Science.gov

Sample records for absolute detection limits

  1. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  2. Absolute limit on rotation of gravitationally bound stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1994-03-01

    The authors seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein`s theory of relativity, Le Chatelier`s principle, causality and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass-shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a M = 1.442 M{circle_dot} neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). If the limit were found to be broken by any pulsar, it would signal that the confined hadronic phase of ordinary nucleons and nuclei is only metastable, an extraordinary conclusion.

  3. Absolute limit on rotation of gravitationally bound stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendenning, N. K.

    1994-03-01

    The authors seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein's theory of relativity, Le Chatelier's principle, causality, and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass-shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a M = 1.442 solar mass neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). If the limit were found to be broken by any pulsar, it would signal that the confined hadronic phase of ordinary nucleons and nuclei is only metastable.

  4. Absolute rotation detection by Coriolis force measurement using optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar; Li, Yong

    2016-10-01

    In this article, we present an application of the optomechanical cavities for absolute rotation detection. Two optomechanical cavities, one in each arm, are placed in a Michelson interferometer. The interferometer is placed on a rotating table and is moved with a uniform velocity of \\dot{\\bar{y}} with respect to the rotating table. The Coriolis force acting on the interferometer changes the length of the optomechanical cavity in one arm, while the length of the optomechanical cavity in the other arm is not changed. The phase shift corresponding to the change in the optomechanical cavity length is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of the absolute rotation. An analytic expression for the minimum detectable rotation rate corresponding to the standard quantum limit of measurable Coriolis force in the interferometer is derived. Squeezing technique is discussed to improve the rotation detection sensitivity by a factor of \\sqrt{{γ }m/{ω }m} at 0 K temperature, where {γ }m and {ω }m are the damping rate and angular frequency of the mechanical oscillator. The temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  5. System providing limit switch function with simultaneous absolute position output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A limit and position sensing system includes a sensor assembly and an emitter. The sensor assembly includes first and second electrical conductors arranged in opposing parallel planes. The first electrical conductor is coiled outwardly from either end thereof in a clockwise fashion to form a first coil region and a second coil region. The second electrical conductor forms a single coil with portions of the single coil's rings lying between the first end and second end of the first electrical conductor being parallel to an axis of the first electrical conductor's plane. Ferromagnetic material is aligned with the first and second electrical conductors and spans beyond (a) the first and second ends of the first electrical conductor, and (b) the portions of the rings of the second electrical conductor's single coil that lie between the first end and second end of the first electrical conductor. The emitter is spaced apart from the sensor assembly and transmits a periodic electromagnetic wave towards the sensor assembly.

  6. Adaptive limit margin detection and limit avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavrucuk, Ilkay

    ) unmanned helicopter test bed for automatic limit detection and avoidance. Angular rate limits and rotor stall limits are considered. Software-in-the-loop simulation and flight test results of the GTMax are included.

  7. Upward excursion limits from air saturation at 5 ATA (Atmospheres Absolute)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Present USN submarine rescue capability makes a prolonged exposure of the submarine crew to hyperbaric air a distinct possibility. The exposure may be to pressures as great as 5 atmospheres absolute (ATA), and for periods of time of up to 72 hours. A series of experimental dives were conducted to establish the safe, upward excursion from 5 ATA (132 FSWG); that is, the maximum, immediate reduction in pressure which these individuals can safely tolerate. This specifies the required pressure in the compartment of a mother submarine to which the rescued personnel would be transferred. In order to minimize the effects of pulmonary oxygen toxicity, the limits first were established using a nitrox equivalent of air at 5 ATA. The upward limit from 4.36 ATA (111 FSWG) was found to be 2.97 ATA (65 FSWG). Once this limit had been set, a series of dives were conducted to test this up limit from standard air at 5 ATA.

  8. Nitromethane K-9 Detection Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Strobel, R; Kury, J

    2003-08-29

    The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) trains canine/handler teams to detect explosives for government and other agencies worldwide. After completing the training program the teams are tested on an array containing explosives and numerous other samples designed to distract a canine. Passing this test results in a team's certification. These teams can be considered as ''detection instruments'' freshly calibrated just before leaving the ''factory''. Using these teams to examine special experimental arrays immediately following certification can lead to a better understanding of a canine's detection capabilities. Forty-one of these ''detection instruments'' were used in four test series with arrays containing dilute nitromethane-in-water solutions. (The canines had been trained on the amount of nitromethane vapor in equilibrium with the undiluted liquid explosive.) By diluting liquid nitromethane with water, the amount of explosive vapor can be reduced many orders of magnitude to test the lower limit of the canine's nitromethane vapor detection response. The results are presented in this paper.

  9. Absolute lower limits on the masses of selectrons and sneutrinos in the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Heister, A.; Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Brunelière, R.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocmé, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugés, E.; Lopez, J.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Pacheco, A.; Paneque, D.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Barklow, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T. C.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J. J.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Leibenguth, G.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R. D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S. A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; White, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Clarke, D. P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Müller, A.-S.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; de Vivie de Régie, J.-B.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M. G.; Jones, L. T.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2002-09-01

    The results of searches for selectrons, charginos and neutralinos performed with the data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV are interpreted in the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model with R-parity conservation. Under the assumptions of gaugino and sfermion mass unification and no sfermion mixing, an absolute lower limit of 73 GeV/c2 is set on the mass of the lighter selectron e~R at the 95% confidence level. Similarly, limits on the masses of the heavier selectron e~L and of the sneutrino ν~e are set at 107 and 84 GeV/c2, respectively. Additional constraints are derived from the results of the searches for Higgs bosons. The results are also interpreted in the framework of minimal supergravity.

  10. Limits of detection and decision. Part 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtman, E.

    2008-02-01

    It has been shown that the MARLAP (Multi-Agency Radiological Laboratory Analytical Protocols) for estimating the Currie detection limit, which is based on 'critical values of the non-centrality parameter of the non-central t distribution', is intrinsically biased, even if no calibration curve or regression is used. This completed the refutation of the method, begun in Part 2. With the field cleared of obstructions, the true theory underlying Currie's limits of decision, detection and quantification, as they apply in a simple linear chemical measurement system (CMS) having heteroscedastic, Gaussian measurement noise and using weighted least squares (WLS) processing, was then derived. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations were performed, on 900 million independent calibration curves, for linear, "hockey stick" and quadratic noise precision models (NPMs). With errorless NPM parameters, all the simulation results were found to be in excellent agreement with the derived theoretical expressions. Even with as much as 30% noise on all of the relevant NPM parameters, the worst absolute errors in rates of false positives and false negatives, was only 0.3%.

  11. Fuzzy logic based anaesthesia monitoring systems for the detection of absolute hypovolaemia.

    PubMed

    Mansoor Baig, Mirza; Gholamhosseini, Hamid; Harrison, Michael J

    2013-07-01

    Anaesthesia monitoring involves critical diagnostic tasks carried out amongst lots of distractions. Computers are capable of handling large amounts of data at high speed and therefore decision support systems and expert systems are now capable of processing many signals simultaneously in real time. We have developed two fuzzy logic based anaesthesia monitoring systems; a real time smart anaesthesia alarm system (RT-SAAM) and fuzzy logic monitoring system-2 (FLMS-2), an updated version of FLMS for the detection of absolute hypovolaemia. This paper presents the design aspects of these two systems which employ fuzzy logic techniques to detect absolute hypovolaemia, and compares their performances in terms of usability and acceptability. The interpretation of these two systems of absolute hypovolaemia was compared with clinicians' assessments using Kappa analysis, RT-SAAM K=0.62, FLMS-2 K=0.75; an improvement in performance by FLMS-2.

  12. Development and application of absolute quantitative detection by duplex chamber-based digital PCR of genetically modified maize events without pretreatment steps.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pengyu; Fu, Wei; Wang, Chenguang; Du, Zhixin; Huang, Kunlun; Zhu, Shuifang; Xu, Wentao

    2016-04-15

    The possibility of the absolute quantitation of GMO events by digital PCR was recently reported. However, most absolute quantitation methods based on the digital PCR required pretreatment steps. Meanwhile, singleplex detection could not meet the demand of the absolute quantitation of GMO events that is based on the ratio of foreign fragments and reference genes. Thus, to promote the absolute quantitative detection of different GMO events by digital PCR, we developed a quantitative detection method based on duplex digital PCR without pretreatment. Moreover, we tested 7 GMO events in our study to evaluate the fitness of our method. The optimized combination of foreign and reference primers, limit of quantitation (LOQ), limit of detection (LOD) and specificity were validated. The results showed that the LOQ of our method for different GMO events was 0.5%, while the LOD is 0.1%. Additionally, we found that duplex digital PCR could achieve the detection results with lower RSD compared with singleplex digital PCR. In summary, the duplex digital PCR detection system is a simple and stable way to achieve the absolute quantitation of different GMO events. Moreover, the LOQ and LOD indicated that this method is suitable for the daily detection and quantitation of GMO events.

  13. Supramolecular spectrally encoded microgels with double strand probes for absolute and direct miRNA fluorescence detection at high sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Causa, Filippo; Aliberti, Anna; Cusano, Angela M; Battista, Edmondo; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-02-11

    We present novel microgels as a particle-based suspension array for direct and absolute microRNA (miRNA) detection. The microgels feature a flexible molecular architecture, antifouling properties, and enhanced sensitivity with a large dynamic range of detection. Specifically, they possess a core-shell molecular architecture with two different fluorescent dyes for multiplex spectral analyses and are endowed with a fluorescent probe for miRNA detection. Encoding and detection fluorescence signals are distinguishable by nonoverlapping emission spectra. Tunable fluorescence probe conjugation and emission confinement on single microgels allow for ultrasensitive miRNA detection. Indeed, the suspension array has high selectivity and sensitivity with absolute quantification, a detection limit of 10(-15) M, a dynamic range from 10(-9) to 10(-15) M, and higher accuracy than qRT-PCR. The antifouling properties of the microgels also permit the direct measurement of miRNAs in serum, without sample pretreatment or target amplification. A multiplexed assay has been tested for a set of miRNAs chosen as cancer biomarkers.

  14. A Novel Pretreatment-Free Duplex Chamber Digital PCR Detection System for the Absolute Quantitation of GMO Samples

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pengyu; Wang, Chenguang; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has developed rapidly since it was first reported in the 1990s. However, pretreatments are often required during preparation for digital PCR, which can increase operation error. The single-plex amplification of both the target and reference genes may cause uncertainties due to the different reaction volumes and the matrix effect. In the current study, a quantitative detection system based on the pretreatment-free duplex chamber digital PCR was developed. The dynamic range, limit of quantitation (LOQ), sensitivity and specificity were evaluated taking the GA21 event as the experimental object. Moreover, to determine the factors that may influence the stability of the duplex system, we evaluated whether the pretreatments, the primary and secondary structures of the probes and the SNP effect influence the detection. The results showed that the LOQ was 0.5% and the sensitivity was 0.1%. We also found that genome digestion and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites affect the detection results, whereas the unspecific hybridization within different probes had little side effect. This indicated that the detection system was suited for both chamber-based and droplet-based digital PCR. In conclusion, we have provided a simple and flexible way of achieving absolute quantitation for genetically modified organism (GMO) genome samples using commercial digital PCR detection systems. PMID:26999129

  15. A Novel Pretreatment-Free Duplex Chamber Digital PCR Detection System for the Absolute Quantitation of GMO Samples.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pengyu; Wang, Chenguang; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2016-03-18

    Digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has developed rapidly since it was first reported in the 1990s. However, pretreatments are often required during preparation for digital PCR, which can increase operation error. The single-plex amplification of both the target and reference genes may cause uncertainties due to the different reaction volumes and the matrix effect. In the current study, a quantitative detection system based on the pretreatment-free duplex chamber digital PCR was developed. The dynamic range, limit of quantitation (LOQ), sensitivity and specificity were evaluated taking the GA21 event as the experimental object. Moreover, to determine the factors that may influence the stability of the duplex system, we evaluated whether the pretreatments, the primary and secondary structures of the probes and the SNP effect influence the detection. The results showed that the LOQ was 0.5% and the sensitivity was 0.1%. We also found that genome digestion and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites affect the detection results, whereas the unspecific hybridization within different probes had little side effect. This indicated that the detection system was suited for both chamber-based and droplet-based digital PCR. In conclusion, we have provided a simple and flexible way of achieving absolute quantitation for genetically modified organism (GMO) genome samples using commercial digital PCR detection systems.

  16. Design, validation, and absolute sensitivity of a novel test for the molecular detection of avian pneumovirus.

    PubMed

    Cecchinato, Mattia; Catelli, Elena; Savage, Carol E; Jones, Richard C; Naylor, Clive J

    2004-11-01

    This study describes attempts to increase and measure sensitivity of molecular tests to detect avian pneumovirus (APV). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnostic tests were designed for the detection of nucleic acid from an A-type APV genome. The objective was selection of PCR oligonucleotide combinations, which would provide the greatest test sensitivity and thereby enable optimal detection when used for later testing of field materials. Relative and absolute test sensitivities could be determined because of laboratory access to known quantities of purified full-length DNA copies of APV genome derived from the same A-type virus. Four new nested PCR tests were designed in the fusion (F) protein (2 tests), small hydrophobic (SH) protein (1 test), and nucleocapsid (N) protein (1 test) genes and compared with an established test in the attachment (G) protein gene. Known amounts of full-length APV genome were serially diluted 10-fold, and these dilutions were used as templates for the different tests. Sensitivities were found to differ between the tests, the most sensitive being the established G test, which proved able to detect 6,000 copies of the G gene. The G test contained predominantly pyrimidine residues at its 3' termini, and because of this, oligonucleotides for the most sensitive F test were modified to incorporate the same residue types at their 3' termini. This was found to increase sensitivity, so that after full 3' pyrimidine substitutions, the F test became able to detect 600 copies of the F gene.

  17. Constraining absolute neutrino masses via detection of galactic supernova neutrinos at JUNO

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jia-Shu; Cao, Jun; Li, Yu-Feng; Zhou, Shun E-mail: caoj@ihep.ac.cn E-mail: zhoush@ihep.ac.cn

    2015-05-01

    A high-statistics measurement of the neutrinos from a galactic core-collapse supernova is extremely important for understanding the explosion mechanism, and studying the intrinsic properties of neutrinos themselves. In this paper, we explore the possibility to constrain the absolute scale of neutrino masses m{sub ν} via the detection of galactic supernova neutrinos at the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) with a 20 kiloton liquid-scintillator detector. In assumption of a nearly-degenerate neutrino mass spectrum and a normal mass ordering, the upper bound on the absolute neutrino mass is found to be m{sub ν} < (0.83 ± 0.24) eV at the 95% confidence level for a typical galactic supernova at a distance of 10 kpc, where the mean value and standard deviation are shown to account for statistical fluctuations. For comparison, we find that the bound in the Super-Kamiokande experiment is m{sub ν} < (0.94 ± 0.28) eV at the same confidence level. However, the upper bound will be relaxed when the model parameters characterizing the time structure of supernova neutrino fluxes are not exactly known, and when the neutrino mass ordering is inverted.

  18. Constraining absolute neutrino masses via detection of galactic supernova neutrinos at JUNO

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jia-Shu; Cao, Jun; Li, Yu-Feng; Zhou, Shun

    2015-05-26

    A high-statistics measurement of the neutrinos from a galactic core-collapse supernova is extremely important for understanding the explosion mechanism, and studying the intrinsic properties of neutrinos themselves. In this paper, we explore the possibility to constrain the absolute scale of neutrino masses m{sub ν} via the detection of galactic supernova neutrinos at the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) with a 20 kiloton liquid-scintillator detector. In assumption of a nearly-degenerate neutrino mass spectrum and a normal mass ordering, the upper bound on the absolute neutrino mass is found to be m{sub ν}<(0.83±0.24) eV at the 95% confidence level for a typical galactic supernova at a distance of 10 kpc, where the mean value and standard deviation are shown to account for statistical fluctuations. For comparison, we find that the bound in the Super-Kamiokande experiment is m{sub ν}<(0.94±0.28) eV at the same confidence level. However, the upper bound will be relaxed when the model parameters characterizing the time structure of supernova neutrino fluxes are not exactly known, and when the neutrino mass ordering is inverted.

  19. Absolute distance measurement by intensity detection using a mode-locked femtosecond pulse laser.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanzhong; Zhang, Fumin; Cao, Shiying; Xing, Shujian; Qu, Xinghua

    2014-05-05

    We propose an interferometric method that enables to measure a distance by the intensity measurement using the scanning of the interferometer reference arm and the recording of the interference fringes including the brightest fringe. With the consideration of the dispersion and absorption of the pulse laser in a dispersive and absorptive medium, we investigate the cross-correlation function between two femtosecond laser pulses in the time domain. We also introduce the measurement principle. We study the relationship between the position of the brightest fringe and the distance measured, which can contribute to the distance measurement. In the experiments, we measure distances using the method of the intensity detection while the reference arm of Michelson interferometer is scanned and the fringes including the brightest fringe is recorded. Firstly we measure a distance in a range of 10 µm. The experimental results show that the maximum deviation is 45 nm with the method of light intensity detection. Secondly, an interference system using three Michelson interferometers is developed, which combines the methods of light intensity detection and time-of-flight. This system can extend the non-ambiguity range of the method of light intensity detection. We can determine a distance uniquely with a larger non-ambiguity range. It is shown that this method and system can realize absolute distance measurement, and the measurement range is a few micrometers in the vicinity of Nl(pp), where N is an integer, and lpp is the pulse-to-pulse length.

  20. Assessment of absolute added correlative coding in optical intensity modulation and direct detection channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong-Nhat, Nguyen; Elsherif, Mohamed A.; Malekmohammadi, Amin

    2016-06-01

    The performance of absolute added correlative coding (AACC) modulation format with direct detection has been numerically and analytically reported, targeting metro data center interconnects. Hereby, the focus lies on the performance of the bit error rate, noise contributions, spectral efficiency, and chromatic dispersion tolerance. The signal space model of AACC, where the average electrical and optical power expressions are derived for the first time, is also delineated. The proposed modulation format was also compared to other well-known signaling, such as on-off-keying (OOK) and four-level pulse-amplitude modulation, at the same bit rate in a directly modulated vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser-based transmission system. The comparison results show a clear advantage of AACC in achieving longer fiber delivery distance due to the higher dispersion tolerance.

  1. An imaging technique for detection and absolute calibration of scintillation light

    SciTech Connect

    Pappalardo, Alfio; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo

    2010-03-15

    Triggered by the need of a detection system to be used in experiments of nuclear fusion in laser-generated plasmas, we developed an imaging technique for the measurement and calibration of the scintillation light yield of scintillating materials. As in such experiments, all the reaction products are generated in an ultrashort time frame, the event-by-event data acquisition scheme is not feasible. As an alternative to the emulsion technique (or the equivalent CR39 sheets) we propose a scintillating screen readout by means of a high performance charge coupled device camera. Even though it is not strictly required in the particular application, this technique allows the absolute calibration of the scintillation light yield.

  2. Electrostatic Limit of Detection of Nanowire-Based Sensors.

    PubMed

    Henning, Alex; Molotskii, Michel; Swaminathan, Nandhini; Vaknin, Yonathan; Godkin, Andrey; Shalev, Gil; Rosenwaks, Yossi

    2015-10-07

    Scanning gate microscopy is used to determine the electrostatic limit of detection (LOD) of a nanowire (NW) based chemical sensor with a precision of sub-elementary charge. The presented method is validated with an electrostatically formed NW whose active area and shape are tunable by biasing a multiple gate field-effect transistor (FET). By using the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) as a local top gate, the field effect of adsorbed molecules is emulated. The tip induced charge is quantified with an analytical electrostatic model and it is shown that the NW sensor is sensitive to about an elementary charge and that the measurements with the AFM tip are in agreement with sensing of ethanol vapor. This method is applicable to any FET-based chemical and biological sensor, provides a means to predict the absolute sensor performance limit, and suggests a standardized way to compare LODs and sensitivities of various sensors.

  3. ELENA MCP detector: absolute detection efficiency for low-energy neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rispoli, R.; De Angelis, E.; Colasanti, L.; Vertolli, N.; Orsini, S.; Scheer, J. A.; Mura, A.; Milillo, A.; Wurz, P.; Selci, S.; Di Lellis, A. M.; Leoni, R.; D'Alessandro, M.; Mattioli, F.; Cibella, S.

    2012-09-01

    Microchannel Plates (MCP) detectors are frequently used in space instrumentation for detecting a wide range of radiation and particles. In particular, the capability to detect non-thermal low energy neutral species is crucial for the sensor ELENA (Emitted Low-Energy Neutral Atoms), part of the package SERENA (Search for Exospheric Refilling and Emitted Natural Abundances) on board the BepiColombo mission of ESA to Mercury to be launched in 2015. ELENA is a Time of Flight (TOF) sensor, based on a novel concept using an ultra-sonic oscillating shutter (Start section), which is operated at frequencies up to 50 kHz; a MCP detector is used as a Stop detector. The scientific objective of ELENA is to detect energetic neutral atoms in the range 10 eV - 5 keV, within 76° FOV, perpendicular to the S/C orbital plane. ELENA will monitor the emission of neutral atoms from the whole surface of Mercury thanks to the spacecraft motion. The major scientific objectives are the interaction between the plasma environment and the planet’s surface, the global particle loss-rate and the remote sensing of the surface properties. In particular, surface release processes are investigated by identifying particles released from the surface, via solar wind-induced ion sputtering (< 1eV - < 100 eV) as well as Hydrogen back-scattered at hundreds eV. MCP absolute detection efficiency for very low energy neutral atoms (E < 30 eV) is a crucial point for this investigation. At the MEFISTO facility of the Physical Institute of the University of Bern (CH), measurements on three different types of MCP (with and without coating) have been performed providing the detection efficiencies in the energy range 10eV - 1keV. Outcomes from such measurements are discussed here.

  4. Ultraviolet photolysis of HCHO: absolute HCO quantum yields by direct detection of the HCO radical photoproduct.

    PubMed

    Carbajo, Paula Gorrotxategi; Smith, Shona C; Holloway, Anne-Louise; Smith, Carina A; Pope, Francis D; Shallcross, Dudley E; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2008-12-04

    Absolute quantum yields for the radical (H + HCO) channel of HCHO photolysis, Phi(HCO), have been measured for the tropospherically relevant range of wavelengths (lambda) between 300 and 330 nm. The HCO photoproduct was directly detected by using a custom-built, combined ultra-violet (UV) absorption and cavity ring down (CRD) detection spectrometer. This instrument was previously employed for high-resolution (spectral resolution approximately 0.0035 nm) measurements of absorption cross-sections of HCHO, sigma(HCHO)(lambda), and relative HCO quantum yields. Absolute Phi(HCO) values were measured at seven wavelengths, lambda = 303.70, 305.13, 308.87, 314.31, 320.67, 325.59, and 329.51 nm, using an independent calibration technique based on the simultaneous UV photolysis of HCHO and Cl(2). These Phi(HCO) measurements display greater variability as a function of wavelength than the current NASA-JPL recommendations for Phi(HCO). The absolute Phi(HCO)(lambda) determinations and previously measured sigma(HCHO)(lambda) were used to scale an extensive set of relative HCO yield measurements. The outcome of this procedure is a full suite of data for the product of the absolute radical quantum yield and HCHO absorption cross-section, Phi(HCO)(lambda)sigma(HCHO)(lambda), at wavelengths from 302.6 to 331.0 nm with a wavelength resolution of 0.005 nm. This product of photochemical parameters is combined with high-resolution solar photon flux data to calculate the integrated photolysis rate of HCHO to the radical (H + HCO) channel, J(HCO). Comparison with the latest NASA-JPL recommendations, reported at 1 nm wavelength resolution, suggests an increased J(HCO) of 25% at 0 degrees solar zenith angle (SZA) increasing to 33% at high SZA (80 degrees). The differences in the calculated photolysis rate compared with the current HCHO data arise, in part, from the higher wavelength resolution of the current data set and highlight the importance of using high-resolution spectroscopic

  5. Detection Limits and Selectivity in Electrochemical Detectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Stephen G.; Long, John T.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three aspects of electrochemical detectors: (1) signal and noise generation and signal-to-noise ratio, (2) improvement of qualitative information content, and (3) control of selectivity of the detector. Explains electronic principles of detectors and detection limits. Lists current applications and research. (ML)

  6. Measuring absolute frequencies beyond the GPS limit via long-haul optical frequency dissemination.

    PubMed

    Clivati, Cecilia; Cappellini, Giacomo; Livi, Lorenzo F; Poggiali, Francesco; de Cumis, Mario Siciliani; Mancini, Marco; Pagano, Guido; Frittelli, Matteo; Mura, Alberto; Costanzo, Giovanni A; Levi, Filippo; Calonico, Davide; Fallani, Leonardo; Catani, Jacopo; Inguscio, Massimo

    2016-05-30

    Global Positioning System (GPS) dissemination of frequency standards is ubiquitous at present, providing the most widespread time and frequency reference for the majority of industrial and research applications worldwide. On the other hand, the ultimate limits of the GPS presently curb further advances in high-precision, scientific and industrial applications relying on this dissemination scheme. Here, we demonstrate that these limits can be reliably overcome even in laboratories without a local atomic clock by replacing the GPS with a 642-km-long optical fiber link to a remote primary caesium frequency standard. Through this configuration we stably address the 1S0-3P0 clock transition in an ultracold gas of 173Yb, with a precision that exceeds the possibilities of a GPS-based measurement, dismissing the need for a local clock infrastructure to perform beyond-GPS high-precision tasks. We also report an improvement of two orders of magnitude in the accuracy on the transition frequency reported in literature.

  7. Quantum limited heterodyne detection of spin noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronenberger, S.; Scalbert, D.

    2016-09-01

    Spin noise spectroscopy is a powerful technique for studying spin relaxation in semiconductors. In this article, we propose an extension of this technique based on optical heterodyne detection of spin noise, which provides several key advantages compared to conventional spin noise spectroscopy: detection of high frequency spin noise not limited by detector bandwidth or sampling rates of digitizers, quantum limited sensitivity even in case of very weak probe power, and possible amplification of the spin noise signal. Heterodyne detection of spin noise is demonstrated on insulating n-doped GaAs. From measurements of spin noise spectra up to 0.4 Tesla, we determined the distribution of g-factors, Δg/g = 0.49%.

  8. Revised Age Constraints on Absolute Age Limits for Mercury's Kuiperian and Mansurian Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Maria E.; Zhiyong, Xiao; Braden, Sarah E.; Marchi, Simone S.; Barlow, Nadine G.; Chapman, Clark R.; Fassett, Caleb I.

    2015-11-01

    On the basis of morphologically distinct basin and crater deposits, Mercury’s surface units have been subdivided into five time-stratigraphic systems (youngest to oldest): Kuiperian, Mansurian, Calorian, Tolstojan, and pre-Tolstojan. Approximate age limits were initially suggested for these systems on the basis of the lunar-derived impact-flux history. High-resolution and multi-band image data obtained by the MErcury Surface, Space ENviroment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft were used to catalogue fresh impact craters interpreted to have formed during the Mansurian and Kuiperian systems. Mansurian and Kuiperian craters are characterized as morphologically fresh with crisp morphologies, well-preserved rims, few or no superposed craters, continuous ejecta with radial lineaments, and well-defined secondary craters; Kuiperian craters have bright ray systems while Mansurian craters maintain fresh morphologies but no longer have discernable ray systems.The density of fresh craters in these datasets, along with the recent production and chronology function of Marchi et al. [2009], are used to estimate new limits for the boundaries of the two most recent of Mercury’s systems. Given the effects of strength and other parameters (such as density), we estimate a model age for the population of craters that have formed since the onset of the Mansurian of ~1.9 ±0.3 Gyr. Likewise we estimate a model age for the population of craters that have formed since the onset of the Kuiperian of ~300 ±40 Myr. A particularly good fit for the Mansurian crater size frequency distribution (SFD) was found for the NEO-derived crater distribution. The same is true for the Kuiperian SFD, although the fit is not as robust as for the Mansurian SFD.

  9. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  10. Detection limits with spectral differential imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rameau, J.; Chauvin, G.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Maire, A.-L.; Boccaletti, A.; Bonnefoy, M.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Direct imaging of exoplanets is polluted by speckle noise that severely limits the achievable contrast. Angular and spectral differential imaging have been proposed to make use of the temporal and chromatic properties of the speckles. Both modes, associated with extreme adaptive-optics and coronagraphy, are at the core of the new generation of planet imagers SPHERE and GPI. Aims: We aim to illustrate and characterize the impact of the SDI and SDI+ADI (ASDI) data reduction on the detection of giant planets. We also propose an unbiased method to derive the detection limits from SDI/ASDI data. Methods: Observations of AB Dor B and β Pictoris made with VLT/NaCo were used to simulate and quantify the effects of SDI and ASDI. The novel method is compared to the traditional injection of artificial point sources. Results: The SDI reduction process creates a typical radial positive-negative pattern of any point-source. Its characteristics and its self-subtraction depend on the separation, but also on the spectral properties of the object. This work demonstrates that the self-subtraction cannot be reduced to a simple geometric effect. As a consequence, the detection performances of SDI observations cannot be expressed as a contrast in magnitude with the central star without the knowledge of the spectral properties of detectable companions. In addition, the residual noise cannot be converted into contrast and physical characteristics (mass, temperature) by standard calibration of flux losses. The proposed method takes the SDI bias into account to derive detection limits without the cost of massively injecting artificial sources into the data. Finally, the sensitivity of ASDI observations can be measured only with a control parameter on the algorithms that controls the minimum rotation that is necessary to build the reference image. Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, ESO : 60.A

  11. Ultra-sensitive and absolute quantitative detection of Cu(2+) based on DNAzyme and digital PCR in water and drink samples.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pengyu; Shang, Ying; Tian, Wenying; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2017-04-15

    Here, we developed an ultra-sensitive and absolute quantitative detection method of Cu(2+) based on DNAzyme and digital PCR. The binding model between DNAzyme and Cu(2+) and the influence caused by the additional primer sequence were revealed to ensure quantitation independent of standard curves. The binding model of DNAzyme and Cu(2+) showed that one molecular DNAzyme could bind one Cu(2+) in the biosensor step. Thus, the final quantitative results, evaluated by three parallels, showed that the limit of quantitation (LOQ) was as low as 0.5pmol, while the sensitivity was evaluated as 50fmol. The specificity evaluation of our methodologies shows that extremely low crossing signal is existed within the non-specific ions. Moreover, the results of practical detection have shown that the quantitative results were stable and accurate among different food substrates. In conclusion, a flexible quantitative detection method with ultra-sensitivity was developed to detect trace amounts Cu(2+) within different substrates.

  12. PCR detection of aflatoxin producing fungi and its limitations.

    PubMed

    Levin, Robert E

    2012-05-01

    Unlike bacterial toxins that are primarily peptides and are therefore encoded by a single gene, fungal toxins such as the aflatoxins are multi-ring structures and therefore require a sequence of structural genes for their biological synthesis. There is therefore no specific PCR for any one of the four biologically produced aflatoxins. Unfortunately, the structural genes presently in use for PCR detection of aflatoxin producing fungi are also involved in the synthesis of other fungal toxins such as sterigmatocystin by Aspergillus versicolor and Aspergillus nidulans and therefore lack absolute specificity for aflatoxin producing fungi (Table 1). In addition, the genomic presence of several structural genes involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis does not guarantee the production of aflatoxin by all isolates of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. The most widely used DNA target regions for discriminating Aspergillus species are those of the rDNA complex, mainly the internal transcribed spacer regions 1 and 2 (ITS1 and ITS2) and the variable regions in the 5'-end of the 28S rRNA gene. Since these sequence regions are unrelated to the structural genes involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis there successful amplification can be used for species identification but do not confirm aflatoxin production. This review therefore presents the various approaches and limitations in the use of the PCR in attempting to detect aflatoxin producing fungi.

  13. Double domain wavelength multiplexed Fizeau interferometer with high resolution dynamic sensing and absolute length detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonacci, Julián; Arenas, Gustavo F.; Duchowicz, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we present a simple photonic instrument that has the ability of measuring positions, distances and vibrations with very high resolution by means of two Fizeau interferometers (FI), both using the same optical fiber end as a probe tip itself. On the one hand we have a time domain FI powered with a 1310 nm laser and monitored by an InGaAs detector providing displacement information with resolution around a tenth of nm but regardless of the absolute position of object and of the displacement sense. On the other, a spectral domain FI version based on a super luminescent source (SLED) centred at 800 nm with bandwidth of nearly 40 nm is analysed in real time by means of a digital spectrometer. Each spectrum is acquired in a very small time interval and provides information of both length of the cavity as well as its correct sense of evolution. Resolution of this system is lower than its complementary temporal case, but distance and sense measurements are absolute and can be determined successfully by adequate processing of spectral signal.Both interferometers are optically coupled to a single fiber optic probe and are wavelength modulated.Therefore, combination of both sensors results in a new one which allows the correct knowledge of an object or surfaces under test, i.e. a high resolution of displacement data plus its absolute position and true sense of movement.

  14. Detection of sputtered and evaporated carbon aggregates: relative and absolute electron ionization fragmentation yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, C.; Deutsch, H.; Becker, K.; Märk, T. D.; Vietzke, E.

    2001-03-01

    The present study is a first attempt to determine electron impact ionization efficiencies for C 2 and C 3. A novel method has been applied to obtain the partial cross-section values for the reactions C 2+e→C +,C 2+e→C 2+ and C 3+e→C +,C 3+e→C 2+ and C 3+e→C 3+. The neutral target consisting of C, C 2 and C 3 is produced by thermal evaporation from a heated graphite sample and the neutral precursors in the subsequent ionization process can be distinguished by their different flight-time distributions acquired in the evaporation process. The partial ionization cross-section ratios obtained in this experiment have been calibrated with calculated absolute total ionization cross section curves of C 2 and C 3 using the Deutsch-Märk (DM) formalism.

  15. Comprehensive panel of real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction assays for detection and absolute quantification of filoviruses, arenaviruses, and New World hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Trombley, Adrienne R; Wachter, Leslie; Garrison, Jeffrey; Buckley-Beason, Valerie A; Jahrling, Jordan; Hensley, Lisa E; Schoepp, Randal J; Norwood, David A; Goba, Augustine; Fair, Joseph N; Kulesh, David A

    2010-05-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fever is caused by a diverse group of single-stranded, negative-sense or positive-sense RNA viruses belonging to the families Filoviridae (Ebola and Marburg), Arenaviridae (Lassa, Junin, Machupo, Sabia, and Guanarito), and Bunyaviridae (hantavirus). Disease characteristics in these families mark each with the potential to be used as a biological threat agent. Because other diseases have similar clinical symptoms, specific laboratory diagnostic tests are necessary to provide the differential diagnosis during outbreaks and for instituting acceptable quarantine procedures. We designed 48 TaqMan-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for specific and absolute quantitative detection of multiple hemorrhagic fever viruses. Forty-six assays were determined to be virus-specific, and two were designated as pan assays for Marburg virus. The limit of detection for the assays ranged from 10 to 0.001 plaque-forming units (PFU)/PCR. Although these real-time hemorrhagic fever virus assays are qualitative (presence of target), they are also quantitative (measure a single DNA/RNA target sequence in an unknown sample and express the final results as an absolute value (e.g., viral load, PFUs, or copies/mL) on the basis of concentration of standard samples and can be used in viral load, vaccine, and antiviral drug studies.

  16. Analysis of Intrinsic Peptide Detectability via Integrated Label-Free and SRM-Based Absolute Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jarnuczak, Andrew F; Lee, Dave C H; Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W; Eyers, Claire E; Hubbard, Simon J

    2016-09-02

    Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics of complex biological samples remains challenging in part due to the variability and charge competition arising during electrospray ionization (ESI) of peptides and the subsequent transfer and detection of ions. These issues preclude direct quantification from signal intensity alone in the absence of a standard. A deeper understanding of the governing principles of peptide ionization and exploitation of the inherent ionization and detection parameters of individual peptides is thus of great value. Here, using the yeast proteome as a model system, we establish the concept of peptide F-factor as a measure of detectability, closely related to ionization efficiency. F-factor is calculated by normalizing peptide precursor ion intensity by absolute abundance of the parent protein. We investigated F-factor characteristics in different shotgun proteomics experiments, including across multiple ESI-based LC-MS platforms. We show that F-factors mirror previously observed physicochemical predictors as peptide detectability but demonstrate a nonlinear relationship between hydrophobicity and peptide detectability. Similarly, we use F-factors to show how peptide ion coelution adversely affects detectability and ionization. We suggest that F-factors have great utility for understanding peptide detectability and gas-phase ion chemistry in complex peptide mixtures, selection of surrogate peptides in targeted MS studies, and for calibration of peptide ion signal in label-free workflows. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003472.

  17. Detection limits of confocal surface plasmon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pechprasarn, Suejit; Somekh, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper applies rigorous diffraction theory to evaluate the minimum mass sensitivity of a confocal optical microscope designed to excite and detect surface plasmons operating on a planar metallic substrate. The diffraction model is compared with an intuitive ray picture which gives remarkably similar predictions. The combination of focusing the surface plasmons and accurate phase measurement mean that under favorable but achievable conditions detection of small numbers of molecules is possible, however, we argue that reliable detection of single molecules will benefit from the use of structured surfaces. System configurations needed to optimize performance are discussed. PMID:24940537

  18. Exhaustive thin-layer cyclic voltammetry for absolute multianalyte halide detection.

    PubMed

    Cuartero, Maria; Crespo, Gastón A; Ghahraman Afshar, Majid; Bakker, Eric

    2014-11-18

    Water analysis is one of the greatest challenges in the field of environmental analysis. In particular, seawater analysis is often difficult because a large amount of NaCl may mask the determination of other ions, i.e., nutrients, halides, and carbonate species. We demonstrate here the use of thin-layer samples controlled by cyclic voltammetry to analyze water samples for chloride, bromide, and iodide. The fabrication of a microfluidic electrochemical cell based on a Ag/AgX wire (working electrode) inserted into a tubular Nafion membrane is described, which confines the sample solution layer to less than 15 μm. By increasing the applied potential, halide ions present in the thin-layer sample (X(-)) are electrodeposited on the working electrode as AgX, while their respective counterions are transported across the perm-selective membrane to an outer solution. Thin-layer cyclic voltammetry allows us to obtain separated peaks in mixed samples of these three halides, finding a linear relationship between the halide concentration and the corresponding peak area from about 10(-5) to 0.1 M for bromide and iodide and from 10(-4) to 0.6 M for chloride. This technique was successfully applied for the halide analysis in tap, mineral, and river water as well as seawater. The proposed methodology is absolute and potentially calibration-free, as evidenced by an observed 2.5% RSD cell to cell reproducibility and independence from the operating temperature.

  19. Interference peak detection based on FPGA for real-time absolute distance ranging with dual-comb lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Kai; Dong, Hao; Zhou, Qian; Xu, Mingfei; Li, Xinghui; Wu, Guanhao

    2015-08-01

    Absolute distance measurement using dual femtosecond comb lasers can achieve higher accuracy and faster measurement speed, which makes it more and more attractive. The data processing flow consists of four steps: interference peak detection, fast Fourier transform (FFT), phase fitting and compensation of index of refraction. A realtime data processing system based on Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) for dual-comb ranging has been newly developed. The design and implementation of the interference peak detection algorithm by FPGA and Verilog language is introduced in this paper, which is viewed as the most complicated part and an important guarantee for system precision and reliability. An adaptive sliding window for scanning is used to detect peaks. In the process of detection, the algorithm stores 16 sample data as a detection unit and calculates the average of each unit. The average result is used to determine the vertical center height of the sliding window. The algorithm estimates the noise intensity of each detection unit, and then calculates the average of the noise strength of successive 128 units. The noise average is used to calculate the signal to noise ratio of the current working environment, which is used to adjust the height of the sliding window. This adaptive sliding window helps to eliminate fake peaks caused by noise. The whole design is based on the way of pipeline, which can improves the real-time throughput of the overall peak detection module. Its execution speed is up to 140MHz in the FPGA, and the peak can be detected in 16 clock cycle when it appears.

  20. Absolute mass lower limit for the lightest neutralino of the MSSM from e+e- data at s up to 209 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heister, A.; Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Brunelière, R.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocmé, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Kraan, A. C.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R. D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S. A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; White, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Clarke, D. P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Müller, A.-S.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; de Vivie de Régie, J.-B.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Ward, J. J.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Lan Wu, Sau; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    2004-03-01

    Charginos and neutralinos are searched for in the data collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP for centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV. The negative result of these searches is combined with those from searches for sleptons and Higgs bosons to derive an absolute lower limit of 43.1 GeV/c2 on the mass of the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), assumed to be the lightest neutralino. This limit is obtained in the framework of the MSSM with R-parity conservation and with gaugino and sfermion mass unification at the GUT scale and assuming no mixing in the stau sector. The LSP limit degrades only slightly to 42.4 GeV/c2 if stau mixing is considered. Within the more constrained framework of minimal supergravity, the limit is 50 GeV/c2.

  1. HEPES is not suitable for fluorescence detection of HClO: a novel probe for HClO in absolute PBS.

    PubMed

    Xing, Panfei; Gao, Kuo; Wang, Beng; Gao, Jian; Yan, Hui; Wen, Jia; Li, Weisi; Xu, Yongqian; Li, Hongjuan; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Wei; Sun, Shiguo

    2016-04-11

    HEPES is not suitable for fluorescence detection of HClO because it can be oxidized by HClO. A novel probe for HClO, which can selectively and sensitively detect HClO in absolute PBS, was developed on the basis of an oxidation reaction with an azo moiety. Furthermore, it works well in live mouse imaging.

  2. Gardening in the zone of death: an experimental assessment of the absolute elevation limit of vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Dvorský, Miroslav; Chlumská, Zuzana; Altman, Jan; Čapková, Kateřina; Řeháková, Klára; Macek, Martin; Kopecký, Martin; Liancourt, Pierre; Doležal, Jiří

    2016-04-13

    Vascular plants in the western Tibetan Plateau reach 6000 m--the highest elevation on Earth. Due to the significant warming of the region, plant ranges are expected to shift upwards. However, factors governing maximum elevational limits of plant are unclear. To experimentally assess these factors, we transplanted 12 species from 5750 m to 5900 m (upper edge of vegetation) and 6100 m (beyond range) and monitored their survival for six years. In the first three years (2009-2012), there were plants surviving beyond the regional upper limit of vegetation. This supports the hypothesis of dispersal and/or recruitment limitation. Substantial warming, recorded in-situ during this period, very likely facilitated the survival. The survival was ecologically a non-random process, species better adapted to repeated soil freezing and thawing survived significantly better. No species have survived at 6100 m since 2013, probably due to the extreme snowfall in 2013. In conclusion, apart from the minimum heat requirements, our results show that episodic climatic events are decisive determinants of upper elevational limits of vascular plants.

  3. Gardening in the zone of death: an experimental assessment of the absolute elevation limit of vascular plants

    PubMed Central

    Dvorský, Miroslav; Chlumská, Zuzana; Altman, Jan; Čapková, Kateřina; Řeháková, Klára; Macek, Martin; Kopecký, Martin; Liancourt, Pierre; Doležal, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Vascular plants in the western Tibetan Plateau reach 6000 m-the highest elevation on Earth. Due to the significant warming of the region, plant ranges are expected to shift upwards. However, factors governing maximum elevational limits of plant are unclear. To experimentally assess these factors, we transplanted 12 species from 5750 m to 5900 m (upper edge of vegetation) and 6100 m (beyond range) and monitored their survival for six years. In the first three years (2009–2012), there were plants surviving beyond the regional upper limit of vegetation. This supports the hypothesis of dispersal and/or recruitment limitation. Substantial warming, recorded in-situ during this period, very likely facilitated the survival. The survival was ecologically a non-random process, species better adapted to repeated soil freezing and thawing survived significantly better. No species have survived at 6100 m since 2013, probably due to the extreme snowfall in 2013. In conclusion, apart from the minimum heat requirements, our results show that episodic climatic events are decisive determinants of upper elevational limits of vascular plants. PMID:27071305

  4. Gardening in the zone of death: an experimental assessment of the absolute elevation limit of vascular plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorský, Miroslav; Chlumská, Zuzana; Altman, Jan; Čapková, Kateřina; Řeháková, Klára; Macek, Martin; Kopecký, Martin; Liancourt, Pierre; Doležal, Jiří

    2016-04-01

    Vascular plants in the western Tibetan Plateau reach 6000 m-the highest elevation on Earth. Due to the significant warming of the region, plant ranges are expected to shift upwards. However, factors governing maximum elevational limits of plant are unclear. To experimentally assess these factors, we transplanted 12 species from 5750 m to 5900 m (upper edge of vegetation) and 6100 m (beyond range) and monitored their survival for six years. In the first three years (2009–2012), there were plants surviving beyond the regional upper limit of vegetation. This supports the hypothesis of dispersal and/or recruitment limitation. Substantial warming, recorded in-situ during this period, very likely facilitated the survival. The survival was ecologically a non-random process, species better adapted to repeated soil freezing and thawing survived significantly better. No species have survived at 6100 m since 2013, probably due to the extreme snowfall in 2013. In conclusion, apart from the minimum heat requirements, our results show that episodic climatic events are decisive determinants of upper elevational limits of vascular plants.

  5. Receiver operating characteristic-curve limits of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysoczanski, Artur; Voigtman, Edward

    2014-10-01

    Using a simple UV LED-excited ruby fluorescence measurement system, we demonstrate that it is easily possible to obtain unbiased detection limits, despite the system deliberately having non-linear response function and non-Gaussian noise. Even when the noise precision model is heteroscedastic, but otherwise only roughly linear, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method readily yields results that are in accordance with a priori canonical specifications of false positives and false negatives at the detection limit. The present work demonstrates that obtaining unbiased detection limits is not abstruse and need not be mathematically complicated. Rather, detection limits continue to serve a useful purpose as part of the characterization of chemical measurement systems.

  6. Detection limits for real-time source water monitoring using indigenous freshwater microalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez Jr, Miguel; Greenbaum, Elias

    2009-01-01

    This research identified toxin detection limits using the variable fluorescence of naturally occurring microalgae in source drinking water for five chemical toxins with different molecular structures and modes of toxicity. The five chemicals investigated were atrazine, Diuron, paraquat, methyl parathion, and potassium cyanide. Absolute threshold sensitivities of the algae for detection of the toxins in unmodified source drinking water were measured. Differential kinetics between the rate of action of the toxins and natural changes in algal physiology, such as diurnal photoinhibition, are significant enough that effects of the toxin can be detected and distinguished from the natural variance. This is true even for physiologically impaired algae where diminished photosynthetic capacity may arise from uncontrollable external factors such as nutrient starvation. Photoinhibition induced by high levels of solar radiation is a predictable and reversible phenomenon that can be dealt with using a period of dark adaption of 30 minutes or more.

  7. Calculation of the absolute detection efficiency of a moderated /sup 235/U neutron detector on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, L.P.; Hendel, H.W.; Liew, S.L.

    1989-02-01

    Neutron transport simulations have been carried out to calculate the absolute detection efficiency of a moderated /sup 235/U neutron detector which is used on the TFTR as a part of the primary fission detector diagnostic system for measuring fusion power yields. Transport simulations provide a means by which the effects of variations in various shielding and geometrical parameters can be explored. These effects are difficult to study in calibration experiments. The calculational model, benchmarked against measurements, can be used to complement future detector calibrations, when the high level of radioactivity resulting from machine operation may severely restrict access to the tokamak. We present a coupled forward-adjoint algorithm, employing both the deterministic and Monte Carlo sampling methods, to model the neutron transport in the complex tokamak and detector geometries. Sensitivities of the detector response to the major and minor radii, and angular anisotropy of the neutron emission are discussed. A semi-empirical model based on matching the calculational results with a small set of experiments produces good agreement (+-15%) for a wide range of source energies and geometries. 20 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Size dependence of microscopic Hall sensor detection limits.

    PubMed

    Vervaeke, K; Simoen, E; Borghs, G; Moshchalkov, V V

    2009-07-01

    In this paper the magnetic field detection limits of microscopic Hall sensors are investigated as a function of their lateral size. Hall sensors fabricated from GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures and silicon are experimentally investigated at different temperatures using Hall effect and noise spectrum measurements. At room temperature a clear size dependence of the detection limit is observed, whereas at low temperatures this dependence is found to disappear. The results are explained using the theory of noise in semiconductors.

  9. Left-hemisphere activation is associated with enhanced vocal pitch error detection in musicians with absolute pitch

    PubMed Central

    Behroozmand, Roozbeh; Ibrahim, Nadine; Korzyukov, Oleg; Robin, Donald A.; Larson, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to process auditory feedback for vocal pitch control is crucial during speaking and singing. Previous studies have suggested that musicians with absolute pitch (AP) develop specialized left-hemisphere mechanisms for pitch processing. The present study adopted an auditory feedback pitch perturbation paradigm combined with ERP recordings to test the hypothesis whether the neural mechanisms of the left-hemisphere enhance vocal pitch error detection and control in AP musicians compared with relative pitch (RP) musicians and non-musicians (NM). Results showed a stronger N1 response to pitch-shifted voice feedback in the right-hemisphere for both AP and RP musicians compared with the NM group. However, the left-hemisphere P2 component activation was greater in AP and RP musicians compared with NMs and also for the AP compared with RP musicians. The NM group was slower in generating compensatory vocal reactions to feedback pitch perturbation compared with musicians, and they failed to re-adjust their vocal pitch after the feedback perturbation was removed. These findings suggest that in the earlier stages of cortical neural processing, the right hemisphere is more active in musicians for detecting pitch changes in voice feedback. In the later stages, the left-hemisphere is more active during the processing of auditory feedback for vocal motor control and seems to involve specialized mechanisms that facilitate pitch processing in the AP compared with RP musicians. These findings indicate that the left hemisphere mechanisms of AP ability are associated with improved auditory feedback pitch processing during vocal pitch control in tasks such as speaking or singing. PMID:24355545

  10. The limit of detection for explosives in spectroscopic differential reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubroca, Thierry; Vishwanathan, Karthik; Hummel, Rolf E.

    2011-05-01

    In the wake of recent terrorist attacks, such as the 2008 Mumbai hotel explosion or the December 25th 2009 "underwear bomber", our group has developed a technique (US patent #7368292) to apply differential reflection spectroscopy to detect traces of explosives. Briefly, light (200-500 nm) is shone on a surface such as a piece of luggage at an airport. Upon reflection, the light is collected with a spectrometer combined with a CCD camera. A computer processes the data and produces in turn a differential reflection spectrum involving two adjacent areas of the surface. This differential technique is highly sensitive and provides spectroscopic data of explosives. As an example, 2,4,6, trinitrotoluene (TNT) displays strong and distinct features in differential reflectograms near 420 nm. Similar, but distinctly different features are observed for other explosives. One of the most important criteria for explosive detection techniques is the limit of detection. This limit is defined as the amount of explosive material necessary to produce a signal to noise ratio of three. We present here, a method to evaluate the limit of detection of our technique. Finally, we present our sample preparation method and experimental set-up specifically developed to measure the limit of detection for our technology. This results in a limit ranging from 100 nano-grams to 50 micro-grams depending on the method and the set-up parameters used, such as the detector-sample distance.

  11. Detection limits of organic compounds achievable with intense, short-pulse lasers.

    PubMed

    Miles, Jordan; De Camillis, Simone; Alexander, Grace; Hamilton, Kathryn; Kelly, Thomas J; Costello, John T; Zepf, Matthew; Williams, Ian D; Greenwood, Jason B

    2015-06-21

    Many organic molecules have strong absorption bands which can be accessed by ultraviolet short pulse lasers to produce efficient ionization. This resonant multiphoton ionization scheme has already been exploited as an ionization source in time-of-flight mass spectrometers used for environmental trace analysis. In the present work we quantify the ultimate potential of this technique by measuring absolute ion yields produced from the interaction of 267 nm femtosecond laser pulses with the organic molecules indole and toluene, and gases Xe, N2 and O2. Using multiphoton ionization cross sections extracted from these results, we show that the laser pulse parameters required for real-time detection of aromatic molecules at concentrations of one part per trillion in air and a limit of detection of a few attomoles are achievable with presently available commercial laser systems. The potential applications for the analysis of human breath, blood and tissue samples are discussed.

  12. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  13. Sniper detection using infrared camera: technical possibilities and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastek, M.; Dulski, R.; Trzaskawka, P.; Bieszczad, G.

    2010-04-01

    The paper discusses technical possibilities to build an effective system for sniper detection using infrared cameras. Descriptions of phenomena which make it possible to detect sniper activities in infrared spectra as well as analysis of physical limitations were performed. Cooled and uncooled detectors were considered. Three phases of sniper activities were taken into consideration: before, during and after the shot. On the basis of experimental data the parameters defining the target were determined which are essential in assessing the capability of infrared camera to detect sniper activity. A sniper body and muzzle flash were analyzed as targets. The simulation of detection ranges was done for the assumed scenario of sniper detection task. The infrared sniper detection system was discussed, capable of fulfilling the requirements. The discussion of the results of analysis and simulations was finally presented.

  14. Detecting terrestrial nutrient limitation: a global meta-analysis of foliar nutrient concentrations after fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostertag, Rebecca; DiManno, Nicole

    2016-03-01

    Examining foliar nutrient concentrations after fertilization provides an alternative method for detecting nutrient limitation of ecosystems, which is logistically simpler to measure than biomass change. We present a meta-analysis of response ratios of foliar nitrogen and phosphorus (RRN, RRP) after addition of fertilizer of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), or the two elements in combination, in relation to climate, ecosystem type, life form, family, and methodological factors. Results support other meta-analyses using biomass, and demonstrate there is strong evidence for nutrient limitation in natural communities. However, because N fertilization experiments greatly outnumber P fertilization trials, it is difficult to discern the absolute importance of N vs. P vs. co-limitation across ecosystems. Despite these caveats, it is striking that results did not follow "conventional wisdom" that temperate ecosystems are N-limited and tropical ones are P-limited. In addition, the use of ratios of N-to-P rather than response ratios also are a useful index of nutrient limitation, but due to large overlap in values, there are unlikely to be universal cutoff values for delimiting N vs. P limitation. Differences in RRN and RRP were most significant across ecosystem types, plant families, life forms, and between competitive environments, but not across climatic variables.

  15. In-flow real-time detection of spectrally encoded microgels for miRNA absolute quantification

    PubMed Central

    Dannhauser, David; Causa, Filippo; Cusano, Angela M.; Rossi, Domenico; Netti, Paolo A.

    2016-01-01

    We present an in-flow ultrasensitive fluorescence detection of microRNAs (miRNAs) using spectrally encoded microgels. We researched and employed a viscoelastic fluid to achieve an optimal alignment of microgels in a straight measurement channel and applied a simple and inexpensive microfluidic layout, allowing continuous fluorescence signal acquisitions with several emission wavelengths. In particular, we chose microgels endowed with fluorescent emitting molecules designed for multiplex spectral analysis of specific miRNA types. We analysed in a quasi-real-time manner circa 80 microgel particles a minute at sample volumes down to a few microliters, achieving a miRNA detection limit of 202 fM in microfluidic flow conditions. Such performance opens up new routes for biosensing applications of particles within microfluidic devices. PMID:27990216

  16. In-flow real-time detection of spectrally encoded microgels for miRNA absolute quantification.

    PubMed

    Dannhauser, David; Causa, Filippo; Battista, Edmondo; Cusano, Angela M; Rossi, Domenico; Netti, Paolo A

    2016-11-01

    We present an in-flow ultrasensitive fluorescence detection of microRNAs (miRNAs) using spectrally encoded microgels. We researched and employed a viscoelastic fluid to achieve an optimal alignment of microgels in a straight measurement channel and applied a simple and inexpensive microfluidic layout, allowing continuous fluorescence signal acquisitions with several emission wavelengths. In particular, we chose microgels endowed with fluorescent emitting molecules designed for multiplex spectral analysis of specific miRNA types. We analysed in a quasi-real-time manner circa 80 microgel particles a minute at sample volumes down to a few microliters, achieving a miRNA detection limit of 202 fM in microfluidic flow conditions. Such performance opens up new routes for biosensing applications of particles within microfluidic devices.

  17. Breaking the concentration limit of optical single-molecule detection.

    PubMed

    Holzmeister, Phil; Acuna, Guillermo P; Grohmann, Dina; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-02-21

    Over the last decade, single-molecule detection has been successfully utilized in the life sciences and materials science. Yet, single-molecule measurements only yield meaningful results when working in a suitable, narrow concentration range. On the one hand, diffraction limits the minimal size of the observation volume in optical single-molecule measurements and consequently a sample must be adequately diluted so that only one molecule resides within the observation volume. On the other hand, at ultra-low concentrations relevant for sensing, the detection volume has to be increased in order to detect molecules in a reasonable timespan. This in turn results in the loss of an optimal signal-to-noise ratio necessary for single-molecule detection. This review discusses the requirements for effective single-molecule fluorescence applications, reflects on the motivation for the extension of the dynamic concentration range of single-molecule measurements and reviews various approaches that have been introduced recently to solve these issues. For the high-concentration limit, we identify four promising strategies including molecular confinement, optical observation volume reduction, temporal separation of signals and well-conceived experimental designs that specifically circumvent the high concentration limit. The low concentration limit is addressed by increasing the measurement speed, parallelization, signal amplification and preconcentration. The further development of these ideas will expand our possibilities to interrogate research questions with the clarity and precision provided only by the single-molecule approach.

