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Sample records for absolute diffusion rates

  1. Absolute rate theories of epigenetic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-12-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape and the transmission factor depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic, and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates. rate theory | stochastic gene expression | gene switches

  2. The Absolute Rate of LGRB Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, J. F.; Schady, P.

    2016-06-01

    We estimate the long-duration gamma-ray burst (LGRB) progenitor rate using our recent work on the effects of environmental metallically on LGRB formation in concert with supernovae (SNe) statistics via an approach patterned loosely off the Drake equation. Beginning with the cosmic star formation history, we consider the expected number of broad-line Type Ic events (the SNe type associated with LGRBs) that are in low-metallicity host environments adjusted by the contribution of high-metallicity host environments at a much reduced rate. We then compare this estimate to the observed LGRB rate corrected for instrumental selection effects to provide a combined estimate of the efficiency fraction of these progenitors to produce LGRBs and the fraction of which are beamed in our direction. From this we estimate that an aligned LGRB occurs for approximately every 4000 ± 2000 low-metallically broad-lined SNe Ic. Therefore, if one assumes a semi-nominal beaming factor of 100, then only about one such supernova out of 40 produce an LGRB. Finally, we propose an off-axis LGRB search strategy of targeting only broad-line Type Ic events that occur in low-metallicity hosts for radio observation.

  3. Absolute and relative diffusion in a turbulent compressibile system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressman, J. R.; Goldburg, W. I.

    2002-11-01

    Floating Particles that move on the surface of a tank of water driven into turbulent motion, move in a plane. Calling the coordinates of this plane x and y, with z=0 at the surface, the velocity of the floating particles obeys the equation partialx u_x(x,y,0,t) +partial_yu_y(x,y,0,t)= - partial_zu_z(x,y,0,t), assuring that their motion is compressible. From PIV measurements made at the surface, one can deduce the absolute and the relative motion of the floaters (Richardson diffusion). The relative diffusion measurements are compared with the Richardson result, t^3 and with computer simulations of Eckhardt and Schumacher [1]. The dimensionless compressibility l C is roughly 0.5 for the floaters, which is large enough to raise questions about the validity of the Kolmogorov paradigm, according to which energy is passed from large to small spatial scales [2]. References 1. G. Falkovich et al., Rev. Mod. Phys. 73 913 (2001). 2. J. Schumacher and B. Eckhardt, Phys. Rev. E 66, 017303 (2002).

  4. Measurement of Disintegration Rates and Absolute {gamma}-ray Intensities

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, Daniel J.; Griffin, Henry C.

    2006-03-13

    The majority of practical radioactive materials decay by modes that include {gamma}-ray emission. For questions of 'how much' or 'how pure', one must know the absolute intensities of the major radiations. We are using liquid scintillation counting (LSC) to measurements of disintegration rates, coupled with {gamma}-ray spectroscopy to measure absolute {gamma}-ray emission probabilities. Described is a study of the 227Th chain yielding absolute {gamma}-ray intensities with {approx}0.5% accuracy and information on LSC efficiencies.

  5. Absolute calibration for complex-geometry biomedical diffuse optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastanduno, Michael A.; Jiang, Shudong; El-Ghussein, Fadi; diFlorio-Alexander, Roberta; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-03-01

    We have presented methodology to calibrate data in NIRS/MRI imaging versus an absolute reference phantom and results in both phantoms and healthy volunteers. This method directly calibrates data to a diffusion-based model, takes advantage of patient specific geometry from MRI prior information, and generates an initial guess without the need for a large data set. This method of calibration allows for more accurate quantification of total hemoglobin, oxygen saturation, water content, scattering, and lipid concentration as compared with other, slope-based methods. We found the main source of error in the method to be derived from incorrect assignment of reference phantom optical properties rather than initial guess in reconstruction. We also present examples of phantom and breast images from a combined frequency domain and continuous wave MRI-coupled NIRS system. We were able to recover phantom data within 10% of expected contrast and within 10% of the actual value using this method and compare these results with slope-based calibration methods. Finally, we were able to use this technique to calibrate and reconstruct images from healthy volunteers. Representative images are shown and discussion is provided for comparison with existing literature. These methods work towards fully combining the synergistic attributes of MRI and NIRS for in-vivo imaging of breast cancer. Complete software and hardware integration in dual modality instruments is especially important due to the complexity of the technology and success will contribute to complex anatomical and molecular prognostic information that can be readily obtained in clinical use.

  6. Diffusion rates for elevated releases

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V.

    1983-11-01

    A search of the literature related to diffusion from elevated sources has determined that an adequate data base exists for use in developing parameterizations for estimating diffusion rates for material released from free standing stacks at nuclear power plants. A review of published data analyses indicates that a new parameterization of horizontal diffusion rates specifically for elevated releases is not likely to significantly change the magnitudes of horizontal diffusion coefficients on the average. However, the uncertainties associated with horizontal diffusion coefficient estimates under any given set of atmospheric conditions could be reduced by a new parameterization. Similarly, a new parameterization of vertical diffusion rates would be unlikely to significantly alter the magnitudes of diffusion coefficients for unstable atmospheric conditons. However, for neutral and stable atmospheric conditions, a new parameterization of vertical diffusion rates might increase vertical diffusion coefficients significantly. The increase would move ground-level time-integrated concentration maxima closer to the plant and would increase the maxima. 55 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  7. Flow rate calibration for absolute cell counting rationale and design.

    PubMed

    Walker, Clare; Barnett, David

    2006-05-01

    There is a need for absolute leukocyte enumeration in the clinical setting, and accurate, reliable (and affordable) technology to determine absolute leukocyte counts has been developed. Such technology includes single platform and dual platform approaches. Derivations of these counts commonly incorporate the addition of a known number of latex microsphere beads to a blood sample, although it has been suggested that the addition of beads to a sample may only be required to act as an internal quality control procedure for assessing the pipetting error. This unit provides the technical details for undertaking flow rate calibration that obviates the need to add reference beads to each sample. It is envisaged that this report will provide the basis for subsequent clinical evaluations of this novel approach. PMID:18770842

  8. Rate Change Graph Technology: Absolute Value Point Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Ken; Duvernois, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Absolute Value Point Methodology (AVPM) is a new theoretical tool for science research centered on Rate Change Graph Technology (RCGT). The modeling techniques of AVPM surpass conventional methods by extending the geometrical rules of mathematics. Exact geometrical structures of matter and energy become clearer revealing new ways to compile advanced data. RCGT mechanics is realized from geometrical intersections that are the result of plotting changing value vs. changing geometry. RCGT methods ignore size and value to perform an objective analysis in geometry. Value and size are then re-introduced back into the analytical system for a clear and concise solution. Available AVPM applications reveal that a massive amount of data from the Big Bang to vast super-clusters is untouched by human thought. Once scientists learn to design tools from RCGT Mechanics, new and formidable approaches to experimentation and theory may lead to new discoveries. In the creation of AVPM, it has become apparent there is a particle-world that exists between strings and our familiar universe. These unrealized particles in their own nature exhibit inflation like properties and may be the progenitor of the implements of our universe. Thus space, time, energy, motion, space-time and gravity are born from its existence and decay. This announcement will be the beginning of many new ideas from the study of RCGT mechanics.

  9. Multidimensional reaction rate theory with anisotropic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Szabo, Attila; Greives, Nicholas; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2014-11-28

    An analytical expression is derived for the rate constant that describes diffusive transitions between two deep wells of a multidimensional potential. The expression, in contrast to the Kramers-Langer formula for the rate constant, is valid even when the diffusion is highly anisotropic. Our approach is based on a variational principle for the reactive flux and uses a trial function for the splitting probability or commitor. The theoretical result is validated by Brownian dynamics simulations.

  10. Explaining the Relative and Absolute LGRB Rate with Metallically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, John

    2016-01-01

    There is now strong evidence that Long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (LGRBs) have an intrinsic preference for low-metallicity environments despite the existence of some exceptions to this trend (Graham & Fruchter 2013). Here I will present a pair of results expanding on this work. First, a detailed effort to quantize magnitude of this effect, and characterized its change as a function of metallicity. Thus we directly address a fundamental question of this subfield: how much more likely is an LGRB to form at one metallicity as compared with another? Then, employing these results, we relate the LGRB rate as a function of redshift to the cosmic star-formation rate and provide a detailed breakdown of the intervening steps and their rate of occurrence. This provides interesting implications for radio search efforts to detect off axis LGRB events which will be discussed.

  11. Noninvasive optical quantification of absolute blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate in exercising skeletal muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurley, Katelyn; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates a method using novel hybrid diffuse optical spectroscopies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)] to obtain continuous, noninvasive measurement of absolute blood flow (BF), blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate (\\Vdot O2) in exercising skeletal muscle. Healthy subjects (n=9) performed a handgrip exercise to increase BF and \\Vdot O2 in forearm flexor muscles, while a hybrid optical probe on the skin surface directly monitored oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations ([HbO2], [Hb], and THC), tissue oxygen saturation (StO2), relative BF (rBF), and relative oxygen consumption rate (r\\Vdot O2). The rBF and r\\Vdot O2 signals were calibrated with absolute baseline BF and \\Vdot O2 obtained through venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Known problems with muscle-fiber motion artifacts in optical measurements during exercise were mitigated using a novel gating algorithm that determined muscle contraction status based on control signals from a dynamometer. Results were consistent with previous findings in the literature. This study supports the application of NIRS/DCS technology to quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic and metabolic parameters in exercising skeletal muscle and holds promise for improving diagnosis and treatment evaluation for patients suffering from diseases affecting skeletal muscle and advancing fundamental understanding of muscle and exercise physiology.

  12. Absolute and Relative Reliability of Percentage of Syllables Stuttered and Severity Rating Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karimi, Hamid; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Jones, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Percentage of syllables stuttered (%SS) and severity rating (SR) scales are measures in common use to quantify stuttering severity and its changes during basic and clinical research conditions. However, their reliability has not been assessed with indices measuring both relative and absolute reliability. This study was designed to provide…

  13. Equilibration Rates and Negative Absolute Temperatures for Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Akos; Mandt, Stephan; Rosch, Achim

    2010-11-01

    As highly tunable interacting systems, cold atoms in optical lattices are ideal to realize and observe negative absolute temperatures, T<0. We show theoretically that, by reversing the confining potential, stable superfluid condensates at finite momentum and T<0 can be created with low entropy production for attractive bosons. They may serve as “smoking gun” signatures of equilibrated T<0. For fermions, we analyze the time scales needed to equilibrate to T<0. For moderate interactions, the equilibration time is proportional to the square of the radius of the cloud and grows with increasing interaction strengths as atoms and energy are transported by diffusive processes.

  14. Effective light absorption and absolute electron transport rates in the coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Milán; Wangpraseurt, Daniel; Tamburic, Bojan; Larkum, Anthony W D; Schreiber, Ulrich; Suggett, David J; Kühl, Michael; Ralph, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM) fluorometry has been widely used to estimate the relative photosynthetic efficiency of corals. However, both the optical properties of intact corals as well as past technical constrains to PAM fluorometers have prevented calculations of the electron turnover rate of PSII. We used a new Multi-colour PAM (MC-PAM) in parallel with light microsensors to determine for the first time the wavelength-specific effective absorption cross-section of PSII photochemistry, σII(λ), and thus PAM-based absolute electron transport rates of the coral photosymbiont Symbiodinium both in culture and in hospite in the coral Pocillopora damicornis. In both cases, σII of Symbiodinium was highest in the blue spectral region and showed a progressive decrease towards red wavelengths. Absolute values for σII at 440 nm were up to 1.5-times higher in culture than in hospite. Scalar irradiance within the living coral tissue was reduced by 20% in the blue when compared to the incident downwelling irradiance. Absolute electron transport rates of P. damicornis at 440 nm revealed a maximum PSII turnover rate of ca. 250 electrons PSII(-1) s(-1), consistent with one PSII turnover for every 4 photons absorbed by PSII; this likely reflects the limiting steps in electron transfer between PSII and PSI. Our results show that optical properties of the coral host strongly affect light use efficiency of Symbiodinium. Therefore, relative electron transport rates do not reflect the productivity rates (or indeed how the photosynthesis-light response is parameterised). Here we provide a non-invasive approach to estimate absolute electron transport rates in corals.

  15. Absolute rate of the reaction of hydrogen atoms with ozone from 219-360 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ozone were obtained over the temperature range 219-360 K by the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. The results can be expressed in Arrhenius form by K = (1.33 plus or minus 0.32)x10 to the minus 10 power exp (-449 plus or minus 58/T) cu cm/molecule/s (two standard deviations). The present work is compared to two previous determinations and is discussed theoretically.

  16. Absolute Density Calibration Cell for Laser Induced Fluorescence Erosion Rate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.; Stevens, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Flight qualification of ion thrusters typically requires testing on the order of 10,000 hours. Extensive knowledge of wear mechanisms and rates is necessary to establish design confidence prior to long duration tests. Consequently, real-time erosion rate measurements offer the potential both to reduce development costs and to enhance knowledge of the dependency of component wear on operating conditions. Several previous studies have used laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure real-time, in situ erosion rates of ion thruster accelerator grids. Those studies provided only relative measurements of the erosion rate. In the present investigation, a molybdenum tube was resistively heated such that the evaporation rate yielded densities within the tube on the order of those expected from accelerator grid erosion. This work examines the suitability of the density cell as an absolute calibration source for LIF measurements, and the intrinsic error was evaluated.

  17. Absolute rate coefficients for the recombination of open f-shell tungsten ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, C.; Spruck, K.; Badnell, N. R.; Becker, A.; Bernhardt, D.; Grieser, M.; Hahn, M.; Novotný, O.; Repnow, R.; Savin, D. W.; Wolf, A.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.

    2014-04-01

    We have carried out direct measurements of the absolute recombination rate coefficients of four charge states of tungsten in the range from W18+ to W21+ in a heavy ion storage ring. We find that the rich atomic fine structure of the open f-shell leads to very high resonant enhancement of the recombination rate at energies below ~50 eV. Even in the higher energy domain relevant to fusion plasma this leads to a recombination rate coefficient that is more than four times higher than predicted by the commonly used ADAS database of recombination rates. In addition to the experimental measurements we have carried out theoretical calculations using Autostructure. For W20+ these predict a plasma recombination rate coefficient that agrees much better with the measurement than the ADAS model but still fail to reproduce the experimental data in detail.

  18. The Br+HO 2 reaction revisited: Absolute determination of the rate constant at 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverdet, G.; Le Bras, G.; Mellouki, A.; Poulet, G.

