. With hard texts,…

  8. Absolute Value Inequalities: High School Students' Solutions and Misconceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almog, Nava; Ilany, Bat-Sheva

    2012-01-01

    Inequalities are one of the foundational subjects in high school math curricula, but there is a lack of academic research into how students learn certain types of inequalities. This article fills part of the research gap by presenting the findings of a study that examined high school students' methods of approaching absolute value inequalities,…

  9. Is There a Rule of Absolute Neutralization in Nupe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krohn, Robert

    1975-01-01

    A previously prosed rule of absolute neutralization (merging underlying low vowels) is eliminated in an alternative analysis including instead a rule that "breaks" the feature matrix of certain low vowels and redistributes the features of each vowel as a sequence of vowel-like transition plus (a). (Author/RM)

  10. A mathematical biologist's guide to absolute and convective instability.

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Jonathan A; Dagbovie, Ayawoa S; Hilker, Frank M

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models have been highly successful at reproducing the complex spatiotemporal phenomena seen in many biological systems. However, the ability to numerically simulate such phenomena currently far outstrips detailed mathematical understanding. This paper reviews the theory of absolute and convective instability, which has the potential to redress this inbalance in some cases. In spatiotemporal systems, unstable steady states subdivide into two categories. Those that are absolutely unstable are not relevant in applications except as generators of spatial or spatiotemporal patterns, but convectively unstable steady states can occur as persistent features of solutions. The authors explain the concepts of absolute and convective instability, and also the related concepts of remnant and transient instability. They give examples of their use in explaining qualitative transitions in solution behaviour. They then describe how to distinguish different types of instability, focussing on the relatively new approach of the absolute spectrum. They also discuss the use of the theory for making quantitative predictions on how spatiotemporal solutions change with model parameters. The discussion is illustrated throughout by numerical simulations of a model for river-based predator-prey systems.

  11. Ophthalmoplegic migraine. Two patients with an absolute response to indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Pareja, J A; Churruca, J; de la Casa Fages, B; de Silanes, C López; Sánchez, C; Barriga, F J

    2010-06-01

    Two patients suffering from ophthalmoplegic migraine had a strictly unilateral headache absolutely responsive to indomethacin, but not to other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, analgesics or corticosteroids. Such observations raise a therapeutic alternative and suggest that ophthalmoplegic migraine may present with different headache phenotypes.

  12. Absolute Interrogative Intonation Patterns in Buenos Aires Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Su Ar

    2010-01-01

    In Spanish, each uttered phrase, depending on its use, has one of a variety of intonation patterns. For example, a phrase such as "Maria viene manana" "Mary is coming tomorrow" can be used as a declarative or as an absolute interrogative (a yes/no question) depending on the intonation pattern that a speaker produces. …

  13. Absolute configurations of zingiberenols isolated from ginger (Zingiber officinale) rhizomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sesquiterpene alcohol zingiberenol, or 1,10-bisaboladien-3-ol, was isolated some time ago from ginger, Zingiber officinale, rhizomes, but its absolute configuration had not been determined. With three chiral centers present in the molecule, zingiberenol can exist in eight stereoisomeric forms. ...

  14. Lyman alpha SMM/UVSP absolute calibration and geocoronal correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, Juan M.; Reichmann, Edwin J.

    1987-01-01

    Lyman alpha observations from the Ultraviolet Spectrometer Polarimeter (UVSP) instrument of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft were analyzed and provide instrumental calibration details. Specific values of the instrument quantum efficiency, Lyman alpha absolute intensity, and correction for geocoronal absorption are presented.

  15. Relative versus Absolute Stimulus Control in the Temporal Bisection Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Carvalho, Marilia Pinhiero; Machado, Armando

    2012-01-01

    When subjects learn to associate two sample durations with two comparison keys, do they learn to associate the keys with the short and long samples (relational hypothesis), or with the specific sample durations (absolute hypothesis)? We exposed 16 pigeons to an ABA design in which phases A and B corresponded to tasks using samples of 1 s and 4 s,…

  16. Mechanism for an absolute parametric instability of an inhomogeneous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipenko, V. I.; Budnikov, V. N.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Romanchuk, I. A.; Simonchik, L. V.

    1984-05-01

    The structure of plasma oscillations in a region of parametric spatial amplification has been studied experimentally for the first time. A new mechanism for an absolute parametric instability has been observed. This mechanism operates when a pump wave with a spatial structure more complicated than a plane wave propagates through a plasma which is inhomogeneous along more than one dimension.