  18. Global limits and interference patterns in dark matter direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Gondolo, Paolo

    2015-08-13

    We compare the general effective theory of one-body dark matter nucleon interactions to current direct detection experiments in a global multidimensional statistical analysis. We derive exclusion limits on the 28 isoscalar and isovector coupling constants of the theory, and show that current data place interesting constraints on dark matter-nucleon interaction operators usually neglected in this context. We characterize the interference patterns that can arise in dark matter direct detection from pairs of dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, or from isoscalar and isovector components of the same operator. We find that commonly neglected destructive interference effects weaken standard direct detection exclusion limits by up to one order of magnitude in the coupling constants.

  19. Global limits and interference patterns in dark matter direct detection

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Gondolo, Paolo E-mail: paolo.gondolo@utah.edu

    2015-08-01

    We compare the general effective theory of one-body dark matter nucleon interactions to current direct detection experiments in a global multidimensional statistical analysis. We derive exclusion limits on the 28 isoscalar and isovector coupling constants of the theory, and show that current data place interesting constraints on dark matter-nucleon interaction operators usually neglected in this context. We characterize the interference patterns that can arise in dark matter direct detection from pairs of dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, or from isoscalar and isovector components of the same operator. We find that commonly neglected destructive interference effects weaken standard direct detection exclusion limits by up to one order of magnitude in the coupling constants.

  20. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  1. Stochastic fluctuations and the detectability limit of network communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floretta, Lucio; Liechti, Jonas; Flammini, Alessandro; Rios, Paolo De Los

    2013-12-01

    We have analyzed the detectability limits of network communities in the framework of the popular Girvan and Newman benchmark. By carefully taking into account the inevitable stochastic fluctuations that affect the construction of each and every instance of the benchmark, we come to the conclusion that the native, putative partition of the network is completely lost even before the in-degree/out-degree ratio becomes equal to that of a structureless Erdös-Rényi network. We develop a simple iterative scheme, analytically well described by an infinite branching process, to provide an estimate of the true detectability limit. Using various algorithms based on modularity optimization, we show that all of them behave (semiquantitatively) in the same way, with the same functional form of the detectability threshold as a function of the network parameters. Because the same behavior has also been found by further modularity-optimization methods and for methods based on different heuristics implementations, we conclude that indeed a correct definition of the detectability limit must take into account the stochastic fluctuations of the network construction.

  2. Absolute Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, George

    1990-12-01

    The absolute sensitivity of the FOS will be determined in SV by observing 2 stars at 3 epochs, first in 3 apertures (1.0", 0.5", and 0.3" circular) and then in 1 aperture (1.0" circular). In cycle 1, one star, BD+28D4211 will be observed in the 1.0" aperture to establish the stability of the sensitivity and flat field characteristics and improve the accuracy obtained in SV. This star will also be observed through the paired apertures since these are not calibrated in SV. The stars will be observed in most detector/grating combinations. The data will be averaged to form the inverse sensitivity functions required by RSDP.

  3. Immuno-analysis of microparticles: probing at the limits of detection

    PubMed Central

    Latham, Sharissa L.; Tiberti, Natalia; Gokoolparsadh, Naveena; Holdaway, Karen; Olivier Couraud, Pierre; Grau, Georges E. R.; Combes, Valery

    2015-01-01

    Microparticle (MP) research is clouded by debate regarding the accuracy and validity of flow cytometry (FCM) as an analytical methodology, as it is influenced by many variables including the pre-analytical conditions, instruments physical capabilities and detection parameters. This study utilises a simplistic in vitro system for generating MP, and through comparative analysis with immuno-electron microscopy (Immuno-EM) assesses the strengths and limitations of probe selection and high-sensitivity FCM. Of the markers examined, MP were most specifically labelled with phosphatidylserine ligands, annexin V and lactadherin, although only ~60% MP are PS positive. Whilst these two ligands detect comparable absolute MP numbers, they interact with the same population in distinct manners; annexin V binding is enhanced on TNF induced MP. CD105 and CD54 expression were, as expected, consistent and enhanced following TNF activation respectively. Their labelling however accounted for as few as 30–40% of MP. The greatest discrepancies between FCM and I-EM were observed in the population solely labelled for the surface antigen. These findings demonstrate that despite significant improvements in resolution, high-sensitivity FCM remains limited in detecting small-size MP expressing low antigen levels. This study highlights factors to consider when selecting endothelial MP probes, as well as interpreting and representing data. PMID:26553743

  4. Investigation of NMR limits of detection for implantable microcoils.

    PubMed

    Baxan, N; Rengle, A; Pasquet, G; Châteaux, J-F; Briguet, A; Morin, P; Fakri-Bouchet, L

    2007-01-01

    Although NMR has the ability to investigate biological systems non-destructively, its low sensitivity primarily has hampered their investigation compared to other analytical techniques. Therefore, optimi zing radio frequency (RF) coils to improve sensitivity do offer benefits in MR spectroscopy (MRS). Sensitivity may be improved for mass- and volume-limited samples if the size of the detection RF coils matches the sample size. In this paper, the mass- and concentration-limit of detection (LOD(m), LOD(c)) for an implantable microcoil will be estimated by MRS measurements and then compared with their analytical values. For a sample containing a solution of several cerebral metabolites, for the Choline case, the LODm is 5.7 . 10(-9)mol and LODc of 3.8 mM. These preliminary results enable to open largely the biomedical applications based on cerebral metabolism investigation on small animal experiments.

  5. Detection of radioactive particles offshore by γ-ray spectrometry Part I: Monte Carlo assessment of detection depth limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maučec, M.; de Meijer, R. J.; Rigollet, C.; Hendriks, P. H. G. M.; Jones, D. G.

    2004-06-01

    A joint research project between the British Geological Survey and Nuclear Geophysics Division of the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Groningen, the Netherlands, was commissioned by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority to establish the efficiency of a towed seabed γ-ray spectrometer for the detection of 137Cs-containing radioactive particles offshore Dounreay, Scotland. Using the MCNP code, a comprehensive Monte Carlo feasibility study was carried out to model various combinations of geological matrices, particle burial depth and lateral displacement, source activity and detector material. To validate the sampling and absolute normalisation procedures of MCNP for geometries including multiple (natural and induced) heterogeneous sources in environmental monitoring, a benchmark experiment was conducted. The study demonstrates the ability of seabed γ-ray spectrometry to locate radioactive particles offshore and to distinguish between γ count rate increases due to particles from those due to enhanced natural radioactivity. The information presented in this study will be beneficial for estimation of the inventory of 137Cs particles and their activity distribution and for the recovery of particles from the sea floor. In this paper, the Monte Carlo assessment of the detection limits is presented. The estimation of the required towing speed and acquisition times and their application to radioactive particle detection and discrimination offshore formed a supplementary part of this study.

  6. Electrostrictive limit and focusing effects in pulsed photoacoustic detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heritier, J.-M.

    1983-01-01

    We give an analytical solution in the time and frequency domain for the cylindrical pressure wave generated by a laser pulse traveling in a liquid, which is valid over a wide range of laser beam dimensions and pulse durations. This leads to a simple prediction of the ultimate limitation set by the electrostrictive coupling and an easy analysis of the focusing effects on the photoacoustic signal. Two separate detection schemes were considered and show different behavior.

  7. Accuracy, precision, and lower detection limits (a deficit reduction approach)

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, C.T.

    1993-10-12

    The evaluation of the accuracy, precision and lower detection limits of the determination of trace radionuclides in environmental samples can become quite sophisticated and time consuming. This in turn could add significant cost to the analyses being performed. In the present method, a {open_quotes}deficit reduction approach{close_quotes} has been taken to keep costs low, but at the same time provide defensible data. In order to measure the accuracy of a particular method, reference samples are measured over the time period that the actual samples are being analyzed. Using a Lotus spreadsheet, data are compiled and an average accuracy is computed. If pairs of reference samples are analyzed, then precision can also be evaluated from the duplicate data sets. The standard deviation can be calculated if the reference concentrations of the duplicates are all in the same general range. Laboratory blanks are used to estimate the lower detection limits. The lower detection limit is calculated as 4.65 times the standard deviation of a set of blank determinations made over a given period of time. A Lotus spreadsheet is again used to compile data and LDLs over different periods of time can be compared.

  8. Thermal Infrared Spectral Band Detection Limits for Unidentified Surface Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkland, Laurel E.; Herr, Kenneth C.; Salisbury, John W.

    2001-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra recorded by airborne or satellite spectrometers can be searched for spectral features to determine the composition of rocks on planetary surfaces. Surface materials are identified by detections of characteristic spectral bands. We show how to define whether to accept an observed spectral feature as a detection when the target material is unknown. We also use remotely sensed spectra measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System to illustrate the importance of instrument parameters and surface properties on band detection limits and how the variation in signal-to-noise ratio with wavelength affects the bands that are most detectable for a given instrument. The spectrometer's sampling interval, spectral resolution, signal-to-noise ratio as a function of wavelength, and the sample's surface properties influence whether the instrument can detect a spectral feature exhibited by a material. As an example, in the 6-13 micrometer wavelength region, massive carbonates exhibit two bands: a very strong, broad feature at approximately 6.5 micrometers and a less intense, sharper band at approximately 11.25 micrometers. Although the 6.5-micrometer band is stronger and broader in laboratory-measured spectra, the 11.25-micrometer band will cause a more detectable feature in TES spectra.

  9. Ultrafast scene detection and recognition with limited visual information.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Carl Erick; Potter, Mary C

    2016-01-01

    Humans can detect target color pictures of scenes depicting concepts like picnic or harbor in sequences of six or twelve pictures presented as briefly as 13 ms, even when the target is named after the sequence (Potter, Wyble, Hagmann, & McCourt, 2014). Such rapid detection suggests that feedforward processing alone enabled detection without recurrent cortical feedback. There is debate about whether coarse, global, low spatial frequencies (LSFs) provide predictive information to high cortical levels through the rapid magnocellular (M) projection of the visual path, enabling top-down prediction of possible object identities. To test the "Fast M" hypothesis, we compared detection of a named target across five stimulus conditions: unaltered color, blurred color, grayscale, thresholded monochrome, and LSF pictures. The pictures were presented for 13-80 ms in six-picture rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) sequences. Blurred, monochrome, and LSF pictures were detected less accurately than normal color or grayscale pictures. When the target was named before the sequence, all picture types except LSF resulted in above-chance detection at all durations. Crucially, when the name was given only after the sequence, performance dropped and the monochrome and LSF pictures (but not the blurred pictures) were at or near chance. Thus, without advance information, monochrome and LSF pictures were rarely understood. The results offer only limited support for the Fast M hypothesis, suggesting instead that feedforward processing is able to activate conceptual representations without complementary reentrant processing.

  10. Absolute and relative blindsight.

    PubMed

    Balsdon, Tarryn; Azzopardi, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The concept of relative blindsight, referring to a difference in conscious awareness between conditions otherwise matched for performance, was introduced by Lau and Passingham (2006) as a way of identifying the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) in fMRI experiments. By analogy, absolute blindsight refers to a difference between performance and awareness regardless of whether it is possible to match performance across conditions. Here, we address the question of whether relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers can be accounted for by response bias. In our replication of Lau and Passingham's experiment, the relative blindsight effect was abolished when performance was assessed by means of a bias-free 2AFC task or when the criterion for awareness was varied. Furthermore, there was no evidence of either relative or absolute blindsight when both performance and awareness were assessed with bias-free measures derived from confidence ratings using signal detection theory. This suggests that both relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers amount to no more than variations in response bias in the assessment of performance and awareness. Consideration of the properties of psychometric functions reveals a number of ways in which relative and absolute blindsight could arise trivially and elucidates a basis for the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 blindsight.

  11. Attentional Capacity Limits Gap Detection during Concurrent Sound Segregation.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ada W S; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Alain, Claude

    2015-11-01

    Detecting a brief silent interval (i.e., a gap) is more difficult when listeners perceive two concurrent sounds rather than one in a sound containing a mistuned harmonic in otherwise in-tune harmonics. This impairment in gap detection may reflect the interaction of low-level encoding or the division of attention between two sound objects, both of which could interfere with signal detection. To distinguish between these two alternatives, we compared ERPs during active and passive listening with complex harmonic tones that could include a gap, a mistuned harmonic, both features, or neither. During active listening, participants indicated whether they heard a gap irrespective of mistuning. During passive listening, participants watched a subtitled muted movie of their choice while the same sounds were presented. Gap detection was impaired when the complex sounds included a mistuned harmonic that popped out as a separate object. The ERP analysis revealed an early gap-related activity that was little affected by mistuning during the active or passive listening condition. However, during active listening, there was a marked decrease in the late positive wave that was thought to index attention and response-related processes. These results suggest that the limitation in detecting the gap is related to attentional processing, possibly divided attention induced by the concurrent sound objects, rather than deficits in preattentional sensory encoding.

  12. Radiometric STFT Analysis of PDV recordings and detectivity limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozier, Olivier; Prudhomme, Gabriel; Mercier, Patrick; Berthe, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    Photonic Doppler Velocimetry is a plug-and-play and versatile diagnostic used in dynamic physic experiments to measure velocities. When signals are analyzed using a Short-Time Fourier Transform, multiple velocities can be distinguished: by example, the velocities of moving particle-cloud appear on spectrograms. In order to estimate the back-scattering fluxes of target, we propose an original approach ``PDV Radiometric analysis'' resulting in an expression of time-velocity spectrograms coded in power units. Experiments involving micron-sized particles raise the issue of detection limit; particle-size limit is very difficult to evaluate. From the quantification of noise sources, we derivate an estimation of the spectrogram noise leading to a detectivity limit. It may be compared to back-scattering and collected power from a particle, which is increasing with its size. At least, some results from laser-shock accelerated particles using two different PDV systems are compared: it may show the improvement of sensitivity.

  13. Assessment of detection limits of fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing for detection of illicit connections.

    PubMed

    Nienhuis, Jaap; de Haan, Cornelis; Langeveld, Jeroen; Klootwijk, Martijn; Clemens, François

    2013-01-01

    Distributed temperature sensing (DTS) with fiber-optic cables is a powerful tool to detect illicit connections in storm sewer systems. High-frequency temperature measurements along the in-sewer cable create a detailed representation of temperature anomalies due to illicit discharges. The detection limits of the monitoring equipment itself are well-known, but there is little information available on detection limits for the discovery of illicit connections, as in mixing of sewers, and attenuation also plays an important role. This paper describes the results of full-scale experiments aiming to quantify the detection limits for illicit connections under various sewer conditions. Based on the results, a new monitoring set-up for (partially) filled sewer conduits has been proposed.

  14. Detection limits of organic contaminants in drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, W.M.; Dhoot, J.S.; Dhaliwal, J.S.; Remoy, J.W.; Perera, S.K.; Baumann, F.J.

    1998-06-01

    This article examines some of the experimental variables that can contribute to the observed variability in laboratory performance. The examples provided suggest that method detection limits (MDLs) would be more uniform among laboratories if (1) uniform spike concentrations were used in MDL determination; (2) analytical methods were more uniform as to procedures, reagents, and materials; and (3) tighter guidelines were established for conducting MDL experiments and handling MDL data. The pooling of data from multiple spike levels (or any other means to increase sample size) minimizes random error in MDL determination. Improved control in MDL determination would lead to better information on laboratory capabilities, and this in turn would improve the technical basis for reporting limits, trigger levels, and water quality standards.

  15. Role of detection limits in drinking water regulation.

    PubMed

    Calder, Ryan S D; Schmitt, Ketra A

    2010-11-01

    Some commentators on environmental science and policy have claimed that advances in analytical chemistry, reflected by an ability to detect contaminants at ever-decreasing concentrations, lead to regulations stricter than justified by available toxicological data. We evaluate this claim in the context of drinking water regulation, with respect to contaminants regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). We examine the relationships between historical and present maximum contaminant levels and goals in the greater context of detection capability and evaluate the extent to which different aspects of the regulatory apparatus (i.e., analytical capability, cost-benefit analysis, analysis of competing risks, and available toxicological data) influence the regulatory process. Our findings do not support the claim that decreases in detection limit lead to more stringent regulation in the context of drinking water regulation in the United States. Further, based on our analysis of the National Primary Drinking Water Regulation and existing United States Environmental Protection Agency approaches to establishing the practical quantifiable level, we conclude that in the absence of changes to the underlying toxicological model, regulatory revision is unlikely.

  16. Theoretical limits on detection and analysis of small earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2016-08-01

    We investigate theoretical limits on detection and reliable estimates of source characteristics of small earthquakes using synthetic seismograms for shear/tensile dislocations on kinematic circular ruptures and observed seismic noise and properties of several acquisition systems (instrument response, sampling rate). Simulated source time functions for shear/tensile dislocation events with different magnitudes, static stress drops, and rupture velocities provide estimates for the amplitude and frequency content of P and S phases at various observation angles. The source time functions are convolved with a Green's function for a homogenous solid assuming given P, S wave velocities and attenuation coefficients and a given instrument response. The synthetic waveforms are superposed with average levels of the observed ambient seismic noise up to 1 kHz. The combined seismograms are used to calculate signal-to-noise ratios and expected frequency content of P and S phases at various locations. The synthetic simulations of signal-to-noise ratio reproduce observed ratios extracted from several well-recorded data sets. The results provide guidelines on detection of small events in various geological environments, along with information relevant to reliable analyses of earthquake source properties.

  17. Limits on detectability of mass loss from cool dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.; Doyle, J. G.; Redman, R. O.; Mathioudakis, M.

    1992-01-01

    Recent spectroscopic evidence supports the theoretical expectation that certain cool dwarfs may have stellar winds with M-dot values several orders of magnitude larger than the solar rate. For large enough values of M-dot, the emission from the wind is expected to have a spectrum which, at low enough frequencies, becomes a power law, S(v) about v exp alpha with alpha about 0.7. Data from IRAS and VLA suggest that such a spectrum may in fact occur in certain M dwarfs: a key test of the wind spectrum would be provided if the stars could be detected at lambda about 1 mm. We show that the M-dot required to ensure power-law emission is a few times 10 exp -10 solar mass/yr. With M-dot of this order, fluxes at lambda about 1 mm would be tens of mJy. Using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, we have tested this prediction on several stars: the data are suggestive but are near the limits of detection. Confirmation of our estimates will be important for evolution and for interstellar medium (ISM) physics: if even a few percent of all M dwarfs are losing mass at the above rates, the mass balance of the ISM will be dominated by M dwarfs.

  18. Fundamental limits of target detection performance in passive polarization imaging.

    PubMed

    Goudail, François; Boffety, Matthieu

    2017-04-01

    We quantitatively determine the target detection performance of different passive polarization imaging architectures perturbed by signal-independent detection noise or signal-dependent Poisson shot noise. We compare the fully adaptive polarimetric imager and the best channel of a static polarimetric imager, and in each case, we compare the use of a polarizer and a polarizing beam splitter as the polarization analyzing device. For all these configurations, we derive a closed-form expression of the target/background separability and quantify the performance gain brought by polarization imaging compared to standard intensity imaging. We show in particular that all the considered polarimetric imaging configurations but one require a minimum value of the polarimetric contrast in order to outperform intensity imaging. The only configuration that always performs better than intensity imaging uses a polarizing beam splitter in the presence of background shot noise. These results are useful in evaluating the fundamental limits of the gain brought by polarization imaging and determining, in practice, which type of imaging architecture is preferable for a given application.

  19. Physiological techniques for detecting expiratory flow limitation during tidal breathing.

    PubMed

    Koulouris, N G; Hardavella, G

    2011-09-01

    Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often exhale along the same flow-volume curve during quiet breathing as they do during the forced expiratory vital capacity manoeuvre, and this has been taken as an indicator of expiratory flow limitation at rest (EFL(T)). Therefore, EFL(T), namely attainment of maximal expiratory flow during tidal expiration, occurs when an increase in transpulmonary pressure causes no increase in expiratory flow. EFL(T) leads to small airway injury and promotes dynamic pulmonary hyperinflation, with concurrent dyspnoea and exercise limitation. In fact, EFL(T) occurs commonly in COPD patients (mainly in Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease III and IV stage), in whom the latter symptoms are common, but is not exclusive to COPD, since it can also be detected in other pulmonary and nonpulmonary diseases like asthma, acute respiratory distress syndrome, heart failure and obesity, etc. The existing up to date physiological techniques of assessing EFL(T) are reviewed in the present work. Among the currently available techniques, the negative expiratory pressure has been validated in a wide variety of settings and disorders. Consequently, it should be regarded as a simple, noninvasive, practical and accurate new technique.

  20. Limits of linearity and detection for some drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Needleman, S B; Romberg, R W

    1990-01-01

    The limits of linearity (LOL) and detection (LOD) are important factors in establishing the reliability of an analytical procedure for accurately assaying drug concentrations in urine specimens. Multiple analyses of analyte over an extended range of concentrations provide a measure of the ability of the analytical procedure to correctly identify known quantities of drug in a biofluid matrix. Each of the seven drugs of abuse gives linear analytical responses from concentrations at or near their LOD to concentrations several-fold higher than those generally encountered in the drug screening laboratory. The upper LOL exceeds the Department of Navy (DON) cutoff values by factors of approximately 2 to 160. The LOD varies from 0.4 to 5.0% of the DON cutoff value for each drug. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) is calculated as the LOD + 7 SD. The range for LOL is greater for drugs analyzed with deuterated internal standards compared with those using conventional internal standards. For THC acid, cocaine, PCP, and morphine, LOLs are 8 to 160-fold greater than the defined cutoff concentrations. For the other drugs, the LOL's are only 2 to 4-fold greater than the defined cutoff concentrations.

  1. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  2. Wave Detection Beyond the Standard Quantum Limit via EPR Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yiqiu; Miao, Haixing; Pang, Belinda; Evans, Matthew; Zhao, Chunnong; Harms, Jan; Schnabel, Roman; Chen, Yanbei

    2017-01-01

    The Standard Quantum Limit in continuous monitoring of a system is given by the trade-off of shot noise and back-action noise. In gravitational-wave detectors, such as Advanced LIGO, both contributions can simultaneously be squeezed in a broad frequency band by injecting a spectrum of squeezed vacuum states with a frequency-dependent squeeze angle. This approach requires setting up an additional long base-line, low-loss filter cavity in a vacuum system at the detector's site. Here, we show that the need for such a filter cavity can be eliminated, by exploiting EPR-entangled signal and idler beams. By harnessing their mutual quantum correlations and the difference in the way each beam propagates in the interferometer, we can engineer the input signal beam to have the appropriate frequency dependent conditional squeezing once the out-going idler beam is detected. Our proposal is appropriate for all future gravitational-wave detectors for achieving sensitivities beyond the Standard Quantum Limit.

  3. Neutron activation analysis detection limits using {sup 252}Cf sources

    SciTech Connect

    DiPrete, D.P.; Sigg, R.A.

    2000-07-01

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) developed a neutron activation analysis (NAA) facility several decades ago using low-flux {sup 252}Cf neutron sources. Through this time, the facility has addressed areas of applied interest in managing the Savannah River Site (SRS). Some applications are unique because of the site's operating history and its chemical-processing facilities. Because sensitivity needs for many applications are not severe, they can be accomplished using an {approximately}6-mg {sup 252}Cf NAA facility. The SRTC {sup 252}Cf facility continues to support applied research programs at SRTC as well as other SRS programs for environmental and waste management customers. Samples analyzed by NAA include organic compounds, metal alloys, sediments, site process solutions, and many other materials. Numerous radiochemical analyses also rely on the facility for production of short-lived tracers, yielding by activation of carriers and small-scale isotope production for separation methods testing. These applications are more fully reviewed in Ref. 1. Although the flux [{approximately}2 x 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s] is low relative to reactor facilities, more than 40 elements can be detected at low and sub-part-per-million levels. Detection limits provided by the facility are adequate for many analytical projects. Other multielement analysis methods, particularly inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, can now provide sensitivities on dissolved samples that are often better than those available by NAA using low-flux isotopic sources. Because NAA allows analysis of bulk samples, (a) it is a more cost-effective choice when its sensitivity is adequate than methods that require digestion and (b) it eliminates uncertainties that can be introduced by digestion processes.

  4. Femtomolar concentration detection limit and zeptomole mass detection limit for protein separation by capillary isoelectric focusing and laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Lauren M; Dickerson, Jane A; Dada, Oluwatosin; Dovichi, Norman J

    2009-03-01

    Fluorescence tends to produce the lowest detection limits for most forms of capillary electrophoresis. Two issues have discouraged its use in capillary isoelectric focusing. The first issue is fluorescent labeling of proteins. Most labeling reagents react with lysine residues and convert the cationic residue to a neutral or anionic product. At best, these reagents perturb the isoelectric point of the protein. At worse, they convert each protein into hundreds of different fluorescent products that confound analysis. The second issue is the large background signal generated by impurities within commercial ampholytes. This background signal is particularly strong when excited in the blue portion of the spectrum, which is required by many common fluorescent labeling reagents. This paper addresses these issues. For labeling, we employ Chromeo P540, which is a fluorogenic reagent that converts cationic lysine residues to cationic fluorescent products. The reaction products are excited in the green, which reduces the background signal generated by impurities present within the ampholytes. To further reduce the background signal, we photobleach ampholytes with high-power photodiodes. Photobleaching reduced the noise in the ampholyte blank by an order of magnitude. Isoelectric focusing performed with photobleached pH 3-10 ampholytes produced concentration detection limits of 270 +/- 25 fM and mass detection limits of 150 +/- 15 zmol for Chromeo P540 labeled beta-lactoglobulin. Concentration detection limits were 520 +/- 40 fM and mass detection limits were 310 +/- 30 zmol with pH 4-8 ampholytes. A homogenate was prepared from a Barrett's esophagus cell line and separated by capillary isoelectric focusing, reproducibly generating dozens of peaks. The sample taken for the separation was equal to the labeled protein homogenate from three cells.

  5. Current limitations and challenges in nanowaste detection, characterisation and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Part, Florian; Zecha, Gudrun; Causon, Tim; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • First review on detection of nanomaterials in complex waste samples. • Focus on nanoparticles in solid, liquid and gaseous waste samples. • Summary of current applicable methods for nanowaste detection and characterisation. • Limitations and challenges of characterisation of nanoparticles in waste. - Abstract: Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are already extensively used in diverse consumer products. Along the life cycle of a nano-enabled product, ENMs can be released and subsequently accumulate in the environment. Material flow models also indicate that a variety of ENMs may accumulate in waste streams. Therefore, a new type of waste, so-called nanowaste, is generated when end-of-life ENMs and nano-enabled products are disposed of. In terms of the precautionary principle, environmental monitoring of end-of-life ENMs is crucial to allow assessment of the potential impact of nanowaste on our ecosystem. Trace analysis and quantification of nanoparticulate species is very challenging because of the variety of ENM types that are used in products and low concentrations of nanowaste expected in complex environmental media. In the framework of this paper, challenges in nanowaste characterisation and appropriate analytical techniques which can be applied to nanowaste analysis are summarised. Recent case studies focussing on the characterisation of ENMs in waste streams are discussed. Most studies aim to investigate the fate of nanowaste during incineration, particularly considering aerosol measurements; whereas, detailed studies focusing on the potential release of nanowaste during waste recycling processes are currently not available. In terms of suitable analytical methods, separation techniques coupled to spectrometry-based methods are promising tools to detect nanowaste and determine particle size distribution in liquid waste samples. Standardised leaching protocols can be applied to generate soluble fractions stemming from solid wastes, while

  6. Estimation of the limit of detection using information theory measures.

    PubMed

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Vergara, Alexander; Huerta, Ramón; Marco, Santiago

    2014-01-31

    Definitions of the limit of detection (LOD) based on the probability of false positive and/or false negative errors have been proposed over the past years. Although such definitions are straightforward and valid for any kind of analytical system, proposed methodologies to estimate the LOD are usually simplified to signals with Gaussian noise. Additionally, there is a general misconception that two systems with the same LOD provide the same amount of information on the source regardless of the prior probability of presenting a blank/analyte sample. Based upon an analogy between an analytical system and a binary communication channel, in this paper we show that the amount of information that can be extracted from an analytical system depends on the probability of presenting the two different possible states. We propose a new definition of LOD utilizing information theory tools that deals with noise of any kind and allows the introduction of prior knowledge easily. Unlike most traditional LOD estimation approaches, the proposed definition is based on the amount of information that the chemical instrumentation system provides on the chemical information source. Our findings indicate that the benchmark of analytical systems based on the ability to provide information about the presence/absence of the analyte (our proposed approach) is a more general and proper framework, while converging to the usual values when dealing with Gaussian noise.

  7. Satellite based Global Flood Detection System - strengths and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Salamon, Peter; Thielen, Jutta; De Groeve, Tom; Zajac, Zuzanna

    2014-05-01

    One of the main problems for global hydrological models is that for many regions only very limited or no observational data for a model assessment is available. This problem could be overcome with filling the gaps using information derived from satellite observations. Thus, an evaluation of the remote sensing signal of the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS) against observed discharge data was performed in order to test the use of this data in sparsely gauged river basins. The study was carried out at 398 locations near the main rivers and in Africa, Asia, Europe, North America and South America. After evaluating different methodologies for extracting the satellite signal, a temporal (4 days) and spatial (4 GFDS pixels) average was chosen to proceed with the analysis. For the 340 stations with a concurrent time series longer than seven years for both, the signal and the in situ observed discharge (obtained mainly from the Global Runoff Data Centre), a calibration based on monthly linear models was carried out. The validation was executed and several skill scores were calculated such as the R2, Nash-Sutcliffe (NSE), and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). It is important to highlight that, for this study, 230 stations globally had Nash-Sutcliffe efficient score higher than zero, indicating that for specific conditions the satellite signal as used in GFDS can fill the gaps where observations are not available. For example, several locations in African catchments have good performance as in the Niger, Volta and Zambezi for which Nash-Sutcliffe is greater than 0.75. It is known that a number of factors affect total upwelling microwave brightness from a mixed water and land surface measured by a single image pixel. Aiming to better understand how some features of the sites could affect the satellite signal and the correlation with in situ observations, apart from the dependency on the river geometry, a multivariate analysis was carried out between the skill scores (NSE and

  8. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  9. Supercontinuum spatial modulation spectroscopy: Detection and noise limitations

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M. P.; Vietmeyer, F.; Kuno, M.; Aleksiuk, D.

    2013-11-15

    Supercontinuum spatial modulation spectroscopy is a facile tool for conducting single molecule/particle extinction spectroscopy throughout the visible and near infrared (420–1100 nm). The technique's capabilities are benchmarked using individual Au nanoparticles (NPs) as a standard since they are well studied and display a prominent plasmon resonance in the visible. Extinction spectra of individual Au NPs with diameters (d) ranging from d ∼ 8 to 40 nm are resolved with extinction cross sections (σ{sub ext}) of σ{sub ext} ∼1 × 10{sup −13}–1 ×10{sup −11} cm{sup 2}. Corresponding signal-to-noise ratios range from ∼30 to ∼1400. The technique's limit of detection is determined to be 4.3 × 10{sup −14} cm{sup 2} (4.3 nm{sup 2}). To showcase supercontinuum spatial modulation spectroscopy's broader applicability, extinction spectra are acquired for other model systems, such as individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and CdSe nanowires. We show for the first time extinction spectra of individual (8,3) and (6,5) SWCNTs. For both chiralities, their E{sub 11} [(8,3) 1.30 eV (952 nm); (6,5) 1.26 eV (986 nm)] and E{sub 22} [(8,3) 1.86 eV (667 nm); (6,5) 2.19 eV (567 nm)] excitonic resonances are seen with corresponding cross sections of σ{sub ext} ∼ 10{sup −13} cm{sup 2} μm{sup −1}.

  10. 40 CFR 434.64 - Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Procedure and method detection limit... method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids. For the purposes of this part, the following... CFR part 136, the method detection limit for measuring settleable solids under this part shall be...

  11. 40 CFR 434.64 - Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedure and method detection limit... method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids. For the purposes of this part, the following... CFR part 136, the method detection limit for measuring settleable solids under this part shall be...

  12. Limited irrigation research and infrared thermometry for detecting water stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS Limited Irrigation Research Farm, located outside of Greeley Colorado, is an experiment evaluating management perspectives of limited irrigation water. An overview of the farm systems is shown, including drip irrigation systems, water budgeting, and experimental design, as well as preli...

  13. LIMITATIONS ON THE USES OF MULTIMEDIA EXPOSURE MEASUREMENTS FOR MULTIPATHWAY EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT - PART I: HANDLING OBSERVATIONS BELOW DETECTION LIMITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multimedia data from two probability-based exposure studies were investigated in terms of how censoring of non-detects affected estimation of population parameters and associations. Appropriate methods for handling censored below-detection-limit (BDL) values in this context were...

  14. Remote sensing for detection of soil limitations in agricultural areas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazee, C. J.; Myers, V. I.; Westin, F. C.

    1971-01-01

    Research was initiated to establish remote sensing techniques for recognizing and mapping soil limitations to land use. Analysis of soils with limitations to land use because of dense subsoil (claypan) and unfavorable topography (convex sloping or depressional areas) was accomplished by experienced soil scientists utilizing a density slicing system. Maps of soil limitations were produced by photographing the color encoded density slicing analysis of an area. The percentage of each soil limitation was measured by the planimeter feature of the density slicing system. The initial results indicate that a density slicing system has great potential not only for delineating areas of similar soil limitations but also for indicating the percentage composition of an area.

  15. Remote sensing for detection of soil limitations in agricultural areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazee, C. J.; Heil, R. D.; Westin, F. C.

    1970-01-01

    Automatic analysis of soil limitations studied by an automatic color TV density slicing system was accomplished. This system color codes the density range of the value component of color of an image. Maps of soil limitations or other similar soil groups are produced by photographing the color coded representation of an area. The planimeter feature of the density slicing system measures the area of each soil limitation providing information on the importance of a soil limitation in an area. The results of this study suggest that an automatic color TV density slicing system has great potential not only for identifying and mapping similar soil areas, but also for indicating the percentage composition of an area.

  16. The absolute threshold of cone vision

    PubMed Central

    Koeing, Darran; Hofer, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of the absolute threshold of cone vision, which has been previously underestimated due to sub-optimal conditions or overly strict subjective response criteria. We avoided these limitations by using optimized stimuli and experimental conditions while having subjects respond within a rating scale framework. Small (1′ fwhm), brief (34 msec), monochromatic (550 nm) stimuli were foveally presented at multiple intensities in dark-adapted retina for 5 subjects. For comparison, 4 subjects underwent similar testing with rod-optimized stimuli. Cone absolute threshold, that is, the minimum light energy for which subjects were just able to detect a visual stimulus with any response criterion, was 203 ± 38 photons at the cornea, ∼0.47 log units lower than previously reported. Two-alternative forced-choice measurements in a subset of subjects yielded consistent results. Cone thresholds were less responsive to criterion changes than rod thresholds, suggesting a limit to the stimulus information recoverable from the cone mosaic in addition to the limit imposed by Poisson noise. Results were consistent with expectations for detection in the face of stimulus uncertainty. We discuss implications of these findings for modeling the first stages of human cone vision and interpreting psychophysical data acquired with adaptive optics at the spatial scale of the receptor mosaic. PMID:21270115

  17. Limitations for heterodyne detection of Brillouin scattered light

    SciTech Connect

    Allemeier, R.T.; Wagner, J.W.; Telschow, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    One means by which elastic properties of a material may be determined is measuring sound wave velocities in the material, from which elastic moduli of interest can be computed. Velocity can be measured by conventional piezoelectric transduction techniques, by applying laser ultrasonics, or by using Brillouin-scattering methods. Brillouin-scattering techniques for determining the sound wave velocity are particularly attractive since they are completely noninvasive. Only a probe beam of light is required since the thermal energy in the material provides the elastic motion. Heterodyne methods for detection of Brillouin-scattered light are considered one possible means to increase the speed of the scattered light frequency detection. Results of experiments with simulated Brillouin scattering suggest that heterodyne detection of the Brillouin-scattered light is feasible. Experiments to detect Brillouin-scattered light, with water as the scattering medium, were designed and interpreted using the results of the simulated scattering experiments. Overall, results showed that it is difficult to narrow the linewidth for Brillouin scattering to an acceptable level. The results given indicate that heterodyne detection of the Brillouin components requires detection bandwidths that are quite small, perhaps 10 Hz or lower. These small bandwidths can be routinely achieved using lock-in amplifier techniques.

  18. Exploring the limits of community detection strategies in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Aldecoa, Rodrigo; Marín, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of network community structure has profound implications in several scientific areas. Therefore, testing the algorithms developed to establish the optimal division of a network into communities is a fundamental problem in the field. We performed here a highly detailed evaluation of community detection algorithms, which has two main novelties: 1) using complex closed benchmarks, which provide precise ways to assess whether the solutions generated by the algorithms are optimal; and, 2) A novel type of analysis, based on hierarchically clustering the solutions suggested by multiple community detection algorithms, which allows to easily visualize how different are those solutions. Surprise, a global parameter that evaluates the quality of a partition, confirms the power of these analyses. We show that none of the community detection algorithms tested provide consistently optimal results in all networks and that Surprise maximization, obtained by combining multiple algorithms, obtains quasi-optimal performances in these difficult benchmarks. PMID:23860510

  19. Multi-wavelength UV-detection in capillary hydrodynamic fractionation. Data treatment for an absolute estimate of the particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementi, Luis A.; Aguirre, Miren; Leiza, José R.; Gugliotta, Luis M.; Vega, Jorge R.

    2017-03-01

    A new approach is proposed for estimating the particle size distribution (PSD) of hydrophobic colloids by capillary hydrodynamic fractionation (CHDF) based on UV-detection at several wavelengths. At each elution time, the multi-wavelength UV signal is used to estimate the instantaneous PSD at the detector cell by solving the involved inverse problem through an artificial neural network. Then, the global PSD is obtained as a weighted sum of the estimated instantaneous PSDs along the entire elution time interval. With the current approach, the estimation procedure is absolute in the sense that no calibration of diameters is required and the instrumental broadening introduced by the fractionation capillary is automatically compensated for. The proposed method was evaluated on the basis of narrow polystyrene standards, as follows: i) a single standard, to emulate a narrow unimodal PSD; ii) a mixture of three standards of relatively close average diameters, to emulate a broad unimodal PSD; and iii) a mixture of two standards of quite different average diameters, to emulate a bimodal PSD. Experimental results indicate that the new approach is able to produce adequate PSD estimates provided that the particle refractive index is known with a relatively high accuracy.

  20. Determination of a Limited Scope Network's Lightning Detection Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rompala, John T.; Blakeslee, R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper outlines a modeling technique to map lightning detection efficiency variations over a region surveyed by a sparse array of ground based detectors. A reliable flash peak current distribution (PCD) for the region serves as the technique's base. This distribution is recast as an event probability distribution function. The technique then uses the PCD together with information regarding: site signal detection thresholds, type of solution algorithm used, and range attenuation; to formulate the probability that a flash at a specified location will yield a solution. Applying this technique to the full region produces detection efficiency contour maps specific to the parameters employed. These contours facilitate a comparative analysis of each parameter's effect on the network's detection efficiency. In an alternate application, this modeling technique gives an estimate of the number, strength, and distribution of events going undetected. This approach leads to a variety of event density contour maps. This application is also illustrated. The technique's base PCD can be empirical or analytical. A process for formulating an empirical PCD specific to the region and network being studied is presented. A new method for producing an analytical representation of the empirical PCD is also introduced.

  1. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m‑1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  2. Absolutely classical spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

  3. Reflectance measurements for the detection and mapping of soil limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, L. A.; Frazee, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    During 1971 and 1972 research was conducted on two fallow fields in the proposed Oahe Irrigation Project to investigate the relationship between the tonal variations observed on aerial photographs and the principal soil limitations of the area. A grid sampling procedure was used to collected detailed field data during the 1972 growing season. The field data was compared to imagery collected on May 14, 1971 at 3050 meters altitude. The imagery and field data were initially evaluated by a visual analysis. Correlation and regression analysis revealed a highly significant correlation and regression analysis revealed a highly significant correlation between the digitized color infrared film data and soil properties such as organic matter content, color, depth to carbonates, bulk density and reflectivity. Computer classification of the multiemulsion film data resulted in maps delineating the areas containing claypan and erosion limitations. Reflectance data from the red spectral band provided the best results.

  4. METHODS OF DEALING WITH VALUES BELOW THE LIMIT OF DETECTION USING SAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to limitations of chemical analysis procedures, small concentrations cannot be precisely measured. These concentrations are said to be below the limit of detection (LOD). In statistical analyses, these values are often censored and substituted with a constant value, such ...

  5. Limits of Precipitation Detection from Microwave Radiometers and Sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munchak, S. J.; Skofronick-Jackson, G.; Johnson, B. T.

    2012-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will unify and draw from numerous microwave conical scanning imaging radiometers and cross-track sounders, many of which already in operation, to provide near real-time precipitation estimates worldwide at 3-hour intervals. Some of these instruments were designed for primary purposes unrelated to precipitation remote sensing. Therefore it is worthwhile to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each set of channels with respect to precipitation detection to fully understand their role in the GPM constellation. The GPM radiometer algorithm will use an observationally-based Bayesian retrieval with common databases of precipitation profiles for all sensors. Since these databases are still under development and will not be truly complete until the GPM core satellite has completed at least one year of dual-frequency radar observations, a screening method based upon retrieval of non-precipitation parameters related to the surface and atmospheric state is used in this study. A cost function representing the departure of modeled radiances from their observed values plus the departure of surface and atmospheric parameters from the TELSEM emissivity atlas and MERRA reanalysis is used as an indicator of precipitation. Using this method, two datasets are used to evaluate precipitation detection: One year of matched AMSR-E and AMSU-B/MHS overpasses with CloudSat used as validation globally; and SSMIS overpasses over the United States using the National Mosaic and QPE (NMQ) as validation. The Heidke Skill Score (HSS) is used as a metric to evaluate detection skill over different surfaces, seasons, and across different sensors. Non-frozen oceans give the highest HSS for all sensors, followed by bare land and coasts, then snow-covered land and sea ice. Negligible skill is present over ice sheets. Sounders tend to have higher skill than imagers over complex surfaces (coast, snow, and sea ice), whereas imagers have higher skill

  6. Transduction of nanovolt signals: Limits of electric-field detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmijn, J.

    1989-11-01

    Life scientists discussed the extreme electrical sensitivity of marine sharks, skates, and rays. After reviewing the results of earlier studies on the electric sense at the animal and system levels, the participants discussed the basic process of signal transduction in terms of voltage-sensitive ionic channels. Struck by the small charge displacements needed for excitation, they strongly recommended that sensory biologists, physiologists, and biophysicists join in a concerted effort to initiate new research on the ionic mechanisms of electric field detection. To obtain detailed information on the electroreceptive membrane and its ionic channels, high resolution recording techniques will be mandatory.

  7. Limit on Remote FTIR Detection of Trace Gases,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    sr.cm-l) CCMIN v (pV) HCI 2900-3000 1.3 x 10- 2.5 x 109 20 NO2 2650-2935 1.4 x 10-9 1.3 x 1010 92 DF 2700-2900 2.6 x 10-9 3.5 x 109 i7 HBr 2450-2650 3.9...dwell time =" 10 secs. MIN v - minimum detectable volume concentration for td 1 0 secs., cloud thickness = 10 m, &T Y5C., Tsfc 300K. L -7.. 2H9-58

  8. Hidden evolution: progress and limitations in detecting multifarious natural selection.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Norman A; Kliman, Richard M

    2002-04-01

    From illustrative examples of research on the best-studied group of species to date, Drosophila melanogaster and its closest relatives, we argue that selection is multifarious, but often hidden. Selective fixation of new, highly advantageous alleles is the most parsimonious explanation for a typical pattern of molecular variation observed in genomic regions characterized by very low recombination: drastically reduced DNA sequence variation within species and typical levels of sequence divergence among species. At the same time, the identity of the gene (or genes) influenced by selection is not just difficult to discern; it may be impossible. Studies of the genetic basis of reproductive isolation demonstrate that, although the D. melanogaster complex species appear virtually identical, dozens of currently unidentified genes contribute to hybrid sterility. We argue that these findings are best explained by selectively-driven functional divergence and demonstrate the multifarious nature of selection. Although multifarious selection certainly occurs, the exact characters responsible for differences in survival and reproductive success are unknown. We do not see these inherent limits as a cause for despair or a problem for evolutionary biology. Instead, we hope to raise awareness of these complexities of evolution by highlighting both the progress and the limitations of characterizing multifarious natural selection.

  9. Naked-eye detection as a universal approach to lower the limit of detection of enzyme-linked immunoassays.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Erin F; Paterson, Sureyya; de la Rica, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Colorimetric biosensors for the detection of analytes with the naked eye are required in environmental monitoring, point-of-care diagnostics, and analyses in resources constrained settings, where detection instruments may not be available. However, instrument-based detection methods are usually more adequate for detecting small variations in the signal compared to naked-eye detection schemes, and consequently the limit of detection of the latter is usually higher than the former. Here, we demonstrate that the limit of detection of colorimetric enzyme-linked immunoassays can be decreased several orders of magnitude when using naked-eye detection instead of a spectrophotometer for detecting the signal. The key step to lower the limit of detection is adding a small volume of chromogenic substrate during the signal generation step. This generates highly colored solutions that can be easily visualized with the naked eye and recorded with the camera of a mobile phone. The proposed method does not require expensive equipment or complex protocols to enhance the signal, and therefore it is a universal approach to lower the limit of detection of colorimetric enzyme-linked immunoassays.

  10. Quantum-limited Terahertz detection without liquid cryogens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Under this contract, we have successfully designed, fabricated and tested a revolutionary new type of detector for Terahertz (THz) radiation, the tunable antenna-coupled intersubband Terahertz (TACIT) detector. The lowest-noise THz detectors used in the astrophysics community require cooling to temperatures below 4K. This deep cryogenic requirement forces satellites launched for THz- observing missions to include either large volumes of liquid Helium, complex cryocoolers, or both. Cryogenic requirements thus add significantly to the cost, complexity and mass of satellites and limit the duration of their missions. It hence desirable to develop new detector technologies with less stringent cryogenic requirements. Such detectors will not only be important in space-based astrophysics, but also respond to a growing demand for THz technology for earth-based scientific and commercial applications.

  11. Analysis of remotely sensed data for detecting soil limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, L. A.; Frazee, C. J.; Waltz, F. A.

    1973-01-01

    During 1971 and 1972 a detailed study was conducted on a fallow field in the proposed Oahe Irrigation Project to determine the relationship between the tonal variation observed on aerial photographs and the properties of eroded soil. Correlation and regression analysis of digitized, multiemulsion, color infrared film (2443) data and detailed field data revealed a highly significant correlation between film transmittance and several soil properties indicative of the erosion limitation. Computer classification of the multiemulsion film data resulted in maps portraying the eroded soil and the normal soil. Both correlation and computer classification results were best using the reflectance data from the red spectral band. The results showed film transmittance was actually measuring the reflectivity of the soil surface which was increased by the incorporation of the light colored, calcareous parent material exposed by erosion or tillage on soils with thin surface horizons.

  12. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  13. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  14. Current limitations and challenges in nanowaste detection, characterisation and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Part, Florian; Zecha, Gudrun; Causon, Tim; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Huber-Humer, Marion

    2015-09-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are already extensively used in diverse consumer products. Along the life cycle of a nano-enabled product, ENMs can be released and subsequently accumulate in the environment. Material flow models also indicate that a variety of ENMs may accumulate in waste streams. Therefore, a new type of waste, so-called nanowaste, is generated when end-of-life ENMs and nano-enabled products are disposed of. In terms of the precautionary principle, environmental monitoring of end-of-life ENMs is crucial to allow assessment of the potential impact of nanowaste on our ecosystem. Trace analysis and quantification of nanoparticulate species is very challenging because of the variety of ENM types that are used in products and low concentrations of nanowaste expected in complex environmental media. In the framework of this paper, challenges in nanowaste characterisation and appropriate analytical techniques which can be applied to nanowaste analysis are summarised. Recent case studies focussing on the characterisation of ENMs in waste streams are discussed. Most studies aim to investigate the fate of nanowaste during incineration, particularly considering aerosol measurements; whereas, detailed studies focusing on the potential release of nanowaste during waste recycling processes are currently not available. In terms of suitable analytical methods, separation techniques coupled to spectrometry-based methods are promising tools to detect nanowaste and determine particle size distribution in liquid waste samples. Standardised leaching protocols can be applied to generate soluble fractions stemming from solid wastes, while micro- and ultrafiltration can be used to enrich nanoparticulate species. Imaging techniques combined with X-ray-based methods are powerful tools for determining particle size, morphology and screening elemental composition. However, quantification of nanowaste is currently hampered due to the problem to differentiate engineered from

  15. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  16. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  17. Crack Detection for Aircraft Holes with Limited Accessibility Containing Fasteners and Sealant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldrin, J. C.; Mandeville, J. R.; Judd, D. R.; Mullis, R. T.; Kropas-Hughes, C. V.

    2003-03-01

    This paper presents a study of crack detection methods for holes in structures with limited accessibility containing fasteners with variable interface conditions. For far crack detection, a method was first designed using models, and refined using a signal processing parameter optimization scheme and an iterative neural network training process. For near crack detection, a method incorporating the spatial variation of the principal components was developed. Using these methods, improvements in crack detection performance were achieved.

  18. 137Cs measurement uncertainties and detection limits for airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) data analysed using a spectral windows method.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, A J; Sanderson, D C W; White, D C

    2006-02-01

    The uncertainties associated with airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) measurements analysed using a spectral windows method, and associated detection limits, have been investigated. For individual short measurements over buried 137Cs activity detection limits of 10 kBq m(-2) are achieved. These detection limits are reduced for superficial activity and longer integration times. For superficial activity, detection limits below 1 kBq m(-2) are achievable. A comparison is made with the detection limits for other data processing methods.

  19. Epidemiologic Evaluation of Measurement Data in the Presence of Detection Limits

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Jay H.; Colt, Joanne S.; Camann, David; Davis, Scott; Cerhan, James R.; Severson, Richard K.; Bernstein, Leslie; Hartge, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of environmental factors greatly improve the quality of epidemiologic studies but can pose challenges because of the presence of upper or lower detection limits or interfering compounds, which do not allow for precise measured values. We consider the regression of an environmental measurement (dependent variable) on several covariates (independent variables). Various strategies are commonly employed to impute values for interval-measured data, including assignment of one-half the detection limit to nondetected values or of “fill-in” values randomly selected from an appropriate distribution. On the basis of a limited simulation study, we found that the former approach can be biased unless the percentage of measurements below detection limits is small (5–10%). The fill-in approach generally produces unbiased parameter estimates but may produce biased variance estimates and thereby distort inference when 30% or more of the data are below detection limits. Truncated data methods (e.g., Tobit regression) and multiple imputation offer two unbiased approaches for analyzing measurement data with detection limits. If interest resides solely on regression parameters, then Tobit regression can be used. If individualized values for measurements below detection limits are needed for additional analysis, such as relative risk regression or graphical display, then multiple imputation produces unbiased estimates and nominal confidence intervals unless the proportion of missing data is extreme. We illustrate various approaches using measurements of pesticide residues in carpet dust in control subjects from a case–control study of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:15579415

  20. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  1. Shot noise limited detection of OH using the technique of laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakalyar, D. M.; Davis, L. I., Jr.; Guo, C.; James, J. V.; Kakos, S.; Morris, P. T.; Wang, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Nearly shot-noise limited detection of OH using the technique of laser-induced fluorescence is reported. A LIDAR configuration is used to excite fluorescence in a large volume and a narrow-bandwidth interference filter provides spectral discrimination. This arrangement alleviates the effect of ozone interference and facilitates image processing at relatively close distances. The detection limit is determined mainly by the shot-noise of the solar background. Ground-based measurements in Dearborn indicate a detection limit of better than 1 x 10 to the 6th power OH/cubic cm over a forty-minute acquisition period. Under favorable conditions, a comparable detection limit was also observed for airborne measurements.

  2. Real-time RT-PCR for detection, identification and absolute quantification of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus using different types of standards.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vazquez, C; Bandín, I; Dopazo, C P

    2015-05-21

    In the present study, 2 systems of real-time RT-PCR-one based on SYBR Green and the other on TaqMan-were designed to detect strains from any genotype of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), with high sensitivity and repeatability/reproducibility. In addition, the method was optimized for quantitative purposes (qRT-PCR), and standard curves with different types of reference templates were constructed and compared. Specificity was tested against 26 isolates from 4 genotypes. The sensitivity of the procedures was first tested against cell culture isolation, obtaining a limit of detection (LD) of 100 TCID50 ml-1 (100-fold below the LD using cell culture), at a threshold cycle value (Ct) of 36. Sensitivity was also evaluated using RNA from crude (LD = 1 fg; 160 genome copies) and purified virus (100 ag; 16 copies), plasmid DNA (2 copies) and RNA transcript (15 copies). No differences between both chemistries were observed in sensitivity and dynamic range. To evaluate repeatability and reproducibility, all experiments were performed in triplicate and on 3 different days, by workers with different levels of experience, obtaining Ct values with coefficients of variation always <5. This fact, together with the high efficiency and R2 values of the standard curves, encouraged us to analyse the reliability of the method for viral quantification. The results not only demonstrated that the procedure can be used for detection, identification and quantification of this virus, but also demonstrated a clear correlation between the regression lines obtained with different standards, which will help scientists to compare sensitivity results between different studies.

  3. Quantum limits on the detection sensitivity of a linear detector with feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang

    2017-03-01

    We show that the detection sensitivity of a linear detector is lower bounded by some quantum limits. For the force sensitivity, which is relevant for atomic force microscopes, the lower bound is given by the so-called ultimate quantum limit (UQL). For the displacement sensitivity, which is relevant for detecting gravitational waves, a generalized lower bound that can overcome the usual UQL is obtained.

  4. METHODS OF DEALING WITH VALUES BELOW THE LIMIT OF DETECTION USING SAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to limitations of chemical analysis procedures, small values cannot be precisely measured. These values are said to be below the limit of detection (LOD). In statistical analyses, these values are often censored and substituted with a constant value, such as half the LOD,...

  5. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  6. Strategies and limitations for fluorescence detection of XAFS at high flux beamlines

    DOE PAGES

    Heald, Steve M.

    2015-02-17

    The issue of detecting the XAFS signal from dilute samples is discussed in detail with the aim of making best use of high flux beamlines that provide up to 1013photons-1. Various detection methods are compared, including filters with slits, solid state detectors, crystal analyzers and combinations of these. These comparisons rely on simulations that use experimentally determined parameters. It is found that inelastic scattering places a fundamental limit on detection, and that it is important to take proper account of the polarization dependence of the signals. The combination of a filter–slit system with a solid state detector is a promisingmore » approach. With an optimized system good performance can be obtained even if the total count rate is limited to 107Hz. Detection schemes with better energy resolution can help at the largest dilutions if their collection efficiency and count rate limits can be improved.« less

  7. Strategies and limitations for fluorescence detection of XAFS at high flux beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, Steve M.

    2015-02-17

    The issue of detecting the XAFS signal from dilute samples is discussed in detail with the aim of making best use of high flux beamlines that provide up to 1013photons-1. Various detection methods are compared, including filters with slits, solid state detectors, crystal analyzers and combinations of these. These comparisons rely on simulations that use experimentally determined parameters. It is found that inelastic scattering places a fundamental limit on detection, and that it is important to take proper account of the polarization dependence of the signals. The combination of a filter–slit system with a solid state detector is a promising approach. With an optimized system good performance can be obtained even if the total count rate is limited to 107Hz. Detection schemes with better energy resolution can help at the largest dilutions if their collection efficiency and count rate limits can be improved.

  8. Analytical Method and Detection Limit Studies for Detection of GB in GB Hydrolysate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    performed at pH 8 and room temperature with a J 50:2 hydrolysate:solvent ratio. Extraction recoveries are listed in Table 13. Hexane and isooctane were...22 Solvent Extraction Efficiency Chloroform 50% Methylene Chloride 49 % Hexane 5 % Isooctane None detected Previous studies have indicated that GB

  9. Estimating the resolution limit of the map equation in community detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Tatsuro; Rosvall, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A community detection algorithm is considered to have a resolution limit if the scale of the smallest modules that can be resolved depends on the size of the analyzed subnetwork. The resolution limit is known to prevent some community detection algorithms from accurately identifying the modular structure of a network. In fact, any global objective function for measuring the quality of a two-level assignment of nodes into modules must have some sort of resolution limit or an external resolution parameter. However, it is yet unknown how the resolution limit affects the so-called map equation, which is known to be an efficient objective function for community detection. We derive an analytical estimate and conclude that the resolution limit of the map equation is set by the total number of links between modules instead of the total number of links in the full network as for modularity. This mechanism makes the resolution limit much less restrictive for the map equation than for modularity; in practice, it is orders of magnitudes smaller. Furthermore, we argue that the effect of the resolution limit often results from shoehorning multilevel modular structures into two-level descriptions. As we show, the hierarchical map equation effectively eliminates the resolution limit for networks with nested multilevel modular structures.

  10. Absolute neutrino mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Silvia; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2013-04-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments firmly established non-vanishing neutrino masses, a result that can be regarded as a strong motivation to extend the Standard Model. In spite of being the lightest massive particles, neutrinos likely represent an important bridge to new physics at very high energies and offer new opportunities to address some of the current cosmological puzzles, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter. In this context, the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale is a key issue within modern High Energy Physics. The talks in this parallel session well describe the current exciting experimental activity aiming to determining the absolute neutrino mass scale and offer an overview of a few models beyond the Standard Model that have been proposed in order to explain the neutrino masses giving a prediction for the absolute neutrino mass scale and solving the cosmological puzzles.

