Science.gov

Sample records for absolute detection limit

  1. Continuum limit of electrostatic gyrokinetic absolute equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian-Zhou

    2012-06-01

    Electrostatic gyrokinetic absolute equilibria with continuum velocity field are obtained through the partition function and through the Green function of the functional integral. The new results justify and explain the prescription for quantization/discretization or taking the continuum limit of velocity. The mistakes in the Appendix D of our earlier work [J.-Z. Zhu and G. W. Hammett, Phys. Plasmas 17, 122307 (2010)] are explained and corrected. If the lattice spacing for discretizing velocity is big enough, all the invariants could concentrate at the lowest Fourier modes in a negative-temperature state, which might indicate a possible variation of the dual cascade picture in 2D plasma turbulence.

  2. Absolute charge calibration of scintillating screens for relativistic electron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, A.; Zeil, K.; Popp, A.; Schmid, K.; Jochmann, A.; Kraft, S. D.; Hidding, B.; Kudyakov, T.; Sears, C. M. S.; Veisz, L.; Karsch, S.; Pawelke, J.; Sauerbrey, R.; Cowan, T.; Krausz, F.; Schramm, U.

    2010-03-01

    We report on new charge calibrations and linearity tests with high-dynamic range for eight different scintillating screens typically used for the detection of relativistic electrons from laser-plasma based acceleration schemes. The absolute charge calibration was done with picosecond electron bunches at the ELBE linear accelerator in Dresden. The lower detection limit in our setup for the most sensitive scintillating screen (KODAK Biomax MS) was 10 fC/mm2. The screens showed a linear photon-to-charge dependency over several orders of magnitude. An onset of saturation effects starting around 10-100 pC/mm2 was found for some of the screens. Additionally, a constant light source was employed as a luminosity reference to simplify the transfer of a one-time absolute calibration to different experimental setups.

  3. Absolute limit on rotation of gravitationally bound stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendenning, N. K.

    1994-03-01

    The authors seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein's theory of relativity, Le Chatelier's principle, causality, and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass-shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a M = 1.442 solar mass neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). If the limit were found to be broken by any pulsar, it would signal that the confined hadronic phase of ordinary nucleons and nuclei is only metastable.

  4. System providing limit switch function with simultaneous absolute position output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A limit and position sensing system includes a sensor assembly and an emitter. The sensor assembly includes first and second electrical conductors arranged in opposing parallel planes. The first electrical conductor is coiled outwardly from either end thereof in a clockwise fashion to form a first coil region and a second coil region. The second electrical conductor forms a single coil with portions of the single coil's rings lying between the first end and second end of the first electrical conductor being parallel to an axis of the first electrical conductor's plane. Ferromagnetic material is aligned with the first and second electrical conductors and spans beyond (a) the first and second ends of the first electrical conductor, and (b) the portions of the rings of the second electrical conductor's single coil that lie between the first end and second end of the first electrical conductor. The emitter is spaced apart from the sensor assembly and transmits a periodic electromagnetic wave towards the sensor assembly.

  5. High-resolution absolute position detection using a multiple grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Ulrich; Drabarek, Pawel; Kuehnle, Goetz; Tiziani, Hans J.

    1996-08-01

    To control electro-mechanical engines, high-resolution linear and rotary encoders are needed. Interferometric methods (grating interferometers) promise a resolution of a few nanometers, but have an ambiguity range of some microns. Incremental encoders increase the absolute measurement range by counting the signal periods starting from a defined initial point. In many applications, however, it is not possible to move to this initial point, so that absolute encoders have to be used. Absolute encoders generally have a scale with two or more tracks placed next to each other. Therefore, they use a two-dimensional grating structure to measure a one-dimensional position. We present a new method, which uses a one-dimensional structure to determine the position in one dimension. It is based on a grating with a large grating period up to some millimeters, having the same diffraction efficiency in several predefined diffraction orders (multiple grating). By combining the phase signals of the different diffraction orders, it is possible to establish the position in an absolute range of the grating period with a resolution like incremental grating interferometers. The principal functionality was demonstrated by applying the multiple grating in a heterodyne grating interferometer. The heterodyne frequency was generated by a frequency modulated laser in an unbalanced interferometer. In experimental measurements an absolute range of 8 mm was obtained while achieving a resolution of 10 nm.

  6. Numerical model estimating the capabilities and limitations of the fast Fourier transform technique in absolute interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talamonti, James J.; Kay, Richard B.; Krebs, Danny J.

    1996-05-01

    A numerical model was developed to emulate the capabilities of systems performing noncontact absolute distance measurements. The model incorporates known methods to minimize signal processing and digital sampling errors and evaluates the accuracy limitations imposed by spectral peak isolation by using Hanning, Blackman, and Gaussian windows in the fast Fourier transform technique. We applied this model to the specific case of measuring the relative lengths of a compound Michelson interferometer. By processing computer-simulated data through our model, we project the ultimate precision for ideal data, and data containing AM-FM noise. The precision is shown to be limited by nonlinearities in the laser scan. absolute distance, interferometer.

  7. Detection of medically important Candida species by absolute quantitation real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Than, Leslie Thian Lung; Chong, Pei Pei; Ng, Kee Peng; Seow, Heng Fong

    2015-01-01

    The number of invasive candidiasis cases has risen especially with an increase in the number of immunosuppressed and immunocom promised patients. The early detection of Candida species which is specific and sensitive is important in determining the correct administration of antifungal drugs to patients. This study aims to develop a method for the detection, identification and quantitation of medically important Candida species through quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The isocitrate lyase (ICL) gene which is not found in mammals was chosen as the target gene of real-time PCR. Absolute quantitation of the gene copy number was achieved by constructing the plasmid containing the ICL gene which is used to generate standard curve. Twenty fungal species, two bacterial species and human DNA were tested to check the specificity of the detection method. All eight Candida species were successfully detected, identified and quantitated based on the ICL gene. A seven-log range of the gene copy number and a minimum detection limit of 10(3) copies were achieved. A one-tube absolute quantification real-time PCR that differentiates medically important Candida species via individual unique melting temperature was achieved. Analytical sensitivity and specificity were not compromised.

  8. Absolute ion detection efficiencies of microchannel plates and funnel microchannel plates for multi-coincidence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehre, K.; Trojanowskaja, D.; Gatzke, J.; Kunitski, M.; Trinter, F.; Zeller, S.; Schmidt, L. Ph. H.; Stohner, J.; Berger, R.; Czasch, A.; Jagutzki, O.; Jahnke, T.; Dörner, R.; Schöffler, M. S.

    2018-04-01

    Modern momentum imaging techniques allow for the investigation of complex molecules in the gas phase by detection of several fragment ions in coincidence. For these studies, it is of great importance that the single-particle detection efficiency ɛ is as high as possible, as the overall efficiency scales with ɛn, i.e., the power of the number of detected particles. Here we present measured absolute detection efficiencies for protons of several micro-channel plates (MCPs), including efficiency enhanced "funnel MCPs." Furthermore, the relative detection efficiency for two-, three-, four-, and five-body fragmentation of CHBrClF has been examined. The "funnel" MCPs exhibit an efficiency of approximately 90%, gaining a factor of 24 (as compared to "normal" MCPs) in the case of a five-fold ion coincidence detection.

  9. APIC. Absolute Position Interfero-Coronagraph for direct exoplanet detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allouche, F.; Glindemann, A.; Aristidi, E.; Vakili, F.

    2009-06-01

    Context: For detecting and directly imaging exoplanets, coronagraphic methods are mandatory when the intensity ratio between a star and its orbiting planet can be as large as 10^6. In 1996, a concept of an achromatic interfero-coronagraph (AIC) was presented for detecting very faint stellar companions, such as exoplanets. Aims: We present a modified version of the AIC not only permitting these faint companions to be detected but also their relative position to be determined with respect to the parent star, a problem that was not solved in the original design of the AIC. Methods: In our modified design, two cylindrical lens doublets were used to remove the 180° ambiguity introduced by the AIC's original design. Results: Our theoretical study and the numerical computations show that the axis of symmetry is destroyed when one of the cylindrical doublets is rotated around the optical axis.

  10. Nitromethane K-9 Detection Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Strobel, R; Kury, J

    2003-08-29

    The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) trains canine/handler teams to detect explosives for government and other agencies worldwide. After completing the training program the teams are tested on an array containing explosives and numerous other samples designed to distract a canine. Passing this test results in a team's certification. These teams can be considered as ''detection instruments'' freshly calibrated just before leaving the ''factory''. Using these teams to examine special experimental arrays immediately following certification can lead to a better understanding of a canine's detection capabilities. Forty-one of these ''detection instruments'' were used in four test series withmore » arrays containing dilute nitromethane-in-water solutions. (The canines had been trained on the amount of nitromethane vapor in equilibrium with the undiluted liquid explosive.) By diluting liquid nitromethane with water, the amount of explosive vapor can be reduced many orders of magnitude to test the lower limit of the canine's nitromethane vapor detection response. The results are presented in this paper.« less

  11. Limits of detection and decision. Part 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtman, E.

    2008-02-01

    It has been shown that the MARLAP (Multi-Agency Radiological Laboratory Analytical Protocols) for estimating the Currie detection limit, which is based on 'critical values of the non-centrality parameter of the non-central t distribution', is intrinsically biased, even if no calibration curve or regression is used. This completed the refutation of the method, begun in Part 2. With the field cleared of obstructions, the true theory underlying Currie's limits of decision, detection and quantification, as they apply in a simple linear chemical measurement system (CMS) having heteroscedastic, Gaussian measurement noise and using weighted least squares (WLS) processing, was then derived. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations were performed, on 900 million independent calibration curves, for linear, "hockey stick" and quadratic noise precision models (NPMs). With errorless NPM parameters, all the simulation results were found to be in excellent agreement with the derived theoretical expressions. Even with as much as 30% noise on all of the relevant NPM parameters, the worst absolute errors in rates of false positives and false negatives, was only 0.3%.

  12. Development and application of absolute quantitative detection by duplex chamber-based digital PCR of genetically modified maize events without pretreatment steps.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pengyu; Fu, Wei; Wang, Chenguang; Du, Zhixin; Huang, Kunlun; Zhu, Shuifang; Xu, Wentao

    2016-04-15

    The possibility of the absolute quantitation of GMO events by digital PCR was recently reported. However, most absolute quantitation methods based on the digital PCR required pretreatment steps. Meanwhile, singleplex detection could not meet the demand of the absolute quantitation of GMO events that is based on the ratio of foreign fragments and reference genes. Thus, to promote the absolute quantitative detection of different GMO events by digital PCR, we developed a quantitative detection method based on duplex digital PCR without pretreatment. Moreover, we tested 7 GMO events in our study to evaluate the fitness of our method. The optimized combination of foreign and reference primers, limit of quantitation (LOQ), limit of detection (LOD) and specificity were validated. The results showed that the LOQ of our method for different GMO events was 0.5%, while the LOD is 0.1%. Additionally, we found that duplex digital PCR could achieve the detection results with lower RSD compared with singleplex digital PCR. In summary, the duplex digital PCR detection system is a simple and stable way to achieve the absolute quantitation of different GMO events. Moreover, the LOQ and LOD indicated that this method is suitable for the daily detection and quantitation of GMO events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Material Limitations on the Detection Limit in Refractometry

    PubMed Central

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Nunes, Pedro S.; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η, with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window (λ ≳ 1100 nm) of silicon the detection limit becomes almost independent on the filling fraction, while in the visible, the detection limit depends strongly on the filling fraction because the silicon absorbs strongly. PMID:22291513

  14. Material limitations on the detection limit in refractometry.

    PubMed

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Nunes, Pedro S; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η, with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window (λ ≳ 1100 nm) of silicon the detection limit becomes almost independent on the filling fraction, while in the visible, the detection limit depends strongly on the filling fraction because the silicon absorbs strongly.

  15. The Dependence of Cloud Property Trend Detection on Absolute Calibration Accuracy of Passive Satellite Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Y.; Wielicki, B. A.; Sun-Mack, S.; Minnis, P.; Zelinka, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    Detecting trends in climate variables on global, decadal scales requires highly accurate, stable measurements and retrieval algorithms. Trend uncertainty depends on its magnitude, natural variability, and instrument and retrieval algorithm accuracy and stability. We applied a climate accuracy framework to quantify the impact of absolute calibration on cloud property trend uncertainty. The cloud properties studied were cloud fraction, effective temperature, optical thickness, and effective radius retrieved using the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Cloud Property Retrieval System, which uses Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer measurements (MODIS). Modeling experiments from the fifth phase of the Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) agree that net cloud feedback is likely positive but disagree regarding its magnitude, mainly due to uncertainty in shortwave cloud feedback. With the climate accuracy framework we determined the time to detect trends for instruments with various calibration accuracies. We estimated a relationship between cloud property trend uncertainty, cloud feedback, and Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity and also between effective radius trend uncertainty and aerosol indirect effect trends. The direct relationship between instrument accuracy requirements and climate model output provides the level of instrument absolute accuracy needed to reduce climate model projection uncertainty. Different cloud types have varied radiative impacts on the climate system depending on several attributes, such as their thermodynamic phase, altitude, and optical thickness. Therefore, we also conducted these studies by cloud types for a clearer understanding of instrument accuracy requirements needed to detect changes in their cloud properties. Combining this information with the radiative impact of different cloud types helps to prioritize among requirements for future satellite sensors and understanding the climate detection

  16. A Novel Pretreatment-Free Duplex Chamber Digital PCR Detection System for the Absolute Quantitation of GMO Samples.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pengyu; Wang, Chenguang; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2016-03-18

    Digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has developed rapidly since it was first reported in the 1990s. However, pretreatments are often required during preparation for digital PCR, which can increase operation error. The single-plex amplification of both the target and reference genes may cause uncertainties due to the different reaction volumes and the matrix effect. In the current study, a quantitative detection system based on the pretreatment-free duplex chamber digital PCR was developed. The dynamic range, limit of quantitation (LOQ), sensitivity and specificity were evaluated taking the GA21 event as the experimental object. Moreover, to determine the factors that may influence the stability of the duplex system, we evaluated whether the pretreatments, the primary and secondary structures of the probes and the SNP effect influence the detection. The results showed that the LOQ was 0.5% and the sensitivity was 0.1%. We also found that genome digestion and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites affect the detection results, whereas the unspecific hybridization within different probes had little side effect. This indicated that the detection system was suited for both chamber-based and droplet-based digital PCR. In conclusion, we have provided a simple and flexible way of achieving absolute quantitation for genetically modified organism (GMO) genome samples using commercial digital PCR detection systems.

  17. A Novel Pretreatment-Free Duplex Chamber Digital PCR Detection System for the Absolute Quantitation of GMO Samples

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pengyu; Wang, Chenguang; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has developed rapidly since it was first reported in the 1990s. However, pretreatments are often required during preparation for digital PCR, which can increase operation error. The single-plex amplification of both the target and reference genes may cause uncertainties due to the different reaction volumes and the matrix effect. In the current study, a quantitative detection system based on the pretreatment-free duplex chamber digital PCR was developed. The dynamic range, limit of quantitation (LOQ), sensitivity and specificity were evaluated taking the GA21 event as the experimental object. Moreover, to determine the factors that may influence the stability of the duplex system, we evaluated whether the pretreatments, the primary and secondary structures of the probes and the SNP effect influence the detection. The results showed that the LOQ was 0.5% and the sensitivity was 0.1%. We also found that genome digestion and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites affect the detection results, whereas the unspecific hybridization within different probes had little side effect. This indicated that the detection system was suited for both chamber-based and droplet-based digital PCR. In conclusion, we have provided a simple and flexible way of achieving absolute quantitation for genetically modified organism (GMO) genome samples using commercial digital PCR detection systems. PMID:26999129

  18. Limits of detection and decision. Part 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtman, E.

    2008-02-01

    Probability density functions (PDFs) have been derived for a number of commonly used limit of detection definitions, including several variants of the Relative Standard Deviation of the Background-Background Equivalent Concentration (RSDB-BEC) method, for a simple linear chemical measurement system (CMS) having homoscedastic, Gaussian measurement noise and using ordinary least squares (OLS) processing. All of these detection limit definitions serve as both decision and detection limits, thereby implicitly resulting in 50% rates of Type 2 errors. It has been demonstrated that these are closely related to Currie decision limits, if the coverage factor, k, is properly defined, and that all of the PDFs are scaled reciprocals of noncentral t variates. All of the detection limits have well-defined upper and lower limits, thereby resulting in finite moments and confidence limits, and the problem of estimating the noncentrality parameter has been addressed. As in Parts 1-3, extensive Monte Carlo simulations were performed and all the simulation results were found to be in excellent agreement with the derived theoretical expressions. Specific recommendations for harmonization of detection limit methodology have also been made.

  19. Development of a duplex droplet digital PCR assay for absolute quantitative detection of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus".

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Vijayanandraj; Maheshwari, Yogita; Hajeri, Subhas; Chen, Jianchi; McCollum, Thomas Greg; Yokomi, Raymond

    2018-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB, citrus greening) is a devastating citrus disease affecting citrus production worldwide. It is associated with the bacterium "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" (CLas) and is vectored by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP). Currently, diagnosis of CLas in regulatory samples is based on real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) using 16S rRNA gene specific primers/probe. The detection of CLas using qPCR is challenging due to low pathogen titer and uneven distribution in infected plants and exacerbated by sampling issues and presence of inhibitors. This study evaluated a duplex droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) using multi-copy gene targets, 16S and RNR, to simultaneously detect CLas DNA targets in the same sample for unambiguous detection of the HLB pathogen in DNA extracts from citrus leaves and ACP. Standard curve analyses on tenfold dilution series with plasmid, citrus leaf and ACP DNA showed that both ddPCR and qPCR exhibited good linearity and efficiency in the duplex assay. CLas-infected low titer samples were used to validate the duplex ddPCR and qPCR performance and demonstrated that detection rate is higher when both 16S and RNR primers were used in duplex assay. However, the receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated that area under the curve for RNR primer was significantly broader, compared to 16S primers for CLas detection at low target titer. The absolute quantification of CLas at variable titers was reproducible and repeatable for both primer sets and the ddPCR showed higher resilience to PCR inhibitors with citrus leaf and ACP extracts. Hence, the resultant duplex ddPCR assay resulted in a significantly improved detection platform for diagnosis of CLas in samples with low pathogen titer.

  20. Development of a duplex droplet digital PCR assay for absolute quantitative detection of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus"

    PubMed Central

    Hajeri, Subhas; Chen, Jianchi; McCollum, Thomas Greg

    2018-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB, citrus greening) is a devastating citrus disease affecting citrus production worldwide. It is associated with the bacterium “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” (CLas) and is vectored by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP). Currently, diagnosis of CLas in regulatory samples is based on real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) using 16S rRNA gene specific primers/probe. The detection of CLas using qPCR is challenging due to low pathogen titer and uneven distribution in infected plants and exacerbated by sampling issues and presence of inhibitors. This study evaluated a duplex droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) using multi-copy gene targets, 16S and RNR, to simultaneously detect CLas DNA targets in the same sample for unambiguous detection of the HLB pathogen in DNA extracts from citrus leaves and ACP. Standard curve analyses on tenfold dilution series with plasmid, citrus leaf and ACP DNA showed that both ddPCR and qPCR exhibited good linearity and efficiency in the duplex assay. CLas-infected low titer samples were used to validate the duplex ddPCR and qPCR performance and demonstrated that detection rate is higher when both 16S and RNR primers were used in duplex assay. However, the receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated that area under the curve for RNR primer was significantly broader, compared to 16S primers for CLas detection at low target titer. The absolute quantification of CLas at variable titers was reproducible and repeatable for both primer sets and the ddPCR showed higher resilience to PCR inhibitors with citrus leaf and ACP extracts. Hence, the resultant duplex ddPCR assay resulted in a significantly improved detection platform for diagnosis of CLas in samples with low pathogen titer. PMID:29772016

  1. ELENA MCP detector: absolute detection efficiency for low-energy neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rispoli, R.; De Angelis, E.; Colasanti, L.; Vertolli, N.; Orsini, S.; Scheer, J. A.; Mura, A.; Milillo, A.; Wurz, P.; Selci, S.; Di Lellis, A. M.; Leoni, R.; D'Alessandro, M.; Mattioli, F.; Cibella, S.

    2012-09-01

    Microchannel Plates (MCP) detectors are frequently used in space instrumentation for detecting a wide range of radiation and particles. In particular, the capability to detect non-thermal low energy neutral species is crucial for the sensor ELENA (Emitted Low-Energy Neutral Atoms), part of the package SERENA (Search for Exospheric Refilling and Emitted Natural Abundances) on board the BepiColombo mission of ESA to Mercury to be launched in 2015. ELENA is a Time of Flight (TOF) sensor, based on a novel concept using an ultra-sonic oscillating shutter (Start section), which is operated at frequencies up to 50 kHz; a MCP detector is used as a Stop detector. The scientific objective of ELENA is to detect energetic neutral atoms in the range 10 eV - 5 keV, within 76° FOV, perpendicular to the S/C orbital plane. ELENA will monitor the emission of neutral atoms from the whole surface of Mercury thanks to the spacecraft motion. The major scientific objectives are the interaction between the plasma environment and the planet’s surface, the global particle loss-rate and the remote sensing of the surface properties. In particular, surface release processes are investigated by identifying particles released from the surface, via solar wind-induced ion sputtering (< 1eV - < 100 eV) as well as Hydrogen back-scattered at hundreds eV. MCP absolute detection efficiency for very low energy neutral atoms (E < 30 eV) is a crucial point for this investigation. At the MEFISTO facility of the Physical Institute of the University of Bern (CH), measurements on three different types of MCP (with and without coating) have been performed providing the detection efficiencies in the energy range 10eV - 1keV. Outcomes from such measurements are discussed here.

  2. Nanomolar detection of hypochlorite by a rhodamine-based chiral hydrazide in absolute aqueous media: application in tap water analysis with live-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Shyamaprosad; Das, Avijit Kumar; Manna, Abhishek; Maity, Anup Kumar; Saha, Partha; Quah, Ching Kheng; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A

    2014-07-01

    By employing the oxidation property of hypochlorite (OCl(-)), a novel rhodamine-based hydrazide of the chiral acid ((S)-(-)-2-pyrrolidone-5-carboxylic acid) (RHHP) was designed and synthesized for detection of OCl(-) absolutely in aqueous medium at nanomolar level. The structure of the chiral sensor was also proved by the X-ray crystallography. The bioactivity and the application of the probe for detection of OCl(-) in natural water system have been demonstrated. A plausible mechanism for oxidation of the sensor followed by hydrolysis is also proposed. The sensibility of the receptor toward OCl(-) was studied in absolute aqueous media, and the detection limit of hypochlorite-mediated oxidation to the receptor in nanomolar level makes this platform (RHHP) an ultrasensitive and unique system for OCl(-) oxidation.

  3. The Limits of Cross-Cultural Dialogue: Pedagogy, Desire, and Absolution in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Alison

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the limits of cross-cultural dialog in the classroom, asking what happens if this togetherness and dialog-across-difference fails to hold a compellingly positive meaning for subordinate ethnic groups. Presents a true story about a classroom in a New Zealand university and a controversial pedagogical strategy employed there. (SM)

  4. Effective connectivity associated with auditory error detection in musicians with absolute pitch

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Amy L.; Behroozmand, Roozbeh; Ibrahim, Nadine; Korzyukov, Oleg; Larson, Charles R.; Robin, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    It is advantageous to study a wide range of vocal abilities in order to fully understand how vocal control measures vary across the full spectrum. Individuals with absolute pitch (AP) are able to assign a verbal label to musical notes and have enhanced abilities in pitch identification without reliance on an external referent. In this study we used dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to model effective connectivity of ERP responses to pitch perturbation in voice auditory feedback in musicians with relative pitch (RP), AP, and non-musician controls. We identified a network compromising left and right hemisphere superior temporal gyrus (STG), primary motor cortex (M1), and premotor cortex (PM). We specified nine models and compared two main factors examining various combinations of STG involvement in feedback pitch error detection/correction process. Our results suggest that modulation of left to right STG connections are important in the identification of self-voice error and sensory motor integration in AP musicians. We also identify reduced connectivity of left hemisphere PM to STG connections in AP and RP groups during the error detection and corrections process relative to non-musicians. We suggest that this suppression may allow for enhanced connectivity relating to pitch identification in the right hemisphere in those with more precise pitch matching abilities. Musicians with enhanced pitch identification abilities likely have an improved auditory error detection and correction system involving connectivity of STG regions. Our findings here also suggest that individuals with AP are more adept at using feedback related to pitch from the right hemisphere. PMID:24634644

  5. Absolute detection efficiencies of low energy H, H -, H +, H 2+ and H 3+ incident on a multichannel plate detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peko, B. L.; Stephen, T. M.

    2000-12-01

    Measured absolute detection efficiencies are presented for H, H - and H n+ ( n=1,2,3) impacting a commercially available, dual multichannel plate (MCP) electron multiplier at kinetic energies ranging from 30 to 1000 eV. Measurements involving isotopic substitutions (D, D -, D n+) and Ar + are also presented. In addition, atomic hydrogen detection efficiencies relative to those of H + and H - are given, as they may have a more universal application. For the three charge states, H, H + and H -, the absolute detection efficiencies are markedly different at low energies and converge to a nearly uniform value of ˜70% with increasing projectile energy. The energy dependence is strongest for H +, varying nearly three orders of magnitude over the energy range studied, and weakest for H -, varying by less than one order of magnitude. In general, for the low energy positive ions at a given energy, the lighter the incident particle mass, the greater the probability of its detection.

  6. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  7. Absolute distance measurement by dual-comb interferometry with multi-channel digital lock-in phase detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruitao; Pollinger, Florian; Meiners-Hagen, Karl; Krystek, Michael; Tan, Jiubin; Bosse, Harald

    2015-08-01

    We present a dual-comb-based heterodyne multi-wavelength absolute interferometer capable of long distance measurements. The phase information of the various comb modes is extracted in parallel by a multi-channel digital lock-in phase detection scheme. Several synthetic wavelengths of the same order are constructed and the corresponding phases are averaged to deduce the absolute lengths with significantly reduced uncertainty. Comparison experiments with an incremental HeNe reference interferometer show a combined relative measurement uncertainty of 5.3 × 10-7 at a measurement distance of 20 m. Combining the advantage of synthetic wavelength interferometry and dual-comb interferometry, our compact and simple approach provides sufficient precision for many industrial applications.

  8. Analysis of Intrinsic Peptide Detectability via Integrated Label-Free and SRM-Based Absolute Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jarnuczak, Andrew F; Lee, Dave C H; Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W; Eyers, Claire E; Hubbard, Simon J

    2016-09-02

    Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics of complex biological samples remains challenging in part due to the variability and charge competition arising during electrospray ionization (ESI) of peptides and the subsequent transfer and detection of ions. These issues preclude direct quantification from signal intensity alone in the absence of a standard. A deeper understanding of the governing principles of peptide ionization and exploitation of the inherent ionization and detection parameters of individual peptides is thus of great value. Here, using the yeast proteome as a model system, we establish the concept of peptide F-factor as a measure of detectability, closely related to ionization efficiency. F-factor is calculated by normalizing peptide precursor ion intensity by absolute abundance of the parent protein. We investigated F-factor characteristics in different shotgun proteomics experiments, including across multiple ESI-based LC-MS platforms. We show that F-factors mirror previously observed physicochemical predictors as peptide detectability but demonstrate a nonlinear relationship between hydrophobicity and peptide detectability. Similarly, we use F-factors to show how peptide ion coelution adversely affects detectability and ionization. We suggest that F-factors have great utility for understanding peptide detectability and gas-phase ion chemistry in complex peptide mixtures, selection of surrogate peptides in targeted MS studies, and for calibration of peptide ion signal in label-free workflows. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003472.

  9. Exhaustive thin-layer cyclic voltammetry for absolute multianalyte halide detection.

    PubMed

    Cuartero, Maria; Crespo, Gastón A; Ghahraman Afshar, Majid; Bakker, Eric

    2014-11-18

    Water analysis is one of the greatest challenges in the field of environmental analysis. In particular, seawater analysis is often difficult because a large amount of NaCl may mask the determination of other ions, i.e., nutrients, halides, and carbonate species. We demonstrate here the use of thin-layer samples controlled by cyclic voltammetry to analyze water samples for chloride, bromide, and iodide. The fabrication of a microfluidic electrochemical cell based on a Ag/AgX wire (working electrode) inserted into a tubular Nafion membrane is described, which confines the sample solution layer to less than 15 μm. By increasing the applied potential, halide ions present in the thin-layer sample (X(-)) are electrodeposited on the working electrode as AgX, while their respective counterions are transported across the perm-selective membrane to an outer solution. Thin-layer cyclic voltammetry allows us to obtain separated peaks in mixed samples of these three halides, finding a linear relationship between the halide concentration and the corresponding peak area from about 10(-5) to 0.1 M for bromide and iodide and from 10(-4) to 0.6 M for chloride. This technique was successfully applied for the halide analysis in tap, mineral, and river water as well as seawater. The proposed methodology is absolute and potentially calibration-free, as evidenced by an observed 2.5% RSD cell to cell reproducibility and independence from the operating temperature.

  10. Investigation of absolute and relative response for three different liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry systems; the impact of ionization and detection saturation.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Lars B; Skansen, Patrik

    2012-06-30

    The investigations in this article were triggered by two observations in the laboratory; for some liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) systems it was possible to obtain linear calibration curves for extreme concentration ranges and for some systems seemingly linear calibration curves gave good accuracy at low concentrations only when using a quadratic regression function. The absolute and relative responses were tested for three different LC/MS/MS systems by injecting solutions of a model compound and a stable isotope labeled internal standard. The analyte concentration range for the solutions was 0.00391 to 500 μM (128,000×), giving overload of the chromatographic column at the highest concentrations. The stable isotope labeled internal standard concentration was 0.667 μM in all samples. The absolute response per concentration unit decreased rapidly as higher concentrations were injected. The relative response, the ratio for the analyte peak area to the internal standard peak area, per concentration unit was calculated. For system 1, the ionization process was found to limit the response and the relative response per concentration unit was constant. For systems 2 and 3, the ion detection process was the limiting factor resulting in decreasing relative response at increasing concentrations. For systems behaving like system 1, simple linear regression can be used for any concentration range while, for systems behaving like systems 2 and 3, non-linear regression is recommended for all concentration ranges. Another consequence is that the ionization capacity limited systems will be insensitive to matrix ion suppression when an ideal internal standard is used while the detection capacity limited systems are at risk of giving erroneous results at high concentrations if the matrix ion suppression varies for different samples in a run. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Comprehensive Panel of Real-Time TaqMan™ Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays for Detection and Absolute Quantification of Filoviruses, Arenaviruses, and New World Hantaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Trombley, Adrienne R.; Wachter, Leslie; Garrison, Jeffrey; Buckley-Beason, Valerie A.; Jahrling, Jordan; Hensley, Lisa E.; Schoepp, Randal J.; Norwood, David A.; Goba, Augustine; Fair, Joseph N.; Kulesh, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fever is caused by a diverse group of single-stranded, negative-sense or positive-sense RNA viruses belonging to the families Filoviridae (Ebola and Marburg), Arenaviridae (Lassa, Junin, Machupo, Sabia, and Guanarito), and Bunyaviridae (hantavirus). Disease characteristics in these families mark each with the potential to be used as a biological threat agent. Because other diseases have similar clinical symptoms, specific laboratory diagnostic tests are necessary to provide the differential diagnosis during outbreaks and for instituting acceptable quarantine procedures. We designed 48 TaqMan™-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for specific and absolute quantitative detection of multiple hemorrhagic fever viruses. Forty-six assays were determined to be virus-specific, and two were designated as pan assays for Marburg virus. The limit of detection for the assays ranged from 10 to 0.001 plaque-forming units (PFU)/PCR. Although these real-time hemorrhagic fever virus assays are qualitative (presence of target), they are also quantitative (measure a single DNA/RNA target sequence in an unknown sample and express the final results as an absolute value (e.g., viral load, PFUs, or copies/mL) on the basis of concentration of standard samples and can be used in viral load, vaccine, and antiviral drug studies. PMID:20439981

  12. Measurement of absolute response functions and detection efficiencies of an NE213 scintillator up to 600 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Sanami, Toshiya; Ishibashi, Kenji; Haight, Robert C.; Fotiades, Nikolaos

    2011-02-01

    Absolute neutron response functions and detection efficiencies of an NE213 liquid scintillator that was 12.7 cm in diameter and 12.7 cm in thickness were measured for neutron energies between 15 and 600 MeV at the Weapons Neutron Research facility of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The experiment was performed with continuous-energy neutrons on a spallation neutron source by 800-MeV proton incidence. The incident neutron flux was measured using a 238U fission ionization chamber. Measured response functions and detection efficiencies were compared with corresponding calculations using the SCINFUL-QMD code. The calculated and experimental values were in good agreement for data below 70 MeV. However, there were discrepancies in the energy region between 70 and 150 MeV. Thus, the code was partly modified and the revised code provided better agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Contactless and absolute linear displacement detection based upon 3D printed magnets combined with passive radio-frequency identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windl, Roman; Abert, Claas; Bruckner, Florian; Huber, Christian; Vogler, Christoph; Weitensfelder, Herbert; Suess, Dieter

    2017-11-01

    Within this work a passive and wireless magnetic sensor, to monitor linear displacements, is proposed. We exploit recent advances in 3D printing and fabricate a polymer bonded magnet with a spatially linear magnetic field component corresponding to the length of the magnet. Regulating the magnetic compound fraction during printing allows specific shaping of the magnetic field distribution. A giant magnetoresistance magnetic field sensor is combined with a radio-frequency identification tag in order to passively monitor the exerted magnetic field of the printed magnet. Due to the tailored magnetic field, a displacement of the magnet with respect to the sensor can be detected within the sub-mm regime. The sensor design provides good flexibility by controlling the 3D printing process according to application needs. Absolute displacement detection using low cost components and providing passive operation, long term stability, and longevity renders the proposed sensor system ideal for structural health monitoring applications.

  14. MethyLight droplet digital PCR for detection and absolute quantification of infrequently methylated alleles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ming; Carter, Kelly T; Makar, Karen W; Vickers, Kathy; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Schoen, Robert E; Brenner, Dean; Markowitz, Sanford D; Grady, William M

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation is a common epigenetic alteration found in colorectal adenomas and cancers and plays a role in cancer initiation and progression. Aberrantly methylated DNA loci can also be found infrequently present in normal colon tissue, where they seem to have potential to be used as colorectal cancer (CRC) risk biomarkers. However, detection and precise quantification of the infrequent methylation events seen in normal colon is likely beyond the capability of commonly used PCR technologies. To determine the potential for methylated DNA loci as CRC risk biomarkers, we developed MethyLight droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assays and compared their performance to the widely used conventional MethyLight PCR. Our analyses demonstrated the capacity of MethyLight ddPCR to detect a single methylated NTRK3 allele from among more than 3125 unmethylated alleles, 25-fold more sensitive than conventional MethyLight PCR. The MethyLight ddPCR assay detected as little as 19 and 38 haploid genome equivalents of methylated EVL and methylated NTRK3, respectively, which far exceeded conventional MethyLight PCR (379 haploid genome equivalents for both genes). When assessing methylated EVL levels in CRC tissue samples, MethyLight ddPCR reduced coefficients of variation (CV) to 6-65% of CVs seen with conventional MethyLight PCR. Importantly, we showed the ability of MethyLight ddPCR to detect infrequently methylated EVL alleles in normal colon mucosa samples that could not be detected by conventional MethyLight PCR. This study suggests that the sensitivity and precision of methylation detection by MethyLight ddPCR enhances the potential of methylated alleles for use as CRC risk biomarkers.

  15. APIC: Absolute Position Interfero Coronagraph for direct exoplanet detection: first laboratory results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allouche, Fatmé; Glindemann, Andreas; Aristidi, Eric; Vakili, Farrokh

    2010-07-01

    For the detection and direct imaging of exoplanets, when the intensity ratio between a star and its orbiting planet can largely exceed 106, coronagraphic methods are mandatory. In 1996, a concept of achromatic interferocoronagraph (AIC) was presented by J. Gay and Y. Rabbia for the detection of very faint stellar companions, such as exoplanets. In an earlier paper, we presented a modified version of the AIC permitting to determine the relative position of these faint companions with respect to the parent star, a problem unsolved in the original design of the AIC. Our modification lied in the use of cylindrical lens doublets as field rotator. By placing two of them in one arm of the interferometric set-up of AIC, we destroyed the axis of symmetry induced by the AIC's original design. Our theoretical study, along with the numerical computations, presented then, and the preliminary test bench results aiming at validating the cylindrical lens doublet field rotation capability, presented in this paper, show that the axis of symmetry is destroyed when one of the cylindrical doublets is rotated around the optic axis.

  16. Investigation of detection limits for diffuse optical tomography systems: II. Analysis of slab and cup geometry for breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Ronny; Brendel, Bernhard; Rinneberg, Herbert; Nielsen, Tim

    2009-01-21

    Using a statistical (chi-square) test on simulated data and a realistic noise model derived from the system's hardware we study the performance of diffuse optical tomography systems for fluorescence imaging. We compare the predicted smallest size of detectable lesions at various positions in slab and cup geometry and model how detection sensitivity depends on breast compression and lesion fluorescence contrast. Our investigation shows that lesion detection is limited by relative noise in slab geometry and by absolute noise in cup geometry.

  17. The introduction of the absolute risk for the detection of fetal aneuploidies in the first-trimester screening.

    PubMed

    Padula, Francesco; Laganà, Antonio Simone; Vitale, Salvatore Giovanni; D'Emidio, Laura; Coco, Claudio; Giannarelli, Diana; Cariola, Maria; Favilli, Alessandro; Giorlandino, Claudio

    2017-05-01

    Maternal age is a crucial factor in fetal aneuploidy screening, resulting in an increased rate of false-positive cases in older women and false-negative cases in younger women. The absolute risk (AR) is the simplest way to eliminate the background maternal age risk, as it represents the amount of improvement of the combined risk from the maternal background risk. The aim of this work is to assess the performance of the AR in the combined first-trimester screening for aneuploidies. A retrospective validation of the AR in the combined first-trimester screening for fetal aneuploidies, in an unselected population at Altamedica Fetal-Maternal Medical Center in Rome, between March 2007 and December 2008. Of 3845 women included in the study, we had a complete follow-up on 2984. We evaluated that an AR < 3 would individuate 22 of 23 cases of aneuploidy with a detection rate of 95.7% (95%CI 87.3-100), a false-positive rate of 8.7% (95%CI 7.7-9.7) and a false-negative rate of 4.3% (95%CI 0-12.7). In our study, the AR ameliorates the detection rate for aneuploidy. Further research and a prospective study on a larger population would help us to improve the AR in detecting most cases of aneuploidy.

  18. Left-hemisphere activation is associated with enhanced vocal pitch error detection in musicians with absolute pitch

    PubMed Central

    Behroozmand, Roozbeh; Ibrahim, Nadine; Korzyukov, Oleg; Robin, Donald A.; Larson, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to process auditory feedback for vocal pitch control is crucial during speaking and singing. Previous studies have suggested that musicians with absolute pitch (AP) develop specialized left-hemisphere mechanisms for pitch processing. The present study adopted an auditory feedback pitch perturbation paradigm combined with ERP recordings to test the hypothesis whether the neural mechanisms of the left-hemisphere enhance vocal pitch error detection and control in AP musicians compared with relative pitch (RP) musicians and non-musicians (NM). Results showed a stronger N1 response to pitch-shifted voice feedback in the right-hemisphere for both AP and RP musicians compared with the NM group. However, the left-hemisphere P2 component activation was greater in AP and RP musicians compared with NMs and also for the AP compared with RP musicians. The NM group was slower in generating compensatory vocal reactions to feedback pitch perturbation compared with musicians, and they failed to re-adjust their vocal pitch after the feedback perturbation was removed. These findings suggest that in the earlier stages of cortical neural processing, the right hemisphere is more active in musicians for detecting pitch changes in voice feedback. In the later stages, the left-hemisphere is more active during the processing of auditory feedback for vocal motor control and seems to involve specialized mechanisms that facilitate pitch processing in the AP compared with RP musicians. These findings indicate that the left hemisphere mechanisms of AP ability are associated with improved auditory feedback pitch processing during vocal pitch control in tasks such as speaking or singing. PMID:24355545

  19. Left-hemisphere activation is associated with enhanced vocal pitch error detection in musicians with absolute pitch.

    PubMed

    Behroozmand, Roozbeh; Ibrahim, Nadine; Korzyukov, Oleg; Robin, Donald A; Larson, Charles R

    2014-02-01

    The ability to process auditory feedback for vocal pitch control is crucial during speaking and singing. Previous studies have suggested that musicians with absolute pitch (AP) develop specialized left-hemisphere mechanisms for pitch processing. The present study adopted an auditory feedback pitch perturbation paradigm combined with ERP recordings to test the hypothesis whether the neural mechanisms of the left-hemisphere enhance vocal pitch error detection and control in AP musicians compared with relative pitch (RP) musicians and non-musicians (NM). Results showed a stronger N1 response to pitch-shifted voice feedback in the right-hemisphere for both AP and RP musicians compared with the NM group. However, the left-hemisphere P2 component activation was greater in AP and RP musicians compared with NMs and also for the AP compared with RP musicians. The NM group was slower in generating compensatory vocal reactions to feedback pitch perturbation compared with musicians, and they failed to re-adjust their vocal pitch after the feedback perturbation was removed. These findings suggest that in the earlier stages of cortical neural processing, the right hemisphere is more active in musicians for detecting pitch changes in voice feedback. In the later stages, the left-hemisphere is more active during the processing of auditory feedback for vocal motor control and seems to involve specialized mechanisms that facilitate pitch processing in the AP compared with RP musicians. These findings indicate that the left hemisphere mechanisms of AP ability are associated with improved auditory feedback pitch processing during vocal pitch control in tasks such as speaking or singing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Gardening in the zone of death: an experimental assessment of the absolute elevation limit of vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Dvorský, Miroslav; Chlumská, Zuzana; Altman, Jan; Čapková, Kateřina; Řeháková, Klára; Macek, Martin; Kopecký, Martin; Liancourt, Pierre; Doležal, Jiří

    2016-04-13

    Vascular plants in the western Tibetan Plateau reach 6000 m--the highest elevation on Earth. Due to the significant warming of the region, plant ranges are expected to shift upwards. However, factors governing maximum elevational limits of plant are unclear. To experimentally assess these factors, we transplanted 12 species from 5750 m to 5900 m (upper edge of vegetation) and 6100 m (beyond range) and monitored their survival for six years. In the first three years (2009-2012), there were plants surviving beyond the regional upper limit of vegetation. This supports the hypothesis of dispersal and/or recruitment limitation. Substantial warming, recorded in-situ during this period, very likely facilitated the survival. The survival was ecologically a non-random process, species better adapted to repeated soil freezing and thawing survived significantly better. No species have survived at 6100 m since 2013, probably due to the extreme snowfall in 2013. In conclusion, apart from the minimum heat requirements, our results show that episodic climatic events are decisive determinants of upper elevational limits of vascular plants.

  1. Gardening in the zone of death: an experimental assessment of the absolute elevation limit of vascular plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorský, Miroslav; Chlumská, Zuzana; Altman, Jan; Čapková, Kateřina; Řeháková, Klára; Macek, Martin; Kopecký, Martin; Liancourt, Pierre; Doležal, Jiří

    2016-04-01

    Vascular plants in the western Tibetan Plateau reach 6000 m-the highest elevation on Earth. Due to the significant warming of the region, plant ranges are expected to shift upwards. However, factors governing maximum elevational limits of plant are unclear. To experimentally assess these factors, we transplanted 12 species from 5750 m to 5900 m (upper edge of vegetation) and 6100 m (beyond range) and monitored their survival for six years. In the first three years (2009-2012), there were plants surviving beyond the regional upper limit of vegetation. This supports the hypothesis of dispersal and/or recruitment limitation. Substantial warming, recorded in-situ during this period, very likely facilitated the survival. The survival was ecologically a non-random process, species better adapted to repeated soil freezing and thawing survived significantly better. No species have survived at 6100 m since 2013, probably due to the extreme snowfall in 2013. In conclusion, apart from the minimum heat requirements, our results show that episodic climatic events are decisive determinants of upper elevational limits of vascular plants.

  2. Detection limits for real-time source water monitoring using indigenous freshwater microalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez Jr, Miguel; Greenbaum, Elias

    This research identified toxin detection limits using the variable fluorescence of naturally occurring microalgae in source drinking water for five chemical toxins with different molecular structures and modes of toxicity. The five chemicals investigated were atrazine, Diuron, paraquat, methyl parathion, and potassium cyanide. Absolute threshold sensitivities of the algae for detection of the toxins in unmodified source drinking water were measured. Differential kinetics between the rate of action of the toxins and natural changes in algal physiology, such as diurnal photoinhibition, are significant enough that effects of the toxin can be detected and distinguished from the natural variance. This ismore » true even for physiologically impaired algae where diminished photosynthetic capacity may arise from uncontrollable external factors such as nutrient starvation. Photoinhibition induced by high levels of solar radiation is a predictable and reversible phenomenon that can be dealt with using a period of dark adaption of 30 minutes or more.« less

  3. USE OF METHOD DETECTION LIMITS IN ENVIRONMENTAL MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental measurements often produce values below the method detection limit (MDL). Because low or zero values may be used in determining compliance with regulatory limits, in determining emission factors (typical concentrations emitted by a given type of source), or in model...

  4. Detection limit used for early warning in public health surveillance.

    PubMed

    Kobari, Tsuyoshi; Iwaki, Kazuo; Nagashima, Tomomi; Ishii, Fumiyoshi; Hayashi, Yuzuru; Yajima, Takehiko

    2009-06-01

    A theory of detection limit, developed in analytical chemistry, is applied to public health surveillance to detect an outbreak of national emergencies such as natural disaster and bioterrorism. In this investigation, the influenza epidemic around the Tokyo area from 2003 to 2006 is taken as a model of normal and large-scale epidemics. The detection limit of the normal epidemic is used as a threshold with a specified level of significance to identify a sign of the abnormal epidemic among the daily variation in anti-influenza drug sales at community pharmacies. While auto-correlation of data is often an obstacle to an unbiased estimator of standard deviation involved in the detection limit, the analytical theory (FUMI) can successfully treat the auto-correlation of the drug sales in the same way as the auto-correlation appearing as 1/f noise in many analytical instruments.

  5. Statistical behavior of ten million experimental detection limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtman, Edward; Abraham, Kevin T.

    2011-02-01

    Using a lab-constructed laser-excited fluorimeter, together with bootstrapping methodology, the authors have generated many millions of experimental linear calibration curves for the detection of rhodamine 6G tetrafluoroborate in ethanol solutions. The detection limits computed from them are in excellent agreement with both previously published theory and with comprehensive Monte Carlo computer simulations. Currie decision levels and Currie detection limits, each in the theoretical, chemical content domain, were found to be simply scaled reciprocals of the non-centrality parameter of the non-central t distribution that characterizes univariate linear calibration curves that have homoscedastic, additive Gaussian white noise. Accurate and precise estimates of the theoretical, content domain Currie detection limit for the experimental system, with 5% (each) probabilities of false positives and false negatives, are presented.

  6. The limit of detection for explosives in spectroscopic differential reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubroca, Thierry; Vishwanathan, Karthik; Hummel, Rolf E.

    2011-05-01

    In the wake of recent terrorist attacks, such as the 2008 Mumbai hotel explosion or the December 25th 2009 "underwear bomber", our group has developed a technique (US patent #7368292) to apply differential reflection spectroscopy to detect traces of explosives. Briefly, light (200-500 nm) is shone on a surface such as a piece of luggage at an airport. Upon reflection, the light is collected with a spectrometer combined with a CCD camera. A computer processes the data and produces in turn a differential reflection spectrum involving two adjacent areas of the surface. This differential technique is highly sensitive and provides spectroscopic data of explosives. As an example, 2,4,6, trinitrotoluene (TNT) displays strong and distinct features in differential reflectograms near 420 nm. Similar, but distinctly different features are observed for other explosives. One of the most important criteria for explosive detection techniques is the limit of detection. This limit is defined as the amount of explosive material necessary to produce a signal to noise ratio of three. We present here, a method to evaluate the limit of detection of our technique. Finally, we present our sample preparation method and experimental set-up specifically developed to measure the limit of detection for our technology. This results in a limit ranging from 100 nano-grams to 50 micro-grams depending on the method and the set-up parameters used, such as the detector-sample distance.

  7. Sniper detection using infrared camera: technical possibilities and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastek, M.; Dulski, R.; Trzaskawka, P.; Bieszczad, G.

    2010-04-01

    The paper discusses technical possibilities to build an effective system for sniper detection using infrared cameras. Descriptions of phenomena which make it possible to detect sniper activities in infrared spectra as well as analysis of physical limitations were performed. Cooled and uncooled detectors were considered. Three phases of sniper activities were taken into consideration: before, during and after the shot. On the basis of experimental data the parameters defining the target were determined which are essential in assessing the capability of infrared camera to detect sniper activity. A sniper body and muzzle flash were analyzed as targets. The simulation of detection ranges was done for the assumed scenario of sniper detection task. The infrared sniper detection system was discussed, capable of fulfilling the requirements. The discussion of the results of analysis and simulations was finally presented.

  8. Detection limits of organic compounds achievable with intense, short-pulse lasers.

    PubMed

    Miles, Jordan; De Camillis, Simone; Alexander, Grace; Hamilton, Kathryn; Kelly, Thomas J; Costello, John T; Zepf, Matthew; Williams, Ian D; Greenwood, Jason B

    2015-06-21

    Many organic molecules have strong absorption bands which can be accessed by ultraviolet short pulse lasers to produce efficient ionization. This resonant multiphoton ionization scheme has already been exploited as an ionization source in time-of-flight mass spectrometers used for environmental trace analysis. In the present work we quantify the ultimate potential of this technique by measuring absolute ion yields produced from the interaction of 267 nm femtosecond laser pulses with the organic molecules indole and toluene, and gases Xe, N2 and O2. Using multiphoton ionization cross sections extracted from these results, we show that the laser pulse parameters required for real-time detection of aromatic molecules at concentrations of one part per trillion in air and a limit of detection of a few attomoles are achievable with presently available commercial laser systems. The potential applications for the analysis of human breath, blood and tissue samples are discussed.

  9. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  10. Automatic rectum limit detection by anatomical markers correlation.

    PubMed

    Namías, R; D'Amato, J P; del Fresno, M; Vénere, M

    2014-06-01

    Several diseases take place at the end of the digestive system. Many of them can be diagnosed by means of different medical imaging modalities together with computer aided detection (CAD) systems. These CAD systems mainly focus on the complete segmentation of the digestive tube. However, the detection of limits between different sections could provide important information to these systems. In this paper we present an automatic method for detecting the rectum and sigmoid colon limit using a novel global curvature analysis over the centerline of the segmented digestive tube in different imaging modalities. The results are compared with the gold standard rectum upper limit through a validation scheme comprising two different anatomical markers: the third sacral vertebra and the average rectum length. Experimental results in both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography colonography (CTC) acquisitions show the efficacy of the proposed strategy in automatic detection of rectum limits. The method is intended for application to the rectum segmentation in MRI for geometrical modeling and as contextual information source in virtual colonoscopies and CAD systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Signal detection evidence for limited capacity in visual search

    PubMed Central

    Fencsik, David E.; Flusberg, Stephen J.; Horowitz, Todd S.; Wolfe, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    The nature of capacity limits (if any) in visual search has been a topic of controversy for decades. In 30 years of work, researchers have attempted to distinguish between two broad classes of visual search models. Attention-limited models have proposed two stages of perceptual processing: an unlimited-capacity preattentive stage, and a limited-capacity selective attention stage. Conversely, noise-limited models have proposed a single, unlimited-capacity perceptual processing stage, with decision processes influenced only by stochastic noise. Here, we use signal detection methods to test a strong prediction of attention-limited models. In standard attention-limited models, performance of some searches (feature searches) should only be limited by a preattentive stage. Other search tasks (e.g., spatial configuration search for a “2” among “5”s) should be additionally limited by an attentional bottleneck. We equated average accuracies for a feature and a spatial configuration search over set sizes of 1–8 for briefly presented stimuli. The strong prediction of attention-limited models is that, given overall equivalence in performance, accuracy should be better on the spatial configuration search than on the feature search for set size 1, and worse for set size 8. We confirm this crossover interaction and show that it is problematic for at least one class of one-stage decision models. PMID:21901574

  12. Stochastic fluctuations and the detectability limit of network communities.

    PubMed

    Floretta, Lucio; Liechti, Jonas; Flammini, Alessandro; De Los Rios, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    We have analyzed the detectability limits of network communities in the framework of the popular Girvan and Newman benchmark. By carefully taking into account the inevitable stochastic fluctuations that affect the construction of each and every instance of the benchmark, we come to the conclusion that the native, putative partition of the network is completely lost even before the in-degree/out-degree ratio becomes equal to that of a structureless Erdös-Rényi network. We develop a simple iterative scheme, analytically well described by an infinite branching process, to provide an estimate of the true detectability limit. Using various algorithms based on modularity optimization, we show that all of them behave (semiquantitatively) in the same way, with the same functional form of the detectability threshold as a function of the network parameters. Because the same behavior has also been found by further modularity-optimization methods and for methods based on different heuristics implementations, we conclude that indeed a correct definition of the detectability limit must take into account the stochastic fluctuations of the network construction.

  13. Overcoming interference with the detection of a stable isotopically labeled microtracer in the evaluation of beclabuvir absolute bioavailability using a concomitant microtracer approach.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Titsch, Craig; Zeng, Jianing; Jones, Barry; Joyce, Philip; Gandhi, Yash; Turley, Wesley; Burrell, Richard; Aubry, Anne F; Arnold, Mark E

    2017-09-05

    The oral absolute bioavailability of beclabuvir in healthy subjects was determined using a microdose (100μg) of the stable isotopically labeled tracer via intravenous (IV) infusion started after oral dosing of beclabuvir (150mg). To simultaneously analyze the concentrations of the IV microtracer ([ 13 C 6 ]beclabuvir) and beclabuvir in plasma samples, a liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was initially developed. Surprisingly beclabuvir significantly interfered with the IV microtracer detection when using the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) in the assay. An interfering component from the drug substance was observed using a high resolution mass spectrometer (HRMS). The mass-to-charge (m/z) of the interfering component was -32ppm different from the nominal value for the IV microtracer and thus could not be differentiated in the SRM assay by the unit mass resolution. To overcome this interference, we evaluated two approaches by either monitoring an alternative product ion using the SRM assay or isolating the interfering component using the parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) assay on the HRMS. This case study has demonstrated two practical approaches for overcoming interferences with the detection of stable isotopically labeled IV microtracers in the evaluation of absolute bioavailability, which provides users the flexibility in using either LC-MS/MS or HRMS to mitigate unpredicted interferences in the assay to support microtracer absolute bioavailability studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Thermal Infrared Spectral Band Detection Limits for Unidentified Surface Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkland, Laurel E.; Herr, Kenneth C.; Salisbury, John W.

    2001-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra recorded by airborne or satellite spectrometers can be searched for spectral features to determine the composition of rocks on planetary surfaces. Surface materials are identified by detections of characteristic spectral bands. We show how to define whether to accept an observed spectral feature as a detection when the target material is unknown. We also use remotely sensed spectra measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System to illustrate the importance of instrument parameters and surface properties on band detection limits and how the variation in signal-to-noise ratio with wavelength affects the bands that are most detectable for a given instrument. The spectrometer's sampling interval, spectral resolution, signal-to-noise ratio as a function of wavelength, and the sample's surface properties influence whether the instrument can detect a spectral feature exhibited by a material. As an example, in the 6-13 micrometer wavelength region, massive carbonates exhibit two bands: a very strong, broad feature at approximately 6.5 micrometers and a less intense, sharper band at approximately 11.25 micrometers. Although the 6.5-micrometer band is stronger and broader in laboratory-measured spectra, the 11.25-micrometer band will cause a more detectable feature in TES spectra.

  15. Ultrafast scene detection and recognition with limited visual information

    PubMed Central

    Hagmann, Carl Erick; Potter, Mary C.

    2016-01-01

    Humans can detect target color pictures of scenes depicting concepts like picnic or harbor in sequences of six or twelve pictures presented as briefly as 13 ms, even when the target is named after the sequence (Potter, Wyble, Hagmann, & McCourt, 2014). Such rapid detection suggests that feedforward processing alone enabled detection without recurrent cortical feedback. There is debate about whether coarse, global, low spatial frequencies (LSFs) provide predictive information to high cortical levels through the rapid magnocellular (M) projection of the visual path, enabling top-down prediction of possible object identities. To test the “Fast M” hypothesis, we compared detection of a named target across five stimulus conditions: unaltered color, blurred color, grayscale, thresholded monochrome, and LSF pictures. The pictures were presented for 13–80 ms in six-picture rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) sequences. Blurred, monochrome, and LSF pictures were detected less accurately than normal color or grayscale pictures. When the target was named before the sequence, all picture types except LSF resulted in above-chance detection at all durations. Crucially, when the name was given only after the sequence, performance dropped and the monochrome and LSF pictures (but not the blurred pictures) were at or near chance. Thus, without advance information, monochrome and LSF pictures were rarely understood. The results offer only limited support for the Fast M hypothesis, suggesting instead that feedforward processing is able to activate conceptual representations without complementary reentrant processing. PMID:28255263

  16. Detection of radioactive particles offshore by γ-ray spectrometry Part I: Monte Carlo assessment of detection depth limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maučec, M.; de Meijer, R. J.; Rigollet, C.; Hendriks, P. H. G. M.; Jones, D. G.

    2004-06-01

    A joint research project between the British Geological Survey and Nuclear Geophysics Division of the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Groningen, the Netherlands, was commissioned by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority to establish the efficiency of a towed seabed γ-ray spectrometer for the detection of 137Cs-containing radioactive particles offshore Dounreay, Scotland. Using the MCNP code, a comprehensive Monte Carlo feasibility study was carried out to model various combinations of geological matrices, particle burial depth and lateral displacement, source activity and detector material. To validate the sampling and absolute normalisation procedures of MCNP for geometries including multiple (natural and induced) heterogeneous sources in environmental monitoring, a benchmark experiment was conducted. The study demonstrates the ability of seabed γ-ray spectrometry to locate radioactive particles offshore and to distinguish between γ count rate increases due to particles from those due to enhanced natural radioactivity. The information presented in this study will be beneficial for estimation of the inventory of 137Cs particles and their activity distribution and for the recovery of particles from the sea floor. In this paper, the Monte Carlo assessment of the detection limits is presented. The estimation of the required towing speed and acquisition times and their application to radioactive particle detection and discrimination offshore formed a supplementary part of this study.

  17. Global limits and interference patterns in dark matter direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Gondolo, Paolo

    2015-08-13

    We compare the general effective theory of one-body dark matter nucleon interactions to current direct detection experiments in a global multidimensional statistical analysis. We derive exclusion limits on the 28 isoscalar and isovector coupling constants of the theory, and show that current data place interesting constraints on dark matter-nucleon interaction operators usually neglected in this context. We characterize the interference patterns that can arise in dark matter direct detection from pairs of dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, or from isoscalar and isovector components of the same operator. We find that commonly neglected destructive interference effects weaken standard direct detection exclusion limitsmore » by up to one order of magnitude in the coupling constants.« less

  18. Global limits and interference patterns in dark matter direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Gondolo, Paolo, E-mail: riccardo.catena@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de, E-mail: paolo.gondolo@utah.edu

    2015-08-01

    We compare the general effective theory of one-body dark matter nucleon interactions to current direct detection experiments in a global multidimensional statistical analysis. We derive exclusion limits on the 28 isoscalar and isovector coupling constants of the theory, and show that current data place interesting constraints on dark matter-nucleon interaction operators usually neglected in this context. We characterize the interference patterns that can arise in dark matter direct detection from pairs of dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, or from isoscalar and isovector components of the same operator. We find that commonly neglected destructive interference effects weaken standard direct detection exclusion limitsmore » by up to one order of magnitude in the coupling constants.« less

  19. Detection of colloidal silver chloride near solubility limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, K. Y.; Adawiah, R.

    2018-03-01

    Detection of nanoparticles in solution has been made possible by several means; one of them is laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD). LIBD is able to distinguish colloids of various sizes and concentrations. This technique has been used in several solubility studies. In this study, the formation of colloids in a mixed system of silver nitrate and sodium chloride was observed by acoustic LIBD. Silver chloride has low solubility limit, therefore LIBD measurement is appropriate. Silver and chloride solutions with equal concentrations, set at below and above the solubility of silver chloride as the expected solid product, were mixed and the resulting colloids were observed. The result of LIBD measurement showed that larger particles were present as more silver and chloride introduced. However, once the concentrations exceeded the solubility limit of silver chloride, the detected particle size seemed to be decreasing, hence suggested the occurrence of coprecipitation process. This phenomenon indicated that the ability of LIBD to detect even small changes in colloid amounts might be a useful tool in study on formation and stability of colloids, i.e. to confirm whether nanoparticles synthesis has been successfully performed and whether the system is stable or not.