    1990-09-01

    The absolute determination of the rate constant for the reaction Br+HO 2→HBr+O 2 has been done at 298 K using the discharge-flor EPR method. The value k1 = (1.5±0.2) × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 was obtained. Previous indirect measurements of k1 from a discharge-flow, LIF/mass spectrometric study of the Br/H 2CO/O 2 system have been reinterpreted, leading to values for k1 ranging from 1.0 × 10 -12 to 2.2 × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 at 298 K. These results are discussed and compared with other literature values.

  19. Study on improving the turbidity measurement of the absolute coagulation rate constant.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiwei; Liu, Jie; Xu, Shenghua

    2006-05-23

    The existing theories dealing with the evaluation of the absolute coagulation rate constant by turbidity measurement were experimentally tested for different particle-sized (radius = a) suspensions at incident wavelengths (lambda) ranging from near-infrared to ultraviolet light. When the size parameter alpha = 2pi a/lambda > 3, the rate constant data from previous theories for fixed-sized particles show significant inconsistencies at different light wavelengths. We attribute this problem to the imperfection of these theories in describing the light scattering from doublets through their evaluation of the extinction cross section. The evaluations of the rate constants by all previous theories become untenable as the size parameter increases and therefore hampers the applicable range of the turbidity measurement. By using the T-matrix method, we present a robust solution for evaluating the extinction cross section of doublets formed in the aggregation. Our experiments show that this new approach is effective in extending the applicability range of the turbidity methodology and increasing measurement accuracy.

  20. A simple reaction-rate model for turbulent diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangert, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    A simple reaction rate model is proposed for turbulent diffusion flames in which the reaction rate is proportional to the turbulence mixing rate. The reaction rate is also dependent on the mean mass fraction and the mean square fluctuation of mass fraction of each reactant. Calculations are compared with experimental data and are generally successful in predicting the measured quantities.

  1. Subjective evaluation of HDTV stereoscopic videos in IPTV scenarios using absolute category rating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Barkowsky, M.; Cousseau, R.; Brunnström, K.; Olsson, R.; Le Callet, P.; Sjöström, M.

    2011-03-01

    Broadcasting of high definition (HD) stereobased 3D (S3D) TV are planned, or has already begun, in Europe, the US, and Japan. Specific data processing operations such as compression and temporal and spatial resampling are commonly used tools for saving network bandwidth when IPTV is the distribution form, as this results in more efficient recording and transmission of 3DTV signals, however at the same time it inevitably brings quality degradations to the processed video. This paper investigated observers quality judgments of state of the art video coding schemes (simulcast H.264/AVC or H.264/MVC), with or without added temporal and spatial resolution reduction of S3D videos, by subjective experiments using the Absolute Category Rating method (ACR) method. The results showed that a certain spatial resolution reduction working together with high quality video compressing was the most bandwidth efficient way of processing video data when the required video quality is to be judged as "good" quality. As the subjective experiment was performed in two different laboratories in two different countries in parallel, a detailed analysis of the interlab differences was performed.

  2. Anesthetic diffusion through lipid membranes depends on the protonation rate.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Isidoro, Rosendo; Sierra-Valdez, F J; Ruiz-Suárez, J C

    2014-12-18

    Hundreds of substances possess anesthetic action. However, despite decades of research and tests, a golden rule is required to reconcile the diverse hypothesis behind anesthesia. What makes an anesthetic to be local or general in the first place? The specific targets on proteins, the solubility in lipids, the diffusivity, potency, action time? Here we show that there could be a new player equally or even more important to disentangle the riddle: the protonation rate. Indeed, such rate modulates the diffusion speed of anesthetics into lipid membranes; low protonation rates enhance the diffusion for local anesthetics while high ones reduce it. We show also that there is a pH and membrane phase dependence on the local anesthetic diffusion across multiple lipid bilayers. Based on our findings we incorporate a new clue that may advance our understanding of the anesthetic phenomenon.

  3. Nitric oxide diffusion rate is reduced in the aortic wall.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoping; Srinivasan, Parthasarathy; Collard, Eric; Grajdeanu, Paula; Zweier, Jay L; Friedman, Avner

    2008-03-01

    Endogenous nitric oxide (NO) plays important physiological roles in the body. As a small diatomic molecule, NO has been assumed to freely diffuse in tissues with a diffusion rate similar to that in water. However, this assumption has not been tested experimentally. In this study, a modified Clark-type NO electrode attached with a customized aorta holder was used to directly measure the flux of NO diffusion across the aortic wall at 37 degrees C. Experiments were carefully designed for accurate measurements of the apparent NO diffusion coefficient D and the partition coefficient alpha in the aortic wall. A mathematical model was presented for analyzing experimental data. It was determined that alpha = 1.15 +/- 0.11 and D = 848 +/- 45 mum(2)/s (n = 12). The NO diffusion coefficient in the aortic wall is nearly fourfold smaller than the reported diffusion coefficient in solution at 37 degrees C, indicating that NO diffusion in the vascular wall is no longer free, but markedly dependent on the environment in the tissue where these NO molecules are. These results imply that the NO diffusion rate in the vascular wall may be upregulated and downregulated by certain physiological and/or pathophysiological processes affecting the composition of tissues.

  4. Current Absolute Plate Velocities Inferred from Hotspot Tracks, Comparison with Absolute Velocities Inferred from Seismic Anisotropy, and Bounds on Rates of Motion Between Groups of Hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Gordon, R. G.; Zheng, L.

    2015-12-01

    Hotspot tracks have been widely used to estimate the velocities of the plate relative to the lower mantle. Here we analyze the hotspot azimuth data set of Morgan and Phipps Morgan [2007] and show that the errors in plate velocity azimuths inferred from hotspot tracks in any one plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths in the same plate. We use a two-tier analysis to account for this correlated error. First, we determine an individual best-fitting pole for each plate. Second, we determine the absolute plate velocity by minimizing the misfit while constrained by the MORVEL relative plate velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]. Our preferred model, HS4-MORVEL, uses azimuths from 9 major plates, which are weighted equally. We find that the Pacific plate rotates 0.860.016°Ma-1 right handed about 63.3°S, 96.1°E. Angular velocities of four plates (Amur, Eurasia, Yangtze and Antarctic) differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.24°±0.014° Ma-1 right handed about 52.3S, 56.9E. The angular velocities differ insignificantly from the absolute angular velocities inferred from the orientation of seismic anisotropy [Zheng et al. 2014]. The within-plate dispersion of hotspot track azimuths is 14°, which is comparable to the within-plate dispersion found from orientations of seismic anisotropy. The between-plate dispersion is 6.9±2.4° (95% confidence limits), which is smaller than that found from seismic anisotropy. The between-plate dispersion of 4.5° to 9.3° can be used to place bounds on how fast hotspots under one plate move relative to hotspots under another plate. For an average plate absolute speed of ≈50 mm/yr, the between-plate dispersion indicates a rate of motion of 4 mm/yr to 8 mm/yr for the component of hotspot motion perpendicular to plate motion. This upper bound is consistent with prior work that indicated upper bounds on motion between Pacific hotspots and Indo-Atlantic hotspots over the past 48 Ma of 8-13 mm

  5. Thermal /Soret/ diffusion effects on interfacial mass transport rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that thermal (Soret) diffusion significantly alters convective mass transport rates and important transition temperatures in highly nonisothermal flow systems involving the transport of 'heavy' species (vapors or particles). Introduction of the Soret transport term is shown to result in mass transfer effects similar to those of 'suction' and a homogeneous chemical 'sink'. It is pointed out that this analogy provides a simple method of correlating and predicting thermal diffusion effects in the abovementioned systems.

  6. Estimation of the diffusion-limited rate of microtubule assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Odde, D J

    1997-01-01

    Microtubule assembly is a complex process with individual microtubules alternating stochastically between extended periods of assembly and disassembly, a phenomenon known as dynamic instability. Since the discovery of dynamic instability, molecular models of assembly have generally assumed that tubulin incorporation into the microtubule lattice is primarily reaction-limited. Recently this assumption has been challenged and the importance of diffusion in microtubule assembly dynamics asserted on the basis of scaling arguments, with tubulin gradients predicted to extend over length scales exceeding a cell diameter, approximately 50 microns. To assess whether individual microtubules in vivo assemble at diffusion-limited rates and to predict the theoretical upper limit on the assembly rate, a steady-state mean-field model for the concentration of tubulin about a growing microtubule tip was developed. Using published parameter values for microtubule assembly in vivo (growth rate = 7 microns/min, diffusivity = 6 x 10(-12) m2/s, tubulin concentration = 10 microM), the model predicted that the tubulin concentration at the microtubule tip was approximately 89% of the concentration far from the tip, indicating that microtubule self-assembly is not diffusion-limited. Furthermore, the gradients extended less than approximately 50 nm (the equivalent of about two microtubule diameters) from the microtubule tip, a distance much less than a cell diameter. In addition, a general relation was developed to predict the diffusion-limited assembly rate from the diffusivity and bulk tubulin concentration. Using this relation, it was estimated that the maximum theoretical assembly rate is approximately 65 microns/min, above which tubulin can no longer diffuse rapidly enough to support faster growth. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9199774

  7. Polymer reversal rate calculated via locally scaled diffusion map.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenwei; Rohrdanz, Mary A; Maggioni, Mauro; Clementi, Cecilia

    2011-04-14

    A recent study on the dynamics of polymer reversal inside a nanopore by Huang and Makarov [J. Chem. Phys. 128, 114903 (2008)] demonstrated that the reaction rate cannot be reproduced by projecting the dynamics onto a single empirical reaction coordinate, a result suggesting the dynamics of this system cannot be correctly described by using a single collective coordinate. To further investigate this possibility we have applied our recently developed multiscale framework, locally scaled diffusion map (LSDMap), to obtain collective reaction coordinates for this system. Using a single diffusion coordinate, we obtain a reversal rate via Kramers expression that is in good agreement with the exact rate obtained from the simulations. Our mathematically rigorous approach accounts for the local heterogeneity of molecular configuration space in constructing a diffusion map, from which collective coordinates emerge. We believe this approach can be applied in general to characterize complex macromolecular dynamics by providing an accurate definition of the collective coordinates associated with processes at different time scales.

  8. Measurement of diffusion coefficients from solution rates of bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krieger, I. M.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of solution of a stationary bubble is limited by the diffusion of dissolved gas molecules away from the bubble surface. Diffusion coefficients computed from measured rates of solution give mean values higher than accepted literature values, with standard errors as high as 10% for a single observation. Better accuracy is achieved with sparingly soluble gases, small bubbles, and highly viscous liquids. Accuracy correlates with the Grashof number, indicating that free convection is the major source of error. Accuracy should, therefore, be greatly increased in a gravity-free environment. The fact that the bubble will need no support is an additional important advantage of Spacelab for this measurement.

  9. Effective reaction rates for diffusion-limited reaction cycles.

    PubMed

    Nałęcz-Jawecki, Paweł; Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miękisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    Biological signals in cells are transmitted with the use of reaction cycles, such as the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, in which substrate is modified by antagonistic enzymes. An appreciable share of such reactions takes place in crowded environments of two-dimensional structures, such as plasma membrane or intracellular membranes, and is expected to be diffusion-controlled. In this work, starting from the microscopic bimolecular reaction rate constants and using estimates of the mean first-passage time for an enzyme-substrate encounter, we derive diffusion-dependent effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients (EMRRC) for a generic reaction cycle. Each EMRRC was found to be half of the harmonic average of the microscopic rate constant (phosphorylation c or dephosphorylation d), and the effective (crowding-dependent) motility divided by a slowly decreasing logarithmic function of the sum of the enzyme concentrations. This implies that when c and d differ, the two EMRRCs scale differently with the motility, rendering the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules diffusion-dependent. Analytical predictions are verified using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the two-dimensional triangular lattice at the single-molecule resolution. It is demonstrated that the proposed formulas estimate the steady-state concentrations and effective reaction rates for different sets of microscopic reaction rates and concentrations of reactants, including a non-trivial example where with increasing diffusivity the fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules changes from 10% to 90%.

  10. Effective reaction rates for diffusion-limited reaction cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nałecz-Jawecki, Paweł; Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    Biological signals in cells are transmitted with the use of reaction cycles, such as the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, in which substrate is modified by antagonistic enzymes. An appreciable share of such reactions takes place in crowded environments of two-dimensional structures, such as plasma membrane or intracellular membranes, and is expected to be diffusion-controlled. In this work, starting from the microscopic bimolecular reaction rate constants and using estimates of the mean first-passage time for an enzyme-substrate encounter, we derive diffusion-dependent effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients (EMRRC) for a generic reaction cycle. Each EMRRC was found to be half of the harmonic average of the microscopic rate constant (phosphorylation c or dephosphorylation d), and the effective (crowding-dependent) motility divided by a slowly decreasing logarithmic function of the sum of the enzyme concentrations. This implies that when c and d differ, the two EMRRCs scale differently with the motility, rendering the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules diffusion-dependent. Analytical predictions are verified using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the two-dimensional triangular lattice at the single-molecule resolution. It is demonstrated that the proposed formulas estimate the steady-state concentrations and effective reaction rates for different sets of microscopic reaction rates and concentrations of reactants, including a non-trivial example where with increasing diffusivity the fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules changes from 10% to 90%.