  11. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  12. Limit of detection of 15{sub N} by gas-chromatography atomic emission detection: Optimization using an experimental design

    SciTech Connect

    Deruaz, D.; Bannier, A.; Pionchon, C.

    1995-08-01

    This paper deals with the optimal conditions for the detection of {sup 15}N determined using a four-factor experimental design from [2{sup 13}C,-1,3 {sup 15}N] caffeine measured with an atomic emission detector (AED) coupled to gas chromatography (GC). Owing to the capability of a photodiodes array, AED can simultaneously detect several elements using their specific emission lines within a wavelength range of 50 nm. So, the emissions of {sup 15}N and {sup 14}N are simultaneously detected at 420.17 nm and 421.46 nm respectively. Four independent experimental factors were tested (1) helium flow rate (plasma gas); (2) methane pressure (reactant gas); (3) oxygen pressure; (4) hydrogen pressure. It has been shown that these four gases had a significant influence on the analytical response of {sup 15}N. The linearity of the detection was determined using {sup 15}N amounts ranging from 1.52 pg to 19 ng under the optimal conditions obtained from the experimental design. The limit of detection was studied using different methods. The limits of detection of {sup 15}N was 1.9 pg/s according to the IUPAC method (International-Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry). The method proposed by Quimby and Sullivan gave a value of 2.3 pg/s and that of Oppenheimer gave a limit of 29 pg/s. For each determination, and internal standard: 1-isobutyl-3.7 dimethylxanthine was used. The results clearly demonstrate that GC AED is sensitive and selective enough to detect and measure {sup 15}N-labelled molecules after gas chromatographic separation.

  13. Modeling the performance limits of novel microcantilever heaters for volatile organic compound detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahangir, Ifat; Koley, Goutam

    2017-01-01

    We present a theoretical model estimating the performance limits of novel AlGaN/GaN heterostructure based microcantilever heater sensors to perform advanced volatile organic compound (VOC) detection and mixture analysis. Operating without any specific surface functionalization or treatment; these devices utilize the strong surface polarization of AlGaN as well as the unique device geometries, to perform selective detection of analytes based on their latent heat of evaporation and molecular dipole moment over a wide concentration range. The presented model incorporates heat transfer, Joule heating, thermal expansion and evaporative heat loss mechanisms, to predict device behaviors such as temperature profiles and sensing performance limits under various steady-state and transient test conditions. In addition, the versatility of the proposed model enables us to successfully predict the capability of the device to perform mixture analysis, and provides guidelines to further optimize the device properties to achieve a limit of detection in sub-ppm concentration.

  14. Combined use of relative and absolute dating techniques for detecting signals of Alpine landscape evolution during the late Pleistocene and early Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favilli, Filippo; Egli, Markus; Brandova, Dagmar; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Kubik, Peter; Cherubini, Paolo; Mirabella, Aldo; Sartori, Giacomo; Giaccai, Daniele; Haeberli, Wilfried

    2009-11-01

    A combination of three relative and two absolute (numerical) dating techniques, applied on nine soil profiles in an Alpine environment located in Val di Rabbi (Trentino, Northern Italy), was used to improve the investigation methodology of Alpine sites in response to climate change and to reconstruct the chronology of late Pleistocene and early Holocene landscape evolution. The degree of podzolisation, clay mineral evolution and the element mass balances of each site were investigated. Furthermore, the stable fraction of the soil organic matter (SOM) was extracted with 10% H 2O 2 and 14C-dated. The age of the organic residues was compared with the age of charcoal fragments found in one of the studied soils and with the age of rock boulders obtained by surface exposure dating (SED) with cosmogenic 10Be. Numerical dating and weathering characteristics of the soils showed a fairly good agreement and enabled a relative and absolute differentiation of landscape elements. The combination of 14C-dating of SOM and SED indicated that deglaciation processes in Val di Rabbi were already far advanced by around 14 000 cal BP and that glacier oscillations affected the highest part of the region until about 9000 cal BP. The development of clay minerals is time-dependent and reflects weathering intensity. We found a close link between secondary clay minerals like smectite or vermiculite and soil age as obtained by the dating of the organic residues after the H 2O 2 treatment. Calculated element mass balances strongly correlated with the ages derived from 14C measurements. Old soils have lost a major part of base cations (up to 75% compared to the parent material), Fe and Al, which indicates a continuous high weathering intensity. Results of the chemical and mineralogical analyses were in good agreement with numerical dating techniques, showing the dynamics of an Alpine landscape within a relatively small area. The combination of relative and absolute dating techniques is a

  15. Hydrazine detection limits in the cigarette smoke matrix using infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Plunkett, Susan; Parrish, Milton E; Shafer, Kenneth H; Shorter, Joanne H; Nelson, David D; Zahniser, Mark S

    2002-09-01

    Infrared absorption lines of hydrazine are broad and typically not baseline resolved, with line strengths approximately 100 times weaker than the more widely studied compound ammonia. Hardware and software improvements have been made to a two-color infrared tunable diode laser (IR-TDL) spectrometer in order to improve the limit of detection (LOD) of hydrazine (N2H4) in the cigarette smoke matrix. The detection limit in the smoke matrix was improved from 25 parts-per-million-by-volume (ppmv) to 4.2 ppmv using a 100 m pathlength cell with acquisition of background spectra immediately prior to each sample and 100 ms temporal resolution. This study did not detect hydrazine in cigarette smoke in the 964.4-964.9 cm(-1) spectral region, after mathematically subtracting the spectral contributions of ethylene, ammonia, carbon dioxide, methanol, acrolein, and acetaldehyde. These compounds are found in cigarette smoke and absorb in this spectral region. The LOD is limited by remaining spectral structure from unidentified smoke species. The pseudo random noise (root mean square) in the improved instrument was 2 x 10(-4) absorbance units (base e) which is equivalent to a 0.09 ppmv hydrazine gas sample in the multipass cell. This would correspond to a detection limit of 0.44 ppmv of hydrazine, given the dilution of the smoke by a factor of 5 by the sampling system. This is a factor of 10 less than the 4.2 ppmv detection limit for hydrazine in the smoke matrix, and indicates that the detection limit is primarily a result of the complexity of the matrix rather than the random noise of the TDL instrument.

  16. Limits of passive remote detection of hazardous vapors by computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanigan, Dennis F.

    1996-06-01

    Passive infrared is an emerging method for the remote detection of hazardous vapors particularly where warning is the primary consideration. Detection of gases, vapors and aerosols is based on the difference, (Delta) T), between the temperature of the target cloud and the effective radiometric temperature of the background. Computer simulation of spectra has been used to predict the detection limits for several target gases with a low angle sky background. The simulation is based on a 3 layer model that uses MODTRAN, which includes 6 standard atmospheric models, to compute background radiance and atmospheric transmittance. The detection limits, at 2 cm-1 resolution, for sulfur hexafluoride (simulant), Sarin, trichlorethylene, methyl isocyanate (the Bhopal gas), mustard gas, methyl chloride, and sulfur dioxide are discussed for selected cases with the U.S. Standard, and the sub-arctic winter and the tropical models. In this paper the method is illustrated with methyl isocyanate.

  17. Method for improving the limit of detection in a data signal

    DOEpatents

    Synovec, Robert E.; Yueng, Edward S.

    1989-10-17

    A method for improving the limit of detection for a data set in which experimental noise is uncorrelated along a given abscissa and an analytical signal is correlated to the abscissa, the steps comprising collecting the data set, converting the data set into a data signal including an analytical portion and the experimental noise portion, designating and adjusting a baseline of the data signal to center the experimental noise numerically about a zero reference, and integrating the data signal preserving the corresponding information for each point of the data signal. The steps of the method produce an enhanced integrated data signal which improves the limit of detection of the data signal.

  18. Limit of detection of field effect transistor biosensors: Effects of surface modification and size dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Nitin K.; Brower, Kara; Duan, Xuexin; Reed, Mark A.

    2014-02-01

    Field-effect transistor biosensors have shown great promise in the detection of biomolecules. However, a quantitative understanding of what limits the smallest measurable concentration of analyte (limit of detection or LOD) is still missing. By considering the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), extracted from a combination of noise and I-V characterization, we are able to accurately predict and experimentally confirm a LOD of 0.01 pH. Our results also show that devices with larger area and with amine functionalized surfaces have larger SNR. We are able to extract the associated oxide trap densities and, thus, quantify the improvements in LOD.

  19. Double-well atom trap for fluorescence detection at the Heisenberg limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroescu, Ion; Hume, David B.; Oberthaler, Markus K.

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an atom number detector capable of simultaneous detection of two mesoscopic ensembles with single-atom resolution. Such a sensitivity is a prerequisite for quantum metrology at a precision approaching the Heisenberg limit. Our system is based on fluorescence detection of atoms in a hybrid trap in which a dipole barrier divides a magneto-optical trap into two separated wells. We introduce a noise model describing the various sources contributing to the measurement error and report a limit of up to 500 atoms for single-atom resolution in the atom number difference.

  20. Reliability, detection limit and depth resolution of the elastic recoil measurement of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisao, Nagai; Shigeki, Hayashi; Michi, Aratani; Tadashi, Nozaki; Minoru, Yanokura; Isao, Kohno; Osamu, Kuboi; Yoshifumi, Yatsurugi

    1987-08-01

    Reliability, detection limit and depth resolution were studied in the elastic recoil measurement of hydrogen mainly in silicon compounds by bombardment with argon ions accelerated up to 50 MeV. For the quantitative determination of hydrogen, recoil silicon atoms proved to serve satisfactorily as an internal monitor. The detection limit was shown to be about 1 to 2×10 12 (atoms/cm 2 for hydrogen on surface and about 1 wt. ppm for hydrogen in bulk. The depth resolution was found to be about 50 nm in most silicon compounds.

  1. Gravitational radiation detection with spacecraft Doppler tracking - Limiting sensitivities and prospective missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, F. B.; Hellings, R. W.; Wahlquist, H. D.; Wolff, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    The prospects of using spacecraft Doppler tracking, in NASA missions, for the detection of gravitational waves are examined. The sensitivity limits of such detection are characterized in terms of plasma scintillation, troposphere scintillation, receiver noise, MDA and ODA quantization error, and clock jitter. Current and possible future NASA missions that will involve gravitational wave experiments are briefly reviewed, including the Galileo, solar polar, Halley/Tempel-2, and solar probe missions.

  2. Determination of Detection Limits and Quantitation Limits for Compounds in a Database of GC/MS by FUMI Theory

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Shinya; Hayashi, Yuzuru

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a stochastic method for estimating the detection limits (DLs) and quantitation limits (QLs) of compounds registered in a database of a GC/MS system and prove its validity with experiments. The approach described in ISO 11843 Part 7 is adopted here as an estimation means of DL and QL, and the decafluorotriphenylphosphine (DFTPP) tuning and retention time locking are carried out for adjusting the system. Coupled with the data obtained from the system adjustment experiments, the information (noise and signal of chromatograms and calibration curves) stored in the database is used for the stochastic estimation, dispensing with the repetition measurements. Of sixty-six pesticides, the DL values obtained by the ISO method were compared with those from the statistical approach and the correlation between them was observed to be excellent with the correlation coefficient of 0.865. The accuracy of the method proposed was also examined and concluded to be satisfactory as well. The samples used are commercial products of pesticides mixtures and the uncertainty from sample preparation processes is not taken into account. PMID:27162706

  3. Displacement response, detection limit, and dynamic range of fiber-optic lever sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Gang; Cuomo, Frank W.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present the evaluation of the displacement response, detection limit, and dynamic range of fiber-optic lever sensors in a general format to establish their dependence on fiber sizes, optoelectronic detector specifications, input power, and other relevant parameters. The formations for the normalized reflected optical power change are derived for the evaluation of the optimal sensor response, the linearity range, and the minimum detectable displacement. The theoretical models are verified by an experiment which determines sensor response, modulation index, reflected optical power change, and linear response range through dynamic measurement. The application of this theoretical model to the study of a fiber-optic microphone for acoustic pressure detection is considered.

  4. Detection of amplitude modulation with squeezed light for sensitivity beyond the shot-noise limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Min; Wu, Ling-An; Kimble, H. J.

    1988-06-01

    An improvement in precision beyond the limit set by the vacuum-state or zero-point fluctuations of the electromagnetic field is reported for the detection of amplitude modulation encoded on a weak signal beam. The improvement is achieved by employing the squeezed light from an optical parametric oscillator to reduce the level of fluctuations below the shot-noise limit. An increase in signal-to-noise ratio of 2.5 dB relative to the shot-noise limit is demonstrated.

  5. Approaches to Improving the Lower Detection Limit of Polymeric Membrane Ion-Selective Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Szigeti, Zsófia; Vigassy, Tamás; Bakker, Eric; Pretsch, Ernö

    2010-01-01

    More than ten different approaches for improving the lower detection limit of polymeric membrane ion-selective electrodes have been suggested during the recent years. In this contribution, their principles are briefly summarized with a focus to their general practical applicability. The methods that are the most rugged and the easiest to implement in a routine laboratory will be highlighted. PMID:20336172

  6. Detection limits of organochlorine pesticides and related compounds in blood serum

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, M.S.; Rivera, M.; Baker, D.B. )

    1991-10-01

    Determinations of organochlorine pesticides and similar chemical residues in blood serum have often reported detection limits of 1 ng/mL. When a study group has incurred body burdens lower than this, underestimates and misclassifications of exposure may occur because persons with pesticide residue concentration below the limit of detection are usually treated as zeros.' Thus in order to more accurately assess exposures in such populations, analysis of adipose tissue has been done. Recently, with TCDD, use of a sufficient volume of serum, as much as 0.5 L, in conjunction with appropriate analytical techniques has been shown to achieve detection limits necessary for epidemiological assessments, i.e., comparable to analysis of adipose tissue. In a population-based study involving children in which the authors were involved, it was not feasible to obtain specimens of either adipose or a large volume of serum. There was no compelling health motivation for such measures, nor did they wish to impair participation rates. Therefore, they chose to optimize the existing serum analysis, in order to achieve a detection limit low enough to assess reasonably the anticipated exposures.

  7. ROBUST ESTIMATION OF MEAN AND VARIANCE USING ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SETS WITH BELOW DETECTION LIMIT OBSERVATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists, especially environmental scientists often encounter trace level concentrations that are typically reported as less than a certain limit of detection, L. Type 1, left-censored data arise when certain low values lying below L are ignored or unknown as they cannot be mea...

  8. The detection limits of antimicrobial agents in cow's milk by a simple Yoghurt Culture Test.

    PubMed

    Mohsenzadeh, M; Bahrainipour, A

    2008-09-15

    The aim of this study was to study performance of Yoghurt Culture Test (YCT) in the detection of antimicrobial residues in milk. For this purpose, the sensitivity of YCT for 15 antibiotics were determined. For each drug, 8 concentrations were tested. The detection limits of YCT at 2.5 h and 4 h incubation were determined (microg kg(-1)): 15 and 37.5, penicillin G; 4 and 5, ampicillin; 5 and 7.5, amoxycillin; 100 and 200, cephalexin; 80 and 100, cefazoline; 100 and 200, oxytetracycline; 500 and 100, chlortetracycline; 100 and 200, tetracycline; 150 and 200, doxycycline; 200 and 400, sulphadimidine; 500 and 1000, gentamycin; 1000 and 1500, spectinomycin; 400 and 500, erythromycin; 50 and 100, tylosin; 5000 and 10000, chloramphenicol. The YCT detection limits at 2.5 h incubation for ampicillin, cephalexin, tetracycline, oxytetracycline and tylosin are similar to those obtained as Maximum Residue Limit (MRL) according to Regulation 2377/90 EEC as set out by the European Union. In addition the detection limits of YCT for some antibiotics were lower than some of microbial inhibitor test.

  9. Theoretical detection limits of magnetic biobarcode sensors and the phase space of nanobiosensing.

    PubMed

    Nair, Pradeep R; Alam, Muhammad A

    2010-11-01

    A scaling theory of the sub atto-molar (aM) detection limits of magnetic particle (MP) based biosensors (e.g., bio-barcode assays) is developed and discussed. Despite the dramatic differences of sensing protocols and detection limits, the MP-based sensors can be interpreted within the same theoretical framework as any other classical biosensor (e.g., nanowire sensors), except that these sensors are differentiated by the geometry of diffusion and the probe (ρ(MP))/target (ρ(T)) density ratio. Our model predicts two regimes for biomolecule detection: For classical biosensors with ρ(MP) ≤ ρ(T), the response time t(s) proportional to 1/ρ(T); while for MP-based biosensors with ρ(MP) > ρ(T), t(s) proportional to 1/ρ(MP). The theory (i) explains the performance improvement of MP-sensors by ρ(MP)/ρ(T) (order of 10(3)-10(6)), broadly validating the sub-aM detection limits reported in literature, (ii) offers intuitive interpretation for the counter-intuitive ρ(T)-independence of detection time in MP-sensors, (iii) shows that statistical fluctuations should reduce with ρ(T) for MP sensors, and (iv) offers obvious routes to sensitivity improvement of classical sensors.

  10. Detection limits of antimicrobials in ewe milk by delvotest photometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Althaus, R L; Torres, A; Montero, A; Balasch, S; Molina, M P

    2003-02-01

    The Delvotest method detection limits per manufacturer's instructions at a fixed reading time of 3 h for 24 antimicrobial agents were determined in ewe milk by photometric measurement. For each drug, eight concentrations were tested on 20 ewe milk samples from individual ewes. Detection limits, determined by means of logistic regression models, were (microg/kg): 3, amoxycillin; 2, ampicillin; 18, cloxacillin; 1, penicillin "G"; 34, cefadroxil; 430, cephalosporin "C"; 40, cephalexin; 20, cefoperazone; 33, Ceftiofur; 18, cefuroxime; 6100, streptomycin; 1200, gentamycin; 2600, neomycin; 830, erythromycin; 100, tylosin; 180, doxycycline; 320, oxytetracycline; 590, tetracycline; 88, sulfadiazine; 44, sulfamethoxazole; 140, sulfametoxypyridazine; 48, sulfaquinoxaline; 12,000, chloramphenicol; and 290, trimethoprim. Whereas the beta-lactam antibiotics, sulphonamides, and tylosin were detected by Delvotest method at levels equal to those of maximum residue limits, its sensitivity needs to be enhanced to detect aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim residues in ewe milk or to develop an integrated residue detection system for ewe milk with different sensitive microorganisms for each group of antiinfectious agents.

  11. Detection limit of Clostridium botulinum spores in dried mushroom samples sourced from China.

    PubMed

    Malakar, Pradeep K; Plowman, June; Aldus, Clare F; Xing, Zengtao; Zhao, Yong; Peck, Michael W

    2013-08-16

    A survey of dried mushrooms (Lentinula edodes (Shiitake) and Auricularia auricula (Wood Ear)) sourced from China was carried out to determine the natural contamination of these mushrooms with spores of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum and non-proteolytic C. botulinum. The mushrooms were collected from supermarkets and retailers in 21 cities in China during October 2008. Spore loads of C. botulinum in mushrooms have a degree of uncertainty and variability and this study contributes valuable data for determining prevalence of spores of C. botulinum in mushrooms. An optimized detection protocol that combined selective enrichment culture with multiplex PCR was used to test for spores of proteolytic and non-proteolytic C. botulinum. Detection limits were calculated, using a maximum likelihood protocol, from mushroom samples inoculated with defined numbers of spores of proteolytic C. botulinum or non-proteolytic C. botulinum. Based on the maximum likelihood detection limit, it is estimated that dried mushroom A. auricula contained <550spores/kg of proteolytic C. botulinum, and <350spores/kg of non-proteolytic C. botulinum. Dried L. edodes contained <1500spores/kg of proteolytic C. botulinum and it was not possible to determine reliable detection limits for spores of non-proteolytic C. botulinum using the current detection protocol.

  12. The limitations of case-control studies in the detection of environmental carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Crombie, I K

    1981-01-01

    The ability of the case-control study to detect human carcinogens has been investigated theoretically for varying fractions of the population exposed to hazards carrying different relative risks. The method is shown to be useful for the investigation of factors to which exposure is widespread (for example, common foods or beverages) but it is of limited use for the study of uncommon types of exposure, such as those associated with occupation. The case-control study is unable to detect very small relative risks (less than 1.5) even where exposure is widespread and large numbers of cases of cancer are occurring in the population. The principal limitation of the method is the maximum number of cases which can be recruited and analysed. It will only be through large-scale collaborative multicentre or international studies that important risk factors will be detected. PMID:7338704

  13. Accounting for Limited Detection Efficiency and Localization Precision in Cluster Analysis in Single Molecule Localization Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shivanandan, Arun; Unnikrishnan, Jayakrishnan; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Single Molecule Localization Microscopy techniques like PhotoActivated Localization Microscopy, with their sub-diffraction limit spatial resolution, have been popularly used to characterize the spatial organization of membrane proteins, by means of quantitative cluster analysis. However, such quantitative studies remain challenged by the techniques’ inherent sources of errors such as a limited detection efficiency of less than 60%, due to incomplete photo-conversion, and a limited localization precision in the range of 10 – 30nm, varying across the detected molecules, mainly depending on the number of photons collected from each. We provide analytical methods to estimate the effect of these errors in cluster analysis and to correct for them. These methods, based on the Ripley’s L(r) – r or Pair Correlation Function popularly used by the community, can facilitate potentially breakthrough results in quantitative biology by providing a more accurate and precise quantification of protein spatial organization. PMID:25794150

  14. Determination of target detection limits in hyperspectral data using band selection and dimensionality reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, W.; Boehler, J.; Twizer, K.; Kedem, B.; Lenz, A.; Kneubuehler, M.; Wellig, P.; Oechslin, R.; Schilling, H.; Rotman, S.; Middelmann, W.

    2016-10-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing data can be used for civil and military applications to robustly detect and classify target objects. High spectral resolution of hyperspectral data can compensate for the comparatively low spatial resolution, which allows for detection and classification of small targets, even below image resolution. Hyperspectral data sets are prone to considerable spectral redundancy, affecting and limiting data processing and algorithm performance. As a consequence, data reduction strategies become increasingly important, especially in view of near-real-time data analysis. The goal of this paper is to analyze different strategies for hyperspectral band selection algorithms and their effect on subpixel classification for different target and background materials. Airborne hyperspectral data is used in combination with linear target simulation procedures to create a representative amount of target-to-background ratios for evaluation of detection limits. Data from two different airborne hyperspectral sensors, AISA Eagle and Hawk, are used to evaluate transferability of band selection when using different sensors. The same target objects were recorded to compare the calculated detection limits. To determine subpixel classification results, pure pixels from the target materials are extracted and used to simulate mixed pixels with selected background materials. Target signatures are linearly combined with different background materials in varying ratios. The commonly used classification algorithms Adaptive Coherence Estimator (ACE) is used to compare the detection limit for the original data with several band selection and data reduction strategies. The evaluation of the classification results is done by assuming a fixed false alarm ratio and calculating the mean target-to-background ratio of correctly detected pixels. The results allow drawing conclusions about specific band combinations for certain target and background combinations. Additionally

  15. Detection limits of the strip test and PCR for genetically modified corn in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, V E; Von Pinho, É V R; Von Pinho, R G; do Nascimento, A D

    2012-08-16

    Brazilian legislation establishes a labeling limit for products that contain more than 1% material from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). We assessed the sensitivity of the lateral flow strip test in detection of the GMO corn varieties Bt11 and MON810 and the specificity and sensitivity of PCR techniques for their detection. For the strip test, the GMO seeds were mixed with conventional seeds at levels of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8% for Bt11, and 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6% for MON810. Three different methodologies were assessed and whole seeds, their endosperm and embryonic axis were used. For the PCR technique, the GMO seeds of each of the two varieties were mixed with conventional seeds at levels of 20, 10, 5, 2, 1, and 0.5%. The seeds were ground and the DNA extracted. For detection of the GMO material, specific primers were used for MON810 and Bt11 and maize zein as an endogenous control. The sensitivity of the strip test varied for both maize varieties and methodologies. The test was positive for Bt11 only at 0.8%, in contrast with the detection limit of 0.4% indicated by the manufacturer. In the multiplex PCR, the primers proved to be specific for the different varieties. These varieties were detected in samples with one GMO seed in 100. Thus, this technique proved to be efficient in detecting contaminations equal to or greater than 1%.

  16. Inclusivity, exclusivity and limit of detection of commercially available real-time PCR assays for the detection of Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Margot, H; Stephan, R; Guarino, S; Jagadeesan, B; Chilton, D; O'Mahony, E; Iversen, C

    2013-08-01

    The traditional cultural detection of Salmonella spp. is both time- and labour-intensive. Salmonella is often a release criterion for the food industry and time to result is therefore an important factor. Storage of finished products and raw materials can be costly and may adversely impact available shelf-life. The application of real-time PCR for the detection of Salmonella spp. in food samples enables a potential time-saving of up to four days. The advancement of real-time PCR coupled with the development of commercially available systems in different formats has made this technology accessible for laboratories in an industrial environment. Ideally these systems are reliable and rapid as well as easy to use. The current study represents a comparative evaluation of seven commercial real-time PCR systems for the detection of Salmonella. Forty-nine target and twenty-nine non-target strains were included in the study to assess inclusivity and exclusivity. The limit of detection for each of the method was determined in four different food products. All systems evaluated were able to correctly identify the 49 Salmonella strains. Nevertheless, false positive results (Citrobacter spp.) were obtained with four of the seven systems. In milk powder and bouillon powder, the limit of detection was similar for all systems, suggesting a minimal matrix effect with these samples. Conversely, for black tea and cocoa powder some systems were prone to inhibition from matrix components. Up to 100% of the samples were inhibited using the proprietary extracts but inhibition could be reduced considerably by application of a DNA clean-up kit.

  17. In-depth Evaluation of Content-Based Phishing Detection to Clarify Its Strengths and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiyama, Koichiro; Seko, Toshinori; Ichinose, Yusuke; Kato, Kei; Kawano, Kohei; Yoshiura, Hiroshi

    Zhang et al. proposed a method for content-based phishing detection (CBD) and reported its high performance in detecting phishing sites written in English. However, the evaluations of the CBD method performed by Zhang et al. and others were small-scale and simply measured the detection and error rates, i.e, they did not analyze the causes of the detection errors. Moreover, the effectiveness of the CBD method with non-English sites, such as Japanese and Chinese language sites, has never been tested. This paper reports our in-depth evaluation and analysis of the CBD method using 843 actual phishing sites (including 475 English and 368 Japanese sites), and explains both the strengths of the CBD method and its limitations. Our work provides a base for using the CBD method in the real world.

  18. Signal averaging limitations in heterodyne- and direct-detection laser remote sensing measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menyuk, N.; Killinger, D. K.; Menyuk, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The improvement in measurement uncertainty brought about by the averaging of increasing numbers of pulse return signals in both heterodyne- and direct-detection lidar systems is investigated. A theoretical analysis is presented which shows the standard deviation of the mean measurement to decrease as the inverse square root of the number of measurements, except in the presence of temporal correlation. Experimental measurements based on a dual-hybrid-TEA CO2 laser differential absorption lidar system are reported which demonstrate that the actual reduction in the standard deviation of the mean in both heterodyne- and direct-detection systems is much slower than the inverse square-root dependence predicted for uncorrelated signals, but is in agreement with predictions in the event of temporal correlation. Results thus favor the use of direct detection at relatively short range where the lower limit of the standard deviation of the mean is about 2 percent, but advantages of heterodyne detection at longer ranges are noted.

  19. Advantages, limitations, and diagnostic accuracy of photoscreeners in early detection of amblyopia: a review

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Irene; Ortiz-Toquero, Sara; Martin, Raul; de Juan, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Amblyopia detection is important to ensure proper visual development and avoid permanent decrease of visual acuity. This condition does not produce symptoms, so it is difficult to diagnose if a vision problem actually exists. However, because amblyopia treatment is limited by age, early diagnosis is of paramount relevance. Traditional vision screening (conducted in <3 years) is related with difficulty in getting cooperation from a subject to conduct the eye exam, so accurate objective methods to improve amblyopia detection are necessary. Handheld devices used for photoscreening or autorefraction could offer advantages to improve amblyopia screening because they reduce exploration time to just few seconds, no subject collaboration is needed, and they provide objective information. The purpose of this review is to summarize the main functions and clinical applicability of commercially available devices for early detection of amblyopia and to describe their differences, advantages, and limitations. Although the studies reviewed are heterogeneous (due to wide differences in referral criteria, use of different risk factors, different types of samples studied, etc), these devices provide objective measures in a quick and objective way with a simple outcome report: retest, pass, or refer. However, due to major limitations, these devices are not recommended, and their use in clinical practice is limited. PMID:27555744

  20. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  1. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  2. Minimum detection limit and spatial resolution of thin-sample field-emission electron probe microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Yugo; Hamada, Kotaro; Urano, Akira

    2013-12-01

    The minimum detection limit and spatial resolution for a thinned semiconductor sample were determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) using a Schottky field emission (FE) electron gun and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Comparison of the FE-EPMA results with those obtained using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry in conjunction with scanning transmission electron microscopy, confirmed that FE-EPMA is largely superior in terms of detection sensitivity. Thin-sample FE-EPMA is demonstrated as a very effective method for high resolution, high sensitivity analysis in a laboratory environment because a high probe current and high signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved.

  3. Detecting single nanomagnet dynamics beyond the diffraction limit in varying magnetostatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Brandt, R.; Yahagi, Y.; Hansen, B.; Harteneck, B.; Bokor, J.; Hawkins, A. R.; Schmidt, H.

    2011-01-01

    As areal bit density increases, characterizing individual magnetic bits within dense arrays becomes difficult with diffraction-limited optics. We demonstrate that dynamic magneto-optical detection breaks this diffraction limit if the characteristic behavior of a nanomagnet is sufficiently different from its neighbors'. We use far-field time-resolved Kerr microscopy to resolve the high-frequency magnetization dynamics of a single, small (Ø150 nm) nanomagnet within a low-frequency background from an array of large (Ø500 nm) magnets. We use this technique to observe and quantify the effects of magnetostatic interactions on the single magnet dynamics as the intermagnet spacing is varied.

  4. Method for improving the limit of detection in a data signal

    DOEpatents

    Synovec, R.E.; Yueng, E.S.

    1989-10-17

    Disclosed is a method for improving the limit of detection for a data set in which experimental noise is uncorrelated along a given abscissa and an analytical signal is correlated to the abscissa, the steps comprising collecting the data set, converting the data set into a data signal including an analytical portion and the experimental noise portion, designating and adjusting a baseline of the data signal to center the experimental noise numerically about a zero reference, and integrating the data signal preserving the corresponding information for each point of the data signal. The steps of the method produce an enhanced integrated data signal which improves the limit of detection of the data signal. 8 figs.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SAM detection limits of 8 debris disks (Gauchet+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauchet, L.; Lacour, S.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Ehrenreich, D.; Bonnefoy, M.; Girard, J. H.; Boccaletti, A.

    2016-06-01

    VLT/NaCo Sparse Aperture Masking data for 8 debris disks in Lprime spectral band (λ=3.80um, Δλ=0.62um). The stars hosting debris disks observed are: β Pictoris, AU Microscopii, 49 Ceti, {eta} Telescopii, Fomalhaut, g Lupi, HD181327 and HR8799 (with respective calibrator: HR2049, HD197339, HD10100, HD181517, del PsA, HD139960, HD180987, HD218234). No companion were found in the observational data. For each star, we have processed a 5σ detection limit map of the neighbourhood of the star. The primary array of each fits file contains a 237x237 pixel image representing a 900x900 mas portion of the sky plane (i.e. 3mas/pixel). The center of the array correspond to the location of the main star. Detection limit values are stated in relative magnitude compared to that of the main star. (2 data files).

  6. Absolute-structure reports.

    PubMed

    Flack, Howard D

    2013-08-01

    All the 139 noncentrosymmetric crystal structures published in Acta Crystallographica Section C between January 2011 and November 2012 inclusive have been used as the basis of a detailed study of the reporting of absolute structure. These structure determinations cover a wide range of space groups, chemical composition and resonant-scattering contribution. Defining A and D as the average and difference of the intensities of Friedel opposites, their level of fit has been examined using 2AD and selected-D plots. It was found, regardless of the expected resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, that the Friedel-difference intensities are often dominated by random uncertainty and systematic error. An analysis of data collection strategy is provided. It is found that crystal-structure determinations resulting in a Flack parameter close to 0.5 may not necessarily be from crystals twinned by inversion. Friedifstat is shown to be a robust estimator of the resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, very little affected by the particular space group of a structure nor by the occupation of special positions. There is considerable confusion in the text of papers presenting achiral noncentrosymmetric crystal structures. Recommendations are provided for the optimal way of treating noncentrosymmetric crystal structures for which the experimenter has no interest in determining the absolute structure.

  7. Investigation of detection limits for solutes in water measured by laser raman spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of experimental parameters on detection sensitivity was determined for laser Raman analysis of dissolved solutes in water. Individual solutions of nitrate, sulfate, carbonate, bicarbonate, monohydrogen phosphate, dihydrogen phosphate, acetate ion, and acetic acid were measured. An equation is derived which expresses the signal-to-noise ratio in terms of solute concentration, measurement time, spectral slit width, laser power fluctuations, and solvent background intensity. Laser beam intensity fluctuations at the sample and solvent background intensity are the most important limiting factors.

  8. Absolute quantum cutting efficiency of Tb3+-Yb3+ co-doped glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Qianqian; Qin, Feng; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2013-12-01

    The absolute quantum cutting efficiency of Tb3+-Yb3+ co-doped glass was quantitatively measured by an integrating sphere detection system, which is independent of the excitation power. As the Yb3+ concentration increases, the near infrared quantum efficiency exhibited an exponential growth with an upper limit of 13.5%, but the visible light efficiency was reduced rapidly. As a result, the total quantum efficiency monotonically decreases rather than increases as theory predicted. In fact, the absolute quantum efficiency was far less than the theoretical value due to the low radiative efficiency of Tb3+ (<61%) and significant cross-relaxation nonradiative loss between Yb3+ ions.

  9. Radiometric Short-Term Fourier Transform analysis of photonic Doppler velocimetry recordings and detectivity limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudhomme, G.; Berthe, L.; Bénier, J.; Bozier, O.; Mercier, P.

    2017-01-01

    Photonic Doppler Velocimetry is a plug-and-play and versatile diagnostic used in dynamic physic experiments to measure velocities. When signals are analyzed using a Short-Time Fourier Transform, multiple velocities can be distinguished: for example, the velocities of moving particle-cloud appear on spectrograms. In order to estimate the back-scattering fluxes of target, we propose an original approach "PDV Radiometric analysis" resulting in an expression of time-velocity spectrograms coded in power units. Experiments involving micron-sized particles raise the issue of detection limit; particle-size limit is very difficult to evaluate. From the quantification of noise sources, we derive an estimation of the spectrogram noise leading to a detectivity limit, which may be compared to the fraction of the incoming power which has been back-scattered by the particle and then collected by the probe. This fraction increases with their size. At last, some results from laser-shock accelerated particles using two different PDV systems are compared: it shows the improvement of detectivity with respect to the Effective Number of Bits (ENOB) of the digitizer.

  10. Evaluation on the detection limit of blood hemoglobin using photolepthysmography based on path-length optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Di; Guo, Chao; Zhang, Ziyang; Han, Tongshuai; Liu, Jin

    2016-10-01

    The blood hemoglobin concentration's (BHC) measurement using Photoplethysmography (PPG), which gets blood absorption to near infrared light from the instantaneous pulse of transmitted light intensity, has not been applied to the clinical use due to the non-enough precision. The main challenge might be caused of the non-enough stable pulse signal when it's very weak and it often varies in different human bodies or in the same body with different physiological states. We evaluated the detection limit of BHC using PPG as the measurement precision level, which can be considered as a best precision result because we got the relative stable subject's pulse signals recorded by using a spectrometer with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) level, which is about 30000:1 in short term. Moreover, we optimized the used pathlength using the theory based on optimum pathlength to get a better sensitivity to the absorption variation in blood. The best detection limit was evaluated as about 1 g/L for BHC, and the best SNR of pulse for in vivo measurement was about 2000:1 at 1130 and 1250 nm. Meanwhile, we conclude that the SNR of pulse signal should be better than 400:1 when the required detection limit is set to 5 g/L. Our result would be a good reference to the BHC measurement to get a desired BHC measurement precision of real application.

  11. Photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence using a quartz substrate to reduce limits of detection

    PubMed Central

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Chaudhery, Vikram; Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Schulz, Stephen; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2010-01-01

    A Photonic Crystal (PC) surface fabricated upon a quartz substrate using nanoimprint lithography has been demonstrated to enhance light emission from fluorescent molecules in close proximity to the PC surface. Quartz was selected for its low autofluorescence characteristics compared to polymer-based PCs, improving the detection sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of PC Enhanced Fluorescence (PCEF). Nanoimprint lithography enables economical fabrication of the subwavelength PCEF surface structure over entire 1x3 in2 quartz slides. The demonstrated PCEF surface supports a transverse magnetic (TM) resonant mode at a wavelength of λ = 632.8 nm and an incident angle of θ = 11°, which amplifies the electric field magnitude experienced by surface-bound fluorophores. Meanwhile, another TM mode at a wavelength of λ = 690 nm and incident angle of θ = 0° efficiently directs the fluorescent emission toward the detection optics. An enhancement factor as high as 7500 × was achieved for the detection of LD-700 dye spin-coated upon the PC, compared to detecting the same material on an unpatterned glass surface. The detection of spotted Alexa-647 labeled polypeptide on the PC exhibits a 330 × SNR improvement. Using dose-response characterization of deposited fluorophore-tagged protein spots, the PCEF surface demonstrated a 140 × lower limit of detection compared to a conventional glass substrate. PMID:21164826

  12. Photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence using a quartz substrate to reduce limits of detection.

    PubMed

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Chaudhery, Vikram; Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Schulz, Stephen; Cunningham, Brian T

    2010-11-22

    A Photonic Crystal (PC) surface fabricated upon a quartz substrate using nanoimprint lithography has been demonstrated to enhance light emission from fluorescent molecules in close proximity to the PC surface. Quartz was selected for its low autofluorescence characteristics compared to polymer-based PCs, improving the detection sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of PC Enhanced Fluorescence (PCEF). Nanoimprint lithography enables economical fabrication of the subwavelength PCEF surface structure over entire 1x3 in2 quartz slides. The demonstrated PCEF surface supports a transverse magnetic (TM) resonant mode at a wavelength of λ = 632.8 nm and an incident angle of θ = 11°, which amplifies the electric field magnitude experienced by surface-bound fluorophores. Meanwhile, another TM mode at a wavelength of λ = 690 nm and incident angle of θ = 0° efficiently directs the fluorescent emission toward the detection optics. An enhancement factor as high as 7500 × was achieved for the detection of LD-700 dye spin-coated upon the PC, compared to detecting the same material on an unpatterned glass surface. The detection of spotted Alexa-647 labeled polypeptide on the PC exhibits a 330 × SNR improvement. Using dose-response characterization of deposited fluorophore-tagged protein spots, the PCEF surface demonstrated a 140 × lower limit of detection compared to a conventional glass substrate.

  13. Absolute determination of charge-coupled device quantum detection efficiency using Si K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Steel, A B

    2012-05-06

    We report a method to determine the quantum detection efficiency and the absorbing layers on a front-illuminated charge-coupled device (CCD). The CCD under study, as part of a crystal spectrometer, measures intense continuum x-ray emission from a picosecond laser-produced plasma and spectrally resolves the Si K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure features due to the electrode gate structure of the device. The CCD response across the Si K-edge shows a large discontinuity as well as a number of oscillations that are identified individually and uniquely from Si, SiO{sub 2}, and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layers. From the spectral analysis of the structure and K-edge discontinuity, the active layer thickness and the different absorbing layers thickness can be determined precisely. A precise CCD detection model from 0.2-10 keV can be deduced from this highly sensitive technique.

  14. Microfluidic-SERS Devices for One Shot Limit-of-Detection

    PubMed Central

    Datt, Ashish; Gao, Zhe; Rycenga, Matthew; Burrows, Nathan D.; Greeneltch, Nathan G.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Van Duyne, Richard P.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic sensing platforms facilitate parallel, low sample volume detection using various optical signal transduction mechanisms. Herein, we introduce a simple mixing microfluidic device, enabling serial dilution of introduced analyte solution that terminates in five discrete sensing elements. We demonstrate the utility of this device with on-chip fluorescence and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of analytes, and we demonstrate device use both when combined with a traditional inflexible SERS substrate and with SERS-active nanoparticles that are directly incorporated into microfluidic channels to create a flexible SERS platform. The results indicate, with varying sensitivities, that either flexible or inflexible devices can be easily used to create a calibration curve and perform a limit of detection study with a single experiment. PMID:24756225

  15. Limitations in the spectral method for graph partitioning: Detectability threshold and localization of eigenvectors.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Tatsuro; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Investigating the performance of different methods is a fundamental problem in graph partitioning. In this paper, we estimate the so-called detectability threshold for the spectral method with both un-normalized and normalized Laplacians in sparse graphs. The detectability threshold is the critical point at which the result of the spectral method is completely uncorrelated to the planted partition. We also analyze whether the localization of eigenvectors affects the partitioning performance in the detectable region. We use the replica method, which is often used in the field of spin-glass theory, and focus on the case of bisection. We show that the gap between the estimated threshold for the spectral method and the threshold obtained from Bayesian inference is considerable in sparse graphs, even without eigenvector localization. This gap closes in a dense limit.

  16. Limitations in the spectral method for graph partitioning: Detectability threshold and localization of eigenvectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Tatsuro; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Investigating the performance of different methods is a fundamental problem in graph partitioning. In this paper, we estimate the so-called detectability threshold for the spectral method with both un-normalized and normalized Laplacians in sparse graphs. The detectability threshold is the critical point at which the result of the spectral method is completely uncorrelated to the planted partition. We also analyze whether the localization of eigenvectors affects the partitioning performance in the detectable region. We use the replica method, which is often used in the field of spin-glass theory, and focus on the case of bisection. We show that the gap between the estimated threshold for the spectral method and the threshold obtained from Bayesian inference is considerable in sparse graphs, even without eigenvector localization. This gap closes in a dense limit.

  17. A point-of-care PCR test for HIV-1 detection in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Jangam, Sujit R; Agarwal, Abhishek K; Sur, Kunal; Kelso, David M

    2013-04-15

    A low-cost, fully integrated sample-to-answer, quantitative PCR (qPCR) system that can be used for detection of HIV-1 proviral DNA in infants at the point-of-care in resource-limited settings has been developed and tested. The system is based on a novel DNA extraction method, which uses a glass fiber membrane, a disposable assay card that includes on-board reagent storage, provisions for thermal cycling and fluorescence detection, and a battery-operated portable analyzer. The system is capable of automated PCR mix assembly using a novel reagent delivery system and performing qPCR. HIV-1 and internal control targets are detected using two spectrally separated fluorophores, FAM and Quasar 670. In this report, a proof-of-concept of the platform is demonstrated. Initial results with whole blood demonstrate that the test is capable of detecting HIV-1 in blood samples containing greater than 5000 copies of HIV-1. In resource-limited settings, a point-of-care HIV-1 qPCR test would greatly increase the number of test results that reach the infants caregivers, allowing them to pursue anti-retroviral therapy.

  18. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  19. Detection limits of 405 nm and 633 nm excited PpIX fluorescence for brain tumor detection during stereotactic biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwardt, Niklas; Götz, Marcus; Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Hollnburger, Bastian; Sroka, Ronald; Stepp, Herbert; Zelenkov, Petr; Rühm, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    5-aminolevulinic-acid-(5-ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence may be used to improve stereotactic brain tumor biopsies. In this study, the sensitivity of PpIX-based tumor detection has been investigated for two potential excitation wavelengths (405 nm, 633 nm). Using a 200 μm fiber in contact with semi-infinite optical phantoms containing ink and Lipovenös, PpIX detection limits of 4.0 nM and 200 nM (relating to 1 mW excitation power) were determined for 405 nm and 633 nm excitation, respectively. Hence, typical PpIX concentrations in glioblastomas of a few μM should be well detectable with both wavelengths. Additionally, blood layers of selected thicknesses were placed between fiber and phantom. Red excitation was shown to be considerably less affected by blood interference: A 50 μm blood layer, for instance, blocked the 405- nm-excited fluorescence completely, but reduced the 633-nm-excited signal by less than 50%. Ray tracing simulations demonstrated that - without blood layer - the sensitivity advantage of 405 nm rises for decreasing fluorescent volume from 50-fold to a maximum of 100-fold. However, at a tumor volume of 1 mm3, which is a typical biopsy sample size, the 633-nm-excited fluorescence signal is only reduced by about 10%. Further simulations revealed that with increasing fiber-tumor distance, the signal drops faster for 405 nm. This reduces the risk of detecting tumor tissue outside the needle's coverage, but diminishes the overlap between optically and mechanically sampled volumes. While 405 nm generally offers a higher sensitivity, 633 nm is more sensitive to distant tumors and considerably superior in case of blood-covered tumor tissue.

  20. Detection of 15 dB Squeezed States of Light and their Application for the Absolute Calibration of Photoelectric Quantum Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahlbruch, Henning; Mehmet, Moritz; Danzmann, Karsten; Schnabel, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Squeezed states of light belong to the most prominent nonclassical resources. They have compelling applications in metrology, which has been demonstrated by their routine exploitation for improving the sensitivity of a gravitational-wave detector since 2010. Here, we report on the direct measurement of 15 dB squeezed vacuum states of light and their application to calibrate the quantum efficiency of photoelectric detection. The object of calibration is a customized InGaAs positive intrinsic negative (p-i-n) photodiode optimized for high external quantum efficiency. The calibration yields a value of 99.5% with a 0.5% (k =2 ) uncertainty for a photon flux of the order 1 017 s-1 at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The calibration neither requires any standard nor knowledge of the incident light power and thus represents a valuable application of squeezed states of light in quantum metrology.

  1. Capability of EnKF to assimilate tracer test data at the lower detection limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckmann, Johanna; Vogt, Christian; Clauser, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    We model water flow and estimate permeability distribution to improve regional groundwater management for a tectonically limited hard-rock aquifer. Management of groundwater resources for drinking water supply requires understanding and quantifying of the regional groundwater flow and groundwater budget which depends largely on the petrophysical transport properties (e. g., porosity and permeability) of the underground. We study a structurally complex and thus highly heterogeneous area on a regional scale: the Hastenrather Graben 15 km northeast of Aachen, Germany. Here, groundwater is produced from a carbonate aquifer for drinking water supply. However, direct data on the geometry and petrophysical properties of the underground are sparse and most data are only one-dimensional. For overcoming this limitation and coping with the heterogeneity of the underground we use the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) for stochastic parameter estimation and statistical ensemble analysis. Assimilating time-dependent tracer test data will help estimating permeability. The fact that the aquifer is used for drinking water supply prevents using of any artificial tracer such as radioactive or fluorescent tracer. Instead, drinking water with a lower salinity compared to the groundwater (e.g., dam water) will be used. The detection limit will be relatively low due to the low salinity contrast between reservoir water and tracer. It might even be in the range of measuring error. For studying the sensitivity of EnKF at the limit of detection we set up a synthetic scenario based on the conditions in our study area. Performing EnKF assimilation runs based on perturbed observations characterized by different measurement error levels yields information on the acceptable signal-to-noise-ratio required by EnKF for successful estimates of the given synthetic permeability distribution. This, in turn, provides information on the limits of the real-world's tracer test at low salinity contrast.

  2. Detection limits of Legionella pneumophila in environmental samples after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The efficiency of recovery and the detection limit of Legionella after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga are not known and so far no investigations have been carried out to determine the efficiency of the recovery of Legionella spp. by co-culture and compare it with that of conventional culturing methods. This study aimed to assess the detection limits of co-culture compared to culture for Legionella pneumophila in compost and air samples. Compost and air samples were spiked with known concentrations of L. pneumophila. Direct culturing and co-culture with amoebae were used in parallel to isolate L. pneumophila and recovery standard curves for both methods were produced for each sample. Results The co-culture proved to be more sensitive than the reference method, detecting 102-103 L. pneumophila cells in 1 g of spiked compost or 1 m3 of spiked air, as compared to 105-106 cells in 1 g of spiked compost and 1 m3 of spiked air. Conclusions Co-culture with amoebae is a useful, sensitive and reliable technique to enrich L. pneumophila in environmental samples that contain only low amounts of bacterial cells. PMID:23442526

  3. Iron pentacarbonyl detection limits in the cigarette smoke matrix using FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, Milton E.; Plunkett, Susan E.; Harward, Charles N.

    2005-11-01

    Endogenous metals present in tobacco from agricultural practices have been purported to generate metal carbonyls in cigarette smoke. Transition metal catalysts, such as iron oxide, have been investigated for the reduction of carbon monoxide (CO) in cigarette smoke. These studies motivated the development of an analytical method to determine if iron pentacarbonyl [Fe(CO) 5] is present in mainstream smoke from cigarette models having cigarette paper made with iron oxide. An FT-IR puff-by-puff method was developed and the detection limit was determined using two primary reference spectra from different sources to estimate the amount of Fe(CO) 5 present in a high-pressure steel cylinder of CO. We do not detect Fe(CO) 5 in a single 35 mL puff from reference cigarettes or from those cigarette models having cigarette paper made with iron oxide, with a 30-ppbV limit of detection (LOD). Also, it was shown that a filter containing activated carbon would remove Fe(CO) 5.

  4. Classification using longitudinal trajectory of biomarker in the presence of detection limits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeonhee; Kong, Lan

    2016-02-01

    Discriminant analysis is commonly used to evaluate the ability of candidate biomarkers to separate patients into pre-defined groups. Recent extension of discriminant analysis to longitudinal data enables us to improve the classification accuracy based on biomarker profiles rather than on a single biomarker measurement. However, the biomarker measurement is often limited by the sensitivity of the given assay, resulting in data that are censored at either the lower or the upper limit of detection. Inappropriate handling of censored data may affect the classification accuracy of biomarker and hinder the evaluation of its potential discrimination power. We develop a discriminant analysis method for censored longitudinal biomarker data based on mixed models and evaluate its performance by area under the receiver operation characteristic curve. Through the simulation study, we show that our method is better than the simple substitution methods in terms of parameter estimation and evaluating biomarker performance. Application to a biomarker study of patients with acute kidney injury demonstrates that our method may shed light on the potential clinical utility of biomarkers by taking into account both longitudinal trajectory and limit of detection issues.

  5. Positioning, alignment and absolute pointing of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, F.; Distefano, C.; Antares Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    A precise detector alignment and absolute pointing is crucial for point-source searches. The ANTARES neutrino telescope utilises an array of hydrophones, tiltmeters and compasses for the relative positioning of the optical sensors. The absolute calibration is accomplished by long-baseline low-frequency triangulation of the acoustic reference devices in the deep-sea with a differential GPS system at the sea surface. The absolute pointing can be independently verified by detecting the shadow of the Moon in cosmic rays.

  6. STATISTICAL METHODS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS USING DATA SETS WITH BELOW DETECTION LIMIT OBSERVATIONS AS INCORPORTED IN PROUCL 4.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nondetect (ND) or below detection limit (BDL) results cannot be measured accurately, and, therefore, are reported as less than certain detection limit (DL) values. However, since the presence of some contaminants (e.g., dioxin) in environmental media may pose a threat to human he...

  7. Improving the detection limit of conformational analysis by utilizing a dual polarization Vernier cascade.

    PubMed

    Hoste, J-W; Soetaert, P; Bienstman, P

    2016-01-11

    The dual polarization microring technique enables the simultaneous and accurate detection of thickness and refractive index of a bound molecular layer. By using three microring resonators in a double Vernier cascade configuration, the dual polarization technique is improved on three distinct levels: an increase of the sensitivity, a suppression of common noise due to self-referencing and the ability to migrate from a standard tunable laser to a cheap broadband LED and an on-chip arrayed waveguide grating as read-out system, allowing for a system which is orders of magnitude faster and cheaper. A dual polarization Vernier cascade proof-of-concept is fabricated and characterized, a read-out computational framework is constructed and it is shown on a theoretical basis that the limit of detection is improved.

  8. Diamond-based electrochemical aptasensor realizing a femtomolar detection limit of bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yibo; Liu, Junsong; Li, Hongdong

    2017-06-15

    In this study, we designed and fabricated an electrochemical impedance aptasensor based on Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) coated boron-doped diamond (BDD) modified with aptamers, and 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH) for the detection of bisphenol A (BPA). The constructed BPA aptasensor exhibits good linearity from 1.0×10(-14) to 1.0×10(-9)molL(-1). The detection limitation of 7.2×10(-15)molL(-1) was achieved, which can be attributed to the synergistic effect of combining BDD with Au-NPs, aptamers, and MCH. The examine results of BPA traces in Tris-HCl buffer and in milk, UV spectra of aptamer/BPA and interference test revealed that the novel aptasensors are of high sensitivity, specificity, stability and repeatability, which could be promising in practical applications.

  9. Diffuse reflectance optical topography: location of inclusions in 3D and detectability limits

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, N. A.; Baez, G. R.; García, H. A.; Waks Serra, M. V.; Di Rocco, H. O.; Iriarte, D. I.; Pomarico, J. A.; Grosenick, D.; Macdonald, R.

    2014-01-01

    In the present contribution we investigate the images of CW diffusely reflected light for a point-like source, registered by a CCD camera imaging a turbid medium containing an absorbing lesion. We show that detection of μa variations (absorption anomalies) is achieved if images are normalized to background intensity. A theoretical analysis based on the diffusion approximation is presented to investigate the sensitivity and the limitations of our proposal and a novel procedure to find the location of the inclusions in 3D is given and tested. An analysis of the noise and its influence on the detection capabilities of our proposal is provided. Experimental results on phantoms are also given, supporting the proposed approach. PMID:24876999

  10. Yeast Biosensors for Detection of Environmental Pollutants: Current State and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Jarque, Sergio; Bittner, Michal; Blaha, Ludek; Hilscherova, Klara

    2016-05-01

    Yeast biosensors have become suitable tools for the screening and detection of environmental pollutants because of their various advantages compared to other sensing technologies. On the other hand, many limitations remain with regard to their optimal performance and applicability in several contexts, such as low-concentration samples and on-site testing. This review summarizes the current state of yeast biosensors, with special focus on screening and assessment of environmental contaminants, discusses both pros and cons, and suggests steps towards their further development and effective use in the environmental assessment.

  11. New low detection limits for EDXRF analyses on the basis of polycapillary optics and chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamizov, R. K.; Kumakhov, M. A.; Nikitina, S. V.; Mikhin, V. A.

    2005-07-01

    The possibilities of increasing the sensitivity of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (EDXRF) of solutions with the use of special preconcentrating sensors are described in the article. The sensors are made from polycapillary tubes or plates consisting of hundred thousands micro-channels, each containing a micro-grain of collecting sorbent. The kinetic regularities for preconcentration of micro-components from solutions are considered. Experimental results are given for EDXRF analyses of different solutions containing metals and other elements in trace amounts, and the detection limits of tens and hundreds ppb are demonstrated. The pilot sample of a new analytical instrument <> is shortly described.

  12. Limit of blank and limit of detection of Plasmodium falciparum thick blood smear microscopy in a routine setting in Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Proper malaria diagnosis depends on the detection of asexual forms of Plasmodium spp. in the blood. Thick blood smear microscopy is the accepted gold standard of malaria diagnosis and is widely implemented. Surprisingly, diagnostic performance of this method is not well investigated and many clinicians in African routine settings base treatment decisions independent of microscopy results. This leads to overtreatment and poor management of other febrile diseases. Implementation of quality control programmes is recommended, but requires sustained funding, external logistic support and constant training and supervision of the staff. This study describes an easily applicable method to assess the performance of thick blood smear microscopy by determining the limit of blank and limit of detection. These two values are representative of the diagnostic quality and allow the correct discrimination between positive and negative samples. Methods Standard-conform methodology was applied and adapted to determine the limit of blank and the limit of detection of two thick blood smear microscopy methods (WHO and Lambaréné method) in a research centre in Lambaréné, Gabon. Duplicates of negative and low parasitaemia thick blood smears were read by several microscopists. The mean and standard deviation of the results were used to calculate the limit of blank and subsequently the limit of detection. Results The limit of blank was 0 parasites/μL for both methods. The limit of detection was 62 and 88 parasites/μL for the Lambaréné and WHO method, respectively. Conclusion With a simple, back-of-the-envelope calculation, the performance of two malaria microscopy methods can be measured. These results are specific for each diagnostic unit and cannot be generalized but implementation of a system to control microscopy performance can improve confidence in parasitological results and thereby strengthen malaria control. PMID:24929248

  13. First direct detection limits on sub-GeV dark matter from XENON10.

    PubMed

    Essig, Rouven; Manalaysay, Aaron; Mardon, Jeremy; Sorensen, Peter; Volansky, Tomer

    2012-07-13

    The first direct detection limits on dark matter in the MeV to GeV mass range are presented, using XENON10 data. Such light dark matter can scatter with electrons, causing ionization of atoms in a detector target material and leading to single- or few-electron events. We use 15  kg day of data acquired in 2006 to set limits on the dark-matter-electron scattering cross section. The strongest bound is obtained at 100 MeV where σ(e)<3×10(-38)  cm2 at 90% C.L., while dark-matter masses between 20 MeV and 1 GeV are bounded by σ(e)<10(-37)  cm2 at 90% C.L. This analysis provides a first proof of principle that direct detection experiments can be sensitive to dark-matter candidates with masses well below the GeV scale.