  20. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments inmore » Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.« less

  1. Immuno-analysis of microparticles: probing at the limits of detection

    PubMed Central

    Latham, Sharissa L.; Tiberti, Natalia; Gokoolparsadh, Naveena; Holdaway, Karen; Olivier Couraud, Pierre; Grau, Georges E. R.; Combes, Valery

    2015-01-01

    Microparticle (MP) research is clouded by debate regarding the accuracy and validity of flow cytometry (FCM) as an analytical methodology, as it is influenced by many variables including the pre-analytical conditions, instruments physical capabilities and detection parameters. This study utilises a simplistic in vitro system for generating MP, and through comparative analysis with immuno-electron microscopy (Immuno-EM) assesses the strengths and limitations of probe selection and high-sensitivity FCM. Of the markers examined, MP were most specifically labelled with phosphatidylserine ligands, annexin V and lactadherin, although only ~60% MP are PS positive. Whilst these two ligands detect comparable absolute MP numbers, they interact with the same population in distinct manners; annexin V binding is enhanced on TNF induced MP. CD105 and CD54 expression were, as expected, consistent and enhanced following TNF activation respectively. Their labelling however accounted for as few as 30–40% of MP. The greatest discrepancies between FCM and I-EM were observed in the population solely labelled for the surface antigen. These findings demonstrate that despite significant improvements in resolution, high-sensitivity FCM remains limited in detecting small-size MP expressing low antigen levels. This study highlights factors to consider when selecting endothelial MP probes, as well as interpreting and representing data. PMID:26553743

  2. Attentional Capacity Limits Gap Detection during Concurrent Sound Segregation.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ada W S; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Alain, Claude

    2015-11-01

    Detecting a brief silent interval (i.e., a gap) is more difficult when listeners perceive two concurrent sounds rather than one in a sound containing a mistuned harmonic in otherwise in-tune harmonics. This impairment in gap detection may reflect the interaction of low-level encoding or the division of attention between two sound objects, both of which could interfere with signal detection. To distinguish between these two alternatives, we compared ERPs during active and passive listening with complex harmonic tones that could include a gap, a mistuned harmonic, both features, or neither. During active listening, participants indicated whether they heard a gap irrespective of mistuning. During passive listening, participants watched a subtitled muted movie of their choice while the same sounds were presented. Gap detection was impaired when the complex sounds included a mistuned harmonic that popped out as a separate object. The ERP analysis revealed an early gap-related activity that was little affected by mistuning during the active or passive listening condition. However, during active listening, there was a marked decrease in the late positive wave that was thought to index attention and response-related processes. These results suggest that the limitation in detecting the gap is related to attentional processing, possibly divided attention induced by the concurrent sound objects, rather than deficits in preattentional sensory encoding.

  3. Detection limits for nanoparticles in solution with classical turbidity spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Blevennec, G.

    2013-09-01

    Detection of nanoparticles in solution is required to manage safety and environmental problems. Spectral transmission turbidity method has now been known for a long time. It is derived from the Mie Theory and can be applied to any number of spheres, randomly distributed and separated by large distance compared to wavelength. Here, we describe a method for determination of size, distribution and concentration of nanoparticles in solution using UV-Vis transmission measurements. The method combines Mie and Beer Lambert computation integrated in a best fit approximation. In a first step, a validation of the approach is completed on silver nanoparticles solution. Verification of results is realized with Transmission Electronic Microscopy measurements for size distribution and an Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry for concentration. In view of the good agreement obtained, a second step of work focuses on how to manage the concentration to be the most accurate on the size distribution. Those efficient conditions are determined by simple computation. As we are dealing with nanoparticles, one of the key points is to know what the size limits reachable are with that kind of approach based on classical electromagnetism. In taking into account the transmission spectrometer accuracy limit we determine for several types of materials, metals, dielectrics, semiconductors the particle size limit detectable by such a turbidity method. These surprising results are situated at the quantum physics frontier.

  4. Detection limit for rate fluctuations in inhomogeneous Poisson processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintani, Toshiaki; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    Estimations of an underlying rate from data points are inevitably disturbed by the irregular occurrence of events. Proper estimation methods are designed to avoid overfitting by discounting the irregular occurrence of data, and to determine a constant rate from irregular data derived from a constant probability distribution. However, it can occur that rapid or small fluctuations in the underlying density are undetectable when the data are sparse. For an estimation method, the maximum degree of undetectable rate fluctuations is uniquely determined as a phase transition, when considering an infinitely long series of events drawn from a fluctuating density. In this study, we analytically examine an optimized histogram and a Bayesian rate estimator with respect to their detectability of rate fluctuation, and determine whether their detectable-undetectable phase transition points are given by an identical formula defining a degree of fluctuation in an underlying rate. In addition, we numerically examine the variational Bayes hidden Markov model in its detectability of rate fluctuation, and determine whether the numerically obtained transition point is comparable to those of the other two methods. Such consistency among these three principled methods suggests the presence of a theoretical limit for detecting rate fluctuations.

  5. Detection limit for rate fluctuations in inhomogeneous Poisson processes.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Toshiaki; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    Estimations of an underlying rate from data points are inevitably disturbed by the irregular occurrence of events. Proper estimation methods are designed to avoid overfitting by discounting the irregular occurrence of data, and to determine a constant rate from irregular data derived from a constant probability distribution. However, it can occur that rapid or small fluctuations in the underlying density are undetectable when the data are sparse. For an estimation method, the maximum degree of undetectable rate fluctuations is uniquely determined as a phase transition, when considering an infinitely long series of events drawn from a fluctuating density. In this study, we analytically examine an optimized histogram and a Bayesian rate estimator with respect to their detectability of rate fluctuation, and determine whether their detectable-undetectable phase transition points are given by an identical formula defining a degree of fluctuation in an underlying rate. In addition, we numerically examine the variational Bayes hidden Markov model in its detectability of rate fluctuation, and determine whether the numerically obtained transition point is comparable to those of the other two methods. Such consistency among these three principled methods suggests the presence of a theoretical limit for detecting rate fluctuations.

  6. Failure Detecting Method of Fault Current Limiter System with Rectifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuda, Noriaki; Matsubara, Yoshio; Asano, Masakuni; Ohkuma, Takeshi; Sato, Yoshibumi; Takahashi, Yoshihisa

    A fault current limiter (FCL) is extensively needed to suppress fault current, particularly required for trunk power systems connecting high-voltage transmission lines, such as 500kV class power system which constitutes the nucleus of the electric power system. We proposed a new type FCL system (rectifier type FCL), consisting of solid-state diodes, DC reactor and bypass AC reactor, and demonstrated the excellent performances of this FCL by developing the small 6.6kV and 66kV model. It is important to detect the failure of power devices used in the rectifier under the normal operating condition, for keeping the excellent reliability of the power system. In this paper, we have proposed a new failure detecting method of power devices most suitable for the rectifier type FCL. This failure detecting system is simple and compact. We have adapted the proposed system to the 66kV prototype single-phase model and successfully demonstrated to detect the failure of power devices.

  7. Combining markers with and without the limit of detection

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ting; Liu, Catherine Chunling; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Tang, Liansheng Larry

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the combination of markers with and without the limit of detection (LOD). LOD is often encountered when measuring proteomic markers. Because of the limited detecting ability of an equipment or instrument, it is difficult to measure markers at a relatively low level. Suppose that after some monotonic transformation, the marker values approximately follow multivariate normal distributions. We propose to estimate distribution parameters while taking the LOD into account, and then combine markers using the results from the linear discriminant analysis. Our simulation results show that the ROC curve parameter estimates generated from the proposed method are much closer to the truth than simply using the linear discriminant analysis to combine markers without considering the LOD. In addition, we propose a procedure to select and combine a subset of markers when many candidate markers are available. The procedure based on the correlation among markers is different from a common understanding that a subset of the most accurate markers should be selected for the combination. The simulation studies show that the accuracy of a combined marker can be largely impacted by the correlation of marker measurements. Our methods are applied to a protein pathway dataset to combine proteomic biomarkers to distinguish cancer patients from non-cancer patients. PMID:24132938

  8. Two-dimensional fluorescence-detected coherent spectroscopy with absolute phasing by confocal imaging of a dynamic grating and 27-step phase-cycling

    SciTech Connect

    De, Arijit K., E-mail: akde@lbl.gov; Fleming, Graham R., E-mail: grfleming@lbl.gov; Department of Chemistry, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94702

    2014-05-21

    We present a novel experimental scheme for two-dimensional fluorescence-detected coherent spectroscopy (2D-FDCS) using a non-collinear beam geometry with the aid of “confocal imaging” of dynamic (population) grating and 27-step phase-cycling to extract the signal. This arrangement obviates the need for distinct experimental designs for previously developed transmission detected non-collinear two-dimensional coherent spectroscopy (2D-CS) and collinear 2D-FDCS. We also describe a novel method for absolute phasing of the 2D spectrum. We apply this method to record 2D spectra of a fluorescent dye in solution at room temperature and observe “spectral diffusion.”.

  9. Detection limit of a VCO based detection chain dedicated to particles recognition and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulié, K.; Rahajandraibe, W.; Aziza, H.; Micolau, G.; Vauché, R.

    2018-01-01

    A particle detection chain based on CMOS-SOI VCO circuit is presented. The solution is used for the recognition and the tracking of a given particle at circuit level. TCAD simulation of the detector has been performed on a 3×3 matrix of diodes based detector for particles recognition and tracking. The current response of the detector has been used for a case study in order to determine the ability of the chain to recognize an alpha particle crossing a 3×3 detection cell. The detection limit of the proposed solution is investigated and discussed in this paper.

  10. Assessment of target detection limits in hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, W.; Boehler, J.; Schilling, H.; Middelmann, W.; Weyermann, J.; Wellig, P.; Oechslin, R.; Kneubuehler, M.

    2015-10-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing data can be used for civil and military applications to detect and classify target objects that cannot be reliably separated using broadband sensors. The comparably low spatial resolution is compensated by the fact that small targets, even below image resolution, can still be classified. The goal of this paper is to determine the target size to spatial resolution ratio for successful classification of different target and background materials. Airborne hyperspectral data is used to simulate data with known mixture ratios and to estimate the detection threshold for given false alarm rates. The data was collected in July 2014 over Greding, Germany, using airborne aisaEAGLE and aisaHAWK hyperspectral sensors. On the ground, various target materials were placed on natural background. The targets were four quadratic molton patches with an edge length of 7 meters in the colors black, white, grey and green. Also, two different types of polyethylene (camouflage nets) with an edge length of approximately 5.5 meters were deployed. Synthetic data is generated from the original data using spectral mixtures. Target signatures are linearly combined with different background materials in specific ratios. The simulated mixtures are appended to the original data and the target areas are removed for evaluation. Commonly used classification algorithms, e.g. Matched Filtering, Adaptive Cosine Estimator are used to determine the detection limit. Fixed false alarm rates are employed to find and analyze certain regions where false alarms usually occur first. A combination of 18 targets and 12 backgrounds is analyzed for three VNIR and two SWIR data sets of the same area.

  11. Of Detection Limits and Effective Mitigation: The Use of Infrared Cameras for Methane Leak Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, A. P.; Wang, J.; McGuire, M.; Bell, C.; Brandt, A. R.

    2017-12-01

    Mitigating methane emissions, a short-lived and potent greenhouse gas, is critical to limiting global temperature rise to two degree Celsius as outlined in the Paris Agreement. A major source of anthropogenic methane emissions in the United States is the oil and gas sector. To this effect, state and federal governments have recommended the use of optical gas imaging systems in periodic leak detection and repair (LDAR) surveys to detect for fugitive emissions or leaks. The most commonly used optical gas imaging systems (OGI) are infrared cameras. In this work, we systematically evaluate the limits of infrared (IR) camera based OGI system for use in methane leak detection programs. We analyze the effect of various parameters that influence the minimum detectable leak rates of infrared cameras. Blind leak detection tests were carried out at the Department of Energy's MONITOR natural gas test-facility in Fort Collins, CO. Leak sources included natural gas wellheads, separators, and tanks. With an EPA mandated 60 g/hr leak detection threshold for IR cameras, we test leak rates ranging from 4 g/hr to over 350 g/hr at imaging distances between 5 ft and 70 ft from the leak source. We perform these experiments over the course of a week, encompassing a wide range of wind and weather conditions. Using repeated measurements at a given leak rate and imaging distance, we generate detection probability curves as a function of leak-size for various imaging distances, and measurement conditions. In addition, we estimate the median detection threshold - leak-size at which the probability of detection is 50% - under various scenarios to reduce uncertainty in mitigation effectiveness. Preliminary analysis shows that the median detection threshold varies from 3 g/hr at an imaging distance of 5 ft to over 150 g/hr at 50 ft (ambient temperature: 80 F, winds < 4 m/s). Results from this study can be directly used to improve OGI based LDAR protocols and reduce uncertainty in estimated

  12. Limits of linearity and detection for some drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Needleman, S B; Romberg, R W

    1990-01-01

    The limits of linearity (LOL) and detection (LOD) are important factors in establishing the reliability of an analytical procedure for accurately assaying drug concentrations in urine specimens. Multiple analyses of analyte over an extended range of concentrations provide a measure of the ability of the analytical procedure to correctly identify known quantities of drug in a biofluid matrix. Each of the seven drugs of abuse gives linear analytical responses from concentrations at or near their LOD to concentrations several-fold higher than those generally encountered in the drug screening laboratory. The upper LOL exceeds the Department of Navy (DON) cutoff values by factors of approximately 2 to 160. The LOD varies from 0.4 to 5.0% of the DON cutoff value for each drug. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) is calculated as the LOD + 7 SD. The range for LOL is greater for drugs analyzed with deuterated internal standards compared with those using conventional internal standards. For THC acid, cocaine, PCP, and morphine, LOLs are 8 to 160-fold greater than the defined cutoff concentrations. For the other drugs, the LOL's are only 2 to 4-fold greater than the defined cutoff concentrations.

  13. High-fidelity target sequencing of individual molecules identified using barcode sequences: de novo detection and absolute quantitation of mutations in plasma cell-free DNA from cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kukita, Yoji; Matoba, Ryo; Uchida, Junji; Hamakawa, Takuya; Doki, Yuichiro; Imamura, Fumio; Kato, Kikuya

    2015-08-01

    Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) is an emerging field of cancer research. However, current ctDNA analysis is usually restricted to one or a few mutation sites due to technical limitations. In the case of massively parallel DNA sequencers, the number of false positives caused by a high read error rate is a major problem. In addition, the final sequence reads do not represent the original DNA population due to the global amplification step during the template preparation. We established a high-fidelity target sequencing system of individual molecules identified in plasma cell-free DNA using barcode sequences; this system consists of the following two steps. (i) A novel target sequencing method that adds barcode sequences by adaptor ligation. This method uses linear amplification to eliminate the errors introduced during the early cycles of polymerase chain reaction. (ii) The monitoring and removal of erroneous barcode tags. This process involves the identification of individual molecules that have been sequenced and for which the number of mutations have been absolute quantitated. Using plasma cell-free DNA from patients with gastric or lung cancer, we demonstrated that the system achieved near complete elimination of false positives and enabled de novo detection and absolute quantitation of mutations in plasma cell-free DNA. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  14. Estimation of the limit of detection using information theory measures.

    PubMed

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Vergara, Alexander; Huerta, Ramón; Marco, Santiago

    2014-01-31

    Definitions of the limit of detection (LOD) based on the probability of false positive and/or false negative errors have been proposed over the past years. Although such definitions are straightforward and valid for any kind of analytical system, proposed methodologies to estimate the LOD are usually simplified to signals with Gaussian noise. Additionally, there is a general misconception that two systems with the same LOD provide the same amount of information on the source regardless of the prior probability of presenting a blank/analyte sample. Based upon an analogy between an analytical system and a binary communication channel, in this paper we show that the amount of information that can be extracted from an analytical system depends on the probability of presenting the two different possible states. We propose a new definition of LOD utilizing information theory tools that deals with noise of any kind and allows the introduction of prior knowledge easily. Unlike most traditional LOD estimation approaches, the proposed definition is based on the amount of information that the chemical instrumentation system provides on the chemical information source. Our findings indicate that the benchmark of analytical systems based on the ability to provide information about the presence/absence of the analyte (our proposed approach) is a more general and proper framework, while converging to the usual values when dealing with Gaussian noise. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Targeted Analyte Detection by Standard Addition Improves Detection Limits in MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Eshghi, Shadi Toghi; Li, Xingde; Zhang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization has proven an effective tool for fast and accurate determination of many molecules. However, the detector sensitivity and chemical noise compromise the detection of many invaluable low-abundance molecules from biological and clinical samples. To challenge this limitation, we developed a targeted analyte detection (TAD) technique. In TAD, the target analyte is selectively elevated by spiking a known amount of that analyte into the sample, thereby raising its concentration above the noise level, where we take advantage of the improved sensitivity to detect the presence of the endogenous analyte in the sample. We assessed TAD on three peptides in simple and complex background solutions with various exogenous analyte concentrations in two MALDI matrices. TAD successfully improved the limit of detection (LOD) of target analytes when the target peptides were added to the sample in a concentration close to optimum concentration. The optimum exogenous concentration was estimated through a quantitative method to be approximately equal to the original LOD for each target. Also, we showed that TAD could achieve LOD improvements on an average of 3-fold in a simple and 2-fold in a complex sample. TAD provides a straightforward assay to improve the LOD of generic target analytes without the need for costly hardware modifications. PMID:22877355

  16. Satellite based Global Flood Detection System - strengths and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Salamon, Peter; Thielen, Jutta; De Groeve, Tom; Zajac, Zuzanna

    2014-05-01

    One of the main problems for global hydrological models is that for many regions only very limited or no observational data for a model assessment is available. This problem could be overcome with filling the gaps using information derived from satellite observations. Thus, an evaluation of the remote sensing signal of the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS) against observed discharge data was performed in order to test the use of this data in sparsely gauged river basins. The study was carried out at 398 locations near the main rivers and in Africa, Asia, Europe, North America and South America. After evaluating different methodologies for extracting the satellite signal, a temporal (4 days) and spatial (4 GFDS pixels) average was chosen to proceed with the analysis. For the 340 stations with a concurrent time series longer than seven years for both, the signal and the in situ observed discharge (obtained mainly from the Global Runoff Data Centre), a calibration based on monthly linear models was carried out. The validation was executed and several skill scores were calculated such as the R2, Nash-Sutcliffe (NSE), and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). It is important to highlight that, for this study, 230 stations globally had Nash-Sutcliffe efficient score higher than zero, indicating that for specific conditions the satellite signal as used in GFDS can fill the gaps where observations are not available. For example, several locations in African catchments have good performance as in the Niger, Volta and Zambezi for which Nash-Sutcliffe is greater than 0.75. It is known that a number of factors affect total upwelling microwave brightness from a mixed water and land surface measured by a single image pixel. Aiming to better understand how some features of the sites could affect the satellite signal and the correlation with in situ observations, apart from the dependency on the river geometry, a multivariate analysis was carried out between the skill scores (NSE and

  17. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  18. Limited irrigation research and infrared thermometry for detecting water stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The USDA-ARS Limited Irrigation Research Farm, located outside of Greeley Colorado, is an experiment evaluating management perspectives of limited irrigation water. An overview of the farm systems is shown, including drip irrigation systems, water budgeting, and experimental design, as well as preli...

  19. LIMITATIONS ON THE USES OF MULTIMEDIA EXPOSURE MEASUREMENTS FOR MULTIPATHWAY EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT - PART I: HANDLING OBSERVATIONS BELOW DETECTION LIMITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multimedia data from two probability-based exposure studies were investigated in terms of how censoring of non-detects affected estimation of population parameters and associations. Appropriate methods for handling censored below-detection-limit (BDL) values in this context were...

  20. Detection limits of intraoperative near infrared imaging for tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Greg M; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Weissleder, Ralph

    2010-12-01

    The application of fluorescent molecular imaging to surgical oncology is a developing field with the potential to reduce morbidity and mortality. However, the detection thresholds and other requirements for successful intervention remain poorly understood. Here we modeled and experimentally validated depth and size of detection of tumor deposits, trade-offs in coverage and resolution of areas of interest, and required pharmacokinetics of probes based on differing levels of tumor target presentation. Three orthotopic tumor models were imaged by widefield epifluorescence and confocal microscopes, and the experimental results were compared with pharmacokinetic models and light scattering simulations to determine detection thresholds. Widefield epifluorescence imaging can provide sufficient contrast to visualize tumor margins and detect tumor deposits 3-5  mm deep based on labeled monoclonal antibodies at low objective magnification. At higher magnification, surface tumor deposits at cellular resolution are detectable at TBR ratios achieved with highly expressed antigens. A widefield illumination system with the capability for macroscopic surveying and microscopic imaging provides the greatest utility for varying surgical goals. These results have implications for system and agent designs, which ultimately should aid complete resection in most surgical beds and provide real-time feedback to obtain clean margins. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Determination of a Limited Scope Network's Lightning Detection Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rompala, John T.; Blakeslee, R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper outlines a modeling technique to map lightning detection efficiency variations over a region surveyed by a sparse array of ground based detectors. A reliable flash peak current distribution (PCD) for the region serves as the technique's base. This distribution is recast as an event probability distribution function. The technique then uses the PCD together with information regarding: site signal detection thresholds, type of solution algorithm used, and range attenuation; to formulate the probability that a flash at a specified location will yield a solution. Applying this technique to the full region produces detection efficiency contour maps specific to the parameters employed. These contours facilitate a comparative analysis of each parameter's effect on the network's detection efficiency. In an alternate application, this modeling technique gives an estimate of the number, strength, and distribution of events going undetected. This approach leads to a variety of event density contour maps. This application is also illustrated. The technique's base PCD can be empirical or analytical. A process for formulating an empirical PCD specific to the region and network being studied is presented. A new method for producing an analytical representation of the empirical PCD is also introduced.

  2. The absolute threshold of cone vision

    PubMed Central

    Koeing, Darran; Hofer, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of the absolute threshold of cone vision, which has been previously underestimated due to sub-optimal conditions or overly strict subjective response criteria. We avoided these limitations by using optimized stimuli and experimental conditions while having subjects respond within a rating scale framework. Small (1′ fwhm), brief (34 msec), monochromatic (550 nm) stimuli were foveally presented at multiple intensities in dark-adapted retina for 5 subjects. For comparison, 4 subjects underwent similar testing with rod-optimized stimuli. Cone absolute threshold, that is, the minimum light energy for which subjects were just able to detect a visual stimulus with any response criterion, was 203 ± 38 photons at the cornea, ∼0.47 log units lower than previously reported. Two-alternative forced-choice measurements in a subset of subjects yielded consistent results. Cone thresholds were less responsive to criterion changes than rod thresholds, suggesting a limit to the stimulus information recoverable from the cone mosaic in addition to the limit imposed by Poisson noise. Results were consistent with expectations for detection in the face of stimulus uncertainty. We discuss implications of these findings for modeling the first stages of human cone vision and interpreting psychophysical data acquired with adaptive optics at the spatial scale of the receptor mosaic. PMID:21270115

  3. Reflectance measurements for the detection and mapping of soil limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, L. A.; Frazee, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    During 1971 and 1972 research was conducted on two fallow fields in the proposed Oahe Irrigation Project to investigate the relationship between the tonal variations observed on aerial photographs and the principal soil limitations of the area. A grid sampling procedure was used to collected detailed field data during the 1972 growing season. The field data was compared to imagery collected on May 14, 1971 at 3050 meters altitude. The imagery and field data were initially evaluated by a visual analysis. Correlation and regression analysis revealed a highly significant correlation and regression analysis revealed a highly significant correlation between the digitized color infrared film data and soil properties such as organic matter content, color, depth to carbonates, bulk density and reflectivity. Computer classification of the multiemulsion film data resulted in maps delineating the areas containing claypan and erosion limitations. Reflectance data from the red spectral band provided the best results.

  4. Finding Kuiper Belt Objects Below the Detection Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whidden, Peter; Kalmbach, Bryce; Bektesevic, Dino; Connolly, Andrew; Jones, Lynne; Smotherman, Hayden; Becker, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach for uncovering the signatures of moving objects (e.g. Kuiper Belt Objects) below the detection thresholds of single astronomical images. To do so, we will employ a matched filter moving at specific rates of proposed orbits through a time-domain dataset. This is analogous to the better-known "shift-and-stack" method; however it uses neither direct shifting nor stacking of the image pixels. Instead of resampling the raw pixels to create an image stack, we will instead integrate the object detection probabilities across multiple single-epoch images to accrue support for a proposed orbit. The filtering kernel provides a measure of the probability that an object is present along a given orbit, and enables the user to make principled decisions about when the search has been successful, and when it may be terminated. The results we present here utilize GPUs to speed up the search by two orders of magnitudes over CPU implementations.

  5. Singlet oxygen detection in biological systems: Uses and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Eugene; Fluhr, Robert

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The study of singlet oxygen in biological systems is challenging in many ways. Singlet oxygen is a relatively unstable ephemeral molecule, and its properties make it highly reactive with many biomolecules, making it difficult to quantify accurately. Several methods have been developed to study this elusive molecule, but most studies thus far have focused on those conditions that produce relatively large amounts of singlet oxygen. However, the need for more sensitive methods is required as one begins to explore the levels of singlet oxygen required in signaling and regulatory processes. Here we discuss the various methods used in the study of singlet oxygen, and outline their uses and limitations. PMID:27231787

  6. Singlet oxygen detection in biological systems: Uses and limitations.

    PubMed

    Koh, Eugene; Fluhr, Robert

    2016-07-02

    The study of singlet oxygen in biological systems is challenging in many ways. Singlet oxygen is a relatively unstable ephemeral molecule, and its properties make it highly reactive with many biomolecules, making it difficult to quantify accurately. Several methods have been developed to study this elusive molecule, but most studies thus far have focused on those conditions that produce relatively large amounts of singlet oxygen. However, the need for more sensitive methods is required as one begins to explore the levels of singlet oxygen required in signaling and regulatory processes. Here we discuss the various methods used in the study of singlet oxygen, and outline their uses and limitations.

  7. Above detection limits - Prebiotic organics in comets and carbonaceous meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, J. C.; Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Martin, M. G.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    The delivery of organic compounds such as amino acids and nucleobases by comets, asteroids, and their fragments may have contributed feedstock for prebiotic chemistry leading to the first self-replicating systems of the early Earth. In order to determine the isotopic composition, distribution, and abundance of prebiotic organic compounds in extraterrestrial samples we have recently optimized a highly sensitive liquid chromatography tandem quadupole mass spectrometer (LC-QqQ-MS) and a gas chromatography mass spectrometer coupled with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-MS/IRMS). This suite of instruments not only allows us to identify and quantify extremely trace amounts of organics of astrobiological interest, but also to confirm their extraterrestrial origins by stable isotopic measurements. The amino acid glycine was detected upon preliminary examinations of foils from NASA’s Stardust mission, which returned cometary material from comet 81P/Wild 2. To rule out the possibility of terrestrial contamination as the source of the glycine, the carbon isotopic ratio was measured. The δ13C value for glycine was determined to be +29 ± 6‰, well outside the terrestrial range for organic carbon of +6 ‰ to -40 ‰. The Stardust glycine δ13C value falls in the range previously reported for glycine (+22‰ to +41‰) in the carbonaceous meteorites Murchison and Orgueil. This represents the first detection of glycine or any other amino acid in a comet. Recent investigations of carbonaceous meteorite organic matter have revealed the presence of several nucleobases in the Murchison meteorite and several Antarctic CR meteorites never before analyzed for nucleobases using LC-QqQ-MS. This analytical tool is a sensitive and highly selective method for measuring the trace amounts of these organics in meteorites. In particular, the unusual Antarctic C2 meteorite, LON 94102, shows high abundances of guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine with concentrations ranging from 70 to

  8. METHODS OF DEALING WITH VALUES BELOW THE LIMIT OF DETECTION USING SAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to limitations of chemical analysis procedures, small concentrations cannot be precisely measured. These concentrations are said to be below the limit of detection (LOD). In statistical analyses, these values are often censored and substituted with a constant value, such ...

  9. Quantum-limited Terahertz detection without liquid cryogens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Under this contract, we have successfully designed, fabricated and tested a revolutionary new type of detector for Terahertz (THz) radiation, the tunable antenna-coupled intersubband Terahertz (TACIT) detector. The lowest-noise THz detectors used in the astrophysics community require cooling to temperatures below 4K. This deep cryogenic requirement forces satellites launched for THz- observing missions to include either large volumes of liquid Helium, complex cryocoolers, or both. Cryogenic requirements thus add significantly to the cost, complexity and mass of satellites and limit the duration of their missions. It hence desirable to develop new detector technologies with less stringent cryogenic requirements. Such detectors will not only be important in space-based astrophysics, but also respond to a growing demand for THz technology for earth-based scientific and commercial applications.

  10. Currie detection limits in gamma-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    De Geer, Lars-Erik

    2004-01-01

    Currie Hypothesis testing is applied to gamma-ray spectral data, where an optimum part of the peak is used and the background is considered well known from nearby channels. With this, the risk of making Type I errors is about 100 times lower than commonly assumed. A programme, PeakMaker, produces random peaks with given characteristics on the screen and calculations are done to facilitate a full use of Poisson statistics in spectrum analyses. SHORT TECHNICAL NOTE SUMMARY: The Currie decision limit concept applied to spectral data is reinterpreted, which gives better consistency between the selected error risk and the observed error rates. A PeakMaker program is described and the few count problem is analyzed.

  11. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  12. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  13. Man vs. Machine: A Junior-level Laboratory Exercise Comparing Human and Instrumental Detection Limits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elias, Ryan J.; Hopfer, Helene; Hofstaedter, Amanda N.; Hayes, John E.

    2017-01-01

    The human nose is a very sensitive detector and is able to detect potent aroma compounds down to low ng/L levels. These levels are often below detection limits of analytical instrumentation. The following laboratory exercise is designed to compare instrumental and human methods for the detection of volatile odor active compounds. Reference…

  14. Search times and probability of detection in time-limited search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David; Devitt, Nicole; Maurer, Tana

    2005-05-01

    When modeling the search and target acquisition process, probability of detection as a function of time is important to war games and physical entity simulations. Recent US Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronics Sensor Directorate modeling of search and detection has focused on time-limited search. Developing the relationship between detection probability and time of search as a differential equation is explored. One of the parameters in the current formula for probability of detection in time-limited search corresponds to the mean time to detect in time-unlimited search. However, the mean time to detect in time-limited search is shorter than the mean time to detect in time-unlimited search and the relationship between them is a mathematical relationship between these two mean times. This simple relationship is derived.

  15. Detectability limit and uncertainty considerations for laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daily, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of flames is discussed, and derived uncertainty relations are used to calculate detectability limits due to statistical errors. Interferences due to Rayleigh scattering from molecules as well as Mie scattering and incandescence from particles have been examined for their effect on detectability limits. Fluorescence trapping is studied, and some methods for reducing the effect are considered. Fluorescence trapping places an upper limit on the number density of the fluorescing species that can be measured without signal loss.

  16. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  17. Development of a fully automated on-line solid phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection method for the pharmacokinetic evaluation of bavachinin: a study on absolute bioavailability and dose proportionality.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Liu, Kang-Ning; Wen, Ya-Bin; Zhang, Han-Wen; Lu, Ya-Xin; Yin, Zheng

    2012-04-15

    A fully automated on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode array detection (DAD) method was developed for determination of bavachinin in mouse plasma. Analytical process was performed on two reversed-phase columns (SPE cartridge and analytical column) connected via a Valco 6-port switching valve. Plasma samples (10 μL) were injected directly onto a C18 SPE cartridge (MF Ph-1 C18, 10 mm × 4 mm, 5 μm) and the biological matrix was washed out for 2 min with the loading solvent (5 mM NaH(2)PO(4) buffer, pH 3.5) at a flow rate of 1 mL/min. By rotation of the switching valve, bavachinin was eluted from the SPE cartridge in the back-flush mode and transferred to the analytical column (Venusil MP C18, 4.6 mm × 150 mm, 5 μm) by the chromatographic mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile-5mM NaH(2)PO(4) buffer 65/35 (v/v, pH 3.5) at a flow rate of 1 mL/min. The complete cycle of the on-line SPE purification and chromatographic separation of the analyte was 13 min with UV detection performed at 236 nm. Calibration curve with good linearity (r=0.9997) was obtained in the range of 20-4000 ng/mL in mouse plasma. The intra-day and inter-day precisions (RSD) of bavachinin were in the range of 0.20-2.32% and the accuracies were between 98.47% and 102.95%. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of the assay was 20 ng/mL. In conclusion, the established automated on-line SPE-HPLC-DAD method demonstrated good performance in terms of linearity, specificity, detection and quantification limits, precision and accuracy, and was successfully utilized to quantify bavachinin in mouse plasma to support the pharmacokinetic (PK) studies. The PK properties of bavachinin were characterized as rapid oral absorption, high clearance, and poor absolute bioavailability. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. On the Determination of Uncertainty and Limit of Detection in Label-Free Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Lavín, Álvaro; Vicente, Jesús de; Holgado, Miguel; Laguna, María F; Casquel, Rafael; Santamaría, Beatriz; Maigler, María Victoria; Hernández, Ana L; Ramírez, Yolanda

    2018-06-26

    A significant amount of noteworthy articles reviewing different label-free biosensors are being published in the last years. Most of the times, the comparison among the different biosensors is limited by the procedure used of calculating the limit of detection and the measurement uncertainty. This article clarifies and establishes a simple procedure to determine the calibration function and the uncertainty of the concentration measured at any point of the measuring interval of a generic label-free biosensor. The value of the limit of detection arises naturally from this model as the limit at which uncertainty tends when the concentration tends to zero. The need to provide additional information, such as the measurement interval and its linearity, among others, on the analytical systems and biosensor in addition to the detection limit is pointed out. Finally, the model is applied to curves that are typically obtained in immunoassays and a discussion is made on the application validity of the model and its limitations.

  19. Epidemiologic Evaluation of Measurement Data in the Presence of Detection Limits

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Jay H.; Colt, Joanne S.; Camann, David; Davis, Scott; Cerhan, James R.; Severson, Richard K.; Bernstein, Leslie; Hartge, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of environmental factors greatly improve the quality of epidemiologic studies but can pose challenges because of the presence of upper or lower detection limits or interfering compounds, which do not allow for precise measured values. We consider the regression of an environmental measurement (dependent variable) on several covariates (independent variables). Various strategies are commonly employed to impute values for interval-measured data, including assignment of one-half the detection limit to nondetected values or of “fill-in” values randomly selected from an appropriate distribution. On the basis of a limited simulation study, we found that the former approach can be biased unless the percentage of measurements below detection limits is small (5–10%). The fill-in approach generally produces unbiased parameter estimates but may produce biased variance estimates and thereby distort inference when 30% or more of the data are below detection limits. Truncated data methods (e.g., Tobit regression) and multiple imputation offer two unbiased approaches for analyzing measurement data with detection limits. If interest resides solely on regression parameters, then Tobit regression can be used. If individualized values for measurements below detection limits are needed for additional analysis, such as relative risk regression or graphical display, then multiple imputation produces unbiased estimates and nominal confidence intervals unless the proportion of missing data is extreme. We illustrate various approaches using measurements of pesticide residues in carpet dust in control subjects from a case–control study of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:15579415

  20. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Shot noise limited detection of OH using the technique of laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakalyar, D. M.; Davis, L. I., Jr.; Guo, C.; James, J. V.; Kakos, S.; Morris, P. T.; Wang, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Nearly shot-noise limited detection of OH using the technique of laser-induced fluorescence is reported. A LIDAR configuration is used to excite fluorescence in a large volume and a narrow-bandwidth interference filter provides spectral discrimination. This arrangement alleviates the effect of ozone interference and facilitates image processing at relatively close distances. The detection limit is determined mainly by the shot-noise of the solar background. Ground-based measurements in Dearborn indicate a detection limit of better than 1 x 10 to the 6th power OH/cubic cm over a forty-minute acquisition period. Under favorable conditions, a comparable detection limit was also observed for airborne measurements.

  2. Shot noise limited detection of OH using the technique of laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakalyar, D. M.; Davis, L. I., Jr.; Guo, C.; James, J. V.; Wang, C. C.; Kakos, S.; Morris, P. T.

    1984-01-01

    Nearly shot-noise limited detection of OH using the technique of laser-induced fluorescence is reported. A LIDAR configuration is used to excite fluoresence in a large volume and a narrow-bandwidth interference filter provides spectral discrimination. This arrangement alleviates the effect of ozone interference and facilitates image processing at relatively close distances. The detection limit is determined mainly by the short-noise of the solar background. Ground-based measurements in Dearborn indicate a detection limit of better than 1 x 10 to the 6th power OH/cubic cm over a forty-minute acquisition period. Under favorable conditions, a comparable detection limit was also observed for airborne measurements.

  3. Censoring: a new approach for detection limits in total-reflection X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajek, M.; Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Braziewicz, J.

    2004-08-01

    It is shown that the detection limits in the total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF), which restrict quantification of very low concentrations of trace elements in the samples, can be accounted for using the statistical concept of censoring. We demonstrate that the incomplete TXRF measurements containing the so-called "nondetects", i.e. the non-measured concentrations falling below the detection limits and represented by the estimated detection limit values, can be viewed as the left random-censored data, which can be further analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier (KM) method correcting for nondetects. Within this approach, which uses the Kaplan-Meier product-limit estimator to obtain the cumulative distribution function corrected for the nondetects, the mean value and median of the detection limit censored concentrations can be estimated in a non-parametric way. The Monte Carlo simulations performed show that the Kaplan-Meier approach yields highly accurate estimates for the mean and median concentrations, being within a few percent with respect to the simulated, uncensored data. This means that the uncertainties of KM estimated mean value and median are limited in fact only by the number of studied samples and not by the applied correction procedure for nondetects itself. On the other hand, it is observed that, in case when the concentration of a given element is not measured in all the samples, simple approaches to estimate a mean concentration value from the data yield erroneous, systematically biased results. The discussed random-left censoring approach was applied to analyze the TXRF detection-limit-censored concentration measurements of trace elements in biomedical samples. We emphasize that the Kaplan-Meier approach allows one to estimate the mean concentrations being substantially below the mean level of detection limits. Consequently, this approach gives a new access to lower the effective detection limits for TXRF method, which is of prime interest for

  4. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  5. A fuel-limited isothermal DNA machine for the sensitive detection of cellular deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiantong; Wu, Tongbo; Xiao, Yu; Xu, Lei; Fang, Simin; Zhao, Meiping

    2016-09-29

    A fuel-limited isothermal DNA machine has been built for the sensitive fluorescence detection of cellular deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) at the fmol level, which greatly reduces the required sample cell number. Upon the input of the limiting target dNTP, the machine runs automatically at 37 °C without the need for higher temperature.

  6. METHODS OF DEALING WITH VALUES BELOW THE LIMIT OF DETECTION USING SAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to limitations of chemical analysis procedures, small values cannot be precisely measured. These values are said to be below the limit of detection (LOD). In statistical analyses, these values are often censored and substituted with a constant value, such as half the LOD,...

  7. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  8. Strategies and limitations for fluorescence detection of XAFS at high flux beamlines

    DOE PAGES

    Heald, Steve M.

    2015-02-17

    The issue of detecting the XAFS signal from dilute samples is discussed in detail with the aim of making best use of high flux beamlines that provide up to 10 13 photons -1. Various detection methods are compared, including filters with slits, solid state detectors, crystal analyzers and combinations of these. These comparisons rely on simulations that use experimentally determined parameters. It is found that inelastic scattering places a fundamental limit on detection, and that it is important to take proper account of the polarization dependence of the signals. The combination of a filter–slit system with a solid state detectormore » is a promising approach. With an optimized system good performance can be obtained even if the total count rate is limited to 10 7 Hz. Detection schemes with better energy resolution can help at the largest dilutions if their collection efficiency and count rate limits can be improved.« less

  9. Strategies and limitations for fluorescence detection of XAFS at high flux beamlines

    PubMed Central

    Heald, Steve M.

    2015-01-01

    The issue of detecting the XAFS signal from dilute samples is discussed in detail with the aim of making best use of high flux beamlines that provide up to 1013 photons s−1. Various detection methods are compared, including filters with slits, solid state detectors, crystal analyzers and combinations of these. These comparisons rely on simulations that use experimentally determined parameters. It is found that inelastic scattering places a fundamental limit on detection, and that it is important to take proper account of the polarization dependence of the signals. The combination of a filter–slit system with a solid state detector is a promising approach. With an optimized system good performance can be obtained even if the total count rate is limited to 107 Hz. Detection schemes with better energy resolution can help at the largest dilutions if their collection efficiency and count rate limits can be improved. PMID:25723945

  10. A tunable, double-wavelength heterodyne detection interferometer with frequency-locked diode-pumped Nd:YAG sources for absolute measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelmini, E.; Minoni, U.; Docchio, F.

    1995-08-01

    A double heterodyne interferometric instrument using a tunable synthetic wavelength for the absolute measurements of distance and position is presented. The optical synthetic wavelength is generated by a pair of PZT-tunable diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers operating at 1.064 μm. Based on a closed-loop scheme, a suitable electronic circuit has been developed to implement the frequency locking of the two lasers. A digital frequency comparator provides an error signal, used to control the slave laser, by comparing the laser beat frequency to a reference oscillator. Demodulation of the superheterodyne signals is obtained by a rf detector followed by low-pass filtering. Distance measurements are obtained by a digital phase meter gauging the phase difference between the demodulated signals from a measuring interferometer and from a reference interferometer. The paper presents the optical and the electronic layouts of the instrument as well as experimental results from a laboratory prototype.

  11. Limit of detection of 15{sub N} by gas-chromatography atomic emission detection: Optimization using an experimental design

    SciTech Connect

    Deruaz, D.; Bannier, A.; Pionchon, C.

    1995-08-01

    This paper deals with the optimal conditions for the detection of {sup 15}N determined using a four-factor experimental design from [2{sup 13}C,-1,3 {sup 15}N] caffeine measured with an atomic emission detector (AED) coupled to gas chromatography (GC). Owing to the capability of a photodiodes array, AED can simultaneously detect several elements using their specific emission lines within a wavelength range of 50 nm. So, the emissions of {sup 15}N and {sup 14}N are simultaneously detected at 420.17 nm and 421.46 nm respectively. Four independent experimental factors were tested (1) helium flow rate (plasma gas); (2) methane pressure (reactant gas); (3)more » oxygen pressure; (4) hydrogen pressure. It has been shown that these four gases had a significant influence on the analytical response of {sup 15}N. The linearity of the detection was determined using {sup 15}N amounts ranging from 1.52 pg to 19 ng under the optimal conditions obtained from the experimental design. The limit of detection was studied using different methods. The limits of detection of {sup 15}N was 1.9 pg/s according to the IUPAC method (International-Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry). The method proposed by Quimby and Sullivan gave a value of 2.3 pg/s and that of Oppenheimer gave a limit of 29 pg/s. For each determination, and internal standard: 1-isobutyl-3.7 dimethylxanthine was used. The results clearly demonstrate that GC AED is sensitive and selective enough to detect and measure {sup 15}N-labelled molecules after gas chromatographic separation.« less

  12. Absolute detection efficiency of a microchannel plate detector to X rays in the 1-100 KeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burginyon, Gary A.; Jacoby, Barry A.; Wobser, James K.; Ernst, Richard; Ancheta, Dione S.; Tirsell, Kenneth G.

    1993-02-01

    There is little information in the literature on the performance of working micro-channel plate (MCP) detectors at high x-ray energies. We have measured the absolute efficiency of a microchannel-plate-intensified, subnanosecond, one dimensional imaging x-ray detector developed at LLNL in the 1 to 100 keV range and at 1.25 MeV. The detector consists of a gold photocathode deposited on the front surface of the MCP (optimized for Ni K(subscript (alpha) ) x rays) to convert x rays to electrons, an MCP to amplify the electrons, and a fast In:CdS phosphor that converts the electron's kinetic energy to light. The phosphor is coated on a fiber-optic faceplate to transmit the light out of the vacuum system. Electrostatic focusing electrodes compress the electron current out of the MCP in one dimension while preserving spatial resolution in the other. The calibration geometry, dictated by a recent experiment, required grazing incidence x rays (15.6 degree(s)) onto the MCP detector in order to maximize deliverable current. The experiment also used a second detector made up of 0.071 in. thick BC422 plastic scintillator material from the Bicron Corporation. We compare the absolute efficiencies of these two detectors in units of optical W/cm(superscript 2) into 4 (pi) per x ray W/cm(superscript 2) incident. At 7.47 keV and 900 volts MCP bias, the MCP detector delivers approximately 1400 times more light than the scintillator detector.

  13. Estimating the resolution limit of the map equation in community detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Tatsuro; Rosvall, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A community detection algorithm is considered to have a resolution limit if the scale of the smallest modules that can be resolved depends on the size of the analyzed subnetwork. The resolution limit is known to prevent some community detection algorithms from accurately identifying the modular structure of a network. In fact, any global objective function for measuring the quality of a two-level assignment of nodes into modules must have some sort of resolution limit or an external resolution parameter. However, it is yet unknown how the resolution limit affects the so-called map equation, which is known to be an efficient objective function for community detection. We derive an analytical estimate and conclude that the resolution limit of the map equation is set by the total number of links between modules instead of the total number of links in the full network as for modularity. This mechanism makes the resolution limit much less restrictive for the map equation than for modularity; in practice, it is orders of magnitudes smaller. Furthermore, we argue that the effect of the resolution limit often results from shoehorning multilevel modular structures into two-level descriptions. As we show, the hierarchical map equation effectively eliminates the resolution limit for networks with nested multilevel modular structures.

  14. Calculation of the detection limit in radiation measurements with systematic uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. M.; Russ, W.; Venkataraman, R.; Young, B. M.

    2015-06-01

    The detection limit (LD) or Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) is an a priori evaluation of assay sensitivity intended to quantify the suitability of an instrument or measurement arrangement for the needs of a given application. Traditional approaches as pioneered by Currie rely on Gaussian approximations to yield simple, closed-form solutions, and neglect the effects of systematic uncertainties in the instrument calibration. These approximations are applicable over a wide range of applications, but are of limited use in low-count applications, when high confidence values are required, or when systematic uncertainties are significant. One proposed modification to the Currie formulation attempts account for systematic uncertainties within a Gaussian framework. We have previously shown that this approach results in an approximation formula that works best only for small values of the relative systematic uncertainty, for which the modification of Currie's method is the least necessary, and that it significantly overestimates the detection limit or gives infinite or otherwise non-physical results for larger systematic uncertainties where such a correction would be the most useful. We have developed an alternative approach for calculating detection limits based on realistic statistical modeling of the counting distributions which accurately represents statistical and systematic uncertainties. Instead of a closed form solution, numerical and iterative methods are used to evaluate the result. Accurate detection limits can be obtained by this method for the general case.

  15. Nonparametric rank regression for analyzing water quality concentration data with multiple detection limits.

    PubMed

    Fu, Liya; Wang, You-Gan

    2011-02-15

    Environmental data usually include measurements, such as water quality data, which fall below detection limits, because of limitations of the instruments or of certain analytical methods used. The fact that some responses are not detected needs to be properly taken into account in statistical analysis of such data. However, it is well-known that it is challenging to analyze a data set with detection limits, and we often have to rely on the traditional parametric methods or simple imputation methods. Distributional assumptions can lead to biased inference and justification of distributions is often not possible when the data are correlated and there is a large proportion of data below detection limits. The extent of bias is usually unknown. To draw valid conclusions and hence provide useful advice for environmental management authorities, it is essential to develop and apply an appropriate statistical methodology. This paper proposes rank-based procedures for analyzing non-normally distributed data collected at different sites over a period of time in the presence of multiple detection limits. To take account of temporal correlations within each site, we propose an optimal linear combination of estimating functions and apply the induced smoothing method to reduce the computational burden. Finally, we apply the proposed method to the water quality data collected at Susquehanna River Basin in United States of America, which clearly demonstrates the advantages of the rank regression models.

  16. Censoring approach to the detection limits in X-ray fluorescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajek, M.; Kubala-Kukuś, A.

    2004-10-01

    We demonstrate that the effect of detection limits in the X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), which limits the determination of very low concentrations of trace elements and results in appearance of the so-called "nondetects", can be accounted for using the statistical concept of censoring. More precisely, the results of such measurements can be viewed as the left random censored data, which can further be analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method correcting the data for the presence of nondetects. Using this approach, the results of measured, detection limit censored concentrations can be interpreted in a nonparametric manner including the correction for the nondetects, i.e. the measurements in which the concentrations were found to be below the actual detection limits. Moreover, using the Monte Carlo simulation technique we show that by using the Kaplan-Meier approach the corrected mean concentrations for a population of the samples can be estimated within a few percent uncertainties with respect of the simulated, uncensored data. This practically means that the final uncertainties of estimated mean values are limited in fact by the number of studied samples and not by the correction procedure itself. The discussed random-left censoring approach was applied to analyze the XRF detection-limit-censored concentration measurements of trace elements in biomedical samples.

  17. Prediction of the limit of detection of an optical resonant reflection biosensor.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jongcheol; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Shin, Jae-Heon; Huh, Chul; Sung, Gun Yong

    2007-07-09

    A prediction of the limit of detection of an optical resonant reflection biosensor is presented. An optical resonant reflection biosensor using a guided-mode resonance filter is one of the most promising label-free optical immunosensors due to a sharp reflectance peak and a high sensitivity to the changes of optical path length. We have simulated this type of biosensor using rigorous coupled wave theory to calculate the limit of detection of the thickness of the target protein layer. Theoretically, our biosensor has an estimated ability to detect thickness change approximately the size of typical antigen proteins. We have also investigated the effects of the absorption and divergence of the incident light on the detection ability of the biosensor.

  18. Theoretical detection limit of PIXE analysis using 20 MeV proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Keizo; Hitomi, Keitaro

    2018-02-01

    Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis is usually performed using proton beams with energies in the range 2∼3 MeV because at these energies, the detection limit is low. The detection limit of PIXE analysis depends on the X-ray production cross-section, the continuous background of the PIXE spectrum and the experimental parameters such as the beam currents and the solid angle and detector efficiency of X-ray detector. Though the continuous background increases as the projectile energy increases, the cross-section of the X-ray increases as well. Therefore, the detection limit of high energy proton PIXE is not expected to increase significantly. We calculated the cross sections of continuous X-rays produced in several bremsstrahlung processes and estimated the detection limit of a 20 MeV proton PIXE analysis by modelling the Compton tail of the γ-rays produced in the nuclear reactions, and the escape effect on the secondary electron bremsstrahlung. We found that the Compton tail does not affect the detection limit when a thin X-ray detector is used, but the secondary electron bremsstrahlung escape effect does have an impact. We also confirmed that the detection limit of the PIXE analysis, when used with 4 μm polyethylene backing film and an integrated beam current of 1 μC, is 0.4∼2.0 ppm for proton energies in the range 10∼30 MeV and elements with Z = 16-90. This result demonstrates the usefulness of several 10 MeV cyclotrons for performing PIXE analysis. Cyclotrons with these properties are currently installed in positron emission tomography (PET) centers.

  19. True detection limits in an experimental linearly heteroscedastic system.. Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtman, Edward; Abraham, Kevin T.

    2011-11-01

    Despite much different processing of the experimental fluorescence detection data presented in Part 1, essentially the same estimates were obtained for the true theoretical Currie decision levels ( YC and XC) and true Currie detection limits ( YD and XD). The obtained experimental values, for 5% probability of false positives and 5% probability of false negatives, were YC = 56.0 mV, YD = 125. mV, XC = 0.132 μg/mL and XD = 0.293 μg/mL. For 5% probability of false positives and 1% probability of false negatives, the obtained detection limits were YD = 158 . mV and XD = 0.371 μg/mL. Furthermore, by using bootstrapping methodology on the experimental data for the standards and the analytical blank, it was possible to validate previously published experimental domain expressions for the decision levels ( yC and xC) and detection limits ( yD and xD). This was demonstrated by testing the generated decision levels and detection limits for their performance in regard to false positives and false negatives. In every case, the obtained numbers of false negatives and false positives were as specified a priori.

  20. Method for improving the limit of detection in a data signal

    DOEpatents

    Synovec, Robert E.; Yueng, Edward S.

    1989-10-17

    A method for improving the limit of detection for a data set in which experimental noise is uncorrelated along a given abscissa and an analytical signal is correlated to the abscissa, the steps comprising collecting the data set, converting the data set into a data signal including an analytical portion and the experimental noise portion, designating and adjusting a baseline of the data signal to center the experimental noise numerically about a zero reference, and integrating the data signal preserving the corresponding information for each point of the data signal. The steps of the method produce an enhanced integrated data signal which improves the limit of detection of the data signal.

  1. Absolute quantification of Medicago truncatula sucrose synthase isoforms and N-metabolism enzymes in symbiotic root nodules and the detection of novel nodule phosphoproteins by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wienkoop, Stefanie; Larrainzar, Estíbaliz; Glinski, Mirko; González, Esther M.; Arrese-Igor, Cesar; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2008-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has become increasingly important for tissue specific protein quantification at the isoform level, as well as for the analysis of protein post-translational regulation mechanisms and turnover rates. Thanks to the development of high accuracy mass spectrometers, peptide sequencing without prior knowledge of the amino acid sequence—de novo sequencing—can be performed. In this work, absolute quantification of a set of key enzymes involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolism in Medicago truncatula ‘Jemalong A17’ root nodules is presented. Among them, sucrose synthase (SuSy; EC 2.4.1.13), one of the central enzymes in sucrose cleavage in root nodules, has been further characterized and the relative phosphorylation state of the three most abundant isoforms has been quantified. De novo sequencing provided sequence information of a so far unidentified peptide, most probably belonging to SuSy2, the second most abundant isoform in M. truncatula root nodules. TiO2-phosphopeptide enrichment led to the identification of not only a phosphorylation site at Ser11 in SuSy1, but also of several novel phosphorylation sites present in other root nodule proteins such as alkaline invertase (AI; EC 3.2.1.26) and an RNA-binding protein. PMID:18772307

  2. Improvements of low-detection-limit filter-free fluorescence sensor developed by charge accumulation operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kiyotsugu; Choi, Yong Joon; Moriwaki, Yu; Hizawa, Takeshi; Iwata, Tatsuya; Dasai, Fumihiro; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2017-04-01

    We developed a low-detection-limit filter-free fluorescence sensor by a charge accumulation technique. For charge accumulation, a floating diffusion amplifier (FDA), which included a floating diffusion capacitor, a transfer gate, and a source follower circuit, was used. To integrate CMOS circuits with the filter-free fluorescence sensor, we adopted a triple-well process to isolate transistors from the sensor on a single chip. We detected 0.1 nW fluorescence under the illumination of excitation light by 1.5 ms accumulation, which was one order of magnitude greater than that of a previous current detection sensor.

  3. Determination of Detection Limits and Quantitation Limits for Compounds in a Database of GC/MS by FUMI Theory

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Shinya; Hayashi, Yuzuru

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a stochastic method for estimating the detection limits (DLs) and quantitation limits (QLs) of compounds registered in a database of a GC/MS system and prove its validity with experiments. The approach described in ISO 11843 Part 7 is adopted here as an estimation means of DL and QL, and the decafluorotriphenylphosphine (DFTPP) tuning and retention time locking are carried out for adjusting the system. Coupled with the data obtained from the system adjustment experiments, the information (noise and signal of chromatograms and calibration curves) stored in the database is used for the stochastic estimation, dispensing with the repetition measurements. Of sixty-six pesticides, the DL values obtained by the ISO method were compared with those from the statistical approach and the correlation between them was observed to be excellent with the correlation coefficient of 0.865. The accuracy of the method proposed was also examined and concluded to be satisfactory as well. The samples used are commercial products of pesticides mixtures and the uncertainty from sample preparation processes is not taken into account. PMID:27162706

  4. Limitation in the detection of Listeria monocytogenes in food in the presence of competing Listeria innocua.

    PubMed

    Oravcová, K; Trncíková, T; Kuchta, T; Kaclíková, E

    2008-02-01

    Detectability of Listeria monocytogenes at 10(0) CFU per food sample in the presence of Listeria innocua using standard microbiological detection was evaluated and compared with the real-time PCR-based method. Enrichment in half-Fraser broth followed by subculture in Fraser broth according to EN ISO 11290-1 was used. False-negative detection of 10(0) CFU L. monocytogenes was obtained in the presence of 10(1) CFU L. innocua per sample using the standard detection method in contrast to more than 10(5) CFU L. innocua per sample using real-time PCR. Identification of L. monocytogenes on the chromogenic medium by the standard procedure was impossible if L. innocua was able to overgrow L. monocytogenes by more than three orders of magnitude after the enrichment in model samples. These results were confirmed using naturally contaminated food samples. Standard microbiological method was insufficient for the reliable detection of 10(0) CFU L. monocytogenes in the presence of more than 10(0) CFU of L. innocua per sample. On the other hand, if the growth of L. monocytogenes was sufficient to reach the concentration equal to the detection limit of PCR, the amount of the other microflora present in the food sample including L. innocua was not relevant for success of the PCR detection of L. monocytogenes. After the enrichment, the PCR detection is more convenient than the standard one as PCR detection is not compromised by other present microflora.

  5. Targeted analyte detection by standard addition improves detection limits in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Toghi Eshghi, Shadi; Li, Xingde; Zhang, Hui

    2012-09-18

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) has proven an effective tool for fast and accurate determination of many molecules. However, the detector sensitivity and chemical noise compromise the detection of many invaluable low-abundance molecules from biological and clinical samples. To challenge this limitation, we developed a targeted analyte detection (TAD) technique. In TAD, the target analyte is selectively elevated by spiking a known amount of that analyte into the sample, thereby raising its concentration above the noise level, where we take advantage of the improved sensitivity to detect the presence of the endogenous analyte in the sample. We assessed TAD on three peptides in simple and complex background solutions with various exogenous analyte concentrations in two MALDI matrices. TAD successfully improved the limit of detection (LOD) of target analytes when the target peptides were added to the sample in a concentration close to optimum concentration. The optimum exogenous concentration was estimated through a quantitative method to be approximately equal to the original LOD for each target. Also, we showed that TAD could achieve LOD improvements on an average of 3-fold in a simple and 2-fold in a complex sample. TAD provides a straightforward assay to improve the LOD of generic target analytes without the need for costly hardware modifications.

  6. Increasing Capacity: Practice Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Pennie; Donkin, Christopher; Brown, Scott D.; Heathcote, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In most of the long history of the study of absolute identification--since Miller's (1956) seminal article--a severe limit on performance has been observed, and this limit has resisted improvement even by extensive practice. In a startling result, Rouder, Morey, Cowan, and Pfaltz (2004) found substantially improved performance with practice in the…

  7. A global algorithm for estimating Absolute Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDougall, T. J.; Jackett, D. R.; Millero, F. J.; Pawlowicz, R.; Barker, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    The International Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater - 2010 has defined the thermodynamic properties of seawater in terms of a new salinity variable, Absolute Salinity, which takes into account the spatial variation of the composition of seawater. Absolute Salinity more accurately reflects the effects of the dissolved material in seawater on the thermodynamic properties (particularly density) than does Practical Salinity. When a seawater sample has standard composition (i.e. the ratios of the constituents of sea salt are the same as those of surface water of the North Atlantic), Practical Salinity can be used to accurately evaluate the thermodynamic properties of seawater. When seawater is not of standard composition, Practical Salinity alone is not sufficient and the Absolute Salinity Anomaly needs to be estimated; this anomaly is as large as 0.025 g kg-1 in the northernmost North Pacific. Here we provide an algorithm for estimating Absolute Salinity Anomaly for any location (x, y, p) in the world ocean. To develop this algorithm, we used the Absolute Salinity Anomaly that is found by comparing the density calculated from Practical Salinity to the density measured in the laboratory. These estimates of Absolute Salinity Anomaly however are limited to the number of available observations (namely 811). In order to provide a practical method that can be used at any location in the world ocean, we take advantage of approximate relationships between Absolute Salinity Anomaly and silicate concentrations (which are available globally).

  8. The detection limits of antimicrobial agents in cow's milk by a simple Yoghurt Culture Test.

    PubMed

    Mohsenzadeh, M; Bahrainipour, A

    2008-09-15

    The aim of this study was to study performance of Yoghurt Culture Test (YCT) in the detection of antimicrobial residues in milk. For this purpose, the sensitivity of YCT for 15 antibiotics were determined. For each drug, 8 concentrations were tested. The detection limits of YCT at 2.5 h and 4 h incubation were determined (microg kg(-1)): 15 and 37.5, penicillin G; 4 and 5, ampicillin; 5 and 7.5, amoxycillin; 100 and 200, cephalexin; 80 and 100, cefazoline; 100 and 200, oxytetracycline; 500 and 100, chlortetracycline; 100 and 200, tetracycline; 150 and 200, doxycycline; 200 and 400, sulphadimidine; 500 and 1000, gentamycin; 1000 and 1500, spectinomycin; 400 and 500, erythromycin; 50 and 100, tylosin; 5000 and 10000, chloramphenicol. The YCT detection limits at 2.5 h incubation for ampicillin, cephalexin, tetracycline, oxytetracycline and tylosin are similar to those obtained as Maximum Residue Limit (MRL) according to Regulation 2377/90 EEC as set out by the European Union. In addition the detection limits of YCT for some antibiotics were lower than some of microbial inhibitor test.

  9. ROBUST ESTIMATION OF MEAN AND VARIANCE USING ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SETS WITH BELOW DETECTION LIMIT OBSERVATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists, especially environmental scientists often encounter trace level concentrations that are typically reported as less than a certain limit of detection, L. Type 1, left-censored data arise when certain low values lying below L are ignored or unknown as they cannot be mea...

  10. Detection limits of antimicrobials in ewe milk by delvotest photometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Althaus, R L; Torres, A; Montero, A; Balasch, S; Molina, M P

    2003-02-01

    The Delvotest method detection limits per manufacturer's instructions at a fixed reading time of 3 h for 24 antimicrobial agents were determined in ewe milk by photometric measurement. For each drug, eight concentrations were tested on 20 ewe milk samples from individual ewes. Detection limits, determined by means of logistic regression models, were (microg/kg): 3, amoxycillin; 2, ampicillin; 18, cloxacillin; 1, penicillin "G"; 34, cefadroxil; 430, cephalosporin "C"; 40, cephalexin; 20, cefoperazone; 33, Ceftiofur; 18, cefuroxime; 6100, streptomycin; 1200, gentamycin; 2600, neomycin; 830, erythromycin; 100, tylosin; 180, doxycycline; 320, oxytetracycline; 590, tetracycline; 88, sulfadiazine; 44, sulfamethoxazole; 140, sulfametoxypyridazine; 48, sulfaquinoxaline; 12,000, chloramphenicol; and 290, trimethoprim. Whereas the beta-lactam antibiotics, sulphonamides, and tylosin were detected by Delvotest method at levels equal to those of maximum residue limits, its sensitivity needs to be enhanced to detect aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim residues in ewe milk or to develop an integrated residue detection system for ewe milk with different sensitive microorganisms for each group of antiinfectious agents.