  11. Site-specific hydrogen diffusion rates during clinopyroxene dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferriss, Elizabeth; Plank, Terry; Walker, David

    2016-06-01

    The rate of hydrogen diffusion in clinopyroxene is relevant to interpreting hydrogen ("water") concentrations in xenoliths, phenocrysts, and clinopyroxene-hosted melt inclusions to provide insight into the deep-earth water cycle and volcanic explosivity. Here, we determine bulk and site-specific hydrogen diffusivities in two diopsides and an augite by heating initially homogeneous water-bearing samples in a 1-atm CO/CO2 gas-mixing furnace at 800-1000 °C and oxygen fugacity at the quartz-fayalite-magnetite buffer and observing H-loss profiles. The O-H stretching range between wavenumbers 3000 and 4000 cm-1 in FTIR spectra is resolved into 4-6 peaks, each of which is assumed to represent a distinct defect site for the hydrogen, to determine peak-specific diffusivities using our previously published whole-block method. For the diopside from the Kunlun Mts. in China, Arrhenius relations are reported for peaks at 3645, 3617, 3540, 3443, and 3355 cm-1 based on measurements at 816, 904, and 1000 °C. Bulk and site-specific diffusivities are determined for the same set of peaks at 904 °C for the second diopside (Jaipur). The augite (PMR-53) was a triangular thin slab, and hydrogen diffusivities were determined for bulk hydrogen and peaks at 3620, 3550, 3460, and 3355 cm-1 in the thickness direction at 800 °C. Bulk hydrogen diffusivity in the Jaipur diopside is consistent with previous work, and hydrogen diffusivity in augite PMR-53 is slightly lower than the fast direction diffusivities measured || [100] and [001]* in Jaipur diopside. Both diopsides show 1-2 orders of magnitude differences in the peaks-specific diffusivities, with the fastest diffusivities at 3450 cm-1 and the slowest at 3645 cm-1. However, the hydrogen diffusivities in Jaipur diopside are 2-4 orders of magnitude higher than those in Kunlun diopside for bulk hydrogen and all peaks. Thus, peak-specific differences cannot by themselves adequately explain the 5 orders of magnitude range in hydrogen

  12. Diffusion Rates on the Overhead Projector: Amines Compared to HCl.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Sally; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a method to compare diffusion rates of selected amines to that of HCl. Provides an opportunity to introduce simple organic compounds early in the general chemistry curriculum and can be used to test Graham's Law for several different molar masses. (JRH)

  13. Shear-Rate-Independent Diffusion in Granular Flows.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yi; Umbanhowar, Paul B; Ottino, Julio M; Lueptow, Richard M

    2015-08-21

    We computationally study the behavior of the diffusion coefficient D in granular flows of monodisperse and bidisperse particles spanning regions of relatively high and low shear rate in open and closed laterally confined heaps. Measurements of D at various flow rates, streamwise positions, and depths collapse onto a single curve when plotted as a function of γd2, where d is the local mean particle diameter and γ is the local shear rate. When γ is large, D is proportional to γd2, as in previous studies. However, for γd2 below a critical value, D is independent of γd2. The acceleration due to gravity g and particle stiffness (or, equivalently, the binary collision time t(c)) together determine the transition in D between regimes. This suggests that while shear rate and particle size determine diffusion at relatively high shear rates in surface-driven flows, diffusion at low shear rates is an elastic phenomenon with time and length scales dependent on gravity (sqrt d/g) and particle stiffness (t(c)sqrt(dg), respectively.

  14. Strain-Rate-Free Diffusion Flames: Initiation, Properties, and Quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fendell, Francis; Rungaldier, Harald; Gokoglu, Suleyman; Schultz, Donald

    1997-01-01

    For about a half century, the stabilization of a steady planar deflagration on a heat-sink-type flat-flame burner has been of extraordinary service for the theoretical modeling and diagnostic probing of combusting gaseous mixtures. However, most engineering devices and most unwanted fire involve the burning of initially unmixed reactants. The most vigorous burning of initially separated gaseous fuel and oxidizer is the diffusion flame. In this useful idealization (limiting case), the reactants are converted to product at a mathematically thin interface, so no interpenetration of fuel and oxidizer occurs. This limit is of practical importance because it often characterizes the condition of optimal performance (and sometimes environmentally objectionable operation) of a combustor. A steady planar diffusion flame is most closely approached in the laboratory in the counterflow apparatus. The utility of this simple-strain-rate flow for the modeling and probing of diffusion flames was noted by Pandya and Weinberg 35 years ago, though only in the last decade or so has its use become internationally common place. However, typically, as the strain rate a is reduced below about 20 cm(exp -1), and the diffusion-flame limit (reaction rate much faster than the flow rate) is approached, the burning is observed to become unstable in earth gravity. The advantageous steady planar flow is not available in the diffusion-flame limit in earth gravity. This is unfortunate because the typical spatial scale in a counterflow is (k/a)(sup 1/2), where k denotes a characteristic diffusion coefficient; thus, the length scale becomes large, and the reacting flow is particularly amenable to diagnostic probing, as the diffusion-flame limit is approached. The disruption of planar symmetry is owing the fact that, as the strain rate a decreases, the residence time (l/a) of the throughput in the counterflow burner increases. Observationally, when the residence time exceeds about 50 msec, the

  15. Absolute OH density measurements by broadband UV absorption in diffuse atmospheric-pressure He-H2O RF glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Cunge, Gilles; Sadeghi, Nader

    2012-06-01

    The measurement of radical densities in atmospheric-pressure plasmas has gained increasing importance in recent years in view of their crucial role in many applications. In this paper we present absolute OH density measurements by broadband UV absorption in diffuse atmospheric-pressure RF glow discharges in mixtures of He and H2O. The use of a 310 nm light-emitting diode as a light source and a very high resolution spectrometer (2.6 pm resolution) made the estimation of the total OH density possible by simultaneously measuring the absorption rates of different spectrally resolved rotational lines of the OH(A-X) transition. For different RF powers and water concentrations, OH densities and gas temperatures ranging between 6 × 1019and 4 × 1020 m-3 and 345 and 410 K, respectively, were obtained. The gas temperature Tg was also measured by three different methods. Tg deduced from the rotational temperature of N2(C-B) emission, nitrogen being present as a trace impurity, provided the most reliable value. The rotational temperature Tr of the ground state OH(X) presented values with a maximum deviation of 25 K compared with Tg. To obtain the gas temperature from the emission intensities of OH(A-X) rotational lines, the recorded intensities of different lines must be corrected for the effect of self-absorption inside the plasma.

  16. Absolute rate constant of the reaction between chlorine /2P/ atoms and hydrogen peroxide from 298 to 424 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1980-01-01

    The absolute rate constant of the reaction between chlorine (2P) atoms and hydrogen peroxide was determined from 298 to 424 K, using the discharge flow resonance fluorescence technique. Pseudo-first-order conditions were used with hydrogen peroxide in large excess. A fast flow-sampling procedure limited hydrogen peroxide decomposition to less than 5% over the temperature range studied. At 298 K, the rate constant is (4.1 plus or minus 0.2) x 10 to the minus 13th cu cm/molecule-sec.

  17. Rates of diffusion in dynamical systems with random jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobre, Elisha J.

    2005-12-01

    This dissertation explores the diffusion properties of a large class of measures under a dynamical system on bigcup i=0infinity S1i with randomly occurring jumps that behave according to a particular probability distribution. The drift rate for the center of mass of the system is then defined and is shown to be well defined Lebesgue almost everywhere. Properties of the drift rate are then explored. In particular the drift rate is shown to be continuous as a function of the probability "jump" distribution and, in a special case, it is shown that the drift rate increases with the probability of jumping. Finally, a central limit theorem for fluctuations about the drift rate is proved. The results are obtained by modeling the system as a random map on a compact space, and using the ergodic properties of the random map.

  18. Linking rates of diffusion and consumption in relation to resources.

    PubMed

    Avgar, Tal; Kuefler, Daniel; Fryxell, John M

    2011-08-01

    The functional response is a fundamental model of the relationship between consumer intake rate and resource abundance. The random walk is a fundamental model of animal movement and is well approximated by simple diffusion. Both models are central to our understanding of numerous ecological processes but are rarely linked in ecological theory. To derive a synthetic model, we draw on the common logical premise underlying these models and show how the diffusion and consumption rates of consumers depend on elementary attributes of naturally occurring consumer-resource interactions: the abundance, spatial aggregation, and traveling speed of resources as well as consumer handling time and directional persistence. We show that resource aggregation may lead to increased consumer diffusion and, in the case of mobile resources, reduced consumption rate. Resource-dependent movement patterns have traditionally been attributed to area-restricted search, reflecting adaptive decision making by the consumer. Our synthesis provides a simple alternative hypothesis that such patterns could also arise as a by-product of statistical movement mechanics.

  19. Absolute Rate Constants for the Reaction of OH with [|#11#|]Cyclopentane and Cycloheptane from 230-350 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dransfield, T. J.; Gennaco, M. M.; Huang, Y.; Hannun, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    We report absolute measurements of the rate constants of the reaction of hydroxyl radical (OH) with cyclopentane and cycloheptane in 6-8 Torr of nitrogen from 230-350 K using Harvard's High Pressure Flow System. Ethane's reactivity was simultaneously measured as a test of experimental performance. Hydroxyl concentrations were measured using Laser-Induced Fluorescence, and alkane concentrations were measured using Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Recent work on this flow system has suggested that cyclohexane has a significantly higher activation energy to reaction with OH than does cyclo-octane, a result which is not suggested by our understanding of hydrocarbon reactivity nor predicted by structure-activity relationships. This work examines the temperature dependent rates for two other similarly-sized cycloalkanes to determine whether they behave as cyclohexane or as cyclooctane. While several previous experiments have studied the reaction with cyclopentane, there is significant scatter in the room temperature rates, and only four absolute rate measurements are available at non-ambient temperatures. There are only two absolute rate measurements available for the reaction with cycloheptane; only one of these reports a temperature dependence, and that study is limited to temperatures above 298 K. Thus, this work significantly expands the available data set for both reactions. The data for the reactions of OH with ethane, cyclopentane, cyclohexane, and cycloheptane are all modeled using a simple Arrhenius fit, and also with a modified Arrhenius equation based on transition state theory, ignoring tunneling. Results from the latter fit indicate that the activation barriers for both title reactions are greater than that of OH + cyclo-octane. The measured activation energy for OH + cyclopentane actually exceeds that of OH + cyclohexane.

  20. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  1. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction OH + C2H2 from 228 to 413 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.; Borkowski, R. P.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction of the hydroxyl radical with acetylene, important in both atmospheric and combustion chemistry, is determined for temperatures between 228 and 413 K. The flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique was employed at five temperatures over wide ranges of pressure and acetylene concentrations, with the OH produced by water photolysis and hydroxyl resonance fluorescent photons measured by multiscaling techniques. Results indicate that, except at the lowest temperature, the bimolecular rate constant for the reaction depends strongly on total pressure, with the pressure effect becoming more pronounced with increasing temperature. At limiting high pressures, the rate constant is found to be equal to 6.83 + or - 1.19 x 10 to the -12th exp (-646 + or - 47/T) cu cm/molecule per sec, where T is the temperature. Results thus demonstrate the importance of environmental conditions in theoretical studies of atmospheric and combustion product compositions

  2. Absolute rate parameters for the reaction of ground state atomic oxygen with carbonyl sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemm, R. B.; Stief, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    The rate parameters for the reaction of O(3P) with carbonyl sulfide, O(3P) + OCS yields CO + SO, have been determined directly by monitoring O(3P) using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. The value for reaction rate was measured over a temperature range of 263-502 K and the data were fitted to an Arrhenius expression with good linearity. A comparison of the present results with those from previous studies of this reaction is also presented.

  3. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    PubMed Central

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model, and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is on the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules. PMID:26871190

  4. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach, in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is of the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.

  5. Assessment of the zinc diffusion rate in estuarine zones.

    PubMed

    Sámano, María Luisa; Pérez, María Luisa; Claramunt, Inigo; García, Andrés

    2016-03-15

    Industrial pressures suffered by estuarine zones leave a pollution record in their sediment. Thus, high concentrations of many heavy metals and some organic compounds are often found in estuarine sediment. This work aims to contribute to the enhancement of water quality management strategies in these zones by studying in detail the diffusive processes that take place between the water and sediment using a two-pronged approach: experimental practice and numerical simulation. To provide an example of the practical application of the methodologies proposed in this paper, the Suances Estuary (northern Spain) was selected as the study zone. This estuary exhibits significant historical pollution and its sediment acts as a continuous internal source of zinc, mainly due to diffusive processes derived from the concentration gradient between the interstitial water at the solid particles of the sediment and the bottom of the water column. The experimentally obtained results, based on 6 case studies, demonstrated the buffering capacity of the system and allowed the determination of the required time for the mass transfer processes to reach an equilibrium state. Furthermore, the diffusion rate of zinc was approximately modeled taking into consideration the high concentration variability observed in sediment along the entire estuary. The convergence between the modeled and the experimental results indicated the required contact time to reach an equilibrium state in a real field situation. PMID:26851870

  6. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation.

    PubMed

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach, in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is of the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.

  7. Absolute rate coefficients for photorecombination of beryllium-like and boron-like silicon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, D.; Becker, A.; Brandau, C.; Grieser, M.; Hahn, M.; Krantz, C.; Lestinsky, M.; Novotný, O.; Repnow, R.; Savin, D. W.; Spruck, K.; Wolf, A.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.

    2016-04-01

    We report measured rate coefficients for electron-ion recombination of Si10+ forming Si9+ and of Si9+ forming Si8+, respectively. The measurements were performed using the electron-ion merged-beams technique at a heavy-ion storage ring. Electron-ion collision energies ranged from 0 to 50 eV for Si9+ and from 0 to 2000 eV for Si10+, thus, extending previous measurements for Si10+ (Orban et al 2010 Astrophys. J. 721 1603) to much higher energies. Experimentally derived rate coefficients for the recombination of Si9+ and Si10+ ions in a plasma are presented along with simple parameterizations. These rate coefficients are useful for the modeling of the charge balance of silicon in photoionized plasmas (Si9+ and Si10+) and in collisionally ionized plasmas (Si10+ only). In the corresponding temperature ranges, the experimentally derived rate coefficients agree with the latest corresponding theoretical results within the experimental uncertainties.

  8. Reaction rates for mesoscopic reaction-diffusion kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Hellander, Stefan; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The mesoscopic reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a popular modeling framework frequently applied to stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics in systems biology. The RDME is derived from assumptions about the underlying physical properties of the system, and it may produce unphysical results for models where those assumptions fail. In that case, other more comprehensive models are better suited, such as hard-sphere Brownian dynamics (BD). Although the RDME is a model in its own right, and not inferred from any specific microscale model, it proves useful to attempt to approximate a microscale model by a specific choice of mesoscopic reaction rates. In this paper we derive mesoscopic scale-dependent reaction rates by matching certain statistics of the RDME solution to statistics of the solution of a widely used microscopic BD model: the Smoluchowski model with a Robin boundary condition at the reaction radius of two molecules. We also establish fundamental limits on the range of mesh resolutions for which this approach yields accurate results and show both theoretically and in numerical examples that as we approach the lower fundamental limit, the mesoscopic dynamics approach the microscopic dynamics. We show that for mesh sizes below the fundamental lower limit, results are less accurate. Thus, the lower limit determines the mesh size for which we obtain the most accurate results. PMID:25768640

  9. Reaction rates for mesoscopic reaction-diffusion kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellander, Stefan; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda

    2015-02-01

    The mesoscopic reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a popular modeling framework frequently applied to stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics in systems biology. The RDME is derived from assumptions about the underlying physical properties of the system, and it may produce unphysical results for models where those assumptions fail. In that case, other more comprehensive models are better suited, such as hard-sphere Brownian dynamics (BD). Although the RDME is a model in its own right, and not inferred from any specific microscale model, it proves useful to attempt to approximate a microscale model by a specific choice of mesoscopic reaction rates. In this paper we derive mesoscopic scale-dependent reaction rates by matching certain statistics of the RDME solution to statistics of the solution of a widely used microscopic BD model: the Smoluchowski model with a Robin boundary condition at the reaction radius of two molecules. We also establish fundamental limits on the range of mesh resolutions for which this approach yields accurate results and show both theoretically and in numerical examples that as we approach the lower fundamental limit, the mesoscopic dynamics approach the microscopic dynamics. We show that for mesh sizes below the fundamental lower limit, results are less accurate. Thus, the lower limit determines the mesh size for which we obtain the most accurate results.