  14. Detecting and quantifying parasite-induced host mortality from intensity data: method comparisons and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Wilber, Mark Q.; Weinstein, Sara B.; Briggs, Cheryl J.

    2016-01-01

    Parasites can significantly impact animal populations by changing host behavior, reproduction and survival. Detecting and quantifying these impacts is critical for understanding disease dynamics and managing wild animal populations. However, for wild hosts infected with macroparasites, it is notoriously difficult to quantify the fatal parasite load and number of animals that have died due to disease. When ethical or logistical constraints prohibit experimental determination of these values, examination of parasite intensity and distribution data may offer an alternative solution. In this study we introduce a novel method for using intensity data to detect and quantify parasite-induced mortality in wildlife populations. Using simulations, we show that this method is more reliable than previously proposed methods while providing quantitative estimates of parasite-induced mortality from empirical data that are consistent with previously published qualitative estimates. However, we stress that this method, and all techniques that estimate parasite-induced mortality from intensity data alone, have several critical assumptions that limit their applicability in the real world. Due to these limitations, these methods should only be used as an exploratory tool to inform more rigorous studies of parasite-induced host mortality. PMID:26475963

  15. Approaching the ppb detection limits for copper in water using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, Walid; Sawaf, Sausan

    2014-05-01

    Copper concentrations in drinking-water is very important to be monitored which can cause cancer if it exceed about 10 mg/liter. In the present work, we have developed a simple, low laser power method to improve the detection limits of laser induced plasma spectroscopy LIBS for copper in aqueous solutions with different concentrations. In this method a medium density fiberboard (MDF) wood have been used as a substrate that absorbs the liquid sample to transform laser liquid interaction to laser solid interaction. Using the fundamental wavelength of Nd:YAG laser, the constructed plasma emissions were monitored for elemental analysis. The signal-to-noise ratio SNR was optimized using low laser fluence of 32 J cm-2, and detector (CDD camera) gate delay of 0.5 μs. Both the electron temperature and density of the induced plasma were determined using Boltzmann plot and the FWHM of the Cu at 324.7 nm, respectively. The plasma temperature was found to be 1.197 eV, while the plasma density was about 1.66 x 1019 cm-3. The detection limits for Cu at 324.7 nm is found to be 131 ppb comparable to the results by others using complicated system.

  16. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency) by removing the source spectrum (moment-rate spectrum) from

  17. System for detecting and limiting electrical ground faults within electrical devices

    DOEpatents

    Gaubatz, Donald C.

    1990-01-01

    An electrical ground fault detection and limitation system for employment with a nuclear reactor utilizing a liquid metal coolant. Elongate electromagnetic pumps submerged within the liquid metal coolant and electrical support equipment experiencing an insulation breakdown occasion the development of electrical ground fault current. Without some form of detection and control, these currents may build to damaging power levels to expose the pump drive components to liquid metal coolant such as sodium with resultant undesirable secondary effects. Such electrical ground fault currents are detected and controlled through the employment of an isolated power input to the pumps and with the use of a ground fault control conductor providing a direct return path from the affected components to the power source. By incorporating a resistance arrangement with the ground fault control conductor, the amount of fault current permitted to flow may be regulated to the extent that the reactor may remain in operation until maintenance may be performed, notwithstanding the existence of the fault. Monitors such as synchronous demodulators may be employed to identify and evaluate fault currents for each phase of a polyphase power, and control input to the submerged pump and associated support equipment.

  18. AN ALTERNATIVE CALIBRATION OF CR-39 DETECTORS FOR RADON DETECTION BEYOND THE SATURATION LIMIT.

    PubMed

    Franci, Daniele; Aureli, Tommaso; Cardellini, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Time-integrated measurements of indoor radon levels are commonly carried out using solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs), due to the numerous advantages offered by this radiation detection technique. However, the use of SSNTD also presents some problems that may affect the accuracy of the results. The effect of overlapping tracks often results in the underestimation of the detected track density, which leads to the reduction of the counting efficiency for increasing radon exposure. This article aims to address the effect of overlapping tracks by proposing an alternative calibration technique based on the measurement of the fraction of the detector surface covered by alpha tracks. The method has been tested against a set of Monte Carlo data and then applied to a set of experimental data collected at the radon chamber of the Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, at the ENEA centre in Casaccia, using CR-39 detectors. It has been proved that the method allows to extend the detectable range of radon exposure far beyond the intrinsic limit imposed by the standard calibration based on the track density.

  19. Gel-based nonradioactive single-strand conformational polymorphism and mutation detection: limitations and solutions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vibhuti; Arora, Reetakshi; Gochhait, Sailesh; Bairwa, Narendra K; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2014-01-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) for screening mutations/single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is a simple, cost-effective technique, saving an expensive exercise of sequencing each and every polymerase chain reaction product and assisting in choosing only the amplicons of interest with expected mutations. The principle of detection of small changes in DNA sequences is based on changes in single-strand DNA conformations. The changes in electrophoretic mobility that SSCP detects are sequence dependent. The limitations faced in SSCP range from routine polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) problems to the problems of resolving mutant DNA bands. Both these problems can be solved by controlling PAGE conditions and by varying physical and environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, voltage, gel type and percentage, addition of additives or denaturants, and others. Despite much upgrading of the technology for mutation detection, SSCP remains the method of choice to analyze mutations and SNPs in order to understand genomic variations, both spontaneous and induced, and the genetic basis of diseases.

  20. Limits of the potential flow model for obstacle detection using a lateral line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maertens, Audrey; Weymouth, Gabriel; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Fish have a particular sensory system called lateral line through which they measure flow velocity and pressure gradient. Behavioral studies have shown that fish can detect and identify obstacles while gliding using this sensory system alone. Despite a widespread interest of the community in understanding and reproducing this capability, a realistic approach is still missing. Indeed, due to computational constraints, most attempts to date have used potential flow models. The present work aims at revealing the limits of the potential flow model in the case of a vehicle gliding by a cylinder. The understanding thus gained can be used to account for viscous effects in a computationally-efficient fashion. An improvement of the boundary data immersion method provides accurate pressure predictions at the Reynolds numbers considered (500 < Re < 10000). It is shown how a potential flow-based obstacle detection algorithm fails at locating the cylinder at these Reynolds numbers. It is also shown that a panel method accounting for dynamically changing displacement thickness leads to accurate pressure prediction. This is a first step toward real-time pressure predictions for viscous flows which is needed for efficient obstacle detection and identification algorithms.

  1. Nanoparticle size detection limits by single particle ICP-MS for 40 elements.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungyun; Bi, Xiangyu; Reed, Robert B; Ranville, James F; Herckes, Pierre; Westerhoff, Paul

    2014-09-02

    The quantification and characterization of natural, engineered, and incidental nano- to micro-size particles are beneficial to assessing a nanomaterial's performance in manufacturing, their fate and transport in the environment, and their potential risk to human health. Single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) can sensitively quantify the amount and size distribution of metallic nanoparticles suspended in aqueous matrices. To accurately obtain the nanoparticle size distribution, it is critical to have knowledge of the size detection limit (denoted as Dmin) using spICP-MS for a wide range of elements (other than a few available assessed ones) that have been or will be synthesized into engineered nanoparticles. Herein is described a method to estimate the size detection limit using spICP-MS and then apply it to nanoparticles composed of 40 different elements. The calculated Dmin values correspond well for a few of the elements with their detectable sizes that are available in the literature. Assuming each nanoparticle sample is composed of one element, Dmin values vary substantially among the 40 elements: Ta, U, Ir, Rh, Th, Ce, and Hf showed the lowest Dmin values, ≤10 nm; Bi, W, In, Pb, Pt, Ag, Au, Tl, Pd, Y, Ru, Cd, and Sb had Dmin in the range of 11-20 nm; Dmin values of Co, Sr, Sn, Zr, Ba, Te, Mo, Ni, V, Cu, Cr, Mg, Zn, Fe, Al, Li, and Ti were located at 21-80 nm; and Se, Ca, and Si showed high Dmin values, greater than 200 nm. A range of parameters that influence the Dmin, such as instrument sensitivity, nanoparticle density, and background noise, is demonstrated. It is observed that, when the background noise is low, the instrument sensitivity and nanoparticle density dominate the Dmin significantly. Approaches for reducing the Dmin, e.g., collision cell technology (CCT) and analyte isotope selection, are also discussed. To validate the Dmin estimation approach, size distributions for three engineered nanoparticle samples were

  2. Limited geographic genetic structure detected in a widespread Palearctic corvid, Nucifraga caryocatactes

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Theresa M.

    2014-01-01

    The Eurasian or spotted nutcracker (Nucifraga caryocatactes) is a widespread resident corvid found throughout the Palearctic from Central Europe to Japan. Characterized by periodic bouts of irruptive dispersal in search of Pinus seed crops, this species has potential for high levels of gene flow across its range. Previous analysis of 11 individuals did not find significant range-wide population genetic structure. We investigated population structure using 924 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA control region sequence data from 62 individuals from 12 populations distributed throughout the nutcracker’s range. We complemented this analysis by incorporating additional genetic data from previously published sequences. High levels of genetic diversity and limited population genetic structure were detected suggesting that potential barriers to dispersal do not restrict gene flow in nutcrackers. PMID:25024901

  3. Model averaging quantiles from data censored by a limit of detection.

    PubMed

    Nysen, Ruth; Faes, Christel; Ferrari, Pietro; Verger, Philippe; Aerts, Marc

    2016-03-01

    In chemical risk assessment, it is important to determine the quantiles of the distribution of concentration data. The selection of an appropriate distribution and the estimation of particular quantiles of interest are largely hindered by the omnipresence of observations below the limit of detection, leading to left-censored data. The log-normal distribution is a common choice, but this distribution is not the only possibility and alternatives should be considered as well. Here, we focus on several distributions that are related to the log-normal distribution or that are seminonparametric extensions of the log-normal distribution. Whereas previous work focused on the estimation of the cumulative distribution function, our interest here goes to the estimation of quantiles, particularly in the left tail of the distribution where most of the left-censored data are located. Two different model averaged quantile estimators are defined and compared for different families of candidate models. The models and methods of selection and averaging are further investigated through simulations and illustrated on data of cadmium concentration in food products. The approach is extended to include covariates and to deal with uncertainty about the values of the limit of detection. These extensions are illustrated with (134) cesium measurements from Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. We can conclude that averaged models do achieve good performance characteristics in case no useful prior knowledge about the true distribution is available; that there is no structural difference in the performance of the direct and indirect method; and that, not surprisingly, only the true or closely approximating model can deal with extremely high percentages of censoring.

  4. Implications of limits of detection of various methods for Bacillus anthracis in computing risks to human health.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Amanda B; McLennan, S Devin; Pandey, Alok K; Gerba, Charles P; Haas, Charles N; Rose, Joan B; Hashsham, Syed A

    2009-10-01

    Used for decades for biological warfare, Bacillus anthracis (category A agent) has proven to be highly stable and lethal. Quantitative risk assessment modeling requires descriptive statistics of the limit of detection to assist in defining the exposure. Furthermore, the sensitivities of various detection methods in environmental matrices are vital information for first responders. A literature review of peer-reviewed journal articles related to methods for detection of B. anthracis was undertaken. Articles focused on the development or evaluation of various detection approaches, such as PCR, real-time PCR, immunoassay, etc. Real-time PCR and PCR were the most sensitive methods for the detection of B. anthracis, with median instrument limits of detection of 430 and 440 cells/ml, respectively. There were very few peer-reviewed articles on the detection methods for B. anthracis in the environment. The most sensitive limits of detection for the environmental samples were 0.1 CFU/g for soil using PCR-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), 17 CFU/liter for air using an ELISA-biochip system, 1 CFU/liter for water using cultivation, and 1 CFU/cm(2) for stainless steel fomites using cultivation. An exponential dose-response model for the inhalation of B. anthracis estimates of risk at concentrations equal to the environmental limit of detection determined the probability of death if untreated to be as high as 0.520. Though more data on the environmental limit of detection would improve the assumptions made for the risk assessment, this study's quantification of the risk posed by current limitations in the knowledge of detection methods should be considered when employing those methods in environmental monitoring and cleanup strategies.

  5. Sensitivity and noise in GC-MS: Achieving low limits of detection for difficult analytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialkov, Alexander B.; Steiner, Urs; Lehotay, Steven J.; Amirav, Aviv

    2007-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) instrument limit of detection (LOD) is typically listed by major vendors as that of octafluoronaphthalene (OFN). Most current GC-MS instruments can achieve LODs in the low femtogram range. However, GC-MS LODs for realistic analytes in actual samples are often a few orders of magnitude higher than OFN's. Users seldom encounter 1 pg LOD in the single ion monitoring mode in their applications. We define this detectability difference as the "OFN gap." In this paper, we demonstrate and discuss how the OFN gap can be significantly reduced by the use of GC-MS with supersonic molecular beams (SMB). Experimental results were obtained with a recently developed GC-MS with SMB named 1200-SMB, that is based on the conversion of the Varian 1200 system into a GC-MS-MS with SMB. With this 1200-SMB system, the LOD of all types of analytes, including OFN, in real samples is significantly improved through the combination of: (a) enhanced molecular ion; (b) elimination of vacuum background noise; (c) elimination of mass independent noise; (d) elimination of ion source peak tailing and degradation; (e) significantly increased range of thermally labile and low volatility compounds that are amenable for analysis through lower sample elution temperatures; (f) reduced column bleed and ghost peaks through sample elution at lower temperatures; (g) improved compatibility with large volume injections; and (h) reduced matrix interferences through the combination of enhanced molecular ion and MS-MS. As a result, the 1200-SMB LODs of common and/or difficult compounds are much closer to its OFN LOD, even in complex matrices. We crossed the <1 fg OFN LOD milestone to achieve the lowest LOD to date using GC-MS, but more importantly, we attained LOD of 2 fg for diazinon, a common pesticide analyte. In another example, we achieved an LOD of 10 fg for underivatized testosterone, which is not amenable in traditional GC-MS analysis, and conducted many analyses

  6. Effectiveness of hairpin probe in increasing the limit of detection for gold nanowire based-biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien Cao, Huu; Pham, Xuan Thanh Tung; Linh Ha, Van; Hieu Le, Van

    2014-12-01

    Electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensors, which are rapid, reagentless and readily integrated into microelectronics and microfluidics, appear a promising alternative to optical methods for the detection of specific nucleic acid sequences. In keeping with this, a large number of distinct E-DNA architectures have been reported to date. Most, however, suffer from one or more drawbacks, including low signal gain, signal-off behavior or instability. To remedy these problems, we report here the development of a signal-on E-DNA architecture that achieves both high signal gain and good stability. This new sensor employs a commercially synthesized, asymmetric hairpin DNA as its recognition and signaling probe, the shorter arm of which is labeled with a redox reporting methylene blue at its free end. Unlike all prior E-DNA architectures, in which the recognition probe is attached via a terminal functional group to its underlying electrode, the probe employed here is affixed using a thiol group located internally, in the turn region of the hairpin. Hybridization of a target DNA to the longer arm of the hairpin displaces the shorter arm, allowing the reporter to approach the electrode surface and transfer electrons. The observed signal gain is sufficient to achieve a demonstrated detection limit of 25 pM.

  7. Lower Limits on Aperture Size for an ExoEarth Detecting Coronagraphic Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Christopher C.; Roberge, Aki; Mandell, Avi; Clampin, Mark; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; McElwain, Michael W.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.

    2015-08-01

    The yield of Earth-like planets will likely be a primary science metric for future space-based missions that will drive telescope aperture size. Maximizing the exoEarth candidate yield is therefore critical to minimizing the required aperture. Here we describe a method for exoEarth candidate yield maximization that simultaneously optimizes, for the first time, the targets chosen for observation, the number of visits to each target, the delay time between visits, and the exposure time of every observation. This code calculates both the detection time and multi-wavelength spectral characterization time required for planets. We also refine the astrophysical assumptions used as inputs to these calculations, relying on published estimates of planetary occurrence rates as well as theoretical and observational constraints on terrestrial planet sizes and classical habitable zones. Given these astrophysical assumptions, optimistic telescope and instrument assumptions, and our new completeness code that produces the highest yields to date, we suggest lower limits on the aperture size required to detect and characterize a statistically motivated sample of exoEarths.

  8. Artifactual mutations resulting from DNA lesions limit detection levels in ultrasensitive sequencing applications

    PubMed Central

    Arbeithuber, Barbara; Makova, Kateryna D.; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2016-01-01

    The need in cancer research or evolutionary biology to detect rare mutations or variants present at very low frequencies (<10−5) poses an increasing demand on lowering the detection limits of available methods. Here we demonstrated that amplifiable DNA lesions introduce important error sources in ultrasensitive technologies such as single molecule PCR (smPCR) applications (e.g. droplet-digital PCR), or next-generation sequencing (NGS) based methods. Using templates with known amplifiable lesions (8-oxoguanine, deaminated 5-methylcytosine, uracil, and DNA heteroduplexes), we assessed with smPCR and duplex sequencing that templates with these lesions were amplified very efficiently by proofreading polymerases (except uracil), leading to G->T, and to a lesser extent, to unreported G->C substitutions at 8-oxoguanine lesions, and C->T transitions in amplified uracil containing templates. Long heat incubations common in many DNA extraction protocols significantly increased the number of G->T substitutions. Moreover, in ∼50-80% smPCR reactions we observed the random amplification preference of only one of both DNA strands explaining the known ‘PCR jackpot effect’, with the result that a lesion became indistinguishable from a true mutation or variant. Finally, we showed that artifactual mutations derived from uracil and 8-oxoguanine could be significantly reduced by DNA repair enzymes. PMID:27477585

  9. Estimation of intervention effect using paired interval-censored data with clumping below lower detection limit.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Lam, K F; Cowling, Benjamin J; Cheung, Yin Bun

    2015-01-30

    Outcome variables that are semicontinuous with clumping at zero are commonly seen in biomedical research. In addition, the outcome measurement is sometimes subject to interval censoring and a lower detection limit (LDL). This gives rise to interval-censored observations with clumping below the LDL. Level of antibody against influenza virus measured by the hemagglutination inhibition assay is an example. The interval censoring is due to the assay's technical procedure. The clumping below LDL is likely a result of the lack of prior exposure in some individuals such that they either have zero level of antibodies or do not have detectable level of antibodies. Given a pair of such measurements from the same subject at two time points, a binary 'fold-increase' endpoint can be defined according to the ratio of these two measurements, as it often is in vaccine clinical trials. The intervention effect or vaccine immunogenicity can be assessed by comparing the binary endpoint between groups of subjects given different vaccines or placebos. We introduce a two-part random effects model for modeling the paired interval-censored data with clumping below the LDL. Based on the estimated model parameters, we propose to use Monte Carlo approximation for estimation of the 'fold-increase' endpoint and the intervention effect. Bootstrapping is used for variance estimation. The performance of the proposed method is demonstrated by simulation. We analyze antibody data from an influenza vaccine trial for illustration.

  10. Three factors limiting the reliable detection of light by retinal ganglion cells of the cat

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, H. B.; Levick, W. R.

    1969-01-01

    1. Responses of cat retinal ganglion cells have been examined with a view to specifying the characteristics that limit the detection of light stimuli. 2. Threshold is defined as the weakest stimulus that can be reliably detected by examination of the output from a retinal ganglion cell; it depends upon (a) the quantum/spike ratio, which is the mean number of additional quantal absorptions required to produce an additional impulse, (b) the temporal course of the response, which determines the time interval within which the maintained discharge is modified, and (c) the statistical distribution of the number of impulses that occur in this time interval in the absence of the stimulus. 3. The quantum/spike ratio changes greatly when adapting luminance is changed, and this is the predominant factor accounting for changes in increment threshold. 4. The time course of the response changes with adaptation level and area of the stimulus. This may account for the changes in temporal integration that occur in analogous psychophysical experiments. 5. Changes in the irregularity of the maintained discharge also affect the threshold of single ganglion cells. This is only a minor factor in the conditions of most of our experiments, but it may be important when unstabilized images and non-equilibrium adaptation conditions are encountered. PMID:5761942

  11. Artifactual mutations resulting from DNA lesions limit detection levels in ultrasensitive sequencing applications.

    PubMed

    Arbeithuber, Barbara; Makova, Kateryna D; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2016-12-01

    The need in cancer research or evolutionary biology to detect rare mutations or variants present at very low frequencies (<10(-5)) poses an increasing demand on lowering the detection limits of available methods. Here we demonstrated that amplifiable DNA lesions introduce important error sources in ultrasensitive technologies such as single molecule PCR (smPCR) applications (e.g. droplet-digital PCR), or next-generation sequencing (NGS) based methods. Using templates with known amplifiable lesions (8-oxoguanine, deaminated 5-methylcytosine, uracil, and DNA heteroduplexes), we assessed with smPCR and duplex sequencing that templates with these lesions were amplified very efficiently by proofreading polymerases (except uracil), leading to G->T, and to a lesser extent, to unreported G->C substitutions at 8-oxoguanine lesions, and C->T transitions in amplified uracil containing templates. Long heat incubations common in many DNA extraction protocols significantly increased the number of G->T substitutions. Moreover, in ∼50-80% smPCR reactions we observed the random amplification preference of only one of both DNA strands explaining the known 'PCR jackpot effect', with the result that a lesion became indistinguishable from a true mutation or variant. Finally, we showed that artifactual mutations derived from uracil and 8-oxoguanine could be significantly reduced by DNA repair enzymes.

  12. Detection limit of fishing boats by the day night band (DNB) on VIIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, Ichio; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Park, John-geol; Mackin, Kenneth J.; Mittleman, John

    2016-09-01

    The detection limit of DNB was proposed as a function of the brightness temperature (BT) at 3.7 μm, where the transmittance of cloud could be observed as a change of surface temperature. The shortwave infrared band exhibited a wide distribution in BT more than the thermal infrared band for the same level of DNB radiance. The lights from surface were identified even under the full Moon condition with the proposed method, where clouds were reflecting the lunar lights. A different distribution of clouds for day to day and a change of the Moon phase with its elevation make this problem more complicated. But the approach of contrast based evaluation of surface lights and lunar reflected lights could be one solution to distinguish the lights from the surface. Currently, a validation is necessary in the future to confirm this algorithm and to validate the detected pixels to be fishing boats with the stable light sources. The time series data of fishing boats could be studied to analyze the region of fishing area relative to the distribution of sea surface temperature and/or chlorophyll-a.

  13. Potential and limits of Raman spectroscopy for carotenoid detection in microorganisms: implications for astrobiology

    PubMed Central

    Jehlička, Jan; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Osterrothová, Kateřina; Novotná, Julie; Nedbalová, Linda; Kopecký, Jiří; Němec, Ivan; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, it is demonstrated how Raman spectroscopy can be used to detect different carotenoids as possible biomarkers in various groups of microorganisms. The question which arose from previous studies concerns the level of unambiguity of discriminating carotenoids using common Raman microspectrometers. A series of laboratory-grown microorganisms of different taxonomic affiliation was investigated, such as halophilic heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria, the anoxygenic phototrophs, the non-halophilic heterotrophs as well as eukaryotes (Ochrophyta, Rhodophyta and Chlorophyta). The data presented show that Raman spectroscopy is a suitable tool to assess the presence of carotenoids of these organisms in cultures. Comparison is made with the high-performance liquid chromatography approach of analysing pigments in extracts. Direct measurements on cultures provide fast and reliable identification of the pigments. Some of the carotenoids studied are proposed as tracers for halophiles, in contrast with others which can be considered as biomarkers of other genera. The limits of application of Raman spectroscopy are discussed for a few cases where the current Raman spectroscopic approach does not allow discriminating structurally very similar carotenoids. The database reported can be used for applications in geobiology and exobiology for the detection of pigment signals in natural settings. PMID:25368348

  14. Breath Analysis Using Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Breath Biomarkers, Spectral Fingerprints, and Detection Limits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuji; Sahay, Peeyush

    2009-01-01

    Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC) disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS), and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS). Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis. PMID:22408503

  15. The minimum detection limits of RDX and TNT deposited on various surfaces as determined by ion mobility spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodacy, P.

    1993-08-01

    An Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) was used to determine the detection limits of RDX and TNT on six different substrates. The preparation of the explosive deposits on the surfaces is examined as well as effects due to the size, uniformity, method of application, and time that a deposit has been on a surface. Sampling methods are discussed along with effects of the surface topology. The transfer of explosives from a hand to a surface, and methods to reduce the detection limits are presented.

  16. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 136 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11 B Appendix B to Part 136 Protection of Environment... Determination of the Method Detection Limit—Revision 1.11 Definition The method detection limit (MDL) is defined... processing steps of the analytical method be included in the determination of the method detection limit....

  17. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  18. Detection limits of tidal-wetland sequences to identify variable rupture modes of megathrust earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shennan, Ian; Garrett, Ed; Barlow, Natasha

    2016-10-01

    Recent paleoseismological studies question whether segment boundaries identified for 20th and 21st century great, >M8, earthquakes persist through multiple earthquake cycles or whether smaller segments with different boundaries rupture and cause significant hazards. The smaller segments may include some currently slipping rather than locked. In this review, we outline general principles regarding indicators of relative sea-level change in tidal wetlands and the conditions in which paleoseismic indicators must be distinct from those resulting from non-seismic processes. We present new evidence from sites across southcentral Alaska to illustrate different detection limits of paleoseismic indicators and consider alternative interpretations for marsh submergence and emergence. We compare predictions of coseismic uplift and subsidence derived from geophysical models of earthquakes with different rupture modes. The spatial patterns of agreement and misfits between model predictions and quantitative reconstructions of coseismic submergence and emergence suggest that no earthquake within the last 4000 years had a pattern of rupture the same as the Mw 9.2 Alaska earthquake in 1964. From the Alaska examples and research from other subduction zones we suggest that If we want to understand whether a megathrust ruptures in segments of variable length in different earthquakes, we need to be site-specific as to what sort of geological-based criteria eliminate the possibility of a particular rupture mode in different earthquakes. We conclude that coastal paleoseismological studies benefit from a methodological framework that employs rigorous evaluation of five essential criteria and a sixth which may be very robust but only occur at some sites: 1 - lateral extent of peat-mud or mud-peat couplets with sharp contacts; 2 - suddenness of submergence or emergence, and replicated within each site; 3 - amount of vertical motion, quantified with 95% error terms and replicated within each

  19. Detection limits for actinides in a monochromatic, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michael L; Havrilla, George J

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics have made it possible to examine the L x-rays of actinides using doubly-curved crystals in a bench-top device. A doubly-curved crystal (DCC) acts as a focusing monochromatic filter for polychromatic x-rays. A Monochromatic, Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (MWDXRF) instrument that uses DCCs to measure Cm and Pu in reprocessing plant liquors was proposed in 2007 by the authors at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A prototype design of this MWDXRF instrument was developed in collaboration with X-ray Optical Systems Inc. (XOS), of East Greenbush, New York. In the MWDXRF instrument, x-rays from a Rhodium-anode x-ray tube are passed through a primary DCC to produce a monochromatic beam of 20.2-keV photons. This beam is focused on a specimen that may contain actinides. The 20.2-keV interrogating beam is just above the L3 edge of Californium; each actinide (with Z = 90 to 98) present in the specimen emits characteristic L x-rays as the result of L3-shell vacancies. In the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRf, these x-rays enter a secondary DCC optic that preferentially passes 14.961-keV photons, corresponding to the L-alpha-1 x-ray peak of Curium. In the present stage of experimentation, Curium-bearing specimens have not been analyzed with the prototype MWDXRF instrument. Surrogate materials for Curium include Rubidium, which has a K-beta-l x-ray at 14.961 keV, and Yttrium, which has a K-alpha-1 x-ray at 14.958 keV. In this paper, the lower limit of detection for Curium in the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRF instrument is estimated. The basis for this estimate is described, including a description of computational models and benchmarking techniques used. Detection limits for other actinides are considered, as well as future safeguards applications for MWDXRF instrumentation.

  20. Detecting regime shifts in marine systems with limited biological data: An example from southeast Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litzow, Michael A.; Hobday, Alistair J.; Frusher, Stewart D.; Dann, Peter; Tuck, Geoffrey N.

    2016-02-01

    The ability to detect ecological regime shifts in a data-limited setting was investigated, using southeast Australian ecosystems as a model. Community variability was summarized for 1968-2008 with the first two principal components (PCs) of recruitment estimates for six fish stocks and reproductive parameters for four seabird species; regional climate was summarized for 1953-2008 with the first two PCs for three parameters (sea surface temperature [SST], sea surface salinity, surface nitrate) measured at two stations; and basin-scale climate variability was summarized for 1950-2012 with mean South Pacific SST and the first two PCs of detrended South Pacific SST. The first two biology PCs explained 45% of total community variability. The first two PCs of basin-scale SST showed abrupt shifts similar to "regime" behavior observed in other ocean basins, and the first PC of basin-scale SST showed significant covariation with the first PC of regional climate. Together, these results are consistent with the strong community variability and decadal-scale red noise climatic variability associated with Northern Hemisphere regime shifts. However, statistical model selection showed that the first two PCs of regional climate and the first PC of biology time series all exhibited linear change, rather than abrupt shifts. This result is consistent with previous studies documenting rapid linear change in the climate and biology of southeast Australian shelf ecosystems, and we conclude that there is no evidence for regime shift behavior in the region's ecology. However, analysis of a large set of previously-published biological time series from the North Pacific (n = 64) suggests that studies using fewer than ∼30 biological time series, such as this one, may be unable to detect regime shifts. Thus we conclude that the nature of ecological variability in the region cannot be determined with available data. The development of additional long-term biological observations is needed

  1. Detecting differential transmissibilities that affect the size of self-limited outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Seth; Funk, Sebastian; Pulliam, Juliet R C

    2014-10-01

    Our ability to respond appropriately to infectious diseases is enhanced by identifying differences in the potential for transmitting infection between individuals. Here, we identify epidemiological traits of self-limited infections (i.e. infections with an effective reproduction number satisfying [0 < R eff < 1) that correlate with transmissibility. Our analysis is based on a branching process model that permits statistical comparison of both the strength and heterogeneity of transmission for two distinct types of cases. Our approach provides insight into a variety of scenarios, including the transmission of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in the Arabian peninsula, measles in North America, pre-eradication smallpox in Europe, and human monkeypox in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. When applied to chain size data for MERS-CoV transmission before 2014, our method indicates that despite an apparent trend towards improved control, there is not enough statistical evidence to indicate that R eff has declined with time. Meanwhile, chain size data for measles in the United States and Canada reveal statistically significant geographic variation in R eff, suggesting that the timing and coverage of national vaccination programs, as well as contact tracing procedures, may shape the size distribution of observed infection clusters. Infection source data for smallpox suggests that primary cases transmitted more than secondary cases, and provides a quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of control interventions. Human monkeypox, on the other hand, does not show evidence of differential transmission between animals in contact with humans, primary cases, or secondary cases, which assuages the concern that social mixing can amplify transmission by secondary cases. Lastly, we evaluate surveillance requirements for detecting a change in the human-to-human transmission of monkeypox since the cessation of cross-protective smallpox vaccination. Our

  2. Visual acuity of the honey bee retina and the limits for feature detection

    PubMed Central

    Rigosi, Elisa; Wiederman, Steven D.; O’Carroll, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Visual abilities of the honey bee have been studied for more than 100 years, recently revealing unexpectedly sophisticated cognitive skills rivalling those of vertebrates. However, the physiological limits of the honey bee eye have been largely unaddressed and only studied in an unnatural, dark state. Using a bright display and intracellular recordings, we here systematically investigated the angular sensitivity across the light adapted eye of honey bee foragers. Angular sensitivity is a measure of photoreceptor receptive field size and thus small values indicate higher visual acuity. Our recordings reveal a fronto-ventral acute zone in which angular sensitivity falls below 1.9°, some 30% smaller than previously reported. By measuring receptor noise and responses to moving dark objects, we also obtained direct measures of the smallest features detectable by the retina. In the frontal eye, single photoreceptors respond to objects as small as 0.6° × 0.6°, with >99% reliability. This indicates that honey bee foragers possess significantly better resolution than previously reported or estimated behaviourally, and commonly assumed in modelling of bee acuity. PMID:28383025

  3. Review of plasmonic fiber optic biochemical sensors: improving the limit of detection.

    PubMed

    Caucheteur, Christophe; Guo, Tuan; Albert, Jacques

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of the technologies used to implement surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effects into fiber-optic sensors for chemical and biochemical applications and a survey of results reported over the last ten years. The performance indicators that are relevant for such systems, such as refractometric sensitivity, operating wavelength, and figure of merit (FOM), are discussed and listed in table form. A list of experimental results with reported limits of detection (LOD) for proteins, toxins, viruses, DNA, bacteria, glucose, and various chemicals is also provided for the same time period. Configurations discussed include fiber-optic analogues of the Kretschmann-Raether prism SPR platforms, made from geometry-modified multimode and single-mode optical fibers (unclad, side-polished, tapered, and U-shaped), long period fiber gratings (LPFG), tilted fiber Bragg gratings (TFBG), and specialty fibers (plastic or polymer, microstructured, and photonic crystal fibers). Configurations involving the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) on continuous thin metal layers as well as those involving localized SPR (LSPR) phenomena in nanoparticle metal coatings of gold, silver, and other metals at visible and near-infrared wavelengths are described and compared quantitatively.

  4. Polarization-resolved sensing with tilted fiber Bragg gratings: theory and limits of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialiayeu, Aliaksandr; Ianoul, Anatoli; Albert, Jacques

    2015-08-01

    Polarization based sensing with tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) sensors is analysed theoretically by two alternative approaches. The first method is based on tracking the grating transmission for two orthogonal states of linear polarized light that are extracted from the measured Jones matrix or Stokes vectors of the TFBG transmission spectra. The second method is based on the measurements along the system principle axes and polarization dependent loss (PDL) parameter, also calculated from measured data. It is shown that the frequent crossing of the Jones matrix eigenvalues as a function of wavelength leads to a non-physical interchange of the calculated principal axes; a method to remove this unwanted mathematical artefact and to restore the order of the system eigenvalues and the corresponding principal axes is provided. A comparison of the two approaches reveals that the PDL method provides a smaller standard deviation and therefore lower limit of detection in refractometric sensing. Furthermore, the polarization analysis of the measured spectra allows for the identification of the principal states of polarization of the sensor system and consequentially for the calculation of the transmission spectrum for any incident polarization state. The stability of the orientation of the system principal axes is also investigated as a function of wavelength.

  5. Pushing the detection limit of infrared spectroscopy for structural analysis of dilute protein samples.

    PubMed

    Baldassarre, Maurizio; Barth, Andreas

    2014-11-07

    Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy is a powerful and versatile tool to investigate the structure and dynamics of proteins in solution. The intrinsically low extinction coefficient of the amide I mode, the main structure-related oscillator, together with the high infrared absorptivity of aqueous media, requires that proteins are studied at high concentrations (>10 mg L(-1)). This may represent a challenge in the study of aggregation-prone proteins and peptides, and questions the significance of structural data obtained for proteins physiologically existing at much lower concentrations. Here we describe the development of a simple experimental approach that increases the detection limit of protein structure analysis by infrared spectroscopy. Our approach relies on custom-made filters to isolate the amide I region (1700-1600 cm(-1)) from irrelevant spectral regions. The sensitivity of the instrument is then increased by background attenuation, an approach consisting in the use of a neutral density filter, such as a non-scattering metal grid, to attentuate the intensity of the background spectrum. When the filters and grid are combined, a 2.4-fold improvement in the noise level can be obtained. We have successfully tested this approach using a highly diluted solution of pyruvate kinase in deuterated medium (0.2% w/v), and found that it provides spectra of a quality comparable to those recorded with a 10-fold higher protein concentration.

  6. Protein immunoassay methods for detection of biotech crops: applications, limitations, and practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Stave, James W

    2002-01-01

    Immunoassay methods are available for detection and quantitation of proteins expressed by most biotechnology-derived crops in commercial production. The 2 most common test formats are enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunochromatographic (lateral flow) strip tests. Two ELISA methods, one for Roundup Ready soybeans and one for MON810 CrylAb corn, were the subject of large international collaborative studies and were demonstrated to quantitatively determine the concentrations of biotech crops in samples of ground grain. Quantitative ELISA methods are also useful for analysis of processed fractions of agricultural commodities such as soybean toasted meal or corn flour. Both strip tests and ELISAs for biotech crops are currently being used on a large scale in the United States to manage the sale and distribution of grain. In these applications, tests are used to determine if the concentration of biotech grain is above or below specified threshold limits. Using existing U.S. Department of Agriculture sampling techniques, the reliability of the threshold determination is expressed in terms of statistical confidence rather than analytical precision. Combining the use of protein immunoassays with Identity Preservation systems provides an effective means of characterizing the raw and processed agricultural inputs to the food production system in a way that allows food producers to comply with labeling laws.

  7. Probe-Specific Procedure to Estimate Sensitivity and Detection Limits for 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alexander J.; Granwehr, Josef; Lesbats, Clémentine; Krupa, James L.; Six, Joseph S.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Thomas, Neil R.; Auer, Dorothee P.; Meersmann, Thomas; Faas, Henryk M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to low fluorine background signal in vivo, 19F is a good marker to study the fate of exogenous molecules by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using equilibrium nuclear spin polarization schemes. Since 19F MRI applications require high sensitivity, it can be important to assess experimental feasibility during the design stage already by estimating the minimum detectable fluorine concentration. Here we propose a simple method for the calibration of MRI hardware, providing sensitivity estimates for a given scanner and coil configuration. An experimental “calibration factor” to account for variations in coil configuration and hardware set-up is specified. Once it has been determined in a calibration experiment, the sensitivity of an experiment or, alternatively, the minimum number of required spins or the minimum marker concentration can be estimated without the need for a pilot experiment. The definition of this calibration factor is derived based on standard equations for the sensitivity in magnetic resonance, yet the method is not restricted by the limited validity of these equations, since additional instrument-dependent factors are implicitly included during calibration. The method is demonstrated using MR spectroscopy and imaging experiments with different 19F samples, both paramagnetically and susceptibility broadened, to approximate a range of realistic environments. PMID:27727294

  8. Absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The distinction between the uses of relative and absolute spectroradiometric calibration of remote sensing systems is discussed. The advantages of detector-based absolute calibration are described, and the categories of relative and absolute system calibrations are listed. The limitations and problems associated with three common methods used for the absolute calibration of remote sensing systems are addressed. Two methods are proposed for the in-flight absolute calibration of advanced multispectral linear array systems. One makes use of a sun-illuminated panel in front of the sensor, the radiance of which is monitored by a spectrally flat pyroelectric radiometer. The other uses a large, uniform, high-radiance reference ground surface. The ground and atmospheric measurements required as input to a radiative transfer program to predict the radiance level at the entrance pupil of the orbital sensor are discussed, and the ground instrumentation is described.

  9. Absolute Temperature Monitoring Using RF Radiometry in the MRI Scanner

    PubMed Central

    El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Sotiriadis, Paul P.; Bottomley, Paul A.; Atalar, Ergin

    2007-01-01

    Temperature detection using microwave radiometry has proven value for noninvasively measuring the absolute temperature of tissues inside the body. However, current clinical radiometers operate in the gigahertz range, which limits their depth of penetration. We have designed and built a noninvasive radiometer which operates at radio frequencies (64 MHz) with ∼100-kHz bandwidth, using an external RF loop coil as a thermal detector. The core of the radiometer is an accurate impedance measurement and automatic matching circuit of 0.05 Ω accuracy to compensate for any load variations. The radiometer permits temperature measurements with accuracy of ±0.1°K, over a tested physiological range of 28° C–40° C in saline phantoms whose electric properties match those of tissue. Because 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners also operate at 64 MHz, we demonstrate the feasibility of integrating our radiometer with an MRI scanner to monitor RF power deposition and temperature dosimetry, obtaining coarse, spatially resolved, absolute thermal maps in the physiological range. We conclude that RF radiometry offers promise as a direct, noninvasive method of monitoring tissue heating during MRI studies and thereby providing an independent means of verifying patient-safe operation. Other potential applications include titration of hyper- and hypo-therapies. PMID:18026562

  10. Factors influencing the detection limit of the lateral-flow sandwich immunoassay: a case study with potato virus X.

    PubMed

    Safenkova, Irina; Zherdev, Anatoly; Dzantiev, Boris

    2012-06-01

    Key factors influencing the analyte detection limit of the sandwich immunochromatographic assay (ICA), namely, the size of gold nanoparticles, the antibody concentration, the conjugation pH, and characteristics of membranes, are discussed. The impacts of these factors were quantitatively characterized and compared for the first time using the same antigen (potato virus X). The antibody-colloidal gold conjugates synthesized at pH 9.0-9.5 (the pH was examined in the range from 7.5 to 10.0) and at an antibody concentration of 15 μg/mL (the concentration was tested from 10 to 100 μg/mL) demonstrated maximum binding with the analyte. The relationship between the size of gold nanoparticles and the ICA detection limit was determined. The detection limit decreases from 80 to 3 ng/mL (for antibodies with K (D) = 1.0 × 10(-9) M, data were obtained using a BIAcore X instrument) for a series of particles with a diameter from 6.4 to 33.4 nm (electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering data). In the case of larger particles (52 nm in diameter), the detection limit increases and reaches 9 ng/mL. A 10 mM phosphate buffer, pH 8, and a 50 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7, were the conditions of choice for the deposition of reactants. Taking into account these facts, we developed a lateral-flow test system for the rapid (10 min) detection of potato virus X in plant leaves. The ICA provided a visual detection limit of 3 ng/mL. In the case of the instrumental processing, potato virus X can be determined in the concentration range from 3 to 300 ng/mL with a detection limit 2 ng/mL.

  11. Database applicaton for absolute spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, Valery V.; Shumko, Sergiy

    2002-12-01

    32-bit database application with multidocument interface for Windows has been developed to calculate absolute energy distributions of observed spectra. The original database contains wavelength calibrated observed spectra which had been already passed through apparatus reductions such as flatfielding, background and apparatus noise subtracting. Absolute energy distributions of observed spectra are defined in unique scale by means of registering them simultaneously with artificial intensity standard. Observations of sequence of spectrophotometric standards are used to define absolute energy of the artificial standard. Observations of spectrophotometric standards are used to define optical extinction in selected moments. FFT algorithm implemented in the application allows performing convolution (deconvolution) spectra with user-defined PSF. The object-oriented interface has been created using facilities of C++ libraries. Client/server model with Windows Socket functionality based on TCP/IP protocol is used to develop the application. It supports Dynamic Data Exchange conversation in server mode and uses Microsoft Exchange communication facilities.

  12. Exploring the Limits of Waveform Correlation Event Detection as Applied to Three Earthquake Aftershock Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. J.; Carr, D.; Resor, M.; Duffey, S.

    2009-12-01

    Swarms of earthquakes and/or aftershock sequences can dramatically increase the level of seismicity in a region for a period of time lasting from days to months, depending on the swarm or sequence. Such occurrences can provide a large amount of useful information to seismologists. For those who monitor seismic events for possible nuclear explosions, however, these swarms/sequences are a nuisance. In an explosion monitoring system, each event must be treated as a possible nuclear test until it can be proven, to a high degree of confidence, not to be. Seismic events recorded by the same station with highly correlated waveforms almost certainly have a similar location and source type, so clusters of events within a swarm can quickly be identified as earthquakes. We have developed a number of tools that can be used to exploit the high degree of waveform similarity expected to be associated with swarms/sequences. Dendro Tool measures correlations between known events. The Waveform Correlation Detector is intended to act as a detector, finding events in raw data which correlate with known events. The Self Scanner is used to find all correlated segments within a raw data steam and does not require an event library. All three techniques together provide an opportunity to study the similarities of events in an aftershock sequence in different ways. To comprehensively characterize the benefits and limits of waveform correlation techniques, we studied 3 aftershock sequences, using our 3 tools, at multiple stations. We explored the effects of station distance and event magnitudes on correlation results. Lastly, we show the reduction in detection threshold and analyst workload offered by waveform correlation techniques compared to STA/LTA based detection. We analyzed 4 days of data from each aftershock sequence using all three methods. Most known events clustered in a similar manner across the toolsets. Up to 25% of catalogued events were found to be a member of a cluster. In

  13. System for absolute measurements by interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Douglas A.

    1993-03-01

    The most common problem of interferometric sensors is their inability to measure absolute path imbalance. Presented in this paper is a signal processing system that gives absolute, unambiguous reading of optical path difference for almost any style of interferometric sensor. Key components are a wide band (incoherent) optical source, a polychromator, and FFT electronics. Advantages include no moving parts in the signal processor, no active components at the sensor location, and the use of standard single mode fiber for sensor illumination and signal transmission. Actual absolute path imbalance of the interferometer is determined without using fringe counting or other inferential techniques. The polychromator extracts the interference information that occurs at each discrete wavelength within the spectral band of the optical source. The signal processing consists of analog and digital filtering, Fast Fourier analysis, and a peak detection and interpolation algorithm. This system was originally designed for use in a remote pressure sensing application that employed a totally passive fiber optic interferometer. A performance qualification was made using a Fabry-Perot interferometer and a commercially available laser interferometer to measure the reference displacement.

  14. Absolute classification with unsupervised clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An absolute classification algorithm is proposed in which the class definition through training samples or otherwise is required only for a particular class of interest. The absolute classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering when one cluster is known initially. The definitions and statistics of the other classes are automatically developed through the weighted unsupervised clustering procedure, which is developed to keep the cluster corresponding to the class of interest from losing its identity as the class of interest. Once all the classes are developed, a conventional relative classifier such as the maximum-likelihood classifier is used in the classification.

  15. Boosting the Quantitative Inorganic Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Sensing to the Limit: The Case of Nitrite/Nitrate Detection.

    PubMed

    Correa-Duarte, Miguel A; Pazos Perez, Nicolas; Guerrini, Luca; Giannini, Vincenzo; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A

    2015-03-05

    A high-performance ionic-sensing platform has been developed by an interdisciplinary approach, combining the classical colorimetric Griess reaction and new concepts of nanotechnology, such as plasmonic coupling of nanoparticles and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. This approach exploits the advantages of combined SERS/surface-enhanced resonant Raman Scattering (SERRS) by inducing the formation of homogeneous hot spots and a colored complex in resonance with the laser line, to yield detection limits for nitrite down to the subpicomolar level. The performance of this new method was compared with the classical Griess reaction and ionic chromatography showing detection limits about 6 and 3 orders of magnitude lower, respectively.

  16. Addressing the Limit of Detectability of Residual Oxide Discontinuities in Friction Stir Butt Welds of Aluminum using Phased Array Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, P. H.

    2008-01-01

    This activity seeks to estimate a theoretical upper bound of detectability for a layer of oxide embedded in a friction stir weld in aluminum. The oxide is theoretically modeled as an ideal planar layer of aluminum oxide, oriented normal to an interrogating ultrasound beam. Experimentally-measured grain scattering level is used to represent the practical noise floor. Echoes from naturally-occurring oxides will necessarily fall below this theoretical limit, and must be above the measurement noise to be potentially detectable.

  17. Analysis of the limiting noise and identification of some factors that dictate the detection limits in a low-power inductively coupled argon plasma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumans, P. W. J. M.; McKenna, R. J.; Bosveld, M.

    The background signal defined as the output signal ( xB) of the photomultiplier and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of xB at the wavelengths of 36 prominent analysis lines in the 190-320 nm region were measured under ICP compromise conditions for simultaneous multi-element analysis using a monochromator with an experimental spectral bandwidth of 0.015 nm. The RSD was found to vary systematically with xB according to the theoretically expected relationship RSD = (α B2 + gβ/ xB) 1/2 where α B(≈0.5%) is the constant source flicker noise contribution, gβ/ xB the shot-noise contribution and gβ a coefficient containing the photomultiplier (PMT) gain g. Dark current detector noise was negligible, at least in part, owing to the use of lock-in amplification. The validity of relationship (0) was tested for various types of PMT and for both pure aqueous solutions and solutions with 1 to 3% w/v amounts of either calcium chloride, sodium chloride, or a mixture of nickel and cobalt nitrates. Only in the case of the nickel-cobalt matrix were some departures found and these were attributable to line coincidences. Relationship (0) was found to apply also to net line signals, the flicker noise term, α s, then being about 1% instead of 0.5% for the present ICP system. Detection limits for 36 prominent lines of the elements As, Au, B, Be, Bi, Ge, In, Mg, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn and Zn were computed on the basis of relationship (0) and measured signal-to-background ratios (SBR). The results permitted an assessment of the separate effects that SBR, source flicker noise and shot noise have on the detection limits and this facilitated a detailed comparison of the detection limits obtained in this work with those reported by Winge, Peterson and Fassel [ Appl. Spectrosc.33, 106 (1979)]. The measurements of detection limits were extended to solutions with matrices (calcium chloride, sodium chloride, and a mixture of nickel and cobalt nitrates) to test the validity of the

  18. An absolute radius scale for Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Cooke, Maren L.; Pelton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Radio and stellar occultation observations of Saturn's rings made by the Voyager spacecraft are discussed. The data reveal systematic discrepancies of almost 10 km in some parts of the rings, limiting some of the investigations. A revised solution for Saturn's rotation pole has been proposed which removes the discrepancies between the stellar and radio occultation profiles. Corrections to previously published radii vary from -2 to -10 km for the radio occultation, and +5 to -6 km for the stellar occultation. An examination of spiral density waves in the outer A Ring supports that the revised absolute radii are in error by no more than 2 km.

  19. Absolute peptide quantification by lutetium labeling and nanoHPLC-ICPMS with isotope dilution analysis.

    PubMed

    Rappel, Christina; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    The need of analytical methods for absolute quantitative protein analysis spurred research on new developments in recent years. In this work, a novel approach was developed for accurate absolute peptide quantification based on metal labeling with lutetium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Lu-DTPA) and nanoflow high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma isotope dilution mass spectrometry (nanoHPLC-ICP-IDMS). In a two-step procedure peptides were derivatized at amino groups with diethylenetriamine pentaacetic anhydride (DTPAA) followed by chelation of lutetium. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) of the reaction product demonstrated highly specific peptide labeling. Under optimized nanoHPLC conditions the labeled peptides were baseline-separated, and the excess labeling reagent did not interfere. A 176Lu-labeled spike was continuously added to the column effluent for quantification by ICP-IDMS. The recovery of a Lu-DTPA-labeled standard peptide was close to 100% indicating high labeling efficiency and accurate absolute quantification. The precision of the entire method was 4.9%. The detection limit for Lu-DTPA-tagged peptides was 179 amol demonstrating that lutetium-specific peptide quantification was by 4 orders of magnitude more sensitive than detection by natural sulfur atoms present in cysteine or methionine residues. Furthermore, the application to peptides in insulin tryptic digest allowed the identification of interfering reagents decreasing the labeling efficiency. An additional advantage of this novel approach is the analysis of peptides, which do not naturally feature ICPMS-detectable elements.

  20. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  1. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  2. Absolute Standards for Climate Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, J.

    2016-10-01

    In a world of changing climate, political uncertainty, and ever-changing budgets, the benefit of measurements traceable to SI standards increases by the day. To truly resolve climate change trends on a decadal time scale, on-orbit measurements need to be referenced to something that is both absolute and unchanging. One such mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to definitively quantify climate change. In the CLARREO mission, we will utilize phase change cells in which a material is melted to calibrate the temperature of a blackbody that can then be observed by a spectrometer. A material's melting point is an unchanging physical constant that, through a series of transfers, can ultimately calibrate a spectrometer on an absolute scale. CLARREO consists of two primary instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer and a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy to calibrate other space-based instrumentation and thus transferring the absolute traceability. The status of various mission options will be presented.

  3. On the theoretical limits of detecting cyclic changes in cardiac high-energy phosphates and creatine kinase reaction kinetics using in vivo ³¹P MRS.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Kilian; Bottomley, Paul A; Weiss, Robert G

    2015-06-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is absolutely required to fuel normal cyclic contractions of the heart. The creatine kinase (CK) reaction is a major energy reserve reaction that rapidly converts creatine phosphate (PCr) to ATP during the cardiac cycle and at times of stress and ischemia, but is significantly impaired in conditions such as hypertrophy and heart failure. Because the magnitudes of possible in vivo cyclic changes in cardiac high-energy phosphates (HEPs) during the cardiac cycle are not well known from previous work, this study uses mathematical modeling to assess whether, and to what extent, cyclic variations in HEPs and in the rate of ATP synthesis through CK (CK flux) could exist in the human heart, and whether they could be measured with current in vivo (31)P MRS methods. Multi-site exchange models incorporating enzymatic rate equations were used to study the cyclic dynamics of the CK reaction, and Bloch equations were used to simulate (31)P MRS saturation transfer measurements of the CK reaction. The simulations show that short-term buffering of ATP by CK requires temporal variations over the cardiac cycle in the CK reaction velocities modeled by enzymatic rate equations. The maximum variation in HEPs in the normal human heart beating at 60 min(-1) was approximately 0.4 mM and proportional to the velocity of ATP hydrolysis. Such HEP variations are at or below the current limits of detection by in vivo (31)P MRS methods. Bloch equation simulations show that (31)P MRS saturation transfer estimates the time-averaged, pseudo-first-order forward rate constant, k(f,ap)', of the CK reaction, and that periodic short-term fluctuations in kf ' and CK flux are not likely to be detectable in human studies employing current in vivo (31)P MRS methods.

  4. Rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens: principles, applications, advantages and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of foodborne diseases has increased over the years and resulted in major public health problem globally. Foodborne pathogens can be found in various foods and it is important to detect foodborne pathogens to provide safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. The conventional methods used to detect foodborne pathogen are time consuming and laborious. Hence, a variety of methods have been developed for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens as it is required in many food analyses. Rapid detection methods can be categorized into nucleic acid-based, biosensor-based and immunological-based methods. This review emphasizes on the principles and application of recent rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Detection methods included are simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR), multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and oligonucleotide DNA microarray which classified as nucleic acid-based methods; optical, electrochemical and mass-based biosensors which classified as biosensor-based methods; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and lateral flow immunoassay which classified as immunological-based methods. In general, rapid detection methods are generally time-efficient, sensitive, specific and labor-saving. The developments of rapid detection methods are vital in prevention and treatment of foodborne diseases. PMID:25628612

  5. Rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens: principles, applications, advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of foodborne diseases has increased over the years and resulted in major public health problem globally. Foodborne pathogens can be found in various foods and it is important to detect foodborne pathogens to provide safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. The conventional methods used to detect foodborne pathogen are time consuming and laborious. Hence, a variety of methods have been developed for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens as it is required in many food analyses. Rapid detection methods can be categorized into nucleic acid-based, biosensor-based and immunological-based methods. This review emphasizes on the principles and application of recent rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Detection methods included are simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR), multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and oligonucleotide DNA microarray which classified as nucleic acid-based methods; optical, electrochemical and mass-based biosensors which classified as biosensor-based methods; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and lateral flow immunoassay which classified as immunological-based methods. In general, rapid detection methods are generally time-efficient, sensitive, specific and labor-saving. The developments of rapid detection methods are vital in prevention and treatment of foodborne diseases.

  6. Compact quantum dot-antibody conjugates for FRET immunoassays with subnanomolar detection limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattera, Lucia; Bhuckory, Shashi; Wegner, K. David; Qiu, Xue; Agnese, Fabio; Lincheneau, Christophe; Senden, Tim; Djurado, David; Charbonnière, Loïc J.; Hildebrandt, Niko; Reiss, Peter

    2016-05-01

    A novel two-step approach for quantum dot (QD) functionalization and bioconjugation is presented, which yields ultra-compact, stable, and highly luminescent antibody-QD conjugates suitable for use in FRET immunoassays. Hydrophobic InPZnS/ZnSe/ZnS (emission wavelength: 530 nm), CdSe/ZnS (605 nm), and CdSeTe/ZnS (705 nm) QDs were surface functionalized with zwitterionic penicillamine, enabling aqueous phase transfer under conservation of the photoluminescence properties. Post-functionalization with a heterobifunctional crosslinker, containing a lipoic acid group and a maleimide function, enabled the subsequent coupling to sulfhydryl groups of proteins. This was demonstrated by QD conjugation with fragmented antibodies (F(ab)). The obtained F(ab)-QD conjugates range among the smallest antibody-functionalized nanoprobes ever reported, with a hydrodynamic diameter <13 nm, PL quantum yield up to 66% at 705 nm, and colloidal stability of several months in various buffers. They were applied as FRET acceptors in homogeneous, time-gated immunoassays using Tb-antibodies as FRET donors, both coupled by an immunological sandwich complex between the two antibodies and a PSA (prostate specific antigen) biomarker. The advantages of the compact surface coating for FRET could be demonstrated by an 6.2 and 2.5 fold improvement of the limit of detection (LOD) for PSA compared to commercially available hydrophilic QDs emitting at 605 and 705 nm, respectively. While the commercial QDs contain identical inorganic cores responsible for their fluorescence, they are coated with a comparably thick amphiphilic polymer layer leading to much larger hydrodynamic diameters (>26 nm without biomolecules). The LODs of 0.8 and 3.7 ng mL-1 obtained in 50 μL serum samples are below the clinical cut-off level of PSA (4 ng mL-1) and demonstrate their direct applicability in clinical diagnostics.A novel two-step approach for quantum dot (QD) functionalization and bioconjugation is presented, which yields

  7. Qualitative Contrast between Knowledge-Limited Mixed-State and Variable-Resources Models of Visual Change Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nosofsky, Robert M.; Donkin, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We report an experiment designed to provide a qualitative contrast between knowledge-limited versions of mixed-state and variable-resources (VR) models of visual change detection. The key data pattern is that observers often respond "same" on big-change trials, while simultaneously being able to discriminate between same and small-change…

  8. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 425 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... processing steps of the analytical method be included in the determination of the method detection limit. The... corresponds to an instrument signal/noise ratio in the range of 2.5 to 5. If the criteria for qualitative identification of the analyte is based upon pattern recognition techniques, the least abundant signal...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 425 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... processing steps of the analytical method be included in the determination of the method detection limit. The... corresponds to an instrument signal/noise ratio in the range of 2.5 to 5. If the criteria for qualitative identification of the analyte is based upon pattern recognition techniques, the least abundant signal...