  11. Detection limits of the strip test and PCR for genetically modified corn in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, V E; Von Pinho, É V R; Von Pinho, R G; do Nascimento, A D

    2012-08-16

    Brazilian legislation establishes a labeling limit for products that contain more than 1% material from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). We assessed the sensitivity of the lateral flow strip test in detection of the GMO corn varieties Bt11 and MON810 and the specificity and sensitivity of PCR techniques for their detection. For the strip test, the GMO seeds were mixed with conventional seeds at levels of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8% for Bt11, and 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6% for MON810. Three different methodologies were assessed and whole seeds, their endosperm and embryonic axis were used. For the PCR technique, the GMO seeds of each of the two varieties were mixed with conventional seeds at levels of 20, 10, 5, 2, 1, and 0.5%. The seeds were ground and the DNA extracted. For detection of the GMO material, specific primers were used for MON810 and Bt11 and maize zein as an endogenous control. The sensitivity of the strip test varied for both maize varieties and methodologies. The test was positive for Bt11 only at 0.8%, in contrast with the detection limit of 0.4% indicated by the manufacturer. In the multiplex PCR, the primers proved to be specific for the different varieties. These varieties were detected in samples with one GMO seed in 100. Thus, this technique proved to be efficient in detecting contaminations equal to or greater than 1%.

  12. Determination of target detection limits in hyperspectral data using band selection and dimensionality reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, W.; Boehler, J.; Twizer, K.; Kedem, B.; Lenz, A.; Kneubuehler, M.; Wellig, P.; Oechslin, R.; Schilling, H.; Rotman, S.; Middelmann, W.

    2016-10-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing data can be used for civil and military applications to robustly detect and classify target objects. High spectral resolution of hyperspectral data can compensate for the comparatively low spatial resolution, which allows for detection and classification of small targets, even below image resolution. Hyperspectral data sets are prone to considerable spectral redundancy, affecting and limiting data processing and algorithm performance. As a consequence, data reduction strategies become increasingly important, especially in view of near-real-time data analysis. The goal of this paper is to analyze different strategies for hyperspectral band selection algorithms and their effect on subpixel classification for different target and background materials. Airborne hyperspectral data is used in combination with linear target simulation procedures to create a representative amount of target-to-background ratios for evaluation of detection limits. Data from two different airborne hyperspectral sensors, AISA Eagle and Hawk, are used to evaluate transferability of band selection when using different sensors. The same target objects were recorded to compare the calculated detection limits. To determine subpixel classification results, pure pixels from the target materials are extracted and used to simulate mixed pixels with selected background materials. Target signatures are linearly combined with different background materials in varying ratios. The commonly used classification algorithms Adaptive Coherence Estimator (ACE) is used to compare the detection limit for the original data with several band selection and data reduction strategies. The evaluation of the classification results is done by assuming a fixed false alarm ratio and calculating the mean target-to-background ratio of correctly detected pixels. The results allow drawing conclusions about specific band combinations for certain target and background combinations. Additionally

  13. Accounting for Limited Detection Efficiency and Localization Precision in Cluster Analysis in Single Molecule Localization Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shivanandan, Arun; Unnikrishnan, Jayakrishnan; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Single Molecule Localization Microscopy techniques like PhotoActivated Localization Microscopy, with their sub-diffraction limit spatial resolution, have been popularly used to characterize the spatial organization of membrane proteins, by means of quantitative cluster analysis. However, such quantitative studies remain challenged by the techniques’ inherent sources of errors such as a limited detection efficiency of less than 60%, due to incomplete photo-conversion, and a limited localization precision in the range of 10 – 30nm, varying across the detected molecules, mainly depending on the number of photons collected from each. We provide analytical methods to estimate the effect of these errors in cluster analysis and to correct for them. These methods, based on the Ripley’s L(r) – r or Pair Correlation Function popularly used by the community, can facilitate potentially breakthrough results in quantitative biology by providing a more accurate and precise quantification of protein spatial organization. PMID:25794150

  14. Inclusivity, exclusivity and limit of detection of commercially available real-time PCR assays for the detection of Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Margot, H; Stephan, R; Guarino, S; Jagadeesan, B; Chilton, D; O'Mahony, E; Iversen, C

    2013-08-01

    The traditional cultural detection of Salmonella spp. is both time- and labour-intensive. Salmonella is often a release criterion for the food industry and time to result is therefore an important factor. Storage of finished products and raw materials can be costly and may adversely impact available shelf-life. The application of real-time PCR for the detection of Salmonella spp. in food samples enables a potential time-saving of up to four days. The advancement of real-time PCR coupled with the development of commercially available systems in different formats has made this technology accessible for laboratories in an industrial environment. Ideally these systems are reliable and rapid as well as easy to use. The current study represents a comparative evaluation of seven commercial real-time PCR systems for the detection of Salmonella. Forty-nine target and twenty-nine non-target strains were included in the study to assess inclusivity and exclusivity. The limit of detection for each of the method was determined in four different food products. All systems evaluated were able to correctly identify the 49 Salmonella strains. Nevertheless, false positive results (Citrobacter spp.) were obtained with four of the seven systems. In milk powder and bouillon powder, the limit of detection was similar for all systems, suggesting a minimal matrix effect with these samples. Conversely, for black tea and cocoa powder some systems were prone to inhibition from matrix components. Up to 100% of the samples were inhibited using the proprietary extracts but inhibition could be reduced considerably by application of a DNA clean-up kit. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. In vitro bioassays for detecting dioxin-like activity--application potentials and limits of detection, a review.

    PubMed

    Eichbaum, Kathrin; Brinkmann, Markus; Buchinger, Sebastian; Reifferscheid, Georg; Hecker, Markus; Giesy, John P; Engwall, Magnus; van Bavel, Bert; Hollert, Henner

    2014-07-15

    Use of in vitro assays as screening tool to characterize contamination of a variety of environmental matrices has become an increasingly popular and powerful toolbox in the field of environmental toxicology. While bioassays cannot entirely substitute analytical methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), the increasing improvement of cell lines and standardization of bioassay procedures enhance their utility as bioanalytical pre-screening tests prior to more targeted chemical analytical investigations. Dioxin-receptor-based assays provide a holistic characterization of exposure to dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) by integrating their overall toxic potential, including potentials of unknown DLCs not detectable via e.g. GC-MS. Hence, they provide important additional information with respect to environmental risk assessment of DLCs. This review summarizes different in vitro bioassay applications for detection of DLCs and considers the comparability of bioassay and chemical analytically derived toxicity equivalents (TEQs) of different approaches and various matrices. These range from complex samples such as sediments through single reference to compound mixtures. A summary of bioassay derived detection limits (LODs) showed a number of current bioassays to be equally sensitive as chemical methodologies, but moreover revealed that most of the bioanalytical studies conducted to date did not report their LODs, which represents a limitation with regard to low potency samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Signal averaging limitations in heterodyne- and direct-detection laser remote sensing measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menyuk, N.; Killinger, D. K.; Menyuk, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The improvement in measurement uncertainty brought about by the averaging of increasing numbers of pulse return signals in both heterodyne- and direct-detection lidar systems is investigated. A theoretical analysis is presented which shows the standard deviation of the mean measurement to decrease as the inverse square root of the number of measurements, except in the presence of temporal correlation. Experimental measurements based on a dual-hybrid-TEA CO2 laser differential absorption lidar system are reported which demonstrate that the actual reduction in the standard deviation of the mean in both heterodyne- and direct-detection systems is much slower than the inverse square-root dependence predicted for uncorrelated signals, but is in agreement with predictions in the event of temporal correlation. Results thus favor the use of direct detection at relatively short range where the lower limit of the standard deviation of the mean is about 2 percent, but advantages of heterodyne detection at longer ranges are noted.

  17. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  18. Gold nanoparticle-based low limit of detection Love wave biosensor for carcinoembryonic antigens.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuangming; Wan, Ying; Su, Yan; Fan, Chunhai; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R

    2017-09-15

    In this work, a Love wave biosensing platform is described for detecting cancer-related biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). An ST 90°-X quartz Love wave device with a layer of SiO 2 waveguide was combined with gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) to amplify the mass loading effect of the acoustic wave sensor to achieve a limit of detection of 37pg/mL. The strategy involves modifying the Au NPs with anti-CEA antibody conjugates to form nanoprobes in a sandwich immunoassay. The unamplified detection limit of the Love wave biosensor is 9.4ng/mL. This 2-3 order of magnitude reduction in the limit of detection brings the SAW platform into the range useful for clinical diagnosis. Measurement electronics and microfluidics are easily constructed for acoustic wave biosensors, such as the Love wave device described here, allowing for robust platforms for point of care applications for cancer biomarkers in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. True detection limits in an experimental linearly heteroscedastic system. Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtman, Edward; Abraham, Kevin T.

    2011-11-01

    Using a lab-constructed laser-excited filter fluorimeter deliberately designed to exhibit linearly heteroscedastic, additive Gaussian noise, it has been shown that accurate estimates may be made of the true theoretical Currie decision levels ( YC and XC) and true Currie detection limits ( YD and XD) for the detection of rhodamine 6 G tetrafluoroborate in ethanol. The obtained experimental values, for 5% probability of false positives and 5% probability of false negatives, were YC = 56.1 mV, YD = 125. mV, XC = 0.132 μg /mL and XD = 0.294 μg /mL. For 5% probability of false positives and 1% probability of false negatives, the obtained detection limits were YD = 158. mV and XD = 0.372 μg /mL. These decision levels and corresponding detection limits were shown to pass the ultimate test: they resulted in observed probabilities of false positives and false negatives that were statistically equivalent to the a priori specified values.

  20. Finite-size analysis of the detectability limit of the stochastic block model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jean-Gabriel; Desrosiers, Patrick; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Laurence, Edward; Dubé, Louis J.

    2017-06-01

    It has been shown in recent years that the stochastic block model is sometimes undetectable in the sparse limit, i.e., that no algorithm can identify a partition correlated with the partition used to generate an instance, if the instance is sparse enough and infinitely large. In this contribution, we treat the finite case explicitly, using arguments drawn from information theory and statistics. We give a necessary condition for finite-size detectability in the general SBM. We then distinguish the concept of average detectability from the concept of instance-by-instance detectability and give explicit formulas for both definitions. Using these formulas, we prove that there exist large equivalence classes of parameters, where widely different network ensembles are equally detectable with respect to our definitions of detectability. In an extensive case study, we investigate the finite-size detectability of a simplified variant of the SBM, which encompasses a number of important models as special cases. These models include the symmetric SBM, the planted coloring model, and more exotic SBMs not previously studied. We conclude with three appendices, where we study the interplay of noise and detectability, establish a connection between our information-theoretic approach and random matrix theory, and provide proofs of some of the more technical results.

  1. The limit of detection in scintigraphic imaging with I-131 in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänscheid, H.; Lassmann, M.; Buck, A. K.; Reiners, C.; Verburg, F. A.

    2014-05-01

    Radioiodine scintigraphy influences staging and treatment in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. The limit of detection for fractional uptake in an iodine avid focus in a scintigraphic image was determined from the number of lesion net counts and the count density of the tissue background. The count statistics were used to calculate the diagnostic activity required to elevate the signal from a lesion with a given uptake significantly above a homogeneous background with randomly distributed counts per area. The dependences of the minimal uptake and the minimal size of lesions visible in a scan on several parameters of influence were determined by linking the typical biokinetics observed in iodine avid tissue to the lesion mass and to the absorbed dose received in a radioiodine therapy. The detection limits for fractional uptake in a neck lesion of a typical patient are about 0.001% after therapy with 7000 MBq, 0.01% for activities typically administered in diagnostic assessments (74-185 MBq), and 0.1% after the administration of 10 MBq I-131. Lesions at the limit of detection in a diagnostic scan with biokinetics eligible for radioiodine therapy are small with diameters of a few millimeters. Increasing the diagnostic activity by a factor of 4 reduces the diameter of visible lesions by 25% or about 1 mm. Several other determinants have a comparable or higher influence on the limit of detection than the administered activity; most important are the biokinetics in both blood pool and target tissue and the time of measurement. A generally valid recommendation for the timing of the scan is impossible as the time of the highest probability to detect iodine avid tissue depends on the administered activity as well as on the biokinetics in the lesion and background in the individual patient.

  2. Absolute auditory threshold: testing the absolute.

    PubMed

    Heil, Peter; Matysiak, Artur

    2017-11-02

    The mechanisms underlying the detection of sounds in quiet, one of the simplest tasks for auditory systems, are debated. Several models proposed to explain the threshold for sounds in quiet and its dependence on sound parameters include a minimum sound intensity ('hard threshold'), below which sound has no effect on the ear. Also, many models are based on the assumption that threshold is mediated by integration of a neural response proportional to sound intensity. Here, we test these ideas. Using an adaptive forced choice procedure, we obtained thresholds of 95 normal-hearing human ears for 18 tones (3.125 kHz carrier) in quiet, each with a different temporal amplitude envelope. Grand-mean thresholds and standard deviations were well described by a probabilistic model according to which sensory events are generated by a Poisson point process with a low rate in the absence, and higher, time-varying rates in the presence, of stimulation. The subject actively evaluates the process and bases the decision on the number of events observed. The sound-driven rate of events is proportional to the temporal amplitude envelope of the bandpass-filtered sound raised to an exponent. We find no evidence for a hard threshold: When the model is extended to include such a threshold, the fit does not improve. Furthermore, we find an exponent of 3, consistent with our previous studies and further challenging models that are based on the assumption of the integration of a neural response that, at threshold sound levels, is directly proportional to sound amplitude or intensity. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Method for improving the limit of detection in a data signal

    DOEpatents

    Synovec, R.E.; Yueng, E.S.

    1989-10-17

    Disclosed is a method for improving the limit of detection for a data set in which experimental noise is uncorrelated along a given abscissa and an analytical signal is correlated to the abscissa, the steps comprising collecting the data set, converting the data set into a data signal including an analytical portion and the experimental noise portion, designating and adjusting a baseline of the data signal to center the experimental noise numerically about a zero reference, and integrating the data signal preserving the corresponding information for each point of the data signal. The steps of the method produce an enhanced integrated data signal which improves the limit of detection of the data signal. 8 figs.

  4. Flexible Modeling of Survival Data with Covariates Subject to Detection Limits via Multiple Imputation.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Paul W; Wang, Huixia Judy; Zhang, Daowen

    2014-01-01

    Models for survival data generally assume that covariates are fully observed. However, in medical studies it is not uncommon for biomarkers to be censored at known detection limits. A computationally-efficient multiple imputation procedure for modeling survival data with covariates subject to detection limits is proposed. This procedure is developed in the context of an accelerated failure time model with a flexible seminonparametric error distribution. The consistency and asymptotic normality of the multiple imputation estimator are established and a consistent variance estimator is provided. An iterative version of the proposed multiple imputation algorithm that approximates the EM algorithm for maximum likelihood is also suggested. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed multiple imputation methods work well while alternative methods lead to estimates that are either biased or more variable. The proposed methods are applied to analyze the dataset from a recently-conducted GenIMS study.

  5. Photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence using a quartz substrate to reduce limits of detection

    PubMed Central

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Chaudhery, Vikram; Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Schulz, Stephen; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2010-01-01

    A Photonic Crystal (PC) surface fabricated upon a quartz substrate using nanoimprint lithography has been demonstrated to enhance light emission from fluorescent molecules in close proximity to the PC surface. Quartz was selected for its low autofluorescence characteristics compared to polymer-based PCs, improving the detection sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of PC Enhanced Fluorescence (PCEF). Nanoimprint lithography enables economical fabrication of the subwavelength PCEF surface structure over entire 1x3 in2 quartz slides. The demonstrated PCEF surface supports a transverse magnetic (TM) resonant mode at a wavelength of λ = 632.8 nm and an incident angle of θ = 11°, which amplifies the electric field magnitude experienced by surface-bound fluorophores. Meanwhile, another TM mode at a wavelength of λ = 690 nm and incident angle of θ = 0° efficiently directs the fluorescent emission toward the detection optics. An enhancement factor as high as 7500 × was achieved for the detection of LD-700 dye spin-coated upon the PC, compared to detecting the same material on an unpatterned glass surface. The detection of spotted Alexa-647 labeled polypeptide on the PC exhibits a 330 × SNR improvement. Using dose-response characterization of deposited fluorophore-tagged protein spots, the PCEF surface demonstrated a 140 × lower limit of detection compared to a conventional glass substrate. PMID:21164826

  6. Investigation of detection limits for solutes in water measured by laser raman spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of experimental parameters on detection sensitivity was determined for laser Raman analysis of dissolved solutes in water. Individual solutions of nitrate, sulfate, carbonate, bicarbonate, monohydrogen phosphate, dihydrogen phosphate, acetate ion, and acetic acid were measured. An equation is derived which expresses the signal-to-noise ratio in terms of solute concentration, measurement time, spectral slit width, laser power fluctuations, and solvent background intensity. Laser beam intensity fluctuations at the sample and solvent background intensity are the most important limiting factors.

  7. An adaptive confidence limit for periodic non-steady conditions fault detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianzhen; Wu, Hao; Ni, Mengqi; Zhang, Milu; Dong, Jingjing; Benbouzid, Mohamed El Hachemi; Hu, Xiong

    2016-05-01

    System monitoring has become a major concern in batch process due to the fact that failure rate in non-steady conditions is much higher than in steady ones. A series of approaches based on PCA have already solved problems such as data dimensionality reduction, multivariable decorrelation, and processing non-changing signal. However, if the data follows non-Gaussian distribution or the variables contain some signal changes, the above approaches are not applicable. To deal with these concerns and to enhance performance in multiperiod data processing, this paper proposes a fault detection method using adaptive confidence limit (ACL) in periodic non-steady conditions. The proposed ACL method achieves four main enhancements: Longitudinal-Standardization could convert non-Gaussian sampling data to Gaussian ones; the multiperiod PCA algorithm could reduce dimensionality, remove correlation, and improve the monitoring accuracy; the adaptive confidence limit could detect faults under non-steady conditions; the fault sections determination procedure could select the appropriate parameter of the adaptive confidence limit. The achieved result analysis clearly shows that the proposed ACL method is superior to other fault detection approaches under periodic non-steady conditions.

  8. Radiometric Short-Term Fourier Transform analysis of photonic Doppler velocimetry recordings and detectivity limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudhomme, G.; Berthe, L.; Bénier, J.; Bozier, O.; Mercier, P.

    2017-01-01

    Photonic Doppler Velocimetry is a plug-and-play and versatile diagnostic used in dynamic physic experiments to measure velocities. When signals are analyzed using a Short-Time Fourier Transform, multiple velocities can be distinguished: for example, the velocities of moving particle-cloud appear on spectrograms. In order to estimate the back-scattering fluxes of target, we propose an original approach "PDV Radiometric analysis" resulting in an expression of time-velocity spectrograms coded in power units. Experiments involving micron-sized particles raise the issue of detection limit; particle-size limit is very difficult to evaluate. From the quantification of noise sources, we derive an estimation of the spectrogram noise leading to a detectivity limit, which may be compared to the fraction of the incoming power which has been back-scattered by the particle and then collected by the probe. This fraction increases with their size. At last, some results from laser-shock accelerated particles using two different PDV systems are compared: it shows the improvement of detectivity with respect to the Effective Number of Bits (ENOB) of the digitizer.

  9. Predictive inference for best linear combination of biomarkers subject to limits of detection.

    PubMed

    Coolen-Maturi, Tahani

    2017-08-15

    Measuring the accuracy of diagnostic tests is crucial in many application areas including medicine, machine learning and credit scoring. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve is a useful tool to assess the ability of a diagnostic test to discriminate between two classes or groups. In practice, multiple diagnostic tests or biomarkers are combined to improve diagnostic accuracy. Often, biomarker measurements are undetectable either below or above the so-called limits of detection (LoD). In this paper, nonparametric predictive inference (NPI) for best linear combination of two or more biomarkers subject to limits of detection is presented. NPI is a frequentist statistical method that is explicitly aimed at using few modelling assumptions, enabled through the use of lower and upper probabilities to quantify uncertainty. The NPI lower and upper bounds for the ROC curve subject to limits of detection are derived, where the objective function to maximize is the area under the ROC curve. In addition, the paper discusses the effect of restriction on the linear combination's coefficients on the analysis. Examples are provided to illustrate the proposed method. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Evaluation on the detection limit of blood hemoglobin using photolepthysmography based on path-length optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Di; Guo, Chao; Zhang, Ziyang; Han, Tongshuai; Liu, Jin

    2016-10-01

    The blood hemoglobin concentration's (BHC) measurement using Photoplethysmography (PPG), which gets blood absorption to near infrared light from the instantaneous pulse of transmitted light intensity, has not been applied to the clinical use due to the non-enough precision. The main challenge might be caused of the non-enough stable pulse signal when it's very weak and it often varies in different human bodies or in the same body with different physiological states. We evaluated the detection limit of BHC using PPG as the measurement precision level, which can be considered as a best precision result because we got the relative stable subject's pulse signals recorded by using a spectrometer with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) level, which is about 30000:1 in short term. Moreover, we optimized the used pathlength using the theory based on optimum pathlength to get a better sensitivity to the absorption variation in blood. The best detection limit was evaluated as about 1 g/L for BHC, and the best SNR of pulse for in vivo measurement was about 2000:1 at 1130 and 1250 nm. Meanwhile, we conclude that the SNR of pulse signal should be better than 400:1 when the required detection limit is set to 5 g/L. Our result would be a good reference to the BHC measurement to get a desired BHC measurement precision of real application.

  11. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  12. Detection limit of intragenic deletions with targeted array comparative genomic hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathogenic mutations range from single nucleotide changes to deletions or duplications that encompass a single exon to several genes. The use of gene-centric high-density array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has revolutionized the detection of intragenic copy number variations. We implemented an exon-centric design of high-resolution aCGH to detect single- and multi-exon deletions and duplications in a large set of genes using the OGT 60 K and 180 K arrays. Here we describe the molecular characterization and breakpoint mapping of deletions at the smaller end of the detectable range in several genes using aCGH. Results The method initially implemented to detect single to multiple exon deletions, was able to detect deletions much smaller than anticipated. The selected deletions we describe vary in size, ranging from over 2 kb to as small as 12 base pairs. The smallest of these deletions are only detectable after careful manual review during data analysis. Suspected deletions smaller than the detection size for which the method was optimized, were rigorously followed up and confirmed with PCR-based investigations to uncover the true detection size limit of intragenic deletions with this technology. False-positive deletion calls often demonstrated single nucleotide changes or an insertion causing lower hybridization of probes demonstrating the sensitivity of aCGH. Conclusions With optimizing aCGH design and careful review process, aCGH can uncover intragenic deletions as small as dozen bases. These data provide insight that will help optimize probe coverage in array design and illustrate the true assay sensitivity. Mapping of the breakpoints confirms smaller deletions and contributes to the understanding of the mechanism behind these events. Our knowledge of the mutation spectra of several genes can be expected to change as previously unrecognized intragenic deletions are uncovered. PMID:24304607

  13. Experimental Study of the Detection Limit in Dual-Gate Biosensors Using Ultrathin Silicon Transistors

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Ting; Alharbi, Abdullah; You, Kai-Dyi; ...

    2017-06-21

    Dual-gate field-effect biosensors (bioFETs) with asymmetric gate capacitances were shown to surpass the Nernst limit of 59 mV/pH. However, previous studies have conflicting findings on the effect of the capacitive amplification scheme on the sensor detection limit, which is inversely proportional to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this paper, we present a systematic experimental investigation of the SNR using ultrathin silicon transistors. Our sensors operate at low voltage and feature asymmetric front and back oxide capacitances with asymmetry factors of 1.4 and 2.3. We demonstrate that in the dual-gate configuration, the response of our bioFETs to the pH change increasesmore » proportional to the asymmetry factor and indeed exceeds the Nernst limit. Further, our results reveal that the noise amplitude also increases in proportion to the asymmetry factor. We establish that the commensurate increase of the noise amplitude originates from the intrinsic low-frequency characteristic of the sensor noise, dominated by number fluctuation. Finally, these findings suggest that this capacitive signal amplification scheme does not improve the intrinsic detection limit of the dual-gate biosensors.« less

  14. Experimental Study of the Detection Limit in Dual-Gate Biosensors Using Ultrathin Silicon Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ting; Alharbi, Abdullah; You, Kai-Dyi

    Dual-gate field-effect biosensors (bioFETs) with asymmetric gate capacitances were shown to surpass the Nernst limit of 59 mV/pH. However, previous studies have conflicting findings on the effect of the capacitive amplification scheme on the sensor detection limit, which is inversely proportional to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this paper, we present a systematic experimental investigation of the SNR using ultrathin silicon transistors. Our sensors operate at low voltage and feature asymmetric front and back oxide capacitances with asymmetry factors of 1.4 and 2.3. We demonstrate that in the dual-gate configuration, the response of our bioFETs to the pH change increasesmore » proportional to the asymmetry factor and indeed exceeds the Nernst limit. Further, our results reveal that the noise amplitude also increases in proportion to the asymmetry factor. We establish that the commensurate increase of the noise amplitude originates from the intrinsic low-frequency characteristic of the sensor noise, dominated by number fluctuation. Finally, these findings suggest that this capacitive signal amplification scheme does not improve the intrinsic detection limit of the dual-gate biosensors.« less

  15. Experimental Study of the Detection Limit in Dual-Gate Biosensors Using Ultrathin Silicon Transistors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ting; Alharbi, Abdullah; You, Kai-Dyi; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric A; Shahrjerdi, Davood

    2017-07-25

    Dual-gate field-effect biosensors (bioFETs) with asymmetric gate capacitances were shown to surpass the Nernst limit of 59 mV/pH. However, previous studies have conflicting findings on the effect of the capacitive amplification scheme on the sensor detection limit, which is inversely proportional to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Here, we present a systematic experimental investigation of the SNR using ultrathin silicon transistors. Our sensors operate at low voltage and feature asymmetric front and back oxide capacitances with asymmetry factors of 1.4 and 2.3. We demonstrate that in the dual-gate configuration, the response of our bioFETs to the pH change increases proportional to the asymmetry factor and indeed exceeds the Nernst limit. Further, our results reveal that the noise amplitude also increases in proportion to the asymmetry factor. We establish that the commensurate increase of the noise amplitude originates from the intrinsic low-frequency characteristic of the sensor noise, dominated by number fluctuation. These findings suggest that this capacitive signal amplification scheme does not improve the intrinsic detection limit of the dual-gate biosensors.

  16. Detection limits of 405 nm and 633 nm excited PpIX fluorescence for brain tumor detection during stereotactic biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwardt, Niklas; Götz, Marcus; Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Hollnburger, Bastian; Sroka, Ronald; Stepp, Herbert; Zelenkov, Petr; Rühm, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    5-aminolevulinic-acid-(5-ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence may be used to improve stereotactic brain tumor biopsies. In this study, the sensitivity of PpIX-based tumor detection has been investigated for two potential excitation wavelengths (405 nm, 633 nm). Using a 200 μm fiber in contact with semi-infinite optical phantoms containing ink and Lipovenös, PpIX detection limits of 4.0 nM and 200 nM (relating to 1 mW excitation power) were determined for 405 nm and 633 nm excitation, respectively. Hence, typical PpIX concentrations in glioblastomas of a few μM should be well detectable with both wavelengths. Additionally, blood layers of selected thicknesses were placed between fiber and phantom. Red excitation was shown to be considerably less affected by blood interference: A 50 μm blood layer, for instance, blocked the 405- nm-excited fluorescence completely, but reduced the 633-nm-excited signal by less than 50%. Ray tracing simulations demonstrated that - without blood layer - the sensitivity advantage of 405 nm rises for decreasing fluorescent volume from 50-fold to a maximum of 100-fold. However, at a tumor volume of 1 mm3, which is a typical biopsy sample size, the 633-nm-excited fluorescence signal is only reduced by about 10%. Further simulations revealed that with increasing fiber-tumor distance, the signal drops faster for 405 nm. This reduces the risk of detecting tumor tissue outside the needle's coverage, but diminishes the overlap between optically and mechanically sampled volumes. While 405 nm generally offers a higher sensitivity, 633 nm is more sensitive to distant tumors and considerably superior in case of blood-covered tumor tissue.

  17. Detection of protein modifications and counterfeit protein pharmaceuticals using isotope tags for relative and absolute quantification and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry: studies of insulins.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hongping; Hill, John; Kauffman, John; Gryniewicz, Connie; Han, Xianlin

    2008-08-15

    Isotope tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) reagent coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) mass spectrometric analysis has been evaluated as both a qualitative and quantitative method for the detection of modifications to active pharmaceutical ingredients derived from recombinant DNA technologies and as a method to detect counterfeit drug products. Five types of insulin (human, bovine, porcine, Lispro, and Lantus) were used as model products in the study because of their minor variations in amino acid sequence. Several experiments were conducted in which each insulin variant was separately digested with Glu-C, and the digestate was labeled with one of four different iTRAQ reagents. All digestates were then combined for desalting and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometric analysis. When the digestion procedure was optimized, the insulin sequence coverage was 100%. Five different types of insulin were readily differentiated, including human insulin (P28K29) and Lispro insulin (K28P29), which differ only by the interchange of two contiguous residues. Moreover, quantitative analyses show that the results obtained from the iTRAQ method agree well with those determined by other conventional methods. Collectively, the iTRAQ method can be used as a qualitative and quantitative technique for the detection of protein modification and counterfeiting.

  18. Iron pentacarbonyl detection limits in the cigarette smoke matrix using FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, Milton E.; Plunkett, Susan E.; Harward, Charles N.

    2005-11-01

    Endogenous metals present in tobacco from agricultural practices have been purported to generate metal carbonyls in cigarette smoke. Transition metal catalysts, such as iron oxide, have been investigated for the reduction of carbon monoxide (CO) in cigarette smoke. These studies motivated the development of an analytical method to determine if iron pentacarbonyl [Fe(CO) 5] is present in mainstream smoke from cigarette models having cigarette paper made with iron oxide. An FT-IR puff-by-puff method was developed and the detection limit was determined using two primary reference spectra from different sources to estimate the amount of Fe(CO) 5 present in a high-pressure steel cylinder of CO. We do not detect Fe(CO) 5 in a single 35 mL puff from reference cigarettes or from those cigarette models having cigarette paper made with iron oxide, with a 30-ppbV limit of detection (LOD). Also, it was shown that a filter containing activated carbon would remove Fe(CO) 5.

  19. Batch Fabrication of Ultrasensitive Carbon Nanotube Hydrogen Sensors with Sub-ppm Detection Limit.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Mengmeng; Liang, Shibo; Han, Jie; Zhong, Donglai; Liu, Jingxia; Zhang, Zhiyong; Peng, Lianmao

    2018-04-27

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has been considered as an ideal channel material for building highly sensitive gas sensors. However, the reported H 2 sensors based on CNT always suffered from the low sensitivity or low production. We developed the technology to massively fabricate ultra-highly sensitive H 2 sensors based on solution derived CNT network through comprehensive optimization of the CNT material, device structure, and fabrication process. In the H 2 sensors, high semiconducting purity solution-derived CNT film sorted by poly[9-(1-octylonoyl)-9 H-carbazole-2,7-diyl](PCz) is used as the main channel, which is decorated with Pd nanoparticles as functionalization for capturing H 2 . Meanwhile, Ti contacts are used to form a Schottky barrier for enhancing transferred charge-induced resistance change, and then a response of resistance change by 3 orders of magnitude is achieved at room temperature under the concentration of ∼311 ppm with a very fast response time of approximately 7 s and a detection limit of 890 ppb, which is the highest response to date for CNT H 2 sensors and the very first time to show the sub-ppm detection for H 2 at room temperature. Furthermore, the detection limit concentration can be improved to 89 ppb at 100 °C. The batch fabrication of CNT film H 2 sensors with ultra-high sensitivity and high uniformity is ready to promote CNT devices to application for the first time in some specialized field.

  20. Detection limits of Legionella pneumophila in environmental samples after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The efficiency of recovery and the detection limit of Legionella after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga are not known and so far no investigations have been carried out to determine the efficiency of the recovery of Legionella spp. by co-culture and compare it with that of conventional culturing methods. This study aimed to assess the detection limits of co-culture compared to culture for Legionella pneumophila in compost and air samples. Compost and air samples were spiked with known concentrations of L. pneumophila. Direct culturing and co-culture with amoebae were used in parallel to isolate L. pneumophila and recovery standard curves for both methods were produced for each sample. Results The co-culture proved to be more sensitive than the reference method, detecting 102-103 L. pneumophila cells in 1 g of spiked compost or 1 m3 of spiked air, as compared to 105-106 cells in 1 g of spiked compost and 1 m3 of spiked air. Conclusions Co-culture with amoebae is a useful, sensitive and reliable technique to enrich L. pneumophila in environmental samples that contain only low amounts of bacterial cells. PMID:23442526

  1. Gravitational wave detection using laser interferometry beyond the standard quantum limit.

    PubMed

    Heurs, M

    2018-05-28

    Interferometric gravitational wave detectors (such as advanced LIGO) employ high-power solid-state lasers to maximize their detection sensitivity and hence their reach into the universe. These sophisticated light sources are ultra-stabilized with regard to output power, emission frequency and beam geometry; this is crucial to obtain low detector noise. However, even when all laser noise is reduced as far as technically possible, unavoidable quantum noise of the laser still remains. This is a consequence of the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, the basis of quantum mechanics: in this case, it is fundamentally impossible to simultaneously reduce both the phase noise and the amplitude noise of a laser to arbitrarily low levels. This fact manifests in the detector noise budget as two distinct noise sources-photon shot noise and quantum radiation pressure noise-which together form a lower boundary for current-day gravitational wave detector sensitivities, the standard quantum limit of interferometry. To overcome this limit, various techniques are being proposed, among them different uses of non-classical light and alternative interferometer topologies. This article explains how quantum noise enters and manifests in an interferometric gravitational wave detector, and gives an overview of some of the schemes proposed to overcome this seemingly fundamental limitation, all aimed at the goal of higher gravitational wave event detection rates.This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'The promises of gravitational-wave astronomy'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  2. Gravitational wave detection using laser interferometry beyond the standard quantum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heurs, M.

    2018-05-01

    Interferometric gravitational wave detectors (such as advanced LIGO) employ high-power solid-state lasers to maximize their detection sensitivity and hence their reach into the universe. These sophisticated light sources are ultra-stabilized with regard to output power, emission frequency and beam geometry; this is crucial to obtain low detector noise. However, even when all laser noise is reduced as far as technically possible, unavoidable quantum noise of the laser still remains. This is a consequence of the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, the basis of quantum mechanics: in this case, it is fundamentally impossible to simultaneously reduce both the phase noise and the amplitude noise of a laser to arbitrarily low levels. This fact manifests in the detector noise budget as two distinct noise sources-photon shot noise and quantum radiation pressure noise-which together form a lower boundary for current-day gravitational wave detector sensitivities, the standard quantum limit of interferometry. To overcome this limit, various techniques are being proposed, among them different uses of non-classical light and alternative interferometer topologies. This article explains how quantum noise enters and manifests in an interferometric gravitational wave detector, and gives an overview of some of the schemes proposed to overcome this seemingly fundamental limitation, all aimed at the goal of higher gravitational wave event detection rates. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue `The promises of gravitational-wave astronomy'.

  3. Absolute measurements of large mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Peng

    The ability to produce mirrors for large astronomical telescopes is limited by the accuracy of the systems used to test the surfaces of such mirrors. Typically the mirror surfaces are measured by comparing their actual shapes to a precision master, which may be created using combinations of mirrors, lenses, and holograms. The work presented here develops several optical testing techniques that do not rely on a large or expensive precision, master reference surface. In a sense these techniques provide absolute optical testing. The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) has been designed with a 350 m 2 collecting area provided by a 25 m diameter primary mirror made out from seven circular independent mirror segments. These segments create an equivalent f/0.7 paraboloidal primary mirror consisting of a central segment and six outer segments. Each of the outer segments is 8.4 m in diameter and has an off-axis aspheric shape departing 14.5 mm from the best-fitting sphere. Much of the work in this dissertation is motivated by the need to measure the surfaces or such large mirrors accurately, without relying on a large or expensive precision reference surface. One method for absolute testing describing in this dissertation uses multiple measurements relative to a reference surface that is located in different positions with respect to the test surface of interest. The test measurements are performed with an algorithm that is based on the maximum likelihood (ML) method. Some methodologies for measuring large flat surfaces in the 2 m diameter range and for measuring the GMT primary mirror segments were specifically developed. For example, the optical figure of a 1.6-m flat mirror was determined to 2 nm rms accuracy using multiple 1-meter sub-aperture measurements. The optical figure of the reference surface used in the 1-meter sub-aperture measurements was also determined to the 2 nm level. The optical test methodology for a 1.7-m off axis parabola was evaluated by moving several

  4. Eye movements during change detection: implications for search constraints, memory limitations, and scanning strategies.

    PubMed

    Zelinsky, G J

    2001-02-01

    Search, memory, and strategy constraints on change detection were analyzed in terms of oculomotor variables. Observers viewed a repeating sequence of three displays (Scene 1-->Mask-->Scene 2-->Mask...) and indicated the presence-absence of a changing object between Scenes 1 and 2. Scenes depicted real-world objects arranged on a surface. Manipulations included set size (one, three, or nine items) and the orientation of the changing objects (similar or different). Eye movements increased with the number of potentially changing objects in the scene, with this set size effect suggesting a relationship between change detection and search. A preferential fixation analysis determined that memory constraints are better described by the operation comparing the pre- and postchange objects than as a capacity limitation, and a scanpath analysis revealed a change detection strategy relying on the peripheral encoding and comparison of display items. These findings support a signal-in-noise interpretation of change detection in which the signal varies with the similarity of the changing objects and the noise is determined by the distractor objects and scene background.

  5. Estimation of the limit of detection in semiconductor gas sensors through linearized calibration models.

    PubMed

    Burgués, Javier; Jiménez-Soto, Juan Manuel; Marco, Santiago

    2018-07-12

    The limit of detection (LOD) is a key figure of merit in chemical sensing. However, the estimation of this figure of merit is hindered by the non-linear calibration curve characteristic of semiconductor gas sensor technologies such as, metal oxide (MOX), gasFETs or thermoelectric sensors. Additionally, chemical sensors suffer from cross-sensitivities and temporal stability problems. The application of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) recommendations for univariate LOD estimation in non-linear semiconductor gas sensors is not straightforward due to the strong statistical requirements of the IUPAC methodology (linearity, homoscedasticity, normality). Here, we propose a methodological approach to LOD estimation through linearized calibration models. As an example, the methodology is applied to the detection of low concentrations of carbon monoxide using MOX gas sensors in a scenario where the main source of error is the presence of uncontrolled levels of humidity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. From nature to MEMS: towards the detection-limit of crickets' hair sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagamseh, A. M. K.

    2013-05-01

    Crickets use highly sensitive mechanoreceptor hairs to detect approaching spiders. The high sensitivity of these hairs enables perceiving tiny air-movements which are only just distinguishable from noise. This forms our source of inspiration to design sensitive arrays made of artificial hair sensors for flow pattern observation i.e. Flow camera. The realization of such high-sensitive hair sensor requires designs with low thermo-mechanical noise to match the detection-limit of crickets' hairs. Here we investigate the damping factor in our artificial hair-sensor using different models as it is the source of the thermo-mechanical noise in MEMS structures. The results show that the damping factor estimated in air is in the range of 10-12 N.m/rad.s-1 which translates into a 52 μm/s threshold flow velocity.

  7. Diamond-based electrochemical aptasensor realizing a femtomolar detection limit of bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yibo; Liu, Junsong; Li, Hongdong

    2017-06-15

    In this study, we designed and fabricated an electrochemical impedance aptasensor based on Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) coated boron-doped diamond (BDD) modified with aptamers, and 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH) for the detection of bisphenol A (BPA). The constructed BPA aptasensor exhibits good linearity from 1.0×10 -14 to 1.0×10 -9 molL -1 . The detection limitation of 7.2×10 -15 molL -1 was achieved, which can be attributed to the synergistic effect of combining BDD with Au-NPs, aptamers, and MCH. The examine results of BPA traces in Tris-HCl buffer and in milk, UV spectra of aptamer/BPA and interference test revealed that the novel aptasensors are of high sensitivity, specificity, stability and repeatability, which could be promising in practical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Trace element analysis by EPMA in geosciences: detection limit, precision and accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batanova, V. G.; Sobolev, A. V.; Magnin, V.

    2018-01-01

    Use of the electron probe microanalyser (EPMA) for trace element analysis has increased over the last decade, mainly because of improved stability of spectrometers and the electron column when operated at high probe current; development of new large-area crystal monochromators and ultra-high count rate spectrometers; full integration of energy-dispersive / wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS/WDS) signals; and the development of powerful software packages. For phases that are stable under a dense electron beam, the detection limit and precision can be decreased to the ppm level by using high acceleration voltage and beam current combined with long counting time. Data on 10 elements (Na, Al, P, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zn) in olivine obtained on a JEOL JXA-8230 microprobe with tungsten filament show that the detection limit decreases proportionally to the square root of counting time and probe current. For all elements equal or heavier than phosphorus (Z = 15), the detection limit decreases with increasing accelerating voltage. The analytical precision for minor and trace elements analysed in olivine at 25 kV accelerating voltage and 900 nA beam current is 4 - 18 ppm (2 standard deviations of repeated measurements of the olivine reference sample) and is similar to the detection limit of corresponding elements. To analyse trace elements accurately requires careful estimation of background, and consideration of sample damage under the beam and secondary fluorescence from phase boundaries. The development and use of matrix reference samples with well-characterised trace elements of interest is important for monitoring and improving of the accuracy. An evaluation of the accuracy of trace element analyses in olivine has been made by comparing EPMA data for new reference samples with data obtained by different in-situ and bulk analytical methods in six different laboratories worldwide. For all elements, the measured concentrations in the olivine reference sample

  9. Picomolar detection limits with current-polarized Pb2+ ion-selective membranes.

    PubMed

    Pergel, E; Gyurcsányi, R E; Tóth, K; Lindner, E

    2001-09-01

    Minor ion fluxes across ion-selective membranes bias submicromolar activity measurements with conventional ion-selective electrodes. When ion fluxes are balanced, the lower limit of detection is expected to be dramatically improved. As proof of principle, the flux of lead ions across an ETH 5435 ionophore-based lead-selective membrane was gradually compensated by applying a few nanoamperes of galvanostatic current. When the opposite ion fluxes were matched, and the undesirable leaching of primary ions was eliminated, Nernstian response down to 3 x 10(-12) M was achieved.

  10. Power-limited low-thrust trajectory optimization with operation point detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Zhemin; Li, Haiyang; Jiang, Fanghua; Li, Junfeng

    2018-06-01

    The power-limited solar electric propulsion system is considered more practical in mission design. An accurate mathematical model of the propulsion system, based on experimental data of the power generation system, is used in this paper. An indirect method is used to deal with the time-optimal and fuel-optimal control problems, in which the solar electric propulsion system is described using a finite number of operation points, which are characterized by different pairs of thruster input power. In order to guarantee the integral accuracy for the discrete power-limited problem, a power operation detection technique is embedded in the fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm with fixed step. Moreover, the logarithmic homotopy method and normalization technique are employed to overcome the difficulties caused by using indirect methods. Three numerical simulations with actual propulsion systems are given to substantiate the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  11. STATISTICAL METHODS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS USING DATA SETS WITH BELOW DETECTION LIMIT OBSERVATIONS AS INCORPORTED IN PROUCL 4.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nondetect (ND) or below detection limit (BDL) results cannot be measured accurately, and, therefore, are reported as less than certain detection limit (DL) values. However, since the presence of some contaminants (e.g., dioxin) in environmental media may pose a threat to human he...

  12. Lowering thresholds for speed limit enforcement impairs peripheral object detection and increases driver subjective workload.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Vanessa K; Loft, Shayne; Tatasciore, Monica; Visser, Troy A W

    2017-01-01

    Speed enforcement reduces incidences of speeding, thus reducing traffic accidents. Accordingly, it has been argued that stricter speed enforcement thresholds could further improve road safety. Effective speed monitoring however requires driver attention and effort, and human information-processing capacity is limited. Emphasizing speed monitoring may therefore reduce resource availability for other aspects of safe vehicle operation. We investigated whether lowering enforcement thresholds in a simulator setting would introduce further competition for limited cognitive and visual resources. Eighty-four young adult participants drove under conditions where they could be fined for travelling 1, 6, or 11km/h over a 50km/h speed-limit. Stricter speed enforcement led to greater subjective workload and significant decrements in peripheral object detection. These data indicate that the benefits of reduced speeding with stricter enforcement may be at least partially offset by greater mental demands on drivers, reducing their responses to safety-critical stimuli on the road. It is likely these results under-estimate the impact of stricter speed enforcement on real-world drivers who experience significantly greater pressures to drive at or above the speed limit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Re-evaluation of groundwater monitoring data for glyphosate and bentazone by taking detection limits into account.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Claus Toni; Ritz, Christian; Gerhard, Daniel; Jensen, Jens Erik; Streibig, Jens Carl

    2015-12-01

    Current regulatory assessment of pesticide contamination of Danish groundwater is exclusively based on samples with pesticide concentrations above detection limit. Here we demonstrate that a realistic quantification of pesticide contamination requires the inclusion of "non-detect" samples i.e. samples with concentrations below the detection limit, as left-censored observations. The median calculated pesticide concentrations are shown to be reduced 10(4) to 10(5) fold for two representative herbicides (glyphosate and bentazone) relative to the median concentrations based upon observations above detection limits alone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. First direct detection limits on sub-GeV dark matter from XENON10.

    PubMed

    Essig, Rouven; Manalaysay, Aaron; Mardon, Jeremy; Sorensen, Peter; Volansky, Tomer

    2012-07-13

    The first direct detection limits on dark matter in the MeV to GeV mass range are presented, using XENON10 data. Such light dark matter can scatter with electrons, causing ionization of atoms in a detector target material and leading to single- or few-electron events. We use 15  kg day of data acquired in 2006 to set limits on the dark-matter-electron scattering cross section. The strongest bound is obtained at 100 MeV where σ(e)<3×10(-38)  cm2 at 90% C.L., while dark-matter masses between 20 MeV and 1 GeV are bounded by σ(e)<10(-37)  cm2 at 90% C.L. This analysis provides a first proof of principle that direct detection experiments can be sensitive to dark-matter candidates with masses well below the GeV scale.

  15. Statistical Methods for Generalized Linear Models with Covariates Subject to Detection Limits.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Paul W; Wang, Huixia J; Zhang, Daowen

    2015-05-01

    Censored observations are a common occurrence in biomedical data sets. Although a large amount of research has been devoted to estimation and inference for data with censored responses, very little research has focused on proper statistical procedures when predictors are censored. In this paper, we consider statistical methods for dealing with multiple predictors subject to detection limits within the context of generalized linear models. We investigate and adapt several conventional methods and develop a new multiple imputation approach for analyzing data sets with predictors censored due to detection limits. We establish the consistency and asymptotic normality of the proposed multiple imputation estimator and suggest a computationally simple and consistent variance estimator. We also demonstrate that the conditional mean imputation method often leads to inconsistent estimates in generalized linear models, while several other methods are either computationally intensive or lead to parameter estimates that are biased or more variable compared to the proposed multiple imputation estimator. In an extensive simulation study, we assess the bias and variability of different approaches within the context of a logistic regression model and compare variance estimation methods for the proposed multiple imputation estimator. Lastly, we apply several methods to analyze the data set from a recently-conducted GenIMS study.

  16. [Estimation of time detection limit for human cytochrome b in females of Lutzomyia evansi].

    PubMed

    Vergara, José Gabriel; Verbel-Vergara, Daniel; Montesino, Ana Milena; Pérez-Doria, Alveiro; Bejarano, Eduar Elías

    2017-03-29

    Molecular biology techniques have allowed a better knowledge of sources of blood meals in vector insects. However, the usefulness of these techniques depends on both the quantity of ingested blood and the digestion process in the insect. To identify the time limit for detection of the human cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene in experimentally fed females of Lutzomyia evansi. Eight groups of L. evansi females were fed on human blood and sacrificed at intervals of 24 hours post-ingestion. Total DNA was extracted from each female and a segment of 358 bp of Cyt b was amplified. In order to eliminate false positives, amplification products were subjected to a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The human Cyt b gene segment was detected in 86% (49/57) of the females of L. evansi, from 0 to 168 hours after blood ingestion. In 7% (4/57) of the individuals we amplified insect DNA, while in the remaining 7%, the band of interest was not amplified. We did not find any statistical differences between groups of females sacrificed at different times post-blood meal regarding the amplification of the human Cyt b gene segment or the number of samples amplified. The human Cyt b gene segment was detectable in L. evansi females up to 168 hours after blood ingestion.

  17. Confocal laser-induced fluorescence detector for narrow capillary system with yoctomole limit of detection.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Mitchell T; Lynch, Kyle B; Zhu, Zaifang; Chen, Huang; Lu, Joann J; Pu, Qiaosheng; Liu, Shaorong

    2017-04-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detectors for low-micrometer and sub-micrometer capillary on-column detection are not commercially available. In this paper, we describe in details how to construct a confocal LIF detector to address this issue. We characterize the detector by determining its limit of detection (LOD), linear dynamic range (LDR) and background signal drift; a very low LOD (~70 fluorescein molecules or 12 yoctomole fluorescein), a wide LDR (greater than 3 orders of magnitude) and a small background signal drift (~1.2-fold of the root mean square noise) are obtained. For detecting analytes inside a low-micrometer and sub-micrometer capillary, proper alignment is essential. We present a simple protocol to align the capillary with the optical system and use the position-lock capability of a translation stage to fix the capillary in position during the experiment. To demonstrate the feasibility of using this detector for narrow capillary systems, we build a 2-μm-i.d. capillary flow injection analysis (FIA) system using the newly developed LIF prototype as a detector and obtain an FIA LOD of 14 zeptomole fluorescein. We also separate a DNA ladder sample by bare narrow capillary - hydrodynamic chromatography and use the LIF prototype to monitor the resolved DNA fragments. We obtain not only well-resolved peaks but also the quantitative information of all DNA fragments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. AN ALTERNATIVE CALIBRATION OF CR-39 DETECTORS FOR RADON DETECTION BEYOND THE SATURATION LIMIT.

    PubMed

    Franci, Daniele; Aureli, Tommaso; Cardellini, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Time-integrated measurements of indoor radon levels are commonly carried out using solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs), due to the numerous advantages offered by this radiation detection technique. However, the use of SSNTD also presents some problems that may affect the accuracy of the results. The effect of overlapping tracks often results in the underestimation of the detected track density, which leads to the reduction of the counting efficiency for increasing radon exposure. This article aims to address the effect of overlapping tracks by proposing an alternative calibration technique based on the measurement of the fraction of the detector surface covered by alpha tracks. The method has been tested against a set of Monte Carlo data and then applied to a set of experimental data collected at the radon chamber of the Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, at the ENEA centre in Casaccia, using CR-39 detectors. It has been proved that the method allows to extend the detectable range of radon exposure far beyond the intrinsic limit imposed by the standard calibration based on the track density. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. System for detecting and limiting electrical ground faults within electrical devices

    DOEpatents

    Gaubatz, Donald C.

    1990-01-01

    An electrical ground fault detection and limitation system for employment with a nuclear reactor utilizing a liquid metal coolant. Elongate electromagnetic pumps submerged within the liquid metal coolant and electrical support equipment experiencing an insulation breakdown occasion the development of electrical ground fault current. Without some form of detection and control, these currents may build to damaging power levels to expose the pump drive components to liquid metal coolant such as sodium with resultant undesirable secondary effects. Such electrical ground fault currents are detected and controlled through the employment of an isolated power input to the pumps and with the use of a ground fault control conductor providing a direct return path from the affected components to the power source. By incorporating a resistance arrangement with the ground fault control conductor, the amount of fault current permitted to flow may be regulated to the extent that the reactor may remain in operation until maintenance may be performed, notwithstanding the existence of the fault. Monitors such as synchronous demodulators may be employed to identify and evaluate fault currents for each phase of a polyphase power, and control input to the submerged pump and associated support equipment.

  20. A novel dNTP-limited PCR and HRM assay to detect Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lichen; Zhang, Xiaoqing; You, Guoling; Yu, Yongguo; Fu, Qihua

    2018-06-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is caused by a microdeletion of chromosome arm 7q11.23. A rapid and inexpensive genotyping method to detect microdeletion on 7q11.23 needs to be developed for the diagnosis of WBS. This study describes the development of a new type of molecular diagnosis method to detect microdeletion on 7q11.23 based upon high-resolution melting (HRM). Four genes on 7q11.23 were selected as the target genes for the deletion genotyping. dNTP-limited duplex PCR was used to amplify the reference gene, CFTR, and one of the four genes respectively on 7q11.23. An HRM assay was performed on the PCR products, and the height ratio of the negative derivative peaks between the target gene and reference gene was employed to analyze the copy number variation of the target region. A new genotyping method for detecting 7q11.23 deletion was developed based upon dNTP-limited PCR and HRM, which cost only 96 min. Samples from 15 WBS patients and 12 healthy individuals were genotyped by this method in a blinded fashion, and the sensitivity and specificity was 100% (95% CI, 0.80-1, and 95% CI, 0.75-1, respectively) which was proved by CytoScan HD array. The HRM assay we developed is an rapid, inexpensive, and highly accurate method for genotyping 7q11.23 deletion. It is potentially useful in the clinical diagnosis of WBS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. WE-H-207A-09: Theoretical Limits to Molecular Biomarker Detection Using Magnetic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, J; Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH

    Purpose: Estimate the limits of molecular biomarker detection using magnetic nanoparticle methods like in vivo ELISA. Methods: Magnetic nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field produce a magnetization that can be detected at exceedingly low levels because the signal at the harmonic frequencies is uniquely produced by the nanoparticles. Because the magnetization can also be used to characterize the nanoparticle rotational freedom, the bound state can be found. If the nanoparticles are coated with molecules that bind the desired biomarker, the rotational freedom reflects the biomarker concentration. The irreducible noise limit is the thermal noise or Johnson noise of the tissuemore » and the contrast that can be measured must be larger than that limit. The contrast produced is a function of the applied field and depends strongly on nanoparticle volume. We have estimated the contrast using a Langevin function of a single composite variable to approximate the full stochastic Langevin equation for nanoparticle dynamics. Results: The thermal noise for a bandwidth reasonable for spectroscopy suggests mid zeptomolar (10–21) to low attomolar (10–18) concentrations can be measured in a volume that is 10cm in scale. The suggested sensitivity is far below the physiologically concentrations of almost all critical biomarkers including cytokines (picomolar), hormones (nanomolar) and heat shock proteins. Conclusion: The sensitivity of in vivo ELISA concentration measurements should be sufficient to measure physiological concentrations of critical biomarkers like cytokines in vivo. Further the sensitivity should be sufficient to measure concentrations of other biomarkers that are six to eight orders of magnitude lower in concentration than immune signaling molecules like cytokines. NIH - 1U54CA151662-01 Department of Radiology.« less

  2. STATISTICS OF GAMMA-RAY POINT SOURCES BELOW THE FERMI DETECTION LIMIT

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshev, Dmitry; Hogg, David W., E-mail: dm137@nyu.edu

    2011-09-10

    An analytic relation between the statistics of photons in pixels and the number counts of multi-photon point sources is used to constrain the distribution of gamma-ray point sources below the Fermi detection limit at energies above 1 GeV and at latitudes below and above 30 deg. The derived source-count distribution is consistent with the distribution found by the Fermi Collaboration based on the first Fermi point-source catalog. In particular, we find that the contribution of resolved and unresolved active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to the total gamma-ray flux is below 20%-25%. In the best-fit model, the AGN-like point-source fraction is 17%more » {+-} 2%. Using the fact that the Galactic emission varies across the sky while the extragalactic diffuse emission is isotropic, we put a lower limit of 51% on Galactic diffuse emission and an upper limit of 32% on the contribution from extragalactic weak sources, such as star-forming galaxies. Possible systematic uncertainties are discussed.« less

  3. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 136 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... calculated method detection limit. To insure that the estimate of the method detection limit is a good...) where: MDL = the method detection limit t(n-1,1- α=.99) = the students' t value appropriate for a 99... Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11 B Appendix B to Part 136 Protection of Environment...

  4. Evaluation of MidIR fibre optic reflectance: Detection limit, reproducibility and binary mixture discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessa, Clarimma; Bagán, Héctor; García, José Francisco

    2013-11-01

    MidIR fibre optic reflectance (MidIR-FORS) is a promising analytical technique in the field of science conservation, especially because it is non-destructive. Another advantage of MidIR-FORS is that the obtained information is representative, as a large amount of spectral data can be collected. Although the technique has a high potential and is almost routinely applied, its quality parameters have not been thoroughly studied in the specific application of analysis of artistic materials. The objective of this study is to evaluate the instrumental capabilities of MidIR-FORS for the analysis of artwork materials in terms of detection limit, reproducibility, and mixture characterisation. The study has been focused on oil easel painting and several paints of known composition have been analysed. Paint layers include blue pigments not only because of their important role along art history, but also because their physical and spectroscopic characteristics allow a better evaluation of the MidIR-FORS capabilities. The results of the analysis indicate that MidIR-FORS supplies a signal affected by different factors, such as the optical, morphological and physical properties of the surface, in addition to the composition of materials analysed. Consequently, the detection limits established are relatively high for artistic objects (Prussian blue - PB 2.1-6.5%; Phthalocyanine blue - Pht 6.3-10.2%; synthetic Ultramarine blue - UM 12.1%) and may therefore lead to an incomplete description of the artwork. Reproducibility of the technique over time and across surface has been determined. The results show that the major sources of dispersion are the heterogeneity of the pigments distribution, physical features, and band shape distortions. The total dispersion is around 4% for the most intense bands (oil) and increases up to 26% when weak or overlapped bands are considered (PB, Pht, UM). The application of different pre-treatments (cutoff of fibres absorption, Savizky-Golay smoothing

  5. Nanoparticle size detection limits by single particle ICP-MS for 40 elements.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungyun; Bi, Xiangyu; Reed, Robert B; Ranville, James F; Herckes, Pierre; Westerhoff, Paul

    2014-09-02

    The quantification and characterization of natural, engineered, and incidental nano- to micro-size particles are beneficial to assessing a nanomaterial's performance in manufacturing, their fate and transport in the environment, and their potential risk to human health. Single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) can sensitively quantify the amount and size distribution of metallic nanoparticles suspended in aqueous matrices. To accurately obtain the nanoparticle size distribution, it is critical to have knowledge of the size detection limit (denoted as Dmin) using spICP-MS for a wide range of elements (other than a few available assessed ones) that have been or will be synthesized into engineered nanoparticles. Herein is described a method to estimate the size detection limit using spICP-MS and then apply it to nanoparticles composed of 40 different elements. The calculated Dmin values correspond well for a few of the elements with their detectable sizes that are available in the literature. Assuming each nanoparticle sample is composed of one element, Dmin values vary substantially among the 40 elements: Ta, U, Ir, Rh, Th, Ce, and Hf showed the lowest Dmin values, ≤10 nm; Bi, W, In, Pb, Pt, Ag, Au, Tl, Pd, Y, Ru, Cd, and Sb had Dmin in the range of 11-20 nm; Dmin values of Co, Sr, Sn, Zr, Ba, Te, Mo, Ni, V, Cu, Cr, Mg, Zn, Fe, Al, Li, and Ti were located at 21-80 nm; and Se, Ca, and Si showed high Dmin values, greater than 200 nm. A range of parameters that influence the Dmin, such as instrument sensitivity, nanoparticle density, and background noise, is demonstrated. It is observed that, when the background noise is low, the instrument sensitivity and nanoparticle density dominate the Dmin significantly. Approaches for reducing the Dmin, e.g., collision cell technology (CCT) and analyte isotope selection, are also discussed. To validate the Dmin estimation approach, size distributions for three engineered nanoparticle samples were

  6. Refining historical limits method to improve disease cluster detection, New York City, New York, USA.

    PubMed

    Levin-Rector, Alison; Wilson, Elisha L; Fine, Annie D; Greene, Sharon K

    2015-02-01

    Since the early 2000s, the Bureau of Communicable Disease of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has analyzed reportable infectious disease data weekly by using the historical limits method to detect unusual clusters that could represent outbreaks. This method typically produced too many signals for each to be investigated with available resources while possibly failing to signal during true disease outbreaks. We made method refinements that improved the consistency of case inclusion criteria and accounted for data lags and trends and aberrations in historical data. During a 12-week period in 2013, we prospectively assessed these refinements using actual surveillance data. The refined method yielded 74 signals, a 45% decrease from what the original method would have produced. Fewer and less biased signals included a true citywide increase in legionellosis and a localized campylobacteriosis cluster subsequently linked to live-poultry markets. Future evaluations using simulated data could complement this descriptive assessment.

  7. Absolute detector calibration using twin beams.

    PubMed

    Peřina, Jan; Haderka, Ondřej; Michálek, Václav; Hamar, Martin

    2012-07-01

    A method for the determination of absolute quantum detection efficiency is suggested based on the measurement of photocount statistics of twin beams. The measured histograms of joint signal-idler photocount statistics allow us to eliminate an additional noise superimposed on an ideal calibration field composed of only photon pairs. This makes the method superior above other approaches presently used. Twin beams are described using a paired variant of quantum superposition of signal and noise.

  8. Development of Detectability Limits for On-Orbit Inspection of Space Shuttle Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, Ryan A.; Johnson, David G.; Mastropietro, A. J.; Ancarrow, Walt C.

    2005-01-01

    At the conclusion of the Columbia Accident Investigation, one of the recommendations of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) was that NASA develop and implement an inspection plan for the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) system components of the Space Shuttle. To address these issues, a group of scientists and engineers at NASA Langley Research Center proposed the use of an IR camera to inspect the RCC. Any crack in an RCC panel changes the thermal resistance of the material in the direction perpendicular to the crack. The change in thermal resistance can be made visible by introducing a heat flow across the crack and using an IR camera to image the resulting surface temperature distribution. The temperature difference across the crack depends on the change in the thermal resistance, the length of the crack, the local thermal gradient, and the rate of radiation exchange with the environment. This paper describes how the authors derived the minimum thermal gradient detectability limits for a through crack in an RCC panel. This paper will also show, through the use of a transient, 3-dimensional, finite element model, that these minimum gradients naturally exist on-orbit. The results from the finite element model confirm that there are sufficient thermal gradient to detect a crack on 96% of the RCC leading edge.