  10. Reaction rates for mesoscopic reaction-diffusion kinetics.

    PubMed

    Hellander, Stefan; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda

    2015-02-01

    The mesoscopic reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a popular modeling framework frequently applied to stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics in systems biology. The RDME is derived from assumptions about the underlying physical properties of the system, and it may produce unphysical results for models where those assumptions fail. In that case, other more comprehensive models are better suited, such as hard-sphere Brownian dynamics (BD). Although the RDME is a model in its own right, and not inferred from any specific microscale model, it proves useful to attempt to approximate a microscale model by a specific choice of mesoscopic reaction rates. In this paper we derive mesoscopic scale-dependent reaction rates by matching certain statistics of the RDME solution to statistics of the solution of a widely used microscopic BD model: the Smoluchowski model with a Robin boundary condition at the reaction radius of two molecules. We also establish fundamental limits on the range of mesh resolutions for which this approach yields accurate results and show both theoretically and in numerical examples that as we approach the lower fundamental limit, the mesoscopic dynamics approach the microscopic dynamics. We show that for mesh sizes below the fundamental lower limit, results are less accurate. Thus, the lower limit determines the mesh size for which we obtain the most accurate results.

  11. A Simple Apparatus for Screening Absolute Photosynthetic Rates of Single Algal Colonies in an Anoxic Atmosphere 1

    PubMed Central

    Graves, D. A.; Greenbaum, E.

    1989-01-01

    Photosynthetically generated O2 was measured from single algal colonies in a He atmosphere, using an enhanced Hersch galvanic cell. The enhancement consisted of using ultrapure potassium hydroxide as the electrolyte and ultrapure lead as the anode. The galvanic cell was placed in a regulated helium-flow system containing a reaction cuvette with the colonies and an electrolysis cell for calibration. Colonies were individually irradiated using a He-Ne laser. Data collection and laser positioning for colony irradiation were microcomputer controlled. This assay system was capable of detecting O2 production rates of 500 femtomoles per second with a signal to noise ratio of 2, a level of sensitivity that permitted the detection of photoevolved O2 from single algal colonies. This capability provides, for the first time, an approach for quantitatively measuring the absolute rate of photosynthetic O2 evolution from a single algal colony. PMID:16666743

  12. Absolute depth-dose-rate measurements for an {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source in water using MOSFET detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zilio, Valery Olivier; Joneja, Om Parkash; Popowski, Youri; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Chawla, Rakesh

    2006-06-15

    Reported MOSFET measurements concern mostly external radiotherapy and in vivo dosimetry. In this paper, we apply the technique for absolute dosimetry in the context of HDR brachytherapy using an {sup 192}Ir source. Measured radial dose rate distributions in water for different planes perpendicular to the source axis are presented and special attention is paid to the calibration of the R and K type detectors, and to the determination of appropriate correction factors for the sensitivity variation with the increase of the threshold voltage and the energy dependence. The experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo simulated dose rate distributions. The experimental results show a good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulations: the discrepancy between experimental and Monte Carlo results being within 5% for 82% of the points and within 10% for 95% of the points. Moreover, all points except two are found to lie within the experimental uncertainties, confirming thereby the quality of the results obtained.

  13. Absolute rate of the reaction of bromine atoms with ozone from 200-360 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Lee, J. H.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction Br + O3 yields BrO + O2 was measured from 200 to 360 K by the technique of flash photolysis coupled to time resolved detection of bromine atoms by resonance fluorescence (FP-RF). Br atoms were produced by the flash photolysis of CH3Br at lambda 165nm.O3 was monitored continuously under reaction conditions by absorption at 253.7 nm. At each of five temperatures the results were independent of substantial variations in O3, total pressure and limited variations in flash intensity. The measured rate constants obeyed the Arrhenius expression, where the error quoted is two standard deviations. Results are compared with previous determinations which employed the discharge flow-mass spectrometric technique.

  14. Absolute rate of the reaction of bromine atoms with ozone from 200 to 360 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Lee, J. H.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction Br + O3 yields BrO + O2 has been measured from 200 to 360 K by the technique of flash photolysis coupled to time resolved detection of bromine atoms by resonance fluorescence (FP-RF). Br atoms were produced by the flash photolysis of CH3Br at a wavelength of 165 nm. O3 concentration was monitored continuously under reaction conditions by absorption at 253.7 nm. At each of five temperatures the results were independent of substantial variations in O3 concentration, total pressure (Ar), and limited variations in flash intensity (i.e., initial Br concentration). The measured rate constants obey the Arrhenius expression, k = (7.74 plus or minus 0.50) x 10 to the -12th exp(-603 plus or minus 16/T) cu cm/molecule/sec, where the error quoted is two standard deviations.

  15. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ketene from 298 to 500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ketene have been measured at room temperature by two techniques, flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence and discharge flow-resonance fluorescence. The measured values are (6.19 + or - 1.68) x 10 to the -14th and (7.3 + or - 1.3) x 10 to the -14th cu cm/molecule/s, respectively. In addition, rate constants as a function of temperature have been measured over the range 298-500 K using the FP-RF technique. The results are best represented by the Arrhenius expression k = (1.88 + or - 1.12) x 10 to the -11th exp(-1725 + or - 190/T) cu cm/molecule/s, where the indicated errors are at the two standard deviation level.

  16. Absolute vertical uplift rates in western Washington inferred from historical leveling and tide gauge data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alba, S.; Weldon, R.; Livelybrooks, D.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    We present a new uplift rate map for western Washington based on reanalysis of water levels from the 12 major NOAA tide gauges, three new water level series that combine NOAA’s historical records and our temporarily deployed gauges (at Cape Disappointment, Olympia, and Point Grenville), and reinterpretation of repeated 1st and 2nd order NGS leveling lines. As previous studies have concluded, EW gradients in the vertical deformation field are consistent with strain accumulation across the Cascadia subduction zone interface; however, uplift rates are highly variable along the outer Washington coast, ranging from approximately +4 to -2 mm/yr, suggesting significant changes in the depth of locking along strike. Improved measure of uplift rates from water level changes are accomplished by aggressively editing available hourly data and applying a transfer function approach to better remove tides, ocean and atmospheric “noise”. The analysis allows uplift to be determined from shorter and less complete records and in some cases permits the identification of transients like slow earthquakes. As we found in a similar study in Oregon (Burgette et al, JGR, 2009), releveled lines need to be anchored to as many tide gauges as possible to remove systematic error, and repeated releveling (especially of tidal benchmarks) is required to identify the few stable benchmarks that link water levels at the tidal stations to each other through time and to the regional NGS leveling lines. A portion of the westernmost Washington coast, from an approximate latitude of 47.4 to 47.9 N, is subsiding, and tilts suggest that the peak in uplift rate is well onshore, indicating that the locked zone extends onshore, in contrast to most previous studies. To the north, the peak in uplift approximately passes through Neah Bay (the NW corner of the Olympic Peninsula, lat. 48.3 N), and to the south the peak is offshore from Grays Harbor (lat. 47 N) to the Columbia River (lat. 46.2 N). A north

  17. Absolute rate constant determinations for the deactivation of O/1D/ by time resolved decay of O/1D/ yields O/3P/ emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J. A.; Sadowski, C. M.; Schiff, H. I.; Howard, C. J.; Schmeltekopf, A. L.; Jennings, D. A.; Streit, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the deactivation of O(1D) atoms by some atmospheric gases have been determined by observing the time-resolved emission of O(1D) at 630 nm. O(1D) atoms were produced by the dissociation of ozone via repetitive laser pulses at 266 nm. Absolute rate constants for the relaxation of O(1D) at 298 K are reported for N2, O2, CO2, O3, H2, D2, CH4, HCl, NH3, H2O, N2O, and Ne. The results obtained are compared with previous relative and absolute measurements reported in the literature.

  18. Absolute rate calculations: atom and proton transfers in hydrogen-bonded systems.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Mónica; Arnaut, Luis G; Formosinho, Sebastião J

    2005-02-01

    We calculate energy barriers of atom- and proton-transfer reactions in hydrogen-bonded complexes in the gas phase. Our calculations do not involve adjustable parameters and are based on bond-dissociation energies, ionization potentials, electron affinities, bond lengths, and vibration frequencies of the reactive bonds. The calculated barriers are in agreement with experimental data and high-level ab initio calculations. We relate the height of the barrier with the molecular properties of the reactants and complexes. The structure of complexes with strong hydrogen bonds approaches that of the transition state, and substantially reduces the barrier height. We calculate the hydrogen-abstraction rates in H-bonded systems using the transition-state theory with the semiclassical correction for tunneling, and show that they are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. H-bonding leads to an increase in tunneling corrections at room temperature. PMID:15751360

  19. Temperature and pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reactions of NH2 radicals with acetylene and ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Nava, D. F.; Brobst, W. D.; Stief, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute rate constants for the reaction between the NH2 free radical and acetylene and ethylene is measured experimentally using a flash photolysis technique. The constant is considered to be a function of temperature and pressure. At each temperature level of the experiment, the observed pseudo-first-order rate constants were assumed to be independent of flash intensity. The results of the experiment indicate that the bimolecular rate constant for the NH2 + C2H2 reaction increases with pressure at 373 K and 459 K but not at lower temperatures. Results near the pressure limit conform to an Arrhenius expression of 1.11 (+ or -) 0.36 x 10 to the -13th over the temperature range from 241 to 459 K. For the reaction NH2 + C2H4, a smaller rate of increase in the bimolecular rate constant was observed over the temperature range 250-465 K. The implications of these results for current theoretical models of NH2 + C2H2 (or H4) reactions in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are discussed.

  20. Solid-state track recorder dosimetry device to measure absolute reaction rates and neutron fluence as a function of time

    DOEpatents

    Gold, Raymond; Roberts, James H.

    1989-01-01

    A solid state track recording type dosimeter is disclosed to measure the time dependence of the absolute fission rates of nuclides or neutron fluence over a period of time. In a primary species an inner recording drum is rotatably contained within an exterior housing drum that defines a series of collimating slit apertures overlying windows defined in the stationary drum through which radiation can enter. Film type solid state track recorders are positioned circumferentially about the surface of the internal recording drum to record such radiation or its secondary products during relative rotation of the two elements. In another species both the recording element and the aperture element assume the configuration of adjacent disks. Based on slit size of apertures and relative rotational velocity of the inner drum, radiation parameters within a test area may be measured as a function of time and spectra deduced therefrom.

  1. Indirectly estimated absolute lung cancer mortality rates by smoking status and histological type based on a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background National smoking-specific lung cancer mortality rates are unavailable, and studies presenting estimates are limited, particularly by histology. This hinders interpretation. We attempted to rectify this by deriving estimates indirectly, combining data from national rates and epidemiological studies. Methods We estimated study-specific absolute mortality rates and variances by histology and smoking habit (never/ever/current/former) based on relative risk estimates derived from studies published in the 20th century, coupled with WHO mortality data for age 70–74 for the relevant country and period. Studies with populations grossly unrepresentative nationally were excluded. 70–74 was chosen based on analyses of large cohort studies presenting rates by smoking and age. Variations by sex, period and region were assessed by meta-analysis and meta-regression. Results 148 studies provided estimates (Europe 59, America 54, China 22, other Asia 13), 54 providing estimates by histology (squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma). For all smoking habits and lung cancer types, mortality rates were higher in males, the excess less evident for never smokers. Never smoker rates were clearly highest in China, and showed some increasing time trend, particularly for adenocarcinoma. Ever smoker rates were higher in parts of Europe and America than in China, with the time trend very clear, especially for adenocarcinoma. Variations by time trend and continent were clear for current smokers (rates being higher in Europe and America than Asia), but less clear for former smokers. Models involving continent and trend explained much variability, but non-linearity was sometimes seen (with rates lower in 1991–99 than 1981–90), and there was regional variation within continent (with rates in Europe often high in UK and low in Scandinavia, and higher in North than South America). Conclusions The indirect method may be questioned, because of variations in definition of smoking and

  2. A rare gas optics-free absolute photon flux and energy analyzer to provide absolute photoionization rates of inflowing interstellar neutrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, Darrell L.

    1994-01-01

    A prototype spectrometer has been developed for space applications requiring long term absolute EUV photon flux measurements. The energy spectrum of the incoming photons is transformed directly into an electron energy spectrum by taking advantage of the photoelectric effect in one of several rare gases at low pressures. Using an electron energy spectrometer, followed by an electron multiplier detector, pulses due to individual electrons are counted. The overall efficiency of this process can be made essentially independent of gain drifts in the signal path, and the secular degradation of optical components which is often a problem in other techniques is avoided. A very important feature of this approach is its freedom from the problem of overlapping spectral orders that plagues grating EUV spectrometers. An instrument with these features has not been flown before, but is essential to further advances in our understanding of solar EUV flux dynamics, and the coupled dynamics of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres. The detailed characteristics of this optics-free spectrometer are presented in the publications section.

  3. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction OH + C2H2 from 228 to 413K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Borokowski, R. P.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure dependence of absolute rate constants for the reaction of OH + C2H2 yields products has been examined at five temperatures ranging from 228 to 413 K. The experimental techniques which was used is flash photolysis-resonance fluoresence. OH was produced by water photolysis and hydroxyl resonance fluorescent photons were measured by multiscaling techniques. The results indicate that the low pressure bimolecular rate constant is 4 x 10 the the minus 13th power cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1) over the temperature range studied. A substantial increase in the bimolecular rate constant with an increase in pressure was observed at all temperatures except 228 K. This indicates the importance of initial adduct formation and subsequent stablization. The high pressure results are well represented by the Arrhenius expression (k sub bi) sub infinity = (6.83 + or - 1.19) x 10 to the minus 12th power exp(-646 + or - 47/T)cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1). The results are compared to previous investigated and are theoretically discussed. The implications of these results on modeling of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and also in combustion chemistry are discussed.