  10. SUPPLEMENT TO EPA COMPENDIUM METHOD TO-15 - REDUCTION OF METHOD DETECTION LIMITS TO MEET VAPOR INTRUSION MONITORING NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Supplement to EPA Compendium Method TO-15 provides guidance for reducing the method detection limit (MDL) for the compound 1,1- dichloroethene (1,1-DCE) and for other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from 0.5 ppbv, as cited in Method TO-15, to much lower concentrations. R...

  11. SUPPLEMENT TO EPA COMPENDIUM METHOD TO-15 - REDUCTION OF METHOD DETECTION LIMITS TO MEET VAPOR INTRUSION MONITORING NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Supplement to EPA Compendium Method TO-15 provides guidance for reducing the method detection limit (MDL) for the compound 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE) and for other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from 0.5 parts per billion by volume (ppbv), as cited in Method TO-15, to ...

  12. Electrochemical flow injection analysis of hydrazine in an excess of an active pharmaceutical ingredient: achieving pharmaceutical detection limits electrochemically.

    PubMed

    Channon, Robert B; Joseph, Maxim B; Bitziou, Eleni; Bristow, Anthony W T; Ray, Andrew D; Macpherson, Julie V

    2015-10-06

    The quantification of genotoxic impurities (GIs) such as hydrazine (HZ) is of critical importance in the pharmaceutical industry in order to uphold drug safety. HZ is a particularly intractable GI and its detection represents a significant technical challenge. Here, we present, for the first time, the use of electrochemical analysis to achieve the required detection limits by the pharmaceutical industry for the detection of HZ in the presence of a large excess of a common active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), acetaminophen (ACM) which itself is redox active, typical of many APIs. A flow injection analysis approach with electrochemical detection (FIA-EC) is utilized, in conjunction with a coplanar boron doped diamond (BDD) microband electrode, insulated in an insulating diamond platform for durability and integrated into a two piece flow cell. In order to separate the electrochemical signature for HZ such that it is not obscured by that of the ACM (present in excess), the BDD electrode is functionalized with Pt nanoparticles (NPs) to significantly shift the half wave potential for HZ oxidation to less positive potentials. Microstereolithography was used to fabricate flow cells with defined hydrodynamics which minimize dispersion of the analyte and optimize detection sensitivity. Importantly, the Pt NPs were shown to be stable under flow, and a limit of detection of 64.5 nM or 0.274 ppm for HZ with respect to the ACM, present in excess, was achieved. This represents the first electrochemical approach which surpasses the required detection limits set by the pharmaceutical industry for HZ detection in the presence of an API and paves the wave for online analysis and application to other GI and API systems.

  13. Optimizing the Thermal Read-Out Technique for MIP-Based Biomimetic Sensors: Towards Nanomolar Detection Limits

    PubMed Central

    Geerets, Bram; Peeters, Marloes; van Grinsven, Bart; Bers, Karolien; de Ceuninck, Ward; Wagner, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    In previous work, the novel heat-transfer method (HTM) for the detection of small molecules with Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIP)-type receptors was presented. In this study we focus on optimization of this sensor performance, with as final aim to lower the detection limit by reducing the noise level. It was determined that the noise originates foremost from the power supply, which can be controlled by varying the PID parameters. Therefore, the effect of the individual parameters was evaluated by tuning P, I and D separately at a temperature of 37 °C, giving a first indication of the optimal configuration. Next, a temperature profile was programmed and the standard deviation of the heat-transfer resistance over the entire regime was studied for a set of parameters. The optimal configuration, P1-I6-D0, reduced the noise level with nearly a factor of three compared to the original parameters of P10-I5-D0. With the optimized settings, the detection of L-nicotine in buffer solutions was studied and the detection limit improved significantly from 100 nM to 35 nM. Summarizing, optimization of the PID parameters and thereby improving the detection limit is a key parameter for first applications of the HTM-method for MIP receptors in analytical research. PMID:23863857

  14. H I detection survey of a complete magnitude-limited sample of dwarf irregular galaxies in the Virgo Cluster area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, G. Lyle; Glosson, John; Helou, George; Salpeter, E. E.; Sandage, A.

    1987-01-01

    New single-beam Arecibo H I observations of 298 late-type galaxies in the Virgo Cluster drawn mostly from the new catalog of Binggeli, Sandage, and Tammann (1985) are presented. Two hundred seventeen of these constitute a magnitude-limited 'complete sample' of such galaxies, types Sdm through Im and BCD. Sixty-one percent of this 'complete sample' was detected, greatly enhancing the store of redshifts and H I masses for such galaxies in the Virgo Cluster. For detected galaxies, heliocentric velocities, 50 percent profile widths, and single-beam fluxes are presented. For those that escaped detection, upper limits are computed to the flux appropriate to the redshift range (-600 to +3000 km/s).

  15. Limits on surface gravities of Kepler planet-candidate host stars from non-detection of solar-like oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Campante, T. L.; Chaplin, W. J.; Handberg, R.; Miglio, A.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Lund, M. N.; Arentoft, T.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Karoff, C.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lundkvist, M.; Huber, D.; Hekker, S.; García, R. A.; Basu, S.; Bedding, T. R.; Gilliland, R. L.; Kawaler, S. D.; and others

    2014-03-10

    We present a novel method for estimating lower-limit surface gravities (log g) of Kepler targets whose data do not allow the detection of solar-like oscillations. The method is tested using an ensemble of solar-type stars observed in the context of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium. We then proceed to estimate lower-limit log g for a cohort of Kepler solar-type planet-candidate host stars with no detected oscillations. Limits on fundamental stellar properties, as provided by this work, are likely to be useful in the characterization of the corresponding candidate planetary systems. Furthermore, an important byproduct of the current work is the confirmation that amplitudes of solar-like oscillations are suppressed in stars with increased levels of surface magnetic activity.

  16. Detection and quantification limits: basic concepts, international harmonization, and outstanding ("low-level") issues.

    PubMed

    Currie, L A

    2004-01-01

    A brief review is given of concepts, basic definitions, and terminology for metrological detection and quantification capabilities, representing harmonized recommendations and norms of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), respectively. Treatment of the (low-level) blank and variance function are discussed in some detail, together with special problems arising with detection decisions and the reporting of low-level data. Key references to the international documents follow, as well as specialized references addressing very low-level counting data, skewed environmental blank distributions, and multiple and multivariate detection decisions.

  17. Experimental feasibility of the airborne measurement of absolute oil fluorescence spectral conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne lidar oil spill experiments carried out to determine the practicability of the AOFSCE (absolute oil fluorescence spectral conversion efficiency) computational model are described. The results reveal that the model is suitable over a considerable range of oil film thicknesses provided the fluorescence efficiency of the oil does not approach the minimum detection sensitivity limitations of the lidar system. Separate airborne lidar experiments to demonstrate measurement of the water column Raman conversion efficiency are also conducted to ascertain the ultimate feasibility of converting such relative oil fluorescence to absolute values. Whereas the AOFSCE model is seen as highly promising, further airborne water column Raman conversion efficiency experiments with improved temporal or depth-resolved waveform calibration and software deconvolution techniques are thought necessary for a final determination of suitability.

  18. ARE WE THERE YET? TIME TO DETECTION OF NANOHERTZ GRAVITATIONAL WAVES BASED ON PULSAR-TIMING ARRAY LIMITS

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S. R.; Vallisneri, M.; Ellis, J. A.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Haasteren, R. van

    2016-03-01

    Decade-long timing observations of arrays of millisecond pulsars have placed highly constraining upper limits on the amplitude of the nanohertz gravitational-wave stochastic signal from the mergers of supermassive black hole binaries (∼10{sup −15} strain at f = 1 yr{sup −1}). These limits suggest that binary merger rates have been overestimated, or that environmental influences from nuclear gas or stars accelerate orbital decay, reducing the gravitational-wave signal at the lowest, most sensitive frequencies. This prompts the question whether nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs) are likely to be detected in the near future. In this Letter, we answer this question quantitatively using simple statistical estimates, deriving the range of true signal amplitudes that are compatible with current upper limits, and computing expected detection probabilities as a function of observation time. We conclude that small arrays consisting of the pulsars with the least timing noise, which yield the tightest upper limits, have discouraging prospects of making a detection in the next two decades. By contrast, we find large arrays are crucial to detection because the quadrupolar spatial correlations induced by GWs can be well sampled by many pulsar pairs. Indeed, timing programs that monitor a large and expanding set of pulsars have an ∼80% probability of detecting GWs within the next 10 years, under assumptions on merger rates and environmental influences ranging from optimistic to conservative. Even in the extreme case where 90% of binaries stall before merger and environmental coupling effects diminish low-frequency gravitational-wave power, detection is delayed by at most a few years.

  19. Are We There Yet? Time to Detection of Nanohertz Gravitational Waves Based on Pulsar-timing Array Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Vallisneri, M.; Ellis, J. A.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Lazio, T. J. W.; van Haasteren, R.

    2016-03-01

    Decade-long timing observations of arrays of millisecond pulsars have placed highly constraining upper limits on the amplitude of the nanohertz gravitational-wave stochastic signal from the mergers of supermassive black hole binaries (˜10-15 strain at f = 1 yr-1). These limits suggest that binary merger rates have been overestimated, or that environmental influences from nuclear gas or stars accelerate orbital decay, reducing the gravitational-wave signal at the lowest, most sensitive frequencies. This prompts the question whether nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs) are likely to be detected in the near future. In this Letter, we answer this question quantitatively using simple statistical estimates, deriving the range of true signal amplitudes that are compatible with current upper limits, and computing expected detection probabilities as a function of observation time. We conclude that small arrays consisting of the pulsars with the least timing noise, which yield the tightest upper limits, have discouraging prospects of making a detection in the next two decades. By contrast, we find large arrays are crucial to detection because the quadrupolar spatial correlations induced by GWs can be well sampled by many pulsar pairs. Indeed, timing programs that monitor a large and expanding set of pulsars have an ˜80% probability of detecting GWs within the next 10 years, under assumptions on merger rates and environmental influences ranging from optimistic to conservative. Even in the extreme case where 90% of binaries stall before merger and environmental coupling effects diminish low-frequency gravitational-wave power, detection is delayed by at most a few years.

  20. Pushing the limits of nickel detection to nanomolar range using a set of engineered bioluminescent Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cayron, Julien; Prudent, Elsa; Escoffier, Camille; Gueguen, Erwan; Mandrand-Berthelot, Marie-Andrée; Pignol, David; Garcia, Daniel; Rodrigue, Agnès

    2017-01-01

    The detection of nickel in water is of great importance due to its harmfulness for living organism. A way to detect Ni is the use of whole-cell biosensors. The aim of the present work was to build a light-emitting bacterial biosensor for the detection of Ni with high specificity and low detection limit properties. For that purpose, the regulatory circuit implemented relied on the RcnR Ni/Co metallo-regulator and its rcnA natural target promoter fused to the lux reporter genes. To convert RcnR to specifically detect Ni, several mutations were tested and the C35A retained. Deleting the Ni efflux pump rcnA and introducing genes encoding several Ni-uptake systems lowered the detection thresholds. When these constructs were assayed in several Escherichia coli strains, it appeared that the detection thresholds were highly variable. The TD2158 wild-type E. coli gave rise to a biosensor ten times more active and sensitive than its W3110 E. coli K12 equivalent. This biosensor was able to confidently detect Ni concentrations as little as 80 nM (4.7 μg l(-1)), which makes its use compatible with the norms governing the drinking water quality.

  1. Rapid Detection Strategies for the Global Threat of Zika Virus: Current State, New Hypotheses, and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shruti; Hong, Sung-Yong; Chung, Soo Hyun; Kim, Myunghee

    2016-01-01

    The current scenario regarding the widespread Zika virus (ZIKV) has resulted in numerous diagnostic studies, specifically in South America and in locations where there is frequent entry of travelers returning from ZIKV-affected areas, including pregnant women with or without clinical symptoms of ZIKV infection. The World Health Organization, WHO, announced that millions of cases of ZIKV are likely to occur in the USA in the near future. This situation has created an alarming public health emergency of international concern requiring the detection of this life-threatening viral candidate due to increased cases of newborn microcephaly associated with ZIKV infection. Hence, this review reports possible methods and strategies for the fast and reliable detection of ZIKV with particular emphasis on current updates, knowledge, and new hypotheses that might be helpful for medical professionals in poor and developing countries that urgently need to address this problem. In particular, we emphasize liposome-based biosensors. Although these biosensors are currently among the less popular tools for human disease detection, they have become useful tools for the screening and detection of pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and viruses because of their versatile advantageous features compared to other sensing devices. This review summarizes the currently available methods employed for the rapid detection of ZIKV and suggests an innovative approach involving the application of a liposome-based hypothesis for the development of new strategies for ZIKV detection and their use as effective biomedicinal tools. PMID:27822207

  2. Rapid Detection Strategies for the Global Threat of Zika Virus: Current State, New Hypotheses, and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shruti; Hong, Sung-Yong; Chung, Soo Hyun; Kim, Myunghee

    2016-01-01

    The current scenario regarding the widespread Zika virus (ZIKV) has resulted in numerous diagnostic studies, specifically in South America and in locations where there is frequent entry of travelers returning from ZIKV-affected areas, including pregnant women with or without clinical symptoms of ZIKV infection. The World Health Organization, WHO, announced that millions of cases of ZIKV are likely to occur in the USA in the near future. This situation has created an alarming public health emergency of international concern requiring the detection of this life-threatening viral candidate due to increased cases of newborn microcephaly associated with ZIKV infection. Hence, this review reports possible methods and strategies for the fast and reliable detection of ZIKV with particular emphasis on current updates, knowledge, and new hypotheses that might be helpful for medical professionals in poor and developing countries that urgently need to address this problem. In particular, we emphasize liposome-based biosensors. Although these biosensors are currently among the less popular tools for human disease detection, they have become useful tools for the screening and detection of pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and viruses because of their versatile advantageous features compared to other sensing devices. This review summarizes the currently available methods employed for the rapid detection of ZIKV and suggests an innovative approach involving the application of a liposome-based hypothesis for the development of new strategies for ZIKV detection and their use as effective biomedicinal tools.

  3. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  4. Physics of negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  5. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium.

    PubMed

    Roshan, M V; Springham, S V; Rawat, R S; Lee, P; Krishnan, M

    2010-08-01

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f(n) approximately 4.1x10(-4) with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10(8) neutrons per discharge.

  6. Prediction of the limits of detection of hazardous vapors by passive infrared with the use of modtran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanigan, Dennis F.

    1996-10-01

    Passive infrared remote detection of hazardous gases, vapors, and aerosols is based on the difference, T , between the air temperature of the threat vapor cloud and the effective radiative temperature of the background. In this paper I address the problem of detection with a low-angle-sky background. I used Modtran to predict T and atmospheric transmittance for standard atmospheric models. The detection limits, at 2-cm 1 resolution, are discussed for sulfur hexafluoride, Sarin, trichloroethylene, methyl isocyanate, mustard gas, methyl chloride, and sulfur dioxide for selected cases with the U.S. Standard, the Subarctic Winter, and the Tropical models. I used a particularly interesting case of Sarin detection with the Subarctic Winter atmospheric model to illustrate the power of Modtran to predict subtle changes in T with angle of elevation (AOE).

  7. Portable TXRF Spectrometer with 10{sup -11}g Detection Limit and Portable XRF Spectromicroscope with Sub-mm Spatial Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kunimura, Shinsuke; Hatakeyama, So; Sasaki, Nobuharu; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kawai, Jun

    2010-04-06

    A portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer that we have developed is applied to trace elemental analysis of water solutions. Although a 5 W X-ray tube is used in the portable TXRF spectrometer, detection limits of several ppb are achieved for 3d transition metal elements and trace elements in a leaching solution of soils, a leaching solution of solder, and alcoholic beverages are detected. Portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectromicroscopes with a 1 W X-ray tube and an 8 W X-ray tube are also presented. Using the portable XRF spectromicroscope with the 1 W X-ray tube, 93 ppm of Cr is detected with an about 700 {mu}m spatial resolution. Spatially resolved elemental analysis of a mug painted with blue, red, green, and white is performed using the two portable spectromicroscopes, and the difference in elemental composition at each paint is detected.

  8. Portable TXRF Spectrometer with 10-11g Detection Limit and Portable XRF Spectromicroscope with Sub-mm Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunimura, Shinsuke; Hatakeyama, So; Sasaki, Nobuharu; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kawai, Jun

    2010-04-01

    A portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer that we have developed is applied to trace elemental analysis of water solutions. Although a 5 W X-ray tube is used in the portable TXRF spectrometer, detection limits of several ppb are achieved for 3d transition metal elements and trace elements in a leaching solution of soils, a leaching solution of solder, and alcoholic beverages are detected. Portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectromicroscopes with a 1 W X-ray tube and an 8 W X-ray tube are also presented. Using the portable XRF spectromicroscope with the 1 W X-ray tube, 93 ppm of Cr is detected with an about 700 μm spatial resolution. Spatially resolved elemental analysis of a mug painted with blue, red, green, and white is performed using the two portable spectromicroscopes, and the difference in elemental composition at each paint is detected.

  9. Modeling of a Single-Notch Microfiber Coupler for High-Sensitivity and Low Detection-Limit Refractive Index Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiali; Shi, Lei; Zhu, Song; Xu, Xinbiao; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    A highly sensitive refractive index sensor with low detection limit based on an asymmetric optical microfiber coupler is proposed. It is composed of a silica optical microfiber and an As2Se3 optical microfiber. Due to the asymmetry of the microfiber materials, a single-notch transmission spectrum is demonstrated by the large refractive index difference between the two optical microfibers. Compared with the symmetric coupler, the bandwidth of the asymmetric structure is over one order of magnitude narrower than that of the former. Therefore, the asymmetric optical microfiber coupler based sensor can reach over one order of magnitude smaller detection limit, which is defined as the minimal detectable refractive index change caused by the surrounding analyte. With the advantage of large evanescent field, the results also show that a sensitivity of up to 3212 nm per refractive index unit with a bandwidth of 12 nm is achieved with the asymmetric optical microfiber coupler. Furthermore, a maximum sensitivity of 4549 nm per refractive index unit can be reached while the radii of the silica optical microfiber and As2Se3 optical microfiber are 0.5 μm and a 0.128 μm, respectively. This sensor component may have important potential for low detection-limit physical and biochemical sensing applications. PMID:27187386

  10. Improved detection limits using a hand-held optical imager with coregistration capabilities.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Sarah J; Martinez, Sergio L; Gonzalez, Jean; Caldera, Lizeth; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2010-07-15

    Optical imaging is emerging as a non-invasive and non-ionizing method for breast cancer diagnosis. A hand-held optical imager has been developed with coregistration facilities towards flexible imaging of different tissue volumes and curvatures in near real-time. Herein, fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging experiments are performed to demonstrate deeper target detection under perfect and imperfect (100:1) uptake conditions in (liquid) tissue phantoms and in vitro. Upon summation of multiple scans (fluorescence intensity images), fluorescent targets are detected at greater depths than from single scan alone.

  11. The detection of landmines by neutron backscattering: exploring the limits of the technique.

    PubMed

    Viesti, G; Lunardon, M; Nebbia, G; Barbui, M; Cinausero, M; D'Erasmo, G; Palomba, M; Pantaleo, A; Obhodas, J; Valković, V

    2006-06-01

    Neutron backscattering (NB) sensors have been proposed for Humanitarian De-mining applications. Recently, a prototype hand-held system integrating a NB sensor in a metal detector has been developed within the EU-funded DIAMINE Project. The results obtained in terms of performance of the NB systems and limitations in its use are presented in this work. It is found that the performance of NB sensors is strongly limited by the presence of the soil moisture and by its small-scale variations. The use of the neutron hit distribution to reduce false alarms is explored.

  12. Detection limits of quantitative and digital PCR assays and their influence in presence-absence surveys of environmental DNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Margaret; Dorazio, Robert M.; Butterfield, John S.; Meigs-Friend, Gaia; Nico, Leo; Ferrante, Jason

    2017-01-01

    A set of universal guidelines is needed to determine the limit of detection (LOD) in PCR-based analyses of low concentration DNA. In particular, environmental DNA (eDNA) studies require sensitive and reliable methods to detect rare and cryptic species through shed genetic material in environmental samples. Current strategies for assessing detection limits of eDNA are either too stringent or subjective, possibly resulting in biased estimates of species’ presence. Here, a conservative LOD analysis grounded in analytical chemistry is proposed to correct for overestimated DNA concentrations predominantly caused by the concentration plateau, a nonlinear relationship between expected and measured DNA concentrations. We have used statistical criteria to establish formal mathematical models for both quantitative and droplet digital PCR. To assess the method, a new Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) TaqMan assay was developed and tested on both PCR platforms using eDNA in water samples. The LOD adjustment reduced Grass Carp occupancy and detection estimates while increasing uncertainty – indicating that caution needs to be applied to eDNA data without LOD correction. Compared to quantitative PCR, digital PCR had higher occurrence estimates due to increased sensitivity and dilution of inhibitors at low concentrations. Without accurate LOD correction, species occurrence and detection probabilities based on eDNA estimates are prone to a source of bias that cannot be reduced by an increase in sample size or PCR replicates. Other applications also could benefit from a standardized LOD such as GMO food analysis, and forensic and clinical diagnostics.

  13. Detection limits of quantitative and digital PCR assays and their influence in presence-absence surveys of environmental DNA.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Margaret E; Dorazio, Robert M; Butterfield, John S S; Meigs-Friend, Gaia; Nico, Leo G; Ferrante, Jason A

    2017-03-01

    A set of universal guidelines is needed to determine the limit of detection (LOD) in PCR-based analyses of low-concentration DNA. In particular, environmental DNA (eDNA) studies require sensitive and reliable methods to detect rare and cryptic species through shed genetic material in environmental samples. Current strategies for assessing detection limits of eDNA are either too stringent or subjective, possibly resulting in biased estimates of species' presence. Here, a conservative LOD analysis grounded in analytical chemistry is proposed to correct for overestimated DNA concentrations predominantly caused by the concentration plateau, a nonlinear relationship between expected and measured DNA concentrations. We have used statistical criteria to establish formal mathematical models for both quantitative and droplet digital PCR. To assess the method, a new Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) TaqMan assay was developed and tested on both PCR platforms using eDNA in water samples. The LOD adjustment reduced Grass Carp occupancy and detection estimates while increasing uncertainty-indicating that caution needs to be applied to eDNA data without LOD correction. Compared to quantitative PCR, digital PCR had higher occurrence estimates due to increased sensitivity and dilution of inhibitors at low concentrations. Without accurate LOD correction, species occurrence and detection probabilities based on eDNA estimates are prone to a source of bias that cannot be reduced by an increase in sample size or PCR replicates. Other applications also could benefit from a standardized LOD such as GMO food analysis and forensic and clinical diagnostics.

  14. Detection and identification of serum monoclonal immunoglobulin by immunoisoelectric focusing. Limits of sensitivity and use during relapse of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, D; Kumararatne, D S; Stott, D

    1984-01-01

    The limits of detection of four classes of monoclonal immunoglobulin and free light chain in serum by isoelectric focusing and immunoisoelectric focusing have been determined and the sensitivity of these techniques compared with that obtained using immunoelectrophoresis and zonal electrophoresis with immunofixation. Immunoisoelectric focusing was 10-40 times more sensitive than immunoelectrophoresis and could be used to detect concentrations of monoclonal immunoglobulin that were undetectable by zonal electrophoresis with immunofixation. The relevance of this work in monitoring multiple myeloma during treatment and relapse is discussed. Images PMID:6421894

  15. Limitations of the Score-Difference Method in Detecting Cheating in Recognition Test Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Dennis M.

    1987-01-01

    This study examines a score-difference model for the detection of cheating based on the difference between two scores for an examinee: one based on the appropriate scoring key and another based on an alternative, inappropriate key. It argues that the score-difference method could falsely accuse students as cheaters. (Author/JAZ)

  16. Limitations of a localized surface plasmon resonance sensor on Salmonella detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have designed a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) biosensor to perform the whole cell detection of Salmonella using gold nanoparticls fabricated by oblique angle deposition technique. The LSPR sensor showed a plasmon peak shift due to the Salmonella antigen and anti-Salmonella antibody r...

  17. Comparison of laser excited fluorescence and photoacoustic limits of detection for static and flow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Voigtman, E.; Jurgensen, A.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1981-10-01

    The fluorescence and photoacoustic characteristics of a windowless flow cell intended for liquid chromatographic applications are compared with respective characteristics of a static cuvette cell. In addition, a photoionization mode of operation for the flow cell is exhibited which utilizes the ionization products of two-photon excitation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in n-alkanes to effect a sensitive detection of those PAHs.

  18. The 1000-th MASTER detection and SALT limit: Fast Doublet OT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanutsa, P.; Lipunov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Buckley, D.; Kniazev, A.; Tiurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Samus, N.; Kuznetsov, A.; Vlasenko, D.; Gorbunov, I.; Popova, E.; Vladimirov, V.; Shumkov, V.; Potter, S.; Kotze, M.; Gress, O.; Budnev, N.; Yazev, S.; Ivanov, K.; Tlatov, A.; Senik, V.; Dormidontov, D.; Parhomenko, A. V.; Yurkov, V.; Sergienko, Yu.; Gabovich, A.; Sinyakov, E.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Lodieu, N.; Israelian, G.; Suarez-Andres, L.; Levato, Hugo; Astronomicas, Carlos Saffe Instituto de Ciencias; Espacio, de la Tierra y. del; Podesta, Ricardo; Mallamaci, Claudio; Lopez, Carlos; Podesta, Federico

    2015-12-01

    MASTER-SAAO (Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net", Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 349171) discovered the 1000th OT source at (RA, Dec) = 05h 10m 14.58s -29d 09m 00.6s on 2015-12-16.97115 UT. The OT unfiltered magnitude is 18.8m (the limit is 20.4m).

  19. Driving down the Detection Limit in Microstructured Fiber-Based Chemical Dip Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Schartner, Erik P.; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Warren-Smith, Stephen C.; White, Richard T.; Monro, Tanya M.

    2011-01-01

    We present improvements to fluorescence sensing in soft-glass microstructured optical fibers that result in significantly improved sensitivity relative to previously published results. Concentrations of CdSe quantum dots down to 10 pM levels have been demonstrated. We show that the primary limitation to the sensitivity of these systems is the intrinsic fluorescence of the glass itself. PMID:22163778

  20. Super-resolving quantum radar: Coherent-state sources with homodyne detection suffice to beat the diffraction limit

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Kebei; Lee, Hwang; Gerry, Christopher C.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2013-11-21

    There has been much recent interest in quantum metrology for applications to sub-Raleigh ranging and remote sensing such as in quantum radar. For quantum radar, atmospheric absorption and diffraction rapidly degrades any actively transmitted quantum states of light, such as N00N states, so that for this high-loss regime the optimal strategy is to transmit coherent states of light, which suffer no worse loss than the linear Beer's law for classical radar attenuation, and which provide sensitivity at the shot-noise limit in the returned power. We show that coherent radar radiation sources, coupled with a quantum homodyne detection scheme, provide both longitudinal and angular super-resolution much below the Rayleigh diffraction limit, with sensitivity at shot-noise in terms of the detected photon power. Our approach provides a template for the development of a complete super-resolving quantum radar system with currently available technology.

  1. Lower limit of detection: definition and elaboration of a proposed position for radiological effluent and environmental measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, L.A.

    1984-09-01

    A manual is provided to define and illustrate a proposed use of the Lower Limit of Detection (LLD) for Radiological Effluent and Environmental Measurements. The manual contains a review of information regarding LLD practices gained from site visits; a review of the literature and a summary of basic principles underlying the concept of detection in Nuclear and Analytical Chemistry; a detailed presentation of the application of LLD principles to a range of problem categories (simple counting to multinuclide spectroscopy), including derivations, equations, and numerical examples; and a brief examination of related issues such as reference samples, numerical quality control, and instrumental limitations. An appendix contains a summary of notation and terminology, a bibliography, and worked-out examples. 100 references, 10 figures, 7 tables.

  2. Joint data detection and parameter estimation: Fundamental limits and applications to optical fiber communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coskun, Orhan

    For ≥10-Gbit/s bit rates that are transmitted over ≥100 km, it is essential that chromatic The traditional method of sending a training signal to identify a channel, followed by data, may be viewed as a simple code for the unknown channel. Results in blind sequence detection suggest that performance similar to this traditional approach can be obtained without training. However, for short packets and/or time-recursive algorithms, significant error floors exist due to the existence of sequences that are indistinguishable without knowledge of the channel. In this work, we first reconsider training signal design in light of recent results in blind sequence detection. We design training codes which combine modulation and training. In order to design these codes, we find an expression for the pairwise error probability of the joint maximum likelihood (JML) channel and sequence estimator. This expression motivates a pairwise distance for the JML receiver based on principal angles between the range spaces of data matrices. The general code design problem (generalized sphere packing) is formulated as the clique problem associated with an unweighted, undirected graph. We provide optimal and heuristic algorithms for this clique problem. For short packets, we demonstrate that significant improvements are possible by jointly considering the design of the training, modulation, and receiver processing. As a practical blind data detection example, data reception in a fiber optical channel is investigated. To get the most out of the data detection methods, auxiliary algorithms such as sampling phase adjustment, decision threshold estimation algorithms are suggested. For the parallel implementation of detectors, semiring structure is introduced both for decision feedback equalizer (DFE) and maximum likelihood sequence detection (MLSD). Timing jitter is another parameter that affects the BER performance of the system. A data-aided clock recovery algorithm reduces the jitter of

  3. Study of Laser Produced Plasma of Limiter of the Aditya Tokomak for Detection of Molecular Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Awadhesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The tokamak wall protection is one of the prime concerns, and for this purpose, limiters are used. Graphite is commonly used as a limiter material and first wall material for complete coverage of the internal vacuum vessel surfaces of the tokamak. From the past few years, we are working to identify and quantify the impurities deposited on the different part of Aditya Tokamak in collaboration with the Scientists at Institute of Plasma Research, Ahmedabad, India using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) [1-3]. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) spectra of limiter of Aditya Tokamak have been recorded in the spectral range of 200-900 nm in open atmosphere. Along with atomic and ionic spectral lines of the constituent elements of the limiter (1-3), LIBS spectra also give the molecular bands. When a high power laser beam is focused on the sample, laser induced plasma is produced on its surface. In early stage of the plasma Back ground continuum is dominated due to free-free or free-bound emission. Just after few nanoseconds the light from the plasma is dominated by ionic emission. Atomic emission spectra is dominated from the laser induced plasma during the first few microsecond after an ablation pulse where as molecular spectra is generated later when the plasma further cools down. For this purpose the LIBS spectra has been recorded with varying gate delay and gate width. The spectra of the limiter show the presence of molecular bands of CN and C2. To get better signal to background ratios of the molecular bands, different experimental parameters like gate delay, gate width, collection angle and collection point (spatial analysis off the plasama) of the plasma have been optimized. Thus the present paper deals with the variation of spectral intensity of the molecular bands with different experimental parameters. Keywords: Limiter, Molecular bands, C2, CN. References: 1. Proof-of-concept experiment for On-line LIBS Analysis of Impurity Layer Deposited on

  4. Detection of airflow limitation using a handheld spirometer in a primary care setting

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Siew-Mooi; Pang, Yong-Kek; Price, David; Cheong, Ai-Theng; Lee, Ping-Yein; Irmi, Ismail; Faezah, Hassan; Ruhaini, Ismail; Chia, Yook-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Early diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in primary care settings is difficult to achieve chiefly due to lack of availability of spirometry. This study estimated the prevalence of airflow limitation among chronic smokers using a handheld spirometer in this setting. Methods This is a cross-sectional study performed on consecutive patients who were ≥40 years old with ≥10 pack-years smoking history. Face-to-face interviews were carried out to obtain demographic data and relevant information. Handheld spirometry was performed according to a standard protocol using the COPd-6 device (Model 4000, Vitalograph, Ennis, Ireland) in addition to standard spirometry. Airflow limitation was defined as ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)/forced expiratory volume in 6 s <0.75 (COPd-6) or FEV1/forced vital capacity <0.7. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to determine predictors of airflow limitation. Results A total of 416 patients were recruited with mean age of 53 years old. The prevalence of airflow limitation was 10.6% (n = 44) with COPd-6 versus 6% as gauged using standard spirometry. Risk factors for airflow limitation were age >65 years (odds ratio (OR) 3.732 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.100–1.280), a history of ‘bad health’ (OR 2.524, 95% CI: 1.037–6.142) and low to normal body mass index (OR 2.914, 95% CI: 1.191–7.190). Conclusions In a primary care setting, handheld spirometry (COPd-6) found a prevalence of airflow limitation of ∼10% in smokers. Patients were older, not overweight and had an ill-defined history of health problems. SUMMARY AT A GLANCE Prevalence of COPD is unknown in Malaysia. The prevalence of COPD using a handheld spirometer (COPd-6TM) was 10.6% versus 6% as gauged using standard spirometry. Predictors of COPD were older age, lower BMI and a history of ‘bad health’. Case-finding for COPD should be targeted in this special population. PMID:24708063

  5. Limits to detection of generalized synchronization in delay-coupled chaotic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideyuki; Soriano, Miguel C; Pereda, Ernesto; Fischer, Ingo; Mirasso, Claudio R

    2013-12-01

    We study how reliably generalized synchronization can be detected and characterized from time-series analysis. To that end, we analyze synchronization in a generalized sense of delay-coupled chaotic oscillators in unidirectional ring configurations. The generalized synchronization condition can be verified via the auxiliary system approach; however, in practice, this might not always be possible. Therefore, in this study, widely used indicators to directly quantify generalized and phase synchronization from noise-free time series of two oscillators are employed complementarily to the auxiliary system approach. In our analysis, none of the indices provide the consistent results of the auxiliary system approach. Our findings indicate that it is a major challenge to directly detect synchronization in a generalized sense between two oscillators that are connected via a chain of other oscillators, even if the oscillators are identical. This has major consequences for the interpretation of the dynamics of coupled systems and applications thereof.

  6. Characterization and comparison of defects detection limits of three ultrasonic non destructive methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péronnet, E.; Eyma, F.; Welemane, H.; Pescay, C.

    2010-06-01

    This work deals with the Liquid Resin Infusion (LRI) process developed within the research program “FUSelage COMPosite” of DAHER SOCATA. This manufacturing process enables the realization of complex composite structures or fuselage elements in a single phase (mono-material), which considerably reduce connections and relative difficulties. The concern here is the investigation of non destructive testing (NDT) methods that can be applied to LRI-structures in order to define their capacities for defect detection, and especially their associated critical defect size. In aviation industry, the AITM standards require the ultrasonic testing as NDT for composite materials. Therefore the aim of this work is to characterize and compare three different and complementary ultrasonic techniques on composite specimens. Such analysis allows to define the NDT application field of each method in term of defect detection.

  7. Taking whispering gallery-mode single virus detection and sizing to the limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantham, V. R.; Holler, S.; Kolchenko, V.; Wan, Z.; Arnold, S.

    2012-07-01

    We report the label-free detection and sizing by a microcavity of the smallest individual RNA virus, MS2, with a mass only ˜1% of InfluenzaA (6 vs. 512 ag). Although detection of such a small bio-nano-particle has been beyond the reach of a bare spherical microcavity, it was accomplished with ease (S/N = 8, Q = 4 × 105) using a single dipole stimulated plasmonic-nanoshell as a microcavity wavelength shift enhancer, providing an enhancement of ˜70×, in agreement with theory. Unique wavelength shift statistics are recorded consistent with an ultra-uniform genetically programmed substance that is drawn to the plasmonic hot spots by light-forces.

  8. Vertical Root Fracture Detection Using Limited-FOV Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    longitudinal orientation along the root (1). The prevalence in extracted endodontically treated teeth is 10.9% (2). Mandibular and maxillary premolars, and...significant, more artificial fractures were detected using both CBCT and PAs. It is possible that fracturing the tooth on the bench- top creates larger...397-403. 8. Huumonen S, Kvist T, Grondahl K, Molander A. Diagnostic value of computed tomography in re-treatment of root fillings in maxillary

  9. Exploring the Thermal Limits of IR-Based Automatic Whale Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    exclusion zone. Marine mammal observers usually scan the ship’s environs for whales using binoculars or the naked eye. Sightings mostly rely on spotting a...of an actively stabilized, spinning IR camera and an algorithm that detects whale blows on the basis of their thermal signature. So far, this...migrations and collecting concurrent independent (double blind ) visual observations (modified cue counting), a data base will be created to: Determine

  10. The Capabilities and Limitations of Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Detecting Kidney Stones: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Mellena D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the performance of currently available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting kidney stones, compared to computed tomography (CT) results, and to determine the characteristics of successfully detected stones. Patients who had undergone both abdominal/pelvic CT and MRI exams within 30 days were studied. The images were reviewed by two expert radiologists blinded to the patients' respective radiological diagnoses. The study consisted of four steps: (1) reviewing the MRI images and determining whether any kidney stone(s) are identified; (2) reviewing the corresponding CT images and confirming whether kidney stones are identified; (3) reviewing the MRI images a second time, armed with the information from the corresponding CT, noting whether any kidney stones are positively identified that were previously missed; (4) for all stones MRI-confirmed on previous steps, the radiologist experts being asked to answer whether in retrospect, with knowledge of size and location on corresponding CT, these stones would be affirmed as confidently identified on MRI or not. In this best-case scenario involving knowledge of stones and their locations on concurrent CT, radiologist experts detected 19% of kidney stones on MRI, with stone size being a major factor for stone identification. PMID:27980535

  11. Concentration of prion protein from biological samples to increase the limits of detection by immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Davidowitz, Eliot; Eljuga, Lucy; Dover, Katarzyna; Tian, Jean; Grossman, Abraham

    2005-06-01

    An RNA-ligand-based adsorbent has been shown to concentrate prion protein (PrP) from solutions in a model system. The work presented here extends the utility of the RNA-based adsorbent to brain homogenates of cow, sheep, mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and elk (Cervus elaphus). Brain homogenates were diluted either in buffer, representing specimens used in post-mortem tests, or in serum, modelling specimens used in biological-fluid-based tests. The RNA adsorbent was effective in binding PrPC (cellular PrP,) and PrPres (proteinase K-resistant PrP) from the brain homogenates of all the species tested in both model systems. The three antibodies against PrP used in the experiments identified PrP in immunoblot analysis after concentrating PrP from brain homogenates with the adsorbent, indicating the general applicability of this technology for improving the detection of PrP in immunoassays. Utilization of RNA adsorbent increased the level of detection of PrPres by immunoblot over several-hundredfold. The results obtained suggest that this RNA adsorbent can be used to increase detection in current post-mortem immunoassays and for the development of a blood-based ante-mortem test.

  12. Current Challenges and Limitations in Antibody-Based Detection of Citrullinated Histones

    PubMed Central

    Neeli, Indira; Radic, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Studies on NETosis demand reliable and convenient markers to monitor the progress of this form of cell death. Because a determining step in the release of nuclear chromatin NETs requires the conversion of arginine residues to citrulline residues in histones by peptidylarginine deiminase, citrullinated histones can provide such a marker. Here, we evaluate antibody reagents for the detection of citrulline residues in histones and observe alarming differences between commercial antisera and mouse and rabbit monoclonal antibodies in their ability to detect their nominal target residues. Differences between antibodies that are currently used to detect citrulline residues in histones could jeopardize efforts to reach a scientific consensus and instead lead to inconsistent and even conflicting conclusions regarding the regulation of histone deimination. Our results will assist others in planning their initial or ongoing studies on peptidylarginine deiminase activity with the use of currently available antibodies. Furthermore, we argue that, along with the careful attention to experimental conditions and calcium concentrations, validated antibody reagents are urgently needed to avoid possible setbacks in the research on NETosis. PMID:27933065

  13. Statistical analysis of water-quality data containing multiple detection limits: S-language software for regression on order statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, L.; Helsel, D.

    2005-01-01

    Trace contaminants in water, including metals and organics, often are measured at sufficiently low concentrations to be reported only as values below the instrument detection limit. Interpretation of these "less thans" is complicated when multiple detection limits occur. Statistical methods for multiply censored, or multiple-detection limit, datasets have been developed for medical and industrial statistics, and can be employed to estimate summary statistics or model the distributions of trace-level environmental data. We describe S-language-based software tools that perform robust linear regression on order statistics (ROS). The ROS method has been evaluated as one of the most reliable procedures for developing summary statistics of multiply censored data. It is applicable to any dataset that has 0 to 80% of its values censored. These tools are a part of a software library, or add-on package, for the R environment for statistical computing. This library can be used to generate ROS models and associated summary statistics, plot modeled distributions, and predict exceedance probabilities of water-quality standards. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Limits of detection in debris disks around young stars with NaCo/Sparse Aperture Masking observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauchet, L.; Lacour, S.

    2014-09-01

    To understand the formation and evolution of solar systems and planets formations in the stars neighbourhood, we need to obtain information of their state at different time of their evolution. Here, we focus on debris disks around young stars aged of ten to few tens of Myr, we analyze NaCo/Sparse Aperture Masking (SAM) observations in the L' band (3.8 μm) of eight objects (beta Pictoris, AU Mic, 49 Ceti, eta Tel, Fomalhaut, G Lupi, HD182327 and HR8799). The aim is to get limits of detection about the mass of the debris orbiting around their stars. The SAM technique consists in transforming a single telescope into a Fizeau interferometer using a non redundant mask inserted in a pupil plane of the instrument. The analysis of the observations was completed with the sparse aperture mode pipeline. Interference fringes are fitted to obtain complex visibilities of the object, then the closure phases are calibrated and evaluated. Finally, a map of the detection limits is obtained as it is related to the closure phases previously estimated. In order to obtain an estimation of the mass corresponding to the luminosity measured with the reduction pipeline we are using theoretical isochrones interpolated into synthetic color tables. The results are maps of detection limits in unit of Jupiter Mass in a range of up to 450 mas around the stars.

  15. Detection Limits for Close Eclipsing and transiting Sub-Stellar and Planetary Companions to White Dwarfs in the WASP Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faedi, Francesca; West, Richard G.; Burleigh, Matt R.; Goad, Mike R.; Hebb, Leslie

    2011-03-01

    We used photometric data from the WASP (Wide-Angle Search for Planets) survey to explore the possibility of detecting eclipses and transit signals of brown dwarfs, gas giants and terrestrial companions in close orbit around white dwarfs. We performed extensive Monte Carlo simulations and we found that for Gaussian random noise WASP is sensitive to companions as small as the Moon orbiting a V~12 white dwarf. For fainter stars WASP is sensitive to increasingly larger bodies. Our sensitivity drops in the presence of co-variant noise structure in the data, nevertheless Earth-size bodies remain readily detectable in relatively low S/N data. We searched for eclipses and transit signals in a sample of 194 white dwarfs in the WASP archive however, no evidence for companions was found. We used our results to place tentative upper limits to the frequency of such systems. While we can only place weak limits on the likely frequency of Earth-sized or smaller companions; brown dwarfs and gas giants (radius~=RJup) with periods <=0.2 days must certainly be rare (<10%). More stringent constraints requires significantly larger white dwarf samples, higher observing cadence and continuous coverage. The short duration of eclipses and transits of white dwarfs compared to the cadence of WASP observations appears to be one of the main factors limiting the detection rate in a survey optimised for planetary transits of main sequence stars.

  16. Limits of visual detection for finasteride polymorphs in prepared binary mixtures: analysis by X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Bezzon, Vinícius D N; Antonio, Selma G; Paiva-Santos, Carlos O

    2014-11-01

    Finasteride (FNT) is a drug that inhibits human enzyme type II 5α-reductase that metabolizes testosterone into dihydrotestosterone. There are two enantiotropic polymorphs with known crystal structure: designated as forms I and II. Identification and control of these polymorphic forms in mixtures can be performed using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data and Rietveld method (RM). As experimental conditions may limit the detection of minority phases in mixtures, it is interesting to show what are these limits for some usual and one high-resolution equipment. So, in this work, we discuss the parameters to find the limit of the detection in binary mixtures of forms I and II of FNT according to each experimental condition. The samples analyzed were binary mixtures prepared with anhydrous polymorphs of the drug FNT. These samples were measured in four diffractometers with different experimental condition. These equipments represent the main resolutions generally used for drug analysis by XRPD. For the development of this work, a batch of form I was obtained pure, and another batch with forms I and II was used to obtain pure form II by heat treatment. Depending on the experimental condition, the polymorphs could be detected in a proportion as low as 0.5 wt%. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:3567-3575, 2014.

  17. Early breast cancer screening using iron/iron oxide-based nanoplatforms with sub-femtomolar limits of detection

    PubMed Central

    Samarakoon, Thilani N; Yapa, Asanka S; Abayaweera, Gayani; Basel, Matthew T; Maynez, Pamela; Ortega, Raquel; Toledo, Yubisela; Bossmann, Leonie; Robinson, Colette; Janik, Katharine E; Koper, Olga B; Li, Ping; Motamedi, Massoud; Higgins, Daniel A; Gadbury, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Summary Proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue serine proteases, and cathepsins (CTS) exhibit numerous functions in tumor biology. Solid tumors are characterized by changes in protease expression levels by tumor and surrounding tissue. Therefore, monitoring protease levels in tissue samples and liquid biopsies is a vital strategy for early cancer detection. Water-dispersable Fe/Fe3O4-core/shell based nanoplatforms for protease detection are capable of detecting protease activity down to sub-femtomolar limits of detection. They feature one dye (tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (TCPP)) that is tethered to the central nanoparticle by means of a protease-cleavable consensus sequence and a second dye (Cy 5.5) that is directly linked. Based on the protease activities of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), MMPs 1, 2, 3, 7, 9, and 13, as well as CTS B and L, human breast cancer can be detected at stage I by means of a simple serum test. By monitoring CTS B and L stage 0 detection may be achieved. This initial study, comprised of 46 breast cancer patients and 20 apparently healthy human subjects, demonstrates the feasibility of protease-activity-based liquid biopsies for early cancer diagnosis. PMID:27335730

  18. Absolute calibration of optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Viana, N.B.; Mazolli, A.; Maia Neto, P.A.; Nussenzveig, H.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Mesquita, O.N.

    2006-03-27

    As a step toward absolute calibration of optical tweezers, a first-principles theory of trapping forces with no adjustable parameters, corrected for spherical aberration, is experimentally tested. Employing two very different setups, we find generally very good agreement for the transverse trap stiffness as a function of microsphere radius for a broad range of radii, including the values employed in practice, and at different sample chamber depths. The domain of validity of the WKB ('geometrical optics') approximation to the theory is verified. Theoretical predictions for the trapping threshold, peak position, depth variation, multiple equilibria, and 'jump' effects are also confirmed.

  19. Linear ultrasonic motor for absolute gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yue; Yao, Zhiyuan; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2017-02-01

    Thanks to their compactness and suitability for vacuum applications, linear ultrasonic motors are considered as substitutes for classical electromagnetic motors as driving elements in absolute gravimeters. Still, their application is prevented by relatively low power output. To overcome this limitation and provide better stability, a V-type linear ultrasonic motor with a new clamping method is proposed for a gravimeter. In this paper, a mechanical model of stators with flexible clamping components is suggested, according to a design criterion for clamps of linear ultrasonic motors. After that, an effect of tangential and normal rigidity of the clamping components on mechanical output is studied. It is followed by discussion of a new clamping method with sufficient tangential rigidity and a capability to facilitate pre-load. Additionally, a prototype of the motor with the proposed clamping method was fabricated and the performance tests in vertical direction were implemented. Experimental results show that the suggested motor has structural stability and high dynamic performance, such as no-load speed of 1.4m/s and maximal thrust of 43N, meeting the requirements for absolute gravimeters.

  20. Sulfur Limits of Detection and Spectral Interference Corrections for DWPF Sludge Matrices by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    JURGENSEN, AR

    2004-04-20

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has been requested to perform sulfur (S) analysis on digested radioactive sludge and supernatant samples by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry (ICP-ES). The amount of sulfur is a concern because there are sulfur limits for the incoming feed, due to glass melter, process vessel, and off-gas line corrosion concerns and limited sulfur solubility in the glass wasteform. Recent changes in the washing strategy and stream additions change the amount of sulfur in the sludge. Increasing the sulfur concentration in the sludge challenges the current limits, so accurately determining the amount of sulfur present in a sludge batch is paramount. There are two important figures of merit that need to be evaluated for this analysis. The first is the detection limit (LOD), the smallest concentration of an element that can be detected with a defined certainty. This issue is important since the sulfur concentration in these process streams is l ow. Another critical analytical parameter is the effect on the S quantitation from potential spectral interferences. Spectral interferences are caused by background emission from plasma recombination events, scattered and stray light from the line emission of high concentration elements, or molecular band emission and from direct or tailing spectral line overlap from a matrix element. Any existing spectral overlaps could give false positives or increase the measured S concentrations in these matrices.

  1. Absolute distance sensing by two laser optical interferometry.

    PubMed

    Thurner, Klaus; Braun, Pierre-François; Karrai, Khaled

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a method for absolute distance sensing by two laser optical interferometry. A particularity of this technique is that a target distance is determined in absolute and is no longer limited to within an ambiguity range affecting usually multiple wavelength interferometers. We implemented the technique in a low-finesse Fabry-Pérot miniature fiber based interferometer. We used two diode lasers, both operating in the 1550 nm wavelength range. The wavelength difference is chosen to create a 25 μm long periodic beating interferometric pattern allowing a nanometer precise position measurement but limited to within an ambiguity range of 25 μm. The ambiguity is then eliminated by scanning one of the wavelengths over a small range (3.4 nm). We measured absolute distances in the sub-meter range and this with just few nanometer repeatability.

  2. Quantum cascade laser-based substance detection: approaching the quantum noise limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuffner, Peter C.; Conroy, Kathryn J.; Boyson, Toby K.; Milford, Greg; Mabrok, Mohamed A.; Kallapur, Abhijit G.; Petersen, Ian R.; Calzada, Maria E.; Spence, Thomas G.; Kirkbride, Kennith P.; Harb, Charles C.

    2011-06-01

    A consortium of researchers at University of New South Wales (UNSW@ADFA), and Loyola University New Orleans (LU NO), together with Australian government security agencies (e.g., Australian Federal Police), are working to develop highly sensitive laser-based forensic sensing strategies applicable to characteristic substances that pose chemical, biological and explosives (CBE) threats. We aim to optimise the potential of these strategies as high-throughput screening tools to detect prohibited and potentially hazardous substances such as those associated with explosives, narcotics and bio-agents.

  3. Absolute limit for the capillary rise of a fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caupin, Frédéric; Cole, Milton W.; Balibar, Sébastien; Treiner, Jacques

    2008-06-01

    Small capillaries can provide strong binding to fluids confined within them. We analyze this behavior with a simple microscopic theory, considering two geometries, a slit pore and a cylindrical pore. A goal is to achieve the maximum possible capillary rise (H) within each type of pore. The attraction for very small capillaries can result in a large value of H, exceeding 100 km in a number of cases (e.g., hydrogen, methane and water in cylindrical graphitic pores). The specific value of H depends on the details of the pore and the fluid-surface interaction. It is maximized in the case of small cylindrical pores, strong interactions and small adsorbate mass. Explicit calculations are presented for graphite and MgO substrates. Experimental tests are possible with an ultracentrifuge, where the high effective gravitational field reduces H.

  4. An analysis of small target feature detection limits using optic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Joseph; Gremillion, Gregory; Mathis, Allison; Nothwang, William

    2015-05-01

    The neurophysiology of insects suggests that they are able to track conspecifics, which manifest as small targets, against a variety of backgrounds with ease. This perception occurs at the same stage as motion perception suggesting a role for optic flow in target discrimination. Optic flow also is an attractive method of perception for visual system design due to the possibility of parallel processing that lends itself to implementation in hardware acceleration. This paper investigates some of the limits for reliable target discrimination solely from an optic flow field which are dependent on algorithm parameters, the nature of the target, and imager noise properties.

  5. Photon noise limited radiation detection with lens-antenna coupled microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S. J. C.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Diener, P.; Endo, A.; Janssen, R. M. J.; Ferrari, L.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2011-08-15

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) have shown great potential for sub-mm instrumentation because of the high scalability of the technology. Here, we demonstrate for the first time in the sub-mm band (0.1-2 mm) a photon noise limited performance of a small antenna coupled MKID detector array and we describe the relation between photon noise and MKID intrinsic generation-recombination noise. Additionally, we use the observed photon noise to measure the optical efficiency of detectors to be 0.8 {+-} 0.2.

  6. Detection of strength limiting defects in cellular glasses by dielectric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.; Adams, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    The foamed glasses that are being considered for structural support in solar thermal energy system silvered glass concentrator mirrors are assessed for strength-limiting defects by a nondestructive technique which measures the capacitance of well defined regions. The feasibility of locating large defects is demonstrated for the case of one type of cellular mass. Observed capacitance variations are believed to be due to small voids or other irregularities in the material. If the defects are equal to or greater than approximately 20 times the glass matrix pore size, they can be resolved with sufficient accuracy to delineate their spatial extent.

  7. Photon noise limited radiation detection with lens-antenna coupled microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, S. J. C.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Endo, A.; Janssen, R. M. J.; Ferrari, L.; Diener, P.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2011-08-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) have shown great potential for sub-mm instrumentation because of the high scalability of the technology. Here, we demonstrate for the first time in the sub-mm band (0.1-2 mm) a photon noise limited performance of a small antenna coupled MKID detector array and we describe the relation between photon noise and MKID intrinsic generation-recombination noise. Additionally, we use the observed photon noise to measure the optical efficiency of detectors to be 0.8 ± 0.2.

  8. Enhanced detection limit by dark mode perturbation in 2D photonic crystal slab refractive index sensors.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Costa; Lau, Wah Tung; Gad, Raanan; Akhavan, Hooman; Schilling, Ryan; Levi, Ofer

    2013-12-16

    We demonstrate for the first time a 300nm thick, 300μm × 300μm 2D dielectric photonic crystal slab membrane with a quality factor of 10,600 by coupling light to slightly perturbed dark modes through alternating nano-hole sizes. The newly created fundamental guided resonances greatly reduce nano-fabrication accuracy requirements. Moreover, we created a new layer architecture resulting in electric field enhancement at the interface between the slab and sensing regions, and spectral sensitivity of >800 nm/RIU, that is, >0.8 of the single-mode theoretical upper limit of spectral sensitivity.

  9. Automatic microseismic event detection by band-limited phase-only correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shaojiang; Wang, Yibo; Zhan, Yi; Chang, Xu

    2016-12-01

    Identification and detection of microseismic events is a significant issue in source locations and source mechanism analysis. The number of the records is notably large, especially in the case of some real-time monitoring, and while the majority of microseismic events are highly weak and sparse, automatic algorithms are indispensable. In this study, we introduce an effective method for the identification and detection of microseismic events by judging whether the P-wave phase exists in a local segment from a single three-component microseismic records. The new judging algorithm consists primarily of the following key steps: 1) transform the waveform time series into time-varying spectral representations using the S-transform; 2) calculate the similarity of the frequency content in the time-frequency domain using the phase-only correlation function; and 3) identify the P-phase by the combination analysis between any two components. The proposed algorithm is compared to a similar approach using the cross-correlation in the time domain between any two components and later tested with synthetic microseismic datasets and real field-recorded datasets. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm is able to distinguish similar and dissimilar waveforms, even for low signal noise ratio and emergent events, which is important for accurate and rapid selection of microseismic events from a large number of records. This method can be applied to other geophysical analyses based on the waveform data.

  10. Tone-deaf ears in moths may limit the acoustic detection of two-tone bats.

    PubMed

    Mora, Emanuel C; Fernández, Yohami; Hechavarría, Julio; Pérez, Martha

    2014-01-01

    Frequency alternation in the echolocation of insectivorous bats has been interpreted in relation to ranging and duty cycle, i.e. advantages for echolocation. The shifts in frequency of the calls of these so-called two-tone bats, however, may also play its role in the success of their hunting behavior for a preferred prey, the tympanate moth. How the auditory receptors (e.g. the A1 and A2 cells) in the moth's ear detect such frequency shifts is currently unknown. Here, we measured the auditory responses of the A1 cell in the noctuid Spodoptera frugiperda to the echolocation hunting sequence of Molossus molossus, a two-tone bat. We also manipulated the bat calls to control for the frequency shifts by lowering the frequency band of the search and approach calls. The firing response of the A1 receptor cell significantly decreases with the shift to higher frequencies during the search and approach phases of the hunting sequence of M. molossus; this could be explained by the receptor's threshold curve. The frequency dependence of the decrease in the receptor's response is supported by the results attained with the manipulated sequence: search and approach calls with the same minimum frequency are detected by the moth at the same threshold intensity. The two-tone bat M. molossus shows a call frequency alternation behavior that may enable it to overcome moth audition even in the mid-frequency range (i.e. 20-50 kHz) where moths hear best.