  9. Potential and limits of Raman spectroscopy for carotenoid detection in microorganisms: implications for astrobiology

    PubMed Central

    Jehlička, Jan; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Osterrothová, Kateřina; Novotná, Julie; Nedbalová, Linda; Kopecký, Jiří; Němec, Ivan; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, it is demonstrated how Raman spectroscopy can be used to detect different carotenoids as possible biomarkers in various groups of microorganisms. The question which arose from previous studies concerns the level of unambiguity of discriminating carotenoids using common Raman microspectrometers. A series of laboratory-grown microorganisms of different taxonomic affiliation was investigated, such as halophilic heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria, the anoxygenic phototrophs, the non-halophilic heterotrophs as well as eukaryotes (Ochrophyta, Rhodophyta and Chlorophyta). The data presented show that Raman spectroscopy is a suitable tool to assess the presence of carotenoids of these organisms in cultures. Comparison is made with the high-performance liquid chromatography approach of analysing pigments in extracts. Direct measurements on cultures provide fast and reliable identification of the pigments. Some of the carotenoids studied are proposed as tracers for halophiles, in contrast with others which can be considered as biomarkers of other genera. The limits of application of Raman spectroscopy are discussed for a few cases where the current Raman spectroscopic approach does not allow discriminating structurally very similar carotenoids. The database reported can be used for applications in geobiology and exobiology for the detection of pigment signals in natural settings. PMID:25368348

  10. Lower Limits on Aperture Size for an ExoEarth Detecting Coronagraphic Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, Christopher C.; Roberge, Aki; Mandell, Avi; Clampin, Mark; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; McElwain, Michael W.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.

    2015-01-01

    The yield of Earth-like planets will likely be a primary science metric for future space-based missions that will drive telescope aperture size. Maximizing the exoEarth candidate yield is therefore critical to minimizing the required aperture. Here we describe a method for exoEarth candidate yield maximization that simultaneously optimizes, for the first time, the targets chosen for observation, the number of visits to each target, the delay time between visits, and the exposure time of every observation. This code calculates both the detection time and multiwavelength spectral characterization time required for planets. We also refine the astrophysical assumptions used as inputs to these calculations, relying on published estimates of planetary occurrence rates as well as theoretical and observational constraints on terrestrial planet sizes and classical habitable zones. Given these astrophysical assumptions, optimistic telescope and instrument assumptions, and our new completeness code that produces the highest yields to date, we suggest lower limits on the aperture size required to detect and characterize a statistically motivated sample of exoEarths.

  11. Estimation of potential and limits of bivalve closure response to detect contaminants: application to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Tran, Damien; Ciret, Pierre; Ciutat, Aurélie; Durrieu, Gilles; Massabuau, Jean-Charles

    2003-04-01

    Bivalve closure responses to detect contaminants have often been studied in ecotoxicology as an aquatic pollution biosensor. We present a new laboratory procedure to estimate its potential and limits for various contaminants and animal susceptible to stress. The study was performed in the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea and applied to cadmium. To take into account the rate of spontaneous closures, we integrated stress problems associated with fixation by a valve in common apparatus and the spontaneous rhythm associated with circadian activity to focus on conditions with the lowest probability of spontaneous closing. Moreover, we developed an original system by impedance valvometry, using light-weight impedance electrodes, to study free-ranging animals in low-stress conditions and a new analytical approach to describe valve closure behavior as a function of response time and concentration of contaminant. In C. fluminea, we show that cadmium concentrations above 50 microg/L can be detected within less than 1 h, concentrations down to 16 microg/L require 5 h of integration time, and values lower than 16 microg/L cannot be distinguished from background noise. Our procedure improved by a factor of six the cadmium sensitivity threshold reported in the literature. Problems of field applications are discussed.

  12. Breath Analysis Using Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Breath Biomarkers, Spectral Fingerprints, and Detection Limits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuji; Sahay, Peeyush

    2009-01-01

    Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC) disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS). Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis. PMID:22408503

  13. Detection of flow limitation in obstructive sleep apnea with an artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Norman, Robert G; Rapoport, David M; Ayappa, Indu

    2007-09-01

    During sleep, the development of a plateau on the inspiratory airflow/time contour provides a non-invasive indicator of airway collapsibility. Humans recognize this abnormal contour easily, and this study replicates this with an artificial neural network (ANN) using a normalized shape. Five 10 min segments were selected from each of 18 sleep records (respiratory airflow measured with a nasal cannula) with varying degrees of sleep disordered breathing. Each breath was visually scored for shape, and breaths split randomly into a training and test set. Equally spaced, peak amplitude normalized flow values (representing breath shape) formed the only input to a back propagation ANN. Following training, breath-by-breath agreement of the ANN with the manual classification was tabulated for the training and test sets separately. Agreement of the ANN was 89% in the training set and 70.6% in the test set. When the categories of 'probably normal' and 'normal', and 'probably flow limited' and 'flow limited' were combined, the agreement increased to 92.7% and 89.4% respectively, similar to the intra- and inter-rater agreements obtained by a visual classification of these breaths. On a naive dataset, the agreement of the ANN to visual classification was 57.7% overall and 82.4% when the categories were collapsed. A neural network based only on the shape of inspiratory airflow succeeded in classifying breaths as to the presence/absence of flow limitation. This approach could be used to provide a standardized, reproducible and automated means of detecting elevated upper airway resistance.

  14. Solid phase extraction of large volume of water and beverage samples to improve detection limits for GC-MS analysis of bisphenol A and four other bisphenols.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xu-Liang; Popovic, Svetlana

    2018-01-01

    Solid phase extraction (SPE) of large volumes of water and beverage products was investigated for the GC-MS analysis of bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol AF (BPAF), bisphenol F (BPF), bisphenol E (BPE), and bisphenol B (BPB). While absolute recoveries of the method were improved for water and some beverage products (e.g. diet cola, iced tea), breakthrough may also have occurred during SPE of 200 mL of other beverages (e.g. BPF in cola). Improvements in method detection limits were observed with the analysis of large sample volumes for all bisphenols at ppt (pg/g) to sub-ppt levels. This improvement was found to be proportional to sample volumes for water and beverage products with less interferences and noise levels around the analytes. Matrix effects and interferences were observed during SPE of larger volumes (100 and 200 mL) of the beverage products, and affected the accurate analysis of BPF. This improved method was used to analyse bisphenols in various beverage samples, and only BPA was detected, with levels ranging from 0.022 to 0.030 ng/g for products in PET bottles, and 0.085 to 0.32 ng/g for products in cans.

  15. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  16. A practical approach to determination of laboratory GC-MS limits of detection.

    PubMed

    Underwood, P J; Kananen, G E; Armitage, E K

    1997-01-01

    Determination of limit of detection (LOD) values in a forensic laboratory serves a fundamental forensic requirement for assay performance. In addition to demonstrating assay capability, LOD values can also be used to fulfill certification requirements of a high-volume forensic drug laboratory. The LOD was defined as the lowest concentration of drug that the laboratory can detect in a specimen with forensic certainty at a minimum of 85% of the time. Overall batch acceptance criteria included acceptable quantitation of control materials (within 20% of target), acceptable chromatography (symmetry, peak integration, peak shape, peak, and baseline resolution), retention time within +/-1% of the extracted standard, and mass ion ratios within +/-20% of the extracted standard mass ion ratios. Individual specimen acceptance criteria were the same as the batch acceptance criteria excluding the quantitation requirement. Data were collected from all instruments on different runs. A minimum of ten data points was required for each certified instrument, and a minimum of 85% of data points was acceptable. Quantitation within +/-20% of the LOD concentration was not required, but acceptable mass ratios were required. Data points with poor chromatography (internal standard failed mass ratios; interference of the baseline, for example, shoulders; asymmetry; and baseline resolution) was omitted from the acceptable rate calculation. Data points with good chromatography with failed mass ion ratios were included in the acceptable rate calculation. With these criteria, we established the following LODs: 11-nor-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid, 2 ng/mL; benzoylecgonine, 5 ng/mL; phencyclidine, 2.5 ng/mL; amphetamine, 150 ng/mL; methamphetamine, 100 ng/mL; codeine, 500 ng/mL; and morphine, 1000 ng/mL.

  17. Detection limits of tidal-wetland sequences to identify variable rupture modes of megathrust earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shennan, Ian; Garrett, Ed; Barlow, Natasha

    2016-10-01

    Recent paleoseismological studies question whether segment boundaries identified for 20th and 21st century great, >M8, earthquakes persist through multiple earthquake cycles or whether smaller segments with different boundaries rupture and cause significant hazards. The smaller segments may include some currently slipping rather than locked. In this review, we outline general principles regarding indicators of relative sea-level change in tidal wetlands and the conditions in which paleoseismic indicators must be distinct from those resulting from non-seismic processes. We present new evidence from sites across southcentral Alaska to illustrate different detection limits of paleoseismic indicators and consider alternative interpretations for marsh submergence and emergence. We compare predictions of coseismic uplift and subsidence derived from geophysical models of earthquakes with different rupture modes. The spatial patterns of agreement and misfits between model predictions and quantitative reconstructions of coseismic submergence and emergence suggest that no earthquake within the last 4000 years had a pattern of rupture the same as the Mw 9.2 Alaska earthquake in 1964. From the Alaska examples and research from other subduction zones we suggest that If we want to understand whether a megathrust ruptures in segments of variable length in different earthquakes, we need to be site-specific as to what sort of geological-based criteria eliminate the possibility of a particular rupture mode in different earthquakes. We conclude that coastal paleoseismological studies benefit from a methodological framework that employs rigorous evaluation of five essential criteria and a sixth which may be very robust but only occur at some sites: 1 - lateral extent of peat-mud or mud-peat couplets with sharp contacts; 2 - suddenness of submergence or emergence, and replicated within each site; 3 - amount of vertical motion, quantified with 95% error terms and replicated within each

  18. 237Np absolute delayed neutron yield measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doré, D.; Ledoux, X.; Nolte, R.; Gagnon-Moisan, F.; Thulliez, L.; Litaize, O.; Roettger, S.; Serot, O.

    2017-09-01

    237Np absolute delayed neutron yields have been measured at different incident neutron energies from 1.5 to 16 MeV. The experiment was performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) facility where the Van de Graaff accelerator and the cyclotron CV28 delivered 9 different neutron energy beams using p+T, d+D and d+T reactions. The detection system is made up of twelve 3He tubes inserted into a polyethylene cylinder. In this paper, the experimental setup and the data analysis method are described. The evolution of the absolute DN yields as a function of the neutron incident beam energies are presented and compared to experimental data found in the literature and data from the libraries.

  19. Visual acuity of the honey bee retina and the limits for feature detection.

    PubMed

    Rigosi, Elisa; Wiederman, Steven D; O'Carroll, David C

    2017-04-06

    Visual abilities of the honey bee have been studied for more than 100 years, recently revealing unexpectedly sophisticated cognitive skills rivalling those of vertebrates. However, the physiological limits of the honey bee eye have been largely unaddressed and only studied in an unnatural, dark state. Using a bright display and intracellular recordings, we here systematically investigated the angular sensitivity across the light adapted eye of honey bee foragers. Angular sensitivity is a measure of photoreceptor receptive field size and thus small values indicate higher visual acuity. Our recordings reveal a fronto-ventral acute zone in which angular sensitivity falls below 1.9°, some 30% smaller than previously reported. By measuring receptor noise and responses to moving dark objects, we also obtained direct measures of the smallest features detectable by the retina. In the frontal eye, single photoreceptors respond to objects as small as 0.6° × 0.6°, with >99% reliability. This indicates that honey bee foragers possess significantly better resolution than previously reported or estimated behaviourally, and commonly assumed in modelling of bee acuity.

  20. Polarization-resolved sensing with tilted fiber Bragg gratings: theory and limits of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialiayeu, Aliaksandr; Ianoul, Anatoli; Albert, Jacques

    2015-08-01

    Polarization based sensing with tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) sensors is analysed theoretically by two alternative approaches. The first method is based on tracking the grating transmission for two orthogonal states of linear polarized light that are extracted from the measured Jones matrix or Stokes vectors of the TFBG transmission spectra. The second method is based on the measurements along the system principle axes and polarization dependent loss (PDL) parameter, also calculated from measured data. It is shown that the frequent crossing of the Jones matrix eigenvalues as a function of wavelength leads to a non-physical interchange of the calculated principal axes; a method to remove this unwanted mathematical artefact and to restore the order of the system eigenvalues and the corresponding principal axes is provided. A comparison of the two approaches reveals that the PDL method provides a smaller standard deviation and therefore lower limit of detection in refractometric sensing. Furthermore, the polarization analysis of the measured spectra allows for the identification of the principal states of polarization of the sensor system and consequentially for the calculation of the transmission spectrum for any incident polarization state. The stability of the orientation of the system principal axes is also investigated as a function of wavelength.

  1. The Use and Abuse of Limits of Detection in Environmental Analytical Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Richard J. C.

    2008-01-01

    The limit of detection (LoD) serves as an important method performance measure that is useful for the comparison of measurement techniques and the assessment of likely signal to noise performance, especially in environmental analytical chemistry. However, the LoD is only truly related to the precision characteristics of the analytical instrument employed for the analysis and the content of analyte in the blank sample. This article discusses how other criteria, such as sampling volume, can serve to distort the quoted LoD artificially and make comparison between various analytical methods inequitable. In order to compare LoDs between methods properly, it is necessary to state clearly all of the input parameters relating to the measurements that have been used in the calculation of the LoD. Additionally, the article discusses that the use of LoDs in contexts other than the comparison of the attributes of analytical methods, in particular when reporting analytical results, may be confusing, less informative than quoting the actual result with an accompanying statement of uncertainty, and may act to bias descriptive statistics. PMID:18690384

  2. Probe-Specific Procedure to Estimate Sensitivity and Detection Limits for 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alexander J; Granwehr, Josef; Lesbats, Clémentine; Krupa, James L; Six, Joseph S; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Thomas, Neil R; Auer, Dorothee P; Meersmann, Thomas; Faas, Henryk M

    2016-01-01

    Due to low fluorine background signal in vivo, 19F is a good marker to study the fate of exogenous molecules by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using equilibrium nuclear spin polarization schemes. Since 19F MRI applications require high sensitivity, it can be important to assess experimental feasibility during the design stage already by estimating the minimum detectable fluorine concentration. Here we propose a simple method for the calibration of MRI hardware, providing sensitivity estimates for a given scanner and coil configuration. An experimental "calibration factor" to account for variations in coil configuration and hardware set-up is specified. Once it has been determined in a calibration experiment, the sensitivity of an experiment or, alternatively, the minimum number of required spins or the minimum marker concentration can be estimated without the need for a pilot experiment. The definition of this calibration factor is derived based on standard equations for the sensitivity in magnetic resonance, yet the method is not restricted by the limited validity of these equations, since additional instrument-dependent factors are implicitly included during calibration. The method is demonstrated using MR spectroscopy and imaging experiments with different 19F samples, both paramagnetically and susceptibility broadened, to approximate a range of realistic environments.

  3. Comparative study of the effectiveness and limitations of current methods for detecting sequence coevolution.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wenzhi; Kaya, Cihan; Dutta, Anindita; Horovitz, Amnon; Bahar, Ivet

    2015-06-15

    With rapid accumulation of sequence data on several species, extracting rational and systematic information from multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) is becoming increasingly important. Currently, there is a plethora of computational methods for investigating coupled evolutionary changes in pairs of positions along the amino acid sequence, and making inferences on structure and function. Yet, the significance of coevolution signals remains to be established. Also, a large number of false positives (FPs) arise from insufficient MSA size, phylogenetic background and indirect couplings. Here, a set of 16 pairs of non-interacting proteins is thoroughly examined to assess the effectiveness and limitations of different methods. The analysis shows that recent computationally expensive methods designed to remove biases from indirect couplings outperform others in detecting tertiary structural contacts as well as eliminating intermolecular FPs; whereas traditional methods such as mutual information benefit from refinements such as shuffling, while being highly efficient. Computations repeated with 2,330 pairs of protein families from the Negatome database corroborated these results. Finally, using a training dataset of 162 families of proteins, we propose a combined method that outperforms existing individual methods. Overall, the study provides simple guidelines towards the choice of suitable methods and strategies based on available MSA size and computing resources. Software is freely available through the Evol component of ProDy API. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Detecting the limits of bronchial closure methods in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Tezel, C; Urek, S; Keles, M; Kiral, H; Koşar, A; Dudu, C; Arman, B

    2006-04-01

    Bronchopleural fistula is a serious complication of major lung resections that may lead to mortality. An experimental animal model was designed to find out the safest bronchial closure method by comparing leakage rates under pressure. The tracheobronchial trees of 50 freshly dead sheep were prepared for either manual closure or closure with a stapler. After left pneumonectomy, the specimens were divided into five groups (n = 10); 3/0 Premilene suture was used with two "u" sutures + interrupted sutures in Group I; in Group II, 3/0 Premilene sutures with continuous horizontal mattress + over-over continuous sutures were used. In Group III and IV the same techniques were used with 3/0 Vicryl. A stapler was used in Group V. Specimens were intubated with an endotracheal tube, connected to a sphygmomanometer, and subsequently positioned under water. The pressure level at which we detected air bubbles indicated the limits of the technique. The median leakage pressure resistance was significantly lower in Group III (135 mm Hg) ( P = 0.001). The best results were achieved by using the continuous horizontal mattress + over-over continuous suture technique. No statistical significance difference was found between the stapler group, Groups I, II, and IV in terms of median leakage pressures. This trial suggests that manual suture closure using an appropriate technique and monofilament materials is as safe as the stapler.

  5. Direct Detection Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy: A Method to Push the Limits of Resolution and Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hart, James L; Lang, Andrew C; Leff, Asher C; Longo, Paolo; Trevor, Colin; Twesten, Ray D; Taheri, Mitra L

    2017-08-15

    In many cases, electron counting with direct detection sensors offers improved resolution, lower noise, and higher pixel density compared to conventional, indirect detection sensors for electron microscopy applications. Direct detection technology has previously been utilized, with great success, for imaging and diffraction, but potential advantages for spectroscopy remain unexplored. Here we compare the performance of a direct detection sensor operated in counting mode and an indirect detection sensor (scintillator/fiber-optic/CCD) for electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Clear improvements in measured detective quantum efficiency and combined energy resolution/energy field-of-view are offered by counting mode direct detection, showing promise for efficient spectrum imaging, low-dose mapping of beam-sensitive specimens, trace element analysis, and time-resolved spectroscopy. Despite the limited counting rate imposed by the readout electronics, we show that both core-loss and low-loss spectral acquisition are practical. These developments will benefit biologists, chemists, physicists, and materials scientists alike.

  6. A Shadowing Problem in the Detection of Overlapping Communities: Lifting the Resolution Limit through a Cascading Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jean-Gabriel; Allard, Antoine; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Dubé, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    Community detection is the process of assigning nodes and links in significant communities (e.g. clusters, function modules) and its development has led to a better understanding of complex networks. When applied to sizable networks, we argue that most detection algorithms correctly identify prominent communities, but fail to do so across multiple scales. As a result, a significant fraction of the network is left uncharted. We show that this problem stems from larger or denser communities overshadowing smaller or sparser ones, and that this effect accounts for most of the undetected communities and unassigned links. We propose a generic cascading approach to community detection that circumvents the problem. Using real and artificial network datasets with three widely used community detection algorithms, we show how a simple cascading procedure allows for the detection of the missing communities. This work highlights a new detection limit of community structure, and we hope that our approach can inspire better community detection algorithms. PMID:26461919

  7. Low-picomolar limits of detection using high-power light-emitting diodes for fluorescence.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Ebbing P; Lucy, Charles A

    2006-05-01

    Fluorescence detectors are ever more frequently being used with light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as the light source. Technological advances in the solid-state lighting industry have produced LEDs which are also suitable tools in analytical measurements. LEDs are now available which deliver 700 mW of radiometric power. While this greater light power can increase the fluorescence signal, it is not trivial to make proper use of this light. This new generation of LEDs has a large emitting area and a highly divergent beam. This presents a classic problem in optics where one must choose between either a small focused light spot, or high light collection efficiency. We have selected for light collection efficiency, which yields a light spot somewhat larger than the emitting area of the LED. This light is focused onto a flow cell. Increasing the detector cell internal diameter (i.d.) produces gains in (sensitivity)3. However, since the detector cell i.d. is smaller than the LED spot size, scattering of excitation light towards the detector remains a significant source of background signal. This can be minimized through the use of spectral filters and spatial filters in the form of pinholes. The detector produced a limit of detection (LOD) of 3 pM, which is roughly three orders of magnitude lower than other reports of LED-based fluorescence detectors. Furthermore, this LOD comes within a factor of six of much more expensive laser-based fluorescence systems. This detector has been used to monitor a separation from a gel filtration column of fluorescently labeled BSA from residual labeling reagent. The LOD of fluorescently labeled BSA is 25 pM.

  8. Compact quantum dot-antibody conjugates for FRET immunoassays with subnanomolar detection limits.

    PubMed

    Mattera, Lucia; Bhuckory, Shashi; Wegner, K David; Qiu, Xue; Agnese, Fabio; Lincheneau, Christophe; Senden, Tim; Djurado, David; Charbonnière, Loïc J; Hildebrandt, Niko; Reiss, Peter

    2016-06-07

    A novel two-step approach for quantum dot (QD) functionalization and bioconjugation is presented, which yields ultra-compact, stable, and highly luminescent antibody-QD conjugates suitable for use in FRET immunoassays. Hydrophobic InPZnS/ZnSe/ZnS (emission wavelength: 530 nm), CdSe/ZnS (605 nm), and CdSeTe/ZnS (705 nm) QDs were surface functionalized with zwitterionic penicillamine, enabling aqueous phase transfer under conservation of the photoluminescence properties. Post-functionalization with a heterobifunctional crosslinker, containing a lipoic acid group and a maleimide function, enabled the subsequent coupling to sulfhydryl groups of proteins. This was demonstrated by QD conjugation with fragmented antibodies (F(ab)). The obtained F(ab)-QD conjugates range among the smallest antibody-functionalized nanoprobes ever reported, with a hydrodynamic diameter <13 nm, PL quantum yield up to 66% at 705 nm, and colloidal stability of several months in various buffers. They were applied as FRET acceptors in homogeneous, time-gated immunoassays using Tb-antibodies as FRET donors, both coupled by an immunological sandwich complex between the two antibodies and a PSA (prostate specific antigen) biomarker. The advantages of the compact surface coating for FRET could be demonstrated by an 6.2 and 2.5 fold improvement of the limit of detection (LOD) for PSA compared to commercially available hydrophilic QDs emitting at 605 and 705 nm, respectively. While the commercial QDs contain identical inorganic cores responsible for their fluorescence, they are coated with a comparably thick amphiphilic polymer layer leading to much larger hydrodynamic diameters (>26 nm without biomolecules). The LODs of 0.8 and 3.7 ng mL(-1) obtained in 50 μL serum samples are below the clinical cut-off level of PSA (4 ng mL(-1)) and demonstrate their direct applicability in clinical diagnostics.

  9. Absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The distinction between the uses of relative and absolute spectroradiometric calibration of remote sensing systems is discussed. The advantages of detector-based absolute calibration are described, and the categories of relative and absolute system calibrations are listed. The limitations and problems associated with three common methods used for the absolute calibration of remote sensing systems are addressed. Two methods are proposed for the in-flight absolute calibration of advanced multispectral linear array systems. One makes use of a sun-illuminated panel in front of the sensor, the radiance of which is monitored by a spectrally flat pyroelectric radiometer. The other uses a large, uniform, high-radiance reference ground surface. The ground and atmospheric measurements required as input to a radiative transfer program to predict the radiance level at the entrance pupil of the orbital sensor are discussed, and the ground instrumentation is described.

  10. Addressing the Limit of Detectability of Residual Oxide Discontinuities in Friction Stir Butt Welds of Aluminum using Phased Array Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, P. H.

    2008-01-01

    This activity seeks to estimate a theoretical upper bound of detectability for a layer of oxide embedded in a friction stir weld in aluminum. The oxide is theoretically modeled as an ideal planar layer of aluminum oxide, oriented normal to an interrogating ultrasound beam. Experimentally-measured grain scattering level is used to represent the practical noise floor. Echoes from naturally-occurring oxides will necessarily fall below this theoretical limit, and must be above the measurement noise to be potentially detectable.

  11. The absolute dynamic ocean topography (ADOT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Wolfgang; Savcenko, Roman

    The sea surface slopes relative to the geoid (an equipotential surface) basically carry the in-formation on the absolute velocity field of the surface circulation. Pure oceanographic models may remain unspecific with respect to the absolute level of the ocean topography. In contrast, the geodetic approach to estimate the ocean topography as difference between sea level and the geoid gives by definition an absolute dynamic ocean topography (ADOT). This approach requires, however, a consistent treatment of geoid and sea surface heights, the first being usually derived from a band limited spherical harmonic series of the Earth gravity field and the second observed with much higher spectral resolution by satellite altimetry. The present contribution shows a procedure for estimating the ADOT along the altimeter profiles, preserving as much sea surface height details as the consistency w.r.t. the geoid heights will allow. The consistent treatment at data gaps and the coast is particular demanding and solved by a filter correction. The ADOT profiles are inspected for their innocent properties towards the coast and compared to external estimates of the ocean topography or the velocity field of the surface circulation as derived, for example, by ARGO floats.

  12. Absolute angular encoder based on optical diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Zhou, Tingting; Yuan, Bo; Wang, Liqiang

    2015-08-01

    A new encoding method for absolute angular encoder based on optical diffraction was proposed in the present study. In this method, an encoder disc is specially designed that a series of elements are uniformly spaced in one circle and each element is consisted of four diffraction gratings, which are tilted in the directions of 30°, 60°, -60° and -30°, respectively. The disc is illuminated by a coherent light and the diffractive signals are received. The positions of diffractive spots are used for absolute encoding and their intensities are for subdivision, which is different from the traditional optical encoder based on transparent/opaque binary principle. Since the track's width in the disc is not limited in the diffraction pattern, it provides a new way to solve the contradiction between the size and resolution, which is good for minimization of encoder. According to the proposed principle, the diffraction pattern disc with a diameter of 40 mm was made by lithography in the glass substrate. A prototype of absolute angular encoder with a resolution of 20" was built up. Its maximum error was tested as 78" by comparing with a small angle measuring system based on laser beam deflection.

  13. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  14. Unveiling the Gamma-Ray Source Count Distribution Below the Fermi Detection Limit with Photon Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Zechlin, Hannes-S.; Cuoco, Alessandro; Donato, Fiorenza

    The source-count distribution as a function of their flux, dN/dS, is one of the main quantities characterizing gamma-ray source populations. In this paper, we employ statistical properties of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) photon counts map to measure the composition of the extragalactic gamma-ray sky at high latitudes (|b| greater-than or slanted equal to 30°) between 1 and 10 GeV. We present a new method, generalizing the use of standard pixel-count statistics, to decompose the total observed gamma-ray emission into (a) point-source contributions, (b) the Galactic foreground contribution, and (c) a truly diffuse isotropic background contribution. Using the 6more » yr Fermi-LAT data set (P7REP), we show that the dN/dS distribution in the regime of so far undetected point sources can be consistently described with a power law with an index between 1.9 and 2.0. We measure dN/dS down to an integral flux of ~2 x 10 -11cm -2s -1, improving beyond the 3FGL catalog detection limit by about one order of magnitude. The overall dN/dS distribution is consistent with a broken power law, with a break at 2.1 +1.0 -1.3 x 10 -8cm -2s -1. The power-law index n 1 = 3.1 +0.7 -0.5 for bright sources above the break hardens to n 2 = 1.97 ± 0.03 for fainter sources below the break. A possible second break of the dN/dS distribution is constrained to be at fluxes below 6.4 x 10 -11cm -2s -1 at 95% confidence level. Finally, the high-latitude gamma-ray sky between 1 and 10 GeV is shown to be composed of ~25% point sources, ~69.3% diffuse Galactic foreground emission, and ~6% isotropic diffuse background.« less

  15. Unveiling the Gamma-Ray Source Count Distribution Below the Fermi Detection Limit with Photon Statistics

    DOE PAGES

    Zechlin, Hannes-S.; Cuoco, Alessandro; Donato, Fiorenza; ...

    2016-07-26

    The source-count distribution as a function of their flux, dN/dS, is one of the main quantities characterizing gamma-ray source populations. In this paper, we employ statistical properties of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) photon counts map to measure the composition of the extragalactic gamma-ray sky at high latitudes (|b| greater-than or slanted equal to 30°) between 1 and 10 GeV. We present a new method, generalizing the use of standard pixel-count statistics, to decompose the total observed gamma-ray emission into (a) point-source contributions, (b) the Galactic foreground contribution, and (c) a truly diffuse isotropic background contribution. Using the 6more » yr Fermi-LAT data set (P7REP), we show that the dN/dS distribution in the regime of so far undetected point sources can be consistently described with a power law with an index between 1.9 and 2.0. We measure dN/dS down to an integral flux of ~2 x 10 -11cm -2s -1, improving beyond the 3FGL catalog detection limit by about one order of magnitude. The overall dN/dS distribution is consistent with a broken power law, with a break at 2.1 +1.0 -1.3 x 10 -8cm -2s -1. The power-law index n 1 = 3.1 +0.7 -0.5 for bright sources above the break hardens to n 2 = 1.97 ± 0.03 for fainter sources below the break. A possible second break of the dN/dS distribution is constrained to be at fluxes below 6.4 x 10 -11cm -2s -1 at 95% confidence level. Finally, the high-latitude gamma-ray sky between 1 and 10 GeV is shown to be composed of ~25% point sources, ~69.3% diffuse Galactic foreground emission, and ~6% isotropic diffuse background.« less

  16. Geodesy cannot presently detect the up-dip limit of frictional locking on megathrusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, R. V.; Lindsey, E. O.; Bradley, K.; Hubbard, J.; Sathiakumar, S.; Malick, R.; Hill, E.

    2017-12-01

    Most discussions of interseismic behavior on megathrust faults focus on whether they are frictionally locked or creeping. Unfortunately, many geodetic studies of subduction zone megathrusts equate fault coupling with frictional locking. This comparison is not appropriate, as one reflects the physical properties of the fault, and the other reflects the kinematics of the fault. Much of the uncertainty about slip behavior is because in subduction zones, the shallow part of the fault is far from land, and therefore creep is not detectable by land-based GPS. Published coupling maps of subduction zone megathrusts often assume a low coupling ratio near the trench, updip from fully coupled regions. Yet, if the megathrust attains a coupling ratio of 1 anywhere on the fault (i.e., the hanging wall is moving with the same velocity as the footwall), a lower value of coupling updip of this location requires interseismic extension at a rate proportional to the decrease (Wang and Dixon, 2004). We argue that the shallow region of megathrusts lie in updip stress shadows, and do not (except under rare circumstances) experience appropriate driving forces to cause significant creep during the interseismic period. Therefore it may not be possible to determine whether these regions are frictionally locked by examining interseismic geodetic records. We demonstrate this effect using a boundary element model with rate-strengthening friction and a simplified subduction zone geometry. We show that a coupling value of zero at the trench is physically unrealistic even if only a small portion of the downdip fault zone is locked. The maximum creep at the trench depends on the width of the transition of the frictionally locked zone, but should be small (<30% of plate rate) under most circumstances. During the interseismic period, even if the shallow parts of megathrusts are frictionally unlocked, creep is likely smaller than the resolution of current seafloor geodetic techniques (which is

  17. Rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens: principles, applications, advantages and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of foodborne diseases has increased over the years and resulted in major public health problem globally. Foodborne pathogens can be found in various foods and it is important to detect foodborne pathogens to provide safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. The conventional methods used to detect foodborne pathogen are time consuming and laborious. Hence, a variety of methods have been developed for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens as it is required in many food analyses. Rapid detection methods can be categorized into nucleic acid-based, biosensor-based and immunological-based methods. This review emphasizes on the principles and application of recent rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Detection methods included are simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR), multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and oligonucleotide DNA microarray which classified as nucleic acid-based methods; optical, electrochemical and mass-based biosensors which classified as biosensor-based methods; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and lateral flow immunoassay which classified as immunological-based methods. In general, rapid detection methods are generally time-efficient, sensitive, specific and labor-saving. The developments of rapid detection methods are vital in prevention and treatment of foodborne diseases. PMID:25628612

  18. Detection limit of Mycobacterium chimaera in water samples for monitoring medical device safety: insights from a pilot experimental series.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, P W; Köhler, N; Cervera, R; Hasse, B; Sax, H; Keller, P M

    2018-07-01

    A growing number of Mycobacterium chimaera infections after cardiosurgery have been reported by several countries. These potentially fatal infections were traced back to contaminated heater-cooler devices (HCDs), which use water as a heat transfer medium. Aerosolization of water contaminated with M. chimaera from HCDs enables airborne transmission to patients undergoing open chest surgery. Infection control teams test HCD water samples for mycobacterial growth to guide preventive measures. The detection limit of M. chimaera in water samples, however, has not previously been investigated. To determine the detection limit of M. chimaera in water samples using laboratory-based serial dilution tests. An M. chimaera strain representative of the international cardiosurgery-associated M. chimaera outbreak was used to generate a logarithmic dilution series. Two different water volumes, 50 and 1000mL, were inoculated, and, after identical processing (centrifugation, decantation, and decontamination), seeded on mycobacteria growth indicator tube (MGIT) and Middlebrook 7H11 solid media. MGIT consistently showed a lower detection limit than 7H11 solid media, corresponding to a detection limit of ≥1.44 × 10 4 cfu/mL for 50mL and ≥2.4cfu/mL for 1000mL water samples. Solid media failed to detect M. chimaera in 50mL water samples. Depending on water volume and culture method, major differences exist in the detection limit of M. chimaera. In terms of sensitivity, 1000mL water samples in MGIT media performed best. Our results have important implications for infection prevention and control strategies in mitigation of the M. chimaera outbreak and healthcare water safety in general. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Compact quantum dot-antibody conjugates for FRET immunoassays with subnanomolar detection limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattera, Lucia; Bhuckory, Shashi; Wegner, K. David; Qiu, Xue; Agnese, Fabio; Lincheneau, Christophe; Senden, Tim; Djurado, David; Charbonnière, Loïc J.; Hildebrandt, Niko; Reiss, Peter

    2016-05-01

    A novel two-step approach for quantum dot (QD) functionalization and bioconjugation is presented, which yields ultra-compact, stable, and highly luminescent antibody-QD conjugates suitable for use in FRET immunoassays. Hydrophobic InPZnS/ZnSe/ZnS (emission wavelength: 530 nm), CdSe/ZnS (605 nm), and CdSeTe/ZnS (705 nm) QDs were surface functionalized with zwitterionic penicillamine, enabling aqueous phase transfer under conservation of the photoluminescence properties. Post-functionalization with a heterobifunctional crosslinker, containing a lipoic acid group and a maleimide function, enabled the subsequent coupling to sulfhydryl groups of proteins. This was demonstrated by QD conjugation with fragmented antibodies (F(ab)). The obtained F(ab)-QD conjugates range among the smallest antibody-functionalized nanoprobes ever reported, with a hydrodynamic diameter <13 nm, PL quantum yield up to 66% at 705 nm, and colloidal stability of several months in various buffers. They were applied as FRET acceptors in homogeneous, time-gated immunoassays using Tb-antibodies as FRET donors, both coupled by an immunological sandwich complex between the two antibodies and a PSA (prostate specific antigen) biomarker. The advantages of the compact surface coating for FRET could be demonstrated by an 6.2 and 2.5 fold improvement of the limit of detection (LOD) for PSA compared to commercially available hydrophilic QDs emitting at 605 and 705 nm, respectively. While the commercial QDs contain identical inorganic cores responsible for their fluorescence, they are coated with a comparably thick amphiphilic polymer layer leading to much larger hydrodynamic diameters (>26 nm without biomolecules). The LODs of 0.8 and 3.7 ng mL-1 obtained in 50 μL serum samples are below the clinical cut-off level of PSA (4 ng mL-1) and demonstrate their direct applicability in clinical diagnostics.A novel two-step approach for quantum dot (QD) functionalization and bioconjugation is presented, which yields

  20. The detection and stabilisation of limit cycle for deterministic finite automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaoguang; Chen, Zengqiang; Liu, Zhongxin; Zhang, Qing

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the topological structure properties of deterministic finite automata (DFA), under the framework of the semi-tensor product of matrices, are investigated. First, the dynamics of DFA are converted into a new algebraic form as a discrete-time linear system by means of Boolean algebra. Using this algebraic description, the approach of calculating the limit cycles of different lengths is given. Second, we present two fundamental concepts, namely, domain of attraction of limit cycle and prereachability set. Based on the prereachability set, an explicit solution of calculating domain of attraction of a limit cycle is completely characterised. Third, we define the globally attractive limit cycle, and then the necessary and sufficient condition for verifying whether all state trajectories of a DFA enter a given limit cycle in a finite number of transitions is given. Fourth, the problem of whether a DFA can be stabilised to a limit cycle by the state feedback controller is discussed. Criteria for limit cycle-stabilisation are established. All state feedback controllers which implement the minimal length trajectories from each state to the limit cycle are obtained by using the proposed algorithm. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to show the theoretical results.

  1. SUPPLEMENT TO EPA COMPENDIUM METHOD TO-15 - REDUCTION OF METHOD DETECTION LIMITS TO MEET VAPOR INTRUSION MONITORING NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Supplement to EPA Compendium Method TO-15 provides guidance for reducing the method detection limit (MDL) for the compound 1,1- dichloroethene (1,1-DCE) and for other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from 0.5 ppbv, as cited in Method TO-15, to much lower concentrations. R...

  2. SUPPLEMENT TO EPA COMPENDIUM METHOD TO-15 - REDUCTION OF METHOD DETECTION LIMITS TO MEET VAPOR INTRUSION MONITORING NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Supplement to EPA Compendium Method TO-15 provides guidance for reducing the method detection limit (MDL) for the compound 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE) and for other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from 0.5 parts per billion by volume (ppbv), as cited in Method TO-15, to ...

  3. Highly selective optical fluoride ion sensor with submicromolar detection limit based on aluminum(III) octaethylporphyrin in thin polymeric film.

    PubMed

    Badr, Ibrahim H A; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2005-04-20

    A highly selective, sensitive, and reversible fluoride optical sensing film based on aluminum(III)octaethylporphyrin as a fluoride ionophore and a lipophilic pH indicator as the optical transducer is described. The fluoride optical sensing films exhibit a submicromolar detection limit and high discrimination for fluoride over several lipophilic anions such as nitrate, perchlorate, and thiocyanate.

  4. Qualitative Contrast between Knowledge-Limited Mixed-State and Variable-Resources Models of Visual Change Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nosofsky, Robert M.; Donkin, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We report an experiment designed to provide a qualitative contrast between knowledge-limited versions of mixed-state and variable-resources (VR) models of visual change detection. The key data pattern is that observers often respond "same" on big-change trials, while simultaneously being able to discriminate between same and small-change…

  5. Determining the 95% limit of detection for waterborne pathogen analyses from primary concentration to qPCR

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The limit of detection (LOD) for qPCR-based analyses is not consistently defined or determined in studies on waterborne pathogens. Moreover, the LODs reported often reflect the qPCR assay rather than the entire sample process. Our objective was to develop a method to determine the 95% LOD (lowest co...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 425 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Determination of the Method Detection Limit 1 C Appendix C to Part 425 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Pt. 425, App. C Appendix C to Part 425—Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the... reagent water. (c) The concentration value that corresponds to the region of the standard curve where...

  7. ARE WE THERE YET? TIME TO DETECTION OF NANOHERTZ GRAVITATIONAL WAVES BASED ON PULSAR-TIMING ARRAY LIMITS

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S. R.; Vallisneri, M.; Ellis, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Decade-long timing observations of arrays of millisecond pulsars have placed highly constraining upper limits on the amplitude of the nanohertz gravitational-wave stochastic signal from the mergers of supermassive black hole binaries (∼10{sup −15} strain at f = 1 yr{sup −1}). These limits suggest that binary merger rates have been overestimated, or that environmental influences from nuclear gas or stars accelerate orbital decay, reducing the gravitational-wave signal at the lowest, most sensitive frequencies. This prompts the question whether nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs) are likely to be detected in the near future. In this Letter, we answer this question quantitatively using simple statistical estimates,more » deriving the range of true signal amplitudes that are compatible with current upper limits, and computing expected detection probabilities as a function of observation time. We conclude that small arrays consisting of the pulsars with the least timing noise, which yield the tightest upper limits, have discouraging prospects of making a detection in the next two decades. By contrast, we find large arrays are crucial to detection because the quadrupolar spatial correlations induced by GWs can be well sampled by many pulsar pairs. Indeed, timing programs that monitor a large and expanding set of pulsars have an ∼80% probability of detecting GWs within the next 10 years, under assumptions on merger rates and environmental influences ranging from optimistic to conservative. Even in the extreme case where 90% of binaries stall before merger and environmental coupling effects diminish low-frequency gravitational-wave power, detection is delayed by at most a few years.« less

  8. Physics of negative absolute temperatures.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  9. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  10. Moral absolutism and ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, C

    2001-02-01

    If one accepts a version of absolutism that excludes the intentional killing of any innocent human person from conception to natural death, ectopic pregnancy poses vexing difficulties. Given that the embryonic life almost certainly will die anyway, how can one retain one's moral principle and yet adequately respond to a situation that gravely threatens the life of the mother and her future fertility? The four options of treatment most often discussed in the literature are non-intervention, salpingectomy (removal of tube with embryo), salpingostomy (removal of embryo alone), and use of methotrexate (MXT). In this essay, I review these four options and introduce a fifth (the milking technique). In order to assess these options in terms of the absolutism mentioned, it will also be necessary to discuss various accounts of the intention/foresight distinction. I conclude that salpingectomy, salpingostomy, and the milking technique are compatible with absolutist presuppositions, but not the use of methotrexate.

  11. Suppression of plasma virus load below the detection limit of a human immunodeficiency virus kit is associated with longer virologic response than suppression below the limit of quantitation.

    PubMed

    Raboud, J M; Rae, S; Hogg, R S; Yip, B; Sherlock, C H; Harrigan, P R; O'Shaughnessy, M V; Montaner, J S

    1999-10-01

    Suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 plasma virus load (PVL) to <20 copies/mL is associated with a longer virologic response after initiation of antiretroviral therapy. The relationship between duration of virologic response and PVL nadir according to a less sensitive assay was explored. When compared with subjects with a PVL nadir >500 copies/mL, the relative risks of PVL rising above 1000 copies/mL for participants in the INCAS trial and the British Columbia Drug Treatment Program with a PVL nadir below the limit of detection (LOD) were 0.04 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.02-0.09) and 0.06 (95% CI, 0.03-0.12), respectively. The corresponding relative risks for persons with a detectable but not quantifiable PVL nadir were 0.25 (95% CI, 0.13-0.50) and 0.54 (95% CI, 0.25-1.19). The relative risks of virologic failure associated with a PVL nadir detectable but not quantifiable and a PVL nadir below the LOD were statistically different (P<.0001) in both data sets.

  12. Absolute gravity measurements in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumberge, M. A.; Sasagawa, G.; Kappus, M.

    1986-08-01

    An absolute gravity meter that determines the local gravitational acceleration by timing a freely falling mass with a laser interferometer has been constructed. The instrument has made measurements at 11 sites in California, four in Nevada, and one in France. The uncertainty in the results is typically 10 microgal. Repeated measurements have been made at several of the sites; only one shows a substantial change in gravity.

  13. Reaching quantum limits for phase-shift detection with semiclassical states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luis, Alfredo

    2004-01-01

    We present two measuring strategies reaching the Heisenberg limit for phase-shift measurements using semiclassical coherent states exclusively. We examine their performance by assuming practical experimental conditions such as losses and nonideal detectors.

  14. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium.

    PubMed

    Roshan, M V; Springham, S V; Rawat, R S; Lee, P; Krishnan, M

    2010-08-01

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f(n) approximately 4.1x10(-4) with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10(8) neutrons per discharge.

  15. Absolute atomic hydrogen densities in a radio frequency discharge measured by two-photon laser induced fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chérigier, L.; Czarnetzki, U.; Luggenhölscher, D.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.; Döbele, H. F.

    1999-01-01

    Absolute atomic hydrogen densities were measured in the gaseous electronics conference reference cell parallel plate reactor by Doppler-free two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TALIF) at λ=205 nm. The capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge was operated at 13.56 MHz in pure hydrogen under various input power and pressure conditions. The Doppler-free excitation technique with an unfocused laser beam together with imaging the fluorescence radiation by an intensified charge coupled device camera allows instantaneous spatial resolution along the radial direction. Absolute density calibration is obtained with the aid of a flow tube reactor and titration with NO2. The influence of spatial intensity inhomogenities along the laser beam and subsequent fluorescence are corrected by TALIF in xenon. A full mapping of the absolute density distribution between the electrodes was obtained. The detection limit for atomic hydrogen amounts to about 2×1018 m-3. The dissociation degree is of the order of a few percent.

  16. No Evidence for an Item Limit in Change Detection (Open Access)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-28

    memory : a reconsideration of mental storage capacity. Behav Brain Sci 24: 87–114. 17. Eng HY, Chen D, Jiang Y (2005) Visual working memory for simple...working memory can hold no more than a fixed number of items (‘‘item-limit models’’). Recent findings force us to consider the alternative view that working... memory is limited by the precision in stimulus encoding, with mean precision decreasing with increasing set size (‘‘continuous-resource models

  17. Exploring the Thermal Limits of IR-Based Automatic Whale Detection (ETAW)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Exploring the thermal limits of IR-based automatic whale ...marine mammals are entering a predefined exclusion zone. Marine mammal observers usually scan the ship’s environs for whales using binoculars or the...Hence, in combination with the whales ’ prolonged dives, sighting opportunities are rare, which, in addition to the limited field of view and finite

  18. Portable TXRF Spectrometer with 10{sup -11}g Detection Limit and Portable XRF Spectromicroscope with Sub-mm Spatial Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kunimura, Shinsuke; Hatakeyama, So; Sasaki, Nobuharu

    A portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer that we have developed is applied to trace elemental analysis of water solutions. Although a 5 W X-ray tube is used in the portable TXRF spectrometer, detection limits of several ppb are achieved for 3d transition metal elements and trace elements in a leaching solution of soils, a leaching solution of solder, and alcoholic beverages are detected. Portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectromicroscopes with a 1 W X-ray tube and an 8 W X-ray tube are also presented. Using the portable XRF spectromicroscope with the 1 W X-ray tube, 93 ppm of Crmore » is detected with an about 700 {mu}m spatial resolution. Spatially resolved elemental analysis of a mug painted with blue, red, green, and white is performed using the two portable spectromicroscopes, and the difference in elemental composition at each paint is detected.« less

  19. Improved detection limits for electrospray ionization on a magnetic sector mass spectrometer by using an array detector.

    PubMed

    Cody, R B; Tamura, J; Finch, J W; Musselman, B D

    1994-03-01

    Array detection was compared with point detection for solutions of hen egg-white lysozyme, equine myoglobin, and ubiquitin analyzed by electrospray ionization with a magnetic sector mass spectrometer. The detection limits for samples analyzed by using the array detector system were at least 10 times lower than could be achieved by using a point detector on the same mass spectrometer. The minimum detectable quantity of protein corresponded to a signal-to-background ratio of approximately 2∶1 for a 500 amol/μL solution of hen egg-white lysozyme. However, the ultimate practical sample concentrations appeared to be in the 10-100 fmol/μL range for the analysis of dilute solutions of relatively pure proteins or simple mixtures.

  20. Limits and signatures of relativistic spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtsever, Ulvi; Wilkinson, Steven

    2018-01-01

    While special relativity imposes an absolute speed limit at the speed of light, our Universe is not empty Minkowski spacetime. The constituents that fill the interstellar/intergalactic vacuum, including the cosmic microwave background photons, impose a lower speed limit on any object travelling at relativistic velocities. Scattering of cosmic microwave photons from an ultra-relativistic object may create radiation with a characteristic signature allowing the detection of such objects at large distances.

  1. Modeling of a Single-Notch Microfiber Coupler for High-Sensitivity and Low Detection-Limit Refractive Index Sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiali; Shi, Lei; Zhu, Song; Xu, Xinbiao; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-05-11

    A highly sensitive refractive index sensor with low detection limit based on an asymmetric optical microfiber coupler is proposed. It is composed of a silica optical microfiber and an As₂Se₃ optical microfiber. Due to the asymmetry of the microfiber materials, a single-notch transmission spectrum is demonstrated by the large refractive index difference between the two optical microfibers. Compared with the symmetric coupler, the bandwidth of the asymmetric structure is over one order of magnitude narrower than that of the former. Therefore, the asymmetric optical microfiber coupler based sensor can reach over one order of magnitude smaller detection limit, which is defined as the minimal detectable refractive index change caused by the surrounding analyte. With the advantage of large evanescent field, the results also show that a sensitivity of up to 3212 nm per refractive index unit with a bandwidth of 12 nm is achieved with the asymmetric optical microfiber coupler. Furthermore, a maximum sensitivity of 4549 nm per refractive index unit can be reached while the radii of the silica optical microfiber and As₂Se₃ optical microfiber are 0.5 μm and a 0.128 μm, respectively. This sensor component may have important potential for low detection-limit physical and biochemical sensing applications.

  2. Limitations of a localized surface plasmon resonance sensor on Salmonella detection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have designed a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) biosensor to perform the whole cell detection of Salmonella using gold nanoparticls fabricated by oblique angle deposition technique. The LSPR sensor showed a plasmon peak shift due to the Salmonella antigen and anti-Salmonella antibody r...

  3. Exploring the Thermal Limits of IR-Based Automatic Whale Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    spouts during the northward humpback whale migration, which occurs annually rather close to shore near North Stradbroke Island, Queensland, Australia...with concurrent visual observations. APPROACH By obtaining continuous IR video footage during two successive northward humpback whale ... Whale Detection (ETAW) Olaf Boebel P.O. Box 120161 27515 Bremerhaven GERMANY phone: +49 (471) 4831-1879 fax: +49 (471) 4831-1797 email

  4. Adaptive Framework for Classification and Novel Class Detection over Evolving Data Streams with Limited Labeled Data.

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Ahsanul; Khan, Latifur; Baron, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Most approaches to classifying evolving data streams either divide the stream of data into fixed-size chunks or use gradual forgetting to address the problems of infinite length and concept drift. Finding the fixed size of the chunks or choosing a forgetting rate without prior knowledge about time-scale of change is not a trivial task. As a result, these approaches suffer from a trade-off between performance and sensitivity. To address this problem, we present a framework which uses change detection techniques on the classifier performance to determine chunk boundaries dynamically. Though this framework exhibits good performance, it is heavily dependent onmore » the availability of true labels of data instances. However, labeled data instances are scarce in realistic settings and not readily available. Therefore, we present a second framework which is unsupervised in nature, and exploits change detection on classifier confidence values to determine chunk boundaries dynamically. In this way, it avoids the use of labeled data while still addressing the problems of infinite length and concept drift. Moreover, both of our proposed frameworks address the concept evolution problem by detecting outliers having similar values for the attributes. We provide theoretical proof that our change detection method works better than other state-of-the-art approaches in this particular scenario. Results from experiments on various benchmark and synthetic data sets also show the efficiency of our proposed frameworks.« less

  5. Group-focused morality is associated with limited conflict detection and resolution capacity: Neuroanatomical evidence.

    PubMed

    Nash, Kyle; Baumgartner, Thomas; Knoch, Daria

    2017-02-01

    Group-focused moral foundations (GMFs) - moral values that help protect the group's welfare - sharply divide conservatives from liberals and religiously devout from non-believers. However, there is little evidence about what drives this divide. Moral foundations theory and the model of motivated social cognition both associate group-focused moral foundations with differences in conflict detection and resolution capacity, but in opposing directions. Individual differences in conflict detection and resolution implicate specific neuroanatomical differences. Examining neuroanatomy thus affords an objective and non-biased opportunity to contrast these influential theories. Here, we report that increased adherence to group-focused moral foundations was strongly associated (whole-brain corrected) with reduced gray matter volume in key regions of the conflict detection and resolution system (anterior cingulate cortex and lateral prefrontal cortex). Because reduced gray matter is reliably associated with reduced neural and cognitive capacity, these findings support the idea outlined in the model of motivated social cognition that belief in group-focused moral values is associated with reduced conflict detection and resolution capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Detecting the limits of northern and southern lineages of tanoak in northern California

    Treesearch

    Eduardo Sandoval-Castro; Richard S. Dodd

    2015-01-01

    Two chloroplast lineages of tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus) meet between Korbel and Hoopa in the North Coast of California. Our earlier work suggests these lineages arose from southern and northern glacial refugia and this region represents their colonizing fronts. Earlier, we detected only one population of mixed lineages, suggesting that...

  7. Evaluation of a single-item screening question to detect limited health literacy in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepika; Sheth, Heena; Bender, Filitsa H; Weisbord, Steven D; Green, Jamie A

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown that a single-item question might be useful in identifying patients with limited health literacy. However, the utility of the approach has not been studied in patients receiving maintenance peritoneal dialysis (PD). We assessed health literacy in a cohort of 31 PD patients by administering the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) and a single-item health literacy (SHL) screening question "How confident are you filling out medical forms by yourself?" (Extremely, Quite a bit, Somewhat, A little bit, or Not at all). To determine the accuracy of the single-item question for detecting limited health literacy, we performed sensitivity and specificity analyses of the SHL and plotted the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve using the REALM as a reference standard. Using a cut-off of "Somewhat" or less confident, the sensitivity of the SHL for detecting limited health literacy was 80%, and the specificity was 88%. The positive likelihood ratio was 6.9. The SHL had an AUROC of 0.79 (95% confidence interval: 0.52 to 1.00). Our results show that the SHL could be effective in detecting limited health literacy in PD patients.

  8. What is the limit to case detection under the DOTS strategy for tuberculosis control?

    PubMed

    Dye, Christopher; Watt, Catherine J; Bleed, Daniel M; Williams, Brian G

    2003-01-01

    In year 2000, the WHO DOTS strategy for tuberculosis (TB) control had been adopted by 148 out of 212 countries, but only 27% of all estimated sputum smear-positive patients were notified under DOTS in that year. Here we investigate the way in which gains in case detection under DOTS were made up until 2000 in an attempt to anticipate future progress towards the global target of 70% case detection. The analysis draws on annual reports of DOTS geographical coverage and case notifications, and focuses on the 22 high-burden countries (HBCs) that account for about 80% of new TB cases arising globally each year. Our principal observation is that, as TB programmes in the 22 HBCs have expanded geographically, the fraction of the estimated number of sputum smear-positive cases detected within designated DOTS areas has remained constant at 40-50% although there are significant differences between countries. This fraction is about the same as the percentage of all smear-positive cases notified annually to WHO via public health systems worldwide. The implication is that, unless the DOTS strategy can reach beyond traditional public health reporting systems, or unless these systems can be improved, case detection will not rise much above 40% in the 22 HBCs, or in the world as a whole, even when the geographical coverage of DOTS is nominally 100%. We estimate that, under full DOTS coverage, three-quarters of the undetected smear-positive cases will be living in India, China, Indonesia, Nigeria, Bangladesh and Pakistan. But case detection could also remain low in countries with smaller populations: in year 2000, over half of all smear-positive TB cases were living in 49 countries that detected less than 40% of cases within DOTS areas. Substantial efforts are therefore needed (a) to develop new case finding and management methods to bridge the gap between current and target case detection, and (b) to improve the accuracy of national estimates of TB incidence, above all by

  9. Experimental feasibility of the airborne measurement of absolute oil fluorescence spectral conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne lidar oil spill experiments carried out to determine the practicability of the AOFSCE (absolute oil fluorescence spectral conversion efficiency) computational model are described. The results reveal that the model is suitable over a considerable range of oil film thicknesses provided the fluorescence efficiency of the oil does not approach the minimum detection sensitivity limitations of the lidar system. Separate airborne lidar experiments to demonstrate measurement of the water column Raman conversion efficiency are also conducted to ascertain the ultimate feasibility of converting such relative oil fluorescence to absolute values. Whereas the AOFSCE model is seen as highly promising, further airborne water column Raman conversion efficiency experiments with improved temporal or depth-resolved waveform calibration and software deconvolution techniques are thought necessary for a final determination of suitability.

  10. Fringe order correction for the absolute phase recovered by two selected spatial frequency fringe projections in fringe projection profilometry.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Peng, Kai; Yu, Miao; Lu, Lei; Zhao, Kun

    2017-08-01

    The performance of the two selected spatial frequency phase unwrapping methods is limited by a phase error bound beyond which errors will occur in the fringe order leading to a significant error in the recovered absolute phase map. In this paper, we propose a method to detect and correct the wrong fringe orders. Two constraints are introduced during the fringe order determination of two selected spatial frequency phase unwrapping methods. A strategy to detect and correct the wrong fringe orders is also described. Compared with the existing methods, we do not need to estimate the threshold associated with absolute phase values to determine the fringe order error, thus making it more reliable and avoiding the procedure of search in detecting and correcting successive fringe order errors. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated by the experimental results.

  11. A Supercompressible, Elastic, and Bendable Carbon Aerogel with Ultrasensitive Detection Limits for Compression Strain, Pressure, and Bending Angle.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Hao; Hu, Yijie; Tong, Xing; Chen, Zehong; Zhong, Linxin; Lai, Haihong; Liu, Linxiang; Jing, Shuangshuang; Liu, Qingzhong; Liu, Chuanfu; Peng, Xinwen; Sun, Runcang

    2018-05-01

    Ultralight and compressible carbon materials have promising applications in strain and pressure detection. However, it is still difficult to prepare carbon materials with supercompressibility, elasticity, stable strain-electrical signal response, and ultrasensitive detection limits, due to the challenge in structural regulation. Herein, a new strategy to prepare a reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-based lamellar carbon aerogels with unexpected and integrated performances by designing wave-shape rGO layers and enhancing the interaction among the rGO layers is demonstrated. Addition of cellulose nanocrystalline and low-molecular-weight carbon precursors enhances the interaction among rGO layers and thus produces an ultralight, flexible, and superstable structure. The as-prepared carbon aerogel displays a supercompressibility (undergoing an extreme strain of 99%) and elasticity (100% height retention after 10 000 cycles at a strain of 30%), as well as stable strain-current response (at least 10 000 cycles). Particularly, the carbon aerogel is ultrasensitive for detecting tiny change in strain (0.012%) and pressure (0.25 Pa), which are the lowest detection limits for compressible carbon materials reported in the literature. Moreover, the carbon aerogel exhibits excellent bendable performance and can detect an ultralow bending angle of 0.052°. Additionally, the carbon aerogel also demonstrates its promising application as wearable devices. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Detection limits of quantitative and digital PCR assays and their influence in presence-absence surveys of environmental DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Margaret; Dorazio, Robert M.; Butterfield, John S.; Meigs-Friend, Gaia; Nico, Leo; Ferrante, Jason A.

    2017-01-01

    A set of universal guidelines is needed to determine the limit of detection (LOD) in PCR-based analyses of low concentration DNA. In particular, environmental DNA (eDNA) studies require sensitive and reliable methods to detect rare and cryptic species through shed genetic material in environmental samples. Current strategies for assessing detection limits of eDNA are either too stringent or subjective, possibly resulting in biased estimates of species’ presence. Here, a conservative LOD analysis grounded in analytical chemistry is proposed to correct for overestimated DNA concentrations predominantly caused by the concentration plateau, a nonlinear relationship between expected and measured DNA concentrations. We have used statistical criteria to establish formal mathematical models for both quantitative and droplet digital PCR. To assess the method, a new Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) TaqMan assay was developed and tested on both PCR platforms using eDNA in water samples. The LOD adjustment reduced Grass Carp occupancy and detection estimates while increasing uncertainty – indicating that caution needs to be applied to eDNA data without LOD correction. Compared to quantitative PCR, digital PCR had higher occurrence estimates due to increased sensitivity and dilution of inhibitors at low concentrations. Without accurate LOD correction, species occurrence and detection probabilities based on eDNA estimates are prone to a source of bias that cannot be reduced by an increase in sample size or PCR replicates. Other applications also could benefit from a standardized LOD such as GMO food analysis, and forensic and clinical diagnostics.

  13. Limits to detection of generalized synchronization in delay-coupled chaotic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideyuki; Soriano, Miguel C; Pereda, Ernesto; Fischer, Ingo; Mirasso, Claudio R

    2013-12-01

    We study how reliably generalized synchronization can be detected and characterized from time-series analysis. To that end, we analyze synchronization in a generalized sense of delay-coupled chaotic oscillators in unidirectional ring configurations. The generalized synchronization condition can be verified via the auxiliary system approach; however, in practice, this might not always be possible. Therefore, in this study, widely used indicators to directly quantify generalized and phase synchronization from noise-free time series of two oscillators are employed complementarily to the auxiliary system approach. In our analysis, none of the indices provide the consistent results of the auxiliary system approach. Our findings indicate that it is a major challenge to directly detect synchronization in a generalized sense between two oscillators that are connected via a chain of other oscillators, even if the oscillators are identical. This has major consequences for the interpretation of the dynamics of coupled systems and applications thereof.

  14. Exploring the Thermal Limits of IR-Based Automatic Whale Detection (ETAW)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    the northward humpback whale migration, which occurs annually rather close to shore near North Stradbroke Island, Queensland, Australia. Based on the...successive northward humpback whale migrations and collecting concurrent independent (double blind) visual observations (modified cue counting), a... Whale Detection (ETAW) Olaf Boebel P.O. Box 120161 27515 Bremerhaven Germany phone: +49 (471) 4831-1879 fax: +49 (471) 4831-1797 email

  15. Absolute metrology for space interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadé, Yves; Courteville, Alain; Dändliker, René

    2017-11-01

    The crucial issue of space-based interferometers is the laser interferometric metrology systems to monitor with very high accuracy optical path differences. Although classical high-resolution laser interferometers using a single wavelength are well developed, this type of incremental interferometer has a severe drawback: any interruption of the interferometer signal results in the loss of the zero reference, which requires a new calibration, starting at zero optical path difference. We propose in this paper an absolute metrology system based on multiplewavelength interferometry.