  4. The reaction H + C4H2 - Absolute rate constant measurement and implication for atmospheric modeling of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nava, D. F.; Mitchell, M. B.; Stief, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction H + C4H2 has been measured over the temperature (T) interval 210-423 K, using the technique of flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence. At each of the five temperatures employed, the results were independent of variations in C4H2 concentration, total pressure of Ar or N2, and flash intensity (i.e., the initial H concentration). The rate constant, k, was found to be equal to 1.39 x 10 to the -10th exp (-1184/T) cu cm/s, with an error of one standard deviation. The Arrhenius parameters at the high pressure limit determined here for the H + C4H2 reaction are consistent with those for the corresponding reactions of H with C2H2 and C3H4. Implications of the kinetic carbon chemistry results, particularly those at low temperature, are considered for models of the atmospheric carbon chemistry of Titan. The rate of this reaction, relative to that of the analogous, but slower, reaction of H + C2H2, appears to make H + C4H2 a very feasible reaction pathway for effective conversion of H atoms to molecular hydrogen in the stratosphere of Titan.

  5. Diffusion-controlled growth rate of stepped interfaces.

    PubMed

    Saidi, P; Hoyt, J J

    2015-07-01

    For many materials, the structure of crystalline surfaces or solid-solid interphase boundaries is characterized by an array of mobile steps separated by immobile terraces. Despite the prevalence of step-terraced interfaces a theoretical description of the growth rate has not been completely solved. In this work the boundary element method (BEM) has been utilized to numerically compute the concentration profile in a fluid phase in contact with an infinite array of equally spaced surface steps and, under the assumption that step motion is controlled by diffusion through the fluid phase, the growth rate is computed. It is also assumed that a boundary layer exists between the growing surface and a point in the liquid where complete convective mixing occurs. The BEM results are presented for varying step spacing, supersaturation, and boundary layer width. BEM calculations were also used to study the phenomenon of step bunching during crystal growth, and it is found that, in the absence of elastic strain energy, a sufficiently large perturbation in the position of a step from its regular spacing will lead to a step bunching instability. Finally, an approximate analytic solution using a matched asymptotic expansion technique is presented for the case of a stagnant liquid or equivalently a solid-solid stepped interface.

  6. SAS-2 observations of the diffuse gamma radiation in the galactic latitude interval 10 deg absolute b or equal to 90 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Oegelman, H. B.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of all of the second small astronomy satellite gamma-ray data for galactic latitudes with the absolute value of b 10 deg has shown that the intensity varies with galactic latitude, being larger near 10 deg than 90 deg. For energies above 100 MeV the gamma-ray data are consistent with a latitude distribution of the form I(b) = C sub 1 + C sub 2/sin b, with the second term being dominant. This result suggests that the radiation above 100 MeV is coming largely from local regions of the galactic disk. Between 35 and 100 MeV, a similar equation is also a good representation of the data, but here the two terms are comparable. These results indicate that the diffuse radiation above 35 MeV consists of two parts, one with a relatively hard galactic component and the other an isotropic, steep spectral component which extrapolates back well to the low energy diffuse radiation. The steepness of the diffuse isotropic component places significant constraints on possible theoretical models of this radiation.

  7. Optical factors determined by the T-matrix method in turbidity measurement of absolute coagulation rate constants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shenghua; Liu, Jie; Sun, Zhiwei

    2006-12-01

    Turbidity measurement for the absolute coagulation rate constants of suspensions has been extensively adopted because of its simplicity and easy implementation. A key factor in deriving the rate constant from experimental data is how to theoretically evaluate the so-called optical factor involved in calculating the extinction cross section of doublets formed during aggregation. In a previous paper, we have shown that compared with other theoretical approaches, the T-matrix method provides a robust solution to this problem and is effective in extending the applicability range of the turbidity methodology, as well as increasing measurement accuracy. This paper will provide a more comprehensive discussion of the physical insight for using the T-matrix method in turbidity measurement and associated technical details. In particular, the importance of ensuring the correct value for the refractive indices for colloidal particles and the surrounding medium used in the calculation is addressed, because the indices generally vary with the wavelength of the incident light. The comparison of calculated results with experiments shows that the T-matrix method can correctly calculate optical factors even for large particles, whereas other existing theories cannot. In addition, the data of the optical factor calculated by the T-matrix method for a range of particle radii and incident light wavelengths are listed.

  8. Mapping the microvascular and the associated absolute values of oxy-hemoglobin concentration through turbid media via local off-set diffuse optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Klämpfl, Florian; Stelzle, Florian; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-11-01

    An imging resolution of micron-scale has not yet been discovered by diffuse optical imaging (DOI), while a superficial response was eliminated. In this work, we report on a new approach of DOI with a local off-set alignment to subvert the common boundary conditions of the modified Beer-Lambert Law (MBLL). It can resolve a superficial target in micron scale under a turbid media. To validate both major breakthroughs, this system was used to recover a subsurface microvascular mimicking structure under an skin equivalent phantom. This microvascular was included with oxy-hemoglobin solution in variant concentrations to distiguish the absolute values of CtRHb and CtHbO2 . Experimental results confirmed the feasibility of recovering the target vascular of 50 µm in diameter, and graded the values of the concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin from 10 g/L to 50 g/L absolutely. Ultimately, this approach could evolve into a non-invasive imaging system to map the microvascular pattern and the associated oximetry under a human skin in-vivo.

  9. Continuous, online measurement of the absolute plasma refill rate during hemodialysis using feedback regulated ultrafiltration: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Brummelhuis, Walter J; van Schelven, Leonard J; Boer, Walther H

    2008-01-01

    Methods to continuously measure absolute refill during dialysis are not available. It would be useful to have such a method because it would allow investigating the mechanism of refill the effect of interventions. We designed a feedback algorithm that adjusts ultrafiltration rate (QUF) according to hemoglobin (Hb) concentration changes in such a way that relative blood volume (BV) remains constant within a narrow target range. In this situation, the generated QUF quantitatively reflects refill. Refill patterns were studied in five hypotension prone patients. In addition, on separate occasions, we studied the effect of antiembolism stockings (AES) and infusion of hydroxy-ethylated starch (HAES) on refill in these patients. Refill during the first hour fell significantly from 21 +/- 3 ml/min to 9 +/- 2 ml/min (p < 0.05). In the second hour, refill decreased further and became zero in four out of five patients. Neither AES nor HAES measurably affected refill. The marked and rapid fall in refill in the early stages of dialysis suggests untimely depletion of the interstitial compartment and underestimation of dry weight. We propose that continuous, online measurement of refill patterns may be of value for accurate estimation of dry weight in dialysis patients. PMID:18204322

  10. Measurements of Transverse Beam Diffusion Rates in the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Johnson, T.R.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    The transverse beam diffusion rate vs. particle oscillation amplitude was measured in the Tevatron using collimator scans. All collimator jaws except one were retracted. As the jaw of interest was moved in small steps, the local shower rates were recorded as a function of time. By using a diffusion model, the time evolution of losses could be related to the diffusion rate at the collimator position. Preliminary results of these measurements are presented.

  11. Pyrrole copolymers with enhanced ion diffusion rates for lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Calvert, P.; Gardlund, Z.; Huntoon, T.; Hall, H.K.; Padias, A.

    1998-07-01

    Copolymers of pyrrole with a polyether-substituted pyrrole were tested as cathodes for lithium batteries. The charge and discharge characteristics showed that anion transport was much faster in the copolymer than in polypyrrole. As a result these electrodes store and release much more charge at higher current densities but are similar to polypyrrole at low currents. Pulse and relaxation measurements of the ion diffusion showed that this difference was due to a ten-fold increase in the anion diffusion coefficient.

  12. Diffusion-controlled reaction rate to an active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traytak, S. D.

    1995-02-01

    The diffusion-controlled reactions of chemically anisotropic reactants are treated for the simplest model of Solc and Stockmayer (Intern. J. Chem. Kinet. 5 (1973) 733) in the absence of rotational diffusion. Using the dual series relations approach we can find the effective steric factor with any necessary accuracy. A few simple analytical approximations for the effective steric factor are proposed. The derived results we compare with the relevant analytical approximations and numerical calculations available in the literature.

  13. Calibration of diffuse correlation spectroscopy with a time-resolved near-infrared technique to yield absolute cerebral blood flow measurements

    PubMed Central

    Diop, Mamadou; Verdecchia, Kyle; Lee, Ting-Yim; St Lawrence, Keith

    2011-01-01

    A primary focus of neurointensive care is the prevention of secondary brain injury, mainly caused by ischemia. A noninvasive bedside technique for continuous monitoring of cerebral blood flow (CBF) could improve patient management by detecting ischemia before brain injury occurs. A promising technique for this purpose is diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) since it can continuously monitor relative perfusion changes in deep tissue. In this study, DCS was combined with a time-resolved near-infrared technique (TR-NIR) that can directly measure CBF using indocyanine green as a flow tracer. With this combination, the TR-NIR technique can be used to convert DCS data into absolute CBF measurements. The agreement between the two techniques was assessed by concurrent measurements of CBF changes in piglets. A strong correlation between CBF changes measured by TR-NIR and changes in the scaled diffusion coefficient measured by DCS was observed (R2 = 0.93) with a slope of 1.05 ± 0.06 and an intercept of 6.4 ± 4.3% (mean ± standard error). PMID:21750781

  14. Low absolute lymphocyte count and addition of rituximab confer high risk for interstitial pneumonia in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Chung; Liu, Chia-Jen; Liu, Chun-Yu; Pai, Jih-Tung; Hong, Ying-Chung; Teng, Hao-Wei; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Chao, Ta-Chung; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Hsu, Hui-Chi; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Chen, Po-Min; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai

    2011-10-01

    Several small-scale studies have reported pulmonary toxicity among patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) receiving rituximab-containing chemotherapy, though whether the use of rituximab predisposes to interstitial pneumonia (IP) remains unclear. This retrospective study was intended to identify the characteristics and risk factors of IP in patients with DLBCL. Between 2000 and 2009, 529 consecutive patients with DLBCL receiving first-line tri-weekly COP- or CHOP-based chemotherapy with or without rituximab were enrolled as subjects. IP was defined as diffuse pulmonary interstitial infiltrates found on computed tomography scans in conjunction with respiratory symptoms. IP was observed in 26 patients (4.9%), six of whom were confirmed with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. The median number of chemotherapy courses before IP was four cycles. Using multivariate analysis, absolute lymphocyte count less than 1×10(9)/l at diagnosis [odds ratio (OR) 2.75, p=0.014] and the addition of rituximab to chemotherapy (OR 4.56, p=0.003) were identified as independent risk factors for IP. In conclusion, the incidence of IP is increased in patients with DLBCL receiving rituximab-containing chemotherapy. Specific subgroups with lymphopenia at diagnosis may justify close scrutiny to detect pulmonary complications. PMID:21647583

  15. Note: The effect of viscosity on the rate of diffusion-limited association of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P

    2015-10-28

    In the treatments of diffusion-limited association of suspended nanoparticles, their diffusion coefficients are usually considered to be constant and equal to those given by conventional hydrodynamics for diffusion of single nanoparticles. In reality, according to hydrodynamics, these coefficients depend, however, on the distance between nanoparticles. I show how this dependence can influence the association rate.

  16. Computation of Rate Constants for Diffusion of Small Ligands to and from Buried Protein Active Sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, P-H; De Sancho, D; Best, R B; Blumberger, J

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of ligands to actives sites of proteins is essential to enzyme catalysis and many cellular signaling processes. In this contribution we review our recently developed methodology for calculation of rate constants for diffusion and binding of small molecules to buried protein active sites. The diffusive dynamics of the ligand obtained from molecular dynamics simulation is coarse grained and described by a Markov state model. Diffusion and binding rate constants are then obtained either from the reactive flux formalism or by fitting the time-dependent population of the Markov state model to a phenomenological rate law. The method is illustrated by applications to diffusion of substrate and inhibitors in [NiFe] hydrogenase, CO-dehydrogenase, and myoglobin. We also discuss a recently developed sensitivity analysis that allows one to identify hot spots in proteins, where mutations are expected to have the strongest effects on ligand diffusion rates.

  17. Computation of Rate Constants for Diffusion of Small Ligands to and from Buried Protein Active Sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, P-H; De Sancho, D; Best, R B; Blumberger, J

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of ligands to actives sites of proteins is essential to enzyme catalysis and many cellular signaling processes. In this contribution we review our recently developed methodology for calculation of rate constants for diffusion and binding of small molecules to buried protein active sites. The diffusive dynamics of the ligand obtained from molecular dynamics simulation is coarse grained and described by a Markov state model. Diffusion and binding rate constants are then obtained either from the reactive flux formalism or by fitting the time-dependent population of the Markov state model to a phenomenological rate law. The method is illustrated by applications to diffusion of substrate and inhibitors in [NiFe] hydrogenase, CO-dehydrogenase, and myoglobin. We also discuss a recently developed sensitivity analysis that allows one to identify hot spots in proteins, where mutations are expected to have the strongest effects on ligand diffusion rates. PMID:27497172

  18. Comparison of Hydrogen Atom Abstraction Rates of Terminal and Bridging Hydrides in Triosmium Clusters: Absolute Abstraction Rate Constants for Benzyl Radical

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, James A.; Kolwaite, Douglas S.; Linehan, John C.; Rosenberg, Edward

    2004-02-02

    Absolute rate constants for hydrogen atom abstraction by benzyl radical from Os3(m-H)2 (CO)9PPh3(1), Os3 (m-H)(H)(CO)10PPh3(2), Os3(m-H)(CO)9(m3-h2-C9H6N)(3), Os3(m-H)(CO)9(m-h2-C9H6N)PPh3 (5) and Os3(m-H)(CO)10(m-h2-C9H6N) (4) were determined in benzene by competition of the abstraction reaction with the self termination of benzyl radical. Thus, experimental values of kabs/kt1/2 were combined with rate constants for self-termination of benzyl radical in benzene from the expression ln(2kt/M-1s-1= 27.23 - 2952.4/RT), RT in cal/mol, to give absolute rate constants for abstraction, kabs: for Os3(m-H)2 (CO)9PPh3(1) in benzene, log (kabs/M-1s-1)= (8.86 .20) - (6.90 .31)/q; for Os3 (m-H)(H)(CO)(10PPh3) (2) log (kabs/M-1s-1)= (8.15 .49) - (4.41 .72)/q; for Os3(m-H)(CO)9(m3-h2-C9H6N) (3) log (kabs/M-1s-1)= (8.9 2) (8.8 3)/q; value for 4 and for Os3(m-H)(CO9)(m-h2-C9H6N)(PPh3) (5) log (kabs/M-1s-1)= (7.0 .38) - (4.15 .56)/q, q= 2.303RT kcal/mol. The terminal hydride on the Os3 c luster 2 is about 10 times more reactive than bridging hydride in 1. The results show that while m-H bridging retards the rate of hydrogen abstraction relative to terminal hydrogen, the bridging hydrogen remains appreciably reactive in the m-H form. In fact, the highest rate observed was for the bridging hydride in 4, Os3(m-H)(CO)10(m-h2-C9H6N). Temperature dependent kinetics for compound 4 were not determined because of significant CO loss above room temperature. However at 293 K the rate constant of hydrogen atom abstraction from this electron-rich cluster, 5 2 x 104 M-1s-1, is at least twice as fast as that for the terminal hydrogen atom cluster, 2, Os3 (m-H)(H)(CO)10PPh3, kabs (298 K)= 1.8 x 104 M-1s-1. The rate constants for hydrogen atom abstraction by benzyl radical from these osmium clusters increase with increasing electron density on the osmium cluster and decrease with increasing steric bulk of the ligands.