  17. Absolute calibration in the 1750 - 3350 A region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strongylis, G. J.; Bohlin, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The absolute flux measurements in the rocket ultraviolet made by Bohlin, Frimout, and Lillie (BFL) are revised using a more correct treatment of the air extinction that enters the air calibration of their instrument. The absorption by molecular oxygen and ozone, Rayleigh scattering, and extinction by aerosols is tabulated for general use in ultraviolet calibrations performed in air. The revised absolute flux of eta UMa and final fluxes for alpha Lyr and zeta Oph are presented in the 1750-3350 A region. The absolute flux of the star eta UMa is compared to four other independent determinations in the 1200-3400 A region and a maximum difference of 35% is found near 1500 A between the OAO-2 and Apollo 17 fluxes. The rocket measurements of BFL, the ANS and TD-1 satellite data, and the Apollo 17 data are compared to the ultraviolet fluxes from the OAO-2, demonstrating a photometric reproducibility of about + or - 3 percent. Therefore, all four sets of spectrophotometry can be reduced to a common absolute scale.

  18. Mathematical Model for Absolute Magnetic Measuring Systems in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fügenschuh, Armin; Fügenschuh, Marzena; Ludszuweit, Marina; Mojsic, Aleksandar; Sokół, Joanna

    2015-09-01

    Scales for measuring systems are either based on incremental or absolute measuring methods. Incremental scales need to initialize a measurement cycle at a reference point. From there, the position is computed by counting increments of a periodic graduation. Absolute methods do not need reference points, since the position can be read directly from the scale. The positions on the complete scales are encoded using two incremental tracks with different graduation. We present a new method for absolute measuring using only one track for position encoding up to micrometre range. Instead of the common perpendicular magnetic areas, we use a pattern of trapezoidal magnetic areas, to store more complex information. For positioning, we use the magnetic field where every position is characterized by a set of values measured by a hall sensor array. We implement a method for reconstruction of absolute positions from the set of unique measured values. We compare two patterns with respect to uniqueness, accuracy, stability and robustness of positioning. We discuss how stability and robustness are influenced by different errors during the measurement in real applications and how those errors can be compensated.

  19. Series that Converge Absolutely but Don't Converge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Robert; Schramm, Michael

    2012-01-01

    If a series of real numbers converges absolutely, then it converges. The usual proof requires completeness in the form of the Cauchy criterion. Failing completeness, the result is false. We provide examples of rational series that illustrate this point. The Cantor set appears in connection with one of the examples.

  20. Analysis of standard reference materials by absolute INAA

    SciTech Connect

    Heft, R.E.; Koszykowski, R.F.

    1981-07-01

    Three standard reference materials, flyash, soil, and ASI 4340 steel, were analyzed by a method of absolute instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Two different light water pool-type reactors were used to produce equivalent analytical results even though the epithermal to thermal flux ratio in one reactor was higher than that in the other by a factor of two.

  1. Symmetry constraint for foreground extraction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huazhu; Cao, Xiaochun; Tu, Zhuowen; Lin, Dongdai

    2014-05-01

    Symmetry as an intrinsic shape property is often observed in natural objects. In this paper, we discuss how explicitly taking into account the symmetry constraint can enhance the quality of foreground object extraction. In our method, a symmetry foreground map is used to represent the symmetry structure of the image, which includes the symmetry matching magnitude and the foreground location prior. Then, the symmetry constraint model is built by introducing this symmetry structure into the graph-based segmentation function. Finally, the segmentation result is obtained via graph cuts. Our method encourages objects with symmetric parts to be consistently extracted. Moreover, our symmetry constraint model is applicable to weak symmetric objects under the part-based framework. Quantitative and qualitative experimental results on benchmark datasets demonstrate the advantages of our approach in extracting the foreground. Our method also shows improved results in segmenting objects with weak, complex symmetry properties.

  2. Genetic map construction with constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Rawlings, C.J.; Soursenot, S.

    1994-12-31

    A pilot program, CME, is described for generating a physical genetic map from hybridization fingerprinting data. CME is implemented in the parallel constraint logic programming language ElipSys. The features of constraint logic programming are used to enable the integration of preexisting mapping information (partial probe orders from cytogenetic maps and local physical maps) into the global map generation process, while parallelism enables the search space to be traversed more efficiently. CME was tested using data from chromosome 2 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe and was found able to generate maps as well as (and sometimes better than) a more traditional method. This paper illustrates the practical benefits of using a symbolic logic programming language and shows that the features of constraint handling and parallel execution bring the development of practical systems based on Al programming technologies nearer to being a reality.

  3. Magnetotail dynamics under isobaric constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, Joachim; Schindler, Karl; Janicke, Lutz; Hesse, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Using linear theory and nonlinear MHD simulations, we investigate the resistive and ideal MHD stability of two-dimensional plasma configurations under the isobaric constraint dP/dt = 0, which in ideal MHD is equivalent to conserving the pressure function P = P(A), where A denotes the magnetic flux. This constraint is satisfied for incompressible modes, such as Alfven waves, and for systems undergoing energy losses. The linear stability analysis leads to a Schroedinger equation, which can be investigated by standard quantum mechanics procedures. We present an application to a typical stretched magnetotail configuration. For a one-dimensional sheet equilibrium characteristic properties of tearing instability are rediscovered. However, the maximum growth rate scales with the 1/7 power of the resistivity, which implies much faster growth than for the standard tearing mode (assuming that the resistivity is