  16. Early breast cancer screening using iron/iron oxide-based nanoplatforms with sub-femtomolar limits of detection

    PubMed Central

    Samarakoon, Thilani N; Yapa, Asanka S; Abayaweera, Gayani; Basel, Matthew T; Maynez, Pamela; Ortega, Raquel; Toledo, Yubisela; Bossmann, Leonie; Robinson, Colette; Janik, Katharine E; Koper, Olga B; Li, Ping; Motamedi, Massoud; Higgins, Daniel A; Gadbury, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Summary Proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue serine proteases, and cathepsins (CTS) exhibit numerous functions in tumor biology. Solid tumors are characterized by changes in protease expression levels by tumor and surrounding tissue. Therefore, monitoring protease levels in tissue samples and liquid biopsies is a vital strategy for early cancer detection. Water-dispersable Fe/Fe3O4-core/shell based nanoplatforms for protease detection are capable of detecting protease activity down to sub-femtomolar limits of detection. They feature one dye (tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (TCPP)) that is tethered to the central nanoparticle by means of a protease-cleavable consensus sequence and a second dye (Cy 5.5) that is directly linked. Based on the protease activities of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), MMPs 1, 2, 3, 7, 9, and 13, as well as CTS B and L, human breast cancer can be detected at stage I by means of a simple serum test. By monitoring CTS B and L stage 0 detection may be achieved. This initial study, comprised of 46 breast cancer patients and 20 apparently healthy human subjects, demonstrates the feasibility of protease-activity-based liquid biopsies for early cancer diagnosis. PMID:27335730

  17. Early breast cancer screening using iron/iron oxide-based nanoplatforms with sub-femtomolar limits of detection.

    PubMed

    Udukala, Dinusha N; Wang, Hongwang; Wendel, Sebastian O; Malalasekera, Aruni P; Samarakoon, Thilani N; Yapa, Asanka S; Abayaweera, Gayani; Basel, Matthew T; Maynez, Pamela; Ortega, Raquel; Toledo, Yubisela; Bossmann, Leonie; Robinson, Colette; Janik, Katharine E; Koper, Olga B; Li, Ping; Motamedi, Massoud; Higgins, Daniel A; Gadbury, Gary; Zhu, Gaohong; Troyer, Deryl L; Bossmann, Stefan H

    2016-01-01

    Proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue serine proteases, and cathepsins (CTS) exhibit numerous functions in tumor biology. Solid tumors are characterized by changes in protease expression levels by tumor and surrounding tissue. Therefore, monitoring protease levels in tissue samples and liquid biopsies is a vital strategy for early cancer detection. Water-dispersable Fe/Fe3O4-core/shell based nanoplatforms for protease detection are capable of detecting protease activity down to sub-femtomolar limits of detection. They feature one dye (tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (TCPP)) that is tethered to the central nanoparticle by means of a protease-cleavable consensus sequence and a second dye (Cy 5.5) that is directly linked. Based on the protease activities of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), MMPs 1, 2, 3, 7, 9, and 13, as well as CTS B and L, human breast cancer can be detected at stage I by means of a simple serum test. By monitoring CTS B and L stage 0 detection may be achieved. This initial study, comprised of 46 breast cancer patients and 20 apparently healthy human subjects, demonstrates the feasibility of protease-activity-based liquid biopsies for early cancer diagnosis.

  18. Detection Limits for Spectro-fluorometry: A Case Study in the Region of Finstersee, Canton Zug, Northern Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otz, M. H.; Otz, H. K.; Keller, P.

    2002-05-01

    Synthetic fluorescent dyes, applied below the visual detection limit (< 0.1 mg/L), have been used as tracers of ground water flow paths since the beginning of the 1950s. Since 1965, we have used spectro-fluorometers with photomultipliers to measure low concentrations of fluorescent dyes in ground water in Switzerland. In collaboration with the Engineering Geology Department of the ETH, we have separated uranine at 0.1 ng/L and Na-naphtionate at 1 ng/L from background fluorescence of spring water in the Finstersee region. These values are 10-100 times lower than postulated detection limits in the literature. The use of low dye concentrations prevents a study region from being contaminated by increased background levels due to remnant dye within the aquifer, thereby leaving the region available for future dye tracing studies. Lower detection limits also can solve particular hydraulic problems where conventional methods fail and enhance the possibility for using artificial dyes in environmentally sensitive aquifer settings.

  19. Comparison of detection limit in fiber-based conventional, amplified, and gain-clamped cavity ring-down techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, K.; Abdul Khudus, M. I. M.; Alam, S. U.; Bhattacharya, S.; Venkitesh, D.; Brambilla, G.

    2018-01-01

    Relative performance and detection limit of conventional, amplified, and gain-clamped cavity ring-down techniques (CRDT) in all-fiber configurations are compared experimentally for the first time. Refractive index measurement using evanescent field in tapered fibers is used as a benchmark for the comparison. The systematic optimization of a nested-loop configuration in gain-clamped CRDT is also discussed, which is crucial for achieving a constant gain in a CRDT experiment. It is found that even though conventional CRDT has the lowest standard error in ring-down time (Δτ), the value of ring-down time (τ) is very small, thus leading to poor detection limit. Amplified CRDT provides an improvement in τ, albeit with two orders of magnitude higher Δτ due to amplifier noise. The nested-loop configuration in gain-clamped CRDT helps in reducing Δτ by an order of magnitude as compared to amplified CRDT whilst retaining the improvement in τ. A detection limit of 1 . 03 × 10-4 RIU at refractive index of 1.322 with a 3 mm long and 4.5 μm diameter tapered fiber is demonstrated with the gain-clamped CRDT.

  20. Detection of Stimulus Displacements Across Saccades is Capacity-Limited and Biased in Favor of the Saccade Target

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, David E.; Robinson, Maria M.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal image displacements caused by saccadic eye movements are generally unnoticed. Recent theories have proposed that perceptual stability across saccades depends on a local evaluation process centered on the saccade target object rather than on remapping and evaluating the positions of all objects in a display. In three experiments, we examined whether objects other than the saccade target also influence perceptual stability by measuring displacement detection thresholds across saccades for saccade targets and a variable number of non-saccade objects. We found that the positions of multiple objects are maintained across saccades, but with variable precision, with the saccade target object having priority in the perception of displacement, most likely because it is the focus of attention before the saccade and resides near the fovea after the saccade. The perception of displacement of objects that are not the saccade target is affected by acuity limitations, attentional limitations, and limitations on memory capacity. Unlike previous studies that have found that a postsaccadic blank improves the detection of displacement direction across saccades, we found that postsaccadic blanking hurt the detection of displacement per se by increasing false alarms. Overall, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that visual working memory underlies the perception of stability across saccades. PMID:26640430

  1. Statistical analysis of water-quality data containing multiple detection limits: S-language software for regression on order statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, L.; Helsel, D.

    2005-01-01

    Trace contaminants in water, including metals and organics, often are measured at sufficiently low concentrations to be reported only as values below the instrument detection limit. Interpretation of these "less thans" is complicated when multiple detection limits occur. Statistical methods for multiply censored, or multiple-detection limit, datasets have been developed for medical and industrial statistics, and can be employed to estimate summary statistics or model the distributions of trace-level environmental data. We describe S-language-based software tools that perform robust linear regression on order statistics (ROS). The ROS method has been evaluated as one of the most reliable procedures for developing summary statistics of multiply censored data. It is applicable to any dataset that has 0 to 80% of its values censored. These tools are a part of a software library, or add-on package, for the R environment for statistical computing. This library can be used to generate ROS models and associated summary statistics, plot modeled distributions, and predict exceedance probabilities of water-quality standards. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Calculation of the detection limits for radionuclides identified in gamma-ray spectra based on post-processing peak analysis results.

    PubMed

    Korun, M; Vodenik, B; Zorko, B

    2018-03-01

    A new method for calculating the detection limits of gamma-ray spectrometry measurements is presented. The method is applicable for gamma-ray emitters, irrespective of the influences of the peaked background, the origin of the background and the overlap with other peaks. It offers the opportunity for multi-gamma-ray emitters to calculate the common detection limit, corresponding to more peaks. The detection limit is calculated by approximating the dependence of the uncertainty in the indication on its value with a second-order polynomial. In this approach the relation between the input quantities and the detection limit are described by an explicit expression and can be easy investigated. The detection limit is calculated from the data usually provided by the reports of peak-analyzing programs: the peak areas and their uncertainties. As a result, the need to use individual channel contents for calculating the detection limit is bypassed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Detection, Size, Measurement, and Structural Analysis Limits for the 2MASS, UKIDSS-LAS, and VISTA VIKING Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Stephen K.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Driver, Simon P.; Robotham, Aaron S. G.

    2014-01-01

    The 2MASS, UKIDSS-LAS, and VISTA VIKING surveys have all now observed the GAMA 9hr region in the Ks band. Here we compare the detection rates, photometry, basic size measurements, and single-component GALFIT structural measurements for a sample of 37 591 galaxies. We explore the sensitivity limits where the data agree for a variety of issues including: detection, star-galaxy separation, photometric measurements, size and ellipticity measurements, and Sérsic measurements. We find that 2MASS fails to detect at least 20% of the galaxy population within all magnitude bins, however for those that are detected we find photometry is robust (± 0.2 mag) to 14.7 AB mag and star-galaxy separation to 14.8 AB mag. For UKIDSS-LAS we find incompleteness starts to enter at a flux limit of 18.9 AB mag, star-galaxy separation is robust to 16.3 AB mag, and structural measurements are robust to 17.7 AB mag. VISTA VIKING data are complete to approximately 20.0 AB mag and structural measurements appear robust to 18.8 AB mag.

  4. Limitations of malaria reactive case detection in an area of low and unstable transmission on the Myanmar-Thailand border.

    PubMed

    Parker, Daniel M; Landier, Jordi; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Dondorp, Arjen; White, Lisa; Hanboonkunupakarn, Borimas; Maude, Richard J; Nosten, François H

    2016-11-25

    the same sample size. The results of these simulations indicate that reactive case detection for clinical cases using RDTs has limited ability in halting transmission in regions of low and unstable transmission. This is linked to high spatial heterogeneity of cases, acquisition of malaria infections outside the village, as well missing asymptomatic infections. When cases are few and sporadic, reactive case detection would result in major time and budgetary losses.

  5. Phase-noise limitations in continuous-variable quantum key distribution with homodyne detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvaja, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    In continuous-variables quantum key distribution with coherent states, the advantage of performing the detection by using standard telecoms components is counterbalanced by the lack of a stable phase reference in homodyne detection due to the complexity of optical phase-locking circuits and to the unavoidable phase noise of lasers, which introduces a degradation on the achievable secure key rate. Pilot-assisted phase-noise estimation and postdetection compensation techniques are used to implement a protocol with coherent states where a local laser is employed and it is not locked to the received signal, but a postdetection phase correction is applied. Here the reduction of the secure key rate determined by the laser phase noise, for both individual and collective attacks, is analytically evaluated and a scheme of pilot-assisted phase estimation proposed, outlining the tradeoff in the system design between phase noise and spectral efficiency. The optimal modulation variance as a function of the phase-noise amount is derived.

  6. Linear ultrasonic motor for absolute gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yue; Yao, Zhiyuan; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2017-05-01

    Thanks to their compactness and suitability for vacuum applications, linear ultrasonic motors are considered as substitutes for classical electromagnetic motors as driving elements in absolute gravimeters. Still, their application is prevented by relatively low power output. To overcome this limitation and provide better stability, a V-type linear ultrasonic motor with a new clamping method is proposed for a gravimeter. In this paper, a mechanical model of stators with flexible clamping components is suggested, according to a design criterion for clamps of linear ultrasonic motors. After that, an effect of tangential and normal rigidity of the clamping components on mechanical output is studied. It is followed by discussion of a new clamping method with sufficient tangential rigidity and a capability to facilitate pre-load. Additionally, a prototype of the motor with the proposed clamping method was fabricated and the performance tests in vertical direction were implemented. Experimental results show that the suggested motor has structural stability and high dynamic performance, such as no-load speed of 1.4m/s and maximal thrust of 43N, meeting the requirements for absolute gravimeters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Opportunistic mammography screening provides effective detection rates in a limited resource healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Teh, Yew-Ching; Tan, Gie-Hooi; Taib, Nur Aishah; Rahmat, Kartini; Westerhout, Caroline Judy; Fadzli, Farhana; See, Mee-Hoong; Jamaris, Suniza; Yip, Cheng-Har

    2015-05-15

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in women world-wide. In low and middle income countries, where there are no population-based mammographic screening programmes, late presentation is common, and because of inadequate access to optimal treatment, survival rates are poor. Mammographic screening is well-studied in high-income countries in western populations, and because it has been shown to reduce breast cancer mortality, it has become part of the healthcare systems in such countries. However the performance of mammographic screening in a developing country is largely unknown. This study aims to evaluate the performance of mammographic screening in Malaysia, a middle income country, and to compare the stage and surgical treatment of screen-detected and symptomatic breast cancer. A retrospective review of 2510 mammograms performed from Jan to Dec 2010 in a tertiary medical centre is carried out. The three groups identified are the routine (opportunistic) screening group, the targeted (high risk) screening group and the diagnostic group. The performance indicators of each group is calculated, and stage at presentation and treatment between the screening and diagnostic group is analyzed. The cancer detection rate in the opportunistic screening group, targeted screening group, and the symptomatic group is 0.5 %, 1.25 % and 26 % respectively. The proportion of ductal carcinoma in situ is 23.1 % in the two screening groups compared to only 2.5 % in the diagnostic group. Among the opportunistic screening group, the cancer detection rate was 0.2 % in women below 50 years old compared to 0.65 % in women 50 years and above. The performance indicators are within international standards. Early-staged breast cancer (Stage 0-2) were 84.6 % in the screening groups compared to 61.1 % in the diagnostic group. From the results, in a setting with resource constraints, targeted screening of high risk individuals will give a higher yield, and if more resources are

  8. Reaching the Ionic Current Detection Limit in Silicon-Based Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puster, Matthew; Rodriguez-Manzo, Julio Alejandro; Nicolai, Adrien; Meunier, Vincent; Drndic, Marija

    2015-03-01

    Solid-state nanopores act as single-molecule sensors whereby passage of an individual molecule in aqueous electrolyte through a nanopore is registered as a change in ionic conductance (ΔG). Future nanopore applications such as DNA sequencing at high bandwidth require high ΔG for optimal signal-to-noise ratio. Reducing the nanopore diameter and thickness increase ΔG. Molecule size limits the diameter, thus efforts concentrate on minimizing the thickness by thinning oxide/nitride films or using 2D materials. Weighted by electrolyte conductivity the highest ΔG reported to date for DNA translocations were obtained with nanopores made in oxide/nitride films. We present a controlled electron irradiation technique to thin such films to the limit of their stability, producing nanopores tailored to molecule size in amorphous Si with thicknesses less than 2 nm. We compare ΔG values with results found in the literature for DNA translocation through these nanopores, where access resistance becomes comparable to the resistance through the nanopore itself.

  9. The Limits of Coding with Joint Constraints on Detected and Undetected Error Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolinar, Sam; Andrews, Kenneth; Pollara, Fabrizio; Divsalar, Dariush

    2008-01-01

    We develop a remarkably tight upper bound on the performance of a parameterized family of bounded angle maximum-likelihood (BA-ML) incomplete decoders. The new bound for this class of incomplete decoders is calculated from the code's weight enumerator, and is an extension of Poltyrev-type bounds developed for complete ML decoders. This bound can also be applied to bound the average performance of random code ensembles in terms of an ensemble average weight enumerator. We also formulate conditions defining a parameterized family of optimal incomplete decoders, defined to minimize both the total codeword error probability and the undetected error probability for any fixed capability of the decoder to detect errors. We illustrate the gap between optimal and BA-ML incomplete decoding via simulation of a small code.

  10. Beta-trace protein in ascites and pleural effusions: limits of CSF leakage detection.

    PubMed

    Dietzel, Joanna; Krebs, Alexander; Böttcher, Dominique; Sieb, Manuela; Glocker, Michael O; Lüdemann, Jan; Roser, Markus; Dressel, Alexander

    2012-06-10

    Rhino- and/or otoliquorrhea can be diagnosed by detecting beta-trace protein (β-TP) in nasal or ear secretions, as β-TP is found in high concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) but not in serum. CSF fistulae following trauma or surgery can also occur at other anatomical sites, resulting in CSF leakage into the thoracic and abdominal cavities. By analogy, determination of ß-TP has also been used to diagnose CSF admixture in pleural effusions and ascites. However, no systematic study has yet evaluated the concentrations of β-TP in such fluids in the absence of CSF. To determine the validity of β-TP determination as a marker for the presence of CSF, we investigated β-TP concentrations in pleural effusions and ascites without CSF admixture. Patients from whom samples of ascites or pleural effusion and a paired plasma sample were available were investigated. One hundred sixty-four patients were prospectively recruited. ß-TP concentrations were determined by nephelometry. Mass spectrometric proteome analysis confirmed the presence of ß-TP in the samples. Median β-TP concentrations detected in ascites and pleural effusions (range, 0.014-26.5 mg/L, median 2.29 mg/L) exceeded the corresponding plasma concentrations 2.6-fold. According to cutoffs published to diagnose rhino- and otoliquorrhea, between 6.1% and 95.7% of the specimens would have been erroneously rated CSF-positive. Protein analysis confirmed the presence of β-TP in pleural effusion and ascites. Ascites and pleural effusion contain high concentrations of β-TP that exceed the levels in corresponding plasma. Therefore, β-TP is not a specific marker for the presence of CSF in these fluids.

  11. The Impact of an ECV Service is Limited by Antenatal Breech Detection: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hemelaar, Joris; Lim, Lee N; Impey, Lawrence W

    2015-06-01

    External cephalic version (ECV) reduces the chance of breech presentation at term birth and lowers the chance of a cesarean delivery. ECV services are now in place in many units in the United Kingdom but their effectiveness is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the reasons for breech presentation at term birth. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 394 consecutive babies who were in breech presentation at term birth in a large United Kingdom maternity unit that offers ECV. The cohort was analyzed over two time periods 10 years apart: 1998-1999 and 2008-2009. Only 33.8 percent of women had undergone a (failed) ECV attempt. This low proportion was mainly because breech presentation was not diagnosed antenatally (27.9%). Other contributing factors were: ECV not offered by clinicians (12.2%), ECV declined by women (14%), and contraindications to ECV (10.7%). Over the 10-year period, the proportion of breech presentations that were not diagnosed antenatally increased from 23.2 to 32.5 percent (p = 0.04), which constituted 52.8 percent of women who had not undergone an ECV attempt in 2008-2009. Failure of clinicians to offer ECV reduced from 21.6 to 3.0 percent (p = 0.0001) and the proportion of women declining ECV decreased from 19.1 to 9.0 percent (p = 0.005). Overall, ECV attempts increased from 28.9 to 38.5 percent (p = 0.05). Although ECV counseling, referral, and attempt rates have increased, failure to detect breech presentation antenatally is the principal barrier to successful ECV. Improved breech detection would have a greater impact than methods to increase ECV success rates. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Strongly nonlinear theory of rapid solidification near absolute stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowal, Katarzyna N.; Altieri, Anthony L.; Davis, Stephen H.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the nonlinear evolution of the morphological deformation of a solid-liquid interface of a binary melt under rapid solidification conditions near two absolute stability limits. The first of these involves the complete stabilization of the system to cellular instabilities as a result of large enough surface energy. We derive nonlinear evolution equations in several limits in this scenario and investigate the effect of interfacial disequilibrium on the nonlinear deformations that arise. In contrast to the morphological stability problem in equilibrium, in which only cellular instabilities appear and only one absolute stability boundary exists, in disequilibrium the system is prone to oscillatory instabilities and a second absolute stability boundary involving attachment kinetics arises. Large enough attachment kinetics stabilize the oscillatory instabilities. We derive a nonlinear evolution equation to describe the nonlinear development of the solid-liquid interface near this oscillatory absolute stability limit. We find that strong asymmetries develop with time. For uniform oscillations, the evolution equation for the interface reduces to the simple form f''+(βf')2+f =0 , where β is the disequilibrium parameter. Lastly, we investigate a distinguished limit near both absolute stability limits in which the system is prone to both cellular and oscillatory instabilities and derive a nonlinear evolution equation that captures the nonlinear deformations in this limit. Common to all these scenarios is the emergence of larger asymmetries in the resulting shapes of the solid-liquid interface with greater departures from equilibrium and larger morphological numbers. The disturbances additionally sharpen near the oscillatory absolute stability boundary, where the interface becomes deep-rooted. The oscillations are time-periodic only for small-enough initial amplitudes and their frequency depends on a single combination of physical parameters, including the

  13. Contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization image processing to improve the detection of simulated spiculations in dense mammograms.

    PubMed

    Pisano, E D; Zong, S; Hemminger, B M; DeLuca, M; Johnston, R E; Muller, K; Braeuning, M P; Pizer, S M

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine whether Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization (CLAHE) improves detection of simulated spiculations in dense mammograms. Lines simulating the appearance of spiculations, a common marker of malignancy when visualized with masses, were embedded in dense mammograms digitized at 50 micron pixels, 12 bits deep. Film images with no CLAHE applied were compared to film images with nine different combinations of clip levels and region sizes applied. A simulated spiculation was embedded in a background of dense breast tissue, with the orientation of the spiculation varied. The key variables involved in each trial included the orientation of the spiculation, contrast level of the spiculation and the CLAHE settings applied to the image. Combining the 10 CLAHE conditions, 4 contrast levels and 4 orientations gave 160 combinations. The trials were constructed by pairing 160 combinations of key variables with 40 backgrounds. Twenty student observers were asked to detect the orientation of the spiculation in the image. There was a statistically significant improvement in detection performance for spiculations with CLAHE over unenhanced images when the region size was set at 32 with a clip level of 2, and when the region size was set at 32 with a clip level of 4. The selected CLAHE settings should be tested in the clinic with digital mammograms to determine whether detection of spiculations associated with masses detected at mammography can be improved.

  14. Digital PCR provides absolute quantitation of viral load for an occult RNA virus.

    PubMed

    White, Richard Allen; Quake, Stephen R; Curr, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Using a multiplexed LNA-based Taqman assay, RT-digital PCR (RT-dPCR) was performed in a prefabricated microfluidic device that monitored absolute viral load in native and immortalized cell lines, overall precision of detection, and the absolute detection limit of an occult RNA virus GB Virus Type C (GBV-C). RT-dPCR had on average a 10% lower overall coefficient of variation (CV, a measurement of precision) for viral load testing than RT-qPCR and had a higher overall detection limit, able to quantify as low as three 5'-UTR molecules of GBV-C genome. Two commercial high-yield in vitro transcription kits (T7 Ribomax Express by Promega and Ampliscribe T7 Flash by Epicentre) were compared to amplify GBV-C RNA genome with T7-mediated amplification. The Ampliscribe T7 Flash outperformed the T7 Ribomax Express in yield of full-length GBV-C RNA genome. THP-1 cells (a model of monocytic derived cells) were transfected with GBV-C, yielding infectious virions that replicated over a 120h time course and could be infected directly. This study provides the first evidence of GBV-C replication in monocytic derived clonal cells. Thus far, it is the only study using a microfluidic device that measures directly viral load of mammalian RNA virus in a digital format without need for a standard curve. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Coronary artery disease detection - limitations of stress testing in left ventricular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bomb, Ritin; Kumar, Senthil; Chockalingam, Anand

    2017-01-01

    Incidental diagnosis of left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVD) is common in clinical practice. The prevalence of asymptomatic LVD (Ejection Fraction, EF < 50%) is 6.0% in men and 0.8% in women and is twice as common as symptomatic LVD. The timely and definitive exclusion of an ischemic etiology is central to optimizing care and reducing mortality in LVD. Advances in cardiovascular imaging provide many options for imaging of patients with left ventricular dysfunction. Clinician experience, patient endurance, imaging modality characteristics, cost and safety determine the choice of testing. In this review, we have compared the diagnostic utility of established tests - nuclear and echocardiographic stress testing with newer techniques like coronary computerized tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and highlight their inherent limitations in patients with underlying left ventricular dysfunction. PMID:28515848

  16. Considerations on the determination of the limit of detection and the limit of quantification in one-dimensional and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Krupčík, Ján; Májek, Pavel; Gorovenko, Roman; Blaško, Jaroslav; Kubinec, Robert; Sandra, Pat

    2015-05-29

    Methods based on the blank signal as proposed by IUPAC procedure and on the signal to noise ratio (S/N) as listed in the ISO-11843-1 norm for determination of the limit of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) in one-dimensional capillary gas chromatography (1D-GC) and comprehensive two-dimensional capillary gas chromatography (CG×GC) are described in detail and compared for both techniques. Flame ionization detection was applied and variables were the data acquisition frequency and, for CG×GC, also the modulation time. It has been stated that LOD and LOQ estimated according to IUPAC might be successfully used for 1D-GC-FID method. Moreover, LOD and LOQ decrease with decrease of data acquisition frequency (DAF). For GC×GC-FID, estimation of LOD by IUPAC gave poor reproducibility of results while for LOQ reproducibility was acceptable (within ±10% rel.). The LOD and LOQ determined by the S/N concept both for 1D-GC-FID and GC×GC-FID methods are ca. three times higher than those values estimated by the standard deviation of the blank. Since the distribution pattern of modulated peaks for any analyte separated by GC×GC is random and cannot be predicted, LOQ and LOD may vary within 30% for 3s modulation time. Concerning sensitivity, 1D-GC-FID at 2Hz and of GC×GC-FID at 50Hz shows a ca. 5 times enhancement of sensitivity in the modulated signal output. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Detection limits of quantitative and digital PCR assays and their influence in presence-absence surveys of environmental DNA.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Margaret E; Dorazio, Robert M; Butterfield, John S S; Meigs-Friend, Gaia; Nico, Leo G; Ferrante, Jason A

    2017-03-01

    A set of universal guidelines is needed to determine the limit of detection (LOD) in PCR-based analyses of low-concentration DNA. In particular, environmental DNA (eDNA) studies require sensitive and reliable methods to detect rare and cryptic species through shed genetic material in environmental samples. Current strategies for assessing detection limits of eDNA are either too stringent or subjective, possibly resulting in biased estimates of species' presence. Here, a conservative LOD analysis grounded in analytical chemistry is proposed to correct for overestimated DNA concentrations predominantly caused by the concentration plateau, a nonlinear relationship between expected and measured DNA concentrations. We have used statistical criteria to establish formal mathematical models for both quantitative and droplet digital PCR. To assess the method, a new Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) TaqMan assay was developed and tested on both PCR platforms using eDNA in water samples. The LOD adjustment reduced Grass Carp occupancy and detection estimates while increasing uncertainty-indicating that caution needs to be applied to eDNA data without LOD correction. Compared to quantitative PCR, digital PCR had higher occurrence estimates due to increased sensitivity and dilution of inhibitors at low concentrations. Without accurate LOD correction, species occurrence and detection probabilities based on eDNA estimates are prone to a source of bias that cannot be reduced by an increase in sample size or PCR replicates. Other applications also could benefit from a standardized LOD such as GMO food analysis and forensic and clinical diagnostics. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, J.P.P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony, E-mail: J.Pinto-Vieira@sussex.ac.uk, E-mail: ctb22@sussex.ac.uk, E-mail: antony@cosmologist.info

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion ( w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contractingmore » counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.« less

  19. Detecting changes in water limitation in the West using integrated ecosystem modeling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulter, B.; Hoy, J.; Emmett, K.; Cross, M.; Maneta, M. P.; Al-Chokhachy, R.

    2016-12-01

    Water in the western United States is the critical currency for determining a range of ecosystem services, such as wildlife habitat, carbon sequestration, and timber and water resources for an expanding human population. The current generation of catchment models trades a detailed representation of hydrologic processes for a generalization of vegetation processes and thus ignores many land-surface feedbacks that are driven by physiological responses to atmospheric CO2 and changes in vegetation structure following disturbance and climate change. Here we demonstrate how catchment scale modeling can better couple vegetation dynamics and disturbance processes to reconstruct historic streamflow, stream temperature and vegetation greening for the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Using a new catchment routing model coupled to the LPJ-GUESS dynamic global vegetation model, simulations are made at 1 km spatial resolution using two different climate products. Decreased winter snowpack has led to increasing spring runoff and declines in summertime slow, and increasing the likelihood that stream temperature exceeds thresholds for cold-water fish growth. Since the mid-1980s, vegetation greening is projected by both the model and detected from space-borne normalized difference vegetation index observations. These greening trends are superimposed on a landscape matrix defined by frequent disturbance and intensive land management, making the climate and CO2 fingerprint difficult to discern. Integrating dynamical vegetation models with in-situ and spaceborne measurements to understand and interpret catchment-scale trends in water availability has potential to better disentangle historical climate, CO2, and human drivers and their ecosystem consequences.

  20. Improving the limits of detection of low background alpha emission measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Brendan D.; Coleman, Stuart; Harris, Jack T.; Warburton, William K.

    2018-01-01

    Alpha particle emission - even at extremely low levels - is a significant issue in the search for rare events (e.g., double beta decay, dark matter detection). Traditional measurement techniques require long counting times to measure low sample rates in the presence of much larger instrumental backgrounds. To address this, a commercially available instrument developed by XIA uses pulse shape analysis to discriminate alpha emissions produced by the sample from those produced by other surfaces of the instrument itself. Experience with this system has uncovered two residual sources of background: cosmogenics and radon emanation from internal components. An R&D program is underway to enhance the system and extend the pulse shape analysis technique further, so that these residual sources can be identified and rejected as well. In this paper, we review the theory of operation and pulse shape analysis techniques used in XIA's alpha counter, and briefly explore data suggesting the origin of the residual background terms. We will then present our approach to enhance the system's ability to identify and reject these terms. Finally, we will describe a prototype system that incorporates our concepts and demonstrates their feasibility.

  1. Lower limits of detection in using carbon nanotubes as thermoluminescent dosimeters of beta radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanazi, Abdulaziz; Jurewicz, Izabela; Alalawi, Amani I.; Alyahyawi, Amjad; Alsubaie, Abdullah; Hinder, Steven; Bañuls-Ciscar, Jorge; Alkhorayef, Mohammed; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-11-01

    World-wide, on-going intensive research is being seen in adaptation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for a wide variety of applications, particular interest herein being in the thermoluminescent (TL) properties of CNTs and their sensitivity towards energetic radiations. Using beta radiation delivering dose levels of a few Gy it has been observed in previous study that strain and impurity defects in CNTs give rise to significant TL yields, providing an initial measure of the extent to which electron trapping centres exist in various qualities of CNT, from super-pure to raw. This in turn points to the possibility that there may be considerable advantage in using such media for radiation dosimetry applications, including for in vivo dosimetry. CNTs also have an effective atomic number similar to that of adipose tissue, making them suitable for soft tissue dosimetry. In present investigations various single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) samples in the form of buckypaper have been irradiated to doses in the range 35-1.3 Gy, use being made of a 90Sr beta source, the response of the CNTs buckypaper with dose showing a trend towards linearity. It is shown for present production methodology for buckypaper samples that the raw SWCNT buckypaper offer the greatest sensitivity, detecting doses down to some few tens of mGy.

  2. A method for evaluating the performance of computer-aided detection of pulmonary nodules in lung cancer CT screening: detection limit for nodule size and density

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hajime; Ohkubo, Masaki; Narita, Akihiro; Marasinghe, Janaka C; Murao, Kohei; Matsumoto, Toru; Sone, Shusuke

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We propose the application of virtual nodules to evaluate the performance of computer-aided detection (CAD) of lung nodules in cancer screening using low-dose CT. Methods: The virtual nodules were generated based on the spatial resolution measured for a CT system used in an institution providing cancer screening and were fused into clinical lung images obtained at that institution, allowing site specificity. First, we validated virtual nodules as an alternative to artificial nodules inserted into a phantom. In addition, we compared the results of CAD analysis between the real nodules (n = 6) and the corresponding virtual nodules. Subsequently, virtual nodules of various sizes and contrasts between nodule density and background density (ΔCT) were inserted into clinical images (n = 10) and submitted for CAD analysis. Results: In the validation study, 46 of 48 virtual nodules had the same CAD results as artificial nodules (kappa coefficient = 0.913). Real nodules and the corresponding virtual nodules showed the same CAD results. The detection limits of the tested CAD system were determined in terms of size and density of peripheral lung nodules; we demonstrated that a nodule with a 5-mm diameter was detected when the nodule had a ΔCT > 220 HU. Conclusion: Virtual nodules are effective in evaluating CAD performance using site-specific scan/reconstruction conditions. Advances in knowledge: Virtual nodules can be an effective means of evaluating site-specific CAD performance. The methodology for guiding the detection limit for nodule size/density might be a useful evaluation strategy. PMID:27897029

  3. Driven tracer with absolute negative mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cividini, J.; Mukamel, D.; Posch, H. A.

    2018-02-01

    Instances of negative mobility, where a system responds to a perturbation in a way opposite to naive expectation, have been studied theoretically and experimentally in numerous nonequilibrium systems. In this work we show that absolute negative mobility (ANM), whereby current is produced in a direction opposite to the drive, can occur around equilibrium states. This is demonstrated with a simple one-dimensional lattice model with a driven tracer. We derive analytical predictions in the linear response regime and elucidate the mechanism leading to ANM by studying the high-density limit. We also study numerically a model of hard Brownian disks in a narrow planar channel, for which the lattice model can be viewed as a toy model. We find that the model exhibits negative differential mobility (NDM), but no ANM.

  4. Measurement of absolute gamma emission probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumithrarachchi, Chandana S.; Rengan, Krish; Griffin, Henry C.

    2003-06-01

    The energies and emission probabilities (intensities) of gamma-rays emitted in radioactive decays of particular nuclides are the most important characteristics by which to quantify mixtures of radionuclides. Often, quantification is limited by uncertainties in measured intensities. A technique was developed to reduce these uncertainties. The method involves obtaining a pure sample of a nuclide using radiochemical techniques, and using appropriate fractions for beta and gamma measurements. The beta emission rates were measured using a liquid scintillation counter, and the gamma emission rates were measured with a high-purity germanium detector. Results were combined to obtain absolute gamma emission probabilities. All sources of uncertainties greater than 0.1% were examined. The method was tested with 38Cl and 88Rb.

  5. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, Carl Atherton

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit bymore » studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 ± 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker`s theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.« less

  6. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit bymore » studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker's theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.« less

  7. Modeling absolute plate and plume motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodinier, G. P.; Wessel, P.; Conrad, C. P.

    2016-12-01

    Paleomagnetic evidence for plume drift has made modeling of absolute plate motions challenging, especially since direct observations of plume drift are lacking. Predictions of plume drift arising from mantle convection models and broadly satisfying observed paleolatitudes have so far provided the only framework for deriving absolute plate motions over moving hotspots. However, uncertainties in mantle rheology, temperature, and initial conditions make such models nonunique. Using simulated and real data, we will show that age progressions along Pacific hotspot trails provide strong constraints on plume motions for all major trails, and furthermore that it is possible to derive models for relative plume drift from these data alone. Relative plume drift depends on the inter-hotspot distances derived from age progressions but lacks a fixed reference point and orientation. By incorporating paleolatitude histories for the Hawaii and Louisville chains we add further constraints on allowable plume motions, yet one unknown parameter remains: a longitude shift that applies equally to all plumes. To obtain a solution we could restrict either the Hawaii or Louisville plume to have latitudinal motion only, thus satisfying paleolatitude constraints. Yet, restricting one plume to latitudinal motion while all others move freely is not realistic. Consequently, it is only possible to resolve the motion of hotspots relative to an overall and unknown longitudinal shift as a function of time. Our plate motions are therefore dependent on the same shift via an unknown rotation about the north pole. Yet, as plume drifts are consequences of mantle convection, our results place strong constraints on the pattern of convection. Other considerations, such as imposed limits on plate speed, plume speed, proximity to LLSVP edges, model smoothness, or relative plate motions via ridge-spotting may add further constraints that allow a unique model of Pacific absolute plate and plume motions to be

  8. Recovery efficiency and limit of detection of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne from environmental surface samples.

    PubMed

    Estill, Cheryl Fairfield; Baron, Paul A; Beard, Jeremy K; Hein, Misty J; Larsen, Lloyd D; Rose, Laura; Schaefer, Frank W; Noble-Wang, Judith; Hodges, Lisa; Lindquist, H D Alan; Deye, Gregory J; Arduino, Matthew J

    2009-07-01

    After the 2001 anthrax incidents, surface sampling techniques for biological agents were found to be inadequately validated, especially at low surface loadings. We aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores within a chamber to achieve very low surface loading (ca. 3, 30, and 200 CFU per 100 cm(2)). Steel and carpet coupons seeded in the chamber were sampled with swab (103 cm(2)) or wipe or vacuum (929 cm(2)) surface sampling methods and analyzed at three laboratories. Agar settle plates (60 cm(2)) were the reference for determining recovery efficiency (RE). The minimum estimated surface concentrations to achieve a 95% response rate based on probit regression were 190, 15, and 44 CFU/100 cm(2) for sampling steel surfaces and 40, 9.2, and 28 CFU/100 cm(2) for sampling carpet surfaces with swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively; however, these results should be cautiously interpreted because of high observed variability. Mean REs at the highest surface loading were 5.0%, 18%, and 3.7% on steel and 12%, 23%, and 4.7% on carpet for the swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively. Precision (coefficient of variation) was poor at the lower surface concentrations but improved with increasing surface concentration. The best precision was obtained with wipe samples on carpet, achieving 38% at the highest surface concentration. The wipe sampling method detected B. anthracis at lower estimated surface concentrations and had higher RE and better precision than the other methods. These results may guide investigators to more meaningfully conduct environmental sampling, quantify contamination levels, and conduct risk assessment for humans.

  9. Recovery Efficiency and Limit of Detection of Aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne from Environmental Surface Samples ▿

    PubMed Central

    Estill, Cheryl Fairfield; Baron, Paul A.; Beard, Jeremy K.; Hein, Misty J.; Larsen, Lloyd D.; Rose, Laura; Schaefer, Frank W.; Noble-Wang, Judith; Hodges, Lisa; Lindquist, H. D. Alan; Deye, Gregory J.; Arduino, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    After the 2001 anthrax incidents, surface sampling techniques for biological agents were found to be inadequately validated, especially at low surface loadings. We aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores within a chamber to achieve very low surface loading (ca. 3, 30, and 200 CFU per 100 cm2). Steel and carpet coupons seeded in the chamber were sampled with swab (103 cm2) or wipe or vacuum (929 cm2) surface sampling methods and analyzed at three laboratories. Agar settle plates (60 cm2) were the reference for determining recovery efficiency (RE). The minimum estimated surface concentrations to achieve a 95% response rate based on probit regression were 190, 15, and 44 CFU/100 cm2 for sampling steel surfaces and 40, 9.2, and 28 CFU/100 cm2 for sampling carpet surfaces with swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively; however, these results should be cautiously interpreted because of high observed variability. Mean REs at the highest surface loading were 5.0%, 18%, and 3.7% on steel and 12%, 23%, and 4.7% on carpet for the swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively. Precision (coefficient of variation) was poor at the lower surface concentrations but improved with increasing surface concentration. The best precision was obtained with wipe samples on carpet, achieving 38% at the highest surface concentration. The wipe sampling method detected B. anthracis at lower estimated surface concentrations and had higher RE and better precision than the other methods. These results may guide investigators to more meaningfully conduct environmental sampling, quantify contamination levels, and conduct risk assessment for humans. PMID:19429546

  10. Tracheal aspirate Gram stain has limited sensitivity and specificity for detecting Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Tetenta, Sodienye; Metersky, Mark L

    2011-01-01

    The increasing incidence of respiratory infections due to methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus has resulted in increased empirical use of antibiotics active against this pathogen. There are limited data available as to whether the Gram stain of respiratory tract secretions accurately predicts growth of S. aureus. We theorized that the distinctive morphology of S. aureus would allow rapid, accurate identification of the organism in respiratory secretions. The authors reviewed all available Gram stains of tracheal aspirates sent to our hospital's microbiology laboratory between 1 April 2008 and 31 October 2008, while blinded to the culture result, and recorded the presence or absence of organisms with a morphology consistent with S. aureus. These results were correlated with the semiquantitative culture result. Among 136 tracheal aspirates studied, 50 (37%) grew S. aureus. The Gram stain was read as positive for organisms consistent with S. aureus in 34 of these. Among 86 samples that did not grow S. aureus, the Gram stain was read as negative in 62. Therefore, the Gram stain had a sensitivity of 68%, a specificity of 72%, a negative predictive value of 80% and a positive predictive value of 59% for culture of S. aureus. False negative Gram stains were more likely when the culture revealed only rare or small growth of S. aureus (P = 0.01). In this study, the tracheal aspirate Gram stain read by an experienced clinician who was not a microbiologist, was not accurate enough to reliably predict the growth of S. aureus. © 2010 The Authors. Respirology © 2010 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  11. Cs2AgBiBr6 single-crystal X-ray detectors with a low detection limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Weicheng; Wu, Haodi; Luo, Jiajun; Deng, Zhenzhou; Ge, Cong; Chen, Chao; Jiang, Xiaowei; Yin, Wan-Jian; Niu, Guangda; Zhu, Lujun; Yin, Lixiao; Zhou, Ying; Xie, Qingguo; Ke, Xiaoxing; Sui, Manling; Tang, Jiang

    2017-11-01

    Sensitive X-ray detection is crucial for medical diagnosis, industrial inspection and scientific research. The recently described hybrid lead halide perovskites have demonstrated low-cost fabrication and outstanding performance for direct X-ray detection, but they all contain toxic Pb in a soluble form. Here, we report sensitive X-ray detectors using solution-processed double perovskite Cs2AgBiBr6 single crystals. Through thermal annealing and surface treatment, we largely eliminate Ag+/Bi3+ disordering and improve the crystal resistivity, resulting in a detector with a minimum detectable dose rate as low as 59.7 nGyair s-1, comparable to the latest record of 0.036 μGyair s-1 using CH3NH3PbBr3 single crystals. Suppressed ion migration in Cs2AgBiBr6 permits relatively large external bias, guaranteeing efficient charge collection without a substantial increase in noise current and thus enabling the low detection limit.

  12. Detection Limit of Smectite by Chemin IV Laboratory Instrument: Preliminary Implications for Chemin on the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archilles, Cherie; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Blake, D. F.

    2011-01-01

    The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is an miniature X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument capable of detecting the mineralogical and elemental compositions of rocks, outcrops and soils on the surface of Mars. CheMin uses a microfocus-source Co X-ray tube, a transmission sample cell, and an energy-discriminating X-ray sensitive CCD to produce simultaneous 2-D XRD patterns and energy-dispersive X-ray histograms from powdered samples. CRISM and OMEGA have identified the presence of phyllosilicates at several locations on Mars including the four candidate MSL landing sites. The objective of this study was to conduct preliminary studies to determine the CheMin detection limit of smectite in a smectite/olivine mixed mineral system.

  13. Scheme for efficient extraction of low-frequency signal beyond the quantum limit by frequency-shift detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, R G; Zhang, J; Zhai, Z H; Zhai, S Q; Liu, K; Gao, J R

    2015-08-10

    Low-frequency (Hz~kHz) squeezing is very important in many schemes of quantum precision measurement. But it is more difficult than that at megahertz-frequency because of the introduction of laser low-frequency technical noise. In this paper, we propose a scheme to obtain a low-frequency signal beyond the quantum limit from the frequency comb in a non-degenerate frequency and degenerate polarization optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) operating below threshold with type I phase matching by frequency-shift detection. Low-frequency squeezing immune to laser technical noise is obtained by a detection system with a local beam of two-frequency intense laser. Furthermore, the low-frequency squeezing can be used for phase measurement in Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be enhanced greatly.

  14. An accurate and inexpensive color-based assay for detecting severe anemia in a limited-resource setting

    PubMed Central

    McGann, Patrick T.; Tyburski, Erika A.; de Oliveira, Vysolela; Santos, Brigida; Ware, Russell E.; Lam, Wilbur A.

    2016-01-01

    Severe anemia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among children in resource-poor settings, but laboratory diagnostics are often limited in these locations. To address this need, we developed a simple, inexpensive, and color-based point-of-care (POC) assay to detect severe anemia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of this novel POC assay to detect moderate and severe anemia in a limited-resource setting. The study was a cross-sectional study conducted on children with sickle cell anemia in Luanda, Angola. The hemoglobin concentrations obtained by the POC assay were compared to reference values measured by a calibrated automated hematology analyzer. A total of 86 samples were analyzed (mean hemoglobin concentration 6.6 g/dL). There was a strong correlation between the hemoglobin concentrations obtained by the POC assay and reference values obtained from an automated hematology analyzer (r=0.88, P<0.0001). The POC assay demonstrated excellent reproducibility (r=0.93, P<0.0001) and the reagents appeared to be durable in a tropical setting (r=0.93, P<0.0001). For the detection of severe anemia that may require blood transfusion (hemoglobin <5 g/dL), the POC assay had sensitivity of 88.9% and specificity of 98.7%. These data demonstrate that an inexpensive (<$0.25 USD) POC assay accurately estimates low hemoglobin concentrations and has the potential to become a transformational diagnostic tool for severe anemia in limited-resource settings. PMID:26317494

  15. Determining the 95% limit of detection for waterborne pathogen analyses from primary concentration to qPCR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stokdyk, Joel P.; Firnstahl, Aaron; Spencer, Susan K.; Burch, Tucker R; Borchardt, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The limit of detection (LOD) for qPCR-based analyses is not consistently defined or determined in studies on waterborne pathogens. Moreover, the LODs reported often reflect the qPCR assay alone rather than the entire sample process. Our objective was to develop an approach to determine the 95% LOD (lowest concentration at which 95% of positive samples are detected) for the entire process of waterborne pathogen detection. We began by spiking the lowest concentration that was consistently positive at the qPCR step (based on its standard curve) into each procedural step working backwards (i.e., extraction, secondary concentration, primary concentration), which established a concentration that was detectable following losses of the pathogen from processing. Using the fraction of positive replicates (n = 10) at this concentration, we selected and analyzed a second, and then third, concentration. If the fraction of positive replicates equaled 1 or 0 for two concentrations, we selected another. We calculated the LOD using probit analysis. To demonstrate our approach we determined the 95% LOD for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, adenovirus 41, and vaccine-derived poliovirus Sabin 3, which were 11, 12, and 6 genomic copies (gc) per reaction (rxn), respectively (equivalent to 1.3, 1.5, and 4.0 gc L−1 assuming the 1500 L tap-water sample volume prescribed in EPA Method 1615). This approach limited the number of analyses required and was amenable to testing multiple genetic targets simultaneously (i.e., spiking a single sample with multiple microorganisms). An LOD determined this way can facilitate study design, guide the number of required technical replicates, aid method evaluation, and inform data interpretation.

  16. Determining the 95% limit of detection for waterborne pathogen analyses from primary concentration to qPCR.

    PubMed

    Stokdyk, Joel P; Firnstahl, Aaron D; Spencer, Susan K; Burch, Tucker R; Borchardt, Mark A

    2016-06-01

    The limit of detection (LOD) for qPCR-based analyses is not consistently defined or determined in studies on waterborne pathogens. Moreover, the LODs reported often reflect the qPCR assay alone rather than the entire sample process. Our objective was to develop an approach to determine the 95% LOD (lowest concentration at which 95% of positive samples are detected) for the entire process of waterborne pathogen detection. We began by spiking the lowest concentration that was consistently positive at the qPCR step (based on its standard curve) into each procedural step working backwards (i.e., extraction, secondary concentration, primary concentration), which established a concentration that was detectable following losses of the pathogen from processing. Using the fraction of positive replicates (n = 10) at this concentration, we selected and analyzed a second, and then third, concentration. If the fraction of positive replicates equaled 1 or 0 for two concentrations, we selected another. We calculated the LOD using probit analysis. To demonstrate our approach we determined the 95% LOD for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, adenovirus 41, and vaccine-derived poliovirus Sabin 3, which were 11, 12, and 6 genomic copies (gc) per reaction (rxn), respectively (equivalent to 1.3, 1.5, and 4.0 gc L(-1) assuming the 1500 L tap-water sample volume prescribed in EPA Method 1615). This approach limited the number of analyses required and was amenable to testing multiple genetic targets simultaneously (i.e., spiking a single sample with multiple microorganisms). An LOD determined this way can facilitate study design, guide the number of required technical replicates, aid method evaluation, and inform data interpretation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Resistance of lichens to simulated galactic cosmic radiation: limits of survival capacity and biosignature detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre Noetzel, Rosa; Miller, Ana Z.; Cubero, Beatriz; Raguse, Marina; Meessen, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Space constitutes an extremely harmful environment for survival of terrestrial organisms. Amongst extremophiles on Earth, lichens are one of the most resistant organisms to harsh terrestrial environments, as well as some species of microorganisms, such as bacteria (Moeller et al., 2010), criptoendolithic cyanobacteria and lithic fungi (de los Ríos et al. 2004). To study the survival capacity of lichens to the harmful radiation environment of space, we have selected the lichen Circinaria gyrosa, an astrobiological model defined by its high capacity of resistance to space conditions (De la Torre et al. 2010) and to a simulated Mars environment (Sanchez et al., 2012). Samples were irradiated with four types of space-relevant ionizing radiation in the STARLIFE campaign: helium and iron ion doses (up to 2,000 Gy), X-ray doses (up to 5,000 Gy) and ultra-high γ-ray doses (from 6 to 113 kGy). Results on resistance of C. gyrosa to space-relevant ionizing radiation and its post-irradiation viability were obtained by: (i) chlorophyll a fluorescence of photosystem II (PS II); (ii) epifluorescence microscopy; (iii) confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM), and (iv) field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Results of photosynthetic activity and epifluorescence showed no significant changes on the viability of C. gyrosa with increasing doses of helium and iron ions as well as X-rays. In contrast, γ-irradiation elicited significant dose-correlated effects as revealed by all applied techniques. Relevant is the presence of whewellite-like crystals, detected by FESEM on C. gyrosa thalli after high irradiation doses, which has been also identified in previous Mars simulation studies (Böttcher et al., 2014). These studies contribute to the better understanding of the adaptability of extremophile organisms to harsh environments, as well as to estimate the habitability of a planet's surface, like Mars; they will be important for planning experiments on the search of life

  18. Detection of Temporally and Spatially Limited Periodic Earthquake Recurrence in Synthetic Seismic Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, O.; Arrowsmith, R. J.

    2005-12-01

    noticeable periodicity during certain intervals in an otherwise aperiodic record. The observed periodic signal is not equally distributed over the range of offsets but shows a multi-modal distribution with increased periodicity for the smallest events and for large events that show a specific offset. These large events also form a shoulder in the frequency-size distribution. Apparently, the model exhibits characteristic earthquakes (defined by similar coseismic slip) that occur more frequently than expected from a power law distribution, and also are significantly more periodic. The wavelength of the periodic signal generally equals the minimum loading time, which is related to the loading velocity and the amount of coseismic slip (i.e., stress drop). No significant event occurs between the characteristic events as long as the system stays in a window of periodic behavior. Within the windows of periodic behavior, earthquake prediction is straightforward. Therefore, recognition of these windows not only in synthetic data but also in real seismic records, may improve the intra-window forecast of earthquakes. Further studies will attempt to determine the characteristics of onset, duration, and end of these windows of periodic earthquake recurrence. Only the motion of a single block within a bigger system was analyzed so far. Going from a zero dimensional scenario to a two dimensional case where the offsets not only of a single block but the displacement patterns caused by a certain event are analyzed will increase the verisimilitude of the detection of periodic earthquake recurrence within an otherwise chaotic seismic record.

  19. Dual-balanced detection scheme with optical hard-limiters in an optical code division multiple access system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Maw-Yang; Hsu, Yi-Kai

    2017-03-01

    Three-arm dual-balanced detection scheme is studied in an optical code division multiple access system. As the MAI and beat noise are the main deleterious source of system performance, we utilize optical hard-limiters to alleviate such channel impairment. In addition, once the channel condition is improved effectively, the proposed two-dimensional error correction code can remarkably enhance the system performance. In our proposed scheme, the optimal thresholds of optical hard-limiters and decision circuitry are fixed, and they will not change with other system parameters. Our proposed scheme can accommodate a large number of users simultaneously and is suitable for burst traffic with asynchronous transmission. Therefore, it is highly recommended as the platform for broadband optical access network.

  20. Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Haddad, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet have extended to short wavelengths by use of rare-gas ionization chambers. The technique involves the measurement of the ion current as a function of the gas pressure in the ion chamber. The true value of the ion current, and hence the absolute photon flux, is obtained by extrapolating the ion current to zero gas pressure. Examples are given at 162 and 266 A. The short-wavelength limit is determined only by the sensitivity of the current-measuring apparatus and by present knowledge of the photoionization processes that occur in the rate gases.

  1. A Control Allocation System for Automatic Detection and Compensation of Phase Shift Due to Actuator Rate Limiting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yildiz, Yidiray; Kolmanovsky, Ilya V.; Acosta, Diana

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a control allocation system that can detect and compensate the phase shift between the desired and the actual total control effort due to rate limiting of the actuators. Phase shifting is an important problem in control system applications since it effectively introduces a time delay which may destabilize the closed loop dynamics. A relevant example comes from flight control where aggressive pilot commands, high gain of the flight control system or some anomaly in the system may cause actuator rate limiting and effective time delay introduction. This time delay can instigate Pilot Induced Oscillations (PIO), which is an abnormal coupling between the pilot and the aircraft resulting in unintentional and undesired oscillations. The proposed control allocation system reduces the effective time delay by first detecting the phase shift and then minimizing it using constrained optimization techniques. Flight control simulation results for an unstable aircraft with inertial cross coupling are reported, which demonstrate phase shift minimization and recovery from a PIO event.

  2. Absolute GPS Positioning Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, G.

    A new inverse approach for restoring the absolute coordinates of a ground -based station from three or four observed GPS pseudo-ranges is proposed. This stochastic method is based on simulations of natural evolution named genetic algorithms (GA). These iterative procedures provide fairly good and robust estimates of the absolute positions in the Earth's geocentric reference system. For comparison/validation, GA results are compared to the ones obtained using the classical linearized least-square scheme for the determination of the XYZ location proposed by Bancroft (1985) which is strongly limited by the number of available observations (i.e. here, the number of input pseudo-ranges must be four). The r.m.s. accuracy of the non -linear cost function reached by this latter method is typically ~10-4 m2 corresponding to ~300-500-m accuracies for each geocentric coordinate. However, GA can provide more acceptable solutions (r.m.s. errors < 10-5 m2), even when only three instantaneous pseudo-ranges are used, such as a lost of lock during a GPS survey. Tuned GA parameters used in different simulations are N=1000 starting individuals, as well as Pc=60-70% and Pm=30-40% for the crossover probability and mutation rate, respectively. Statistical tests on the ability of GA to recover acceptable coordinates in presence of important levels of noise are made simulating nearly 3000 random samples of erroneous pseudo-ranges. Here, two main sources of measurement errors are considered in the inversion: (1) typical satellite-clock errors and/or 300-metre variance atmospheric delays, and (2) Geometrical Dilution of Precision (GDOP) due to the particular GPS satellite configuration at the time of acquisition. Extracting valuable information and even from low-quality starting range observations, GA offer an interesting alternative for high -precision GPS positioning.

  3. Integrated poly(dimethysiloxane) with an intrinsic nonfouling property approaching "absolute" zero background in immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongwei; Wu, Yuanzi; Yang, Xiaoli; Liu, Xing; He, Jianan; Fu, Long; Wang, Jie; Xu, Hongke; Shi, Yi; Zhong, Renqian

    2010-08-01

    The key to achieve a highly sensitive and specific protein microarray assay is to prevent nonspecific protein adsorption to an "absolute" zero level because any signal amplification method will simultaneously amplify signal and noise. Here, we develop a novel solid supporting material, namely, polymer coated initiator integrated poly(dimethysiloxane) (iPDMS), which was able to achieve such "absolute" zero (i.e., below the detection limit of instrument). The implementation of this iPDMS enables practical and high-quality multiplexed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of 11 tumor markers. This iPDMS does not need any blocking steps and only require mild washing conditions. It also uses on an average 8-fold less capture antibodies compared with the mainstream nitrocellulose (NC) film. Besides saving time and materials, iPDMS achieved a limit-of-detection (LOD) as low as 19 pg mL(-1), which is sufficiently low for most current clinical diagnostic applications. We expect to see an immediate impact of this iPDMS on the realization of the great potential of protein microarray in research and practical uses such as large scale and high-throughput screening, clinical diagnosis, inspection, and quarantine.

  4. Computational Methodology for Absolute Calibration Curves for Microfluidic Optical Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Pin; Nagel, David J.; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2010-01-01

    Optical fluorescence and absorption are two of the primary techniques used for analytical microfluidics. We provide a thorough yet tractable method for computing the performance of diverse optical micro-analytical systems. Sample sizes range from nano- to many micro-liters and concentrations from nano- to milli-molar. Equations are provided to trace quantitatively the flow of the fundamental entities, namely photons and electrons, and the conversion of energy from the source, through optical components, samples and spectral-selective components, to the detectors and beyond. The equations permit facile computations of calibration curves that relate the concentrations or numbers of molecules measured to the absolute signals from the system. This methodology provides the basis for both detailed understanding and improved design of microfluidic optical analytical systems. It saves prototype turn-around time, and is much simpler and faster to use than ray tracing programs. Over two thousand spreadsheet computations were performed during this study. We found that some design variations produce higher signal levels and, for constant noise levels, lower minimum detection limits. Improvements of more than a factor of 1,000 were realized. PMID:22163573

  5. Scanning micro-resonator direct-comb absolute spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gambetta, Alessio; Cassinerio, Marco; Gatti, Davide; Laporta, Paolo; Galzerano, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Direct optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy (DFCS) is proving to be a fundamental tool in many areas of science and technology thanks to its unique performance in terms of ultra-broadband, high-speed detection and frequency accuracy, allowing for high-fidelity mapping of atomic and molecular energy structure. Here we present a novel DFCS approach based on a scanning Fabry-Pérot micro-cavity resonator (SMART) providing a simple, compact and accurate method to resolve the mode structure of an optical frequency comb. The SMART approach, while drastically reducing system complexity, allows for a straightforward absolute calibration of the optical-frequency axis with an ultimate resolution limited by the micro-resonator resonance linewidth and can be used in any spectral region from UV to THz. We present an application to high-precision spectroscopy of acetylene at 1.54 μm, demonstrating performances comparable or even better than current state-of-the-art DFCS systems in terms of sensitivity, optical bandwidth and frequency-resolution. PMID:27752132

  6. Interpretation of the Arcade 2 Absolute Sky Brightness Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiffert, M.; Fixsen, D. J.; Kogut, A.; Levin, S. M.; Limon, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Mirel, P.; Singal, J.; Villela, T.; Wollack, E.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We use absolutely calibrated data between 3 and 90 GHz from the 2006 balloon flight of the ARCADE 2 instrument, along with previous measurements at other frequencies to constrain models of extragalactic emission. Such emission is a combination of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) monopole, Galactic foreground emission, the integrated contribution of radio emission from external galaxies, any spectral distortions present in the CMB, and any other extragalactic source. After removal of estimates of foreground emission from our own Galaxy, and an estimated contribution of external galaxies, we present fits to a combination of the flat-spectrum CMB and potential spectral distortions in the CMB. We find 217 upper limits to CMB spectral distortions of u < 6x10(exp -4) and [Y(sub ff)] < 1x10(exp -4). We also find a significant detection of a residual signal beyond that, which can be explained by the CMB plus the integrated radio emission from galaxies estimated from existing surveys. This residual signal may be due to an underestimated galactic foreground contribution, an unaccounted for contribution of a background of radio sources, or some combination of both. The residual signal is consistent with emission in the form of a power law with amplitUde 18.4 +/- 2.1 K at 0.31 GHz and a spectral index of -2.57 +/- 0.05.

  7. Natural history of optical coherence tomography-detected non-flow-limiting edge dissections following drug-eluting stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Radu, Maria D; Räber, Lorenz; Heo, Jungho; Gogas, Bill D; Jørgensen, Erik; Kelbæk, Henning; Muramatsu, Takashi; Farooq, Vasim; Helqvist, Steffen; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Windecker, Stephan; Saunamäki, Kari; Serruys, Patrick W

    2014-01-22

    Angiographic evidence of edge dissections has been associated with a risk of early stent thrombosis. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a high-resolution technology detecting a greater number of edge dissections--particularly non-flow-limiting--compared to angiography. Their natural history and clinical implications remain unclear. The objectives of the present study were to assess the morphology, healing response, and clinical outcomes of OCT-detected edge dissections using serial OCT imaging at baseline and at one year following drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. Edge dissections were defined as disruptions of the luminal surface in the 5 mm segments proximal and distal to the stent, and categorised as flaps, cavities, double-lumen dissections or fissures. Qualitative and quantitative OCT analyses were performed every 0.5 mm at baseline and one year, and clinical outcomes were assessed. Sixty-three lesions (57 patients) were studied with OCT at baseline and one-year follow-up. Twenty-two non-flow-limiting edge dissections in 21 lesions (20 patients) were identified by OCT; only two (9%) were angiographically visible. Flaps were found in 96% of cases. The median longitudinal dissection length was 2.9 mm (interquartile range [IQR] 1.6-4.2 mm), whereas the circumferential and axial extensions amounted to 1.2 mm (IQR: 0.9-1.7 mm) and 0.6 mm (IQR: 0.4-0.7 mm), respectively. Dissections extended into the media and adventitia in seven (33%) and four (20%) cases, respectively. Eighteen (82%) OCT-detected edge dissections were also evaluated with intravascular ultrasound which identified nine (50%) of these OCT-detected dissections. No stent thrombosis or target lesion revascularisation occurred up to one year. At follow-up, 20 (90%) edge dissections were completely healed on OCT. The two cases exhibiting persistent dissection had the longest flaps (2.81 mm and 2.42 mm) at baseline. OCT-detected edge dissections which are angiographically silent in the majority of

  8. Assessment of average of normals (AON) procedure for outlier-free datasets including qualitative values below limit of detection (LoD): an application within tumor markers such as CA 15-3, CA 125, and CA 19-9.