  19. Dependence of Turing pattern wavelength on diffusion rate

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Q. ); Li, R.; Li, G. ); Swinney, H.L. )

    1995-02-08

    The relation between the diffusion coefficient of reactants and the wavelength of Turing patterns is examined in experiments on the chlorite--iodide--malonic acid (CIMA) reaction in gel media. The diffusion coefficients in polyacrylamide and agarose gels are varied by varying the gel densities. The diffusion coefficient [ital D] of NaCl is found to vary from 0.5[times]10[sup [minus]5] to 1.8[times]10[sup [minus]5] cm[sup 2]/s for the gel conditions considered. The CIMA reactants are assumed to have diffusion coefficients that are directly proportional to that of NaCl. The wavelength [lambda] of the observed hexagonal patterns (0.13--0.28 mm) varies in accord with the predicted relation for Turing patterns, [lambda][similar to][ital D][sup 1/2]. Moreover, the predicted relationship to a characteristic period of oscillation [tau], [lambda]=(2[pi][tau][ital D])[sup 1/2], is supported by measurements of [tau] just beyond a Hopf bifurcation in a stirred flow reactor.

  20. Coordinate-dependent diffusion coefficients: Decay rate in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Palchikov, Yu. V.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.

    2007-06-15

    Based on a master equation for the reduced density matrix of an open quantum collective system, the influence of coordinate-dependent microscopical diffusion coefficients on the decay rate from a metastable state is treated. For various frictions and temperatures larger than a crossover temperature, the quasistationary decay rates obtained with the coordinate-dependent microscopical set of diffusion coefficients are compared with those obtained with the coordinate-independent microscopical set of diffusion coefficients and coordinate-independent and -dependent phenomenological sets of diffusion coefficients. Neglecting the coordinate dependence of diffusion coefficients, one can strongly overestimate or underestimate the decay rate at low temperature. The coordinate-dependent phenomenological diffusion coefficient in momentum are shown to be suitable for applications.

  1. Peripheral blood absolute lymphocyte/monocyte ratio during rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone treatment cycles predicts clinical outcomes in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Porrata, Luis F; Ristow, Kay M; Habermann, Thomas M; Witzig, Thomas E; Colgan, Joseph P; Inwards, David J; Ansell, Stephen M; Micallef, Ivana N; Johnston, Patrick B; Nowakowski, Grzegorz; Thompson, Carrie A; Markovic, Svetomir N

    2014-12-01

    A limitation of the prognostic factor peripheral blood absolute lymphocyte/monocyte ratio (ALC/AMC) at diagnosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is its inability to sequentially assess the host/tumor microenvironment interaction and clinical outcomes during treatment. Therefore, we studied the ALC/AMC ratio at each rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone (R-CHOP) cycle as a predictor for survival. We studied 107 consecutive patients with DLBCL diagnosed, treated only with R-CHOP and followed at the Mayo Clinic. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified four clusters based on the patterns of ALC/AMC ratio recovery during cycles. The most inferior survival was seen in the cluster with ALC/AMC ratio < 1.1 in all cycles. By multivariate analysis, ALC/AMC ratio < 1.1 during all cycles was an independent predictor for inferior overall survival and progression-free survival. The ALC/AMC ratio during R-CHOP cycles predicts survival and provides a platform to develop therapeutic modalities to manipulate the ALC/AMC ratio during R-CHOP cycles to improve DLBCL clinical outcomes.

  2. Anisotropic conductivity tensor imaging in MREIT using directional diffusion rate of water molecules.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh In; Jeong, Woo Chul; Sajib, Saurav Z K; Kim, Hyung Joong; Woo, Eung Je

    2014-06-21

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is an emerging method to visualize electrical conductivity and/or current density images at low frequencies (below 1 KHz). Injecting currents into an imaging object, one component of the induced magnetic flux density is acquired using an MRI scanner for isotropic conductivity image reconstructions. Diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI) measures the intrinsic three-dimensional diffusion property of water molecules within a tissue. It characterizes the anisotropic water transport by the effective diffusion tensor. Combining the DT-MRI and MREIT techniques, we propose a novel direct method for absolute conductivity tensor image reconstructions based on a linear relationship between the water diffusion tensor and the electrical conductivity tensor. We first recover the projected current density, which is the best approximation of the internal current density one can obtain from the measured single component of the induced magnetic flux density. This enables us to estimate a scale factor between the diffusion tensor and the conductivity tensor. Combining these values at all pixels with the acquired diffusion tensor map, we can quantitatively recover the anisotropic conductivity tensor map. From numerical simulations and experimental verifications using a biological tissue phantom, we found that the new method overcomes the limitations of each method and successfully reconstructs both the direction and magnitude of the conductivity tensor for both the anisotropic and isotropic regions.

  3. Effective reaction rates in diffusion-limited phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miękisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the kinetics of the ubiquitous phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle on biological membranes by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the triangular lattice. We establish the dependence of effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients as well as the steady-state phosphorylated substrate fraction on the diffusion coefficient and concentrations of opposing enzymes: kinases and phosphatases. In the limits of zero and infinite diffusion, the numerical results agree with analytical predictions; these two limits give the lower and the upper bound for the macroscopic rate coefficients, respectively. In the zero-diffusion limit, which is important in the analysis of dense systems, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions can convert only these substrates which remain in contact with opposing enzymes. In the most studied regime of nonzero but small diffusion, a contribution linearly proportional to the diffusion coefficient appears in the reaction rate. In this regime, the presence of opposing enzymes creates inhomogeneities in the (de)phosphorylated substrate distributions: The spatial correlation function shows that enzymes are surrounded by clouds of converted substrates. This effect becomes important at low enzyme concentrations, substantially lowering effective reaction rates. Effective reaction rates decrease with decreasing diffusion and this dependence is more pronounced for the less-abundant enzyme. Consequently, the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrates can increase or decrease with diffusion, depending on relative concentrations of both enzymes. Additionally, steady states are controlled by molecular crowders which, mostly by lowering the effective diffusion of reactants, favor the more abundant enzyme.

  4. Effective reaction rates in diffusion-limited phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the kinetics of the ubiquitous phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle on biological membranes by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the triangular lattice. We establish the dependence of effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients as well as the steady-state phosphorylated substrate fraction on the diffusion coefficient and concentrations of opposing enzymes: kinases and phosphatases. In the limits of zero and infinite diffusion, the numerical results agree with analytical predictions; these two limits give the lower and the upper bound for the macroscopic rate coefficients, respectively. In the zero-diffusion limit, which is important in the analysis of dense systems, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions can convert only these substrates which remain in contact with opposing enzymes. In the most studied regime of nonzero but small diffusion, a contribution linearly proportional to the diffusion coefficient appears in the reaction rate. In this regime, the presence of opposing enzymes creates inhomogeneities in the (de)phosphorylated substrate distributions: The spatial correlation function shows that enzymes are surrounded by clouds of converted substrates. This effect becomes important at low enzyme concentrations, substantially lowering effective reaction rates. Effective reaction rates decrease with decreasing diffusion and this dependence is more pronounced for the less-abundant enzyme. Consequently, the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrates can increase or decrease with diffusion, depending on relative concentrations of both enzymes. Additionally, steady states are controlled by molecular crowders which, mostly by lowering the effective diffusion of reactants, favor the more abundant enzyme.

  5. Diffusive shock acceleration - Acceleration rate, magnetic-field direction and the diffusion limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jokipii, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews the concept of diffusive shock acceleration, showing that the acceleration of charged particles at a collisionless shock is a straightforward consequence of the standard cosmic-ray transport equation, provided that one treats the discontinuity at the shock correctly. This is true for arbitrary direction of the upstream magnetic field. Within this framework, it is shown that acceleration at perpendicular or quasi-perpendicular shocks is generally much faster than for parallel shocks. Paradoxically, it follows also that, for a simple scattering law, the acceleration is faster for less scattering or larger mean free path. Obviously, the mean free path can not become too large or the diffusion limit becomes inapplicable. Gradient and curvature drifts caused by the magnetic-field change at the shock play a major role in the acceleration process in most cases. Recent observations of the charge state of the anomalous component are shown to require the faster acceleration at the quasi-perpendicular solar-wind termination shock.

  6. Quantifying the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdecchia, Kyle; Diop, Mamadou; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2013-02-01

    Preterm infants are highly susceptible to ischemic brain injury; consequently, continuous bedside monitoring to detect ischemia before irreversible damage occurs would improve patient outcome. In addition to monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF), assessing the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) would be beneficial considering that metabolic thresholds can be used to evaluate tissue viability. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that changes in absolute CMRO2 could be measured by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) with time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TR-NIRS). Absolute CBF was determined using bolus-tracking TR-NIRS to calibrate the DCS measurements. Cerebral venous blood oxygenation (SvO2) was determined by multiwavelength TR-NIRS measurements, the accuracy of which was assessed by directly measuring the oxygenation of sagittal sinus blood. In eight newborn piglets, CMRO2 was manipulated by varying the anesthetics and by injecting sodium cyanide. No significant differences were found between the two sets of SvO2 measurements obtained by TR-NIRS or sagittal sinus blood samples and the corresponding CMRO2 measurements. Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean CMRO2 difference of 0.0268±0.8340 mL O2/100 g/min between the two techniques over a range from 0.3 to 4 mL O2/100 g/min.

  7. Calculated diffusion coefficients and the growth rate of olivine in a basalt magma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    Concentration gradients in glass adjacent to skeletal olivines in a basalt have been examined by electron probe. The glass is depleted in Mg, Fe, and Cr and enriched in Si, Al, Na, and Ca relative to that far from olivine. Ionic diffusion coefficients for the glass compositions are calculated from temperature, ionic radius and melt viscosity, using the Stokes-Einstein relation. At 1170 C, the diffusion coefficient of Mg(2+) ions in the basalt is 4.5 billionths sq cm per sec. Comparison with measured diffusion coefficients in a mugearite suggests this value may be 16 times too small. The concentration gradient data and the diffusion coefficients are used to calculate instantaneous olivine growth rates. Growth necessarily preceded emplacement such that the composition of the crystals plus the enclosing glass need not be that of a melt. The computed olivine growth rates are compatible with the rate of crystallization deduced for the Skaegaard intrusion.

  8. Application of a diffusion-desorption rate equation model in astrochemistry.

    PubMed

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Desorption and diffusion are two of the most important processes on interstellar grain surfaces; knowledge of them is critical for the understanding of chemical reaction networks in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, a lack of information on desorption and diffusion is preventing further progress in astrochemistry. To obtain desorption energy distributions of molecules from the surfaces of ISM-related materials, one usually carries out adsorption-desorption temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments, and uses rate equation models to extract desorption energy distributions. However, the often-used rate equation models fail to adequately take into account diffusion processes and thus are only valid in situations where adsorption is strongly localized. As adsorption-desorption experiments show that adsorbate molecules tend to occupy deep adsorption sites before occupying shallow ones, a diffusion process must be involved. Thus, it is necessary to include a diffusion term in the model that takes into account the morphology of the surface as obtained from analyses of TPD experiments. We take the experimental data of CO desorption from the MgO(100) surface and of D2 desorption from amorphous solid water ice as examples to show how a diffusion-desorption rate equation model explains the redistribution of adsorbate molecules among different adsorption sites. We extract distributions of desorption energies and diffusion energy barriers from TPD profiles. These examples are contrasted with a system where adsorption is strongly localized--HD from an amorphous silicate surface. Suggestions for experimental investigations are provided.

  9. Enhancement of cation diffusion rates across the 410-kilometer discontinuity in Earth's mantle

    PubMed

    Chakraborty; Knoche; Schulze; Rubie; Dobson; Ross; Angel

    1999-01-15

    Rates of cation diffusion (magnesium, iron, and nickel) have been determined in olivine and its high-pressure polymorph, wadsleyite, at 9 to 15 gigapascals and 1100 degrees to 1400 degreesC for compositions that are relevant to Earth's mantle. Diffusion in olivine becomes strongly dependent on composition at high pressure. In wadsleyite, diffusion is one to two orders of magnitude faster than in olivine, depending on temperature. Homogenization of mantle heterogeneities (chemical mixing) and mineral transformations involving a magnesium-iron exchange will therefore occur considerably faster in the transition zone than at depths of less than 410 kilometers. PMID:9888846

  10. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  11. Recombination of W19 + ions with electrons: Absolute rate coefficients from a storage-ring experiment and from theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badnell, N. R.; Spruck, K.; Krantz, C.; Novotný, O.; Becker, A.; Bernhardt, D.; Grieser, M.; Hahn, M.; Repnow, R.; Savin, D. W.; Wolf, A.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.

    2016-05-01

    Experimentally measured and theoretically calculated rate coefficients for the recombination of W19 +([Kr ] 4 d10 4 f9 ) ions with free electrons (forming W18 +) are presented. At low electron-ion collision energies, the merged-beam rate coefficient is dominated by strong, mutually overlapping, recombination resonances as already found previously for the neighboring charge-state ions W18 + and W20 +. In the temperature range where W19 + is expected to form in a collisionally ionized plasma, the experimentally derived recombination rate coefficient deviates by up to a factor of about 20 from the theoretical rate coefficient obtained from the Atomic Data and Analysis Structure database. The present calculations, which employ a Breit-Wigner redistributive partitioning of autoionizing widths for dielectronic recombination via multi-electron resonances, reproduce the experimental findings over the entire temperature range.