  11. Phase-noise limitations in continuous-variable quantum key distribution with homodyne detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvaja, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    In continuous-variables quantum key distribution with coherent states, the advantage of performing the detection by using standard telecoms components is counterbalanced by the lack of a stable phase reference in homodyne detection due to the complexity of optical phase-locking circuits and to the unavoidable phase noise of lasers, which introduces a degradation on the achievable secure key rate. Pilot-assisted phase-noise estimation and postdetection compensation techniques are used to implement a protocol with coherent states where a local laser is employed and it is not locked to the received signal, but a postdetection phase correction is applied. Here the reduction of the secure key rate determined by the laser phase noise, for both individual and collective attacks, is analytically evaluated and a scheme of pilot-assisted phase estimation proposed, outlining the tradeoff in the system design between phase noise and spectral efficiency. The optimal modulation variance as a function of the phase-noise amount is derived.

  12. Detecting and quantifying parasite-induced host mortality from intensity data: method comparisons and limitations.

    PubMed

    Wilber, Mark Q; Weinstein, Sara B; Briggs, Cheryl J

    2016-01-01

    Parasites can significantly impact animal populations by changing host behaviour, reproduction and survival. Detecting and quantifying these impacts is critical for understanding disease dynamics and managing wild animal populations. However, for wild hosts infected with macroparasites, it is notoriously difficult to quantify the fatal parasite load and number of animals that have died due to disease. When ethical or logistical constraints prohibit experimental determination of these values, examination of parasite intensity and distribution data may offer an alternative solution. In this study we introduce a novel method for using intensity data to detect and quantify parasite-induced mortality in wildlife populations. We use simulations to show that this method is more reliable than previously proposed methods while providing quantitative estimates of parasite-induced mortality from empirical data that are consistent with previously published qualitative estimates. However this method, and all techniques that estimate parasite-induced mortality from intensity data alone, have several important assumptions that must be scrutinised before applying those to real-world data. Given that these assumptions are met, our method is a new exploratory tool that can help inform more rigorous studies of parasite-induced host mortality.

  13. Fast detection of biomolecules in diffusion-limited regime using micromechanical pillars.

    PubMed

    Melli, Mauro; Scoles, Giacinto; Lazzarino, Marco

    2011-10-25

    We have developed a micromechanical sensor based on vertically oriented oscillating beams, in which contrary to what is normally done (for example with oscillating cantilevers) the sensitive area is located at the free end of the oscillator. In the micropillar geometry used here, analyte adsorption is confined only to the tip of the micropillar, thus reducing the volume from which the analyte molecules must diffuse to saturate the surface to a sphere of radius more than 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the corresponding linear distance valid for adsorption on a macroscopic surface. Hence the absorption rate is 3 orders of magnitude faster than on a typical 200 × 20 square micrometer cantilever. Pillar oscillations are detected by means of an optical lever method, but the geometry is suitable for multiplexing with compact integrated detection. We demonstrate our technology by investigating the formation of a single-strand DNA self-assembled monolayer (SAM) consisting of less than 10(6) DNA molecules and by measuring their hybridization efficiency. We show that the binding rate is 1000 times faster than on a "macroscopic" surface. We also show that the hybridization of a SAM of maximum density DNA is 40% or 4 times the value reported in the literature. These results suggest that the lower values previously reported in the literature can be attributed to incomplete saturation of the surface due to the slower adsorption rate on the "macroscopic" surfaces used.

  14. Detectability limitations with 3-D point reconstruction algorithms using digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Lindgren, Erik

    2015-03-31

    The estimated impact of pores in clusters on component fatigue will be highly conservative when based on 2-D rather than 3-D pore positions. To 3-D position and size defects using digital radiography and 3-D point reconstruction algorithms in general require a lower inspection time and in some cases work better with planar geometries than X-ray computed tomography. However, the increase in prior assumptions about the object and the defects will increase the intrinsic uncertainty in the resulting nondestructive evaluation output. In this paper this uncertainty arising when detecting pore defect clusters with point reconstruction algorithms is quantified using simulations. The simulation model is compared to and mapped to experimental data. The main issue with the uncertainty is the possible masking (detectability zero) of smaller defects around some other slightly larger defect. In addition, the uncertainty is explored in connection to the expected effects on the component fatigue life and for different amount of prior object-defect assumptions made.

  15. Considerations on the determination of the limit of detection and the limit of quantification in one-dimensional and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Krupčík, Ján; Májek, Pavel; Gorovenko, Roman; Blaško, Jaroslav; Kubinec, Robert; Sandra, Pat

    2015-05-29

    Methods based on the blank signal as proposed by IUPAC procedure and on the signal to noise ratio (S/N) as listed in the ISO-11843-1 norm for determination of the limit of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) in one-dimensional capillary gas chromatography (1D-GC) and comprehensive two-dimensional capillary gas chromatography (CG×GC) are described in detail and compared for both techniques. Flame ionization detection was applied and variables were the data acquisition frequency and, for CG×GC, also the modulation time. It has been stated that LOD and LOQ estimated according to IUPAC might be successfully used for 1D-GC-FID method. Moreover, LOD and LOQ decrease with decrease of data acquisition frequency (DAF). For GC×GC-FID, estimation of LOD by IUPAC gave poor reproducibility of results while for LOQ reproducibility was acceptable (within ±10% rel.). The LOD and LOQ determined by the S/N concept both for 1D-GC-FID and GC×GC-FID methods are ca. three times higher than those values estimated by the standard deviation of the blank. Since the distribution pattern of modulated peaks for any analyte separated by GC×GC is random and cannot be predicted, LOQ and LOD may vary within 30% for 3s modulation time. Concerning sensitivity, 1D-GC-FID at 2Hz and of GC×GC-FID at 50Hz shows a ca. 5 times enhancement of sensitivity in the modulated signal output.

  16. Absolute nonlocality via distributed computing without communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekaj, Ł.; Pawłowski, M.; Vértesi, T.; Grudka, A.; Horodecki, M.; Horodecki, R.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the role that quantum entanglement plays as a resource in various information processing tasks is one of the crucial goals of quantum information theory. Here we propose an alternative perspective for studying quantum entanglement: distributed computation of functions without communication between nodes. To formalize this approach, we propose identity games. Surprisingly, despite no signaling, we obtain that nonlocal quantum strategies beat classical ones in terms of winning probability for identity games originating from certain bipartite and multipartite functions. Moreover we show that, for a majority of functions, access to general nonsignaling resources boosts success probability two times in comparison to classical ones for a number of large enough outputs. Because there are no constraints on the inputs and no processing of the outputs in the identity games, they detect very strong types of correlations: absolute nonlocality.

  17. Detection of HBr and upper limit for HOBr: Bromine partitioning in the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.G.; Traub, W.A.; Chance, K.V.

    1995-06-01

    The authors determine mixing ratio profiles for HBr and upper limits for HOBr in the stratosphere with precisions up to 1.7 and 4.8 parts per trillion, respectively, using the combined data from 7 flights of their far-infrared spectrometer. The measurements suggest that in the range 22-34 km the average mixing ratio of HBr is 2.0{+-}0.8, and that the average mixing ratio of HOBr is less than 2.8 ppt. Their measurements of HBr are in reasonable agreement with a photochemical model which includes 0 or 2% production of HBr through the reaction of BrO with HO{sub 2}, but in strong disagreement with a model including 5 or 10% HBr production. 15 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Specificity and detection limit of a dermal temperature histamine sensitization test for absence of residual pertussis toxin in vaccines.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Sten E; Illigen, Kristin E Engelhart; Badsberg, Jens Henrik; Hasløv, Kaare R

    2012-01-01

    Currently, an assay based on fatal sensitization of mice to histamine challenge is widely used for testing absence of residual pertussis toxin in acellular pertussis containing vaccines. For replacement of this lethal end-point assay, an alternative method based on body temperature measurement in mice has been presented, and in this study the specificity and detection limit of a dermal temperature-based assay were assessed. Test preparations containing pertussis toxin were prepared in aluminum-adjuvanted pertussis toxoid vaccine and injected intraperitoneally in histamine sensitive mice. Later the mice were challenged with histamine and the pertussis toxin-induced decrease in dermal temperature recorded. By comparison of mice treated with pertussis toxoid vaccine spiked with pertussis toxin with mice treated with pertussis toxoid vaccine alone, the assay gave a response that specifically could detect presence of pertussis toxin. The acellular pertussis containing vaccine did not interfere with the pertussis toxin-induced temperature response recorded. In tests for presence of pertussis toxin in the pertussis vaccine preparation, the detection limit of the assay was estimated to approximately 5 ng pertussis toxin per human dose of pertussis toxoid. The dermal temperature-based assay was found to be a valid method to be applied in routine quality control of vaccines.

  19. Performance limitations of a free-space optical communication satellite network owing to vibrations: heterodyne detection.

    PubMed

    Arnon, S; Rotman, S R; Kopeika, N S

    1998-09-20

    Free-space optical communication between satellites in a distributed network can permit high data rates of communication between different places on Earth. To establish optical communication between any two satellites requires that the line of sight of their optics be aligned during the entire communication time. Because of the large distance between the satellites and the alignment accuracy required, the pointing from one satellite to another is complicated because of vibrations of the pointing system caused by two fundamental stochastic mechanisms: tracking noise created by the electro-optic tracker and vibrations derived from mechanical components. Vibration of the transmitter beam in the receiver plane causes a decrease in the received optical power. Vibrations of the receiver telescope relative to the received beam decrease the heterodyne mixing efficiency. These two factors increase the bit-error rate of a coherent detection network. We derive simple mathematical models of the network bit-error rate versus the system parameters and the transmitter and receiver vibration statistics. An example of a practical optical heterodyne free-space satellite optical communication network is presented. From this research it is clear that even low-amplitude vibration of the satellite-pointing systems dramatically decreases network performance.

  20. Using proximity biotinylation to detect herpesvirus entry glycoprotein interactions: Limitations for integral membrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lajko, Michelle; Haddad, Alexander F; Robinson, Carolyn A; Connolly, Sarah A

    2015-09-01

    Herpesvirus entry into cells requires coordinated interactions among several viral transmembrane glycoproteins. Viral glycoproteins bind to receptors and interact with other glycoproteins to trigger virus-cell membrane fusion. Details of these glycoprotein interactions are not well understood because they are likely transient and/or low affinity. Proximity biotinylation is a promising protein-protein interaction assay that can capture transient interactions in live cells. One protein is linked to a biotin ligase and a second protein is linked to a short specific acceptor peptide (AP). If the two proteins interact, the ligase will biotinylate the AP, without requiring a sustained interaction. To examine herpesvirus glycoprotein interactions, the ligase and AP were linked to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) gD and Epstein Barr virus (EBV) gB. Interactions between monomers of these oligomeric proteins (homotypic interactions) served as positive controls to demonstrate assay sensitivity. Heterotypic combinations served as negative controls to determine assay specificity, since HSV1 gD and EBV gB do not interact functionally. Positive controls showed strong biotinylation, indicating that viral glycoprotein proximity can be detected. Unexpectedly, the negative controls also showed biotinylation. These results demonstrate the special circumstances that must be considered when examining interactions among glycosylated proteins that are constrained within a membrane.

  1. Estimating the computational limits of detection of microbial non-model organisms.

    PubMed

    Kuhring, Mathias; Renard, Bernhard Y

    2015-10-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a key instrument for proteomic studies of single bacteria as well as microbial communities. However, the identification of spectra from MS/MS experiments is still challenging, in particular for non-model organisms. Due to the limited amount of related protein reference sequences, underexplored organisms often remain completely unidentified or their spectra match to peptides of uncertain degree of relation. Alternative strategies such as error-tolerant spectra searches or proteogenomic approaches may reduce the amount of unidentified spectra and lead to peptide matches on more related taxonomic levels. However, to what extent these strategies may be successful is difficult to judge prior to an MS/MS experiment. In this contribution, we introduce a method to estimate the suitability of databases of interest. Further, it allows estimating the possible influence of error-tolerant searches and proteogenomic approaches on databases of interest with respect to the number of unidentified spectra and the taxonomic distances of identified spectra. Furthermore, we provide an implementation of our approach that supports experimental design by evaluating the benefit and need of different search strategies with respect to present databases and organisms under study. We provide several examples which highlight the different effects of additional search strategies on databases and organisms with varying amount of known relative species available.

  2. Early detection of diabetic kidney disease: Present limitations and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Hung; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is one of the most common diabetic complications, as well as the leading cause of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease around the world. To prevent the dreadful consequence, development of new assays for diagnostic of DKD has always been the priority in the research field of diabetic complications. At present, urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) are the standard methods for assessing glomerular damage and renal function changes in clinical practice. However, due to diverse tissue involvement in different individuals, the so-called “non-albuminuric renal impairment” is not uncommon, especially in patients with type 2 diabetes. On the other hand, the precision of creatinine-based GFR estimates is limited in hyperfiltration status. These facts make albuminuria and eGFR less reliable indicators for early-stage DKD. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in the understanding of the pathogenesis of DKD, along with the elucidation of its genetic profiles and phenotypic expression of different molecules. With the help of ever-evolving technologies, it has gradually become plausible to apply the thriving information in clinical practice. The strength and weakness of several novel biomarkers, genomic, proteomic and metabolomic signatures in assisting the early diagnosis of DKD will be discussed in this article. PMID:27525056

  3. Limited genetic variability and phenotypic plasticity detected for cavitation resistance in a Mediterranean pine.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Delzon, Sylvain; Bouche, Pauline S; Alia, Ricardo; Vendramin, Giovanni Giuseppe; Cochard, Hervé; Plomion, Christophe

    2014-02-01

    Resistance to cavitation is a major determinant of plant survival under severe drought and can be used to quantify species adaptive potential. Interspecific variation in this key trait is well defined in woody species, but intraspecific variation (level and structure) resulting from standing genetic variation and phenotypic plasticity has never been determined. Combining for the first time in situ characterization of natural populations and two reciprocal common gardens in dry and wet sites, we estimated variance components (phenotypic, genetic, environmental, and genetic × environmental) of cavitation resistance based on 513 genotypes of a Mediterranean pine, Pinus pinaster. Despite the selected populations being climatically contrasted, phenotypic plasticity in resistance to cavitation remained low and was essentially attributed to family level. Between-population variation in cavitation resistance for both phenotypic and genetic variation was limited. These results strongly suggest that cavitation resistance is buffered against genetic and to a lesser extent environmental variation (canalization) in maritime pine. Consequently, in a drier world, the increasing drought tolerance of Pinus species might be severely constrained by the low level of cavitation resistance variation, resulting in a large-scale loss of productivity.

  4. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker's theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

  5. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus_minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker`s theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

  6. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  7. Peak acceleration limiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. P.

    1972-01-01

    Device is described that limits accelerations by shutting off shaker table power very rapidly in acceleration tests. Absolute value of accelerometer signal is used to trigger electronic switch which terminates test and sounds alarm.

  8. 40 CFR Table I-10 to Subpart I of... - Maximum Field Detection Limits Applicable to Fluorinated GHG Concentration Measurements for Stack...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maximum Field Detection Limits Applicable to Fluorinated GHG Concentration Measurements for Stack Systems I Table I-10 to Subpart I of Part... Subpart I of Part 98—Maximum Field Detection Limits Applicable to Fluorinated GHG...

  9. Recovery efficiency and limit of detection of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne from environmental surface samples.

    PubMed

    Estill, Cheryl Fairfield; Baron, Paul A; Beard, Jeremy K; Hein, Misty J; Larsen, Lloyd D; Rose, Laura; Schaefer, Frank W; Noble-Wang, Judith; Hodges, Lisa; Lindquist, H D Alan; Deye, Gregory J; Arduino, Matthew J

    2009-07-01

    After the 2001 anthrax incidents, surface sampling techniques for biological agents were found to be inadequately validated, especially at low surface loadings. We aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores within a chamber to achieve very low surface loading (ca. 3, 30, and 200 CFU per 100 cm(2)). Steel and carpet coupons seeded in the chamber were sampled with swab (103 cm(2)) or wipe or vacuum (929 cm(2)) surface sampling methods and analyzed at three laboratories. Agar settle plates (60 cm(2)) were the reference for determining recovery efficiency (RE). The minimum estimated surface concentrations to achieve a 95% response rate based on probit regression were 190, 15, and 44 CFU/100 cm(2) for sampling steel surfaces and 40, 9.2, and 28 CFU/100 cm(2) for sampling carpet surfaces with swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively; however, these results should be cautiously interpreted because of high observed variability. Mean REs at the highest surface loading were 5.0%, 18%, and 3.7% on steel and 12%, 23%, and 4.7% on carpet for the swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively. Precision (coefficient of variation) was poor at the lower surface concentrations but improved with increasing surface concentration. The best precision was obtained with wipe samples on carpet, achieving 38% at the highest surface concentration. The wipe sampling method detected B. anthracis at lower estimated surface concentrations and had higher RE and better precision than the other methods. These results may guide investigators to more meaningfully conduct environmental sampling, quantify contamination levels, and conduct risk assessment for humans.

  10. Nouvelles Limites sur la Detection Directe de la Matiere Sombre avec l'Experience PICASSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Marie-Cecile

    Astronomical and cosmological observations strongly suggest the presence of an exotic form of non-relativistic, non-baryonic matter that would represent 26% of the actual energy-matter content of the Universe. This so-called cold dark matter would be composed of Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMP). PICASSO (Project In CAnada to Search for Supersymmetric Objects) aims to detect directly one of the dark matter candidates proposed in the framework of supersymmetric extensions of the standard model : the neutralino. The experiment is installed in the SNOLAB underground laboratory at Sudbury (Ontario) and uses superheated C4F10 droplets detectors, a variant of bubble chamber technique. Phase transitions in the superheated liquids are triggered by 19F recoils caused by the elastic collision with neutralinos and create an acoustic signal which is recorded by piezoelectric sensors. This thesis presents recent progress in PICASSO leading to a substantially increased sensitivity in the search of neutralinos. New fabrication and purification procedures allowed a background reduction of about a factor 10 of the major detectors contamination caused by alpha emitters. Detailed studies allowed to localize these emitters in the detectors. In addition, data analysis efforts were able to improve substantially the discrimination between alpha particle induced events and those created by nuclear recoils. New analysis tools were also developed in order to discriminate between particle induced and non-particle induced events, such as electronic backgrounds and acoustic noise signals. An important new background suppression mechanism at higher temperatures led to the present improved sensitivity of PICASSO at low WIMP masses.

  11. Molecular Detection of Culture-Confirmed Bacterial Bloodstream Infections with Limited Enrichment Time

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Miranda S.; McCann, Chase D.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional blood culturing using automated instrumentation with phenotypic identification requires a significant amount of time to generate results. This study investigated the speed and accuracy of results generated using PCR and pyrosequencing compared to the time required to obtain Gram stain results and final culture identification for cases of culture-confirmed bloodstream infections. Research and physician-ordered blood cultures were drawn concurrently. Aliquots of the incubating research blood culture fluid were removed hourly between 5 and 8 h, at 24 h, and again at 5 days. DNA was extracted from these 6 time point aliquots and analyzed by PCR and pyrosequencing for bacterial rRNA gene targets. These results were then compared to those of the physician-ordered blood culture. PCR and pyrosequencing accurately identified 92% of all culture-confirmed cases after a mean enrichment time of 5.8 ± 2.9 h. When the time needed to complete sample processing was included for PCR and pyrosequencing protocols, the molecular approach yielded results in 11.8 ± 2.9 h compared to means of 27.9 ± 13.6 h to obtain the Gram stain results and 81.6 ± 24.0 h to generate the final culture-based identification. The molecular approach enabled accurate detection of most bacteria present in incubating blood culture bottles on average about 16 h sooner than Gram stain results became available and approximately 3 days sooner than the phenotypic identification was entered in the Laboratory Information System. If implemented, this more rapid molecular approach could minimize the number of doses of unnecessary or ineffective antibiotics administered to patients. PMID:23985915

  12. Scheme for efficient extraction of low-frequency signal beyond the quantum limit by frequency-shift detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, R G; Zhang, J; Zhai, Z H; Zhai, S Q; Liu, K; Gao, J R

    2015-08-10

    Low-frequency (Hz~kHz) squeezing is very important in many schemes of quantum precision measurement. But it is more difficult than that at megahertz-frequency because of the introduction of laser low-frequency technical noise. In this paper, we propose a scheme to obtain a low-frequency signal beyond the quantum limit from the frequency comb in a non-degenerate frequency and degenerate polarization optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) operating below threshold with type I phase matching by frequency-shift detection. Low-frequency squeezing immune to laser technical noise is obtained by a detection system with a local beam of two-frequency intense laser. Furthermore, the low-frequency squeezing can be used for phase measurement in Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be enhanced greatly.

  13. Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Haddad, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet have extended to short wavelengths by use of rare-gas ionization chambers. The technique involves the measurement of the ion current as a function of the gas pressure in the ion chamber. The true value of the ion current, and hence the absolute photon flux, is obtained by extrapolating the ion current to zero gas pressure. Examples are given at 162 and 266 A. The short-wavelength limit is determined only by the sensitivity of the current-measuring apparatus and by present knowledge of the photoionization processes that occur in the rate gases.

  14. Absolute pulse energy measurements of soft x-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Tiedtke, K; Sorokin, A A; Jastrow, U; Juranić, P; Kreis, S; Gerken, N; Richter, M; Arp, U; Feng, Y; Nordlund, D; Soufli, R; Fernández-Perea, M; Juha, L; Heimann, P; Nagler, B; Lee, H J; Mack, S; Cammarata, M; Krupin, O; Messerschmidt, M; Holmes, M; Rowen, M; Schlotter, W; Moeller, S; Turner, J J

    2014-09-08

    This paper reports novel measurements of x-ray optical radiation on an absolute scale from the intense and ultra-short radiation generated in the soft x-ray regime of a free electron laser. We give a brief description of the detection principle for radiation measurements which was specifically adapted for this photon energy range. We present data characterizing the soft x-ray instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) with respect to the radiant power output and transmission by using an absolute detector temporarily placed at the downstream end of the instrument. This provides an estimation of the reflectivity of all x-ray optical elements in the beamline and provides the absolute photon number per bandwidth per pulse. This parameter is important for many experiments that need to understand the trade-offs between high energy resolution and high flux, such as experiments focused on studying materials via resonant processes. Furthermore, the results are compared with the LCLS diagnostic gas detectors to test the limits of linearity, and observations are reported on radiation contamination from spontaneous undulator radiation and higher harmonic content.

  15. A STUDY OF FUNDAMENTAL LIMITATIONS TO STATISTICAL DETECTION OF REDSHIFTED H I FROM THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Udaya Shankar, N.; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Arcus, Wayne; Emrich, David; Herne, David; Bernardi, Gianni; Greenhill, Lincoln J.; Bowman, Judd D.; Briggs, Frank; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Bunton, John D.; DeSouza, Ludi; Cappallo, Roger J.; Corey, Brian E.; Goeke, Robert F.; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Hazelton, Bryna J.; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Kaplan, David L.; and others

    2013-10-10

    In this paper, we explore for the first time the relative magnitudes of three fundamental sources of uncertainty, namely, foreground contamination, thermal noise, and sample variance, in detecting the H I power spectrum from the epoch of reionization (EoR). We derive limits on the sensitivity of a Fourier synthesis telescope to detect EoR based on its array configuration and a statistical representation of images made by the instrument. We use the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) configuration for our studies. Using a unified framework for estimating signal and noise components in the H I power spectrum, we derive an expression for and estimate the contamination from extragalactic point-like sources in three-dimensional k-space. Sensitivity for EoR H I power spectrum detection is estimated for different observing modes with MWA. With 1000 hr of observing on a single field using the 128 tile MWA, EoR detection is feasible (S/N >1 for k ∼< 0.8 Mpc{sup –1}). Bandpass shaping and refinements to the EoR window are found to be effective in containing foreground contamination, which makes the instrument tolerant to imaging errors. We find that for a given observing time, observing many independent fields of view does not offer an advantage over a single field observation when thermal noise dominates over other uncertainties in the derived power spectrum.

  16. Determining the 95% limit of detection for waterborne pathogen analyses from primary concentration to qPCR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stokdyk, Joel P.; Firnstahl, Aaron; Spencer, Susan K.; Burch, Tucker R; Borchardt, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The limit of detection (LOD) for qPCR-based analyses is not consistently defined or determined in studies on waterborne pathogens. Moreover, the LODs reported often reflect the qPCR assay alone rather than the entire sample process. Our objective was to develop an approach to determine the 95% LOD (lowest concentration at which 95% of positive samples are detected) for the entire process of waterborne pathogen detection. We began by spiking the lowest concentration that was consistently positive at the qPCR step (based on its standard curve) into each procedural step working backwards (i.e., extraction, secondary concentration, primary concentration), which established a concentration that was detectable following losses of the pathogen from processing. Using the fraction of positive replicates (n = 10) at this concentration, we selected and analyzed a second, and then third, concentration. If the fraction of positive replicates equaled 1 or 0 for two concentrations, we selected another. We calculated the LOD using probit analysis. To demonstrate our approach we determined the 95% LOD for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, adenovirus 41, and vaccine-derived poliovirus Sabin 3, which were 11, 12, and 6 genomic copies (gc) per reaction (rxn), respectively (equivalent to 1.3, 1.5, and 4.0 gc L−1 assuming the 1500 L tap-water sample volume prescribed in EPA Method 1615). This approach limited the number of analyses required and was amenable to testing multiple genetic targets simultaneously (i.e., spiking a single sample with multiple microorganisms). An LOD determined this way can facilitate study design, guide the number of required technical replicates, aid method evaluation, and inform data interpretation.

  17. Extending the Sensitivity to the Detection of WIMP Dark Matter with an Improved Understanding of the Limiting Neutron Backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, Sharmila

    2005-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) uses position-sensitive Germanium and Silicon crystals in the direct detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) believed to constitute most of the dark matter in the Universe. WIMP interactions with matter being rare, identifying and eliminating known backgrounds is critical for detection. Event-by-event discrimination by the detectors rejects the predominant gamma and beta backgrounds while Monte Carlo simulations help estimate, and subtract, the contribution from the neutrons. This thesis describes the effort to understand neutron backgrounds as seen in the two stages of the CDMS search for WIMPs. The first stage of the experiment was at a shallow site at the Stanford Underground Facility where the limiting background came from high-energy neutrons produced by cosmic-ray muon interactions in the rock surrounding the cavern. Simulations of this background helped inform the analysis of data from an experimental run at this site and served as input for the background reduction techniques necessary to set new exclusion limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross-section, excluding new parameter space for WIMPs of masses 8-20 GeV/c2. This thesis considers the simulation methods used as well as how various event populations in the data served as checks on the simulations to allow them to be used in the interpretation of the WIMP-search data. The studies also confirmed the presence of a limiting neutron background at the shallow site, necessitating the move to the 713-meter deep Soudan Underground Facility. Similar computer-based studies helped quantify the neutron background seen at the deeper site and informed the analysis of the data emerging from the first physics run of the experiment at Soudan. In conjunction with the WIMP-search and calibration data, the simulations confirmed that increased depth considerably reduced the neutron backgrounds seen, greatly improving the sensitivity to WIMP detection. The data

  18. Integrated poly(dimethysiloxane) with an intrinsic nonfouling property approaching "absolute" zero background in immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongwei; Wu, Yuanzi; Yang, Xiaoli; Liu, Xing; He, Jianan; Fu, Long; Wang, Jie; Xu, Hongke; Shi, Yi; Zhong, Renqian

    2010-08-01

    The key to achieve a highly sensitive and specific protein microarray assay is to prevent nonspecific protein adsorption to an "absolute" zero level because any signal amplification method will simultaneously amplify signal and noise. Here, we develop a novel solid supporting material, namely, polymer coated initiator integrated poly(dimethysiloxane) (iPDMS), which was able to achieve such "absolute" zero (i.e., below the detection limit of instrument). The implementation of this iPDMS enables practical and high-quality multiplexed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of 11 tumor markers. This iPDMS does not need any blocking steps and only require mild washing conditions. It also uses on an average 8-fold less capture antibodies compared with the mainstream nitrocellulose (NC) film. Besides saving time and materials, iPDMS achieved a limit-of-detection (LOD) as low as 19 pg mL(-1), which is sufficiently low for most current clinical diagnostic applications. We expect to see an immediate impact of this iPDMS on the realization of the great potential of protein microarray in research and practical uses such as large scale and high-throughput screening, clinical diagnosis, inspection, and quarantine.

  19. Assessment of average of normals (AON) procedure for outlier-free datasets including qualitative values below limit of detection (LoD): an application within tumor markers such as CA 15-3, CA 125, and CA 19-9.

    PubMed

    Usta, Murat; Aral, Hale; Mete Çilingirtürk, Ahmet; Kural, Alev; Topaç, Ibrahim; Semerci, Tuna; Hicri Köseoğlu, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    Average of normals (AON) is a quality control procedure that is sensitive only to systematic errors that can occur in an analytical process in which patient test results are used. The aim of this study was to develop an alternative model in order to apply the AON quality control procedure to datasets that include qualitative values below limit of detection (LoD). The reported patient test results for tumor markers, such as CA 15-3, CA 125, and CA 19-9, analyzed by two instruments, were retrieved from the information system over a period of 5 months, using the calibrator and control materials with the same lot numbers. The median as a measure of central tendency and the median absolute deviation (MAD) as a measure of dispersion were used for the complementary model of AON quality control procedure. The ubias values, which were determined for the bias component of the measurement uncertainty, were partially linked to the percentages of the daily median values of the test results that fall within the control limits. The results for these tumor markers, in which lower limits of reference intervals are not medically important for clinical diagnosis and management, showed that the AON quality control procedure, using the MAD around the median, can be applied for datasets including qualitative values below LoD.

  20. Detection of Temporally and Spatially Limited Periodic Earthquake Recurrence in Synthetic Seismic Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, O.; Arrowsmith, R. J.

    2005-12-01

    noticeable periodicity during certain intervals in an otherwise aperiodic record. The observed periodic signal is not equally distributed over the range of offsets but shows a multi-modal distribution with increased periodicity for the smallest events and for large events that show a specific offset. These large events also form a shoulder in the frequency-size distribution. Apparently, the model exhibits characteristic earthquakes (defined by similar coseismic slip) that occur more frequently than expected from a power law distribution, and also are significantly more periodic. The wavelength of the periodic signal generally equals the minimum loading time, which is related to the loading velocity and the amount of coseismic slip (i.e., stress drop). No significant event occurs between the characteristic events as long as the system stays in a window of periodic behavior. Within the windows of periodic behavior, earthquake prediction is straightforward. Therefore, recognition of these windows not only in synthetic data but also in real seismic records, may improve the intra-window forecast of earthquakes. Further studies will attempt to determine the characteristics of onset, duration, and end of these windows of periodic earthquake recurrence. Only the motion of a single block within a bigger system was analyzed so far. Going from a zero dimensional scenario to a two dimensional case where the offsets not only of a single block but the displacement patterns caused by a certain event are analyzed will increase the verisimilitude of the detection of periodic earthquake recurrence within an otherwise chaotic seismic record.

  1. Resistance of lichens to simulated galactic cosmic radiation: limits of survival capacity and biosignature detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre Noetzel, Rosa; Miller, Ana Z.; Cubero, Beatriz; Raguse, Marina; Meessen, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Space constitutes an extremely harmful environment for survival of terrestrial organisms. Amongst extremophiles on Earth, lichens are one of the most resistant organisms to harsh terrestrial environments, as well as some species of microorganisms, such as bacteria (Moeller et al., 2010), criptoendolithic cyanobacteria and lithic fungi (de los Ríos et al. 2004). To study the survival capacity of lichens to the harmful radiation environment of space, we have selected the lichen Circinaria gyrosa, an astrobiological model defined by its high capacity of resistance to space conditions (De la Torre et al. 2010) and to a simulated Mars environment (Sanchez et al., 2012). Samples were irradiated with four types of space-relevant ionizing radiation in the STARLIFE campaign: helium and iron ion doses (up to 2,000 Gy), X-ray doses (up to 5,000 Gy) and ultra-high γ-ray doses (from 6 to 113 kGy). Results on resistance of C. gyrosa to space-relevant ionizing radiation and its post-irradiation viability were obtained by: (i) chlorophyll a fluorescence of photosystem II (PS II); (ii) epifluorescence microscopy; (iii) confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM), and (iv) field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Results of photosynthetic activity and epifluorescence showed no significant changes on the viability of C. gyrosa with increasing doses of helium and iron ions as well as X-rays. In contrast, γ-irradiation elicited significant dose-correlated effects as revealed by all applied techniques. Relevant is the presence of whewellite-like crystals, detected by FESEM on C. gyrosa thalli after high irradiation doses, which has been also identified in previous Mars simulation studies (Böttcher et al., 2014). These studies contribute to the better understanding of the adaptability of extremophile organisms to harsh environments, as well as to estimate the habitability of a planet's surface, like Mars; they will be important for planning experiments on the search of life

  2. Silver nanoparticles for SERS-based ultrasensitive chemical detection in aqueous solutions: Role of binding affinity and surface oxidation in the detection limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erol, Melek

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) in the presence of noble metal nanostructures holds significant promise for sensing and molecular fingerprinting down to single molecule level. This dissertation explores the effect of binding affinity and surface oxidation of Ag nanoparticles on SERS detection sensitivity of SO42-, CN-, SCN-, ClO4- and nitro-aromatic compounds in water. Specifically positively charged Ag nanoparticles (Ag [+]) were synthesized by UV-assisted reduction of silver nitrate using branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI) and 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) solutions. Both primary amino and amide groups on the surface of Ag [+] allowed strong binding affinity with anions, critical for sensitive SERS measurements. For substrates with immobilized Ag [+] (30 nanoparticles/mum2), SERS sensitivity increased in the order of SO42- < CN- < SCN- ≈ ClO4 -, with respective binding constants of 105, 3.3 x 105, and 107 (for both SCN- and ClO4-) M-1. Significantly, substrates with Ag [+] exhibited limit of detection values of 8.0 x 10-8 M (8 ppb) and 2.7 x 10-7 M (7 ppb) for ClO 4- and CN-, respectively. We revealed for the first time that oxidation of negatively charged Ag nanoparticles (Ag [-]) produced by a modified Lee and Meisel procedure drastically altered adsorption and orientation of nitro-aromatic molecules and increased their SERS detection limit. This observation can be attributed to the hinderance of Ag-to-aromatic ring charge transfer by the resultant oxide layer. SERS detection of p-nitrophenol at 1 ppt was achieved through inhibition of oxidation of Ag [-] in argon gas. Finally, to extend our work for potential biosensing applications, we showed that BPEI coatings of high molecular weight were unique in their ability to provide avidin-resistant surfaces at physiological conditions due to steric hindrance from the branched architecture of adsorbed polymer chains. BPEI coated surfaces were also effective for suppression of

  3. Scanning micro-resonator direct-comb absolute spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambetta, Alessio; Cassinerio, Marco; Gatti, Davide; Laporta, Paolo; Galzerano, Gianluca

    2016-10-01

    Direct optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy (DFCS) is proving to be a fundamental tool in many areas of science and technology thanks to its unique performance in terms of ultra-broadband, high-speed detection and frequency accuracy, allowing for high-fidelity mapping of atomic and molecular energy structure. Here we present a novel DFCS approach based on a scanning Fabry-Pérot micro-cavity resonator (SMART) providing a simple, compact and accurate method to resolve the mode structure of an optical frequency comb. The SMART approach, while drastically reducing system complexity, allows for a straightforward absolute calibration of the optical-frequency axis with an ultimate resolution limited by the micro-resonator resonance linewidth and can be used in any spectral region from UV to THz. We present an application to high-precision spectroscopy of acetylene at 1.54 μm, demonstrating performances comparable or even better than current state-of-the-art DFCS systems in terms of sensitivity, optical bandwidth and frequency-resolution.

  4. Interpretation of the Arcade 2 Absolute Sky Brightness Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiffert, M.; Fixsen, D. J.; Kogut, A.; Levin, S. M.; Limon, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Mirel, P.; Singal, J.; Villela, T.; Wollack, E.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    We use absolutely calibrated data between 3 and 90 GHz from the 2006 balloon flight of the ARCADE 2 instrument, along with previous measurements at other frequencies to constrain models of extragalactic emission. Such emission is a combination of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) monopole, Galactic foreground emission, the integrated contribution of radio emission from external galaxies, any spectral distortions present in the CMB, and any other extragalactic source. After removal of estimates of foreground emission from our own Galaxy, and an estimated contribution of external galaxies, we present fits to a combination of the flat-spectrum CMB and potential spectral distortions in the CMB. We find 217 upper limits to CMB spectral distortions of u < 6x10(exp -4) and [Y(sub ff)] < 1x10(exp -4). We also find a significant detection of a residual signal beyond that, which can be explained by the CMB plus the integrated radio emission from galaxies estimated from existing surveys. This residual signal may be due to an underestimated galactic foreground contribution, an unaccounted for contribution of a background of radio sources, or some combination of both. The residual signal is consistent with emission in the form of a power law with amplitUde 18.4 +/- 2.1 K at 0.31 GHz and a spectral index of -2.57 +/- 0.05.

  5. Scanning micro-resonator direct-comb absolute spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gambetta, Alessio; Cassinerio, Marco; Gatti, Davide; Laporta, Paolo; Galzerano, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Direct optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy (DFCS) is proving to be a fundamental tool in many areas of science and technology thanks to its unique performance in terms of ultra-broadband, high-speed detection and frequency accuracy, allowing for high-fidelity mapping of atomic and molecular energy structure. Here we present a novel DFCS approach based on a scanning Fabry-Pérot micro-cavity resonator (SMART) providing a simple, compact and accurate method to resolve the mode structure of an optical frequency comb. The SMART approach, while drastically reducing system complexity, allows for a straightforward absolute calibration of the optical-frequency axis with an ultimate resolution limited by the micro-resonator resonance linewidth and can be used in any spectral region from UV to THz. We present an application to high-precision spectroscopy of acetylene at 1.54 μm, demonstrating performances comparable or even better than current state-of-the-art DFCS systems in terms of sensitivity, optical bandwidth and frequency-resolution. PMID:27752132

  6. A Control Allocation System for Automatic Detection and Compensation of Phase Shift Due to Actuator Rate Limiting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yildiz, Yidiray; Kolmanovsky, Ilya V.; Acosta, Diana

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a control allocation system that can detect and compensate the phase shift between the desired and the actual total control effort due to rate limiting of the actuators. Phase shifting is an important problem in control system applications since it effectively introduces a time delay which may destabilize the closed loop dynamics. A relevant example comes from flight control where aggressive pilot commands, high gain of the flight control system or some anomaly in the system may cause actuator rate limiting and effective time delay introduction. This time delay can instigate Pilot Induced Oscillations (PIO), which is an abnormal coupling between the pilot and the aircraft resulting in unintentional and undesired oscillations. The proposed control allocation system reduces the effective time delay by first detecting the phase shift and then minimizing it using constrained optimization techniques. Flight control simulation results for an unstable aircraft with inertial cross coupling are reported, which demonstrate phase shift minimization and recovery from a PIO event.

  7. Absolute GPS Positioning Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, G.

    A new inverse approach for restoring the absolute coordinates of a ground -based station from three or four observed GPS pseudo-ranges is proposed. This stochastic method is based on simulations of natural evolution named genetic algorithms (GA). These iterative procedures provide fairly good and robust estimates of the absolute positions in the Earth's geocentric reference system. For comparison/validation, GA results are compared to the ones obtained using the classical linearized least-square scheme for the determination of the XYZ location proposed by Bancroft (1985) which is strongly limited by the number of available observations (i.e. here, the number of input pseudo-ranges must be four). The r.m.s. accuracy of the non -linear cost function reached by this latter method is typically ~10-4 m2 corresponding to ~300-500-m accuracies for each geocentric coordinate. However, GA can provide more acceptable solutions (r.m.s. errors < 10-5 m2), even when only three instantaneous pseudo-ranges are used, such as a lost of lock during a GPS survey. Tuned GA parameters used in different simulations are N=1000 starting individuals, as well as Pc=60-70% and Pm=30-40% for the crossover probability and mutation rate, respectively. Statistical tests on the ability of GA to recover acceptable coordinates in presence of important levels of noise are made simulating nearly 3000 random samples of erroneous pseudo-ranges. Here, two main sources of measurement errors are considered in the inversion: (1) typical satellite-clock errors and/or 300-metre variance atmospheric delays, and (2) Geometrical Dilution of Precision (GDOP) due to the particular GPS satellite configuration at the time of acquisition. Extracting valuable information and even from low-quality starting range observations, GA offer an interesting alternative for high -precision GPS positioning.

  8. Qualitative contrast between knowledge-limited mixed-state and variable-resources models of visual change detection.

    PubMed

    Nosofsky, Robert M; Donkin, Chris

    2016-10-01

    We report an experiment designed to provide a qualitative contrast between knowledge-limited versions of mixed-state and variable-resources (VR) models of visual change detection. The key data pattern is that observers often respond “same” on big-change trials, while simultaneously being able to discriminate between same and small-change trials. The mixed-state model provides a natural account of this data pattern: With some probability, the observer is in a zero-memory state and is forced to guess. Thus, even on big-change trials, there is a significant probability that the observer will respond “same.” On other trials, the observer retains memory for the probed study item, and these memory-based responses allow the observer to show above-chance discrimination between same and small-change trials. By contrast, we show that important versions of the VR models that we refer to as knowledge-limited models are stymied by this simple pattern of results. In agreement with Keshvari, van den Berg, and Ma (2012, 2013), alternative knowledge-rich VR models that employ ideal-observer decision rules provide a significant improvement over the knowledge-limited VR models; however, extant versions of the knowledge-rich VR models still fall short quantitatively compared to the descriptive mixed-state model. We discuss implications of the knowledge-rich assumptions that are posited in current versions of the VR models that have been used to fit change-detection data.

  9. Detection of micrometastasis by cytokeratin 20 RT-PCR is limited due to stable background transcription in granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jung, R; Petersen, K; Krüger, W; Wolf, M; Wagener, C; Zander, A; Neumaier, M

    1999-01-01

    The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of cytokeratin 20 (CK20) mRNA is considered a promising candidate method for the detection of circulating tumour cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood of cancer patients. In this study we have investigated the diagnostic specificity of the CK20 mRNA detection in samples from healthy donors (HD; n = 33), intensive care units patients (ICU; n = 20) and bone marrow obtained from patients suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases (CID; n = 14). RNAs purified from stabilized lysates showed positive results in 24% of the HD group (8/33), 35% of the ICU group (8/20) and in 40% of the CID group (5/14). The use of Ficoll gradients to separate nucleated cells completely restored the specificity of this CK20 RT-PCR assay. The CK20-expressing cells are positively identified to belong to the granulocyte fraction of leucocytes, which appear to express the gene on a background level. Our results demonstrate for the first time that CK20 mRNA expression is not limited to epithelium. Its occurrence in normal granulocytes has to be considered in tests designed to detect circulating cancer cells or micrometastases. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10555760

  10. Dependence of detection limits on angular alignment, substrate type and surface concentration in active mode standoff IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Zuñiga, Carlos A.; Galán-Freyle, Nataly Y.; Castro-Suarez, John R.; Aparicio-Bolaño, Joaquín.; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-05-01

    A standoff multivariate calibration for detection of highly energetic materials (HEM) using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is presented in this report. The procedure consists in standoff sensing at 1 m distance and the variation of three parameters of detection. The first variable considered was the angular dependence: 0° to 45‡ from source-target with respect to alignment of target-detector. The second variable consisted on the use of several surfaces on which the material was deposited. The substrates used were polished aluminum and anodized aluminum. The third variable studied was the dependence on some specific analyte loading surface concentration: from 10 μg/cm2 to200 μg/cm2. The HEM used in this work was PETN, synthesized in our lab. Calibration curves were based on the use of chemometrics routines such as partial least squares (PLS) regression analysis. This algorithm was used to evaluate the impact of the angular dependence about the limits of detection of different HME loadings on aluminum substrates.

  11. Limited Streamer Tube System for Detecting Contamination in the Gas Used in the BaBar Instrumented Flux Return

    SciTech Connect

    Huntley, L.I.; /Franklin - Marshall Coll.

    2006-08-30

    The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) initially installed in the Instrumented Flux Return (IFR) of the BABAR particle detector have proven unreliable and inefficient for detecting muons and neutral hadrons. In the summer of 2004, the BABAR Collaboration began replacing the RPCs with Limited Streamer Tubes (LSTs). LST operation requires a mixture of very pure gases and an operating voltage of 5500 V to achieve maximum efficiency. In the past, the gas supplies obtained by the BABAR Collaboration have contained contaminants that caused the efficiency of the IFR LSTs to drop from approximately 90% to approximately 60%. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a method for testing this gas for contaminants. An LST test system was designed and built using two existing LSTs, one placed 1 cm above the other. These LSTs detect cosmic muons in place of particles created during the BABAR experiment. The effect of gas contamination was mimicked by reducing the operating voltage of the test system in order to lower the detection efficiency. When contaminated gas was simulated, the coincidence rate and the percent coincidence between the LSTs in the test system dropped off significantly, demonstrating that test system can be used as an indicator of gas purity. In the fall of 2006, the LST test system will be installed in the gas storage area near the BABAR facility for the purpose of testing the gas being sent to the IFR.

  12. The Firm Redshift Lower Limit of the Most Distant TeV-detected Blazar PKS 1424+240

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furniss, A.; Williams, D. A.; Danforth, C.; Fumagalli, M.; Prochaska, J. X.; Primack, J.; Urry, C. M.; Stocke, J.; Filippenko, A. V.; Neely, W.

    2013-05-01

    We present the redshift lower limit of z >= 0.6035 for the very high energy (VHE; E >= 100 GeV) emitting blazar PKS 1424+240 (PG 1424+240). This limit is inferred from Lyβ and Lyγ absorption observed in the far-ultraviolet spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. No VHE-detected blazar has shown solid spectroscopic evidence of being more distant. At this distance, VHE observations by VERITAS are shown to sample historically large gamma-ray opacity values at 500 GeV, extending beyond τ = 4 for low-level models of the extragalactic background light (EBL) and beyond τ = 5 for high levels. The majority of the z = 0.6035 absorption-corrected VHE spectrum appears to exhibit a lower flux than an extrapolation of the contemporaneous Large Area Telescope power-law fit beyond 100 GeV. However, the highest energy VERITAS point is the only point showing agreement with this extrapolation, possibly implying the overestimation of the gamma-ray opacity or the onset of an unexpected VHE spectral feature. A curved log parabola is favored when fitting the full range of gamma-ray data (0.5-500 GeV). While fitting the absorption-corrected VHE data alone results in a harder differential power law than that from the full range, the indices derived using three EBL models are consistent with the physically motivated limit set by Fermi acceleration processes.

  13. Finding binaries from phase modulation of pulsating stars with Kepler - IV. Detection limits and radial velocity verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Simon J.; Shibahashi, Hiromoto; Bedding, Timothy R.

    2016-10-01

    We explore the detection limits of the phase modulation (PM) method of finding binary systems among multiperiodic pulsating stars. The method is an attractive way of finding non-transiting planets in the habitable zones of intermediate-mass stars, whose rapid rotation inhibits detections via the radial velocity (RV) method. While oscillation amplitudes of a few mmag are required to find planets, many δ Scuti stars have these amplitudes. In suboptimal cases where the signal to noise of the oscillations is lower, low-mass brown dwarfs (˜13MJup) are detectable at orbital periods longer than about 1 yr, and the lowest mass main-sequence stars (0.1-0.2 M⊙) are detectable at all orbital periods where the PM method can be applied. We use purpose-written Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) software for the calculation of the PM orbits, which offers robust uncertainties for comparison with RV solutions. Using Kepler data and ground-based RVs, we verify that these two methods are in agreement, even at short orbital periods where the PM method undersamples the orbit. We develop new theory to account for the undersampling of the time delays, which is also necessary for the inclusion of RVs as observational data in the MCMC software. We show that combining RVs with time delays substantially refines the orbits because of the complementarity of working in both the spatial (PM) and velocity (RV) domains simultaneously. Software outputs were tested through an extensive hare-and-hounds exercise, covering a wide range of orbital configurations including binaries containing two pulsators.

  14. Methods for automatized detection of rapid changes in lateral boundary condition fields for NWP limited area models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudor, M.

    2015-08-01

    Three-hourly temporal resolution of lateral boundary data for limited area models (LAMs) can be too infrequent to resolve rapidly moving storms. This problem is expected to be worse with increasing horizontal resolution. In order to detect intensive disturbances in surface pressure moving rapidly through the model domain, a filtered surface pressure field (MCUF) is computed operationally in the ARPEGE global model of Météo France. The field is distributed in the coupling files along with conventional meteorological fields used for lateral boundary conditions (LBCs) for the operational forecast using limited area model ALADIN (Aire Limitée Adaptation dynamique Développement InterNational) in the Meteorological and Hydrological Service of Croatia (DHMZ). Here an analysis is performed of the MCUF field for the LACE coupling domain for the period from 23 January 2006, when it became available, until 15 November 2014. The MCUF field is a good indicator of rapidly moving pressure disturbances (RMPDs). Its spatial and temporal distribution can be associated with the usual cyclone tracks and areas known to be supporting cyclogenesis. An alternative set of coupling files from the IFS operational run in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) is also available operationally in DHMZ with 3-hourly temporal resolution, but the MCUF field is not available. Here, several methods are tested that detect RMPDs in surface pressure a posteriori from the IFS model fields provided in the coupling files. MCUF is computed by running ALADIN on the coupling files from IFS. The error function is computed using one-time-step integration of ALADIN on the coupling files without initialization, initialized with digital filter initialization (DFI) or scale-selective DFI (SSDFI). Finally, the amplitude of changes in the mean sea level pressure is computed from the fields in the coupling files. The results are compared to the MCUF field of ARPEGE and the results of same

  15. Taking single virus detection and sizing to the limit with molecular sensitivity: the birth of nanoplasmonic-microcavity hybrid sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, S.

    2013-03-01

    The BioPhotonics community is buzzing at the prospect that ulta-small bio-nanoparticles such as Polio virus and protein can be detected label-free in their native state and sized one at a time. As the awareness that the claim of label-free single protein sensing through the frequency shift of a bare microcavity by A.M. Armani et al in Science in 2007 fades from lack of independent experimental confirmation or a viable physical mechanism to account for the magnitude of the reported wavelength shifts, a new approach has captured the community's interest. It is a product of a marriage between nano-optics and micro-photonics, and is poised to take label-free sensing to the limit.

  16. All-numerical noise filtering of fluorescence signals for achieving ultra-low limit of detection in biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Dongre, Chaitanya; Pollnau, Markus; Hoekstra, Hugo J W M

    2011-03-21

    We present an all-numerical method for post-processing of the fluorescent signal as obtained from labeled molecules by capillary electrophoresis (CE) in an optofluidic chip, on the basis of data filtering in the Fourier domain. It is shown that the method outperforms the well-known lock-in amplification during experiments in the reduction of noise by a factor of (square root)2. The method is illustrated using experimental data obtained during CE separation of molecules from a commercial DNA ladder with 17 fluorescently labeled molecules having different base-pair sizes. An improvement in signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of ∼10 is achieved, resulting in a record-low limit of detection of 210 fM.

  17. Analysis of the Differential Phase Detection Signal in Multi-level Run-Length Limited Read-Only Disk Driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Quanhong; Pei, Jing; Xu, Haizheng; Wang, Lin; Xu, Duanyi

    2006-07-01

    Multilevel run-length-limited (ML-RLL) recording technology could be employed to increase the capacity of the read-only disc without changing optical and mechanical units. In this paper, the tracking error signal (TES) of differential phase detection (DPD) for ML-RLL digital versatile disk (DVD) read-only disk driver is analyzed in both theoretical and experimental way, the uniformity and symmetry of which are worse than that of the DVD read-only disk driver. The variation of peak to peak (PP) value distribution of the DPD signal in open loop of ML-RLL DVD read-only disk driver is about 2.6 times of that of the conventional DVD driver while the asymmetry is about 4 times. It is predicted that some improvements of the tracking servo system are needed in ML-RLL system.

  18. Quantification of selected furocoumarins by high-performance liquid chromatography and UV-detection: capabilities and limits.

    PubMed

    Macmaster, Angus P; Owen, Neil; Brussaux, Sylvain; Brevard, Hugues; Hiserodt, Richard; Leijs, Hans; Bast, Nikola; Weber, Berthold; Loesing, Gerd; Sherlock, Alan; Schippa, Christine; Vey, Matthias; Frérot, Eric; Tissot, Emeline; Chaintreau, Alain

    2012-09-28

    The performance of HPLC-UV as a means of quantifying selected furocoumarins in essential oils has been evaluated, based on a ring test validation approach. Accuracy profiles were generated, to determine bias and statistical confidence associated with determination at different concentrations, along with lower limits of quantification (LOQ). From these findings, it can be concluded that the method described may only be used in simple cases (essential oils), to measure individual furocoumarin compounds at concentrations greater than 10mg/l; the non compound-specific nature of detection by absorption in the UV range is unable to overcome the effect of interferences arising from chromatographic coelutions, such as those encountered in the analysis of complex commercial fragrance mixtures. The use of an algorithmically calculated 'spectral similarity' function, with reference to authentic standards, may be used to improve reliability in assignment and quantification.

  19. Simultaneous inference for longitudinal data with detection limits and covariates measured with errors, with application to AIDS studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lang

    2004-06-15

    In AIDS studies such as HIV viral dynamics, statistical inference is often complicated because the viral load measurements may be subject to left censoring due to a detection limit and time-varying covariates such as CD4 counts may be measured with substantial errors. Mixed-effects models are often used to model the response and the covariate processes in these studies. We propose a unified approach which addresses the censoring and measurement errors simultaneously. We estimate the model parameters by a Monte-Carlo EM algorithm via the Gibbs sampler. A simulation study is conducted to compare the proposed method with the usual two-step method and a naive method. We find that the proposed method produces approximately unbiased estimates with more reliable standard errors. A real data set from an AIDS study is analysed using the proposed method.

  20. Minimum detectable limits of measuring bone mineral density using an energy dispersive X-ray diffraction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allday, A. W.; Farquharson, M. J.

    2001-06-01

    In the clinical environment, the most common method of assessing bone mineral density (BMD) loss is dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), which relies on the transmission of X-ray photons through the volume of interest. Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD), which utilises coherent X-ray scattering, potentially is a more accurate method. As part of the development of a precision EDXRD system, an experiment was performed using a range of bone and fat mix phantoms, which were also used for DEXA evaluation. The results are presented here and suggest initial minimum detectable limits of the order of 5% BMD loss for the EDXRD experiment and 10-15% for the DEXA assessment.

  1. On the importance of direct detection combined limits for spin independent and spin dependent dark matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos, Cristina; Peiró, Miguel; Robles, Sandra E-mail: miguel.peiro@uam.es

    2016-03-01

    In this work we show how the inclusion of dark matter (DM) direct detection upper bounds in a theoretically consistent manner can affect the allowed parameter space of a DM model. Traditionally, the limits from DM direct detection experiments on the elastic scattering cross section of DM particles as a function of their mass are extracted under simplifying assumptions. Relaxing the assumptions related to the DM particle nature, such as the neutron to proton ratio of the interactions, or the possibility of having similar contributions from the spin independent (SI) and spin dependent (SD) interactions can vary significantly the upper limits. Furthermore, it is known that astrophysical and nuclear uncertainties can also affect the upper bounds. To exemplify the impact of properly including all these factors, we have analysed two well motivated and popular DM scenarios: neutralinos in the NMSSM and a Z' portal with Dirac DM. We have found that the allowed parameter space of these models is subject to important variations when one includes both the SI and SD interactions at the same time, realistic neutron to proton ratios, as well as using different self-consistent speed distributions corresponding to popular DM halo density profiles, and distinct SD structure functions. Finally, we provide all the necessary information to include the upper bounds of SuperCDMS and LUX taking into account all these subtleties in the investigation of any particle physics model. The data for each experiment and example codes are available at this site http://goo.gl/1CDFYi, and their use is detailed in the appendices of this work.

  2. The Absolute Gravimeter FG5 - Adjustment and Residual Data Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlob, M.; Braun, A.; Henton, J.; Courtier, N.; Liard, J.

    2009-05-01

    The most widely used method of direct terrestrial gravity determination is performed by using a ballistic absolute gravimeter. Today, the FG5 (Micro-g LaCoste; Lafayette, CO) is the most common free-fall absolute gravimeter. It uses the Michelson-type interferometer to determine the absolute gravity value with accuracies up to one part- per-billion of g. Furthermore, absolute gravimeter measurements can be used to assist in the validation and interpretation of temporal variations of the global gravity field, e.g. from the GRACE mission. In addition, absolute gravimetry allows for monitoring gravity changes which are caused by subsurface mass redistributions and/or vertical displacements. In this study,adjustment software was developed and applied to the raw data sets of FG5#106 and FG5#236, made available by Natural Resources Canada. Both data sets have been collected at the same time and place which leads to an intercomparison of the instruments performance. The adjustment software was validated against the official FG5 software package developed by Micro-g Lacoste. In order to identify potential environmental or instrument disturbances in the observed time series, a Lomb- Scargle periodogram analysis was employed. The absolute gravimeter FG5 is particularly sensitive to low frequencies between 0-3Hz. Hence, the focus of the analysis is to detect signals in the band of 0-100 Hz. An artificial signal was added to the measurements for demonstration purposes. Both the performance of the adjustment software and the Lomb-Scargle analysis will be discussed.