    PubMed

    Usta, Murat; Aral, Hale; Mete Çilingirtürk, Ahmet; Kural, Alev; Topaç, Ibrahim; Semerci, Tuna; Hicri Köseoğlu, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    Average of normals (AON) is a quality control procedure that is sensitive only to systematic errors that can occur in an analytical process in which patient test results are used. The aim of this study was to develop an alternative model in order to apply the AON quality control procedure to datasets that include qualitative values below limit of detection (LoD). The reported patient test results for tumor markers, such as CA 15-3, CA 125, and CA 19-9, analyzed by two instruments, were retrieved from the information system over a period of 5 months, using the calibrator and control materials with the same lot numbers. The median as a measure of central tendency and the median absolute deviation (MAD) as a measure of dispersion were used for the complementary model of AON quality control procedure. The u bias values, which were determined for the bias component of the measurement uncertainty, were partially linked to the percentages of the daily median values of the test results that fall within the control limits. The results for these tumor markers, in which lower limits of reference intervals are not medically important for clinical diagnosis and management, showed that the AON quality control procedure, using the MAD around the median, can be applied for datasets including qualitative values below LoD.

  9. Evaluating detection limits of next-generation sequencing for the surveillance and monitoring of international marine pests.

    PubMed

    Pochon, Xavier; Bott, Nathan J; Smith, Kirsty F; Wood, Susanna A

    2013-01-01

    Most surveillance programmes for marine invasive species (MIS) require considerable taxonomic expertise, are laborious, and are unable to identify species at larval or juvenile stages. Therefore, marine pests may go undetected at the initial stages of incursions when population densities are low. In this study, we evaluated the ability of the benchtop GS Junior™ 454 pyrosequencing system to detect the presence of MIS in complex sample matrices. An initial in-silico evaluation of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and the nuclear small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU) genes, found that multiple primer sets (targeting a ca. 400 base pair region) would be required to obtain species level identification within the COI gene. In contrast a single universal primer set was designed to target the V1-V3 region of SSU, allowing simultaneous PCR amplification of a wide taxonomic range of MIS. To evaluate the limits of detection of this method, artificial contrived communities (10 species from 5 taxonomic groups) were created using varying concentrations of known DNA samples and PCR products. Environmental samples (water and sediment) spiked with one or five 160 hr old Asterias amurensis larvae were also examined. Pyrosequencing was able to recover DNA/PCR products of individual species present at greater than 0.64% abundance from all tested contrived communities. Additionally, single A. amurensis larvae were detected from both water and sediment samples despite the co-occurrence of a large array of environmental eukaryotes, indicating an equivalent sensitivity to quantitative PCR. NGS technology has tremendous potential for the early detection of marine invasive species worldwide.

  10. Evaluating Detection Limits of Next-Generation Sequencing for the Surveillance and Monitoring of International Marine Pests

    PubMed Central

    Pochon, Xavier; Bott, Nathan J.; Smith, Kirsty F.; Wood, Susanna A.

    2013-01-01

    Most surveillance programmes for marine invasive species (MIS) require considerable taxonomic expertise, are laborious, and are unable to identify species at larval or juvenile stages. Therefore, marine pests may go undetected at the initial stages of incursions when population densities are low. In this study, we evaluated the ability of the benchtop GS Junior™ 454 pyrosequencing system to detect the presence of MIS in complex sample matrices. An initial in-silico evaluation of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and the nuclear small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU) genes, found that multiple primer sets (targeting a ca. 400 base pair region) would be required to obtain species level identification within the COI gene. In contrast a single universal primer set was designed to target the V1–V3 region of SSU, allowing simultaneous PCR amplification of a wide taxonomic range of MIS. To evaluate the limits of detection of this method, artificial contrived communities (10 species from 5 taxonomic groups) were created using varying concentrations of known DNA samples and PCR products. Environmental samples (water and sediment) spiked with one or five 160 hr old Asterias amurensis larvae were also examined. Pyrosequencing was able to recover DNA/PCR products of individual species present at greater than 0.64% abundance from all tested contrived communities. Additionally, single A. amurensis larvae were detected from both water and sediment samples despite the co-occurrence of a large array of environmental eukaryotes, indicating an equivalent sensitivity to quantitative PCR. NGS technology has tremendous potential for the early detection of marine invasive species worldwide. PMID:24023913

  11. Linking Comparisons of Absolute Gravimeters: A Proof of Concept for a new Global Absolute Gravity Reference System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wziontek, H.; Palinkas, V.; Falk, R.; Vaľko, M.

    2016-12-01

    Since decades, absolute gravimeters are compared on a regular basis on an international level, starting at the International Bureau for Weights and Measures (BIPM) in 1981. Usually, these comparisons are based on constant reference values deduced from all accepted measurements acquired during the comparison period. Temporal changes between comparison epochs are usually not considered. Resolution No. 2, adopted by IAG during the IUGG General Assembly in Prague 2015, initiates the establishment of a Global Absolute Gravity Reference System based on key comparisons of absolute gravimeters (AG) under the International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) in order to establish a common level in the microGal range. A stable and unique reference frame can only be achieved, if different AG are taking part in different kind of comparisons. Systematic deviations between the respective comparison reference values can be detected, if the AG can be considered stable over time. The continuous operation of superconducting gravimeters (SG) on selected stations further supports the temporal link of comparison reference values by establishing a reference function over time. By a homogenous reprocessing of different comparison epochs and including AG and SG time series at selected stations, links between several comparisons will be established and temporal comparison reference functions will be derived. By this, comparisons on a regional level can be traced to back to the level of key comparisons, providing a reference for other absolute gravimeters. It will be proved and discussed, how such a concept can be used to support the future absolute gravity reference system.

  12. Generic method for the absolute quantification of glutathione S-conjugates: Application to the conjugates of acetaminophen, clozapine and diclofenac.

    PubMed

    den Braver, Michiel W; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Commandeur, Jan N M

    2017-03-01

    Modification of cellular macromolecules by reactive drug metabolites is considered to play an important role in the initiation of tissue injury by many drugs. Detection and identification of reactive intermediates is often performed by analyzing the conjugates formed after trapping by glutathione (GSH). Although sensitivity of modern mass spectrometrical methods is extremely high, absolute quantification of GSH-conjugates is critically dependent on the availability of authentic references. Although 1 H NMR is currently the method of choice for quantification of metabolites formed biosynthetically, its intrinsically low sensitivity can be a limiting factor in quantification of GSH-conjugates which generally are formed at low levels. In the present study, a simple but sensitive and generic method for absolute quantification of GSH-conjugates is presented. The method is based on quantitative alkaline hydrolysis of GSH-conjugates and subsequent quantification of glutamic acid and glycine by HPLC after precolumn derivatization with o-phthaldialdehyde/N-acetylcysteine (OPA/NAC). Because of the lower stability of the glycine OPA/NAC-derivate, quantification of the glutamic acid OPA/NAC-derivate appeared most suitable for quantification of GSH-conjugates. The novel method was used to quantify the concentrations of GSH-conjugates of diclofenac, clozapine and acetaminophen and quantification was consistent with 1 H NMR, but with a more than 100-fold lower detection limit for absolute quantification. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Using rapid-scan EPR to improve the detection limit of quantitative EPR by more than one order of magnitude.

    PubMed

    Möser, J; Lips, K; Tseytlin, M; Eaton, G R; Eaton, S S; Schnegg, A

    2017-08-01

    X-band rapid-scan EPR was implemented on a commercially available Bruker ELEXSYS E580 spectrometer. Room temperature rapid-scan and continuous-wave EPR spectra were recorded for amorphous silicon powder samples. By comparing the resulting signal intensities the feasibility of performing quantitative rapid-scan EPR is demonstrated. For different hydrogenated amorphous silicon samples, rapid-scan EPR results in signal-to-noise improvements by factors between 10 and 50. Rapid-scan EPR is thus capable of improving the detection limit of quantitative EPR by at least one order of magnitude. In addition, we provide a recipe for setting up and calibrating a conventional pulsed and continuous-wave EPR spectrometer for rapid-scan EPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Recent observations of interstellar molecules - Detection of CCO and a limit on H2C3O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. D.; Cragg, D. M.; Godfrey, P. D.; Irvine, W. M.; Mcgonagle, D.; Ohishi, M.

    1992-01-01

    In order to test gas-phase reaction schemes for the production of small oxides of carbon in cold, dense interstellar clouds, we have searched for the radical CCO and for propadienone (H2C3O) in Taurus Molecular Cloud 1, a nearby cloud which exhibits a rich organic chemistry. The radical CCO has been detected with a fractional abundance some two orders of magnitude less than that of CCS, about one order of magnitude less than that of H2CCO, and slightly less than that of C3O. An upper limit has been obtained on the abundance of propadienone which is slightly less than that of its isomer propynal (HC2CHO).

  15. A Fast EM Algorithm for Fitting Joint Models of a Binary Response and Multiple Longitudinal Covariates Subject to Detection Limits

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Paul W.; Zhang, Daowen; Wang, Huixia Judy

    2014-01-01

    Joint modeling techniques have become a popular strategy for studying the association between a response and one or more longitudinal covariates. Motivated by the GenIMS study, where it is of interest to model the event of survival using censored longitudinal biomarkers, a joint model is proposed for describing the relationship between a binary outcome and multiple longitudinal covariates subject to detection limits. A fast, approximate EM algorithm is developed that reduces the dimension of integration in the E-step of the algorithm to one, regardless of the number of random effects in the joint model. Numerical studies demonstrate that the proposed approximate EM algorithm leads to satisfactory parameter and variance estimates in situations with and without censoring on the longitudinal covariates. The approximate EM algorithm is applied to analyze the GenIMS data set. PMID:25598564

  16. Mixed-effects location and scale Tobit joint models for heterogeneous longitudinal data with skewness, detection limits, and measurement errors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tao

    2017-01-01

    The joint modeling of mean and variance for longitudinal data is an active research area. This type of model has the advantage of accounting for heteroscedasticity commonly observed in between and within subject variations. Most of researches focus on improving the estimating efficiency but ignore many data features frequently encountered in practice. In this article, we develop a mixed-effects location scale joint model that concurrently accounts for longitudinal data with multiple features. Specifically, our joint model handles heterogeneity, skewness, limit of detection, measurement errors in covariates which are typically observed in the collection of longitudinal data from many studies. We employ a Bayesian approach for making inference on the joint model. The proposed model and method are applied to an AIDS study. Simulation studies are performed to assess the performance of the proposed method. Alternative models under different conditions are compared.

  17. Taking single virus detection and sizing to the limit with molecular sensitivity: the birth of nanoplasmonic-microcavity hybrid sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, S.

    2013-03-01

    The BioPhotonics community is buzzing at the prospect that ulta-small bio-nanoparticles such as Polio virus and protein can be detected label-free in their native state and sized one at a time. As the awareness that the claim of label-free single protein sensing through the frequency shift of a bare microcavity by A.M. Armani et al in Science in 2007 fades from lack of independent experimental confirmation or a viable physical mechanism to account for the magnitude of the reported wavelength shifts, a new approach has captured the community's interest. It is a product of a marriage between nano-optics and micro-photonics, and is poised to take label-free sensing to the limit.

  18. Chlorine-trapped CVD bilayer graphene for resistive pressure sensor with high detection limit and high sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuong Pham, Viet; Triet Nguyen, Minh; Park, Jin Woo; Kwak, Sung Soo; Nguyen, Dieu Hien Thi; Kyeom Mun, Mu; Danh Phan, Hoang; San Kim, Doo; Kim, Ki Hyun; Lee, Nae-Eung; Yeom, Geun Young

    2017-06-01

    Pressure sensing is one of the key functions for smart electronics. Considerably more effort is required to achieve the fabrication of pressure sensors that can imitate and overcome the sophisticated pressure sensing characteristics in nature and industry, especially in the innovation of materials and structures. Almost all of the pressure sensors reported until now have a high sensitivity at a low-pressure detection limit (<10 kPa). While the exploration of a pressure sensor with a high sensitivity and a high responsivity at a high-pressure is challenging, it is required for next generation smart electronics. Here, we report an exotic heterostructure pressure sensor based on ZnO/chlorine radical-trap doped bilayer graphene (ZGClG) as an ideal channel for pressure sensors. Using this ZGClG as the channel, this study shows the possibility of forming a pressure sensor with a high sensitivity (0.19 kPa-1) and a high responsivity (0.575 s) at V  =  1 V on glass substrate. Further, the pressure detection limit of this device was as high as 98 kPa. The investigation of the sensing mechanism under pressure has revealed that the significant improved sensing effect is related to the heavy p-type chlorine trap doping in the channel graphene with chlorine radicals without damaging the graphene. This work indicates that the ZGClG channel used for the pressure sensing device could also provide a simple and essential sensing platform for chemical-, medical-, and biological-sensing for future smart electronics.

  19. Estimating the absolute wealth of households

    PubMed Central

    Gerkey, Drew; Hadley, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the absolute wealth of households using data from demographic and health surveys. Methods We developed a new metric, the absolute wealth estimate, based on the rank of each surveyed household according to its material assets and the assumed shape of the distribution of wealth among surveyed households. Using data from 156 demographic and health surveys in 66 countries, we calculated absolute wealth estimates for households. We validated the method by comparing the proportion of households defined as poor using our estimates with published World Bank poverty headcounts. We also compared the accuracy of absolute versus relative wealth estimates for the prediction of anthropometric measures. Findings The median absolute wealth estimates of 1 403 186 households were 2056 international dollars per capita (interquartile range: 723–6103). The proportion of poor households based on absolute wealth estimates were strongly correlated with World Bank estimates of populations living on less than 2.00 United States dollars per capita per day (R2 = 0.84). Absolute wealth estimates were better predictors of anthropometric measures than relative wealth indexes. Conclusion Absolute wealth estimates provide new opportunities for comparative research to assess the effects of economic resources on health and human capital, as well as the long-term health consequences of economic change and inequality. PMID:26170506

  20. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  1. 49 CFR 236.709 - Block, absolute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Block, absolute. 236.709 Section 236.709 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Block, absolute. A block in which no train is permitted to enter while it is occupied by another train. ...

  2. Estimating the absolute wealth of households.

    PubMed

    Hruschka, Daniel J; Gerkey, Drew; Hadley, Craig

    2015-07-01

    To estimate the absolute wealth of households using data from demographic and health surveys. We developed a new metric, the absolute wealth estimate, based on the rank of each surveyed household according to its material assets and the assumed shape of the distribution of wealth among surveyed households. Using data from 156 demographic and health surveys in 66 countries, we calculated absolute wealth estimates for households. We validated the method by comparing the proportion of households defined as poor using our estimates with published World Bank poverty headcounts. We also compared the accuracy of absolute versus relative wealth estimates for the prediction of anthropometric measures. The median absolute wealth estimates of 1,403,186 households were 2056 international dollars per capita (interquartile range: 723-6103). The proportion of poor households based on absolute wealth estimates were strongly correlated with World Bank estimates of populations living on less than 2.00 United States dollars per capita per day (R(2)  = 0.84). Absolute wealth estimates were better predictors of anthropometric measures than relative wealth indexes. Absolute wealth estimates provide new opportunities for comparative research to assess the effects of economic resources on health and human capital, as well as the long-term health consequences of economic change and inequality.

  3. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  4. Investigating Absolute Value: A Real World Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret; Pagni, David

    2009-01-01

    Making connections between various representations is important in mathematics. In this article, the authors discuss the numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of sums of absolute values of linear functions. The initial explanations are accessible to all students who have experience graphing and who understand that absolute value simply…

  5. 49 CFR 236.709 - Block, absolute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Block, absolute. 236.709 Section 236.709 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Block, absolute. A block in which no train is permitted to enter while it is occupied by another train. ...

  6. Absolute Income, Relative Income, and Happiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Richard; Chernova, Kateryna

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses data from the World Values Survey to investigate how an individual's self-reported happiness is related to (i) the level of her income in absolute terms, and (ii) the level of her income relative to other people in her country. The main findings are that (i) both absolute and relative income are positively and significantly…

  7. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  8. Sandwiched gold/PNIPAm/gold microstructures for smart plasmonics application: towards the high detection limit and Raman quantitative measurements.

    PubMed

    Elashnikov, R; Mares, D; Podzimek, T; Švorčík, V; Lyutakov, O

    2017-08-07

    A smart plasmonic sensor, comprising a layer of a stimuli-responsive polymer sandwiched between two gold layers, is reported. As a stimuli-responsive material, a monolayer of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) crosslinked globules is used. A quasi-periodic structure of the top gold layer facilitates efficient excitation and serves as a support for plasmon excitation and propagation. The intermediate layer of PNIPAm efficiently entraps targeted molecules from solutions. The sensor structure was optimized for efficient light focusing in the "active" PNIPAm layer. The optimization was based on the time-resolved finite-element simulations, which take into account the thickness of gold layers, size of PNIPAm globules and Raman excitation wavelength (780 nm). The prepared structures were characterized using SEM, AFM, UV-Vis refractometry and goniometry. Additional AFM scans were performed in water at two temperatures corresponding to the collapsed and swollen PNIPAm states. The Raman measurements demonstrate a high detection limit and perfect reproducibility of the Raman scattering signal for the prepared sensor. In addition, the use of created SERS structures for the detection of relevant molecules in the medical, biological and safety fields was demonstrated.

  9. Upper limits to the detection of ammonia from protoplanetary disks around HL Tauri and L1551-IRS 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Jose F.; Torrelles, Jose M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge

    1993-01-01

    We present NH3(1, 1) and (2, 2) observations of the young stellar sources HL Tau and L1551-IRS 5 using the VLA in its B-configuration, which provides an angular resolution of about 0.4 arcsec (about 50 AU at 140 pc) at 1.3 cm wavelength. Our goal was to detect and resolve circumstellar molecular disks with radius of the order of 100 AU around these two sources. No ammonia emission was detected toward either of them. The 3-sigma levels were 2.7 mJy/beam and 3.9 mJy/beam for HL Tau and L1551-IRS 5, respectively, with a velocity resolution of about 5 km/s. With this nondetection, we estimate upper limits to the mass of the proposed protoplanetary molecular disks (within a radius of 10 AU from the central stars) on the order of 0.02/(X(NH3)/10 exp -8) solar mass for HL Tau and 0.1/(X(NH3)/10 exp -8) solar mass for L1551-IRS 5.

  10. Quantifying efficacy and limits of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology for weed seedling detection as affected by sensor resolution.

    PubMed

    Peña, José M; Torres-Sánchez, Jorge; Serrano-Pérez, Angélica; de Castro, Ana I; López-Granados, Francisca

    2015-03-06

    In order to optimize the application of herbicides in weed-crop systems, accurate and timely weed maps of the crop-field are required. In this context, this investigation quantified the efficacy and limitations of remote images collected with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) for early detection of weed seedlings. The ability to discriminate weeds was significantly affected by the imagery spectral (type of camera), spatial (flight altitude) and temporal (the date of the study) resolutions. The colour-infrared images captured at 40 m and 50 days after sowing (date 2), when plants had 5-6 true leaves, had the highest weed detection accuracy (up to 91%). At this flight altitude, the images captured before date 2 had slightly better results than the images captured later. However, this trend changed in the visible-light images captured at 60 m and higher, which had notably better results on date 3 (57 days after sowing) because of the larger size of the weed plants. Our results showed the requirements on spectral and spatial resolutions needed to generate a suitable weed map early in the growing season, as well as the best moment for the UAV image acquisition, with the ultimate objective of applying site-specific weed management operations.

  11. Shot-noise Limited Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy for Detection of Nitric Oxide Isotopes in Breath, Urine, and Blood

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin; Nikodem, Michal; Zhang, Eric; Cikach, Frank; Barnes, Jarrod; Comhair, Suzy; Dweik, Raed A.; Kao, Christina; Wysocki, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of NO and/or its metabolites in the various body compartments has transformed our understanding of biology. The inability of the current NO measurement methods to account for naturally occurring and experimental NO isotopes, however, has prevented the scientific community from fully understating NO metabolism in vivo. Here we present a mid-IR Faraday rotation spectrometer (FRS) for detection of NO isotopes. The instrument utilizes a novel dual modulation/demodulation (DM) FRS method which exhibits noise performance at only 2 times the fundamental quantum shot-noise level and provides the record sensitivity in its class. This is achieved with a system that is fully autonomous, robust, transportable, and does not require cryogenic cooling. The DM-FRS enables continuous monitoring of nitric oxide isotopes with the detection limits of 3.72 ppbv/Hz1/2 to14NO and 0.53 ppbv/Hz1/2 to15NO using only 45 cm active optical path. This DM-FRS measurement method can be used to improve the performance of conventional FRS sensors targeting other radical species. The feasibility of the instrument to perform measurements relevant to studies of NO metabolism in humans is demonstrated. PMID:25767064

  12. Quantifying Efficacy and Limits of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Technology for Weed Seedling Detection as Affected by Sensor Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Peña, José M.; Torres-Sánchez, Jorge; Serrano-Pérez, Angélica; de Castro, Ana I.; López-Granados, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    In order to optimize the application of herbicides in weed-crop systems, accurate and timely weed maps of the crop-field are required. In this context, this investigation quantified the efficacy and limitations of remote images collected with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) for early detection of weed seedlings. The ability to discriminate weeds was significantly affected by the imagery spectral (type of camera), spatial (flight altitude) and temporal (the date of the study) resolutions. The colour-infrared images captured at 40 m and 50 days after sowing (date 2), when plants had 5–6 true leaves, had the highest weed detection accuracy (up to 91%). At this flight altitude, the images captured before date 2 had slightly better results than the images captured later. However, this trend changed in the visible-light images captured at 60 m and higher, which had notably better results on date 3 (57 days after sowing) because of the larger size of the weed plants. Our results showed the requirements on spectral and spatial resolutions needed to generate a suitable weed map early in the growing season, as well as the best moment for the UAV image acquisition, with the ultimate objective of applying site-specific weed management operations. PMID:25756867

  13. Narrow phase-dependent features in X-ray dim isolated neutron stars: a new detection and upper limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghese, A.; Rea, N.; Coti Zelati, F.; Tiengo, A.; Turolla, R.; Zane, S.

    2017-07-01

    We report on the results of a detailed phase-resolved spectroscopy of archival XMM-Newton observations of X-ray dim isolated neutron stars (XDINSs). Our analysis revealed a narrow and phase-variable absorption feature in the X-ray spectrum of RX J1308.6+2127. The feature has an energy of ˜740 eV and an equivalent width of ˜15 eV. It is detected only in ˜1/5 of the phase cycle, and appears to be present for the entire timespan covered by the observations (2001 December to 2007 June). The strong dependence on the pulsar rotation and the narrow width suggest that the feature is likely due to resonant cyclotron absorption/scattering in a confined high-B structure close to the stellar surface. Assuming a proton cyclotron line, the magnetic field strength in the loop is Bloop ˜ 1.7 × 1014 G, about a factor of ˜5 higher than the surface dipolar magnetic field (Bsurf ˜ 3.4 × 1013 G). This feature is similar to that recently detected in another XDINS, RX J0720.4-3125, showing (as expected by theoretical simulations) that small-scale magnetic loops close to the surface might be common to many highly magnetic neutron stars (although difficult to detect with current X-ray instruments). Furthermore, we investigated the available XMM-Newton data of all XDINSs in search for similar narrow phase-dependent features, but could derive only upper limits for all the other sources.

  14. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete's urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as 'T-equivalent' concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact.

  15. sFIDA automation yields sub-femtomolar limit of detection for Aβ aggregates in body fluids.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Yvonne; Kulawik, Andreas; Kühbach, Katja; Hülsemann, Maren; Peters, Luriano; Bujnicki, Tuyen; Kravchenko, Kateryna; Linnartz, Christina; Willbold, Johannes; Zafiu, Christian; Bannach, Oliver; Willbold, Dieter

    2017-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with yet non-existent therapeutic and limited diagnostic options. Reliable biomarker-based AD diagnostics are of utmost importance for the development and application of therapeutic substances. We have previously introduced a platform technology designated 'sFIDA' for the quantitation of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) aggregates as AD biomarker. In this study we implemented the sFIDA assay on an automated platform to enhance robustness and performance of the assay. In sFIDA (surface-based fluorescence intensity distribution analysis) Aβ species are immobilized by a capture antibody to a glass surface. Aβ aggregates are then multiply loaded with fluorescent antibodies and quantitated by high resolution fluorescence microscopy. As a model system for Aβ aggregates, we used Aβ-conjugated silica nanoparticles (Aβ-SiNaPs) diluted in PBS buffer and cerebrospinal fluid, respectively. Automation of the assay was realized on a liquid handling system in combination with a microplate washer. The automation of the sFIDA assay results in improved intra-assay precision, linearity and sensitivity in comparison to the manual application, and achieved a limit of detection in the sub-femtomolar range. Automation improves the precision and sensitivity of the sFIDA assay, which is a prerequisite for high-throughput measurements and future application of the technology in routine AD diagnostics. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  17. Auditory processing in absolute pitch possessors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKetton, Larissa; Schneider, Keith A.

    2018-05-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is a rare ability in classifying a musical pitch without a reference standard. It has been of great interest to researchers studying auditory processing and music cognition since it is seldom expressed and sheds light on influences pertaining to neurodevelopmental biological predispositions and the onset of musical training. We investigated the smallest frequency that could be detected or just noticeable difference (JND) between two pitches. Here, we report significant differences in JND thresholds in AP musicians and non-AP musicians compared to non-musician control groups at both 1000 Hz and 987.76 Hz testing frequencies. Although the AP-musicians did better than non-AP musicians, the difference was not significant. In addition, we looked at neuro-anatomical correlates of musicianship and AP using structural MRI. We report increased cortical thickness of the left Heschl's Gyrus (HG) and decreased cortical thickness of the inferior frontal opercular gyrus (IFO) and circular insular sulcus volume (CIS) in AP compared to non-AP musicians and controls. These structures may therefore be optimally enhanced and reduced to form the most efficient network for AP to emerge.

  18. Limiting Short-term Noise versus Optical Density in a Direct Absorption Spectrometer for Trace Gas Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jervis, D.

    2016-12-01

    Field-deployable trace gas monitors are important for understanding a multitude of atmospheric processes: from forest photosynthesis and respiration [1], to fugitive methane emissions [2] and satellite measurement validation [3]. Consequently, a detailed knowledge of the performance limitations of these instruments is essential in order to establish reliable datasets. We present the short-term ( >1 Hz) performance of a long-pass direct absorption spectrometer as a function of the optical density of the absorption transition being probed. In particular, we identify fluctuations in the laser intensity as limiting the optical density uncertainty to 4x10-6/√Hz for weak transitions, and noise in the laser drive current as limiting the fractional noise in the optical density to 4x10-5/√Hz for deep transitions. We provide numerical and analytical predictions for both effects, as well as using the understanding of this phenomena to estimate how noise on neighboring strong and weak transitions couple to each other. All measurements were performed using the Aerodyne Research TILDAS Monitor, but are general to any instrument that uses direct absorption spectroscopy as a detection method. Wehr, R., et al. "Seasonality of temperate forest photosynthesis and daytime respiration." Nature 534.7609 (2016): 680-683. Conley, S., et al. "Methane emissions from the 2015 Aliso Canyon blowout in Los Angeles, CA." Science 351.6279 (2016): 1317-1320. Emmons, L. K., et al. "Validation of Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) CO retrievals with aircraft in situ profiles." Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 109.D3 (2004).

  19. Standardization approaches in absolute quantitative proteomics with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Celis, Francisco; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2017-07-31

    Mass spectrometry-based approaches have enabled important breakthroughs in quantitative proteomics in the last decades. This development is reflected in the better quantitative assessment of protein levels as well as to understand post-translational modifications and protein complexes and networks. Nowadays, the focus of quantitative proteomics shifted from the relative determination of proteins (ie, differential expression between two or more cellular states) to absolute quantity determination, required for a more-thorough characterization of biological models and comprehension of the proteome dynamism, as well as for the search and validation of novel protein biomarkers. However, the physico-chemical environment of the analyte species affects strongly the ionization efficiency in most mass spectrometry (MS) types, which thereby require the use of specially designed standardization approaches to provide absolute quantifications. Most common of such approaches nowadays include (i) the use of stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, isotopologues to the target proteotypic peptides expected after tryptic digestion of the target protein; (ii) use of stable isotope-labeled protein standards to compensate for sample preparation, sample loss, and proteolysis steps; (iii) isobaric reagents, which after fragmentation in the MS/MS analysis provide a final detectable mass shift, can be used to tag both analyte and standard samples; (iv) label-free approaches in which the absolute quantitative data are not obtained through the use of any kind of labeling, but from computational normalization of the raw data and adequate standards; (v) elemental mass spectrometry-based workflows able to provide directly absolute quantification of peptides/proteins that contain an ICP-detectable element. A critical insight from the Analytical Chemistry perspective of the different standardization approaches and their combinations used so far for absolute quantitative MS-based (molecular and

  20. Gyrokinetic statistical absolute equilibrium and turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jianzhou; Hammett, Gregory W.

    2010-12-15

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: a finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N+1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperaturemore » states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.« less

  1. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, correspondingmore » to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.« less

  2. [Tobacco and plastic surgery: An absolute contraindication?

    PubMed

    Matusiak, C; De Runz, A; Maschino, H; Brix, M; Simon, E; Claudot, F

    2017-08-01

    Smoking increases perioperative risk regarding wound healing, infection rate and failure of microsurgical procedures. There is no present consensus about plastic and aesthetic surgical indications concerning smoking patients. The aim of our study is to analyze French plastic surgeons practices concerning smokers. A questionnaire was send by e-mail to French plastic surgeons in order to evaluate their own operative indications: patient information about smoking dangers, pre- and postoperative delay of smoking cessation, type of intervention carried out, smoking cessation supports, use of screening test and smoking limit associated to surgery refusing were studied. Statistical tests were used to compare results according to practitioner activity (liberal or public), own smoking habits and time of installation. In 148 questionnaires, only one surgeon did not explain smoking risk. Of the surgeons, 49.3% proposed smoking-cessation supports, more frequently with public practice (P=0.019). In total, 85.4% of surgeons did not use screening tests. Years of installation affected operative indication with smoking patients (P=0.02). Pre- and postoperative smoking cessation delay were on average respectively 4 and 3 weeks in accordance with literature. Potential improvements could be proposed to smoking patients' care: smoking cessation assistance, screening tests, absolute contraindication of some procedures or level of consumption to determine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. A systematic review of the limitations and approaches to improve detection and management of peripheral arterial disease in Hispanics.

    PubMed

    Rosero, Eric B; Kane, Katherine; Clagett, G Patrick; Timaran, Carlos H

    2010-04-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a highly prevalent public health problem associated with major detrimental effects on quality of life and functional status, and it is also the main cause of limb amputation. More importantly, PAD has been classified as a coronary artery disease equivalent, meaning that patients with a diagnosis of PAD carry a risk for major coronary events equal to that of established coronary artery disease. PAD is also a potent predictor of stroke and death. Despite its frequent occurrence (8 to 10 million Americans are affected), little is known about the natural history of PAD in racial/ethnic minorities, particularly in Hispanics, who represent 12.5% of the United States population. Furthermore, the disease is commonly underdiagnosed and undertreated in this minority group, and outcomes are poorer in Hispanics as compared with whites. Limited access to health care, difficulties for recruitment in population-based studies, and limitations of the noninvasive screening tests are well-established barriers to determine the prevalence and natural history of PAD in Hispanics. Although the most widely used test for assessment of patients at risk for PAD is the ankle-brachial index (ABI), the test has substantial limitations in individuals with diabetes and arterial calcification, which are highly prevalent in Hispanics. The ABI should, therefore, be supplemented by the use of other noninvasive tests, such as the pulse volume recordings (PVR) and toe-brachial index. Besides the use of a combination of diagnostic techniques, the implementation of a research methodology that improves recruitment of Hispanics in population-based studies is necessary to obtain better knowledge of the epidemiology of the disease in this group. Community-based participatory research may be the most appropriate approach to study this ethnic minority because it overcomes barriers for limited access to health care and increases the possibility of overcoming distrust of

  4. Metabolomics variable selection and classification in the presence of observations below the detection limit using an extension of ERp.

    PubMed

    van Reenen, Mari; Westerhuis, Johan A; Reinecke, Carolus J; Venter, J Hendrik

    2017-02-02

    ERp is a variable selection and classification method for metabolomics data. ERp uses minimized classification error rates, based on data from a control and experimental group, to test the null hypothesis of no difference between the distributions of variables over the two groups. If the associated p-values are significant they indicate discriminatory variables (i.e. informative metabolites). The p-values are calculated assuming a common continuous strictly increasing cumulative distribution under the null hypothesis. This assumption is violated when zero-valued observations can occur with positive probability, a characteristic of GC-MS metabolomics data, disqualifying ERp in this context. This paper extends ERp to address two sources of zero-valued observations: (i) zeros reflecting the complete absence of a metabolite from a sample (true zeros); and (ii) zeros reflecting a measurement below the detection limit. This is achieved by allowing the null cumulative distribution function to take the form of a mixture between a jump at zero and a continuous strictly increasing function. The extended ERp approach is referred to as XERp. XERp is no longer non-parametric, but its null distributions depend only on one parameter, the true proportion of zeros. Under the null hypothesis this parameter can be estimated by the proportion of zeros in the available data. XERp is shown to perform well with regard to bias and power. To demonstrate the utility of XERp, it is applied to GC-MS data from a metabolomics study on tuberculosis meningitis in infants and children. We find that XERp is able to provide an informative shortlist of discriminatory variables, while attaining satisfactory classification accuracy for new subjects in a leave-one-out cross-validation context. XERp takes into account the distributional structure of data with a probability mass at zero without requiring any knowledge of the detection limit of the metabolomics platform. XERp is able to identify variables

  5. SERS activity with tenfold detection limit optimization on a type of nanoporous AAO-based complex multilayer substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Chaofan; Wang, Kaige; Wang, Shuang; Ren, Junying; Bai, Xiaohong; Bai, Jintao

    2016-03-01

    Most of SERS applications are constricted by heterogeneous hotspots and aggregates of nanostructure, which result in low sensitivity and poor reproducibility of characteristic signals. This work intends to introduce SERS properties of a type of SERS-active substrate, Au-CuCl2-AAO, which is innovatively developed on a porous anodic alumina oxide (AAO) template. Spectral measuring results of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) on this substrate optimized by controlling morphology and gold thickness showed that enhancement factor (2.30 × 107) and detection limit (10-10 M) were both improved and represented better performance than its template AAO. Homogenous hot spots across the region of interest were achieved by scanning SERS intensity distribution for the band at 1505 cm-1 in 5 × 5 μm2 area. Furthermore, the promising SERS activity of the flower-patterned substrate was theoretically explained through simulation of the electromagnetic field distribution. In addition, this SERS substrate is proposed for applications within the field of chemical and biochemical analyses.Most of SERS applications are constricted by heterogeneous hotspots and aggregates of nanostructure, which result in low sensitivity and poor reproducibility of characteristic signals. This work intends to introduce SERS properties of a type of SERS-active substrate, Au-CuCl2-AAO, which is innovatively developed on a porous anodic alumina oxide (AAO) template. Spectral measuring results of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) on this substrate optimized by controlling morphology and gold thickness showed that enhancement factor (2.30 × 107) and detection limit (10-10 M) were both improved and represented better performance than its template AAO. Homogenous hot spots across the region of interest were achieved by scanning SERS intensity distribution for the band at 1505 cm-1 in 5 × 5 μm2 area. Furthermore, the promising SERS activity of the flower-patterned substrate was theoretically explained through simulation of the

  6. Diagnostic Application of Absolute Neutron Activation Analysis in Hematology

    SciTech Connect

    Zamboni, C.B.; Oliveira, L.C.; Dalaqua, L. Jr.

    2004-10-03

    The Absolute Neutron Activation Analysis (ANAA) technique was used to determine element concentrations of Cl and Na in blood of healthy group (male and female blood donators), select from Blood Banks at Sao Paulo city, to provide information which can help in diagnosis of patients. This study permitted to perform a discussion about the advantages and limitations of using this nuclear methodology in hematological examinations.

  7. Eddy-covariance data with low signal-to-noise ratio: time-lag determination, uncertainties and limit of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, B.; Acton, W.; Ammann, C.; Valach, A.; Nemitz, E.

    2015-10-01

    All eddy-covariance flux measurements are associated with random uncertainties which are a combination of sampling error due to natural variability in turbulence and sensor noise. The former is the principal error for systems where the signal-to-noise ratio of the analyser is high, as is usually the case when measuring fluxes of heat, CO2 or H2O. Where signal is limited, which is often the case for measurements of other trace gases and aerosols, instrument uncertainties dominate. Here, we are applying a consistent approach based on auto- and cross-covariance functions to quantify the total random flux error and the random error due to instrument noise separately. As with previous approaches, the random error quantification assumes that the time lag between wind and concentration measurement is known. However, if combined with commonly used automated methods that identify the individual time lag by looking for the maximum in the cross-covariance function of the two entities, analyser noise additionally leads to a systematic bias in the fluxes. Combining data sets from several analysers and using simulations, we show that the method of time-lag determination becomes increasingly important as the magnitude of the instrument error approaches that of the sampling error. The flux bias can be particularly significant for disjunct data, whereas using a prescribed time lag eliminates these effects (provided the time lag does not fluctuate unduly over time). We also demonstrate that when sampling at higher elevations, where low frequency turbulence dominates and covariance peaks are broader, both the probability and magnitude of bias are magnified. We show that the statistical significance of noisy flux data can be increased (limit of detection can be decreased) by appropriate averaging of individual fluxes, but only if systematic biases are avoided by using a prescribed time lag. Finally, we make recommendations for the analysis and reporting of data with low signal

  8. Eddy-covariance data with low signal-to-noise ratio: time-lag determination, uncertainties and limit of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, B.; Acton, W.; Ammann, C.; Valach, A.; Nemitz, E.

    2015-03-01

    All eddy-covariance flux measurements are associated with random uncertainties which are a combination of sampling error due to natural variability in turbulence and sensor noise. The former is the principal error for systems where the signal-to-noise ratio of the analyser is high, as is usually the case when measuring fluxes of heat, CO2 or H2O. Where signal is limited, which is often the case for measurements of other trace gases and aerosols, instrument uncertainties dominate. We are here applying a consistent approach based on auto- and cross-covariance functions to quantifying the total random flux error and the random error due to instrument noise separately. As with previous approaches, the random error quantification assumes that the time-lag between wind and concentration measurement is known. However, if combined with commonly used automated methods that identify the individual time-lag by looking for the maximum in the cross-covariance function of the two entities, analyser noise additionally leads to a systematic bias in the fluxes. Combining datasets from several analysers and using simulations we show that the method of time-lag determination becomes increasingly important as the magnitude of the instrument error approaches that of the sampling error. The flux bias can be particularly significant for disjunct data, whereas using a prescribed time-lag eliminates these effects (provided the time-lag does not fluctuate unduly over time). We also demonstrate that when sampling at higher elevations, where low frequency turbulence dominates and covariance peaks are broader, both the probability and magnitude of bias are magnified. We show that the statistical significance of noisy flux data can be increased (limit of detection can be decreased) by appropriate averaging of individual fluxes, but only if systematic biases are avoided by using a prescribed time-lag. Finally, we make recommendations for the analysis and reporting of data with low signal

  9. Multiplex real-time quantitative PCR, microscopy and rapid diagnostic immuno-chromatographic tests for the detection of Plasmodium spp: performance, limit of detection analysis and quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Krishna; Martin, Donald; Lau, Rachel; Ralevski, Filip; Pillai, Dylan R

    2009-12-09

    Accurate laboratory diagnosis of malaria species in returning travelers is paramount in the treatment of this potentially fatal infectious disease. A total of 466 blood specimens from returning travelers to Africa, Asia, and South/Central America with suspected malaria infection were collected between 2007 and 2009 at the reference public health laboratory. These specimens were assessed by reference microscopy, multipex real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR), and two rapid diagnostic immuno-chromatographic tests (ICT) in a blinded manner. Key clinical laboratory parameters such as limit of detection (LOD) analysis on clinical specimens by parasite stage, inter-reader variability of ICTs, staffing implications, quality assurance and cost analysis were evaluated. QPCR is the most analytically sensitive method (sensitivity 99.41%), followed by CARESTART (sensitivity 88.24%), and BINAXNOW (sensitivity 86.47%) for the diagnosis of malaria in returning travelers when compared to reference microscopy. However, microscopy was unable to specifically identify Plasmodia spp. in 18 out of 170 positive samples by QPCR. Moreover, the 17 samples that were negative by microscopy and positive by QPCR were also positive by ICTs. Quality assurance was achieved for QPCR by exchanging a blinded proficiency panel with another reference laboratory. The Kappa value of inter-reader variability among three readers for BINAXNOW and CARESTART was calculated to be 0.872 and 0.898 respectively. Serial dilution studies demonstrated that the QPCR cycle threshold correlates linearly with parasitemia (R(2) = 0.9746) in a clinically relevant dynamic range and retains a LOD of 11 rDNA copies/microl for P. falciparum, which was several log lower than reference microscopy and ICTs. LOD for QPCR is affected not only by parasitemia but the parasite stage distribution of each clinical specimen. QPCR was approximately 6-fold more costly than reference microscopy. These data suggest that

  10. Detecting Ebola with limited laboratory access in the Democratic Republic of Congo: evaluation of a clinical passive surveillance reporting system.

    PubMed

    Ashbaugh, Hayley R; Kuang, Brandon; Gadoth, Adva; Alfonso, Vivian H; Mukadi, Patrick; Doshi, Reena H; Hoff, Nicole A; Sinai, Cyrus; Mossoko, Mathias; Kebela, Benoit Ilunga; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Wemakoy, Emile Okitolonda; Rimoin, Anne W

    2017-09-01

    Ebola virus disease (EVD) can be clinically severe and highly fatal, making surveillance efforts for early disease detection of paramount importance. In areas with limited access to laboratory testing, the Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) strategy in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) may be a vital tool in improving outbreak response. Using DRC IDSR data from the nation's four EVD outbreak periods from 2007-2014, we assessed trends of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) and EVD differential diagnoses reportable through IDSR. With official case counts from active surveillance of EVD outbreaks, we assessed accuracy of reporting through the IDSR passive surveillance system. Although the active and passive surveillance represent distinct sets of data, the two were correlated, suggesting that passive surveillance based only on clinical evaluation may be a useful predictor of true cases prior to laboratory confirmation. There were 438 suspect VHF cases reported through the IDSR system and 416 EVD cases officially recorded across the outbreaks examined. Although collected prior to official active surveillance cases, case reporting through the IDSR during the 2007, 2008 and 2012 outbreaks coincided with official EVD epidemic curves. Additionally, all outbreak areas experienced increases in suspected cases for both malaria and typhoid fever during EVD outbreaks, underscoring the importance of training health care workers in recognising EVD differential diagnoses and the potential for co-morbidities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Limitations of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis reference genome H37Rv in the detection of virulence-related loci.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Ronan F; Gautam, Sanjay S

    2017-10-01

    The genome sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv is an important and valuable reference point in the study of M. tuberculosis phylogeny, molecular epidemiology, and drug-resistance mutations. However, it is becoming apparent that use of H37Rv as a sole reference genome in analysing clinical isolates presents some limitations to fully investigating M. tuberculosis virulence. Here, we examine the presence of single locus variants and the absence of entire genes in H37Rv with respect to strains that are responsible for cases and outbreaks of tuberculosis. We discuss how these polymorphisms may affect phenotypic properties of H37Rv including pathogenicity. Based on our observations and those of other researchers, we propose that use of a single reference genome, H37Rv, is not sufficient for the detection and characterisation of M. tuberculosis virulence-related loci. We recommend incorporation of genome sequences of other reference strains, in particular, direct clinical isolates, in such analyses in addition to H37Rv. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Absolute quantification of microbial taxon abundances.

    PubMed

    Props, Ruben; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Rubbens, Peter; De Vrieze, Jo; Hernandez Sanabria, Emma; Waegeman, Willem; Monsieurs, Pieter; Hammes, Frederik; Boon, Nico

    2017-02-01

    High-throughput amplicon sequencing has become a well-established approach for microbial community profiling. Correlating shifts in the relative abundances of bacterial taxa with environmental gradients is the goal of many microbiome surveys. As the abundances generated by this technology are semi-quantitative by definition, the observed dynamics may not accurately reflect those of the actual taxon densities. We combined the sequencing approach (16S rRNA gene) with robust single-cell enumeration technologies (flow cytometry) to quantify the absolute taxon abundances. A detailed longitudinal analysis of the absolute abundances resulted in distinct abundance profiles that were less ambiguous and expressed in units that can be directly compared across studies. We further provide evidence that the enrichment of taxa (increase in relative abundance) does not necessarily relate to the outgrowth of taxa (increase in absolute abundance). Our results highlight that both relative and absolute abundances should be considered for a comprehensive biological interpretation of microbiome surveys.

  13. Low absolute neutrophil counts in African infants.

    PubMed

    Kourtis, Athena P; Bramson, Brian; van der Horst, Charles; Kazembe, Peter; Ahmed, Yusuf; Chasela, Charles; Hosseinipour, Mina; Knight, Rodney; Lugalia, Lebah; Tegha, Gerald; Joaki, George; Jafali, Robert; Jamieson, Denise J

    2005-07-01

    Infants of African origin have a lower normal range of absolute neutrophil counts than white infants; this fact, however, remains under appreciated by clinical researchers in the United States. During the initial stages of a clinical trial in Malawi, the authors noted an unexpectedly high number of infants with absolute neutrophil counts that would be classifiable as neutropenic using the National Institutes of Health's Division of AIDS toxicity tables. The authors argue that the relevant Division of AIDS table does not take into account the available evidence of low absolute neutrophil counts in African infants and that a systematic collection of data from many African settings might help establish the absolute neutrophil count cutpoints to be used for defining neutropenia in African populations.

  14. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  15. Absolute colorimetric characterization of a DSLR camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnera, Giuseppe Claudio; Bianco, Simone; Schettini, Raimondo

    2014-03-01

    A simple but effective technique for absolute colorimetric camera characterization is proposed. It offers a large dynamic range requiring just a single, off-the-shelf target and a commonly available controllable light source for the characterization. The characterization task is broken down in two modules, respectively devoted to absolute luminance estimation and to colorimetric characterization matrix estimation. The characterized camera can be effectively used as a tele-colorimeter, giving an absolute estimation of the XYZ data in cd=m2. The user is only required to vary the f - number of the camera lens or the exposure time t, to better exploit the sensor dynamic range. The estimated absolute tristimulus values closely match the values measured by a professional spectro-radiometer.

  16. Development of a Protein Standard Absolute Quantification (PSAQ™) assay for the quantification of Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin A in serum.

    PubMed

    Adrait, Annie; Lebert, Dorothée; Trauchessec, Mathieu; Dupuis, Alain; Louwagie, Mathilde; Masselon, Christophe; Jaquinod, Michel; Chevalier, Benoît; Vandenesch, François; Garin, Jérôme; Bruley, Christophe; Brun, Virginie

    2012-06-06

    Enterotoxin A (SEA) is a staphylococcal virulence factor which is suspected to worsen septic shock prognosis. However, the presence of SEA in the blood of sepsis patients has never been demonstrated. We have developed a mass spectrometry-based assay for the targeted and absolute quantification of SEA in serum. To enhance sensitivity and specificity, we combined an immunoaffinity-based sample preparation with mass spectrometry analysis in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. Absolute quantification of SEA was performed using the PSAQ™ method (Protein Standard Absolute Quantification), which uses a full-length isotope-labeled SEA as internal standard. The lower limit of detection (LLOD) and lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) were estimated at 352pg/mL and 1057pg/mL, respectively. SEA recovery after immunocapture was determined to be 7.8±1.4%. Therefore, we assumed that less than 1femtomole of each SEA proteotypic peptide was injected on the liquid chromatography column before SRM analysis. From a 6-point titration experiment, quantification accuracy was determined to be 77% and precision at LLOQ was lower than 5%. With this sensitive PSAQ-SRM assay, we expect to contribute to decipher the pathophysiological role of SEA in severe sepsis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics: The clinical link. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Metal Stable Isotope Tagging: Renaissance of Radioimmunoassay for Multiplex and Absolute Quantification of Biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Shixi; Wei, Chao; Xing, Zhi; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2016-05-17

    The unambiguous quantification of biomolecules is of great significance in fundamental biological research as well as practical clinical diagnosis. Due to the lack of a detectable moiety, the direct and highly sensitive quantification of biomolecules is often a "mission impossible". Consequently, tagging strategies to introduce detectable moieties for labeling target biomolecules were invented, which had a long and significant impact on studies of biomolecules in the past decades. For instance, immunoassays have been developed with radioisotope tagging by Yalow and Berson in the late 1950s. The later languishment of this technology can be almost exclusively ascribed to the use of radioactive isotopes, which led to the development of nonradioactive tagging strategy-based assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, fluorescent immunoassay, and chemiluminescent and electrochemiluminescent immunoassay. Despite great success, these strategies suffered from drawbacks such as limited spectral window capacity for multiplex detection and inability to provide absolute quantification of biomolecules. After recalling the sequences of tagging strategies, an apparent question is why not use stable isotopes from the start? A reasonable explanation is the lack of reliable means for accurate and precise quantification of stable isotopes at that time. The situation has changed greatly at present, since several atomic mass spectrometric measures for metal stable isotopes have been developed. Among the newly developed techniques, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is an ideal technique to determine metal stable isotope-tagged biomolecules, for its high sensitivity, wide dynamic linear range, and more importantly multiplex and absolute quantification ability. Since the first published report by our group, metal stable isotope tagging has become a revolutionary technique and gained great success in biomolecule quantification. An exciting research highlight in this area

  18. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath plate interiors may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the sub-asthenospheric mantle. Here we analyze two global sets of shear-wave splitting data, that of Kreemer [2009] and an updated and expanded data set, to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. We also explore the effect of using geologically current plate velocities (i.e., the MORVEL set of angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]) compared with geodetically current plate velocities (i.e., the GSRM v1.2 angular velocities [Kreemer et al. 2014]). We demonstrate that the errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. The SKS-MORVEL absolute plate angular velocities (based on the Kreemer [2009] data set) are determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2° ) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6° ). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4° ) than for continental

  19. Changes in respiratory function impairment following the treatment of severe pulmonary tuberculosis - limitations for the underlying COPD detection.

    PubMed

    Radovic, Milan; Ristic, Lidija; Ciric, Zorica; Dinic-Radovic, Violeta; Stankovic, Ivana; Pejcic, Tatjana; Rancic, Milan; Bogdanovic, Dragan

    2016-01-01

    During the treatment phase of active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), respiratory function impairment is usually restrictive. This may become obstructive, as a PTB-associated airflow obstruction (AFO) or as a later manifestation of underlying COPD. The aim of the study was to examine the potential causes and risks for AFO development in PTB by exploring the aspects of spirometry limitations and clinical implications for the underlying COPD detection, taking into account various confounding factors. Prospective, nest case-control study on 40 new cases of PTB with initial restrictive respiratory function impairment, diagnosed and treated according to the directly observed treatment short course (DOTS) strategy. From all observed patients, 37.5% of them developed AFO upon the completion of PTB treatment, with significantly increased average of forced vital capacity (%) (P<0.01). Their changes in forced expiratory volume in the first second (%) during the PTB treatment were strongly associated with the air pollution exposure in living (0.474%-20.971% for 95% confidence interval [CI]; P=0.041) and working environments (3.928%-20.379% for 95% CI; P=0.005), initial radiological extent of PTB lesions (0.018%-0.700% for 95% CI; P=0.047), leukocyte count (0.020%-1.328% for 95% CI; P=0.043), and C-reactive protein serum level (0.046%-0.205% for 95% CI; P=0.003) compared to the other patients. The multivariate logistic regression analysis model shows initial radiological extent of pulmonary tuberculosis lesions (OR 1.01-1.05 for 95% CI; P=0.02) and sputum conversion rate on culture (OR 1.02-1.68 for 95% CI; P=0.04) as the most significant predictors for the risk of AFO development. AFO upon PTB treatment is a common manifestation of underlying COPD, which mostly occurs later, during the reparative processes in active PTB, even in the absence of major risk factors, such as cigarette smoking and biomass fuel dust exposure. Initial spirometry testing in patients with active PTB is

  20. Limited diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and clinical tests for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Brockmeyer, Matthias; Schmitt, Cornelia; Haupert, Alexander; Kohn, Dieter; Lorbach, Olaf

    2017-12-01

    The reliable diagnosis of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff is still elusive in clinical practise. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of MR imaging and clinical tests for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff as well as the combination of these parameters. 334 consecutive shoulder arthroscopies for rotator cuff pathologies performed during the time period between 2010 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively for the findings of common clinical signs for rotator cuff lesions and preoperative MR imaging. These were compared with the intraoperative arthroscopic findings as "gold standard". The reports of the MR imaging were evaluated with regard to the integrity of the rotator cuff. The Ellman Classification was used to define partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff in accordance with the arthroscopic findings. Descriptive statistics, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value were calculated. MR imaging showed 80 partial-thickness and 70 full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. The arthroscopic examination confirmed 64 partial-thickness tears of which 52 needed debridement or refixation of the rotator cuff. Sensitivity for MR imaging to identify partial-thickness tears was 51.6%, specificity 77.2%, positive predictive value 41.3% and negative predictive value 83.7%. For the Jobe-test, sensitivity was 64.1%, specificity 43.2%, positive predictive value 25.9% and negative predictive value 79.5%. Sensitivity for the Impingement-sign was 76.7%, specificity 46.6%, positive predictive value 30.8% and negative predictive value 86.5%. For the combination of MR imaging, Jobe-test and Impingement-sign sensitivity was 46.9%, specificity 85.4%, positive predictive value 50% and negative predictive value 83.8%. The diagnostic accuracy of MR imaging and clinical tests (Jobe-test and Impingement-sign) alone is limited for detecting partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Additionally

  1. The Fatty Liver Index has limited utility for the detection and quantification of hepatic steatosis in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Borman, Meredith A; Ladak, Farah; Crotty, Pam; Pollett, Aaron; Kirsch, Richard; Pomier-Layrargues, Gilles; Beaton, Melanie; Duarte-Rojo, Andres; Elkashab, Magdy; Myers, Robert P

    2013-06-01

    Noninvasive tools for the detection of hepatic steatosis are needed. The Fatty Liver Index (FLI), which includes body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, triglycerides, and γ-glutamyl-transferase, has been proposed as a screening tool for fatty liver. Our objective was to validate the FLI for the detection and quantification of hepatic steatosis in an obese population. Patients with chronic liver disease and BMI ≥ 28 kg/m(2) underwent liver biopsy and FLI determination. FLI performance for diagnosing steatosis compared with biopsy was assessed using areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROCs), and a novel model for the prediction of significant steatosis (≥5 %) was derived. Among 250 included patients, 65 % were male, and the median BMI was 33 kg/m(2); 48 % had nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and 77 % had significant (≥5 %) steatosis. The FLI was weakly correlated with the percentage (ρ = 0.25, p = 0.0001) and grade of steatosis (ρ = 0.28, p < 0.00005). The median FLI was higher among patients with significant steatosis (91 vs. 80 with <5 % steatosis; p = 0.0001) and the AUROC for this outcome was 0.67 (95 % CI 0.59-0.76). At an optimal FLI cut-off of 79, the FLI was 81 % sensitive and 49 % specific, and had positive and negative predictive values of 84 and 43 %, respectively. A novel index including triglycerides, glucose, alkaline phosphatase, and BMI outperformed the FLI for predicting significant steatosis [AUROCs 0.78 vs. 0.68; p = 0.009 (n = 247)]. In obese patients, the FLI is a poor predictor of significant steatosis and has limited utility for steatosis quantification compared with liver histology. A novel index including triglycerides, glucose, alkaline phosphatase, and BMI may be useful, but requires validation.

  2. Multivariate estimation of the limit of detection by orthogonal partial least squares in temperature-modulated MOX sensors.

    PubMed

    Burgués, Javier; Marco, Santiago

    2018-08-17

    Metal oxide semiconductor (MOX) sensors are usually temperature-modulated and calibrated with multivariate models such as partial least squares (PLS) to increase the inherent low selectivity of this technology. The multivariate sensor response patterns exhibit heteroscedastic and correlated noise, which suggests that maximum likelihood methods should outperform PLS. One contribution of this paper is the comparison between PLS and maximum likelihood principal components regression (MLPCR) in MOX sensors. PLS is often criticized by the lack of interpretability when the model complexity increases beyond the chemical rank of the problem. This happens in MOX sensors due to cross-sensitivities to interferences, such as temperature or humidity and non-linearity. Additionally, the estimation of fundamental figures of merit, such as the limit of detection (LOD), is still not standardized in multivariate models. Orthogonalization methods, such as orthogonal projection to latent structures (O-PLS), have been successfully applied in other fields to reduce the complexity of PLS models. In this work, we propose a LOD estimation method based on applying the well-accepted univariate LOD formulas to the scores of the first component of an orthogonal PLS model. The resulting LOD is compared to the multivariate LOD range derived from error-propagation. The methodology is applied to data extracted from temperature-modulated MOX sensors (FIS SB-500-12 and Figaro TGS 3870-A04), aiming at the detection of low concentrations of carbon monoxide in the presence of uncontrolled humidity (chemical noise). We found that PLS models were simpler and more accurate than MLPCR models. Average LOD values of 0.79 ppm (FIS) and 1.06 ppm (Figaro) were found using the approach described in this paper. These values were contained within the LOD ranges obtained with the error-propagation approach. The mean LOD increased to 1.13 ppm (FIS) and 1.59 ppm (Figaro) when considering validation samples

  3. High-sensitivity cardiac troponin t concentrations below the limit of detection to exclude acute myocardial infarction: a prospective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Body, Richard; Burrows, Gillian; Carley, Simon; Cullen, Louise; Than, Martin; Jaffe, Allan S; Lewis, Philip S

    2015-07-01

    Initial reports suggest that concentrations of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) (Roche Diagnostics Elecsys(®)) below the limit of blank (LoB) (3 ng/L) or limit of detection (LoD) (5 ng/L) of the assay have almost 100% negative predictive value (NPV) for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), particularly among patients without electrocardiograph (ECG) evidence of ischemia. We aimed to prospectively validate those findings. We included adults presenting to the emergency department with suspected cardiac chest pain. Standard troponin T (cTnT) and hs-cTnT (both Roche Elecsys) were tested in samples drawn on arrival. The primary outcome was AMI, adjudicated by 2 investigators on the basis of clinical data and ≥12-h cTnT testing. We also evaluated diagnostic performance when AMI was readjudicated on the basis of hs-cTnT (≥12-h) concentrations. Of 463 patients included, 79 (17.1%) had AMI. Twenty-four patients (5.2%) had hs-cTnT concentrations below the LoB, although none had AMI. Ninety-six patients (20.7%) had hs-cTnT concentrations below the LoD, 1 of whom had AMI. Thus, diagnostic sensitivity was 98.7% (95% CI 87.5%-98.6%) and NPV was 99.0% (95% CI 94.3%-100.0%). Of the 17.3% (n = 80) patients with hs-cTnT below the LoD and no ECG ischemia, none had AMI. Thus, diagnostic sensitivity was 100.0% (95% CI 95.4%-100.0%) and NPV was 100.0% (95% CI 95.5%-100.0%). Sensitivity and NPV were maintained when AMI was readjudicated on the basis of hs-cTnT. Our findings confirm that patients with nonischemic ECG and undetectable hs-cTnT at presentation have a very low probability of AMI, although the proportion of patients affected was smaller than in previous research. © 2015 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  4. Procedures for determination of detection limits: application to high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of fat-soluble vitamins in human serum.

    PubMed

    Browne, Richard W; Whitcomb, Brian W

    2010-07-01

    Problems in the analysis of laboratory data commonly arise in epidemiologic studies in which biomarkers subject to lower detection thresholds are used. Various thresholds exist including limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), and limit of blank (LOB). Choosing appropriate strategies for dealing with data affected by such limits relies on proper understanding of the nature of the detection limit and its determination. In this paper, we demonstrate experimental and statistical procedures generally used for estimating different detection limits according to standard procedures in the context of analysis of fat-soluble vitamins and micronutrients in human serum. Fat-soluble vitamins and micronutrients were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. A simulated serum matrix blank was repeatedly analyzed for determination of LOB parametrically by using the observed blank distribution as well as nonparametrically by using ranks. The LOD was determined by combining information regarding the LOB with data from repeated analysis of standard reference materials (SRMs), diluted to low levels; from LOB to 2-3 times LOB. The LOQ was determined experimentally by plotting the observed relative standard deviation (RSD) of SRM replicates compared with the concentration, where the LOQ is the concentration at an RSD of 20%. Experimental approaches and example statistical procedures are given for determination of LOB, LOD, and LOQ. These quantities are reported for each measured analyte. For many analyses, there is considerable information available below the LOQ. Epidemiologic studies must understand the nature of these detection limits and how they have been estimated for appropriate treatment of affected data.

  5. Absolute and convective instabilities in combined Couette-Poiseuille flow past a neo-Hookean solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patne, Ramkarn; Shankar, V.

    2017-12-01

    Temporal and spatio-temporal stability analyses are carried out to characterize the occurrence of convective and absolute instabilities in combined Couette-Poiseuille flow of a Newtonian fluid past a deformable, neo-Hookean solid layer in the creeping-flow limit. Plane Couette flow of a Newtonian fluid past a neo-Hookean solid becomes temporally unstable in the inertia-less limit when the parameter Γ = V η/(GR) exceeds a critical value. Here, V is the velocity of the top plate, η is the fluid viscosity, G is the shear modulus of the solid layer, and R is the fluid layer thickness. The Kupfer-Bers method is employed to demarcate regions of absolute and convective instabilities in the Γ-H parameter space, where H is the ratio of solid to fluid thickness in the system. For certain ranges of the thickness ratio H, we find that the flow could be absolutely unstable, and the critical Γ required for absolute instability is very close to that for temporal instability, thus making the flow absolutely unstable at the onset of temporal instability. In some cases, there is a gap in the parameter Γ between the temporal and absolute instability boundaries. The present study thus shows that absolute instabilities are possible, even at very low Reynolds numbers in flow past deformable solid surfaces. The presence of absolute instabilities could potentially be exploited in the enhancement of mixing at low Reynolds numbers in flow through channels with deformable solid walls.

  6. Searching for Planets in the Hyades. V. Limits on Planet Detection in the Presence of Stellar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulson, Diane B.; Cochran, William D.; Hatzes, Artie P.