  12. Absolute rate of the reaction of Cl(p-2) with molecular hydrogen from 200 - 500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whytock, D. A.; Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of atomic chlorine with hydrogen are measured from 200 - 500 K using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. The results are compared with previous work and are discussed with particular reference to the equilibrium constant for the reaction and to relative rate data for chlorine atom reactions. Theoretical calculations, using the BEBO method with tunneling, give excellent agreement with experiment.

  13. Absolute rate of the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ethylene from 198 to 320 K at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    The rate constant for the H+C2H4 reaction has been measured as a function of temperature. Experiments were performed with high pressures of Ar heat bath gas at seven temperatures from 198 to 320 K with the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence (FP-RF) technique. Pressures were chosen so as to isolate the addition rate constant k1. The results are well represented by an Arrhenius expression. The results are compared with other studies and are theoretically discussed.

  14. Adsorption rate of phenol from aqueous solution onto organobentonite: surface diffusion and kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Ocampo-Perez, Raul; Leyva-Ramos, Roberto; Mendoza-Barron, Jovita; Guerrero-Coronado, Rosa M

    2011-12-01

    The concentration decay curves for the adsorption of phenol on organobentonite were obtained in an agitated tank batch adsorber. The experimental adsorption rate data were interpreted with diffusional models as well as first-order, second-order and Langmuir kinetic models. The surface diffusion model adjusted the data quite well, revealing that the overall rate of adsorption was controlled by surface diffusion. Furthermore, the surface diffusion coefficient increased raising the mass of phenol adsorbed at equilibrium and was independent of the particle diameter in the range 0.042-0.0126 cm. It was demonstrated that the overall rate of adsorption was essentially not affected by the external mass transfer. The second-order and the Langmuir kinetic models fitted the experimental data quite well; however, the kinetic constants of both models varied without any physical meaning while increasing the particle size and the mass of phenol adsorbed at equilibrium.

  15. Jump rates for surface diffusion of large molecules from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Patrick Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    2015-04-21

    We apply a recently developed stochastic model for the surface diffusion of large molecules to calculate jump rates for 9,10-dithioanthracene on a Cu(111) surface. The necessary input parameters for the stochastic model are calculated from first principles using density functional theory (DFT). We find that the inclusion of van der Waals corrections to the DFT energies is critical to obtain good agreement with experimental results for the adsorption geometry and energy barrier for diffusion. The predictions for jump rates in our model are in excellent agreement with measured values and show a marked improvement over transition state theory (TST). We find that the jump rate prefactor is reduced by an order of magnitude from the TST estimate due to frictional damping resulting from energy exchange with surface phonons, as well as a rotational mode of the diffusing molecule.

  16. A Transition in the Cumulative Reaction Rate of Two Species Diffusion with Bimolecular Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, Harihar; Arshadi, Masoud

    2015-04-01

    Diffusion and bimolecular reaction between two initially separated reacting species is a prototypical small-scale description of reaction induced by transverse mixing. It is also relevant to diffusion controlled transport regimes as encountered in low-permeability matrix blocks in fractured media. In previous work, the reaction-diffusion problem has been analyzed as a Stefan problem involving a distinct moving boundary (reaction front), which predicts that front motion scales as √t, and the cumulative reaction rate scales as 1/√t-. We present a general non-dimensionalization of the problem and a perturbation analysis to show that there is an early time regime where the cumulative reaction rate scales as √t- rather than 1/√t. The duration of this early time regime (where the cumulative rate is kinetically rather than diffusion controlled) depends on the rate parameter, in a manner that is consistently predicted by our non-dimensionalization. We also present results on the scaling of the reaction front width. We present numerical simulations in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media to demonstrate the limited influence of heterogeneity on the behavior of the reaction-diffusion system. We illustrate applications to the practical problem of in-situ chemical oxidation of TCE and PCE by permanganate, which is employed to remediate contaminated sites where the DNAPLs are largely dissolved in the rock matrix.

  17. Models of diffusion-limited uptake of trace elements in fossils and rates of fossilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Matthew J.

    2008-08-01

    Many fossils are assumed to take up trace elements by a process of combined diffusion plus adsorption (DA), yet in principle composition profiles can be explained by several different diffusion-limited processes, including diffusion plus reaction or recrystallization (DR) and double-medium diffusion (DMD). The DA and DMD models are supported by REE and U composition profiles across fossil teeth, measured by laser-ablation ICP-MS, that show error-function - like diffusion profiles into enamel from the dentine-enamel interface and concentrations in the interior of enamel that are at original biogenic levels or higher. Published composition and age profiles in some Pleistocene bones may be better explained by a DR model. All three diffusion models imply linear behavior between age and distance squared, vastly simplifying U-series dating methods for Pleistocene fossils. Modeled uptake rates for fossil teeth yield a strict minimum bound on durations of about one decade to one century. The similarity of diffusion profiles in teeth, irrespective of depositional ages ranging from ˜30 ka to >30 Ma, implies that uptake occurred quickly, with a maximum duration of a few tens of kyr for typical fossil enamel; faster uptake is implied for typical fossil bone and dentine. Disparities in these uptake estimates compared to some archeological bone may reflect sampling and preservation bias for paleontological vs. archeological materials.

  18. Geometry-specific heterogeneity of the apparent diffusion rate of materials inside sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Takao, Daisuke; Kamimura, Shinji

    2010-04-21

    In sea urchin spermatozoa, the energy source powering flagellar motion is provided as ATP produced by mitochondria located at the proximal ends of flagella. However, the bottleneck structure between the sperm head and the flagellar tail seems to restrict the free entry of ATP from mitochondria into the tail region. To test this possibility, we investigated the diffusion properties in sperm cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. We found that the rate of fluorescence recovery in the head region was approximately 10% of that observed in the flagellar tail regions. We also found that, even within the tail region, rates varied depending on location, i.e., rates were slower at the more distal regions. Using computational analysis, the rate heterogeneity was shown to be caused mainly by the geometry of the sperm structure, even if little or no difference in diffusion rates through the neck region was assumed. Therefore, we concluded that materials such as ATP would generally diffuse freely between the heads and the flagella of sperm cells. We believe these findings regarding the diffusion properties inside spermatozoa provide further insights into material transportation and chemical signaling inside eukaryotic cilia and flagella. PMID:20409478

  19. Geometry-specific heterogeneity of the apparent diffusion rate of materials inside sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Takao, Daisuke; Kamimura, Shinji

    2010-04-21

    In sea urchin spermatozoa, the energy source powering flagellar motion is provided as ATP produced by mitochondria located at the proximal ends of flagella. However, the bottleneck structure between the sperm head and the flagellar tail seems to restrict the free entry of ATP from mitochondria into the tail region. To test this possibility, we investigated the diffusion properties in sperm cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. We found that the rate of fluorescence recovery in the head region was approximately 10% of that observed in the flagellar tail regions. We also found that, even within the tail region, rates varied depending on location, i.e., rates were slower at the more distal regions. Using computational analysis, the rate heterogeneity was shown to be caused mainly by the geometry of the sperm structure, even if little or no difference in diffusion rates through the neck region was assumed. Therefore, we concluded that materials such as ATP would generally diffuse freely between the heads and the flagella of sperm cells. We believe these findings regarding the diffusion properties inside spermatozoa provide further insights into material transportation and chemical signaling inside eukaryotic cilia and flagella.

  20. Absolute rate constant of the reaction OH + H2O2 yields HO2 + H2O from 245 to 423 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1980-01-01

    The absolute rate constant of the reaction between the hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide was measured by using the discharge-flow resonance fluorescence technique at total pressure between 1 and 4 torr. At 298 K the result is (1.64 + or - 0.32) x 10 to the -12th cu cm/molecule s. The observed rate constant is independent of pressure, surface-to-volume ratio, the addition of vibrational quenchers, and the source of OH. The temperature dependence has also been determined between 245 and 423 K; the resulting Arrhenius expression is k cu cm/molecule s is equal to (2.51 + or - 0.6) x 10 to the -12th exp(-126 + or - 76/T).

  1. Absolute rate of the reaction of O/3-P/ with hydrogen sulfide over the temperature range 263 to 495 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whytock, D. A.; Timmons, R. B.; Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    The technique of flash photolysis coupled with time resolved detection of O via resonance fluorescence has been used to obtain rate constants for the reaction of O(3-P) with H2S at temperatures from 263 to 495 K and at pressures in the range 10-400 torr. Under conditions where secondary reactions are avoided, the measured rate constants for the primary step obey the Arrhenius equation k = (7.24 plus or minus 1.07) x 10 to the -12th exp(-3300 plus or minus 100/1.987 T) cu cm/molecules/s. Experiments with D2S show that the reaction exhibits a primary isotope effect, in support of a hydrogen abstraction mechanism.

  2. Thiyl radical reaction with thymine: absolute rate constant for hydrogen abstraction and comparison to benzylic C-H bonds.

    PubMed

    Nauser, Thomas; Schöneich, Christian

    2003-09-01

    Free radical damage of DNA is a well-known process affecting biological tissue under conditions of oxidative stress. Thiols can repair DNA-derived radicals. However, the product thiyl radicals may also cause biological damage. To obtain quantitative information on the potential reactivity with DNA components, we measured the rate constant for hydrogen abstraction by cysteamine thiyl radicals from thymine C5-CH(3), k = (1.2 +/- 0.8) x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), and thymidine-5'-monophosphate, k = (0.9 +/- 0.6) x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). Hence, the hydrogen abstraction from C5-CH(3) occurs with rate constants similar to the hydrogen abstraction from the carbohydrate moieties. Especially at low oxygen concentration such as that found in skeletal muscle, such hydrogen abstraction processes by thiyl radicals may well compete against other dioxygen-dependent reactions. The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction at thymine C5-CH(3) were compared to those with benzylic substrates, toluenesulfonic acid, and benzyl alcohol.

  3. Kinetics of reaction of peroxynitrite with selenium- and sulfur-containing compounds: Absolute rate constants and assessment of biological significance.

    PubMed

    Storkey, Corin; Pattison, David I; Ignasiak, Marta T; Schiesser, Carl H; Davies, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Peroxynitrite (the physiological mixture of ONOOH and its anion, ONOO(-)) is a powerful biologically-relevant oxidant capable of oxidizing and damaging a range of important targets including sulfides, thiols, lipids, proteins, carbohydrates and nucleic acids. Excessive production of peroxynitrite is associated with several human pathologies including cardiovascular disease, ischemic-reperfusion injury, circulatory shock, inflammation and neurodegeneration. This study demonstrates that low-molecular-mass selenols (RSeH), selenides (RSeR') and to a lesser extent diselenides (RSeSeR') react with peroxynitrite with high rate constants. Low molecular mass selenols react particularly rapidly with peroxynitrite, with second order rate constants k2 in the range 5.1 × 10(5)-1.9 × 10(6)M(-1)s(-1), and 250-830 fold faster than the corresponding thiols (RSH) and many other endogenous biological targets. Reactions of peroxynitrite with selenides, including selenosugars are approximately 15-fold faster than their sulfur homologs with k2 approximately 2.5 × 10(3)M(-1)s(-1). The rate constants for diselenides and sulfides were slower with k2 0.72-1.3 × 10(3)M(-1)s(-1) and approximately 2.1 × 10(2)M(-1)s(-1) respectively. These studies demonstrate that both endogenous and exogenous selenium-containing compounds may modulate peroxynitrite-mediated damage at sites of acute and chronic inflammation, with this being of particular relevance at extracellular sites where the thiol pool is limited.

  4. Efficient kinetic Monte Carlo method for reaction-diffusion problems with spatially varying annihilation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Karsten; Rieger, Heiko

    2013-03-01

    We present an efficient Monte Carlo method to simulate reaction-diffusion processes with spatially varying particle annihilation or transformation rates as it occurs for instance in the context of motor-driven intracellular transport. Like Green's function reaction dynamics and first-passage time methods, our algorithm avoids small diffusive hops by propagating sufficiently distant particles in large hops to the boundaries of protective domains. Since for spatially varying annihilation or transformation rates the single particle diffusion propagator is not known analytically, we present an algorithm that generates efficiently either particle displacements or annihilations with the correct statistics, as we prove rigorously. The numerical efficiency of the algorithm is demonstrated with an illustrative example.

  5. Hydroxyl-radical-induced degradative oxidation of beta-lactam antibiotics in water: absolute rate constant measurements.

    PubMed

    Dail, Michelle K; Mezyk, Stephen P

    2010-08-19

    The beta-lactam antibiotics are some of the most prevalent pharmaceutical contaminants currently being detected in aquatic environments. Because the presence of any trace level of antibiotic in water may adversely affect aquatic ecosystems and contribute to the production of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, active removal by additional water treatments, such as using advanced oxidation and reduction processes (AO/RPs), may be required. However, to ensure that any AOP treatment process occurs efficiently and quantitatively, a full understanding of the kinetics and mechanisms of all of the chemical reactions involved under the conditions of use is necessary. In this study, we report on our kinetic measurements for the hydroxyl-radical-induced oxidation of 11 beta-lactam antibiotics obtained using electron pulse radiolysis techniques. For the 5-member ring species, an average reaction rate constant of (7.9 +/- 0.8) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) was obtained, slightly faster than for the analogous 6-member ring containing antibiotics, (6.6 +/- 1.2) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The consistency of these rate constants for each group infers a common reaction mechanism, consisting of the partitioning of the hydroxyl radical between addition to peripheral aromatic rings and reaction with the central double-ring core of these antibiotics.

  6. Absolute rate constants for O + NO + M /= He, Ne, Ar, Kr/ yields NO2 + M from 217-500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Whytock, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction O + NO + M yields NO2 + M have been obtained at temperatures from 217-500 K in four different rare gases by a method combining flash photolysis with time resolved detection of O(3-P) by resonance fluorescence. The measured rate constants in Arrhenius form are (10.8 plus or minus 1.2) x 10 to the -33rd exp(1040 plus or minus 60/1.987 T) for helium; (9.01 plus or minus 1.16) x 10 to the -33rd exp(1180 plus or minus 70/1.987 T) for argon; (9.33 plus or minus 1.10) x 10 to the -33rd exp(1030 plus or minus 60/1.987 T) for neon; and (9.52 plus or minus 1.10) x 10 to the -33rd exp(1140 plus or minus 70/1.987 T) for krypton in units of cm to the 6th/sq molecule/s.