  3. Absolute efficiency measurements with the 10B based Jalousie detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modzel, G.; Henske, M.; Houben, A.; Klein, M.; Köhli, M.; Lennert, P.; Meven, M.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schmidt, U.; Schweika, W.

    2014-04-01

    The 10B based Jalousie detector is a replacement for 3He counter tubes, which are nowadays less affordable for large area detectors due to the 3He crisis. In this paper we investigate and verify the performance of the new 10B based detector concept and its adoption for the POWTEX diffractometer, which is designed for the detection of thermal neutrons with predicted detection efficiencies of 75-50% for neutron energies of 10-100 meV, respectively. The predicted detection efficiency has been verified by absolute measurements using neutrons with a wavelength of 1.17 Å (59 meV).

  4. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  5. ON A SUFFICIENT CONDITION FOR ABSOLUTE CONTINUITY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The formulation of a condition which yields absolute continuity when combined with continuity and bounded variation is the problem considered in the...Briefly, the formulation is achieved through a discussion which develops a proof by contradiction of a sufficiently theorem for absolute continuity which uses in its hypothesis the condition of continuity and bounded variation .

  6. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  7. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  8. Upper limits to the detection of ammonia from protoplanetary disks around HL Tauri and L1551-IRS 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Jose F.; Torrelles, Jose M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge

    1993-01-01

    We present NH3(1, 1) and (2, 2) observations of the young stellar sources HL Tau and L1551-IRS 5 using the VLA in its B-configuration, which provides an angular resolution of about 0.4 arcsec (about 50 AU at 140 pc) at 1.3 cm wavelength. Our goal was to detect and resolve circumstellar molecular disks with radius of the order of 100 AU around these two sources. No ammonia emission was detected toward either of them. The 3-sigma levels were 2.7 mJy/beam and 3.9 mJy/beam for HL Tau and L1551-IRS 5, respectively, with a velocity resolution of about 5 km/s. With this nondetection, we estimate upper limits to the mass of the proposed protoplanetary molecular disks (within a radius of 10 AU from the central stars) on the order of 0.02/(X(NH3)/10 exp -8) solar mass for HL Tau and 0.1/(X(NH3)/10 exp -8) solar mass for L1551-IRS 5.

  9. Shot-noise Limited Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy for Detection of Nitric Oxide Isotopes in Breath, Urine, and Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Nikodem, Michal; Zhang, Eric; Cikach, Frank; Barnes, Jarrod; Comhair, Suzy; Dweik, Raed A.; Kao, Christina; Wysocki, Gerard

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of NO and/or its metabolites in the various body compartments has transformed our understanding of biology. The inability of the current NO measurement methods to account for naturally occurring and experimental NO isotopes, however, has prevented the scientific community from fully understating NO metabolism in vivo. Here we present a mid-IR Faraday rotation spectrometer (FRS) for detection of NO isotopes. The instrument utilizes a novel dual modulation/demodulation (DM) FRS method which exhibits noise performance at only 2 times the fundamental quantum shot-noise level and provides the record sensitivity in its class. This is achieved with a system that is fully autonomous, robust, transportable, and does not require cryogenic cooling. The DM-FRS enables continuous monitoring of nitric oxide isotopes with the detection limits of 3.72 ppbv/Hz1/2 to14NO and 0.53 ppbv/Hz1/2 to15NO using only 45 cm active optical path. This DM-FRS measurement method can be used to improve the performance of conventional FRS sensors targeting other radical species. The feasibility of the instrument to perform measurements relevant to studies of NO metabolism in humans is demonstrated.

  10. Quantifying Efficacy and Limits of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Technology for Weed Seedling Detection as Affected by Sensor Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Peña, José M.; Torres-Sánchez, Jorge; Serrano-Pérez, Angélica; de Castro, Ana I.; López-Granados, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    In order to optimize the application of herbicides in weed-crop systems, accurate and timely weed maps of the crop-field are required. In this context, this investigation quantified the efficacy and limitations of remote images collected with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) for early detection of weed seedlings. The ability to discriminate weeds was significantly affected by the imagery spectral (type of camera), spatial (flight altitude) and temporal (the date of the study) resolutions. The colour-infrared images captured at 40 m and 50 days after sowing (date 2), when plants had 5–6 true leaves, had the highest weed detection accuracy (up to 91%). At this flight altitude, the images captured before date 2 had slightly better results than the images captured later. However, this trend changed in the visible-light images captured at 60 m and higher, which had notably better results on date 3 (57 days after sowing) because of the larger size of the weed plants. Our results showed the requirements on spectral and spatial resolutions needed to generate a suitable weed map early in the growing season, as well as the best moment for the UAV image acquisition, with the ultimate objective of applying site-specific weed management operations. PMID:25756867

  11. Multivariate detection limits of on-line NIR model for extraction process of chlorogenic acid from Lonicera japonica.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhisheng; Sui, Chenglin; Xu, Bing; Ai, Lu; Ma, Qun; Shi, Xinyuan; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2013-04-15

    A methodology is proposed to estimate the multivariate detection limits (MDL) of on-line near-infrared (NIR) model in Chinese Herbal Medicines (CHM) system. In this paper, Lonicera japonica was used as an example, and its extraction process was monitored by on-line NIR spectroscopy. Spectra of on-line NIR could be collected by two fiber optic probes designed to transmit NIR radiation by a 2mm-flange. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used as a reference method to determine the content of chlorogenic acid in the extract solution. Multivariate calibration models were carried out including partial least squares regression (PLS) and interval partial least-squares (iPLS). The result showed improvement of model performance: compared with PLS model, the root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) of iPLS model decreased from 0.111mg to 0.068mg, and the R(2) parameter increased from 0.9434 to 0.9801. Furthermore, MDL values were determined by a multivariate method using the type of errors and concentration ranges. The MDL of iPLS model was about 14ppm, which confirmed that on-line NIR spectroscopy had the ability to detect trace amounts of chlorogenic acid in L. japonica. As a result, the application of on-line NIR spectroscopy for monitoring extraction process in CHM could be very encouraging and reliable.

  12. Quantifying efficacy and limits of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology for weed seedling detection as affected by sensor resolution.

    PubMed

    Peña, José M; Torres-Sánchez, Jorge; Serrano-Pérez, Angélica; de Castro, Ana I; López-Granados, Francisca

    2015-03-06

    In order to optimize the application of herbicides in weed-crop systems, accurate and timely weed maps of the crop-field are required. In this context, this investigation quantified the efficacy and limitations of remote images collected with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) for early detection of weed seedlings. The ability to discriminate weeds was significantly affected by the imagery spectral (type of camera), spatial (flight altitude) and temporal (the date of the study) resolutions. The colour-infrared images captured at 40 m and 50 days after sowing (date 2), when plants had 5-6 true leaves, had the highest weed detection accuracy (up to 91%). At this flight altitude, the images captured before date 2 had slightly better results than the images captured later. However, this trend changed in the visible-light images captured at 60 m and higher, which had notably better results on date 3 (57 days after sowing) because of the larger size of the weed plants. Our results showed the requirements on spectral and spatial resolutions needed to generate a suitable weed map early in the growing season, as well as the best moment for the UAV image acquisition, with the ultimate objective of applying site-specific weed management operations.

  13. Shot-noise Limited Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy for Detection of Nitric Oxide Isotopes in Breath, Urine, and Blood

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin; Nikodem, Michal; Zhang, Eric; Cikach, Frank; Barnes, Jarrod; Comhair, Suzy; Dweik, Raed A.; Kao, Christina; Wysocki, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of NO and/or its metabolites in the various body compartments has transformed our understanding of biology. The inability of the current NO measurement methods to account for naturally occurring and experimental NO isotopes, however, has prevented the scientific community from fully understating NO metabolism in vivo. Here we present a mid-IR Faraday rotation spectrometer (FRS) for detection of NO isotopes. The instrument utilizes a novel dual modulation/demodulation (DM) FRS method which exhibits noise performance at only 2 times the fundamental quantum shot-noise level and provides the record sensitivity in its class. This is achieved with a system that is fully autonomous, robust, transportable, and does not require cryogenic cooling. The DM-FRS enables continuous monitoring of nitric oxide isotopes with the detection limits of 3.72 ppbv/Hz1/2 to14NO and 0.53 ppbv/Hz1/2 to15NO using only 45 cm active optical path. This DM-FRS measurement method can be used to improve the performance of conventional FRS sensors targeting other radical species. The feasibility of the instrument to perform measurements relevant to studies of NO metabolism in humans is demonstrated. PMID:25767064

  14. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete's urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as 'T-equivalent' concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact.

  15. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete’s urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as ‘T-equivalent’ concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact. PMID:26998755

  16. [Study on limit detection of flavones in diterpene ginkgolides meglumine injection materials by LC-MS and HPLC-DAD].

    PubMed

    Bi, Sen; Li, Yan-jing; Huang, Wen-zhe; Kang, Dan-yu; Ding, Gang; Xiao, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Limit test of flavones in diterpene ginkgolides meglumine injection materials by UV-Vis and HPLC-DAD method was studied in this essay. The HPLC-DAD method has lower LOD (about 1% of the UV-Vis), that is, the sensitivity is higher than UV-Vis method. Through the analysis of the kinds of flavonoids ingredients in the samples by LC-MS, the three compounds with highest contents are kaempferol, quercetin and isorhamnetin. Kaempferol, quercetin and isorhamnetin were chosen as reference compounds for HPLC analysis, and the HPLC separation analysis was carried on an Agilent Eclipse plus C18 column (4.6 mm x 250 mm, 5 μm) with methanol and water containing 0.4% phosphoric acid (50: 50) as mobile phase, and the flow rate was 1.0 mL x min(-1). The detection wavelength was set at 360 nm. This method has good specificity, precision and reproducibility. The LODs of quercetin, kaempferide and isorhamnetin were 27.6, 22.3, 29.5 μg x L(-1). The average recovery was 87.9% (RSD 3.3%), 91.7% (RSD 3.1%), 88.3 (RSD 1.3%) for quercetin, kaempferide and isorhamnetin, respectively. Based on the 10 batches of sample results and sensitivity of different HPLC, the content of total flavonoids ingredients of diterpene ginkgolides meglumine injection materials was limited no more than 2 x 10(-5). This method is simple, quick and has good maneuverability, and could be used to the limit test of flavonoids in the diterpene ginkgolides meglumine injection materials.

  17. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  18. What is Needed for Absolute Paleointensity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Many alternative approaches to the Thellier and Thellier technique for absolute paleointensity have been proposed during the past twenty years. One reason is the time consuming aspect of the experiments. Another reason is to avoid uncertainties in determinations of the paleofield which are mostly linked to the presence of multidomain grains. Despite great care taken by these new techniques, there is no indication that they always provide the right answer and in fact sometimes fail. We are convinced that the most valid approach remains the original double heating Thellier protocol provided that natural remanence is controlled by pure magnetite with a narrow distribution of small grain sizes, mostly single domains. The presence of titanium, even in small amount generates biases which yield incorrect field values. Single domain grains frequently dominate the magnetization of glass samples, which explains the success of this selective approach. They are also present in volcanic lava flows but much less frequently, and therefore contribute to the low success rate of most experiments. However the loss of at least 70% of the magnetization at very high temperatures prior to the Curie point appears to be an essential prerequisite that increases the success rate to almost 100% and has been validated from historical flows and from recent studies. This requirement can easily be tested by thermal demagnetization while low temperature experiments can document the detection of single domain magnetite using the δFC/δZFC parameter as suggested (Moskowitz et al, 1993) for biogenic magnetite.

  19. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  20. Estimation of Absolute Protein Quantities of Unlabeled Samples by Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Christina; Claassen, Manfred; Schmidt, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2012-01-01

    For many research questions in modern molecular and systems biology, information about absolute protein quantities is imperative. This information includes, for example, kinetic modeling of processes, protein turnover determinations, stoichiometric investigations of protein complexes, or quantitative comparisons of different proteins within one sample or across samples. To date, the vast majority of proteomic studies are limited to providing relative quantitative comparisons of protein levels between limited numbers of samples. Here we describe and demonstrate the utility of a targeting MS technique for the estimation of absolute protein abundance in unlabeled and nonfractionated cell lysates. The method is based on selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry and the “best flyer” hypothesis, which assumes that the specific MS signal intensity of the most intense tryptic peptides per protein is approximately constant throughout a whole proteome. SRM-targeted best flyer peptides were selected for each protein from the peptide precursor ion signal intensities from directed MS data. The most intense transitions per peptide were selected from full MS/MS scans of crude synthetic analogs. We used Monte Carlo cross-validation to systematically investigate the accuracy of the technique as a function of the number of measured best flyer peptides and the number of SRM transitions per peptide. We found that a linear model based on the two most intense transitions of the three best flying peptides per proteins (TopPep3/TopTra2) generated optimal results with a cross-correlated mean fold error of 1.8 and a squared Pearson coefficient R2 of 0.88. Applying the optimized model to lysates of the microbe Leptospira interrogans, we detected significant protein abundance changes of 39 target proteins upon antibiotic treatment, which correlate well with literature values. The described method is generally applicable and exploits the inherent performance advantages of SRM

  1. Diagnostic Application of Absolute Neutron Activation Analysis in Hematology

    SciTech Connect

    Zamboni, C.B.; Oliveira, L.C.; Dalaqua, L. Jr.

    2004-10-03

    The Absolute Neutron Activation Analysis (ANAA) technique was used to determine element concentrations of Cl and Na in blood of healthy group (male and female blood donators), select from Blood Banks at Sao Paulo city, to provide information which can help in diagnosis of patients. This study permitted to perform a discussion about the advantages and limitations of using this nuclear methodology in hematological examinations.

  2. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM

  3. Absolute realization of low BRDF value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zilong; Liao, Ningfang; Li, Ping; Wang, Yu

    2010-10-01

    Low BRDF value is widespread used in many critical domains such as space and military fairs. These values below 0.1 Sr-1 . So the Absolute realization of these value is the most critical issue in the absolute measurement of BRDF. To develop the Absolute value realization theory of BRDF , defining an arithmetic operators of BRDF , achieving an absolute measurement Eq. of BRDF based on radiance. This is a new theory method to solve the realization problem of low BRDF value. This theory method is realized on a self-designed common double orientation structure in space. By designing an adding structure to extend the range of the measurement system and a control and processing software, Absolute realization of low BRDF value is achieved. A material of low BRDF value is measured in this measurement system and the spectral BRDF value are showed within different angles allover the space. All these values are below 0.4 Sr-1 . This process is a representative procedure about the measurement of low BRDF value. A corresponding uncertainty analysis of this measurement data is given depend on the new theory of absolute realization and the performance of the measurement system. The relative expand uncertainty of the measurement data is 0.078. This uncertainty analysis is suitable for all measurements using the new theory of absolute realization and the corresponding measurement system.

  4. Study of the art: canine olfaction used for cancer detection on the basis of breath odour. Perspectives and limitations.

    PubMed

    Jezierski, Tadeusz; Walczak, Marta; Ligor, Tomasz; Rudnicka, Joanna; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2015-05-06

    Experimental studies using trained dogs to identify breath odour markers of human cancer, published in the recent decade, have been analyzed and compared with the authors' own results. Particular published studies differ as regards the experimental setup, kind of odour samples (breath, urine, tumor tissue, serum), sample collection methods, dogs' characteristics and dog training methods as well as in results presented in terms of detection sensitivity and specificity. Generally it can be stated that trained dogs are able to distinguish breath odour samples typical for patients with lung cancer and other cancers from samples typical for healthy humans at a 'better than by chance' rate. Dogs' indications were positively correlated with content of 2-pentanone and ethyl acetate (r = 0.97 and r = 0.85 respectively) and negatively correlated with 1-propanol and propanal in breath samples (r = -0.98 and -0.87 respectively). The canine method has some advantages as a potential cancer-screening method, due to its non-invasiveness, simplicity of odour sampling and storage, ease of testing and interpretation of results and relatively low costs. Disadvantages and limitations of this method are related to the fact that it is still not known exactly to which chemical compounds and/or their combinations the dogs react. So far it could not be confirmed that dogs are able to sniff out early preclinical cancer stages with approximately the same accuracy as already diagnosed cases. The detection accuracy may vary due to failure in conditioning of dogs, decreasing motivation or confounding factors. The dogs' performance should be systematically checked in rigorous double-blind procedures. Recommendations for methodological standardization have been proposed.

  5. Comparison of nucleic acid extraction platforms for detection of select biothreat agents for use in clinical resource limited settings.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Michelle A; Koehler, Jeffrey W; Kulesh, David A; Minogue, Timothy D

    2012-10-01

    High-quality nucleic acids are critical for optimal PCR-based diagnostics and pathogen detection. Rapid sample processing time is important for the earliest administration of therapeutic and containment measures, especially in the case of biothreat agents. In this context, we compared the Fujifilm QuickGene-Mini80 to Qiagen's QIAamp Mini Purification kits for extraction of DNA and RNA for potential use in austere settings. Qiagen (QIAamp) column-based extraction is the currently recommended purification platform by United States Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases for both DNA and RNA extraction. However, this sample processing system requires dedicated laboratory equipment including a centrifuge. In this study, we investigated the QuickGene-Mini80, which does not require centrifugation, as a suitable platform for nucleic acid extraction for use in resource-limited locations. Quality of the sample extraction was evaluated using pathogen-specific, real-time PCR assays for nucleic acids extracted from viable and γ-irradiated Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, vaccinia virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, or B. anthracis spores in buffer or human whole blood. QuickGene-Mini80 and QIAamp performed similarly for DNA extraction regardless of organism viability. It was noteworthy that γ-irradiation did not have a significant impact on real-time PCR for organism detection. Comparison with QIAamp showed a less than adequate performance of the Fujifilm instrument for RNA extraction. However, QuickGene-Mini80 remains a viable alternative to QIAamp for DNA extraction for use in remote settings due to extraction quality, time efficiency, reduced instrument requirements, and ease of use.

  6. Geometrical configurations of unphased diffraction-limited antennas in passive millimetre-wave imaging systems for concealed weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serenelli, Roberto

    2004-12-01

    This paper analyzes simple imaging configurations to scan a human body, suitable as passive or active millimetre-wave imaging systems for concealed weapon detection (CWD). The first cylindrical configuration allows a 360 degrees scan: N unphased diffraction-limited antennas each of size L are placed on a circular support surrounding the subject (allowing scanning in the horizontal plane with N non-overlapping independent beams), and this circle is mechanically displaced over the whole body height. An analytical formula gives the maximum obtainable spatial resolution for different dimensions of the circular scanning device and operating frequencies, and the number of receivers achieving this optimal resolution. Constraints to be taken into account are diffraction, the usable total length of the circle, and the full coverage by the N beams over the subject, which is modelled as a cylinder with variable radius, coaxial with the scanning circle. Numerical calculations of system resolution are shown for different operating microwave (MW) and millimetre-wave (MMW) frequencies; in order to study off-axis performances, situations where the subject is not coaxial with the scanning device are also considered. For the case of a parallelepiped to be imaged instead of a cylinder, a linear array configuration is analyzed similarly to the circular one. A theoretical study is carried out to design other curved arrays, filled with unphased diffraction-limited antennas, for the imaging of linear subjects with finer resolution. Finally, the application of such configurations is considered for the design of active imaging systems, and different system architectures are discussed.

  7. Eddy-covariance data with low signal-to-noise ratio: time-lag determination, uncertainties and limit of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, B.; Acton, W.; Ammann, C.; Valach, A.; Nemitz, E.

    2015-03-01

    All eddy-covariance flux measurements are associated with random uncertainties which are a combination of sampling error due to natural variability in turbulence and sensor noise. The former is the principal error for systems where the signal-to-noise ratio of the analyser is high, as is usually the case when measuring fluxes of heat, CO2 or H2O. Where signal is limited, which is often the case for measurements of other trace gases and aerosols, instrument uncertainties dominate. We are here applying a consistent approach based on auto- and cross-covariance functions to quantifying the total random flux error and the random error due to instrument noise separately. As with previous approaches, the random error quantification assumes that the time-lag between wind and concentration measurement is known. However, if combined with commonly used automated methods that identify the individual time-lag by looking for the maximum in the cross-covariance function of the two entities, analyser noise additionally leads to a systematic bias in the fluxes. Combining datasets from several analysers and using simulations we show that the method of time-lag determination becomes increasingly important as the magnitude of the instrument error approaches that of the sampling error. The flux bias can be particularly significant for disjunct data, whereas using a prescribed time-lag eliminates these effects (provided the time-lag does not fluctuate unduly over time). We also demonstrate that when sampling at higher elevations, where low frequency turbulence dominates and covariance peaks are broader, both the probability and magnitude of bias are magnified. We show that the statistical significance of noisy flux data can be increased (limit of detection can be decreased) by appropriate averaging of individual fluxes, but only if systematic biases are avoided by using a prescribed time-lag. Finally, we make recommendations for the analysis and reporting of data with low signal

  8. Eddy-covariance data with low signal-to-noise ratio: time-lag determination, uncertainties and limit of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, B.; Acton, W.; Ammann, C.; Valach, A.; Nemitz, E.

    2015-10-01

    All eddy-covariance flux measurements are associated with random uncertainties which are a combination of sampling error due to natural variability in turbulence and sensor noise. The former is the principal error for systems where the signal-to-noise ratio of the analyser is high, as is usually the case when measuring fluxes of heat, CO2 or H2O. Where signal is limited, which is often the case for measurements of other trace gases and aerosols, instrument uncertainties dominate. Here, we are applying a consistent approach based on auto- and cross-covariance functions to quantify the total random flux error and the random error due to instrument noise separately. As with previous approaches, the random error quantification assumes that the time lag between wind and concentration measurement is known. However, if combined with commonly used automated methods that identify the individual time lag by looking for the maximum in the cross-covariance function of the two entities, analyser noise additionally leads to a systematic bias in the fluxes. Combining data sets from several analysers and using simulations, we show that the method of time-lag determination becomes increasingly important as the magnitude of the instrument error approaches that of the sampling error. The flux bias can be particularly significant for disjunct data, whereas using a prescribed time lag eliminates these effects (provided the time lag does not fluctuate unduly over time). We also demonstrate that when sampling at higher elevations, where low frequency turbulence dominates and covariance peaks are broader, both the probability and magnitude of bias are magnified. We show that the statistical significance of noisy flux data can be increased (limit of detection can be decreased) by appropriate averaging of individual fluxes, but only if systematic biases are avoided by using a prescribed time lag. Finally, we make recommendations for the analysis and reporting of data with low signal

  9. Metal Stable Isotope Tagging: Renaissance of Radioimmunoassay for Multiplex and Absolute Quantification of Biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Shixi; Wei, Chao; Xing, Zhi; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2016-05-17

    The unambiguous quantification of biomolecules is of great significance in fundamental biological research as well as practical clinical diagnosis. Due to the lack of a detectable moiety, the direct and highly sensitive quantification of biomolecules is often a "mission impossible". Consequently, tagging strategies to introduce detectable moieties for labeling target biomolecules were invented, which had a long and significant impact on studies of biomolecules in the past decades. For instance, immunoassays have been developed with radioisotope tagging by Yalow and Berson in the late 1950s. The later languishment of this technology can be almost exclusively ascribed to the use of radioactive isotopes, which led to the development of nonradioactive tagging strategy-based assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, fluorescent immunoassay, and chemiluminescent and electrochemiluminescent immunoassay. Despite great success, these strategies suffered from drawbacks such as limited spectral window capacity for multiplex detection and inability to provide absolute quantification of biomolecules. After recalling the sequences of tagging strategies, an apparent question is why not use stable isotopes from the start? A reasonable explanation is the lack of reliable means for accurate and precise quantification of stable isotopes at that time. The situation has changed greatly at present, since several atomic mass spectrometric measures for metal stable isotopes have been developed. Among the newly developed techniques, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is an ideal technique to determine metal stable isotope-tagged biomolecules, for its high sensitivity, wide dynamic linear range, and more importantly multiplex and absolute quantification ability. Since the first published report by our group, metal stable isotope tagging has become a revolutionary technique and gained great success in biomolecule quantification. An exciting research highlight in this area

  10. Combination of high spatial resolution and low minimum detection limit using thinned specimens in cutting-edge electron probe microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Yugo; Hamada, Kotaro

    2015-10-01

    The effect of sample thickness on the spatial resolution and minimum detection limit (MDL) has been investigated for field-emission electron probe microanalysis with wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FE-EPMA-WDX). Indium gallium phosphide samples thinned to thicknesses of about 100, 130, 210, 310, and 430 nm provided effective thin-sample FE-EPMA-WDX in the resolution range of 40-350 nm and MDL range of 13,000-600 ppm (mass). A comparison of the FE-EPMA results for thin and bulk samples demonstrated that thin-sample FE-EPMA can achieve both higher sensitivity and better spatial resolution than is possible using bulk samples. Most of the X-rays that determine the MDL are generated in a surface region of the sample with a depth of approximately 300 nm. The spatial resolution and MDL can be tuned by the sample thickness. Furthermore, analysis of small amounts of Cl in SiO2 indicated that thin-sample FE-EPMA can realize a spatial resolution and MDL of 41 nm and 446 ppm at Iprob=50 nA, respectively, whereas bulk-sample FE-EPMA offers a resolution of only 348 nm and MDL of 426 ppm.

  11. Improving the detection limits of antispasmodic drugs electrodes by using modified membrane sensors with inner solid contact.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hosny; Issa, Y M; Abu-Shawish, Hazem M

    2007-05-09

    Three coated wire electrodes (CWEs) for the antispasmodic drugs; dicyclomine (Dc), mebeverine (Mv) and drotaverine (Dv) hydrochlorides were developed. Each electrode based on ion-associate of a heteropoly anion with the drug cation incorporated in membrane sensor modified with graphite and deposited on silver internal solid contact. The influence of addition of graphite to the membranes and the type of the internal solid contact on the potentiometric responses of the electrodes was investigated. The characteristics of the new electrodes were compared to the characteristics of previously reported traditional liquid inner contact electrodes of the same drugs. The lower detection limits of the proposed electrodes were somewhat better than those observed with the corresponding liquid contact ISEs and reached (1.2-2.0)x10(-7)M. The potentiometric selectivity of the CWEs revealed a significant improvement and much faster response times compared to the liquid contact ISEs. The practical utility of each electrode has been demonstrated by using it successfully in potentiometric determination of its respective drug in pharmaceutical preparations both in batch and flow injection conditions. Each electrode was also used as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of the drug against standard silicotungstic acid and in potentiometric determination of the drug concentration in urine samples.

  12. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  13. Magnifying absolute instruments for optically homogeneous regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tyc, Tomas

    2011-09-15

    We propose a class of magnifying absolute optical instruments with a positive isotropic refractive index. They create magnified stigmatic images, either virtual or real, of optically homogeneous three-dimensional spatial regions within geometrical optics.

  14. The Simplicity Argument and Absolute Morality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the author has maintained that there is a similarity of thought to be found in the writings of Cudworth, Emerson, and Husserl in his investigation of an absolute system of morality. (Author/RK)

  15. Absolute Measurements Of Methane On Mars: The Current Status.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, G. L.; Novak, R. E.; Hewagama, T.; Bonev, B. P.; DiSanti, M. A.; Smith, M. D.

    2008-09-01

    Our study of methane on Mars now extends over three Mars years, sampling a wide range of seasons with significant spatial coverage. Three spectrometer-telescope combinations were used. With the spectrometer slit oriented North-South on the planet, we obtain simultaneous spectra at latitudes along the central meridian. Successive longitudes are sampled as the planet rotates, and the combination then permits partial mapping of the planet. We earlier reported differential detections of methane and water on Mars. Here, we present absolute extractions of methane, based on improved analytical procedures developed since 2005. We now identify and correct instrumental effects such as variations in resolving power along the slit, second-order optical fringe removal, and correction of (minor) internal scattered light. We synthesize the fully-resolved terrestrial transmittance spectrum, convolve it to the instrumental resolution, and subtract it from the measured Mars-Earth spectrum. Fraunhofer lines are removed from the residual Mars spectra along with spectral lines of water and of (newly identified by us) carbon dioxide isotopomers. The residuals are then inspected for signatures of methane and other possible trace constituents such as HDO and H2O (Villanueva et al., this Conference). On certain dates, the residual spectra display spectral lines at the Doppler-shifted positions expected for methane on Mars. The positive indications favor certain seasons (e.g., Ls = 121° & 155°) and locations. Mixing ratios derived from those residuals (up to 60 ppb) greatly exceed upper limits obtained at other seasons (e.g., < 3ppb at Ls = 17°) these variations could be consistent with episodic release. The CH4 spatial extent requires transport over large distances (coupled with eddy diffusion), and destruction lifetimes of order one year. Details will be presented and implications will be discussed. This work was supported by NASA's Astrobiology, Planetary Astronomy, and Postdoctoral

  16. Absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, O. A.

    1993-11-01

    The program SEEF is a Fortran IV computer code for the extraction of absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions. When the evaporation residue is fed by its parents, only cumulative cross sections will be obtained from off-line gamma ray measurements. But, if one has the parent excitation function (experimental or calculated), this code will make it possible to determine absolute cross sections of any exit channel.

  17. Kelvin and the absolute temperature scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlichson, Herman

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the absolute temperature scale of Kelvin (William Thomson). Kelvin found that Carnot's axiom about heat being a conserved quantity had to be abandoned. Nevertheless, he found that Carnot's fundamental work on heat engines was correct. Using the concept of a Carnot engine Kelvin found that Q1/Q2 = T1/T2. Thermometers are not used to obtain absolute temperatures since they are calculated temperatures.

  18. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath plate interiors may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the sub-asthenospheric mantle. Here we analyze two global sets of shear-wave splitting data, that of Kreemer [2009] and an updated and expanded data set, to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. We also explore the effect of using geologically current plate velocities (i.e., the MORVEL set of angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]) compared with geodetically current plate velocities (i.e., the GSRM v1.2 angular velocities [Kreemer et al. 2014]). We demonstrate that the errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. The SKS-MORVEL absolute plate angular velocities (based on the Kreemer [2009] data set) are determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2° ) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6° ). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4° ) than for continental

  19. Simultaneously improving the sensitivity and absolute accuracy of CPT magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shang-Qing; Yang, Guo-Qing; Xu, Yun-Fei; Lin, Qiang; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Chen, Zheng-Xiang

    2014-03-24

    A new method to improve the sensitivity and absolute accuracy simultaneously for coherent population trapping (CPT) magnetometer based on the differential detection method is presented. Two modulated optical beams with orthogonal circular polarizations are applied, in one of which two magnetic resonances are excited simultaneously by modulating a 3.4GHz microwave with Larmor frequency. When a microwave frequency shift is introduced, the difference in the power transmitted through the cell in each beam shows a low noise resonance. The sensitivity of 2pT/Hz @ 10Hz is achieved. Meanwhile, the absolute accuracy of ± 0.5nT within the magnetic field ranging from 20000nT to 100000nT is realized.

  20. Self consistent, absolute calibration technique for photon number resolving detectors.

    PubMed

    Avella, A; Brida, G; Degiovanni, I P; Genovese, M; Gramegna, M; Lolli, L; Monticone, E; Portesi, C; Rajteri, M; Rastello, M L; Taralli, E; Traina, P; White, M

    2011-11-07

    Well characterized photon number resolving detectors are a requirement for many applications ranging from quantum information and quantum metrology to the foundations of quantum mechanics. This prompts the necessity for reliable calibration techniques at the single photon level. In this paper we propose an innovative absolute calibration technique for photon number resolving detectors, using a pulsed heralded photon source based on parametric down conversion. The technique, being absolute, does not require reference standards and is independent upon the performances of the heralding detector. The method provides the results of quantum efficiency for the heralded detector as a function of detected photon numbers. Furthermore, we prove its validity by performing the calibration of a Transition Edge Sensor based detector, a real photon number resolving detector that has recently demonstrated its effectiveness in various quantum information protocols.

  1. The importance and attainment of accurate absolute radiometric calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of accurate absolute radiometric calibration is discussed by reference to the needs of those wishing to validate or use models describing the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with the atmosphere and earth surface features. The in-flight calibration methods used for the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and the Systeme Probatoire d'Observation de la Terre, Haute Resolution visible (SPOT/HRV) systems are described and their limitations discussed. The questionable stability of in-flight absolute calibration methods suggests the use of a radiative transfer program to predict the apparent radiance, at the entrance pupil of the sensor, of a ground site of measured reflectance imaged through a well characterized atmosphere. The uncertainties of such a method are discussed.

  2. Determination of absolute internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorri, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Papadakis, P.; Konki, J.; Cox, D. M.; Auranen, K.; Partanen, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Uusitalo, J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Smallcombe, J.; Davies, P. J.; Barton, C. J.; Jenkins, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    A non-reference based method to determine internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer is carried out for transitions in the nuclei of 154Sm, 152Sm and 166Yb. The Normalised-Peak-to-Gamma method is in general an efficient tool to extract internal conversion coefficients. However, in many cases the required well-known reference transitions are not available. The data analysis steps required to determine absolute internal conversion coefficients with the SAGE spectrometer are presented. In addition, several background suppression methods are introduced and an example of how ancillary detectors can be used to select specific reaction products is given. The results obtained for ground-state band E2 transitions show that the absolute internal conversion coefficients can be extracted using the methods described with a reasonable accuracy. In some cases of less intense transitions only an upper limit for the internal conversion coefficient could be given.

  3. Changes in respiratory function impairment following the treatment of severe pulmonary tuberculosis – limitations for the underlying COPD detection

    PubMed Central

    Radovic, Milan; Ristic, Lidija; Ciric, Zorica; Dinic-Radovic, Violeta; Stankovic, Ivana; Pejcic, Tatjana; Rancic, Milan; Bogdanovic, Dragan

    2016-01-01

    Background During the treatment phase of active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), respiratory function impairment is usually restrictive. This may become obstructive, as a PTB-associated airflow obstruction (AFO) or as a later manifestation of underlying COPD. Purpose The aim of the study was to examine the potential causes and risks for AFO development in PTB by exploring the aspects of spirometry limitations and clinical implications for the underlying COPD detection, taking into account various confounding factors. Patients and methods Prospective, nest case–control study on 40 new cases of PTB with initial restrictive respiratory function impairment, diagnosed and treated according to the directly observed treatment short course (DOTS) strategy. Results From all observed patients, 37.5% of them developed AFO upon the completion of PTB treatment, with significantly increased average of forced vital capacity (%) (P<0.01). Their changes in forced expiratory volume in the first second (%) during the PTB treatment were strongly associated with the air pollution exposure in living (0.474%–20.971% for 95% confidence interval [CI]; P=0.041) and working environments (3.928%–20.379% for 95% CI; P=0.005), initial radiological extent of PTB lesions (0.018%–0.700% for 95% CI; P=0.047), leukocyte count (0.020%–1.328% for 95% CI; P=0.043), and C-reactive protein serum level (0.046%–0.205% for 95% CI; P=0.003) compared to the other patients. The multivariate logistic regression analysis model shows initial radiological extent of pulmonary tuberculosis lesions (OR 1.01–1.05 for 95% CI; P=0.02) and sputum conversion rate on culture (OR 1.02–1.68 for 95% CI; P=0.04) as the most significant predictors for the risk of AFO development. Conclusion AFO upon PTB treatment is a common manifestation of underlying COPD, which mostly occurs later, during the reparative processes in active PTB, even in the absence of major risk factors, such as cigarette smoking and biomass fuel

  4. Absolute measurements of the cosmic microwave background from Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station

    SciTech Connect

    Bersanelli, S.; Bonelli, G.; Sironi, G. ); Levin, S. ); Smoot, G.F.; Bensadoun, M.; De Amici, G.; Limon, M.; Vinje, W. )

    1993-01-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background play a central role in modern cosmology. The existence of the CMB as a remanent of the early Universe has constituted a pillar for the Big Bang scenario. The recent cosmic background explorer differential microwave radiometer results have provided further support to the generally accepted standard model by detecting for the first time primordial fluctuations in the CMB field at the limits expected by structure formation theories. An international program of ground-based absoluted measurements of the CMB at the centimeter and multicentimeter wavelengths was initiated in 1982. This paper reports results at the South Pole, one of a few areas of low-background environments. 12 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Single-track absolute position encoding method based on spatial frequency of stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xiansong; Lu, Yancong; Wei, Chunlong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A new method of single-track absolute position encoding based on spatial frequency of stripes is proposed. Instead of using pseudorandom-sequence arranged stripes as in conventional situations, this kind of encoding method stores the location information in the frequency space of the stripes, which means the spatial frequency of stripes varies with position and indicates position. This encoding method has a strong fault-tolerant capability with single-stripe detecting errors. The method can be applied to absolute linear encoders, absolute photoelectric angle encoders or two-dimensional absolute linear encoders. The measuring apparatus includes a CCD image sensor and a microscope system, and the method of decoding this frequency code is based on FFT algorithm. This method should be highly interesting for practical applications as an absolute position encoding method.

  6. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: technique, new features, and detection limits of trace elements in Al base alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegazy, H.; Abdel-Wahab, E. A.; Abdel-Rahim, F. M.; Allam, S. H.; Nossair, A. M. A.

    2014-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has proven to be extremely versatile, providing multielement analysis in real time without sample preparation. The principle is based on the ablation of a small amount of target material by interaction of a strong laser beam with a solid target. The laser must have sufficient energy to excite atoms and to ionize them to produce plasma. We aimed to improve the LIBS limit of detection (LOD) and the precision of spectral lines emitted from the produced plasma by optimizing the parameters affecting the LIBS technique. LIBS LOD is affected by many experimental parameters such as interferences, self-absorption, spectral overlap, signal-to-noise ratio, and matrix effects. The plasma in the present study is generated by focusing a 6-ns pulsed Nd-YAG laser at the fundamental wavelength of 1,064 nm onto the Al target in air at atmospheric pressure. The emission spectra are recorded using an SE 200 Echelle spectrometer manufactured by the Catalina Corporation; it is equipped with an ICCD camera type Andor model iStar DH734-18. This spectrometer allows time-resolved spectral acquisition over the whole UV-NIR (200-1,000 nm) spectral range. Calibration curves for Cu, Mg, Mn, Si, Cr, and Fe were obtained with linear regression coefficients around 99 % on the average in aluminum standard alloy samples. The determined LOD has very useful improvements for Cu I at 521.85 nm, Si I at 288.15 nm, Mn I at 482.34 nm, and Cr I at 520.84 nm spectral lines. LOD is improved by 83.8 % for Cu, 49 % for Si, 84.3 % for Mn, and 45 % for Cr lower with respect to the previous works.

  7. Limited value of PCR for detection of Toxoplasma gondii in blood from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Franzen, C; Altfeld, M; Hegener, P; Hartmann, P; Arendt, G; Jablonowski, H; Rockstroh, J; Diehl, V; Salzberger, B; Fätkenheuer, G

    1997-01-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis is a common, opportunistic, and often life-threatening disease in HIV-infected patients. Diagnosis is supported mainly by clinical evidence and computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scans, but brain images may share features with other brain diseases occurring in HIV-infected patients. To determine the diagnostic value of PCR for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii in blood from HIV-infected patients, we examined 89 blood samples from 59 HIV-infected patients. PCR and Southern blot hybridization were done with DNA extracted from blood samples from 20 patients with confirmed cerebral toxoplasmosis and from 10 patients with suspected but not confirmed cerebral toxoplasmosis. The samples were taken before and 7 to 10 days after the beginning of antiparasitic therapy. For 9 patients who suffered from cerebral toxoplasmosis more than 6 months prior to the study and for 20 patients without any evidence for toxoplasmosis only one blood sample per patient was examined. PCR gave positive results with 5 of the 20 blood samples from patients who suffered from cerebral toxoplasmosis. After 7 to 10 days of therapy PCR results became negative in all these five cases. No amplification was seen with DNA from blood samples from the other 54 patients as the target. The results presented here show that PCR testing of blood samples from HIV-infected patients is of limited value for the diagnosis of cerebral toxoplasmosis. The sensitivity was only 25%, but the specificity was very high (100%), so this technique may be useful for discriminating between cerebral toxoplasmosis and other brain diseases which may be mistaken for toxoplasmosis. PMID:9316922

  8. BACKGROUND TRACK DENSITY REDUCTION OF 50-HZ-HV ECE-PROCESSED THICK POLYCARBONATE DETECTORS TO IMPROVE LOWER DETECTION LIMIT.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, M; Hakimi, A; Soltani, Z

    2016-12-01

    A recent novel development of 50-Hz-HV ECE of 1-mm-thick and 250-µm-thick polycarbonate track detectors (PCTDs) has proved some promising results for some health physics, dosimetry and ion-beam-related applications. The method while proved having some good characteristics for some applications provided a relatively higher background track density (BGTD) in particular when very high voltages are applied to the PCTDs. In order to decrease the minimum detection limit (MDL) of the PCTDs and to further promote its applications for low dose, the BGTD was reduced by applying a layer removal methodology applying ethylendiamine (EDA). The effects of EDA concentrations (50, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85 and 90 %) in water at room temperature (26°C) and soaking durations up to 100 min at different EDA concentration on BGTD reduction were studied. The thickness of the layer removed from the surface of a PCTD highly depends on the soaking time and EDA concentration; it increases as the EDA concentration increases up to for example 700 µm after 2 h of soaking in the EDA solution. After ∼10 min of soaking duration at any of the above-stated concentrations, the BGTD reaches its minimum value, a value which differs from concentration to concentration. An EDA concentration of 85 % in water provided the lowest BGTD of 64.06 ± 3.12 tracks cm(- 2); ∼6 times lower than that of its original value. It is shown that the layer removal process does not change the registration characteristics of the PCTD and its appearance significantly. The MDL of the PCTDs depends strongly on the BGTD. The MDL values for a desired confidence level were also studied by three calculation methods. The results of the BGTD and the MDL studies under different conditions applied are presented and discussed.

  9. Interaction of cosmic ray muons with spent nuclear fuel dry casks and determination of lower detection limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzidakis, S.; Choi, C. K.; Tsoukalas, L. H.

    2016-08-01

    The potential non-proliferation monitoring of spent nuclear fuel sealed in dry casks interacting continuously with the naturally generated cosmic ray muons is investigated. Treatments on the muon RMS scattering angle by Moliere, Rossi-Greisen, Highland and, Lynch-Dahl were analyzed and compared with simplified Monte Carlo simulations. The Lynch-Dahl expression has the lowest error and appears to be appropriate when performing conceptual calculations for high-Z, thick targets such as dry casks. The GEANT4 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate dry casks with various fuel loadings and scattering variance estimates for each case were obtained. The scattering variance estimation was shown to be unbiased and using Chebyshev's inequality, it was found that 106 muons will provide estimates of the scattering variances that are within 1% of the true value at a 99% confidence level. These estimates were used as reference values to calculate scattering distributions and evaluate the asymptotic behavior for small variations on fuel loading. It is shown that the scattering distributions between a fully loaded dry cask and one with a fuel assembly missing initially overlap significantly but their distance eventually increases with increasing number of muons. One missing fuel assembly can be distinguished from a fully loaded cask with a small overlapping between the distributions which is the case of 100,000 muons. This indicates that the removal of a standard fuel assembly can be identified using muons providing that enough muons are collected. A Bayesian algorithm was developed to classify dry casks and provide a decision rule that minimizes the risk of making an incorrect decision. The algorithm performance was evaluated and the lower detection limit was determined.

  10. Validity and limitation of manual rotational test to detect impaired visual-vestibular interaction due to cerebellar disorders.

    PubMed

    Murai, Norihiko; Funabiki, Kazuo; Naito, Yasushi; Ito, Juichi; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate validity and limitation of the novel infrared system to record and analyze horizontal visual-vestibular interaction using whole-body rotation rapidly and conveniently in the routine vestibular clinic. We examined 11 patients with cerebellar dysequilibrium and 25 patients with peripheral dysequilibrium for vestibulo-ocular reflex in darkness (DVOR), visually-enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex (VEVOR), and fixation suppression of vestibulo-ocular reflex (FSVOR), and compared the results with those of examination for head-fixed smooth pursuit and fixation suppression during caloric stimulation. The manual rotation stimuli were 0.5-0.75 Hz in frequency and 60-90 degrees /s in maximal angular velocity. Gain of vestibulo-ocular reflex in darkness was not significantly correlated with maximal slow phase velocity (MSPV) of caloric-induced nystagmus at that stimulus condition either in patients with peripheral dysequilibrium or in those with cerebellar dysequilibrium. An index for fixation suppression of vestibulo-ocular reflex during rotation stimulus was significantly lower in patients with cerebellar dysequilibrium than in normal control subjects and those with peripheral dysequilibrium. On the other hand, there was no significant difference among the two disease groups and the normal control group in gain of visually-enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex. In about a half of patients with cerebellar dysequilibrium, measured smooth pursuit gain was lower than estimated smooth pursuit gain calculated based on a simple superposition theory of vestibulo-ocular reflex and smooth pursuit. Testing fixation suppression using the present system is an unusually convenient tool for detection of cerebellar dysequilibrium.

  11. Label-Free Absolute Quantitation of Oligosaccharides Using Multiple Reaction Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An absolute quantitation method for measuring free human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) in milk samples was developed using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). To obtain the best sensitivity, the instrument conditions were optimized to reduce the source and postsource fragmentation prior to the quadrupole transmission. Fragmentation spectra of HMOs using collision-induced dissociation were studied to obtain the best characteristic fragments. At least two MRM transitions were used to quantify and identify each structure in the same run. The fragment ions corresponded to the production of singly charged mono-, di-, and trisaccharide fragments. The sensitivity and accuracy of the quantitation using MRM were determined, with the detection limit in the femtomole level and the calibration range spanning over 5 orders of magnitude. Seven commercial HMO standards were used to create calibration curves and were used to determine a universal response for all HMOs. The universal response factor was used to estimate absolute amounts of other structures and the total oligosaccharide content in milk. The quantitation method was applied to 20 human milk samples to determine the variations in HMO concentrations from women classified as secretors and nonsecretors, a phenotype that can be identified by the concentration of 2′-fucosylation in their milk. PMID:24502421

  12. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 425 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Table. S=standard deviation of the replicate analyses. (b) The 95 percent confidence limits for the MDL... where MDLLCL and MDLUCL are the lower and upper 95 percent confidence limits respectively based on seven... (12, 1−a=.99) (e) The 95 percent confidence limits for MDL derived in 7c are computed according to...

  13. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed.

  14. The use of X-ray crystallography to determine absolute configuration.

    PubMed

    Flack, H D; Bernardinelli, G

    2008-05-15

    Essential background on the determination of absolute configuration by way of single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) is presented. The use and limitations of an internal chiral reference are described. The physical model underlying the Flack parameter is explained. Absolute structure and absolute configuration are defined and their similarities and differences are highlighted. The necessary conditions on the Flack parameter for satisfactory absolute-structure determination are detailed. The symmetry and purity conditions for absolute-configuration determination are discussed. The physical basis of resonant scattering is briefly presented and the insights obtained from a complete derivation of a Bijvoet intensity ratio by way of the mean-square Friedel difference are exposed. The requirements on least-squares refinement are emphasized. The topics of right-handed axes, XRD intensity measurement, software, crystal-structure evaluation, errors in crystal structures, and compatibility of data in their relation to absolute-configuration determination are described. Characterization of the compounds and crystals by the physicochemical measurement of optical rotation, CD spectra, and enantioselective chromatography are presented. Some simple and some complex examples of absolute-configuration determination using combined XRD and CD measurements, using XRD and enantioselective chromatography, and in multiply-twinned crystals clarify the technique. The review concludes with comments on absolute-configuration determination from light-atom structures.

  15. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  16. Triple quad ICPMS (ICPQQQ) as a new tool for absolute quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Diez Fernández, Silvia; Sugishama, Naoki; Ruiz Encinar, Jorge; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2012-07-17

    It is clear that sensitive and interference-free quantification of ICP-detectable elements naturally present in proteins will boost the role of ICPMS in proteomics. In this study, a completely new way of polyatomic interference removal in ICPMS for detection of sulfur (present in the majority of proteins as methionine or cysteine) and phosphorus (present in phosphorylated proteins) is presented. It is based on the concept of tandem mass spectrometry (QQQ) typically used in molecular MS. Briefly, the first quadrupole can be operated as 1 amu window band-pass mass filter to select target analyte ions ((31)P, (32)S, and their on-mass polyatomic interferences). In this way, only selected ions enter the cell and react with O(2), reducing the interferences produced by matrix ions as well as background noise. After optimization of the cell conditions, product ions formed for the targets, (47)PO(+) and (48)SO(+), could be detected with enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. The coupling to capillary HPLC allowed analysis of S- and P-containing species with the lowest detection limits ever published (11 and 6.6 fmol, respectively). The potential of the approach for proteomics studies was demonstrated for the highly sensitive simultaneous absolute quantification of different S-containing peptides and phosphopeptides.

  17. Quantitative standards for absolute linguistic universals.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Steven T; Gibson, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Absolute linguistic universals are often justified by cross-linguistic analysis: If all observed languages exhibit a property, the property is taken to be a likely universal, perhaps specified in the cognitive or linguistic systems of language learners and users. In many cases, these patterns are then taken to motivate linguistic theory. Here, we show that cross-linguistic analysis will very rarely be able to statistically justify absolute, inviolable patterns in language. We formalize two statistical methods--frequentist and Bayesian--and show that in both it is possible to find strict linguistic universals, but that the numbers of independent languages necessary to do so is generally unachievable. This suggests that methods other than typological statistics are necessary to establish absolute properties of human language, and thus that many of the purported universals in linguistics have not received sufficient empirical justification.

  18. Interferometric Astrometry of Proxima Centauri and Barnard's Star Using HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Fine Guidance Sensor 3: Detection Limits for Substellar Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, G. Fritz; McArthur, Barbara; Chappell, D. W.; Nelan, E.; Jefferys, W. H.; van Altena, W.; Lee, J.; Cornell, D.; Shelus, P. J.; Hemenway, P. D.; Franz, Otto G.; Wasserman, L. H.; Duncombe, R. L.; Story, D.; Whipple, A. L.; Fredrick, L. W.

    1999-08-01

    We report on a substellar-companion search utilizing interferometric fringe-tracking astrometry acquired with Fine Guidance Sensor 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope. Our targets were Proxima Centauri and Barnard's star. We obtain absolute parallax values of pi_abs=0.7687"+/-0.0003" for Proxima Cen and pi_abs=0.5454"+/-0.0003" for Barnard's star. Once low-amplitude instrumental systematic errors are identified and removed, our companion detection sensitivity is less than or equal to one Jupiter mass for periods longer than 60 days for Proxima Cen. Between the astrometry and the recent radial velocity results of Kürster et al., we exclude all companions with M>0.8M_Jup for the range of periods 1 daydetection sensitivity is less than or equal to one Jupiter mass for periods longer than 150 days. Our null results for Barnard's star are consistent with those reported by Gatewood in 1995.

  19. Absolute Distance Measurement with the MSTAR Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Peters, Robert; Burger, Johan; Ahn, Seh-Won; Steier, William H.; Fetterman, Harrold R.; Chang, Yian

    2003-01-01

    The MSTAR sensor (Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging) is a new system for measuring absolute distance, capable of resolving the integer cycle ambiguity of standard interferometers, and making it possible to measure distance with sub-nanometer accuracy. The sensor uses a single laser in conjunction with fast phase modulators and low frequency detectors. We describe the design of the system - the principle of operation, the metrology source, beamlaunching optics, and signal processing - and show results for target distances up to 1 meter. We then demonstrate how the system can be scaled to kilometer-scale distances.

  20. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed.

  1. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 136 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11 B Appendix B to Part 136 Protection of Environment... FOR THE ANALYSIS OF POLLUTANTS Pt. 136, App. B Appendix B to Part 136—Definition and Procedure for the... corresponds to an instrument signal/noise in the range of 2.5 to 5. (b) The concentration equivalent of...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 136 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11 B Appendix B to Part 136 Protection of Environment... FOR THE ANALYSIS OF POLLUTANTS Pt. 136, App. B Appendix B to Part 136—Definition and Procedure for the... corresponds to an instrument signal/noise in the range of 2.5 to 5. (b) The concentration equivalent of...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 136 - Definition and Procedure for the Determination of the Method Detection Limit-Revision 1.11

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... processing steps of the analytical method be included in the determination of the method detection limit. The... corresponds to an instrument signal/noise in the range of 2.5 to 5. (b) The concentration equivalent of three.... Interferences are defined as systematic errors in the measured analytical signal of an established...

  4. A method to estimate the absolute ultrasonic nonlinearity parameter from relative measurements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongbeom; Song, Dong-Gi; Jhang, Kyung-Young

    2017-02-17

    The ultrasonic nonlinearity parameter, β, is determined from the displacement amplitude of the second-order harmonic frequency component generated during the propagation of ultrasonic waves through a material. This parameter is generally referred to as the absolute parameter. Meanwhile, it is difficult to measure the small displacement amplitude of the second-order harmonic component; therefore, most studies measure the relative parameter determined from the detected signal amplitude. However, for quantitative assessment of material degradation, the absolute parameter is still required. This study proposes a method to estimate the absolute parameter for damaged material by measuring the relative parameter. This method is based on the fact that the fractional ratio of the relative parameters between different materials is identical to that of the absolute parameters after compensation for material dependent differences such as the wavenumber and detection-sensitivity. In order to experimentally verify the method, the relative parameters of heat-treated Al6061-T6 alloy specimens with different aging times were measured to compare with absolute parameters directly measured by piezo-electric detection. The results show that the fluctuations of both parameters with respect to aging time were very similar to each other, and that the absolute parameters estimated by the proposed method were in good agreement with those measured directly.

  5. Comparative vs. Absolute Judgments of Trait Desirability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstee, Willem K. B.

    1970-01-01

    Reversals of trait desirability are studied. Terms indicating conservativw behavior appeared to be judged relatively desirable in comparative judgement, while traits indicating dynamic and expansive behavior benefited from absolute judgement. The reversal effect was shown to be a general one, i.e. reversals were not dependent upon the specific…

  6. New Techniques for Absolute Gravity Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-07

    Hammond, J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J. A., and Iliff, R. L. (1979) The AFGL absolute gravity system...International Gravimetric Bureau, No. L:I-43. 7. Hammond. J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J.A., and

  7. An Absolute Electrometer for the Physics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.; Cartacci, A.

    2009-01-01

    A low-cost, easy-to-use absolute electrometer is presented: two thin metallic plates and an electronic balance, usually available in a laboratory, are used. We report on the very good performance of the device that allows precise measurements of the force acting between two charged plates. (Contains 5 footnotes, 2 tables, and 6 figures.)

  8. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  9. Absolute Positioning Using the Global Positioning System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has becom a useful tool In providing relativ survey...Includes the development of a low cost navigator for wheeled vehicles. ABSTRACT The Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has become a useful tool In providing...technique of absolute or point positioning involves the use of a single Global Positioning System ( GPS ) receiver to determine the three-dimenslonal

  10. Absolute Radiation Thermometry in the NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünger, L.; Taubert, R. D.; Gutschwager, B.; Anhalt, K.; Briaudeau, S.; Sadli, M.

    2017-04-01

    A near infrared (NIR) radiation thermometer (RT) for temperature measurements in the range from 773 K up to 1235 K was characterized and calibrated in terms of the "Mise en Pratique for the definition of the Kelvin" (MeP-K) by measuring its absolute spectral radiance responsivity. Using Planck's law of thermal radiation allows the direct measurement of the thermodynamic temperature independently of any ITS-90 fixed-point. To determine the absolute spectral radiance responsivity of the radiation thermometer in the NIR spectral region, an existing PTB monochromator-based calibration setup was upgraded with a supercontinuum laser system (0.45 μm to 2.4 μm) resulting in a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio. The RT was characterized with respect to its nonlinearity, size-of-source effect, distance effect, and the consistency of its individual temperature measuring ranges. To further improve the calibration setup, a new tool for the aperture alignment and distance measurement was developed. Furthermore, the diffraction correction as well as the impedance correction of the current-to-voltage converter is considered. The calibration scheme and the corresponding uncertainty budget of the absolute spectral responsivity are presented. A relative standard uncertainty of 0.1 % (k=1) for the absolute spectral radiance responsivity was achieved. The absolute radiometric calibration was validated at four temperature values with respect to the ITS-90 via a variable temperature heatpipe blackbody (773 K ...1235 K) and at a gold fixed-point blackbody radiator (1337.33 K).