    2004-06-01

    We present the results of a radial velocity survey of a sample of Hyades stars and discuss the effects of stellar activity on radial velocity measurements. The level of radial velocity scatter due to rotational modulation of stellar surface features for the Hyades is in agreement with the 1997 predictions of Saar & Donahue-the maximum radial velocity rms of up to ~50 m s-1, with an average rms of ~16 m s-1. In this sample of 94 stars we find one new binary, two stars with linear trends indicative of binary companions, and no close-in giant planets. We discuss the limits on extrasolar planet detection in the Hyades and the constraints imposed on radial velocity surveys of young stars. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. The authors wish to recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that the summit of Mauna Kea has always had within the indigenous Hawaiian community. We are most fortunate to have the opportunity to conduct observations from this mountain. Additional data were obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is operated by McDonald Observatory on behalf of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  7. BACKGROUND TRACK DENSITY REDUCTION OF 50-HZ-HV ECE-PROCESSED THICK POLYCARBONATE DETECTORS TO IMPROVE LOWER DETECTION LIMIT.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, M; Hakimi, A; Soltani, Z

    2016-12-01

    A recent novel development of 50-Hz-HV ECE of 1-mm-thick and 250-µm-thick polycarbonate track detectors (PCTDs) has proved some promising results for some health physics, dosimetry and ion-beam-related applications. The method while proved having some good characteristics for some applications provided a relatively higher background track density (BGTD) in particular when very high voltages are applied to the PCTDs. In order to decrease the minimum detection limit (MDL) of the PCTDs and to further promote its applications for low dose, the BGTD was reduced by applying a layer removal methodology applying ethylendiamine (EDA). The effects of EDA concentrations (50, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85 and 90 %) in water at room temperature (26°C) and soaking durations up to 100 min at different EDA concentration on BGTD reduction were studied. The thickness of the layer removed from the surface of a PCTD highly depends on the soaking time and EDA concentration; it increases as the EDA concentration increases up to for example 700 µm after 2 h of soaking in the EDA solution. After ∼10 min of soaking duration at any of the above-stated concentrations, the BGTD reaches its minimum value, a value which differs from concentration to concentration. An EDA concentration of 85 % in water provided the lowest BGTD of 64.06 ± 3.12 tracks cm - 2 ; ∼6 times lower than that of its original value. It is shown that the layer removal process does not change the registration characteristics of the PCTD and its appearance significantly. The MDL of the PCTDs depends strongly on the BGTD. The MDL values for a desired confidence level were also studied by three calculation methods. The results of the BGTD and the MDL studies under different conditions applied are presented and discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Interaction of cosmic ray muons with spent nuclear fuel dry casks and determination of lower detection limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzidakis, S.; Choi, C. K.; Tsoukalas, L. H.

    2016-08-01

    The potential non-proliferation monitoring of spent nuclear fuel sealed in dry casks interacting continuously with the naturally generated cosmic ray muons is investigated. Treatments on the muon RMS scattering angle by Moliere, Rossi-Greisen, Highland and, Lynch-Dahl were analyzed and compared with simplified Monte Carlo simulations. The Lynch-Dahl expression has the lowest error and appears to be appropriate when performing conceptual calculations for high-Z, thick targets such as dry casks. The GEANT4 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate dry casks with various fuel loadings and scattering variance estimates for each case were obtained. The scattering variance estimation was shown to be unbiased and using Chebyshev's inequality, it was found that 106 muons will provide estimates of the scattering variances that are within 1% of the true value at a 99% confidence level. These estimates were used as reference values to calculate scattering distributions and evaluate the asymptotic behavior for small variations on fuel loading. It is shown that the scattering distributions between a fully loaded dry cask and one with a fuel assembly missing initially overlap significantly but their distance eventually increases with increasing number of muons. One missing fuel assembly can be distinguished from a fully loaded cask with a small overlapping between the distributions which is the case of 100,000 muons. This indicates that the removal of a standard fuel assembly can be identified using muons providing that enough muons are collected. A Bayesian algorithm was developed to classify dry casks and provide a decision rule that minimizes the risk of making an incorrect decision. The algorithm performance was evaluated and the lower detection limit was determined.

  9. Application and Limitations of GPS Radio Occultation (GPS-RO) Data for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Height Detection over the Arctic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeshan, M.; Wu, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Due to recent changes in the Arctic environment, it is important to monitor the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) properties over the Arctic Ocean, especially to explore the variability in ABL clouds (such as sensitivity and feedback to sea ice loss). For example, radiosonde and satellite observations of the Arctic ABL height (and low-cloud cover) have recently suggested a positive response to sea ice loss during October that may not occur during the melt season (June-September). Owing to its high vertical and spatiotemporal resolution, an independent ABL height detection algorithm using GPS Radio Occultation (GPS-RO) refractivity in the Arctic is explored. Similar GPS-RO algorithms developed previously typically define the level of the most negative moisture gradient as the ABL height. This definition is favorable for subtropical oceans where a stratocumulus-topped ABL is often capped by a layer of sharp moisture lapse rate (coincident with the temperature inversion). The Arctic Ocean is also characterized by stratocumulus cloud cover, however, the specific humidity does not frequently decrease in the ABL capping inversion. The use of GPS-RO refractivity for ABL height retrieval therefore becomes more complex. During winter months (December-February), when the total precipitable water in the troposphere is a minimum, a fairly straightforward algorithm for ABL height retrieval is developed. The applicability and limitations of this method for other seasons (Spring, Summer, Fall) is determined. The seasonal, interannual and spatial variability in the GPS-derived ABL height over the Arctic Ocean, as well as its relation to the underlying surface (ice vs. water), is investigated. The GPS-RO profiles are also explored for the evidence of low-level moisture transport in the cold Arctic environment.

  10. The importance and attainment of accurate absolute radiometric calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of accurate absolute radiometric calibration is discussed by reference to the needs of those wishing to validate or use models describing the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with the atmosphere and earth surface features. The in-flight calibration methods used for the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and the Systeme Probatoire d'Observation de la Terre, Haute Resolution visible (SPOT/HRV) systems are described and their limitations discussed. The questionable stability of in-flight absolute calibration methods suggests the use of a radiative transfer program to predict the apparent radiance, at the entrance pupil of the sensor, of a ground site of measured reflectance imaged through a well characterized atmosphere. The uncertainties of such a method are discussed.

  11. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed.

  12. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  13. Stimulus probability effects in absolute identification.

    PubMed

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of presentation probability on both proportion correct and response times. The effects were moderated by the ubiquitous stimulus position effect. The accuracy and response time data were predicted by an exemplar-based model of perceptual cognition (Kent & Lamberts, 2005). The bow in discriminability was also attenuated when presentation probability for middle items was relatively high, an effect that will constrain future model development. The study provides evidence for item-specific learning in absolute identification. Implications for other theories of absolute identification are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Absolute gravimetry for monitoring geodynamics in Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, E.; Strykowski, G.; Forsberg, R.

    2015-12-01

    Here are presented the preliminary results of the absolute gravity measurements done in Greenland by DTU Space with their A10 absolute gravimeter (the A10-019). The purpose, besides establishing and maintaining a national gravity network, is to study geodynamics.The absolute gravity measurements are juxtaposed with the permanent GNET GNSS stations. The first measurements were conducted in 2009 and a few sites have been re-visited. As of present is there a gravity value at 18 GNET sites.There are challenges in interpreting the measurements from Greenland and several signals has to be taken into account, besides the geodynamical signals originating from the changing load of the ice, there is also a clear signal of direct attraction from different masses. Here are presented the preliminary results of our measurements in Greenland and attempts explain them through modelling of the geodynamical signals and the direct attraction from the ocean and ice.

  15. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus DNA among Chronic and potential Occult HBV patients in resource-limited settings by Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Akram, Arifa; Islam, S M Rashedul; Munshi, Saif Ullah; Tabassum, Shahina

    2018-05-16

    Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) usually occurs due to the transfusion of blood or blood products from chronic HBV (CHB) or occult HBV infected (OBI) patients. Besides serological tests e.g. HBsAg and anti-HBc (total), detection of HBV-DNA is necessary for the diagnosis of OBI patients. Different nucleic acid tests (NATs) including real-time-Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) are used for the detect HBV-DNA. The NATs are expensive and require technical expertise which are barriers to introducing them in resource-limited settings. This study was undertaken to evaluate the use of Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) assay as an alternative to qPCR for the detection of HBV-DNA in CHB and potential OBI patients in resource-limited settings. Following the published protocols with some modifications, a LAMP assay was developed for detection of HBV-DNA by either using a heat block followed by detection in an agarose gel or using a qPCR thermocycler. The LAMP assay was applied to supernatant prepared from heat treated serum collected from CHB and potential OBI patients. HBV viral load in serum was measured by qPCR using a single step HBV-DNA quantification kit. Among 200 samples tested, qPCR was capable to detect HBV-DNA in 25.5% of cases, whereas LAMP assay detected HBV-DNA in 43.5% cases. The qPCR was able to detect 11 (9.16%) potential OBI cases, whereas LAMP assay identified HBV-DNA in 43 (35.83%) cases. In addition to tests for HBsAg and/or anti-HBc (total), detection of HBV-DNA by LAMP assay may aid in preventing post-transfusion HBV infection in resource-limited settings. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Methane Flux Estimation from Point Sources using GOSAT Target Observation: Detection Limit and Improvements with Next Generation Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuze, A.; Suto, H.; Kataoka, F.; Shiomi, K.; Kondo, Y.; Crisp, D.; Butz, A.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) has an important role in global radiative forcing of climate but its emission estimates have larger uncertainties than carbon dioxide (CO2). The area of anthropogenic emission sources is usually much smaller than 100 km2. The Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation Fourier-Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) onboard the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) has measured CO2 and CH4 column density using sun light reflected from the earth's surface. It has an agile pointing system and its footprint can cover 87-km2 with a single detector. By specifying pointing angles and observation time for every orbit, TANSO-FTS can target various CH4 point sources together with reference points every 3 day over years. We selected a reference point that represents CH4 background density before or after targeting a point source. By combining satellite-measured enhancement of the CH4 column density and surface measured wind data or estimates from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, we estimated CH4emission amounts. Here, we picked up two sites in the US West Coast, where clear sky frequency is high and a series of data are available. The natural gas leak at Aliso Canyon showed a large enhancement and its decrease with time since the initial blowout. We present time series of flux estimation assuming the source is single point without influx. The observation of the cattle feedlot in Chino, California has weather station within the TANSO-FTS footprint. The wind speed is monitored continuously and the wind direction is stable at the time of GOSAT overpass. The large TANSO-FTS footprint and strong wind decreases enhancement below noise level. Weak wind shows enhancements in CH4, but the velocity data have large uncertainties. We show the detection limit of single samples and how to reduce uncertainty using time series of satellite data. We will propose that the next generation instruments for accurate anthropogenic CO2 and CH

  17. Absolute Distance Measurement with the MSTAR Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Peters, Robert; Burger, Johan; Ahn, Seh-Won; Steier, William H.; Fetterman, Harrold R.; Chang, Yian

    2003-01-01

    The MSTAR sensor (Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging) is a new system for measuring absolute distance, capable of resolving the integer cycle ambiguity of standard interferometers, and making it possible to measure distance with sub-nanometer accuracy. The sensor uses a single laser in conjunction with fast phase modulators and low frequency detectors. We describe the design of the system - the principle of operation, the metrology source, beamlaunching optics, and signal processing - and show results for target distances up to 1 meter. We then demonstrate how the system can be scaled to kilometer-scale distances.

  18. Comparison of detection limits in environmental analysis--is it possible? An approach on quality assurance in the lower working range by verification.

    PubMed

    Geiss, S; Einax, J W

    2001-07-01

    Detection limit, reporting limit and limit of quantitation are analytical parameters which describe the power of analytical methods. These parameters are used for internal quality assurance and externally for competing, especially in the case of trace analysis in environmental compartments. The wide variety of possibilities for computing or obtaining these measures in literature and in legislative rules makes any comparison difficult. Additionally, a host of terms have been used within the analytical community to describe detection and quantitation capabilities. Without trying to create an order for the variety of terms, this paper is aimed at providing a practical proposal for answering the main questions for the analysts concerning quality measures above. These main questions and related parameters were explained and graphically demonstrated. Estimation and verification of these parameters are the two steps to get real measures. A rule for a practical verification is given in a table, where the analyst can read out what to measure, what to estimate and which criteria have to be fulfilled. In this manner verified parameters detection limit, reporting limit and limit of quantitation now are comparable and the analyst himself is responsible to the unambiguity and reliability of these measures.

  19. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed.

  20. 242Pu absolute neutron-capture cross section measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2017-09-01

    The absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. During target fabrication, a small amount of 239Pu was added to the active target so that the absolute scale of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section could be set according to the known 239Pu(n,f) resonance at En,R = 7.83 eV. The relative scale of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section covers four orders of magnitude for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈ 40 keV. The cross section reported in ENDF/B-VII.1 for the 242Pu(n,γ) En,R = 2.68 eV resonance was found to be 2.4% lower than the new absolute 242Pu(n,γ) cross section.

  1. Absolute gravimetry as an operational tool for geodynamics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torge, W.

    Relative gravimetric techniques have been used for nearly 30 years for measuring non-tidal gravity variations with time, and thus have contributed to geodynamics research by monitoring vertical crustal movements and internal mass shifts. With today's accuracy of about ± 0.05µms-2 (or 5µGal), significant results have been obtained in numerous control nets of local extension, especially in connection with seismic and volcanic events. Nevertheless, the main drawbacks of relative gravimetry, which are deficiencies in absolute datum and calibration, set a limit for its application, especially with respect to large-scale networks and long-term investigations. These problems can now be successfully attacked by absolute gravimetry, with transportable gravimeters available since about 20 years. While the absolute technique during the first two centuries of gravimetry's history was based on the pendulum method, the free-fall method can now be employed taking advantage of laser-interferometry, electronic timing, vacuum and shock absorbing techniques, and on-line computer-control. The accuracy inherent in advanced instruments is about ± 0.05 µms-2. In field work, generally an accuracy of ±0.1 µms-2 may be expected, strongly depending on local environmental conditions.

  2. Design considerations and validation of the MSTAR absolute metrology system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Robert D.; Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Burger, Johan; Jeganathan, Muthu

    2004-08-01

    Absolute metrology measures the actual distance between two optical fiducials. A number of methods have been employed, including pulsed time-of-flight, intensity-modulated optical beam, and two-color interferometry. The rms accuracy is currently limited to ~5 microns. Resolving the integer number of wavelengths requires a 1-sigma range accuracy of ~0.1 microns. Closing this gap has a large pay-off: the range (length measurement) accuracy can be increased substantially using the unambiguous optical phase. The MSTAR sensor (Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging) is a new system for measuring absolute distance, capable of resolving the integer cycle ambiguity of standard interferometers, and making it possible to measure distance with sub-nanometer accuracy. In this paper, we present recent experiments that use dispersed white light interferometry to independently validate the zero-point of the system. We also describe progress towards reducing the size of optics, and stabilizing the laser wavelength for operation over larger target ranges. MSTAR is a general-purpose tool for conveniently measuring length with much greater accuracy than was previously possible, and has a wide range of possible applications.

  3. A vibration correction method for free-fall absolute gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, J.; Wang, G.; Wu, K.; Wang, L. J.

    2018-02-01

    An accurate determination of gravitational acceleration, usually approximated as 9.8 m s-2, has been playing an important role in the areas of metrology, geophysics, and geodetics. Absolute gravimetry has been experiencing rapid developments in recent years. Most absolute gravimeters today employ a free-fall method to measure gravitational acceleration. Noise from ground vibration has become one of the most serious factors limiting measurement precision. Compared to vibration isolators, the vibration correction method is a simple and feasible way to reduce the influence of ground vibrations. A modified vibration correction method is proposed and demonstrated. A two-dimensional golden section search algorithm is used to search for the best parameters of the hypothetical transfer function. Experiments using a T-1 absolute gravimeter are performed. It is verified that for an identical group of drop data, the modified method proposed in this paper can achieve better correction effects with much less computation than previous methods. Compared to vibration isolators, the correction method applies to more hostile environments and even dynamic platforms, and is expected to be used in a wider range of applications.

  4. Solving Absolute Value Equations Algebraically and Geometrically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiyuan, Wei

    2005-01-01

    The way in which students can improve their comprehension by understanding the geometrical meaning of algebraic equations or solving algebraic equation geometrically is described. Students can experiment with the conditions of the absolute value equation presented, for an interesting way to form an overall understanding of the concept.

  5. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  6. On Relative and Absolute Conviction in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Keith; Mejia-Ramos, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Conviction is a central construct in mathematics education research on justification and proof. In this paper, we claim that it is important to distinguish between absolute conviction and relative conviction. We argue that researchers in mathematics education frequently have not done so and this has lead to researchers making unwarranted claims…

  7. Absolute Points for Multiple Assignment Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adlakha, V.; Kowalski, K.

    2006-01-01

    An algorithm is presented to solve multiple assignment problems in which a cost is incurred only when an assignment is made at a given cell. The proposed method recursively searches for single/group absolute points to identify cells that must be loaded in any optimal solution. Unlike other methods, the first solution is the optimal solution. The…

  8. Partial Least Squares Calibration Modeling Towards the Multivariate Limit of Detection for Enriched Isotopic Mixtures via Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Candace; Profeta, Luisa; Akpovo, Codjo

    The psuedo univariate limit of detection was calculated to compare to the multivariate interval. ompared with results from the psuedounivariate LOD, the multivariate LOD includes other factors (i.e. signal uncertainties) and the reveals the significance in creating models that not only use the analyte’s emission line but also its entire molecular spectra.

  9. Sample-morphology effects on x-ray photoelectron peak intensities. II. Estimation of detection limits for thin-film materials

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Cedric J., E-mail: cedric.powell@nist.gov; Werner, Wolfgang S. M.; Smekal, Werner

    2014-09-01

    The authors show that the National Institute of Standards and Technology database for the simulation of electron spectra for surface analysis (SESSA) can be used to determine detection limits for thin-film materials such as a thin film on a substrate or buried at varying depths in another material for common x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement conditions. Illustrative simulations were made for a W film on or in a Ru matrix and for a Ru film on or in a W matrix. In the former case, the thickness of a W film at a given depth in the Ru matrix wasmore » varied so that the intensity of the W 4d{sub 5/2} peak was essentially the same as that for a homogeneous RuW{sub 0.001} alloy. Similarly, the thickness of a Ru film at a selected depth in the W matrix was varied so that the intensity of the Ru 3p{sub 3/2} peak matched that from a homogeneous WRu{sub 0.01} alloy. These film thicknesses correspond to the detection limits of each minor component for measurement conditions where the detection limits for a homogeneous sample varied between 0.1 at. % (for the RuW{sub 0.001} alloy) and 1 at. % (for the WRu{sub 0.01} alloy). SESSA can be similarly used to convert estimates of XPS detection limits for a minor species in a homogeneous solid to the corresponding XPS detection limits for that species as a thin film on or buried in the chosen solid.« less

  10. Limited copy number - high resolution melting (LCN-HRM) enables the detection and identification by sequencing of low level mutations in cancer biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Do, Hongdo; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Background Mutation detection in clinical tumour samples is challenging when the proportion of tumour cells, and thus mutant alleles, is low. The limited sensitivity of conventional sequencing necessitates the adoption of more sensitive approaches. High resolution melting (HRM) is more sensitive than sequencing but identification of the mutation is desirable, particularly when it is important to discriminate false positives due to PCR errors or template degradation from true mutations. We thus developed limited copy number - high resolution melting (LCN-HRM) which applies limiting dilution to HRM. Multiple replicate reactions with a limited number of target sequences per reaction allow low level mutations to be detected. The dilutions used (based on Ct values) are chosen such that mutations, if present, can be detected by the direct sequencing of amplicons with aberrant melting patterns. Results Using cell lines heterozygous for mutations, we found that the mutations were not readily detected when they comprised 10% of total alleles (20% tumour cells) by sequencing, whereas they were readily detectable at 5% total alleles by standard HRM. LCN-HRM allowed these mutations to be identified by direct sequencing of those positive reactions. LCN-HRM was then used to review formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) clinical samples showing discordant findings between sequencing and HRM for KRAS exon 2 and EGFR exons 19 and 21. Both true mutations present at low levels and sequence changes due to artefacts were detected by LCN-HRM. The use of high fidelity polymerases showed that the majority of the artefacts were derived from the damaged template rather than replication errors during amplification. Conclusion LCN-HRM bridges the sensitivity gap between HRM and sequencing and is effective in distinguishing between artefacts and true mutations. PMID:19811662

  11. Limited copy number-high resolution melting (LCN-HRM) enables the detection and identification by sequencing of low level mutations in cancer biopsies.

    PubMed

    Do, Hongdo; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2009-10-08

    Mutation detection in clinical tumour samples is challenging when the proportion of tumour cells, and thus mutant alleles, is low. The limited sensitivity of conventional sequencing necessitates the adoption of more sensitive approaches. High resolution melting (HRM) is more sensitive than sequencing but identification of the mutation is desirable, particularly when it is important to discriminate false positives due to PCR errors or template degradation from true mutations.We thus developed limited copy number - high resolution melting (LCN-HRM) which applies limiting dilution to HRM. Multiple replicate reactions with a limited number of target sequences per reaction allow low level mutations to be detected. The dilutions used (based on Ct values) are chosen such that mutations, if present, can be detected by the direct sequencing of amplicons with aberrant melting patterns. Using cell lines heterozygous for mutations, we found that the mutations were not readily detected when they comprised 10% of total alleles (20% tumour cells) by sequencing, whereas they were readily detectable at 5% total alleles by standard HRM. LCN-HRM allowed these mutations to be identified by direct sequencing of those positive reactions.LCN-HRM was then used to review formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) clinical samples showing discordant findings between sequencing and HRM for KRAS exon 2 and EGFR exons 19 and 21. Both true mutations present at low levels and sequence changes due to artefacts were detected by LCN-HRM. The use of high fidelity polymerases showed that the majority of the artefacts were derived from the damaged template rather than replication errors during amplification. LCN-HRM bridges the sensitivity gap between HRM and sequencing and is effective in distinguishing between artefacts and true mutations.

  12. Overcoming the detection bandwidth limit in precision spectroscopy: The analytical apparatus function for a stepped frequency scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohart, François

    2017-01-01

    In a previous paper [Rohart et al., Phys Rev A 2014;90(042506)], the influence of detection-bandwidth properties on observed line-shapes in precision spectroscopy was theoretically modeled for the first time using the basic model of a continuous sweeping of the laser frequency. Specific experiments confirmed general theoretical trends but also revealed several insufficiencies of the model in case of stepped frequency scans. As a consequence in as much as up-to-date experiments use step-by-step frequency-swept lasers, a new model of the influence of the detection-bandwidth is developed, including a realistic timing of signal sampling and frequency changes. Using Fourier transform techniques, the resulting time domain apparatus function gets a simple analytical form that can be easily implemented in line-shape fitting codes without any significant increase of computation durations. This new model is then considered in details for detection systems characterized by 1st and 2nd order bandwidths, underlining the importance of the ratio of detection time constant to frequency step duration, namely for the measurement of line frequencies. It also allows a straightforward analysis of corresponding systematic deviations on retrieved line frequencies and broadenings. Finally, a special attention is paid to consequences of a finite detection-bandwidth in Doppler Broadening Thermometry, namely to experimental adjustments required for a spectroscopic determination of the Boltzmann constant at the 1-ppm level of accuracy. In this respect, the interest of implementing a Butterworth 2nd order filter is emphasized.

  13. INTERCOMPARISON ON THE MEASUREMENT OF THE QUANTITY PERSONAL DOSE EQUIVALENT HP(10) IN PHOTON FIELDS. LINEARITY DEPENDENCE, LOWER LIMIT OF DETECTION AND UNCERTAINTY IN MEASUREMENT OF DOSIMETRY SYSTEMS OF INDIVIDUAL MONITORING SERVICES IN GABON AND GHANA.

    PubMed

    Ondo Meye, P; Schandorf, C; Amoako, J K; Manteaw, P O; Amoatey, E A; Adjei, D N

    2017-12-01

    An inter-comparison study was conducted to assess the capability of dosimetry systems of individual monitoring services (IMSs) in Gabon and Ghana to measure personal dose equivalent Hp(10) in photon fields. The performance indicators assessed were the lower limit of detection, linearity and uncertainty in measurement. Monthly and quarterly recording levels were proposed with corresponding values of 0.08 and 0.025 mSv, and 0.05 and 0.15 mSv for the TLD and OSL systems, respectively. The linearity dependence of the dosimetry systems was performed following the requirement given in the Standard IEC 62387 of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The results obtained for the two systems were satisfactory. The procedure followed for the uncertainty assessment is the one given in the IEC technical report TR62461. The maximum relative overall uncertainties, in absolute value, expressed in terms of Hp(10), for the TL dosimetry system Harshaw 6600, are 44. 35% for true doses below 0.40 mSv and 36.33% for true doses ≥0.40 mSv. For the OSL dosimetry system microStar, the maximum relative overall uncertainties, in absolute value, are 52.17% for true doses below 0.40 mSv and 37.43% for true doses ≥0.40 mSv. These results are in good agreement with the requirements for accuracy of the International Commission on Radiological protection. When expressing the uncertainties in terms of response, comparison with the IAEA requirements for overall accuracy showed that the uncertainty results were also acceptable. The values of Hp(10) directly measured by the two dosimetry systems showed a significant underestimation for the Harshaw 6600 system, and a slight overestimation for the microStar system. After correction for linearity of the measured doses, the two dosimetry systems gave better and comparable results. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Early results from the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, J. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Shafer, R. A.; Eplee, R. E.; Isaacman, R. B.; Fixsen, D. J.; Read, S. M.; Meyer, S. S.; Weiss, R.; Wright, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mapped 98 percent of the sky, 60 percent of it twice, before the liquid helium coolant was exhausted. The FIRAS covers the frequency region from 1 to 100/cm with a 7 deg angular resolution. The spectral resolution is 0.2/cm for frequencies less than 20/cm and 0.8/cm for higher frequencies. Preliminary results include: a limit on the deviations from a Planck curve of 1 percent of the peak brightness from 1 to 20/cm, a temperature of 2.735 +/- 0.06 K, a limit on the Comptonization parameter y of 0.001, on the chemical potential parameter mu of 0.01, a strong limit on the existence of a hot smooth intergalactic medium, and a confirmation that the dipole anisotropy spectrum is that of a Doppler shifted blackbody.

  15. Water vapour emission in vegetable fuel: absorption cell measurements and detection limits of our CO II Dial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellecci, C.; De Leo, L.; Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.; Lo Feudo, T.; Martellucci, S.; Richetta, M.

    2006-09-01

    Forest fires can be the cause of serious environmental and economic damages. For this reason a considerable effort has been directed toward the forest protection and fire fighting. In the early forest fire detection, Lidar technique present considerable advantages compared to the passive detection methods based on infrared cameras currently in common use, due its higher sensitivity and ability to accurately locate the fire. The combustion phase of the vegetable matter causes a great amount of water vapour emission, thus the water molecule behaviour will be studied to obtain a fire detection system ready and efficient also before the flame propagation. A first evaluation of increment of the water vapour concentration compared to standard one will be estimated by a numerical simulation. These results will be compared with the experimental measurements carried out into a cell with a CO II Dial system, burning different kinds of vegetable fuel. Our results and their comparison will be reported in this paper.

  16. 20 CFR 404.1205 - Absolute coverage groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Absolute coverage groups. 404.1205 Section... Covered § 404.1205 Absolute coverage groups. (a) General. An absolute coverage group is a permanent... are not under a retirement system. An absolute coverage group may include positions which were...

  17. Scope and limitations of the TEMPO/EPR method for singlet oxygen detection: the misleading role of electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Giacomo; Manet, Ilse; Monti, Sandra; Miranda, Miguel A; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie

    2014-12-01

    For many biological and biomedical studies, it is essential to detect the production of (1)O2 and quantify its production yield. Among the available methods, detection of the characteristic 1270-nm phosphorescence of singlet oxygen by time-resolved near-infrared (TRNIR) emission constitutes the most direct and unambiguous approach. An alternative indirect method is electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in combination with a singlet oxygen probe. This is based on the detection of the TEMPO free radical formed after oxidation of TEMP (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine) by singlet oxygen. Although the TEMPO/EPR method has been widely employed, it can produce misleading data. This is demonstrated by the present study, in which the quantum yields of singlet oxygen formation obtained by TRNIR emission and by the TEMPO/EPR method are compared for a set of well-known photosensitizers. The results reveal that the TEMPO/EPR method leads to significant overestimation of singlet oxygen yield when the singlet or triplet excited state of the photosensitizer is efficiently quenched by TEMP, acting as electron donor. In such case, generation of the TEMP(+) radical cation, followed by deprotonation and reaction with molecular oxygen, gives rise to an EPR-detectable TEMPO signal that is not associated with singlet oxygen production. This knowledge is essential for an appropriate and error-free application of the TEMPO/EPR method in chemical, biological, and medical studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Detecting Position Using ARKit II: Generating Position-Time Graphs in Realtime and Further Information on Limitations of ARKit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilek, Ufuk; Erol, Mustafa

    2018-01-01

    ARKit is a framework which allows developers to create augmented reality apps for the iPhone and iPad. In a previous study, we had shown that it could be used to detect position in educational physics experiments and emphasized that the ability to provide position data in real-time was one of the prominent features of this newly emerging…

  19. Detection of Microbial Water Quality Indicators and Fecal Waterborne Pathogens in Environmental Waters: A Review of Methods, Applications, and Limitations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental waters are important reservoirs of pathogenic microorganisms, many of which are of fecal origin. In most cases, the presence of pathogens is determined using surrogate bacterial indicators. In other cases, direct detection of the pathogen in question is required. M...

  20. Effects of Kapton Sample Cell Windows on the Detection Limit of Smectite: Implications for CheMin on the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achilles, C. N.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, R. V.; Blake, D. F.

    2012-01-01

    The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity is an X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument capable of providing the mineralogical and chemical compositions of rocks and soils on the surface of Mars. CheMin uses a microfocus X-ray tube with a Co target, transmission geometry, and an energy-discriminating X-ray sensitive CCD to produce simultaneous 2-D XRD patterns and energy-dispersive X-ray histograms from powdered samples. CheMin has two different window materials used for sample cells -- Mylar and Kapton. Instrument details are provided elsewhere. Fe/Mg-smectite (e.g., nontronite) has been identified in Gale Crater, the MSL future landing site, by CRISM spectra. While large quantities of phyllosilicate minerals will be easily detected by CheMin, it is important to establish detection limits of such phases to understand capabilities and limitations of the instrument. A previous study indicated that the (001) peak of smectite at 15 Ang was detectable in a mixture of 1 wt.% smectite with olivine when Mylar is the window material for the sample cell. Complications arise when Kapton is the window material because Kapton itself also has a diffraction peak near 15 Ang (6.8 deg 2 Theta). This study presents results of mineral mixtures of smectite and olivine to determine smectite detection limits for Kapton sample cells. Because the intensity and position of the smectite (001) peak depends on the hydration state, we also analyzed mixtures with "hydrated" and "dehydrated"h smectite to examine the effects of hydration state on detection limits.

  1. Enhancement of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) Detection limit using a low-pressure and short-pulse laser-induced plasma process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Kuwahara, Masakazu; Yan, Jun Jie; Liu, Ji Ping

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technology is an appealing technique compared with many other types of elemental analysis because of the fast response, high sensitivity, real-time, and noncontact features. One of the challenging targets of LIBS is the enhancement of the detection limit. In this study, the detection limit of gas-phase LIBS analysis has been improved by controlling the pressure and laser pulse width. In order to verify this method, low-pressure gas plasma was induced using nanosecond and picosecond lasers. The method was applied to the detection of Hg. The emission intensity ratio of the Hg atom to NO (IHg/INO) was analyzed to evaluate the LIBS detection limit because the NO emission (interference signal) was formed during the plasma generation and cooling process of N2 and O2 in the air. It was demonstrated that the enhancement of IHg/INO arose by decreasing the pressure to a few kilopascals, and the IHg/INO of the picosecond breakdown was always much higher than that of the nanosecond breakdown at low buffer gas pressure. Enhancement of IHg/INO increased more than 10 times at 700 Pa using picosecond laser with 35 ps pulse width. The detection limit was enhanced to 0.03 ppm (parts per million). We also saw that the spectra from the center and edge parts of plasma showed different features. Comparing the central spectra with the edge spectra, IHg/INO of the edge spectra was higher than that of the central spectra using the picosecond laser breakdown process.

  2. X-ray Bursts in Neutron Star and Black Hole Binaries from USA Data: Detections and Upper Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Tournear, Derek M

    Narayan and Heyl (2002) have developed a theoretical framework to convert suitable upper limits on type I X-ray bursts from accreting black hole candidates (BHCs) into evidence for an event horizon. However, no appropriate observational limit exists in the literature. In this paper we survey 2101.2 ks of data from the Unconventional Stellar Aspect (USA) X-ray timing experiment and 5142 ks of data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) experiment to obtain a formal constraint of this type. 1122 ks of neutron star data yield a population averaged mean burst rate of 1.69 x 10{sup -5} bursts s{sup -1}more » while 6081 ks of BHC data yield a 95% confidence level upper limit of 4.9 x 10{sup -7} bursts s{sup -1}. This is the first published limit of this type for Black Hole Candidates. Applying the theoretical framework of Narayan and Heyl (2002) we calculate regions of unstable luminosity where the neutron stars are expected to burst and the BHCs would be expected to burst if they had a surface. In this unstable luminosity region 464 ks of neutron star data yield an averaged mean burst rate of 4.1 x 10{sup -5} bursts s{sup -1} and 1512 ks of BHC data yield a 95% confidence level upper limit of 2.0 x 10{sup 6} bursts s{sup -1}, and a limit of > 10 {sigma} that BHCs do not burst with a rate similar to the rate of neutron stars in these unstable regions. This gives further evidence that BHCs do not have surfaces unless there is some new physics occurring on their surface.« less

  3. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  4. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  5. Absolute photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The absolute values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.

  6. Absolute photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.

    1985-01-01

    The absolute values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.

  7. Behavior of Multiclass Pesticide Residue Concentrations during the Transformation from Rose Petals to Rose Absolute.

    PubMed

    Tascone, Oriane; Fillâtre, Yoann; Roy, Céline; Meierhenrich, Uwe J

    2015-05-27

    This study investigates the concentrations of 54 multiclass pesticides during the transformation processes from rose petal to concrete and absolute using roses spiked with pesticides as a model. The concentrations of the pesticides were followed during the process of transforming the spiked rose flowers from an organic field into concrete and then into absolute. The rose flowers, the concrete, and the absolute, as well as their transformation intermediates, were analyzed for pesticide content using gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. We observed that all the pesticides were extracted and concentrated in the absolute, with the exception of three molecules: fenthion, fenamiphos, and phorate. Typical pesticides were found to be concentrated by a factor of 100-300 from the rose flowers to the rose absolute. The observed effect of pesticide enrichment was also studied in roses and their extracts from four classically phytosanitary treated fields. Seventeen pesticides were detected in at least one of the extracts. Like the case for the spiked samples in our model, the pesticides present in the rose flowers from Turkey were concentrated in the absolute. Two pesticides, methidathion and chlorpyrifos, were quantified in the rose flowers at approximately 0.01 and 0.01-0.05 mg kg(-1), respectively, depending on the treated field. The concentrations determined for the corresponding rose absolutes were 4.7 mg kg(-1) for methidathion and 0.65-27.25 mg kg(-1) for chlorpyrifos.

  8. Picoliter Well Array Chip-Based Digital Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Absolute Quantification of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Liu, Yong; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Yuanjie; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuelian; Yu, Yude

    2016-01-01

    Absolute, precise quantification methods expand the scope of nucleic acids research and have many practical applications. Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a powerful method for nucleic acid detection and absolute quantification. However, it requires thermal cycling and accurate temperature control, which are difficult in resource-limited conditions. Accordingly, isothermal methods, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), are more attractive. We developed a picoliter well array (PWA) chip with 27,000 consistently sized picoliter reactions (314 pL) for isothermal DNA quantification using digital RPA (dRPA) at 39°C. Sample loading using a scraping liquid blade was simple, fast, and required small reagent volumes (i.e., <20 μL). Passivating the chip surface using a methoxy-PEG-silane agent effectively eliminated cross-contamination during dRPA. Our creative optical design enabled wide-field fluorescence imaging in situ and both end-point and real-time analyses of picoliter wells in a 6-cm(2) area. It was not necessary to use scan shooting and stitch serial small images together. Using this method, we quantified serial dilutions of a Listeria monocytogenes gDNA stock solution from 9 × 10(-1) to 4 × 10(-3) copies per well with an average error of less than 11% (N = 15). Overall dRPA-on-chip processing required less than 30 min, which was a 4-fold decrease compared to dPCR, requiring approximately 2 h. dRPA on the PWA chip provides a simple and highly sensitive method to quantify nucleic acids without thermal cycling or precise micropump/microvalve control. It has applications in fast field analysis and critical clinical diagnostics under resource-limited settings.

  9. Picoliter Well Array Chip-Based Digital Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Absolute Quantification of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao; Liu, Yong; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Yuanjie; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuelian; Yu, Yude

    2016-01-01

    Absolute, precise quantification methods expand the scope of nucleic acids research and have many practical applications. Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a powerful method for nucleic acid detection and absolute quantification. However, it requires thermal cycling and accurate temperature control, which are difficult in resource-limited conditions. Accordingly, isothermal methods, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), are more attractive. We developed a picoliter well array (PWA) chip with 27,000 consistently sized picoliter reactions (314 pL) for isothermal DNA quantification using digital RPA (dRPA) at 39°C. Sample loading using a scraping liquid blade was simple, fast, and required small reagent volumes (i.e., <20 μL). Passivating the chip surface using a methoxy-PEG-silane agent effectively eliminated cross-contamination during dRPA. Our creative optical design enabled wide-field fluorescence imaging in situ and both end-point and real-time analyses of picoliter wells in a 6-cm2 area. It was not necessary to use scan shooting and stitch serial small images together. Using this method, we quantified serial dilutions of a Listeria monocytogenes gDNA stock solution from 9 × 10-1 to 4 × 10-3 copies per well with an average error of less than 11% (N = 15). Overall dRPA-on-chip processing required less than 30 min, which was a 4-fold decrease compared to dPCR, requiring approximately 2 h. dRPA on the PWA chip provides a simple and highly sensitive method to quantify nucleic acids without thermal cycling or precise micropump/microvalve control. It has applications in fast field analysis and critical clinical diagnostics under resource-limited settings. PMID:27074005

  10. Chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil.

    PubMed

    Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-10

    Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) absolute oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the absolute oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound.

  11. Measurement of absolute gravity acceleration in Firenze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, M.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the University of Firenze (Italy). In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the Newtonian law at short distances are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. The only available datum, pertaining to the italian zero-order gravity network, was taken more than 20 years ago at a distance of more than 60 km from the study site. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 absolute gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The absolute accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are (980 492 160.6 ± 4.0) μGal and (980 492 048.3 ± 3.0) μGal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the absolute value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.

  12. On the Perceptual Subprocess of Absolute Pitch.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Goo; Knösche, Thomas R

    2017-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the rare ability of musicians to identify the pitch of tonal sound without external reference. While there have been behavioral and neuroimaging studies on the characteristics of AP, how the AP is implemented in human brains remains largely unknown. AP can be viewed as comprising of two subprocesses: perceptual (processing auditory input to extract a pitch chroma) and associative (linking an auditory representation of pitch chroma with a verbal/non-verbal label). In this review, we focus on the nature of the perceptual subprocess of AP. Two different models on how the perceptual subprocess works have been proposed: either via absolute pitch categorization (APC) or based on absolute pitch memory (APM). A major distinction between the two views is that whether the AP uses unique auditory processing (i.e., APC) that exists only in musicians with AP or it is rooted in a common phenomenon (i.e., APM), only with heightened efficiency. We review relevant behavioral and neuroimaging evidence that supports each notion. Lastly, we list open questions and potential ideas to address them.

  13. On the Perceptual Subprocess of Absolute Pitch

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Goo; Knösche, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the rare ability of musicians to identify the pitch of tonal sound without external reference. While there have been behavioral and neuroimaging studies on the characteristics of AP, how the AP is implemented in human brains remains largely unknown. AP can be viewed as comprising of two subprocesses: perceptual (processing auditory input to extract a pitch chroma) and associative (linking an auditory representation of pitch chroma with a verbal/non-verbal label). In this review, we focus on the nature of the perceptual subprocess of AP. Two different models on how the perceptual subprocess works have been proposed: either via absolute pitch categorization (APC) or based on absolute pitch memory (APM). A major distinction between the two views is that whether the AP uses unique auditory processing (i.e., APC) that exists only in musicians with AP or it is rooted in a common phenomenon (i.e., APM), only with heightened efficiency. We review relevant behavioral and neuroimaging evidence that supports each notion. Lastly, we list open questions and potential ideas to address them. PMID:29085275

  14. Detection of nanoplastics in food by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled to multi-angle light scattering: possibilities, challenges and analytical limitations.

    PubMed

    Correia, Manuel; Loeschner, Katrin

    2018-02-06

    We tested the suitability of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to multi-angle light scattering (MALS) for detection of nanoplastics in fish. A homogenized fish sample was spiked with 100 nm polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs) (1.3 mg/g fish). Two sample preparation strategies were tested: acid digestion and enzymatic digestion with proteinase K. Both procedures were found suitable for degradation of the organic matrix. However, acid digestion resulted in large PSNPs aggregates/agglomerates (> 1 μm). The presence of large particulates was not observed after enzymatic digestion, and consequently it was chosen as a sample preparation method. The results demonstrated that it was possible to use AF4 for separating the PSNPs from the digested fish and to determine their size by MALS. The PSNPs could be easily detected by following their light scattering (LS) signal with a limit of detection of 52 μg/g fish. The AF4-MALS method could also be exploited for another type of nanoplastics in solution, namely polyethylene (PE). However, it was not possible to detect the PE particles in fish, due to the presence of an elevated LS background. Our results demonstrate that an analytical method developed for a certain type of nanoplastics may not be directly applicable to other types of nanoplastics and may require further adjustment. This work describes for the first time the detection of nanoplastics in a food matrix by AF4-MALS. Despite the current limitations, this is a promising methodology for detecting nanoplastics in food and in experimental studies (e.g., toxicity tests, uptake studies). Graphical abstract Basic concept for the detection of nanoplastics in fish by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled to multi-angle light scattering.

  15. Markov Dynamics as a Zooming Lens for Multiscale Community Detection: Non Clique-Like Communities and the Field-of-View Limit

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Michael T.; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Yaliraki, Sophia N.; Barahona, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a surge of interest in community detection algorithms for complex networks. A variety of computational heuristics, some with a long history, have been proposed for the identification of communities or, alternatively, of good graph partitions. In most cases, the algorithms maximize a particular objective function, thereby finding the ‘right’ split into communities. Although a thorough comparison of algorithms is still lacking, there has been an effort to design benchmarks, i.e., random graph models with known community structure against which algorithms can be evaluated. However, popular community detection methods and benchmarks normally assume an implicit notion of community based on clique-like subgraphs, a form of community structure that is not always characteristic of real networks. Specifically, networks that emerge from geometric constraints can have natural non clique-like substructures with large effective diameters, which can be interpreted as long-range communities. In this work, we show that long-range communities escape detection by popular methods, which are blinded by a restricted ‘field-of-view’ limit, an intrinsic upper scale on the communities they can detect. The field-of-view limit means that long-range communities tend to be overpartitioned. We show how by adopting a dynamical perspective towards community detection [1], [2], in which the evolution of a Markov process on the graph is used as a zooming lens over the structure of the network at all scales, one can detect both clique- or non clique-like communities without imposing an upper scale to the detection. Consequently, the performance of algorithms on inherently low-diameter, clique-like benchmarks may not always be indicative of equally good results in real networks with local, sparser connectivity. We illustrate our ideas with constructive examples and through the analysis of real-world networks from imaging, protein structures and the power grid

  16. Essential Limitations of the Standard THz TDS Method for Substance Detection and Identification and a Way of Overcoming Them

    PubMed Central

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Varentsova, Svetlana A.

    2016-01-01

    Low efficiency of the standard THz TDS method of the detection and identification of substances based on a comparison of the spectrum for the signal under investigation with a standard signal spectrum is demonstrated using the physical experiments conducted under real conditions with a thick paper bag as well as with Si-based semiconductors under laboratory conditions. In fact, standard THz spectroscopy leads to false detection of hazardous substances in neutral samples, which do not contain them. This disadvantage of the THz TDS method can be overcome by using time-dependent THz pulse spectrum analysis. For a quality assessment of the standard substance spectral features presence in the signal under analysis, one may use time-dependent integral correlation criteria. PMID:27070617

  17. Essential Limitations of the Standard THz TDS Method for Substance Detection and Identification and a Way of Overcoming Them.

    PubMed

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A; Varentsova, Svetlana A

    2016-04-08

    Low efficiency of the standard THz TDS method of the detection and identification of substances based on a comparison of the spectrum for the signal under investigation with a standard signal spectrum is demonstrated using the physical experiments conducted under real conditions with a thick paper bag as well as with Si-based semiconductors under laboratory conditions. In fact, standard THz spectroscopy leads to false detection of hazardous substances in neutral samples, which do not contain them. This disadvantage of the THz TDS method can be overcome by using time-dependent THz pulse spectrum analysis. For a quality assessment of the standard substance spectral features presence in the signal under analysis, one may use time-dependent integral correlation criteria.

  18. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kasper; Budvytyte, Rima; Thomas, Rodrigo A.; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette M.; Balabas, Mikhail V.; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars D.; Stærkind, Hans C.; Müller, Jörg H.; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the first detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the temporal shape of the nerve impulse. This work opens new ways towards implementing optical magnetometers as practical devices for medical diagnostics. PMID:27417378

  19. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kasper; Budvytyte, Rima; Thomas, Rodrigo A.; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette M.; Balabas, Mikhail V.; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars D.; Stærkind, Hans C.; Müller, Jörg H.; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the first detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the temporal shape of the nerve impulse. This work opens new ways towards implementing optical magnetometers as practical devices for medical diagnostics.

  20. Characteristics of right-sided colonic neoplasia and colonoscopy barriers limiting their early detection and prognosis: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fischbach, Wolfgang; Elsome, Rory; Amlani, Bharat

    2018-06-05

    Colonoscopy provides less protection from colorectal cancer in the right colon than the left. Areas covered: This review examines patient outcomes and colonoscopy success rates to identify factors that limit the protective effect of colonoscopy in the right colon. The MEDLINE and Embase databases were searched for literature from 2000 onwards, on the long-term outcomes and differences in screening practice between the right and left colon. In total, 12 systematic reviews (including nine meta-analyses) and 44 primary data records were included. Differences in patient outcomes and colonoscopy practice were identified between the right and left colon, suggesting that several factors, many of which disproportionally affect the right colon, impact lesion detection rates. Shorter withdrawal times reduce detection rates, while longer times significantly increase detection; mostly of adenomas in the right colon. Colonoscope attachments often only show a significant improvement in detection rates in the right colon, suggesting detection is more challenging due to visibility of the right colonic mucosa. Higher bowel cleansing grades significantly improve detection rates in the right colon compared to the left. Expert commentary: These findings confirm the need for continued improvement of colonoscopy effectiveness, and obligatory quality assessment, overall and especially in the right colon.

  1. Quantitative analysis of trace levels of surface contamination by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy Part I: statistical uncertainty near the detection limit.

    PubMed

    Hill, Shannon B; Faradzhev, Nadir S; Powell, Cedric J

    2017-12-01

    We discuss the problem of quantifying common sources of statistical uncertainties for analyses of trace levels of surface contamination using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We examine the propagation of error for peak-area measurements using common forms of linear and polynomial background subtraction including the correlation of points used to determine both background and peak areas. This correlation has been neglected in previous analyses, but we show that it contributes significantly to the peak-area uncertainty near the detection limit. We introduce the concept of relative background subtraction variance (RBSV) which quantifies the uncertainty introduced by the method of background determination relative to the uncertainty of the background area itself. The uncertainties of the peak area and atomic concentration and of the detection limit are expressed using the RBSV, which separates the contributions from the acquisition parameters, the background-determination method, and the properties of the measured spectrum. These results are then combined to find acquisition strategies that minimize the total measurement time needed to achieve a desired detection limit or atomic-percentage uncertainty for a particular trace element. Minimization of data-acquisition time is important for samples that are sensitive to x-ray dose and also for laboratories that need to optimize throughput.

  2. Applying ISO 11929:2010 Standard to detection limit calculation in least-squares based multi-nuclide gamma-ray spectrum evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanisch, G.

    2017-05-01

    The concepts of ISO 11929 (2010) are applied to evaluation of radionuclide activities from more complex multi-nuclide gamma-ray spectra. From net peak areas estimated by peak fitting, activities and their standard uncertainties are calculated by weighted linear least-squares method with an additional step, where uncertainties of the design matrix elements are taken into account. A numerical treatment of the standard's uncertainty function, based on ISO 11929 Annex C.5, leads to a procedure for deriving decision threshold and detection limit values. The methods shown allow resolving interferences between radionuclide activities also in case of calculating detection limits where they can improve the latter by including more than one gamma line per radionuclide. The co"mmon single nuclide weighted mean is extended to an interference-corrected (generalized) weighted mean, which, combined with the least-squares method, allows faster detection limit calculations. In addition, a new grouped uncertainty budget was inferred, which for each radionuclide gives uncertainty budgets from seven main variables, such as net count rates, peak efficiencies, gamma emission intensities and others; grouping refers to summation over lists of peaks per radionuclide.

  3. Surface modification of alignment layer by ultraviolet irradiation to dramatically improve the detection limit of liquid-crystal-based immunoassay for the cancer biomarker CA125.

    PubMed

    Su, Hui-Wen; Lee, Mon-Juan; Lee, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)-based biosensing has attracted much attention in recent years. We focus on improving the detection limit of LC-based immunoassay techniques by surface modification of the surfactant alignment layer consisting of dimethyloctadecyl[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ammonium chloride (DMOAP). The cancer biomarker CA125 was detected with an array of anti-CA125 antibodies immobilized on the ultraviolet (UV)-modified DMOAP monolayer. Compared with a pristine counterpart, UV irradiation enhanced the binding affinity of the CA125 antibody and reproducibility of immunodetection in which a detection limit of 0.01 ng∕ml for the cancer biomarker CA125 was achieved. Additionally, the optical texture observed under a crossed polarized microscope was correlated with the analyte concentration. In a proof-of-concept experiment using CA125-spiked human serum as the analyte, specific binding between the CA125 antigen and the anti-CA125 antibody resulted in a distinct and concentration-dependent optical response despite the high background caused by nonspecific binding of other biomolecules in the human serum. Results from this study indicate that UVmodification of the alignment layer, as well as detection with LCs of large birefringence, contributes to the enhanced performance of the label-free LC-based immunodetection, which may be considered a promising alternative to conventional label-based methods.

  4. Absolute Quantification of Norovirus Capsid Protein in Food, Water, and Soil Using Synthetic Peptides with Electrospray and MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Erica M.; Colquhoun, David R.; Schwab, Kellogg J.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus infections are one of the most prominent public health problems of microbial origin in the U.S. and other industrialized countries. Surveillance is necessary to prevent secondary infection, confirm successful cleanup after outbreaks, and track the causative agent. Quantitative mass spectrometry, based on absolute quantitation with stable-isotope labeled peptides, is a promising tool for norovirus monitoring because of its speed, sensitivity, and robustness in the face of environmental inhibitors. In the current study, we present two new methods for the detection of the norovirus genogroup I capsid protein using electrospray and matrixassisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The peptide TLDPIEVPLEDVR was used to quantify norovirus-like particles down to 500 attomoles with electrospray and 100 attomoles with MALDI. With MALDI, we also demonstrate a detection limit of 1 femtomole and a quantitative dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude in the presence of an environmental matrix effect. Due to the rapid processing time and applicability to a wide range of environmental sample types (bacterial lysate, produce, milk, soil, and groundwater), mass spectrometry-based absolute quantitation has a strong potential for use in public health and environmental sciences. PMID:25603302

  5. Absolute far-ultraviolet spectrophotometry of hot subluminous stars from Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holberg, J. B.; Ali, B.; Carone, T. E.; Polidan, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    Observations, obtained with the Voyager ultraviolet spectrometers, are presented of absolute fluxes for two well-known hot subluminous stars: BD + 28 deg 4211, an sdO, and G191 - B2B, a hot DA white dwarf. Complete absolute energy distributions for these two stars, from the Lyman limit at 912 A to 1 micron, are given. For BD + 28 deg 4211, a single power law closely represents the entire observed energy distribution. For G191 - B2B, a pure hydrogen model atmosphere provides an excellent match to the entire absolute energy distribution. Voyager absolute fluxes are discussed in relation to those reported from various sounding rocket experiments, including a recent rocket observation of BD + 28 deg 4211.

  6. Debiased estimates for NEO orbits, absolute magnitudes, and source regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granvik, Mikael; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Jedicke, Robert; Bolin, Bryce T.; Bottke, William; Beshore, Edward C.; Vokrouhlicky, David; Nesvorny, David; Michel, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    The debiased absolute-magnitude and orbit distributions as well as source regions for near-Earth objects (NEOs) provide a fundamental frame of reference for studies on individual NEOs as well as on more complex population-level questions. We present a new four-dimensional model of the NEO population that describes debiased steady-state distributions of semimajor axis (a), eccentricity (e), inclination (i), and absolute magnitude (H). We calibrate the model using NEO detections by the 703 and G96 stations of the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) during 2005-2012 corresponding to objects with 17absolute sense using the biases computed for CSS (Jedicke et al. 2016, Icarus 266, 173). The model makes use of six source regions or escape routes from the main asteroid belt as identified by Granvik et al. (2017, A&A 598, A52) in addition to Jupiter-family comets: Hungaria and Phocaea asteroids, and main-belt asteroids escaping through the ν6, 3:1J, 5:2J and 2:1J resonance complexes. We account for the destruction of asteroids with small perihelion distances (Granvik et al. 2016, Nature 530, 303) by fitting a penalty function in perihelion distance. Our model accurately reproduces the observed distribution of NEOs and the predicted numbers, particularly for the larger NEOs, are in agreement with other contemporary estimates. Our model also provides updated estimates for the likelihood of the various source regions and escape routes as a function of NEO (a,e,i,H) parameters. We present the model and its predictions, and discuss them in the context of other contemporary estimates.

  7. Testing the discrimination and detection limits of WorldView-2 imagery on a challenging invasive plant target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, T. P.; Wardell-Johnson, G. W.; Pracilio, G.; Brown, C.; Corner, R.; van Klinken, R. D.

    2016-02-01

    Invasive plants pose significant threats to biodiversity and ecosystem function globally, leading to costly monitoring and management effort. While remote sensing promises cost-effective, robust and repeatable monitoring tools to support intervention, it has been largely restricted to airborne platforms that have higher spatial and spectral resolutions, but which lack the coverage and versatility of satellite-based platforms. This study tests the ability of the WorldView-2 (WV2) eight-band satellite sensor for detecting the invasive shrub mesquite (Prosopis spp.) in the north-west Pilbara region of Australia. Detectability was challenged by the target taxa being largely defoliated by a leaf-tying biological control agent (Gelechiidae: Evippe sp. #1) and the presence of other shrubs and trees. Variable importance in the projection (VIP) scores identified bands offering greatest capacity for discrimination were those covering the near-infrared, red, and red-edge wavelengths. Wavelengths between 400 nm and 630 nm (coastal blue, blue, green, yellow) were not useful for species level discrimination in this case. Classification accuracy was tested on three band sets (simulated standard multispectral, all bands, and bands with VIP scores ≥1). Overall accuracies were comparable amongst all band-sets (Kappa = 0.71-0.77). However, mesquite omission rates were unacceptably high (21.3%) when using all eight bands relative to the simulated standard multispectral band-set (9.5%) and the band-set informed by VIP scores (11.9%). An incremental cover evaluation on the latter identified most omissions to be for objects <16 m2. Mesquite omissions reduced to 2.6% and overall accuracy significantly improved (Kappa = 0.88) when these objects were left out of the confusion matrix calculations. Very high mapping accuracy of objects >16 m2 allows application for mapping mesquite shrubs and coalesced stands, the former not previously possible, even with 3 m resolution hyperspectral

  8. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  9. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  10. Fractional order absolute vibration suppression (AVS) controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevi, Yoram

    2017-04-01

    Absolute vibration suppression (AVS) is a control method for flexible structures. The first step is an accurate, infinite dimension, transfer function (TF), from actuation to measurement. This leads to the collocated, rate feedback AVS controller that in some cases completely eliminates the vibration. In case of the 1D wave equation, the TF consists of pure time delays and low order rational terms, and the AVS controller is rational. In all other cases, the TF and consequently the controller are fractional order in both the delays and the "rational parts". The paper considers stability, performance and actual implementation in such cases.

  11. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  12. Structural Characterization and Absolute Quantification of Microcystin Peptides Using Collision-Induced and Ultraviolet Photo-Dissociation Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, Troy J.; Carter, Melissa D.; Fang, Mengxuan; Johnson, Rudolph C.; Reid, Gavin E.

    2018-05-01

    Microcystin (MC) peptides produced by cyanobacteria pose a hepatotoxic threat to human health upon ingestion from contaminated drinking water. While rapid MC identification and quantification in contaminated body fluids or tissue samples is important for patient treatment and outcomes, conventional immunoassay-based measurement strategies typically lack the specificity required for unambiguous determination of specific MC variants, whose toxicity can significantly vary depending on their structures. Furthermore, the unambiguous identification and accurate quantitation of MC variants using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS)-based methods can be limited due to a current lack of appropriate stable isotope-labeled internal standards. To address these limitations, we have systematically examined here the sequence and charge state dependence to the formation and absolute abundance of both "global" and "variant-specific" product ions from representative MC-LR, MC-YR, MC-RR, and MC-LA peptides, using higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD)-MS/MS, ion-trap collision-induced dissociation (CID)-MS/MS and CID-MS3, and 193 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UPVD)-MS/MS. HCD-MS/MS was found to provide the greatest detection sensitivity for both global and variant-specific product ions in each of the MC variants, except for MC-YR where a variant-specific product uniquely formed via UPVD-MS/MS was observed with the greatest absolute abundance. A simple methodology for the preparation and characterization of 18O-stable isotope-labeled MC reference materials for use as internal standards was also developed. Finally, we have demonstrated the applicability of the methods developed herein for absolute quantification of MC-LR present in human urine samples, using capillary scale liquid chromatography coupled with ultra-high resolution / accurate mass spectrometry and HCD-MS/MS.

  13. Gap Detection and Temporal Modulation Transfer Function as Behavioral Estimates of Auditory Temporal Acuity Using Band-Limited Stimuli in Young and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Gap detection and the temporal modulation transfer function (TMTF) are 2 common methods to obtain behavioral estimates of auditory temporal acuity. However, the agreement between the 2 measures is not clear. This study compares results from these 2 methods and their dependencies on listener age and hearing status. Method Gap detection thresholds and the parameters that describe the TMTF (sensitivity and cutoff frequency) were estimated for young and older listeners who were naive to the experimental tasks. Stimuli were 800-Hz-wide noises with upper frequency limits of 2400 Hz, presented at 85 dB SPL. A 2-track procedure (Shen & Richards, 2013) was used for the efficient estimation of the TMTF. Results No significant correlation was found between gap detection threshold and the sensitivity or the cutoff frequency of the TMTF. No significant effect of age and hearing loss on either the gap detection threshold or the TMTF cutoff frequency was found, while the TMTF sensitivity improved with increasing hearing threshold and worsened with increasing age. Conclusion Estimates of temporal acuity using gap detection and TMTF paradigms do not seem to provide a consistent description of the effects of listener age and hearing status on temporal envelope processing. PMID:25087722

  14. The limitations on organic detection in Mars-like soils by thermal volatilization–gas chromatography–MS and their implications for the Viking results

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-González, Rafael; Navarro, Karina F.; de la Rosa, José; Iñiguez, Enrique; Molina, Paola; Miranda, Luis D.; Morales, Pedro; Cienfuegos, Edith; Coll, Patrice; Raulin, François; Amils, Ricardo; McKay, Christopher P.

    2006-01-01

    The failure of Viking Lander thermal volatilization (TV) (without or with thermal degradation)–gas chromatography (GC)–MS experiments to detect organics suggests chemical rather than biological interpretations for the reactivity of the martian soil. Here, we report that TV–GC–MS may be blind to low levels of organics on Mars. A comparison between TV–GC–MS and total organics has been conducted for a variety of Mars analog soils. In the Antarctic Dry Valleys and the Atacama and Libyan Deserts we find 10–90 μg of refractory or graphitic carbon per gram of soil, which would have been undetectable by the Viking TV–GC–MS. In iron-containing soils (jarosites from Rio Tinto and Panoche Valley) and the Mars simulant (palogonite), oxidation of the organic material to carbon dioxide (CO2) by iron oxides and/or their salts drastically attenuates the detection of organics. The release of 50–700 ppm of CO2 by TV–GC–MS in the Viking analysis may indicate that an oxidation of organic material took place. Therefore, the martian surface could have several orders of magnitude more organics than the stated Viking detection limit. Because of the simplicity of sample handling, TV–GC–MS is still considered the standard method for organic detection on future Mars missions. We suggest that the design of future organic instruments for Mars should include other methods to be able to detect extinct and/or extant life. PMID:17060639

  15. The limitations on organic detection in Mars-like soils by thermal volatilization-gas chromatography-MS and their implications for the Viking results.

    PubMed

    Navarro-González, Rafael; Navarro, Karina F; de la Rosa, José; Iñiguez, Enrique; Molina, Paola; Miranda, Luis D; Morales, Pedro; Cienfuegos, Edith; Coll, Patrice; Raulin, François; Amils, Ricardo; McKay, Christopher P

    2006-10-31

    The failure of Viking Lander thermal volatilization (TV) (without or with thermal degradation)-gas chromatography (GC)-MS experiments to detect organics suggests chemical rather than biological interpretations for the reactivity of the martian soil. Here, we report that TV-GC-MS may be blind to low levels of organics on Mars. A comparison between TV-GC-MS and total organics has been conducted for a variety of Mars analog soils. In the Antarctic Dry Valleys and the Atacama and Libyan Deserts we find 10-90 mug of refractory or graphitic carbon per gram of soil, which would have been undetectable by the Viking TV-GC-MS. In iron-containing soils (jarosites from Rio Tinto and Panoche Valley) and the Mars simulant (palogonite), oxidation of the organic material to carbon dioxide (CO(2)) by iron oxides and/or their salts drastically attenuates the detection of organics. The release of 50-700 ppm of CO(2) by TV-GC-MS in the Viking analysis may indicate that an oxidation of organic material took place. Therefore, the martian surface could have several orders of magnitude more organics than the stated Viking detection limit. Because of the simplicity of sample handling, TV-GC-MS is still considered the standard method for organic detection on future Mars missions. We suggest that the design of future organic instruments for Mars should include other methods to be able to detect extinct and/or extant life.