  11. Picoliter Well Array Chip-Based Digital Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Absolute Quantification of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Liu, Yong; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Yuanjie; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuelian; Yu, Yude

    2016-01-01

    Absolute, precise quantification methods expand the scope of nucleic acids research and have many practical applications. Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a powerful method for nucleic acid detection and absolute quantification. However, it requires thermal cycling and accurate temperature control, which are difficult in resource-limited conditions. Accordingly, isothermal methods, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), are more attractive. We developed a picoliter well array (PWA) chip with 27,000 consistently sized picoliter reactions (314 pL) for isothermal DNA quantification using digital RPA (dRPA) at 39°C. Sample loading using a scraping liquid blade was simple, fast, and required small reagent volumes (i.e., <20 μL). Passivating the chip surface using a methoxy-PEG-silane agent effectively eliminated cross-contamination during dRPA. Our creative optical design enabled wide-field fluorescence imaging in situ and both end-point and real-time analyses of picoliter wells in a 6-cm(2) area. It was not necessary to use scan shooting and stitch serial small images together. Using this method, we quantified serial dilutions of a Listeria monocytogenes gDNA stock solution from 9 × 10(-1) to 4 × 10(-3) copies per well with an average error of less than 11% (N = 15). Overall dRPA-on-chip processing required less than 30 min, which was a 4-fold decrease compared to dPCR, requiring approximately 2 h. dRPA on the PWA chip provides a simple and highly sensitive method to quantify nucleic acids without thermal cycling or precise micropump/microvalve control. It has applications in fast field analysis and critical clinical diagnostics under resource-limited settings.

  12. Picoliter Well Array Chip-Based Digital Recombinase Polymerase Amplification for Absolute Quantification of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao; Liu, Yong; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Yuanjie; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Xuelian; Yu, Yude

    2016-01-01

    Absolute, precise quantification methods expand the scope of nucleic acids research and have many practical applications. Digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) is a powerful method for nucleic acid detection and absolute quantification. However, it requires thermal cycling and accurate temperature control, which are difficult in resource-limited conditions. Accordingly, isothermal methods, such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), are more attractive. We developed a picoliter well array (PWA) chip with 27,000 consistently sized picoliter reactions (314 pL) for isothermal DNA quantification using digital RPA (dRPA) at 39°C. Sample loading using a scraping liquid blade was simple, fast, and required small reagent volumes (i.e., <20 μL). Passivating the chip surface using a methoxy-PEG-silane agent effectively eliminated cross-contamination during dRPA. Our creative optical design enabled wide-field fluorescence imaging in situ and both end-point and real-time analyses of picoliter wells in a 6-cm2 area. It was not necessary to use scan shooting and stitch serial small images together. Using this method, we quantified serial dilutions of a Listeria monocytogenes gDNA stock solution from 9 × 10-1 to 4 × 10-3 copies per well with an average error of less than 11% (N = 15). Overall dRPA-on-chip processing required less than 30 min, which was a 4-fold decrease compared to dPCR, requiring approximately 2 h. dRPA on the PWA chip provides a simple and highly sensitive method to quantify nucleic acids without thermal cycling or precise micropump/microvalve control. It has applications in fast field analysis and critical clinical diagnostics under resource-limited settings. PMID:27074005

  13. Behavior of Multiclass Pesticide Residue Concentrations during the Transformation from Rose Petals to Rose Absolute.

    PubMed

    Tascone, Oriane; Fillâtre, Yoann; Roy, Céline; Meierhenrich, Uwe J

    2015-05-27

    This study investigates the concentrations of 54 multiclass pesticides during the transformation processes from rose petal to concrete and absolute using roses spiked with pesticides as a model. The concentrations of the pesticides were followed during the process of transforming the spiked rose flowers from an organic field into concrete and then into absolute. The rose flowers, the concrete, and the absolute, as well as their transformation intermediates, were analyzed for pesticide content using gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. We observed that all the pesticides were extracted and concentrated in the absolute, with the exception of three molecules: fenthion, fenamiphos, and phorate. Typical pesticides were found to be concentrated by a factor of 100-300 from the rose flowers to the rose absolute. The observed effect of pesticide enrichment was also studied in roses and their extracts from four classically phytosanitary treated fields. Seventeen pesticides were detected in at least one of the extracts. Like the case for the spiked samples in our model, the pesticides present in the rose flowers from Turkey were concentrated in the absolute. Two pesticides, methidathion and chlorpyrifos, were quantified in the rose flowers at approximately 0.01 and 0.01-0.05 mg kg(-1), respectively, depending on the treated field. The concentrations determined for the corresponding rose absolutes were 4.7 mg kg(-1) for methidathion and 0.65-27.25 mg kg(-1) for chlorpyrifos.

  14. Antimony speciation in soils: improving the detection limits using post-column pre-reduction hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (HPLC/pre-reduction/HG-AFS).

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Waldo; Olivares, David; Bravo, Manuel; Feldmann, Jorg; Raab, Andrea

    2011-04-15

    HG-AFS is highly sensitive and low cost detection system and its use for antimony chemical speciation coupled to HPLC is gaining popularity. However speciation analysis in soils is strongly hampered because the most efficient extractant reported in the literature (oxalic acid) strongly inhibits the generation of SbH(3) by Sb(V), the major species in this kind of matrix, severely affecting its detection limits. The purpose of this research is to reduce the detection limit of Sb(V), by using a post column on-line reduction system with l-cysteine reagent (HPLC/pre-reduction/HG-AFS). The system was optimized by experimental design, optimum conditions found were 2% (w/v) and 10°C temperature coil. Detection limits of Sb(V) and Sb(III) in oxalic acid (0.25 mol L(-1)) were improved from 0.3 and 0.1 μg L(-1) to 0.07 and 0.07 μg L(-1), respectively. The methodology developed was applied to Chilean soils, where Sb(V) was the predominant species.

  15. Overcoming the detection bandwidth limit in precision spectroscopy: The analytical apparatus function for a stepped frequency scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohart, François

    2017-01-01

    In a previous paper [Rohart et al., Phys Rev A 2014;90(042506)], the influence of detection-bandwidth properties on observed line-shapes in precision spectroscopy was theoretically modeled for the first time using the basic model of a continuous sweeping of the laser frequency. Specific experiments confirmed general theoretical trends but also revealed several insufficiencies of the model in case of stepped frequency scans. As a consequence in as much as up-to-date experiments use step-by-step frequency-swept lasers, a new model of the influence of the detection-bandwidth is developed, including a realistic timing of signal sampling and frequency changes. Using Fourier transform techniques, the resulting time domain apparatus function gets a simple analytical form that can be easily implemented in line-shape fitting codes without any significant increase of computation durations. This new model is then considered in details for detection systems characterized by 1st and 2nd order bandwidths, underlining the importance of the ratio of detection time constant to frequency step duration, namely for the measurement of line frequencies. It also allows a straightforward analysis of corresponding systematic deviations on retrieved line frequencies and broadenings. Finally, a special attention is paid to consequences of a finite detection-bandwidth in Doppler Broadening Thermometry, namely to experimental adjustments required for a spectroscopic determination of the Boltzmann constant at the 1-ppm level of accuracy. In this respect, the interest of implementing a Butterworth 2nd order filter is emphasized.

  16. Enhancement of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) Detection limit using a low-pressure and short-pulse laser-induced plasma process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Kuwahara, Masakazu; Yan, Jun Jie; Liu, Ji Ping

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technology is an appealing technique compared with many other types of elemental analysis because of the fast response, high sensitivity, real-time, and noncontact features. One of the challenging targets of LIBS is the enhancement of the detection limit. In this study, the detection limit of gas-phase LIBS analysis has been improved by controlling the pressure and laser pulse width. In order to verify this method, low-pressure gas plasma was induced using nanosecond and picosecond lasers. The method was applied to the detection of Hg. The emission intensity ratio of the Hg atom to NO (IHg/INO) was analyzed to evaluate the LIBS detection limit because the NO emission (interference signal) was formed during the plasma generation and cooling process of N2 and O2 in the air. It was demonstrated that the enhancement of IHg/INO arose by decreasing the pressure to a few kilopascals, and the IHg/INO of the picosecond breakdown was always much higher than that of the nanosecond breakdown at low buffer gas pressure. Enhancement of IHg/INO increased more than 10 times at 700 Pa using picosecond laser with 35 ps pulse width. The detection limit was enhanced to 0.03 ppm (parts per million). We also saw that the spectra from the center and edge parts of plasma showed different features. Comparing the central spectra with the edge spectra, IHg/INO of the edge spectra was higher than that of the central spectra using the picosecond laser breakdown process.

  17. Effects of Kapton Sample Cell Windows on the Detection Limit of Smectite: Implications for CheMin on the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achilles, C. N.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, R. V.; Blake, D. F.

    2012-01-01

    The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity is an X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument capable of providing the mineralogical and chemical compositions of rocks and soils on the surface of Mars. CheMin uses a microfocus X-ray tube with a Co target, transmission geometry, and an energy-discriminating X-ray sensitive CCD to produce simultaneous 2-D XRD patterns and energy-dispersive X-ray histograms from powdered samples. CheMin has two different window materials used for sample cells -- Mylar and Kapton. Instrument details are provided elsewhere. Fe/Mg-smectite (e.g., nontronite) has been identified in Gale Crater, the MSL future landing site, by CRISM spectra. While large quantities of phyllosilicate minerals will be easily detected by CheMin, it is important to establish detection limits of such phases to understand capabilities and limitations of the instrument. A previous study indicated that the (001) peak of smectite at 15 Ang was detectable in a mixture of 1 wt.% smectite with olivine when Mylar is the window material for the sample cell. Complications arise when Kapton is the window material because Kapton itself also has a diffraction peak near 15 Ang (6.8 deg 2 Theta). This study presents results of mineral mixtures of smectite and olivine to determine smectite detection limits for Kapton sample cells. Because the intensity and position of the smectite (001) peak depends on the hydration state, we also analyzed mixtures with "hydrated" and "dehydrated"h smectite to examine the effects of hydration state on detection limits.

  18. Water vapour emission in vegetable fuel: absorption cell measurements and detection limits of our CO II Dial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellecci, C.; De Leo, L.; Gaudio, P.; Gelfusa, M.; Lo Feudo, T.; Martellucci, S.; Richetta, M.

    2006-09-01

    Forest fires can be the cause of serious environmental and economic damages. For this reason a considerable effort has been directed toward the forest protection and fire fighting. In the early forest fire detection, Lidar technique present considerable advantages compared to the passive detection methods based on infrared cameras currently in common use, due its higher sensitivity and ability to accurately locate the fire. The combustion phase of the vegetable matter causes a great amount of water vapour emission, thus the water molecule behaviour will be studied to obtain a fire detection system ready and efficient also before the flame propagation. A first evaluation of increment of the water vapour concentration compared to standard one will be estimated by a numerical simulation. These results will be compared with the experimental measurements carried out into a cell with a CO II Dial system, burning different kinds of vegetable fuel. Our results and their comparison will be reported in this paper.

  19. Detection of Microbial Water Quality Indicators and Fecal Waterborne Pathogens in Environmental Waters: A Review of Methods, Applications, and Limitations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental waters are important reservoirs of pathogenic microorganisms, many of which are of fecal origin. In most cases, the presence of pathogens is determined using surrogate bacterial indicators. In other cases, direct detection of the pathogen in question is required. M...

  20. Scope and limitations of the TEMPO/EPR method for singlet oxygen detection: the misleading role of electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Giacomo; Manet, Ilse; Monti, Sandra; Miranda, Miguel A; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie

    2014-12-01

    For many biological and biomedical studies, it is essential to detect the production of (1)O2 and quantify its production yield. Among the available methods, detection of the characteristic 1270-nm phosphorescence of singlet oxygen by time-resolved near-infrared (TRNIR) emission constitutes the most direct and unambiguous approach. An alternative indirect method is electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in combination with a singlet oxygen probe. This is based on the detection of the TEMPO free radical formed after oxidation of TEMP (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine) by singlet oxygen. Although the TEMPO/EPR method has been widely employed, it can produce misleading data. This is demonstrated by the present study, in which the quantum yields of singlet oxygen formation obtained by TRNIR emission and by the TEMPO/EPR method are compared for a set of well-known photosensitizers. The results reveal that the TEMPO/EPR method leads to significant overestimation of singlet oxygen yield when the singlet or triplet excited state of the photosensitizer is efficiently quenched by TEMP, acting as electron donor. In such case, generation of the TEMP(+) radical cation, followed by deprotonation and reaction with molecular oxygen, gives rise to an EPR-detectable TEMPO signal that is not associated with singlet oxygen production. This knowledge is essential for an appropriate and error-free application of the TEMPO/EPR method in chemical, biological, and medical studies.

  1. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  2. Consistent thermostatistics forbids negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hilbert, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, a considerable number of theories and experiments have claimed the existence of negative absolute temperature in spin systems and ultracold quantum gases. This has led to speculation that ultracold gases may be dark-energy analogues and also suggests the feasibility of heat engines with efficiencies larger than one. Here, we prove that all previous negative temperature claims and their implications are invalid as they arise from the use of an entropy definition that is inconsistent both mathematically and thermodynamically. We show that the underlying conceptual deficiencies can be overcome if one adopts a microcanonical entropy functional originally derived by Gibbs. The resulting thermodynamic framework is self-consistent and implies that absolute temperature remains positive even for systems with a bounded spectrum. In addition, we propose a minimal quantum thermometer that can be implemented with available experimental techniques.

  3. Absolute measurement of length with nanometric resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, D.; Garoi, F.; Timcu, A.; Damian, V.; Logofatu, P. C.; Nascov, V.

    2005-08-01

    Laser interferometer displacement measuring transducers have a well-defined traceability route to the definition of the meter. The laser interferometer is de-facto length scale for applications in micro and nano technologies. However their physical unit -half lambda is too large for nanometric resolution. Fringe interpolation-usual technique to improve the resolution-lack of reproducibility could be avoided using the principles of absolute distance measurement. Absolute distance refers to the use of interferometric techniques for determining the position of an object without the necessity of measuring continuous displacements between points. The interference pattern as produced by the interference of two point-like coherent sources is fitted to a geometric model so as to determine the longitudinal location of the target by minimizing least square errors. The longitudinal coordinate of the target was measured with accuracy better than 1 nm, for a target position range of 0.4μm.

  4. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  5. Computer processing of spectrograms for absolute intensities.

    PubMed

    Guttman, A; Golden, J; Galbraith, H J

    1967-09-01

    A computer program was developed to process photographically recorded spectra for absolute intensity. Test and calibration films are subjected to densitometric scans that provide digitally recorded densities on magnetic tapes. The nonlinear calibration data are fitted by least-squares cubic polynomials to yield a good approximation to the monochromatic H&D curves for commonly used emulsions (2475 recording film, Royal-X, Tri-X, 4-X). Several test cases were made. Results of these cases show that the machine processed absolute intensities are accurate to within 15%o. Arbitrarily raising the sensitivity threshold by 0.1 density units above gross fog yields cubic polynomial fits to the H&D curves that are radiometrically accurate within 10%. In addition, curves of gamma vs wavelength for 2475, Tri-X, and 4-X emulsions were made. These data show slight evidence of the photographic Purkinje effect in the 2475 emulsion.

  6. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  7. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum.

  8. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Raffaele, L.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Marchetto, F.; Sacchi, R.; Giordanengo, S.; Monaco, V.

    2013-07-01

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  9. Absolute far-ultraviolet spectrophotometry of hot subluminous stars from Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holberg, J. B.; Ali, B.; Carone, T. E.; Polidan, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    Observations, obtained with the Voyager ultraviolet spectrometers, are presented of absolute fluxes for two well-known hot subluminous stars: BD + 28 deg 4211, an sdO, and G191 - B2B, a hot DA white dwarf. Complete absolute energy distributions for these two stars, from the Lyman limit at 912 A to 1 micron, are given. For BD + 28 deg 4211, a single power law closely represents the entire observed energy distribution. For G191 - B2B, a pure hydrogen model atmosphere provides an excellent match to the entire absolute energy distribution. Voyager absolute fluxes are discussed in relation to those reported from various sounding rocket experiments, including a recent rocket observation of BD + 28 deg 4211.

  10. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  11. Markov dynamics as a zooming lens for multiscale community detection: non clique-like communities and the field-of-view limit.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Michael T; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Yaliraki, Sophia N; Barahona, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a surge of interest in community detection algorithms for complex networks. A variety of computational heuristics, some with a long history, have been proposed for the identification of communities or, alternatively, of good graph partitions. In most cases, the algorithms maximize a particular objective function, thereby finding the 'right' split into communities. Although a thorough comparison of algorithms is still lacking, there has been an effort to design benchmarks, i.e., random graph models with known community structure against which algorithms can be evaluated. However, popular community detection methods and benchmarks normally assume an implicit notion of community based on clique-like subgraphs, a form of community structure that is not always characteristic of real networks. Specifically, networks that emerge from geometric constraints can have natural non clique-like substructures with large effective diameters, which can be interpreted as long-range communities. In this work, we show that long-range communities escape detection by popular methods, which are blinded by a restricted 'field-of-view' limit, an intrinsic upper scale on the communities they can detect. The field-of-view limit means that long-range communities tend to be overpartitioned. We show how by adopting a dynamical perspective towards community detection [1], [2], in which the evolution of a Markov process on the graph is used as a zooming lens over the structure of the network at all scales, one can detect both clique- or non clique-like communities without imposing an upper scale to the detection. Consequently, the performance of algorithms on inherently low-diameter, clique-like benchmarks may not always be indicative of equally good results in real networks with local, sparser connectivity. We illustrate our ideas with constructive examples and through the analysis of real-world networks from imaging, protein structures and the power grid, where a

  12. Markov Dynamics as a Zooming Lens for Multiscale Community Detection: Non Clique-Like Communities and the Field-of-View Limit

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Michael T.; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Yaliraki, Sophia N.; Barahona, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a surge of interest in community detection algorithms for complex networks. A variety of computational heuristics, some with a long history, have been proposed for the identification of communities or, alternatively, of good graph partitions. In most cases, the algorithms maximize a particular objective function, thereby finding the ‘right’ split into communities. Although a thorough comparison of algorithms is still lacking, there has been an effort to design benchmarks, i.e., random graph models with known community structure against which algorithms can be evaluated. However, popular community detection methods and benchmarks normally assume an implicit notion of community based on clique-like subgraphs, a form of community structure that is not always characteristic of real networks. Specifically, networks that emerge from geometric constraints can have natural non clique-like substructures with large effective diameters, which can be interpreted as long-range communities. In this work, we show that long-range communities escape detection by popular methods, which are blinded by a restricted ‘field-of-view’ limit, an intrinsic upper scale on the communities they can detect. The field-of-view limit means that long-range communities tend to be overpartitioned. We show how by adopting a dynamical perspective towards community detection [1], [2], in which the evolution of a Markov process on the graph is used as a zooming lens over the structure of the network at all scales, one can detect both clique- or non clique-like communities without imposing an upper scale to the detection. Consequently, the performance of algorithms on inherently low-diameter, clique-like benchmarks may not always be indicative of equally good results in real networks with local, sparser connectivity. We illustrate our ideas with constructive examples and through the analysis of real-world networks from imaging, protein structures and the power grid

  13. Negative absolute temperature for mobile particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Simon; Ronzheimer, Philipp; Schreiber, Michael; Hodgman, Sean; Bloch, Immanuel; Schneider, Ulrich

    2013-05-01

    Absolute temperature is usually bound to be strictly positive. However, negative absolute temperature states, where the occupation probability of states increases with their energy, are possible in systems with an upper energy bound. So far, such states have only been demonstrated in localized spin systems with finite, discrete spectra. We realized a negative absolute temperature state for motional degrees of freedom with ultracold bosonic 39K atoms in an optical lattice, by implementing the attractive Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. This new state strikingly revealed itself by a quasimomentum distribution that is peaked at maximum kinetic energy. The measured kinetic energy distribution and the extracted negative temperature indicate that the ensemble is close to degeneracy, with coherence over several lattice sites. The state is as stable as a corresponding positive temperature state: The negative temperature stabilizes the system against mean-field collapse driven by negative pressure. Negative temperatures open up new parameter regimes for cold atoms, enabling fundamentally new many-body states. Additionally, they give rise to several counterintuitive effects such as heat engines with above unity efficiency.

  14. Measurement of absolute gravity acceleration in Firenze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, M.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the University of Firenze (Italy). In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the Newtonian law at short distances are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. The only available datum, pertaining to the italian zero-order gravity network, was taken more than 20 years ago at a distance of more than 60 km from the study site. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 absolute gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The absolute accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are (980 492 160.6 ± 4.0) μGal and (980 492 048.3 ± 3.0) μGal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the absolute value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.

  15. Chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil.

    PubMed

    Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-10

    Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) absolute oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the absolute oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound.

  16. Constrained Least Absolute Deviation Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhishun; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that least absolute deviation (LAD) criterion or L1-norm used for estimation of parameters is characterized by robustness, i.e., the estimated parameters are totally resistant (insensitive) to large changes in the sampled data. This is an extremely useful feature, especially, when the sampled data are known to be contaminated by occasionally occurring outliers or by spiky noise. In our previous works, we have proposed the least absolute deviation neural network (LADNN) to solve unconstrained LAD problems. The theoretical proofs and numerical simulations have shown that the LADNN is Lyapunov-stable and it can globally converge to the exact solution to a given unconstrained LAD problem. We have also demonstrated its excellent application value in time-delay estimation. More generally, a practical LAD application problem may contain some linear constraints, such as a set of equalities and/or inequalities, which is called constrained LAD problem, whereas the unconstrained LAD can be considered as a special form of the constrained LAD. In this paper, we present a new neural network called constrained least absolute deviation neural network (CLADNN) to solve general constrained LAD problems. Theoretical proofs and numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed CLADNN is Lyapunov stable and globally converges to the exact solution to a given constrained LAD problem, independent of initial values. The numerical simulations have also illustrated that the proposed CLADNN can be used to robustly estimate parameters for nonlinear curve fitting, which is extensively used in signal and image processing. PMID:18269958

  17. Essential Limitations of the Standard THz TDS Method for Substance Detection and Identification and a Way of Overcoming Them

    PubMed Central

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Varentsova, Svetlana A.

    2016-01-01

    Low efficiency of the standard THz TDS method of the detection and identification of substances based on a comparison of the spectrum for the signal under investigation with a standard signal spectrum is demonstrated using the physical experiments conducted under real conditions with a thick paper bag as well as with Si-based semiconductors under laboratory conditions. In fact, standard THz spectroscopy leads to false detection of hazardous substances in neutral samples, which do not contain them. This disadvantage of the THz TDS method can be overcome by using time-dependent THz pulse spectrum analysis. For a quality assessment of the standard substance spectral features presence in the signal under analysis, one may use time-dependent integral correlation criteria. PMID:27070617

  18. Limitations of highly sensitive enzymatic presence-absence tests for detection of waterborne coliforms and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Van Poucke, S O; Nelis, H J

    1997-01-01

    This study presents evidence for the unfeasibility of enzymatic presence-absence tests to detect one total coliform or one Escherichia coli organism in 100 ml of drinking water within a working day. The results of field trials with prototype chemiluminometric procedures indicated that the sensitivity-boosting measures that are essential to achieve the required speed compromise the specificity of the tests. PMID:9023956

  19. Detection and Differentiation of Herpes Simplex Viruses by Use of the Viper Platform: Advantages, Limitations, and Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Amanda L. S.; Roberts, Catherine; Mazzulli, Tony; Hatchette, Todd F.

    2014-01-01

    The Viper HSV-Qx assay was evaluated for the detection of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 in specimens from oral, anogenital, and other miscellaneous sites. The HSV-Qx assay was found to be highly sensitive and accurate; however, a gray zone may be required for specimens with values falling between 50 and 800 maximum relative fluorescence units. PMID:24696023

  20. Detection and differentiation of herpes simplex viruses by use of the viper platform: advantages, limitations, and concerns.

    PubMed

    Lang, Amanda L S; Roberts, Catherine; Mazzulli, Tony; Hatchette, Todd F; LeBlanc, Jason J

    2014-06-01

    The Viper HSV-Q(x) assay was evaluated for the detection of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 in specimens from oral, anogenital, and other miscellaneous sites. The HSV-Q(x) assay was found to be highly sensitive and accurate; however, a gray zone may be required for specimens with values falling between 50 and 800 maximum relative fluorescence units.

  1. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kasper; Budvytyte, Rima; Thomas, Rodrigo A.; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette M.; Balabas, Mikhail V.; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars D.; Stærkind, Hans C.; Müller, Jörg H.; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the first detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the temporal shape of the nerve impulse. This work opens new ways towards implementing optical magnetometers as practical devices for medical diagnostics. PMID:27417378

  2. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kasper; Budvytyte, Rima; Thomas, Rodrigo A; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette M; Balabas, Mikhail V; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars D; Stærkind, Hans C; Müller, Jörg H; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S

    2016-07-15

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the first detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the temporal shape of the nerve impulse. This work opens new ways towards implementing optical magnetometers as practical devices for medical diagnostics.

  3. Non-invasive detection of animal nerve impulses with an atomic magnetometer operating near quantum limited sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kasper; Budvytyte, Rima; Thomas, Rodrigo A.; Wang, Tian; Fuchs, Annette M.; Balabas, Mikhail V.; Vasilakis, Georgios; Mosgaard, Lars D.; Stærkind, Hans C.; Müller, Jörg H.; Heimburg, Thomas; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic fields generated by human and animal organs, such as the heart, brain and nervous system carry information useful for biological and medical purposes. These magnetic fields are most commonly detected using cryogenically-cooled superconducting magnetometers. Here we present the first detection of action potentials from an animal nerve using an optical atomic magnetometer. Using an optimal design we are able to achieve the sensitivity dominated by the quantum shot noise of light and quantum projection noise of atomic spins. Such sensitivity allows us to measure the nerve impulse with a miniature room-temperature sensor which is a critical advantage for biomedical applications. Positioning the sensor at a distance of a few millimeters from the nerve, corresponding to the distance between the skin and nerves in biological studies, we detect the magnetic field generated by an action potential of a frog sciatic nerve. From the magnetic field measurements we determine the activity of the nerve and the temporal shape of the nerve impulse. This work opens new ways towards implementing optical magnetometers as practical devices for medical diagnostics.

  4. Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer detection limits and thermal energy analyzer interface status report and present capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, A.; Andresen, B.; Martin, W.

    1990-10-18

    A new Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer was purchased and installed at LLNL. Over a period of several months the instrument was tested under a variety of conditions utilizing a capillary gas chromatography interface which allowed separated organic compounds to be carried directly into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. This direct interface allowed maximum analytical sensitivity. A variety of critical tests were performed in order to optimize the sensitivity of the system under a variety of analysis conditions. These tests altered the critical time cycles of the ionization, ion trapping, and detection. Various carrier gas pressures were also employed in order to ascertain the overall sensitivity of the instrument. In addition we have also interfaced a thermal energy analyzer (TEA) to the gas chromatograph in order to simultaneously detect volatile nitrogen containing compounds while mass spectral data is being acquired. This is the first application at this laboratory of simultaneous ultra-trace detections while utilizing two orthogonal analytical techniques. In particular, explosive-related compound and/or residues are of interest to the general community in water, soil and gas sampler. In this paper are highlighted a few examples of the analytical power of this new GC-TEA-ITMS technology.

  5. Error Performance of Differentially Coherent Detection of Binary DPSK Data Transmission on the Hard-Limiting Satellite Channel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    unequal power levels and noise correlations between the two adjacent time slot pulses. In practice, the power imbalance, or equivalently SNR imbalance...is a practical assumption since the noise is necessarily band limited in the system. Error probabilities are given as a function of uplink SNR with...different levels of SNR imbalances and different downlink SNR as parameters. It is discovered that, while SNR imbalance affects error performance, the

  6. Novel Absolute Displacement Sensor with Wide Range Based on Malus Law

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Lu, Xiaoping; Lin, Yonggang

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a novel wide range absolute displacement sensor based on polarized light detection principle. The sensor comprises of two sets of polarized light detecting systems which are coupled by pulleys. The inherent disadvantage in optic system like light source intensity drift is solved and absolute measurement with wide-range is achieved. A prototype and the relevant test bed have been built. The test results are in good agreement with expectation. Its measurement range is 540 mm, and its linearity is better than 0.05%. PMID:22303181

  7. Long range surface plasmon resonance with ultra-high penetration depth for self-referenced sensing and ultra-low detection limit using diverging beam approach

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, Sivan Abdulhalim, Ibrahim

    2015-05-11

    Using an insulator-metal-insulator structure with dielectric having refractive index (RI) larger than the analyte, long range surface plasmon (SP) resonance exhibiting ultra-high penetration depth is demonstrated for sensing applications of large bioentities at wavelengths in the visible range. Based on the diverging beam approach in Kretschmann-Raether configuration, one of the SP resonances is shown to shift in response to changes in the analyte RI while the other is fixed; thus, it can be used as a built in reference. The combination of the high sensitivity, high penetration depth and self-reference using the diverging beam approach in which a dark line is detected of the high sensitivity, high penetration depth, self-reference, and the diverging beam approach in which a dark line is detected using large number of camera pixels with a smart algorithm for sub-pixel resolution, a sensor with ultra-low detection limit is demonstrated suitable for large bioentities.

  8. A rapid and noninvasive method for detecting tissue-limited mosaicism: detection of i(12)(p10) in buccal smear from a child with Pallister-Killian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Velagaleti, Gopalrao V N; Tapper, Jill K; Rampy, Bill A; Zhang, Shuliu; Hawkins, Judy C; Lockhart, Lillian H

    2003-01-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS), a rare disorder, is characterized by tissue-limited or tissue-specific mosaicism. The characteristic chromosome abnormality associated with PKS is i(12p), which is seen predominantly in skin fibroblast cultures. Diagnosis of i(12p) has been carried out on buccal smears before and was shown to be an easy and feasible method. All previously published studies used alpha-satellite probes for the diagnosis and as such have several pitfalls. Our approach, using dual-color, locus-specific probes, has high specificity and sensitivity for the diagnosis of i(12p). Using statistical analysis, we have also confirmed that the signal pattern in interphase nuclei is consistent with isochromosome 12p.

  9. Testing the discrimination and detection limits of WorldView-2 imagery on a challenging invasive plant target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, T. P.; Wardell-Johnson, G. W.; Pracilio, G.; Brown, C.; Corner, R.; van Klinken, R. D.

    2016-02-01

    Invasive plants pose significant threats to biodiversity and ecosystem function globally, leading to costly monitoring and management effort. While remote sensing promises cost-effective, robust and repeatable monitoring tools to support intervention, it has been largely restricted to airborne platforms that have higher spatial and spectral resolutions, but which lack the coverage and versatility of satellite-based platforms. This study tests the ability of the WorldView-2 (WV2) eight-band satellite sensor for detecting the invasive shrub mesquite (Prosopis spp.) in the north-west Pilbara region of Australia. Detectability was challenged by the target taxa being largely defoliated by a leaf-tying biological control agent (Gelechiidae: Evippe sp. #1) and the presence of other shrubs and trees. Variable importance in the projection (VIP) scores identified bands offering greatest capacity for discrimination were those covering the near-infrared, red, and red-edge wavelengths. Wavelengths between 400 nm and 630 nm (coastal blue, blue, green, yellow) were not useful for species level discrimination in this case. Classification accuracy was tested on three band sets (simulated standard multispectral, all bands, and bands with VIP scores ≥1). Overall accuracies were comparable amongst all band-sets (Kappa = 0.71-0.77). However, mesquite omission rates were unacceptably high (21.3%) when using all eight bands relative to the simulated standard multispectral band-set (9.5%) and the band-set informed by VIP scores (11.9%). An incremental cover evaluation on the latter identified most omissions to be for objects <16 m2. Mesquite omissions reduced to 2.6% and overall accuracy significantly improved (Kappa = 0.88) when these objects were left out of the confusion matrix calculations. Very high mapping accuracy of objects >16 m2 allows application for mapping mesquite shrubs and coalesced stands, the former not previously possible, even with 3 m resolution hyperspectral

  10. Detection of Acute and Early HIV-1 Infections in an HIV Hyper-Endemic Area with Limited Resources

    PubMed Central

    Mayaphi, Simnikiwe H.; Martin, Desmond J.; Quinn, Thomas C.; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Olorunju, Steve A. S.; Tintinger, Gregory R.; Stoltz, Anton C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Two thirds of the world’s new HIV infections are in sub-Saharan Africa. Acute HIV infection (AHI) is the time of virus acquisition until the appearance of HIV antibodies. Early HIV infection, which includes AHI, is the interval between virus acquisition and establishment of viral load set-point. This study aimed to detect acute and early HIV infections in a hyper-endemic setting. Methods This was a cross-sectional diagnostic study that enrolled individuals who had negative rapid HIV results in five clinics in South Africa. Pooled nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) was performed, followed by individual sample testing in positive pools. NAAT-positive participants were recalled to the clinics for confirmatory testing and appropriate management. HIV antibody, p24 antigen, Western Blot and avidity tests were performed for characterization of NAAT-positive samples. Results The study enrolled 6910 individuals with negative rapid HIV results. Median age was 27 years (interquartile range {IQR}: 23–31). NAAT was positive in 55 samples, resulting in 0.8% newly diagnosed HIV-infected individuals (95% confidence interval {CI}: 0.6–1.0). The negative predictive value for rapid HIV testing was 99.2% (95% CI: 99.0–99.4). Characterization of NAAT-positive samples revealed that 0.04% (95% CI: 0.000–0.001) had AHI, 0.3% (95% CI: 0.1–0.4) had early HIV infection, and 0.5% (95% CI: 0.5–0.7) had chronic HIV infection. Forty-seven (86%) of NAAT-positive participants returned for follow-up at a median of 4 weeks (IQR: 2–8). Follow-up rapid tests were positive in 96% of these participants. Conclusions NAAT demonstrated that a substantial number of HIV-infected individuals are misdiagnosed at South African points-of-care. Follow-up rapid tests done within a 4 week interval detected early and chronic HIV infections initially missed by rapid HIV testing. This may be a practical and affordable strategy for earlier detection of these infections in resource

  11. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  12. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  13. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  14. The limitations on organic detection in Mars-like soils by thermal volatilization–gas chromatography–MS and their implications for the Viking results

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-González, Rafael; Navarro, Karina F.; de la Rosa, José; Iñiguez, Enrique; Molina, Paola; Miranda, Luis D.; Morales, Pedro; Cienfuegos, Edith; Coll, Patrice; Raulin, François; Amils, Ricardo; McKay, Christopher P.

    2006-01-01

    The failure of Viking Lander thermal volatilization (TV) (without or with thermal degradation)–gas chromatography (GC)–MS experiments to detect organics suggests chemical rather than biological interpretations for the reactivity of the martian soil. Here, we report that TV–GC–MS may be blind to low levels of organics on Mars. A comparison between TV–GC–MS and total organics has been conducted for a variety of Mars analog soils. In the Antarctic Dry Valleys and the Atacama and Libyan Deserts we find 10–90 μg of refractory or graphitic carbon per gram of soil, which would have been undetectable by the Viking TV–GC–MS. In iron-containing soils (jarosites from Rio Tinto and Panoche Valley) and the Mars simulant (palogonite), oxidation of the organic material to carbon dioxide (CO2) by iron oxides and/or their salts drastically attenuates the detection of organics. The release of 50–700 ppm of CO2 by TV–GC–MS in the Viking analysis may indicate that an oxidation of organic material took place. Therefore, the martian surface could have several orders of magnitude more organics than the stated Viking detection limit. Because of the simplicity of sample handling, TV–GC–MS is still considered the standard method for organic detection on future Mars missions. We suggest that the design of future organic instruments for Mars should include other methods to be able to detect extinct and/or extant life. PMID:17060639

  15. The limitations on organic detection in Mars-like soils by thermal volatilization-gas chromatography-MS and their implications for the Viking results.

    PubMed

    Navarro-González, Rafael; Navarro, Karina F; de la Rosa, José; Iñiguez, Enrique; Molina, Paola; Miranda, Luis D; Morales, Pedro; Cienfuegos, Edith; Coll, Patrice; Raulin, François; Amils, Ricardo; McKay, Christopher P

    2006-10-31

    The failure of Viking Lander thermal volatilization (TV) (without or with thermal degradation)-gas chromatography (GC)-MS experiments to detect organics suggests chemical rather than biological interpretations for the reactivity of the martian soil. Here, we report that TV-GC-MS may be blind to low levels of organics on Mars. A comparison between TV-GC-MS and total organics has been conducted for a variety of Mars analog soils. In the Antarctic Dry Valleys and the Atacama and Libyan Deserts we find 10-90 mug of refractory or graphitic carbon per gram of soil, which would have been undetectable by the Viking TV-GC-MS. In iron-containing soils (jarosites from Rio Tinto and Panoche Valley) and the Mars simulant (palogonite), oxidation of the organic material to carbon dioxide (CO(2)) by iron oxides and/or their salts drastically attenuates the detection of organics. The release of 50-700 ppm of CO(2) by TV-GC-MS in the Viking analysis may indicate that an oxidation of organic material took place. Therefore, the martian surface could have several orders of magnitude more organics than the stated Viking detection limit. Because of the simplicity of sample handling, TV-GC-MS is still considered the standard method for organic detection on future Mars missions. We suggest that the design of future organic instruments for Mars should include other methods to be able to detect extinct and/or extant life.

  16. Brownian motion: Absolute negative particle mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Alexandra; Eichhorn, Ralf; Regtmeier, Jan; Duong, Thanh Tu; Reimann, Peter; Anselmetti, Dario

    2005-08-01

    Noise effects in technological applications, far from being a nuisance, can be exploited with advantage - for example, unavoidable thermal fluctuations have found application in the transport and sorting of colloidal particles and biomolecules. Here we use a microfluidic system to demonstrate a paradoxical migration mechanism in which particles always move in a direction opposite to the net acting force (`absolute negative mobility') as a result of an interplay between thermal noise, a periodic and symmetric microstructure, and a biased alternating-current electric field. This counterintuitive phenomenon could be used for bioanalytical purposes, for example in the separation and fractionation of colloids, biological molecules and cells.

  17. Arbitrary segments of absolute negative mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruyin; Nie, Linru; Chen, Chongyang; Wang, Chaojie

    2017-01-01

    In previous research work, investigators have reported only one or two segments of absolute negative mobility (ANM) in a periodic potential. In fact, many segments of ANM also occur in the system considered here. We investigate transport of an inertial particle in a gating ratchet periodic potential subjected to a constant bias force. Our numerical results show that its mean velocity can decrease with the bias force increasing, i.e. ANM phenomenon. Furthermore, the ANM can take place arbitrary segments, even up to more than thirty. Intrinsic physical mechanism and conditions for arbitrary segments of ANM to occur are discussed in detail.

  18. Absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-07-21

    With the increasing availability of positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging, the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) has become popular in clinical settings. Quantitative MBF provides an important additional diagnostic or prognostic information over conventional visual assessment. The success of MBF quantification using PET/computed tomography (CT) has increased the demand for this quantitative diagnostic approach to be more accessible. In this regard, MBF quantification approaches have been developed using several other diagnostic imaging modalities including single-photon emission computed tomography, CT, and cardiac magnetic resonance. This review will address the clinical aspects of PET MBF quantification and the new approaches to MBF quantification.

  19. Absolute Rate Theories of Epigenetic Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, Jose N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2006-03-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape, and the transmission factor, depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates.

  20. Absolute rate theories of epigenetic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-12-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape and the transmission factor depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic, and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates. rate theory | stochastic gene expression | gene switches

  1. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  2. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  3. Limitations of vitek GPS-418 cards in exact detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci with the vanB genotype.

    PubMed

    Okabe, T; Oana, K; Kawakami, Y; Yamaguchi, M; Takahashi, Y; Okimura, Y; Honda, T; Katsuyama, T

    2000-06-01

    The susceptibilities of 20 strains of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) with the vanB genotype obtained by using Vitek GPS-418 cards were compared with those obtained by the broth dilution method of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) (approved standard M7-A4) and with those obtained by the agar screen method using bile esculin azide agar containing 6 microgram of vancomycin per ml. Although both the broth dilution and agar screen methods disclosed no discordance, Vitek GPS-418 cards yielded a very major error compared with the results obtained by the reference broth dilution method of the NCCLS. Vitek GPS-418 cards were therefore found to have considerable room for improvement for the accurate detection of vanB VRE strains.

  4. NOTE: Detection limits for ferrimagnetic particle concentrations using magnetic resonance imaging based proton transverse relaxation rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoe, H.; Chua-anusorn, W.; St. Pierre, T. G.; Dobson, J.

    2003-03-01

    A clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system was used to measure proton transverse relaxation rates (R2) in agar gels with varying concentrations of ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in a field strength of 1.5 T. The nanoparticles were prepared by coprecipitation of ferric and ferrous ions in the presence of either dextran or polyvinyl alcohol. The method of preparation resulted in loosely packed clusters (dextran) or branched chains (polyvinyl alcohol) of particles containing of the order of 600 and 400 particles, respectively. For both methods of particle preparation, concentrations of ferrimagnetic iron in agar gel less than 0.01 mg ml-1 had no measurable effect on the value of R2 for the gel. The results indicate that MRI-based R2 measurements using 1.5 T clinical scanners are not quite sensitive enough to detect the very low concentrations of nanoparticulate biogenic magnetite reported in human brain tissue.

  5. Explosion Seismology: Capabilities and limitations of long-range methods for detecting and recognizing explosions are discussed.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, E W

    1965-01-22

    I have tried to describe some current research trends in seismology which are specifically directed toward solving the problem of detecting, locating, and identifying underground nuclear explosions. Attention has been directed specifically toward problems which arise in efforts to obtain information at distances in excess of 2500 kilometers. The main scientific advantage which accrues from working at such distances is that the seismic signals suffer minimal distortion by the geological complexities of the earth. Extrapolation of the data to the question of an international test ban is not within the scope of this article. Suffice it to note that all of the parameters must, in the final resort, be resolved in terms of probabilities. In some cases the seismological probabilities can be estimated with reasonable degrees of accuracy, but the future of the test ban question depends not only on seismology but on such questions as inspection and what probabilities are acceptable.

  6. Automatic section thickness determination using an absolute gradient focus function.

    PubMed

    Elozory, D T; Kramer, K A; Chaudhuri, B; Bonam, O P; Goldgof, D B; Hall, L O; Mouton, P R

    2012-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of microstructures using computerized stereology systems is an essential tool in many disciplines of bioscience research. Section thickness determination in current nonautomated approaches requires manual location of upper and lower surfaces of tissue sections. In contrast to conventional autofocus functions that locate the optimally focused optical plane using the global maximum on a focus curve, this study identified by two sharp 'knees' on the focus curve as the transition from unfocused to focused optical planes. Analysis of 14 grey-scale focus functions showed, the thresholded absolute gradient function, was best for finding detectable bends that closely correspond to the bounding optical planes at the upper and lower tissue surfaces. Modifications to this function generated four novel functions that outperformed the original. The 'modified absolute gradient count' function outperformed all others with an average error of 0.56 μm on a test set of images similar to the training set; and, an average error of 0.39 μm on a test set comprised of images captured from a different case, that is, different staining methods on a different brain region from a different subject rat. We describe a novel algorithm that allows for automatic section thickness determination based on just out-of-focus planes, a prerequisite for fully automatic computerized stereology.

  7. Efficacy and Limitations of Tachycardia Detection Interval Guided Reprogramming for Reduction of Inappropriate Shock in Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Patients.

    PubMed

    Fujiishi, Tamami; Niwano, Shinichi; Murakami, Masami; Nakamura, Hironori; Igarashi, Tazuru; Ishizue, Naruya; Oikawa, Jun; Kishihara, Jun; Fukaya, Hidehira; Niwano, Hiroe; Ako, Junya

    2016-05-25

    The avoidance of inappropriate shock therapy is an important clinical issue in implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) patients. We retrospectively analyzed therapeutic events in ICD patients, and the effect of tachycardia detection interval (TDI) and tachycardia cycle length (TCL) guided reprograming on the reduction of inappropriate ICD therapy. The clinical determinants of after reprogramming were also evaluated.A total of 254 consecutive ICD patients were included in the study, and the incidence of antitachycardia therapy was evaluated during the follow-up period of 27.3 ± 18.7 months. When inappropriate antitachycardia therapy appeared, TDI was reprogrammed not to exceed the detected TCL and the patients continued to be followed-up. Various clinical parameters were compared between patients with and without inappropriate ICD therapy. During the initial follow-up period of 18.6 ± 15.6 months, ICD therapy occurred in 127/254 patients (50%) including inappropriate antitachycardia pacing (ATP) (12.9%) and shock (44.35%). Determinants of initial inappropriate therapy were dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), history of therapeutic hypothermia, and QRS duration. Of the 61 patients with inappropriate therapy, 24 received TCL guided reprogramming. During the additional observation period of 17.0 ± 16.8 months, inappropriate therapy recurred in 5/24 patients (2 ATP, 3 shocks). The determinant of these inappropriate therapy events after reprogramming was the presence of supraventricular tachycardia.By applying simple TCL and TDI guided reprogramming, inappropriate therapy was reduced by 79%. The determinant of inappropriate therapy after reprogramming was the presence of supraventricular tachycardia.

  8. Using European travellers as an early alert to detect emerging pathogens in countries with limited laboratory resources

    PubMed Central

    Guerin, Philippe J; Grais, Rebecca Freeman; Rottingen, John Arne; Valleron, Alain Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Background The volume, extent and speed of travel have dramatically increased in the past decades, providing the potential for an infectious disease to spread through the transportation network. By collecting information on the suspected place of infection, existing surveillance systems in industrialized countries may provide timely information for areas of the world without adequate surveillance currently in place. We present the results of a case study using reported cases of Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (Sd1) in European travellers to detect "events" of Sd1, related to either epidemic cases or endemic cases in developing countries. Methods We identified papers from a Medline search for reported events of Sd1 from 1940 to 2002. We requested data on shigella infections reported to the responsible surveillance entities in 17 European countries. Reports of Sd1 from the published literature were then compared with Sd1 notified cases among European travellers from 1990 to 2002. Results Prior to a large epidemic in 1999–2000, no cases of Sd1 had been identified in West Africa. However, if travellers had been used as an early warning, Sd1 could have been identified in this region as earlier as 1992. Conclusion This project demonstrates that tracking diseases in European travellers could be used to detect emerging disease in developing countries. This approach should be further tested with a view to the continuous improvement of national health surveillance systems and existing European networks, and may play a significant role in aiding the international public health community to improve infectious disease control. PMID:17239228

  9. Error analysis in newborn screening: can quotients support the absolute values?

    PubMed

    Arneth, Borros; Hintz, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Newborn screening is performed using modern tandem mass spectrometry, which can simultaneously detect a variety of analytes, including several amino acids and fatty acids. Tandem mass spectrometry measures the diagnostic parameters as absolute concentrations and produces fragments which are used as markers of specific substances. Several prominent quotients can also be derived, which are quotients of two absolute measured concentrations. In this study, we determined the precision of both the absolute concentrations and the derived quotients. First, the measurement error of the absolute concentrations and the measurement error of the ratios were practically determined. Then, the Gaussian theory of error calculation was used. Finally, these errors were compared with one another. The practical analytical accuracies of the quotients were significantly higher (e.g., coefficient of variation (CV) = 5.1% for the phenylalanine to tyrosine (Phe/Tyr) quotient and CV = 5.6% for the Fisher quotient) than the accuracies of the absolute measured concentrations (mean CVs = 12%). According to our results, the ratios are analytically correct and, from an analytical point of view, can support the absolute values in finding the correct diagnosis.

  10. A discussion on the merits and limitations of using drive-by monitoring to detect localised damage in a bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, David; González, Arturo

    2017-06-01

    Given the large number of bridges that currently have no instrumentation, there are obvious advantages in monitoring the condition of a bridge by analysing the response of a vehicle crossing it. As a result, the last two decades have seen a rise in the research attempting to solve the problem of identifying damage in a bridge from vehicle measurements. This paper examines the theoretical feasibility and practical limitations of a drive-by system in identifying damage associated to localised stiffness losses. First, the nature of the damage feature that is sought within the vehicle response needs to be characterized. For this purpose, the total vehicle response is considered to be made of 'static' and 'dynamic' components, and where the bridge has experienced a localised loss in stiffness, an additional 'damage' component. Understanding the nature of this 'damage' component is crucial to have an informed discussion on how damage can be identified and localised. Leveraging this new understanding, the authors propose a wavelet-based drive-by algorithm. By comparing the effect of the 'damage' component to other key effects defining the measurements such as 'vehicle speed', the 'road profile' and 'noise' on a wavelet contour plot, it is possible to establish if there is a frequency range where drive-by can be successful. The algorithm uses then specific frequency bands to improve the sensitivity to damage with respect to limitations imposed by Vehicle-Bridge vibrations. Recommendations on the selection of the mother wavelet and frequency band are provided. Finally, the paper discusses the impact of noise and road profile on the ability of the approach to identify damage and how periodic measurements can be effective at monitoring localised stiffness changes.

  11. Limits of detections for the determination of mono- and dicarboxylic acids using gas and liquid chromatographic methods coupled with mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Št’ávová, Jana; Beránek, Josef; Nelson, Eric P.; Diep, Bonnie A.; Kubátová, Alena

    2011-01-01

    The chromatographic separation and instrumental limits of detection (LODs) were obtained for a broad range of C1-C18 monocarboxylic (MCAs) and C2-C14 dicarboxylic acids (DCAs) employing either chemical derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and flame ionization detection (GC-MS/FID) or direct analysis with liquid chromatography high resolution MS and tandem MS (LC-MS). Suitability, efficiency and stability of reaction products for several derivatization agents used for esterification (BF3/butanol), and trimethysilylation, including trimethylsilyl-N-N-dimethylcarbamate (TMSDMC) and N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) were evaluated. The lowest limits of detection for the majority of compounds below 10 pg (with the exception of acetic acid) were obtained for derivatization with BF3/butanol followed by GC-MS in the total ion current (TIC) mode. Further improvements were achieved when applying either selected ion monitoring (SIM), which decreased the LODs to 1–4 pg or a combination of SIM and TIC (SITI) (2–5 pg). GC-FID provided LODs comparable to those obtained by GC-MS TIC. Both trimethylsilylation (followed by GC-MS) and direct LC-MS/MS analysis yielded LODs of 5– 40 pg for most of the acids. For volatile acids the LODs were higher, e.g., 25 and 590 ng for TMSDMC and BSTFA derivatized formic acid, respectively whereas the LC-MS methods did not allow for the analysis of formic acid at all. PMID:21185238

  12. Screening for thyroid disease in a primary care unit with a thyroid stimulating hormone assay with a low detection limit.

    PubMed Central

    Eggertsen, R.; Petersen, K.; Lundberg, P. A.; Nyström, E.; Lindstedt, G.

    1988-01-01

    In a study at a primary care centre in a predominantly rural area of Sweden the records of all patients with established thyroid disease were scrutinised and 2000 consecutive adult patients screened with an immunoenzymometric thyroid stimulating hormone assay. The aims of the study were fourfold: firstly, to assess the total burden of thyroid disease in primary care centres in Sweden; secondly, to assess the efficacy of clinical diagnosis of the disease in unselected populations of patients; thirdly, to assess the efficacy of clinical evaluation of treatment with thyroxine; and, lastly, to see whether a single analysis of the serum thyroid stimulating hormone concentration by recent methods would be enough to identify an abnormality of thyroid function. Of the roughly 17,400 adults in the study community, 111 women and 10 men were being treated for thyroid disease. Screening detected 68 patients (3.5%) not receiving thyroxine who had a serum thyroid stimulating hormone concentration of 0.20 mU/l or less, all of whom were followed up clinically. Fifty of these patients were also studied biochemically during follow up. Only nine of the 68 patients had thyroid disease (three with thyrotoxicosis requiring treatment), no evidence of the disease being found in the remainder. Sixteen patients had spontaneous hypothyroidism requiring treatment, and neither these nor three patients with thyrotoxicosis had been detected at the preceding clinical examination. Of 35 patients in whom thyroid disease was suspected clinically at screening, none had laboratory evidence of thyroid dysfunction. In this series 1.3% of all women in the study community (2.6% of all 50-59 year olds) and 0.1% of the men were being treated for thyroid disease at the primary care centre, roughly 1.0% of adults subjected to screening were found to have thyroid disease requiring treatment, and most patients with a thyroid stimulating hormone concentration of 0.20 mU/l or less did not have thyroid dysfunction

  13. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  14. Why to compare absolute numbers of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the absolute number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to absolute mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations.

  15. [Estimation of absolute risk for fracture].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2009-03-01

    Osteoporosis treatment aims to prevent fractures and maintain the QOL of the elderly. However, persons at high risk of future fracture cannot be effectively identified on the basis of bone density (BMD) alone, although BMD is used as an diagnostic criterion. Therefore, the WHO recommended that absolute risk for fracture (10-year probability of fracture) for each individual be evaluated and used as an index for intervention threshold. The 10-year probability of fracture is calculated based on age, sex, BMD at the femoral neck (body mass index if BMD is not available), history of previous fractures, parental hip fracture history, smoking, steroid use, rheumatoid arthritis, secondary osteoporosis and alcohol consumption. The WHO has just announced the development of a calculation tool (FRAX: WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool) in February this year. Fractures could be prevented more effectively if, based on each country's medical circumstances, an absolute risk value for fracture to determine when to start medical treatment is established and persons at high risk of fracture are identified and treated accordingly.

  16. Absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A and alterporriols.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Saki; Honma, Miho; Murakami, Takanori; Tsushima, Taro; Kudo, Shinji; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Nihei, Ken-Ichi; Nehira, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Masaru

    2012-02-01

    The absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A (1) was established by observing a positive exciton couplet in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of the C3,C4-O-bis(2-naphthoyl) derivative 10 and by chemical correlations with known compound 8. Before the discussion, the relative stereochemistry of 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The shielding effect at C7'-OMe group by C1-O-benzoylation established the relative stereochemical relationship between the C8-C8' axial bonding and the C1-C4/C1'-C4' polyol moieties of alterporriols E (3), an atropisomer of the C8-C8' dimer of 1. As 3 could be obtained by dimerization of 1 in vitro, the absolute configuration of its central chirality elements (C1-C4) must be identical to those of 1. Spectral comparison between the experimental and theoretical CD spectra supported the above conclusion. Axial stereochemistry of novel C4-O-deoxy dimeric derivatives, alterporriols F (4) and G (5), were also revealed by comparison of their CD spectra to those of 2 and 3.

  17. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. )

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  18. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometers Burst Mode Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, P.; Vigneron, P.; Hulot, G.; Crespo Grau, R.; Brocco, L.; Lalanne, X.; Sirol, O.; Leger, J. M.; Jager, T.; Bertrand, F.; Boness, A.; Fratter, I.

    2014-12-01

    Each of the three Swarm satellites embarks an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) to provide absolute scalar measurements of the magnetic field with high accuracy and stability. Nominal data acquisition of these ASMs is 1 Hz. But they can also run in a so-called "burst mode" and provide data at 250 Hz. During the commissioning phase of the mission, seven burst mode acquisition campaigns have been run simultaneously for all satellites, obtaining a total of ten days of burs-mode data. These campaigns allowed the identification of issues related to the operations of the piezo-electric motor and the heaters connected to the ASM, that do not impact the nominal 1 Hz scalar data. We analyze the burst mode data to identify high frequency geomagnetic signals, focusing the analysis in two regions: the low latitudes, where we seek signatures of ionospheric irregularities, and the high latitudes, to identify high frequency signals related to polar region currents. Since these campaigns have been conducted during the initial months of the mission, the three satellites where still close to each other, allowing to analyze the spatial coherency of the signals. Wavelet analysis have revealed 31 Hz signals appearing in the night-side in the equatorial region.

  19. A lower limit of detection for atrazine was obtained using bioluminescent reporter bacteria via a lower incubation temperature.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kun; Eltzov, Evgeni; Toury, Timothée; Marks, Robert S; Ionescu, Rodica E

    2012-10-01

    The present article reports on the influence of various atrazine concentrations to the response of genetically modified Escherichia coli TV1061 bacterial cells while modulating the experimental conditions. Interesting increases of bioluminescence signals are recorded for E. coli TV1061 bacteria in the presence of 10 μg/mL atrazine concentration named "high-toxicity bacteria alert" when compared with 1 μg/mL -10 fg/mL atrazine termed "low-toxicity bacteria alert". Detecting the effect of atrazine via its effect on bioluminescence of bacteria has been carried out by two consecutive measurements (fresh and overnight modes) at different concentrations of analyte. We have shown that a more precise discrimination at lower-toxicity concentrations can be obtained through overnight incubation of bacteria with the analyte at 4 °C. In addition, centrifugation of bacterial cells and analyte dilutions has been performed in order to ensure a better interaction between the insoluble atrazine pesticide and the bacterial cells.

  20. Study of boron detection limit using the in-air PIGE set-up at LAMFI-USP

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, M. V.; Silva, T. F.; Trindade, G. F.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.

    2014-11-11

    The quantification of small amounts of boron in materials is of extreme importance in different areas of materials science. Boron is an important contaminant and also a silicon dopant in the semiconductor industry. Boron is also extensively used in nuclear power plants, either for neutron shielding or for safety control and boron is an essential nutrient for life, either vegetable or animal. The production of silicon solar cells, by refining metallurgical-grade silicon (MG-Si) requires the control and reduction of several silicon contaminants to very low concentration levels. Boron is one of the contaminants of solar-grade silicon (SG-Si) that must be controlled and quantified at sub-ppm levels. In the metallurgical purification, boron quantification is usually made by Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, (ICP-MS) but the results need to be verified by an independent analytical method. In this work we present the results of the analysis of silicon samples by Particle Induced Gamma-Ray Emission (PIGE) aiming the quantification of low concentrations of boron. PIGE analysis was carried out using the in-air external beam line of the Laboratory for Materials Analysis with Ion Beams (LAMFI-USP) by the {sup 10}B(p,αγ({sup 7}Be nuclear reaction, and measuring the 429 keV γ-ray. The in-air PIGE measurements at LAMFI have a quantification limit of the order of 10{sup 16} at/cm{sup 2}.