  16. Absolute plate motions relative to deep mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shimin; Yu, Hongzheng; Zhang, Qiong; Zhao, Yonghong

    2018-05-01

    Advances in whole waveform seismic tomography have revealed the presence of broad mantle plumes rooted at the base of the Earth's mantle beneath major hotspots. Hotspot tracks associated with these deep mantle plumes provide ideal constraints for inverting absolute plate motions as well as testing the fixed hotspot hypothesis. In this paper, 27 observed hotspot trends associated with 24 deep mantle plumes are used together with the MORVEL model for relative plate motions to determine an absolute plate motion model, in terms of a maximum likelihood optimization for angular data fitting, combined with an outlier data detection procedure based on statistical tests. The obtained T25M model fits 25 observed trends of globally distributed hotspot tracks to the statistically required level, while the other two hotspot trend data (Comores on Somalia and Iceland on Eurasia) are identified as outliers, which are significantly incompatible with other data. For most hotspots with rate data available, T25M predicts plate velocities significantly lower than the observed rates of hotspot volcanic migration, which cannot be fully explained by biased errors in observed rate data. Instead, the apparent hotspot motions derived by subtracting the observed hotspot migration velocities from the T25M plate velocities exhibit a combined pattern of being opposite to plate velocities and moving towards mid-ocean ridges. The newly estimated net rotation of the lithosphere is statistically compatible with three recent estimates, but differs significantly from 30 of 33 prior estimates.

  17. A discussion on the merits and limitations of using drive-by monitoring to detect localised damage in a bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, David; González, Arturo

    2017-06-01

    Given the large number of bridges that currently have no instrumentation, there are obvious advantages in monitoring the condition of a bridge by analysing the response of a vehicle crossing it. As a result, the last two decades have seen a rise in the research attempting to solve the problem of identifying damage in a bridge from vehicle measurements. This paper examines the theoretical feasibility and practical limitations of a drive-by system in identifying damage associated to localised stiffness losses. First, the nature of the damage feature that is sought within the vehicle response needs to be characterized. For this purpose, the total vehicle response is considered to be made of 'static' and 'dynamic' components, and where the bridge has experienced a localised loss in stiffness, an additional 'damage' component. Understanding the nature of this 'damage' component is crucial to have an informed discussion on how damage can be identified and localised. Leveraging this new understanding, the authors propose a wavelet-based drive-by algorithm. By comparing the effect of the 'damage' component to other key effects defining the measurements such as 'vehicle speed', the 'road profile' and 'noise' on a wavelet contour plot, it is possible to establish if there is a frequency range where drive-by can be successful. The algorithm uses then specific frequency bands to improve the sensitivity to damage with respect to limitations imposed by Vehicle-Bridge vibrations. Recommendations on the selection of the mother wavelet and frequency band are provided. Finally, the paper discusses the impact of noise and road profile on the ability of the approach to identify damage and how periodic measurements can be effective at monitoring localised stiffness changes.

  18. Variation in the limit-of-detection of the ProSpecT Campylobacter microplate enzyme immunoassay in stools spiked with emerging Campylobacter species.

    PubMed

    Bojanić, Krunoslav; Midwinter, Anne Camilla; Marshall, Jonathan Craig; Rogers, Lynn Elizabeth; Biggs, Patrick Jon; Acke, Els

    2016-08-01

    Campylobacter enteritis in humans is primarily associated with C. jejuni/coli infection. The impact of other Campylobacter spp. is likely to be underestimated due to the bias of culture methods towards Campylobacter jejuni/coli diagnosis. Stool antigen tests are becoming increasingly popular and appear generally less species-specific. A review of independent studies of the ProSpecT® Campylobacter Microplate enzyme immunoassay (EIA) developed for C. jejuni/coli showed comparable diagnostic results to culture methods but the examination of non-jejuni/coli Campylobacter spp. was limited and the limit-of-detection (LOD), where reported, varied between studies. This study investigated LOD of EIA for Campylobacter upsaliensis, Campylobacter hyointestinalis and Campylobacter helveticus spiked in human stools. Multiple stools and Campylobacter isolates were used in three different concentrations (10(4)-10(9)CFU/ml) to reflect sample heterogeneity. All Campylobacter species evaluated were detectable by EIA. Multivariate analysis showed LOD varied between Campylobacter spp. and faecal consistency as fixed effects and individual faecal samples as random effects. EIA showed excellent performance in replicate testing for both within and between batches of reagents, in agreement between visual and spectrophotometric reading of results, and returned no discordance between the bacterial concentrations within independent dilution test runs (positive results with lower but not higher concentrations). This study shows how limitations in experimental procedures lead to an overestimation of consistency and uniformity of LOD for EIA that may not hold under routine use in diagnostic laboratories. Benefits and limitations for clinical practice and the influence on estimates of performance characteristics from detection of multiple Campylobacter spp. by EIA are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Limitations of Using IL-17A and IFN-γ-Induced Protein 10 to Detect Bovine Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Ting; Gao, Xintao; Yang, Hongjun; Li, Pingjun; Liang, Qianqian; Hou, Shaohua; Sui, Xiukun; Guo, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Weifeng; Zhu, Hongfei; Ding, Jiabo; Jia, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is primarily caused by infection with Mycobacterium bovis, which belongs to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. The airborne route is considered the most common for transmission of M. bovis, and more than 15% of cattle with bTB shed the Mycobacterium, which can be detect by nested PCR to amplify mycobacterial mpb70 from a nasal swab from a cow. To screen for cytokines fostering early and accurate detection of bTB, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from naturally M. bovis-infected, experimentally M. bovis 68002-infected, and uninfected cattle, then these cells were stimulated by PPD-B, CFP-10-ESAT-6 (CE), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) for 6 h. The levels of interferon gamma (IFN-γ), IFN-γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10), IL-6, IL-12, IL-17A, and tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA were measured using real-time PCR. To explore the cytokines associated with different periods of M. bovis infection, cattle were divided into three groups: PCR-positive, PCR-negative, and uninfected using the tuberculin skin test, CFP-10/ESAT-6/TB10.4 protein cocktail-based skin test, IFN-γ release assay (IGRA), CFP-10/ESAT-6 (CE)-based IGRA, and nested PCR. The expression of IP-10, IL-17A, and IFN-γ proteins induced by PPD-B, CE, or PBS was detected by ELISA. The results showed that levels of PPD-B-stimulated IL-17A and IP-10 (mRNA and protein), and CE-induced IP-10 (mRNA and protein) were significantly higher in cattle naturally or experimentally infected with M. bovis than in those that were uninfected. The levels of PPD-B- or CE-induced IL-17A and IP-10 (protein) could be used to differentiate M. bovis-infected calves from uninfected ones for 6 to 30 weeks post-infection, whereas PPD-B- and CE-induced IP-10 and IL-17A mRNA expression could be used to differentiate M. bovis-infected calves from uninfected ones between 6 and 58 weeks post-infection. However, CE-induced IL-17A (protein) was not a reliable indicator of M. bovis infection

  20. Evaluation of a manual DNA extraction protocol and an isothermal amplification assay for detecting HIV-1 DNA from dried blood spots for use in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Jeanne A; Ibe, Christine O; Moore, Miranda S; Host, Christel; Simon, Gary L

    2012-05-01

    In resource-limited settings (RLS) dried blood spots (DBS) are collected on infants and transported through provincial laboratories to a central facility where HIV-1 DNA PCR testing is performed using specialized equipment. Implementing a simpler approach not requiring such equipment or skilled personnel could allow the more numerous provincial laboratories to offer testing, improving turn-around-time to identify and treat infected infants sooner. Assess performances of a manual DNA extraction method and helicase-dependent amplification (HDA) assay for detecting HIV-1 DNA from DBS. 60 HIV-1 infected adults were enrolled, blood samples taken and DBS made. DBS extracts were assessed for DNA concentration and beta globin amplification using PCR and melt-curve analysis. These same extracts were then tested for HIV-1 DNA using HDA and compared to results generated by PCR and pyrosequencing. Finally, HDA limit of detection (LOD) studies were performed using DBS extracts prepared with known numbers of 8E5 cells. The manual extraction protocol consistently yielded high concentrations of amplifiable DNA from DBS. LOD assessment demonstrated HDA detected ∼470 copies/ml of HIV-1 DNA extracts in 4/4 replicates. No statistical difference was found using the McNemar's test when comparing HDA to PCR for detecting HIV-1 DNA from DBS. Using just a magnet, heat block and pipettes, the manual extraction protocol and HDA assay detected HIV-1 DNA from DBS at levels that would be useful for early infant diagnosis. Next steps will include assessing HDA for non-B HIV-1 subtypes recognition and comparison to Roche HIV-1 DNA v1.5 PCR assay. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Why to compare absolute numbers of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the absolute number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to absolute mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Relational versus absolute representation in categorization.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Darren J; Pothos, Emmanuel M; Perlman, Amotz

    2012-01-01

    This study explores relational-like and absolute-like representations in categorization. Although there is much evidence that categorization processes can involve information about both the particular physical properties of studied instances and abstract (relational) properties, there has been little work on the factors that lead to one kind of representation as opposed to the other. We tested 370 participants in 6 experiments, in which participants had to classify new items into predefined artificial categories. In 4 experiments, we observed a predominantly relational-like mode of classification, and in 2 experiments we observed a shift toward an absolute-like mode of classification. These results suggest 3 factors that promote a relational-like mode of classification: fewer items per group, more training groups, and the presence of a time delay. Overall, we propose that less information about the distributional properties of a category or weaker memory traces for the category exemplars (induced, e.g., by having smaller categories or a time delay) can encourage relational-like categorization.

  3. Absolute calibration of a multichannel plate detector for low energy O, O-, and O+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, T. M.; Peko, B. L.

    2000-03-01

    Absolute detection efficiencies of a commercial multichannel plate detector have been measured for O, O+, and O-, impacting at normal incidence for energies ranging from 30-1000 eV. In addition, the detection efficiencies for O relative to its ions are presented, as they may have a more universal application. The absolute detection efficiencies are strongly energy dependent and significant differences are observed for the various charge states at lower energies. The detection efficiencies for the different charge states appear to converge at higher energies. The strongest energy dependence is for O+; the detection efficiency varies by three orders of magnitude across the energy range studied. The weakest dependence is for O-, which varies less than one order of magnitude.

  4. Mixed group validation: a method to address the limitations of criterion group validation in research on malingering detection.

    PubMed

    Frederick, R I

    2000-01-01

    Mixed group validation (MGV) is offered as an alternative to criterion group validation (CGV) to estimate the true positive and false positive rates of tests and other diagnostic signs. CGV requires perfect confidence about each research participant's status with respect to the presence or absence of pathology. MGV determines diagnostic efficiencies based on group data; knowing an individual's status with respect to pathology is not required. MGV can use relatively weak indicators to validate better diagnostic signs, whereas CGV requires perfect diagnostic signs to avoid error in computing true positive and false positive rates. The process of MGV is explained, and a computer simulation demonstrates the soundness of the procedure. MGV of the Rey 15-Item Memory Test (Rey, 1958) for 723 pre-trial criminal defendants resulted in higher estimates of true positive rates and lower estimates of false positive rates as compared with prior research conducted with CGV. The author demonstrates how MGV addresses all the criticisms Rogers (1997b) outlined for differential prevalence designs in malingering detection research. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Forecasting Error Calculation with Mean Absolute Deviation and Mean Absolute Percentage Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khair, Ummul; Fahmi, Hasanul; Hakim, Sarudin Al; Rahim, Robbi

    2017-12-01

    Prediction using a forecasting method is one of the most important things for an organization, the selection of appropriate forecasting methods is also important but the percentage error of a method is more important in order for decision makers to adopt the right culture, the use of the Mean Absolute Deviation and Mean Absolute Percentage Error to calculate the percentage of mistakes in the least square method resulted in a percentage of 9.77% and it was decided that the least square method be worked for time series and trend data.

  6. Absolute Quantification of Selected Proteins in the Human Osteoarthritic Secretome

    PubMed Central

    Peffers, Mandy J.; Beynon, Robert J.; Clegg, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by a loss of extracellular matrix which is driven by catabolic cytokines. Proteomic analysis of the OA cartilage secretome enables the global study of secreted proteins. These are an important class of molecules with roles in numerous pathological mechanisms. Although cartilage studies have identified profiles of secreted proteins, quantitative proteomics techniques have been implemented that would enable further biological questions to be addressed. To overcome this limitation, we used the secretome from human OA cartilage explants stimulated with IL-1β and compared proteins released into the media using a label-free LC-MS/MS-based strategy. We employed QconCAT technology to quantify specific proteins using selected reaction monitoring. A total of 252 proteins were identified, nine were differentially expressed by IL-1 β stimulation. Selected protein candidates were quantified in absolute amounts using QconCAT. These findings confirmed a significant reduction in TIMP-1 in the secretome following IL-1β stimulation. Label-free and QconCAT analysis produced equivocal results indicating no effect of cytokine stimulation on aggrecan, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, fibromodulin, matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3 or plasminogen release. This study enabled comparative protein profiling and absolute quantification of proteins involved in molecular pathways pertinent to understanding the pathogenesis of OA. PMID:24132152

  7. Limitations of Vegetation Indices For Detecting Pasture Degradation: A Case Study of Montane Pastoral Systems in Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddy, I. M. S.; Gergel, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Grazing is the most extensive land use on Earth. Widespread consequences of overgrazing pastures include long-term decreases in plant biomass and limited recovery of vegetation. Remotely-sensed vegetation indices linked to biomass (e.g. NDVI) are routinely used to monitor pasture health over broad areas to track pasture degradation and recovery over time. Unfortunately, overgrazing can impact vegetation in various other ways not easily evaluated using satellite imagery, such as by altering species composition. Furthermore, the response of vegetation to grazing may be influenced by underlying terrain and topographic gradients. We examined multi-decadal trends in pasture condition in Kyrgyzstan, a country where pasture degradation is of serious concern. Using a chronosequence of Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery, we compared fifteen-year trends in NDVI with contemporary field-based measurements of pasture health in thirty 1-km 2 sites. Multivariate regression was used to discern the relationship between long-term NDVI trends and pasture health in pastures of differing terrain (areas of varying topographic wetness index and solar insolation). Preliminary results suggest that pasture degradation can be correlated with either positive or negative changes in NDVI depending upon the topographic position of the pasture. Furthermore, terrain characteristics explained a considerable portion of the observed variance in NDVI trends across the region. Improving our understanding of grazing impacts in montane systems is critical given their vulnerability to impending climate change.

  8. Detecting gravitational decoherence with clocks: Limits on temporal resolution from a classical-channel model of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Kiran E.; Altamirano, Natacha

    2017-05-01

    The notion of time is given a different footing in quantum mechanics and general relativity, treated as a parameter in the former and being an observer-dependent property in the latter. From an operational point of view time is simply the correlation between a system and a clock, where an idealized clock can be modeled as a two-level system. We investigate the dynamics of clocks interacting gravitationally by treating the gravitational interaction as a classical information channel. This model, known as the classical-channel gravity (CCG), postulates that gravity is mediated by a fundamentally classical force carrier and is therefore unable to entangle particles gravitationally. In particular, we focus on the decoherence rates and temporal resolution of arrays of N clocks, showing how the minimum dephasing rate scales with N , and the spatial configuration. Furthermore, we consider the gravitational redshift between a clock and a massive particle and show that a classical-channel model of gravity predicts a finite-dephasing rate from the nonlocal interaction. In our model we obtain a fundamental limitation in time accuracy that is intrinsic to each clock.

  9. Study of boron detection limit using the in-air PIGE set-up at LAMFI-USP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, M. V.; Silva, T. F.; Trindade, G. F.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.

    2014-11-01

    The quantification of small amounts of boron in materials is of extreme importance in different areas of materials science. Boron is an important contaminant and also a silicon dopant in the semiconductor industry. Boron is also extensively used in nuclear power plants, either for neutron shielding or for safety control and boron is an essential nutrient for life, either vegetable or animal. The production of silicon solar cells, by refining metallurgical-grade silicon (MG-Si) requires the control and reduction of several silicon contaminants to very low concentration levels. Boron is one of the contaminants of solar-grade silicon (SG-Si) that must be controlled and quantified at sub-ppm levels. In the metallurgical purification, boron quantification is usually made by Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, (ICP-MS) but the results need to be verified by an independent analytical method. In this work we present the results of the analysis of silicon samples by Particle Induced Gamma-Ray Emission (PIGE) aiming the quantification of low concentrations of boron. PIGE analysis was carried out using the in-air external beam line of the Laboratory for Materials Analysis with Ion Beans (LAMFI-USP) by the 10B ( p ,αγ(7Be nuclear reaction, and measuring the 429 keV γ-ray. The in-air PIGE measurements at LAMFI have a quantification limit of the order of 1016 at/cm2.

  10. Limiting and detecting bacterial contamination of apheresis platelets: inlet-line diversion and increased culture volume improve component safety.

    PubMed

    Eder, Anne F; Kennedy, Jean M; Dy, Beth A; Notari, Edward P; Skeate, Robert; Bachowski, Gary; Mair, David C; Webb, Jonathan S; Wagner, Stephen J; Dodd, Roger Y; Benjamin, Richard J

    2009-08-01

    Septic transfusion reactions to apheresis platelets (PLTs) continue to occur despite preventive measures. This study evaluated the effect of two operational changes designed to reduce bacterial risk: 1) introducing inlet-line sample diversion on two-arm procedures and 2) increasing the sample volume cultured from 4 to 8 mL from all donations. Aerobic culture results and septic transfusion reactions reported between December 1, 2006, and July 31, 2008 (Period 2), were compared to March 1, 2004, to May 31, 2006 (Period 1). During Period 2, a total of 781,936 apheresis PLT collections were cultured, of which 130 donations (1:6015) were confirmed positive and 9 (1:86,882) had negative culture results but were associated with 11 septic reactions. Confirmed-positive cultures from two-arm procedures decreased (27.2 to 14.7 per 105 collections; odds ratio [OR], 0.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41-0.70) in Period 2, owing to a lower rate of skin flora contamination. Detection of contamination of one-arm collections significantly increased by 54% in Period 2 (13.7 vs. 21.1 per 105 collections; OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.05-2.27). Fewer septic transfusion reactions occurred in Period 2, but the difference did not reach significance (1.7 vs. 1.2 per 105 donations; OR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.30-1.53). Inlet-line diversion decreased bacterial contamination during two-arm collections by more than 46%. Concurrently, doubling the sample volume was associated with a 54% relative increase in culture sensitivity. These interventions act cooperatively to decrease bacterial risk.

  11. Contributions and limitations of scientific examination and analysis in the detection of forgeries of old masters' paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Chanu, Patrick

    1998-05-01

    There is a law in my country, France, which is supposed to deal with forgeries in several fields including the arts. It is called the 'Erreur sur la substance' Error on substance. It means that after an object was sold, if the former owner or buyer can prove that he or she was not aware of the substance of the object, meaning in this particular case its authenticity or lack of authenticity, the sale can be cancelled. We should keep in mind this theme of what makes up the substance of a work of art when we study forgeries. The making of forgeries is probably as old, if not as art itself, at least as old as the art market. Making forgeries is a response to the demand of the market, in close connection with art historical activity. The critics and the art historians inside and outside museums contribute to the fame of artists, which stimulates the art market, the rise inspires the demand for more works, thus the making of copies and of forgeries. Before presenting a few studies made in our laboratory, I would like to make a short survey of the examination and analysis methods we use that particularly help us in the detection of forgeries of old masters paintings. The Research Laboratory of French Museums (LRMF) generally makes a distinction between two main categories of working methods: The first one, Examination, concerns mostly photographic and imaging techniques. The second one, Analysis, is a structural study for which the goal is the identification of the constitutive materials of a work of art and how they were used.

  12. Method and apparatus for making absolute range measurements

    DOEpatents

    Earl, Dennis D [Knoxville, TN; Allison, Stephen W [Knoxville, TN; Cates, Michael R [Oak Ridge, TN; Sanders, Alvin J [Knoxville, TN

    2002-09-24

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for making absolute distance or ranging measurements using Fresnel diffraction. The invention employs a source of electromagnetic radiation having a known wavelength or wavelength distribution, which sends a beam of electromagnetic radiation through a screen at least partially opaque at the wavelength. The screen has an aperture sized so as to produce a Fresnel diffraction pattern. A portion of the beam travels through the aperture to a detector spaced some distance from the screen. The detector detects the central intensity of the beam as well as a set of intensities displaced from a center of the aperture. The distance from the source to the target can then be calculated based upon the known wavelength, aperture radius, and beam intensity.

  13. A Conceptual Approach to Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. When absolute value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…

  14. Using, Seeing, Feeling, and Doing Absolute Value for Deeper Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponce, Gregorio A.

    2008-01-01

    Using sticky notes and number lines, a hands-on activity is shared that anchors initial student thinking about absolute value. The initial point of reference should help students successfully evaluate numeric problems involving absolute value. They should also be able to solve absolute value equations and inequalities that are typically found in…

  15. 20 CFR 404.1205 - Absolute coverage groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Absolute coverage groups. 404.1205 Section... INSURANCE (1950- ) Coverage of Employees of State and Local Governments What Groups of Employees May Be Covered § 404.1205 Absolute coverage groups. (a) General. An absolute coverage group is a permanent...

  16. 20 CFR 404.1205 - Absolute coverage groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Absolute coverage groups. 404.1205 Section... INSURANCE (1950- ) Coverage of Employees of State and Local Governments What Groups of Employees May Be Covered § 404.1205 Absolute coverage groups. (a) General. An absolute coverage group is a permanent...

  17. 20 CFR 404.1205 - Absolute coverage groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Absolute coverage groups. 404.1205 Section... INSURANCE (1950- ) Coverage of Employees of State and Local Governments What Groups of Employees May Be Covered § 404.1205 Absolute coverage groups. (a) General. An absolute coverage group is a permanent...

  18. Empirical evaluation demonstrated importance of validating biomarkers for early detection of cancer in screening settings to limit the number of false-positive findings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongda; Knebel, Phillip; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-07-01

    Search for biomarkers for early detection of cancer is a very active area of research, but most studies are done in clinical rather than screening settings. We aimed to empirically evaluate the role of study setting for early detection marker identification and validation. A panel of 92 candidate cancer protein markers was measured in 35 clinically identified colorectal cancer patients and 35 colorectal cancer patients identified at screening colonoscopy. For each case group, we selected 38 controls without colorectal neoplasms at screening colonoscopy. Single-, two- and three-marker combinations discriminating cases and controls were identified in each setting and subsequently validated in the alternative setting. In all scenarios, a higher number of predictive biomarkers were initially detected in the clinical setting, but a substantially lower proportion of identified biomarkers could subsequently be confirmed in the screening setting. Confirmation rates were 50.0%, 84.5%, and 74.2% for one-, two-, and three-marker algorithms identified in the screening setting and were 42.9%, 18.6%, and 25.7% for algorithms identified in the clinical setting. Validation of early detection markers of cancer in a true screening setting is important to limit the number of false-positive findings. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Difference between beta1-adrenoceptor autoantibodies of human and animal origin-Limitations detecting beta1-adrenoceptor autoantibodies using peptide based ELISA technology.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Katrin; Schulze-Rothe, Sarah; Müller, Johannes; Wallukat, Gerd; Haberland, Annekathrin

    2018-01-01

    Cell-based analytics for the detection of the beta1-adrenoceptor autoantibody (beta1-AAB) are functional, yet difficult to handle, and should be replaced by easily applicable, routine lab methods. Endeavors to develop solid-phase-based assays such as ELISA to exploit epitope moieties for trapping autoantibodies are ongoing. These solid-phase-based assays, however, are often unreliable when used with human patient material, in contrast to animal derived autoantibodies. We therefore tested an immunogen peptide-based ELISA for the detection of beta1-AAB, and compared commercially available goat antibodies against the 2nd extracellular loop of human beta1-adrenoceptor (ADRB1-AB) to autoantibodies enriched from patient material. The functionality of these autoantibodies was tested in a cell based assay for comparison and their structural appearance was investigated using 2D gel electrophoresis. The ELISA showed a limit of detection for ADRB1-AB of about 1.5 nmol antibody/L when spiked in human control serum and only about 25 nmol/L when spiked in species identical (goat) matrix material. When applied to samples of human origin, the ELISA failed to identify the specific beta1-AABs. A low concentration of beta1-AAB, together with structural inconsistency of the patient originated samples as seen from the 2D Gel appearance, might contribute to the failure of the peptide based ELISA technology to detect human beta1-AABs.

  20. First Limit on the Direct Detection of Lightly Ionizing Particles for Electric Charge as Low as e / 1000 with the Majorana Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Alvis, S. I.; Arnquist, I. J.; Avignone, F. T.

    The Majorana Demonstrator is an ultralow-background experiment searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge. The heavily shielded array of germanium detectors, placed nearly a mile underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, also allows searches for new exotic physics. Free, relativistic, lightly ionizing particles with an electrical charge less than e are forbidden by the standard model but predicted by some of its extensions. If such particles exist, they might be detected in the Majorana Demonstrator by searching for multiple-detector events with individual-detector energy depositions down to 1 keV. This search is background-free, and no candidatemore » events have been found in 285 days of data taking. As a result, new direct-detection limits are set for the flux of lightly ionizing particles for charges as low as e/1000.« less

  1. First Limit on the Direct Detection of Lightly Ionizing Particles for Electric Charge as Low as e /1000 with the Majorana Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvis, S. I.; Arnquist, I. J.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Barton, C. J.; Bertrand, F. E.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Buuck, M.; Caldwell, T. S.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Chu, P.-H.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Dunagan, C.; Efremenko, Yu.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I. S.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Haufe, C. R.; Hehn, L.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howe, M. A.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; Lopez, A. M.; Martin, R. D.; Massarczyk, R.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Myslik, J.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Othman, G.; Pettus, W.; Poon, A. W. P.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Reine, A. L.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ruof, N. W.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhu, B. X.; Majorana Collaboration

    2018-05-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator is an ultralow-background experiment searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge. The heavily shielded array of germanium detectors, placed nearly a mile underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, also allows searches for new exotic physics. Free, relativistic, lightly ionizing particles with an electrical charge less than e are forbidden by the standard model but predicted by some of its extensions. If such particles exist, they might be detected in the Majorana Demonstrator by searching for multiple-detector events with individual-detector energy depositions down to 1 keV. This search is background-free, and no candidate events have been found in 285 days of data taking. New direct-detection limits are set for the flux of lightly ionizing particles for charges as low as e /1000 .

  2. First Limit on the Direct Detection of Lightly Ionizing Particles for Electric Charge as Low as e / 1000 with the Majorana Demonstrator

    DOE PAGES

    Alvis, S. I.; Arnquist, I. J.; Avignone, F. T.; ...

    2018-05-25

    The Majorana Demonstrator is an ultralow-background experiment searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge. The heavily shielded array of germanium detectors, placed nearly a mile underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, also allows searches for new exotic physics. Free, relativistic, lightly ionizing particles with an electrical charge less than e are forbidden by the standard model but predicted by some of its extensions. If such particles exist, they might be detected in the Majorana Demonstrator by searching for multiple-detector events with individual-detector energy depositions down to 1 keV. This search is background-free, and no candidatemore » events have been found in 285 days of data taking. As a result, new direct-detection limits are set for the flux of lightly ionizing particles for charges as low as e/1000.« less

  3. Limits of diagnostic accuracy of anti-hepatitis C virus antibodies detection by ELISA and immunoblot assay.

    PubMed

    Suslov, Anatoly P; Kuzin, Stanislav N; Golosova, Tatiana V; Shalunova, Nina V; Malyshev, Nikolai A; Sadikova, Natalia V; Vavilova, Lubov M; Somova, Anna V; Musina, Elena E; Ivanova, Maria V; Kipor, Tatiana T; Timonin, Igor M; Kuzina, Lubov E; Godkov, Mihail A; Bajenov, Alexei I; Nesterenko, Vladimir G

    2002-07-01

    When human sera samples are tested for anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies using different ELISA kits as well as immunoblot assay kits discrepant results often occur. As a result the diagnostics of HCV infection in such sera remains unclear. The purpose of this investigation is to define the limits of HCV serodiagnostics. Overall 7 different test kits of domestic and foreign manufacturers were used for the sampled sera testing. Preliminary comparative study, using seroconversion panels PHV905, PHV907, PHV908 was performed and reference kit was chosen (Murex anti-HCV version 4) as the most sensitive kit on the base of this study results. Overall 1640 sera samples have been screened using different anti-HCV ELISA kits and 667 of them gave discrepant results in at least two kits. These sera were then tested using three anti-HCV ELISA kits (first set of 377 samples) or four anti-HCV ELISA kits (second set of 290 samples) at the conditions of reference laboratory. In the first set 17.2% samples remained discrepant and in the second set - 13.4%. "Discrepant" sera were further tested in RIBA 3.0 and INNO-LIA immunoblot confirmatory assays, but approximately 5-7% of them remained undetermined after all the tests. For the samples with signal-to-cutoff ratio higher than 3.0 high rate of result consistency by reference, ELISA routing and INNO-LIA immunoblot assay was observed. On the other hand the results of tests 27 "problematic" sera in RIBA 3.0 and INNO-LIA were consistent only in 55.5% cases. Analysis of the antigen spectrum reactive with antibodies in "problematic" sera, demonstrated predominance of Core, NS3 and NS4 antigens for sera, positive in RIBA 3.0 and Core and NS3 antigens for sera, positive in INNO-LIA. To overcome the problem of undetermined sera, methods based on other principles, as well as alternative criteria of HCV infection diagnostics are discussed.

  4. Use of Absolute and Comparative Performance Feedback in Absolute and Comparative Judgments and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Don A.; Klein, William M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Which matters more--beliefs about absolute ability or ability relative to others? This study set out to compare the effects of such beliefs on satisfaction with performance, self-evaluations, and bets on future performance. In Experiment 1, undergraduate participants were told they had answered 20% correct, 80% correct, or were not given their…

  5. Hallmarks in prostate cancer imaging with Ga68-PSMA-11-PET/CT with reference to detection limits and quantitative properties.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Crespo, Alejandro; Jussing, Emma; Björklund, Ann-Charlotte; Pokrovskaja Tamm, Katja

    2018-04-04

    Gallium-68-labeled prostate-specific antigen positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging (Ga68-PSMA-11-PET/CT) has emerged as a potential gold standard for prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis. However, the imaging limitations of this technique at the early state of PCa recurrence/metastatic spread are still not well characterized. The aim of this study was to determine the quantitative properties and the fundamental imaging limits of Ga68-PSMA-11-PET/CT in localizing small PCa cell deposits. The human PCa LNCaP cells (PSMA expressing) were grown and collected as single cell suspension or as 3D-spheroids at different cell numbers and incubated with Ga68-PSMA-11. Thereafter, human HCT116 cells (PSMA negative) were added to a total cell number of 2 × 10 5 cells per tube. The tubes were then pelleted and the supernatant aspirated. A whole-body PET/CT scanner with a clinical routine protocol was used for imaging the pellets inside of a cylindrical water phantom with increasing amounts of background activity. The actual activity bound to the cells was also measured in an automatic gamma counter. Imaging detection limits and activity recovery coefficients as a function of LNCaP cell number were obtained. The effect of Ga68-PSMA-11 mass concentration on cell binding was also investigated in samples of LnCaP cells incubated with increasing concentrations of radioligand. A total of 1 × 10 4 LNCaP cells mixed in a pellet of 2 × 10 5 cells were required to reach a 50% detection probability with Ga68-PSMA-11-PET/CT without background. With a background level of 1 kBq/ml, between 4 × 10 5 and 1 × 10 6 cells are required. The radioligand equilibrium dissociation constant was 27.05 nM, indicating high binding affinity. Hence, the specific activity of the radioligand has a profound effect on image quantification. Ga68-PSMA-11-PET detects a small number of LNCaP cells even when they are mixed in a population of non-PSMA expressing cells and in the

  6. Absolute calibration of ultraviolet filter photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, R. C.; Fairchild, T.; Code, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The essential features of the calibration procedure can be divided into three parts. First, the shape of the bandpass of each photometer was determined by measuring the transmissions of the individual optical components and also by measuring the response of the photometer as a whole. Secondly, each photometer was placed in the essentially-collimated synchrotron radiation bundle maintained at a constant intensity level, and the output signal was determined from about 100 points on the objective. Finally, two or three points on the objective were illuminated by synchrotron radiation at several different intensity levels covering the dynamic range of the photometers. The output signals were placed on an absolute basis by the electron counting technique described earlier.

  7. Absolute negative mobility in the anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruyin; Chen, Chongyang; Nie, Linru

    2017-12-01

    Transport of an inertial Brownian particle driven by the multiplicative Lévy noise was investigated here. Numerical results indicate that: (i) The Lévy noise is able to induce absolute negative mobility (ANM) in the system, while disappearing in the deterministic case; (ii) the ANM can occur in the region of superdiffusion while disappearing in the region of normal diffusion, and the appropriate stable index of the Lévy noise makes the particle move along the opposite direction of the bias force to the maximum degree; (iii) symmetry breaking of the Lévy noise also causes the ANM effect. In addition, the intrinsic physical mechanism and conditions for the ANM to occur are discussed in detail. Our results have the implication that the Lévy noise plays an important role in the occurrence of the ANM phenomenon.

  8. Absolute partial photoionization cross sections of ethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, F. A.; Whitley, T. A.; Keller, P. R.; Taylor, J. W.

    1991-07-01

    Absolute partial photoionization cross sections for ionization out of the first four valence orbitals to the X 2B 3u, A 2B 3g, B 2A g and C 2B 2u states of the C 2H 4+ ion are presented as a function of photon energy over the energy range from 12 to 26 eV. The experimental results have been compared to previously published relative partial cross sections for the first two bands at 18, 21 and 24 eV. Comparison of the experimental data with continuum multiple scattering Xα calculations provides evidence for extensive autoionization to the X 2B 3u state and confirms the predicted shape resonances in ionization to the A 2B 3g and B 2A g states. Identification of possible transitions for the autoionizing resonances have been made using multiple scattering transition state calculations on Rydberg excited states.

  9. Detecting position using ARKit II: generating position-time graphs in real-time and further information on limitations of ARKit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilek, Ufuk; Erol, Mustafa

    2018-05-01

    ARKit is a framework which allows developers to create augmented reality apps for the iPhone and iPad. In a previous study, we had shown that it could be used to detect position in educational physics experiments and emphasized that the ability to provide position data in real-time was one of the prominent features of this newly emerging technology. In this study, we demonstrate an example of how real-time data acquisition can be employed in educational settings, report some of the limitations of ARKit and how we have overcome these limitations. By means of ARKit or a similar framework, ordinary mobile devices can be adapted for use in microcomputer-based lab activities.

  10. Lower limits of spin detection efficiency for two-parameter two-qubit (TPTQ) states with non-ideal ferromagnetic detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majd, Nayereh; Ghasemi, Zahra

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated a TPTQ state as an input state of a non-ideal ferromagnetic detectors. Minimal spin polarization required to demonstrate spin entanglement according to entanglement witness and CHSH inequality with respect to (w.r.t.) their two free parameters have been found, and we have numerically shown that the entanglement witness is less stringent than the direct tests of Bell's inequality in the form of CHSH in the entangled limits of its free parameters. In addition, the lower limits of spin detection efficiency fulfilling secure cryptographic key against eavesdropping have been derived. Finally, we have considered TPTQ state as an output of spin decoherence channel and the region of ballistic transmission time w.r.t. spin relaxation time and spin dephasing time has been found.

  11. Measured and modelled absolute gravity in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, E.; Forsberg, R.; Strykowski, G.

    2012-12-01

    Present day changes in the ice volume in glaciated areas like Greenland will change the load on the Earth and to this change the lithosphere will respond elastically. The Earth also responds to changes in the ice volume over a millennial time scale. This response is due to the viscous properties of the mantle and is known as Glaical Isostatic Adjustment (GIA). Both signals are present in GPS and absolute gravity (AG) measurements and they will give an uncertainty in mass balance estimates calculated from these data types. It is possible to separate the two signals if both gravity and Global Positioning System (GPS) time series are available. DTU Space acquired an A10 absolute gravimeter in 2008. One purpose of this instrument is to establish AG time series in Greenland and the first measurements were conducted in 2009. Since then are 18 different Greenland GPS Network (GNET) stations visited and six of these are visited more then once. The gravity signal consists of three signals; the elastic signal, the viscous signal and the direct attraction from the ice masses. All of these signals can be modelled using various techniques. The viscous signal is modelled by solving the Sea Level Equation with an appropriate ice history and Earth model. The free code SELEN is used for this. The elastic signal is modelled as a convolution of the elastic Greens function for gravity and a model of present day ice mass changes. The direct attraction is the same as the Newtonian attraction and is calculated as this. Here we will present the preliminary results of the AG measurements in Greenland. We will also present modelled estimates of the direct attraction, the elastic and the viscous signals.

  12. Absolute Bioavailability of Osimertinib in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Vishwanathan, Karthick; So, Karen; Thomas, Karen; Bramley, Alex; English, Stephen; Collier, Jo

    2018-04-23

    Osimertinib is a third-generation, central nervous system-active, epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) selective for EGFR-TKI sensitizing and T790M resistance mutations. This phase 1, open-label study (NCT02491944) investigated absolute bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) of oral and intravenous (IV) osimertinib. Ten healthy subjects (21-61 years) received a single oral 80-mg dose concomitantly with a 100 μg (containing 1 μCi) IV microtracer dose of [ 14 C]osimertinib. Oral and IV PK were determined simultaneously for osimertinib and its active metabolites, AZ5104 and AZ7550. High-performance liquid chromatography and accelerator mass spectrometry were used to characterize IV dose PK. Geometric mean absolute oral bioavailability of osimertinib was 69.8% (90% confidence interval, 66.7, 72.9). Oral osimertinib was slowly absorbed (median time to maximum plasma concentration [t max ] 7.0 hours). Following t max , plasma concentrations fell in an apparent monophasic manner. IV clearance and volume of distribution were 16.8 L/h and 1285 L, respectively. Arithmetic mean elimination half-life estimates were 59.7, 52.6, and 72.6 hours for osimertinib, AZ5104, and AZ7550, respectively (oral dosing), and 54.9, 68.4, and 99.7 hours for [ 14 C]osimertinib, [ 14 C]AZ5104, and [ 14 C]AZ7550, respectively (IV dosing). Oral osimertinib was well absorbed. Simultaneous IV and oral PK analysis proved useful for complete understanding of osimertinib PK and showed that the first-pass effect was minimal for osimertinib. © 2018, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  13. Sub-nanometer periodic nonlinearity error in absolute distance interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongxing; Huang, Kaiqi; Hu, Pengcheng; Zhu, Pengfei; Tan, Jiubin; Fan, Zhigang

    2015-05-01

    Periodic nonlinearity which can result in error in nanometer scale has become a main problem limiting the absolute distance measurement accuracy. In order to eliminate this error, a new integrated interferometer with non-polarizing beam splitter is developed. This leads to disappearing of the frequency and/or polarization mixing. Furthermore, a strict requirement on the laser source polarization is highly reduced. By combining retro-reflector and angel prism, reference and measuring beams can be spatially separated, and therefore, their optical paths are not overlapped. So, the main cause of the periodic nonlinearity error, i.e., the frequency and/or polarization mixing and leakage of beam, is eliminated. Experimental results indicate that the periodic phase error is kept within 0.0018°.

  14. Absolute Radiation Measurements in Earth and Mars Entry Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the measurement of radiative heating for shock heated flows which simulate conditions for Mars and Earth entries. Radiation measurements are made in NASA Ames' Electric Arc Shock Tube at velocities from 3-15 km/s in mixtures of N2/O2 and CO2/N2/Ar. The technique and limitations of the measurement are summarized in some detail. The absolute measurements will be discussed in regards to spectral features, radiative magnitude and spatiotemporal trends. Via analysis of spectra it is possible to extract properties such as electron density, and rotational, vibrational and electronic temperatures. Relaxation behind the shock is analyzed to determine how these properties relax to equilibrium and are used to validate and refine kinetic models. It is found that, for some conditions, some of these values diverge from non-equilibrium indicating a lack of similarity between the shock tube and free flight conditions. Possible reasons for this are discussed.

  15. Absolute stellar photometry on moderate-resolution FPA images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    An extensive database of star (and Moon) images has been collected by the ground-based RObotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) as part of the US Geological Survey program for lunar calibration. The stellar data are used to derive nightly atmospheric corrections for the observations from extinction measurements, and absolute calibration of the ROLO sensors is based on observations of Vega and published reference flux and spectrum data. The ROLO telescopes were designed for imaging the Moon at moderate resolution, thus imposing some limitations for the stellar photometry. Attaining accurate stellar photometry with the ROLO image data has required development of specialized processing techniques. A key consideration is consistency in discriminating the star core signal from the off-axis point spread function. The analysis and processing methods applied to the ROLO stellar image database are described. ?? 2009 BIPM and IOP Publishing Ltd.

  16. Variance computations for functional of absolute risk estimates.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, R M; Petracci, E

    2011-07-01

    We present a simple influence function based approach to compute the variances of estimates of absolute risk and functions of absolute risk. We apply this approach to criteria that assess the impact of changes in the risk factor distribution on absolute risk for an individual and at the population level. As an illustration we use an absolute risk prediction model for breast cancer that includes modifiable risk factors in addition to standard breast cancer risk factors. Influence function based variance estimates for absolute risk and the criteria are compared to bootstrap variance estimates.

  17. Variance computations for functional of absolute risk estimates

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, R.M.; Petracci, E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple influence function based approach to compute the variances of estimates of absolute risk and functions of absolute risk. We apply this approach to criteria that assess the impact of changes in the risk factor distribution on absolute risk for an individual and at the population level. As an illustration we use an absolute risk prediction model for breast cancer that includes modifiable risk factors in addition to standard breast cancer risk factors. Influence function based variance estimates for absolute risk and the criteria are compared to bootstrap variance estimates. PMID:21643476

  18. Detection limits and cost comparisons of human- and gull-associated conventional and quantitative PCR assays in artificial and environmental waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riedel, Timothy E.; Zimmer-Faust, Amity G.; Thulsiraj, Vanessa; Madi, Tania; Hanley, Kaitlyn T.; Ebentier, Darcy L.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Layton, Blythe; Raith, Meredith; Boehm, Alexandria B.; Griffith, John F.; Holden, Patricia A.; Shanks, Orin C.; Weisberg, Stephen B.; Jay, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Some molecular methods for tracking fecal pollution in environmental waters have both PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays available for use. To assist managers in deciding whether to implement newer qPCR techniques in routine monitoring programs, we compared detection limits (LODs) and costs of PCR and qPCR assays with identical targets that are relevant to beach water quality assessment. For human-associated assays targeting Bacteroidales HF183 genetic marker, qPCR LODs were 70 times lower and there was no effect of target matrix (artificial freshwater, environmental creek water, and environmental marine water) on PCR or qPCR LODs. The PCR startup and annual costs were the lowest, while the per reaction cost was 62% lower than the Taqman based qPCR and 180% higher than the SYBR based qPCR. For gull-associated assays, there was no significant difference between PCR and qPCR LODs, target matrix did not effect PCR or qPCR LODs, and PCR startup, annual, and per reaction costs were lower. Upgrading to qPCR involves greater startup and annual costs, but this increase may be justified in the case of the human-associated assays with lower detection limits and reduced cost per sample.

  19. Conducting electrospun fibres with polyanionic grafts as highly selective, label-free, electrochemical biosensor with a low detection limit for non-Hodgkin lymphoma gene.

    PubMed

    Kerr-Phillips, Thomas E; Aydemir, Nihan; Chan, Eddie Wai Chi; Barker, David; Malmström, Jenny; Plesse, Cedric; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka

    2018-02-15

    A highly selective, label-free sensor for the non-Hodgkin lymphoma gene, with an aM detection limit, utilizing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is presented. The sensor consists of a conducting electrospun fibre mat, surface-grafted with poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) brushes and a conducting polymer sensing element with covalently attached oligonucleotide probes. The sensor was fabricated from electrospun NBR rubber, embedded with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), followed by grafting poly(acrylic acid) brushes and then electrochemically polymerizing a conducting polymer monomer with ssDNA probe sequence pre-attached. The resulting non-Hodgkin lymphoma gene sensor showed a detection limit of 1aM (1 × 10 -18 mol/L), more than 400 folds lower compared to a thin-film analogue. The sensor presented extraordinary selectivity, with only 1%, 2.7% and 4.6% of the signal recorded for the fully non-complimentary, T-A and G-C base mismatch oligonucleotide sequences, respectively. We suggest that such greatly enhanced selectivity is due to the presence of negatively charged carboxylic acid moieties from PAA grafts that electrostatically repel the non-complementary and mismatch DNA sequences, overcoming the non-specific binding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Detection limits and cost comparisons of human- and gull-associated conventional and quantitative PCR assays in artificial and environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Timothy E; Zimmer-Faust, Amity G; Thulsiraj, Vanessa; Madi, Tania; Hanley, Kaitlyn T; Ebentier, Darcy L; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Layton, Blythe; Raith, Meredith; Boehm, Alexandria B; Griffith, John F; Holden, Patricia A; Shanks, Orin C; Weisberg, Stephen B; Jay, Jennifer A

    2014-04-01

    Some molecular methods for tracking fecal pollution in environmental waters have both PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays available for use. To assist managers in deciding whether to implement newer qPCR techniques in routine monitoring programs, we compared detection limits (LODs) and costs of PCR and qPCR assays with identical targets that are relevant to beach water quality assessment. For human-associated assays targeting Bacteroidales HF183 genetic marker, qPCR LODs were 70 times lower and there was no effect of target matrix (artificial freshwater, environmental creek water, and environmental marine water) on PCR or qPCR LODs. The PCR startup and annual costs were the lowest, while the per reaction cost was 62% lower than the Taqman based qPCR and 180% higher than the SYBR based qPCR. For gull-associated assays, there was no significant difference between PCR and qPCR LODs, target matrix did not effect PCR or qPCR LODs, and PCR startup, annual, and per reaction costs were lower. Upgrading to qPCR involves greater startup and annual costs, but this increase may be justified in the case of the human-associated assays with lower detection limits and reduced cost per sample. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relative and Absolute Error Control in a Finite-Difference Method Solution of Poisson's Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, J. S. C.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm for error control (absolute and relative) in the five-point finite-difference method applied to Poisson's equation is described. The algorithm is based on discretization of the domain of the problem by means of three rectilinear grids, each of different resolution. We discuss some hardware limitations associated with the algorithm,…

  2. Long range surface plasmon resonance with ultra-high penetration depth for self-referenced sensing and ultra-low detection limit using diverging beam approach

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, Sivan, E-mail: sivan.isaacs@gmail.com; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim; NEW CREATE Programme, School of Materials Science and Engineering, 1 CREATE Way, Research Wing, #02-06/08, Singapore 138602

    2015-05-11

    Using an insulator-metal-insulator structure with dielectric having refractive index (RI) larger than the analyte, long range surface plasmon (SP) resonance exhibiting ultra-high penetration depth is demonstrated for sensing applications of large bioentities at wavelengths in the visible range. Based on the diverging beam approach in Kretschmann-Raether configuration, one of the SP resonances is shown to shift in response to changes in the analyte RI while the other is fixed; thus, it can be used as a built in reference. The combination of the high sensitivity, high penetration depth and self-reference using the diverging beam approach in which a dark linemore » is detected of the high sensitivity, high penetration depth, self-reference, and the diverging beam approach in which a dark line is detected using large number of camera pixels with a smart algorithm for sub-pixel resolution, a sensor with ultra-low detection limit is demonstrated suitable for large bioentities.« less

  3. A socio-psychological investigation into limitations and incentives concerning reporting a clinically suspect situation aimed at improving early detection of classical swine fever outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Elbers, A R W; Gorgievski-Duijvesteijn, M J; van der Velden, P G; Loeffen, W L A; Zarafshani, K

    2010-04-21

    The aim of this study was to identify limitations and incentives in reporting clinically suspect situations, possibly caused by classical swine fever (CSF), to veterinary authorities with the ultimate aim to facilitate early detection of CSF outbreaks. Focus group sessions were held with policy makers from the veterinary authorities, and representatives of veterinary practitioners and pig farmer unions. Personal interviews with a small group of pig farmers and practitioners were held to check limitations raised and solutions proposed during the focus group sessions. An electronic questionnaire was mailed to pig farmers and practitioners to investigate perceptions and attitudes with respect to clinically suspect situations possibly caused by CSF. After triangulating the responses of veterinary authorities, veterinary practitioners and farmers, six themes emerged across all groups: (1) lack of knowledge on the early signs of CSF; (2) guilt, shame and prejudice; (3) negative opinion on control measures; (4) dissatisfaction with post-reporting procedures; (5) lack of trust in government bodies; (6) uncertainty and lack of transparency of reporting procedures. The following solutions to facilitate early detection of CSF were put forward: (a) development of a clinical decision-support system for vets and farmers, in order to get faster diagnosis and detection of CSF; (b) possibility to submit blood samples directly to the reference laboratory to exclude CSF in a clinical situation with non-specific clinical signs, without isolation of the farm and free of charge for the individual farmer; (c) decrease social and economic consequences of reporting CSF, for example by improving the public opinion on first reports; (d) better schooling of veterinary officers to deal with emotions and insecurity of farmers in the process after reporting; (e) better communication of rules and regulations, where to report, what will happen next; (f) up-to-date website with information and

  4. Clinical Application of Picodroplet Digital PCR Technology for Rapid Detection of EGFR T790M in Next-Generation Sequencing Libraries and DNA from Limited Tumor Samples.

    PubMed

    Borsu, Laetitia; Intrieri, Julie; Thampi, Linta; Yu, Helena; Riely, Gregory; Nafa, Khedoudja; Chandramohan, Raghu; Ladanyi, Marc; Arcila, Maria E

    2016-11-01

    Although next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a robust technology for comprehensive assessment of EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas with acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, it may not provide sufficiently rapid and sensitive detection of the EGFR T790M mutation, the most clinically relevant resistance biomarker. Here, we describe a digital PCR (dPCR) assay for rapid T790M detection on aliquots of NGS libraries prepared for comprehensive profiling, fully maximizing broad genomic analysis on limited samples. Tumor DNAs from patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas and acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors were prepared for Memorial Sloan-Kettering-Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets sequencing, a hybrid capture-based assay interrogating 410 cancer-related genes. Precapture library aliquots were used for rapid EGFR T790M testing by dPCR, and results were compared with NGS and locked nucleic acid-PCR Sanger sequencing (reference high sensitivity method). Seventy resistance samples showed 99% concordance with the reference high sensitivity method in accuracy studies. Input as low as 2.5 ng provided a sensitivity of 1% and improved further with increasing DNA input. dPCR on libraries required less DNA and showed better performance than direct genomic DNA. dPCR on NGS libraries is a robust and rapid approach to EGFR T790M testing, allowing most economical utilization of limited material for comprehensive assessment. The same assay can also be performed directly on any limited DNA source and cell-free DNA. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. BEAMing LAMP: single-molecule capture and on-bead isothermal amplification for digital detection of hepatitis C virus in plasma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiyun; Xu, Xiaomin; Huang, Zhimei; Luo, Yuan; Tang, Lijuan; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2018-01-02

    A novel dNAD platform (BEAMing LAMP) by combining emulsion micro-reactors, single-molecule magnetic capture and on-bead loop-mediated isothermal amplification has been developed for DNA detection, which enables absolute and high-precision quantification of a target with a detection limit of 300 copies.

  6. Absolute Calibration of the AXAF Telescope Effective Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, E.; Cohen, L.; Edgar, R.; Evans, I.; Freeman, M.; Gaetz, T.; Jerius, D.; McDermott, W. C.; McKinnon, P.; Murray, S.; hide

    1997-01-01

    The prelaunch calibration of AXAF encompasses many aspects of the telescope. In principle, all that is needed is the complete point response function. This is, however, a function of energy, off-axis angle of the source, and operating mode of the facility. No single measurement would yield the entire result. Also, any calibration made prior to launch will be affected by changes in conditions after launch, such as the change from one g to zero g. The reflectivity of the mirror and perhaps even the detectors can change as well, for example by addition or removal of small amounts of material deposited on their surfaces. In this paper, we give a broad view of the issues in performing such a calibration, and discuss how they are being addressed in prelaunch preparation of AXAF. As our title indicates, we concentrate here on the total throughput of the observatory. This can be thought of as the integral of the point response function, i.e. the encircled energy, out ot the largest practical solid angle for an observation. Since there is no standard x-ray source in the sky whose flux is known to the -1% accuracy we are trying to achieve, we must do this calibration on the ground. we also must provide a means for monitoring any possible changes in this calibration from pre-launch until on-orbit operation can transfer the calibration to a celestial x-ray source whose emission is stable. In this paper, we analyze the elements of the absolute throughput calibration, which we call Effective Area. We review the requirements for calibrations of components or subsystems of the AXAF facility, including mirror, detectors, and gratings. We show how it is necessary to calibrate this ground-based detection system at standard man-made x-ray sources, such as electron storage rings. We present the status of all these calibrations, with indications of the measurements remaining to be done, even though the measurements on the AXAF flight optics and detectors will have been completed by the

  7. Landsat-7 ETM+ radiometric stability and absolute calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markham, B.L.; Barker, J.L.; Barsi, J.A.; Kaita, E.; Thome, K.J.; Helder, D.L.; Palluconi, Frank Don; Schott, J.R.; Scaramuzza, Pat; ,

    2002-01-01

    Launched in April 1999, the Landsat-7 ETM+ instrument is in its fourth year of operation. The quality of the acquired calibrated imagery continues to be high, especially with respect to its three most important radiometric performance parameters: reflective band instrument stability to better than ??1%, reflective band absolute calibration to better than ??5%, and thermal band absolute calibration to better than ??0.6 K. The ETM+ instrument has been the most stable of any of the Landsat instruments, in both the reflective and thermal channels. To date, the best on-board calibration source for the reflective bands has been the Full Aperture Solar Calibrator, which has indicated changes of at most -1.8% to -2.0% (95% C.I.) change per year in the ETM+ gain (band 4). However, this change is believed to be caused by changes in the solar diffuser panel, as opposed to a change in the instrument's gain. This belief is based partially on ground observations, which bound the changes in gain in band 4 at -0.7% to +1.5%. Also, ETM+ stability is indicated by the monitoring of desert targets. These image-based results for four Saharan and Arabian sites, for a collection of 35 scenes over the three years since launch, bound the gain change at -0.7% to +0.5% in band 4. Thermal calibration from ground observations revealed an offset error of +0.31 W/m 2 sr um soon after launch. This offset was corrected within the U. S. ground processing system at EROS Data Center on 21-Dec-00, and since then, the band 6 on-board calibration has indicated changes of at most +0.02% to +0.04% (95% C.I.) per year. The latest ground observations have detected no remaining offset error with an RMS error of ??0.6 K. The stability and absolute calibration of the Landsat-7 ETM+ sensor make it an ideal candidate to be used as a reference source for radiometric cross-calibrating to other land remote sensing satellite systems.

  8. Comparison of Detection Limits of 4th Generation Combination HIV Antigen/Antibody, p24 Antigen and Viral Load Assays on Diverse HIV Isolates.

    PubMed

    Stone, Mars; Bainbridge, John; Sanchez, Ana M; Keating, Sheila M; Pappas, Andrea; Rountree, Wes; Todd, Chris; Bakkour, Sonia; Manak, Mark; Peel, Sheila A; Coombs, Robert W; Ramos, Eric M; Shriver, M Kathleen; Contestable, Paul; Nair, Sangeetha Vijaysri; Wilson, David H; Stengelin, Martin; Murphy, Gary; Hewlett, Indira; Denny, Thomas N; Busch, Michael P

    2018-05-23

    Detection of acute HIV infection is critical for HIV public health and diagnostics. Clinical 4 th generation antigen-antibody (Ag/Ab) combination (combo) and p24 Ag immunoassays have enhanced detection of acute infection compared to Ab alone assays, but require ongoing evaluation with currently circulating diverse subtypes. Genetically and geographically diverse HIV clinical isolates were used to assess clinical HIV diagnostic, blood screening and next generation assays. Blinded 300 member panels of 20 serially diluted well-characterized antibody negative HIV isolates were distributed to manufacturers and end-user labs to assess relative analytic sensitivity of currently approved and pre-approved clinical HIV 4 th generation Ag/Ab combo or p24 Ag alone immunoassays across diverse subtypes. The limits of virus detection (LODs) were estimated for different subtypes relative to confirmed viral loads. Analysis of immunoassay sensitivity was benchmarked against confirmed viral load measurements on the blinded panel. Based on the proportion of positive results on 300 observations all Ag/Ab combo and standard sensitivity p24 Ag assays performed similarly and within half log LODs, illustrating similar breadth of reactivity and diagnostic utility. Ultrasensitive p24 Ag assays achieved dramatically increased sensitivities, while the rapid combo-assays performed poorly. Similar performance of the different commercially available 4 th gen assays on diverse subtypes supports their use in broad geographic settings with locally circulating HIV clades and recombinant strains. Next generation pre-clinical ultrasensitive p24 Ag assays achieved dramatically improved sensitivity, while p24 Ag detection by rapid 4 th gen assays performed poorly. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Comparative analysis of detection limits and specificity of molecular diagnostic markers for three pathogens (Microsporidia, Nosema spp.) in the key pollinators Apis mellifera and Bombus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Erler, Silvio; Lommatzsch, Stefanie; Lattorff, H Michael G

    2012-04-01

    Global pollinator decline has recently been discussed in the context of honey and bumble bee infections from various pathogens including viruses, bacteria, microsporidia and mites. The microsporidian pathogens Nosema apis, Nosema ceranae and Nosema bombi may in fact be major candidates contributing to this decline. Different molecular and non-molecular detection methods have been developed; however, a comparison, especially of the highly sensitive PCR based methods, is currently lacking. Here, we present the first comparative quantitative real-time PCR study of nine Nosema spp. primers within the framework of primer specificity and sensitivity. With the help of dilution series of defined numbers of spores, we reveal six primer pairs amplifying N. apis, six for N. bombi and four for N. ceranae. All appropriate primer pairs detected an amount of at least 10(4) spores, the majority of which were even as sensitive to detect such low amounts as 10(3) to ten spores. Species specificity of primers was observed for N. apis and N. bombi, but not for N. ceranae. Additionally, we did not find any significant correlation for the amplified fragments with PCR efficiency or the limit of detection. We discuss our findings on the background of false positive and negative results using quantitative real-time PCR. On the basis of these results, future research might be based on appropriate primer selection depending on the experimental needs. Primers may be selected on the basis of specificity or sensitivity. Pathogen species and load may be determined with higher precision enhancing all kinds of diagnostic studies.

  10. Elevation correction factor for absolute pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, Joseph W.; Sorrells, Mark R.

    1996-01-01

    With the arrival of highly accurate multi-port pressure measurement systems, conditions that previously did not affect overall system accuracy must now be scrutinized closely. Errors caused by elevation differences between pressure sensing elements and model pressure taps can be quantified and corrected. With multi-port pressure measurement systems, the sensing elements are connected to pressure taps that may be many feet away. The measurement system may be at a different elevation than the pressure taps due to laboratory space or test article constraints. This difference produces a pressure gradient that is inversely proportional to height within the interface tube. The pressure at the bottom of the tube will be higher than the pressure at the top due to the weight of the tube's column of air. Tubes with higher pressures will exhibit larger absolute errors due to the higher air density. The above effect is well documented but has generally been taken into account with large elevations only. With error analysis techniques, the loss in accuracy from elevation can be easily quantified. Correction factors can be applied to maintain the high accuracies of new pressure measurement systems.

  11. Absolute flux measurements for swift atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M.; Kohl, D. A.; Keto, J. W.; Antoniewicz, P.

    1987-01-01

    While a torsion balance in vacuum can easily measure the momentum transfer from a gas beam impinging on a surface attached to the balance, this measurement depends on the accommodation coefficients of the atoms with the surface and the distribution of the recoil. A torsion balance is described for making absolute flux measurements independent of recoil effects. The torsion balance is a conventional taut suspension wire design and the Young modulus of the wire determines the relationship between the displacement and the applied torque. A compensating magnetic field is applied to maintain zero displacement and provide critical damping. The unique feature is to couple the impinging gas beam to the torsion balance via a Wood's horn, i.e., a thin wall tube with a gradual 90 deg bend. Just as light is trapped in a Wood's horn by specular reflection from the curved surfaces, the gas beam diffuses through the tube. Instead of trapping the beam, the end of the tube is open so that the atoms exit the tube at 90 deg to their original direction. Therefore, all of the forward momentum of the gas beam is transferred to the torsion balance independent of the angle of reflection from the surfaces inside the tube.

  12. Absolute Lower Bound on the Bounce Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ryosuke; Takimoto, Masahiro

    2018-03-01

    The decay rate of a false vacuum is determined by the minimal action solution of the tunneling field: bounce. In this Letter, we focus on models with scalar fields which have a canonical kinetic term in N (>2 ) dimensional Euclidean space, and derive an absolute lower bound on the bounce action. In the case of four-dimensional space, we show the bounce action is generically larger than 24 /λcr, where λcr≡max [-4 V (ϕ )/|ϕ |4] with the false vacuum being at ϕ =0 and V (0 )=0 . We derive this bound on the bounce action without solving the equation of motion explicitly. Our bound is derived by a quite simple discussion, and it provides useful information even if it is difficult to obtain the explicit form of the bounce solution. Our bound offers a sufficient condition for the stability of a false vacuum, and it is useful as a quick check on the vacuum stability for given models. Our bound can be applied to a broad class of scalar potential with any number of scalar fields. We also discuss a necessary condition for the bounce action taking a value close to this lower bound.

  13. Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, John P.