  7. Enhancement of Diffusion-Controlled Reaction Rates by Surface-Induced Orientational Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Ambarish; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2006-01-01

    We explore the means by which immobilization of a substrate on a surface can increase the rate of a diffusion-controlled enzymatic reaction. A quasichemical approach is developed and compared with Brownian dynamics simulations. We use these methods to show that restricting only the orientation of the enzyme by long-range interactions with the surface is sufficient for enhancing catalysis. PMID:16299070

  8. Residue-specific NH exchange rates studied by NMR diffusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Torsten; Cabrita, Eurico J.; Morris, Gareth A.; Günther, Robert; Hofmann, Hans-Jörg; Berger, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    We present a novel approach to the investigation of rapid (>2 s -1) NH exchange rates in proteins, based on residue-specific diffusion measurements. 1H, 15N-DOSY-HSQC spectra are recorded in order to observe resolved amide proton signals for most residues of the protein. Human ubiquitin was used to demonstrate the proposed method. Exchange rates are derived directly from the decay data of the diffusion experiment by applying a model deduced from the assumption of a two-site exchange with water and the "pure" diffusion coefficients of water and protein. The "pure" diffusion coefficient of the protein is determined in an experiment with selective excitation of the amide protons in order to suppress the influence of magnetization transfer from water to amide protons on the decay data. For rapidly exchanging residues a comparison of our results with the exchange rates obtained in a MEXICO experiment showed good agreement. Molecular dynamics (MD) and quantum mechanical calculations were performed to find molecular parameters correlating with the exchangeability of the NH protons. The RMS fluctuations of the amide protons, obtained from the MD simulations, together with the NH coupling constants provide a bilinear model which shows a good correlation with the experimental NH exchange rates.

  9. A transition in the spatially integrated reaction rate of bimolecular reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshadi, Masoud; Rajaram, Harihar

    2015-09-01

    Numerical simulations of diffusion with bimolecular reaction demonstrate a transition in the spatially integrated reaction rate—increasing with time initially, and transitioning to a decrease with time. In previous work, this reaction-diffusion problem has been analyzed as a Stefan problem involving a distinct moving boundary (reaction front), leading to predictions that front motion scales as √t, and correspondingly the spatially integrated reaction rate decreases as the square root of time 1/√t. We present a general nondimensionalization of the problem and a perturbation analysis to show that there is an early time regime where the spatially integrated reaction rate scales as √t rather than 1/√t. The duration of this early time regime (where the spatially integrated reaction rate is kinetically rather than diffusion controlled) is shown to depend on the kinetic rate parameters, diffusion coefficients, and initial concentrations of the two species. Numerical simulation results confirm the theoretical estimates of the transition time. We present illustrative calculations in the context of in situ chemical oxidation for remediation of fractured rock systems where contaminants are largely dissolved in the rock matrix. We consider different contaminants of concern (COCs), including TCE, PCE, MTBE, and RDX. While the early time regime is very short lived for TCE, it can persist over months to years for MTBE and RDX, due to slow oxidation kinetics.

  10. The effect of receptor clustering on diffusion-limited forward rate constants.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, B; Wiegel, F W

    1983-01-01

    The effect of receptor clustering on the diffusion-limited forward rate constant (k+) is studied theoretically by modeling cell surface receptors by hemispheres distributed on a plane. We give both exact results and bounds. The exact results are obtained using an electrostatic analogue and applying the method of the images. Accurate upper bounds on k+ are found from a variational principle. PMID:6309261

  11. The rate of the deoxygenation reaction limits myoglobin- and hemoglobin-facilitated O₂ diffusion in cells.

    PubMed

    Endeward, Volker

    2012-05-01

    A mathematical model describing facilitation of O(2) diffusion by the diffusion of myoglobin and hemoglobin is presented. The equations are solved numerically by a finite-difference method for the conditions as they prevail in cardiac and skeletal muscle and in red cells without major simplifications. It is demonstrated that, in the range of intracellular diffusion distances, the degree of facilitation is limited by the rate of the chemical reaction between myglobin or hemoglobin and O(2). The results are presented in the form of relationships between the degree of facilitation and the length of the diffusion path on the basis of the known kinetics of the oxygenation-deoxygenation reactions. It is concluded that the limitation by reaction kinetics reduces the maximally possible facilitated oxygen diffusion in cardiomyoctes by ∼50% and in skeletal muscle fibers by ∼ 20%. For human red blood cells, a reduction of facilitated O(2) diffusion by 36% is obtained in agreement with previous reports. This indicates that, especially in cardiomyocytes and red cells, chemical equilibrium between myoglobin or hemoglobin and O(2) is far from being established, an assumption that previously has often been made. Although the "O(2) transport function" of myoglobin in cardiac muscle cells thus is severely limited by the chemical reaction kinetics, and to a lesser extent also in skeletal muscle, it is noteworthy that the speed of release of O(2) from MbO(2), the "storage function," is not limited by the reaction kinetics under physiological conditions.

  12. Accurate and absolute diffusion measurements of Rhodamine 6G in low-concentration aqueous solutions by the PGSE-WATERGATE sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, G.; Zick, K.

    2015-04-28

    A pulsed field gradient spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sequence with solvent suppression (PGSE-WATERGATE) was applied to accurately measure the diffusion coefficients of Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) in low-concentration aqueous solutions. Three samples with Rh6G concentrations of C{sub Rh6G} = 1, 4.5, and 25 μM were investigated. The precise determination of the diffusion coefficients in this low-concentration range was made possible by using a cryogenically cooled NMR probe and by the effective solvent suppression of the PGSE-WATERGATE sequence. The present results bridge the gap between diffusion data measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in the single molecule limit and diffusivities obtained by pulsed field gradient NMR (PFG-NMR) without solvent suppression at higher concentrations. To further extend the concentration range, the diffusion coefficient of Rh6G was also measured on a sample with C{sub Rh6G} = 410 μM by PFG-NMR. The overall concentration dependence of the Rh6G diffusion at 25 °C is discussed in terms of dimerization of the Rh6G molecules. The concentration-dependent monomer/dimer proportion is deduced from the diffusion data.

  13. Optically based quantification of absolute cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with high spatial resolution in rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Sakadžić, Sava; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Measuring oxygen delivery in brain tissue is important for identifying the pathophysiological changes associated with brain injury and various diseases such as cancer, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease. We have developed a multi-modal imaging system for minimally invasive measurement of cerebral oxygenation and blood flow in small animals with high spatial resolution. The system allows for simultaneous measurement of blood flow using Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography, and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) using either confocal or multiphoton phosphorescence lifetime imaging with exogenous porphyrin-based dyes sensitive to dissolved oxygen. Here we present the changes in pO2 and blood flow in superficial cortical vessels of Sprague Dawley rats in response to conditions such as hypoxia, hyperoxia, and functional stimulation. pO2 measurements display considerable heterogeneity over distances that cannot be resolved with more widely used oxygen-monitoring techniques such as BOLD-fMRI. Large increases in blood flow are observed in response to functional stimulation and hypoxia. Our system allows for quantification of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) with high spatial resolution, providing a better understanding of metabolic dynamics during functional stimulation and under various neuropathologies. Ultimately, better insight into the underlying mechanisms of neuropathologies will facilitate the development of improved therapeutic strategies to minimize damage to brain tissue.

  14. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction Cl + C2H2 from 210-361 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunning, J.; Stief, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been given to the role of chlorine compounds in the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone. However, while some reactions have been studied extensively, the kinetic data for the reaction of Cl with C2H2 is sparse with only three known determinations of the rate constant k3. The reactions involved are Cl + C2H2 yields reversibly ClC2H2(asterisk) (3a) and ClC2H2(asterisk) + M yields ClC2H2 + M (3b). In the present study, flash photolysis coupled with chlorine atomic resonance fluorescence have been employed to determine the pressure and temperature dependence of k3 with the third body M = Ar. Room temperature values are also reported for M = N2. The pressure dependence observed in the experiments confirms the expectation that the reaction involves addition of Cl to the unsaturated C2H2 molecule followed by collisional stabilization of the resulting adduct radical.

  15. Diffusion effects on the CPMG relaxation rate in a dipolar field.

    PubMed

    Ziener, C H; Kampf, T; Jakob, P M; Bauer, W R

    2010-01-01

    The diffusion in the magnetic dipolar field around a sphere is considered. The diffusion is restricted to the space between two concentric spheres, where the inner sphere is the source of the magnetic dipolar field. Analytical expressions for the CPMG transverse relaxation rate as well as the free induction decay and the spin echo time evolution are given in the Gaussian approximation. The influence of the inter-echo time is analyzed. The limiting cases of small and large inter-echo times as well as the short and long time behavior are evaluated.

  16. Development of the new approach to the diffusion-limited reaction rate theory

    SciTech Connect

    Veshchunov, M. S.

    2012-04-15

    The new approach to the diffusion-limited reaction rate theory, recently proposed by the author, is further developed on the base of a similar approach to Brownian coagulation. The traditional diffusion approach to calculation of the reaction rate is critically analyzed. In particular, it is shown that the traditional approach is applicable only in the special case of reactions with a large reaction radius and the mean inter-particle distances, and become inappropriate in calculating the reaction rate in the case of a relatively small reaction radius. In the latter case, most important for chemical reactions, particle collisions occur not in the diffusion regime but mainly in the kinetic regime characterized by homogeneous (random) spatial distribution of particles on the length scale of the mean inter-particle distance. The calculated reaction rate for a small reaction radius in three dimensions formally (and fortuitously) coincides with the expression derived in the traditional approach for reactions with a large reaction radius, but notably deviates at large times from the traditional result in the planar two-dimensional geometry. In application to reactions on discrete lattice sites, new relations for the reaction rate constants are derived for both three-dimensional and two-dimensional lattices.

  17. Multi-Rate Mass Transfer (MRMT) models for general diffusive porosity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babey, Tristan; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald; Casenave, Céline

    2015-02-01

    We determine the relevance of Multi-Rate Mass Tansfer (MRMT) models (Haggerty and Gorelick, 1995) to general diffusive porosity structures. To this end, we introduce Structured INteracting Continua (SINC) models as the combination of a finite number of diffusion-dominated interconnected immobile zones exchanging with an advection-dominated mobile domain. It directly extends Multiple INteracting Continua framework (Pruess and Narasimhan, 1985) by introducing a structure in the immobile domain, coming for example from the dead-ends of fracture clusters or poorly-connected dissolution patterns. We demonstrate that, whatever their structure, SINC models can be made equivalent in terms of concentration in the mobile zone to a unique MRMT model. We develop effective shape-free numerical methods to identify its few dominant rates, that comply with any distribution of rates and porosities. We show that differences in terms of macrodispersion are not larger than 50% for approximate MRMT models with only one rate (double porosity models), and drop down to less than 0.1% for five rates MRMT models. Low-dimensional MRMT models accurately approach transport in structured diffusive porosities at intermediate and long times and only miss early responses.

  18. An Analytical Model for Estimating Water Exchange Rate in White Matter Using Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Davoodi-Bojd, Esmaeil; Chopp, Michael; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Wang, Shiyang; Ding, Guangliang; Jiang, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Substantial effort is being expended on using micro-structural modeling of the white matter, with the goal of relating diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) to the underlying structure of the tissue, such as axonal density. However, one of the important parameters affecting diffusion is the water exchange rate between the intra- and extra-axonal space, which has not been fully investigated and is a crucial marker of brain injury such as multiple sclerosis (MS), stroke, and traumatic brain injury (TBI). To our knowledge, there is no diffusion analytical model which includes the Water eXchange Rate (WXR) without the requirement of short gradient pulse (SGP) approximation. We therefore propose a new analytical model by deriving the diffusion signal for a permeable cylinder, assuming a clinically feasible pulse gradient spin echo (PGSE) sequence. Simulations based on Markov Random Walk confirm that the exchange parameter included in our model has a linear correlation (R2>0.88) with the actual WXR. Moreover, increasing WXR causes the estimated values of diameter and volume fraction of the cylinders to increase and decrease, respectively, which is consistent with our findings from histology measurements in tissues near TBI regions. This model was also applied to the diffusion signal acquired from ex vivo brains of 14 male (10 TBI and 4 normal) rats using hybrid diffusion imaging. The estimated values of axon diameter and axonal volume fraction are in agreement with their corresponding histological measurements in normal brains, with 0.96 intra-class correlation coefficient value resulting from consistency analysis. Moreover, a significant increase (p = 0.001) in WXR and diameter and decrease in axonal volume fraction in the TBI boundary were detected in the TBI rats compared with the normal rats. PMID:24836290

  19. A quantitative radioluminographic imaging method for evaluating lateral diffusion rates in skin.

    PubMed

    Rush, Allison K; Miller, Matthew A; Smith, Edward D; Kasting, Gerald B

    2015-10-28

    A method is presented for measuring the lateral diffusion coefficients of exogenously applied compounds on excised skin. The method involves sequential high resolution imaging of the spatial distribution of β-radiation associated with [(14)C]-labeled compounds to monitor the development of the concentration profile on the skin surface. It is exemplified by measurements made on three radiolabeled test compounds--caffeine, testosterone, and zinc pyrithione (ZnPT)--administered as solutions. Lateral diffusivity is expected to be an important determinant of the topical bioavailability of ZnPT, which is characteristically administered as a fine suspension and must reach microorganisms in molecular form to exert biocidal activity. Application of the test compounds at levels below and above their estimated saturation doses in the upper stratum corneum allows one to distinguish between diffusion-limited and dissolution rate-limited kinetics. The effective lateral diffusivities of the two chemically stable reference compounds, caffeine and testosterone, were (1-4) × 10(-9) cm(2)/s and (3-9) × 10(-9) cm(2)/s, respectively. Lateral transport of [(14)C] associated with ZnPT was formulation-dependent, with effective diffusivities of (1-2) × 10(-9) cm(2)/s in water and (3-9) × 10(-9) cm(2)/s in a 1% body wash solution. These differences are thought to be related to molecular speciation and/or the presence of a residual surfactant phase on the skin surface. All values were greater than those estimated for the transverse diffusivities of these compounds in stratum corneum by factors ranging from 250 to over 2000. Facile lateral transport on skin, combined with a low transdermal permeation rate, may thus be seen to be a key factor in the safe and effective use of ZnPT as a topical antimicrobial agent. PMID:26241749

  20. A quantitative radioluminographic imaging method for evaluating lateral diffusion rates in skin.

    PubMed

    Rush, Allison K; Miller, Matthew A; Smith, Edward D; Kasting, Gerald B

    2015-10-28

    A method is presented for measuring the lateral diffusion coefficients of exogenously applied compounds on excised skin. The method involves sequential high resolution imaging of the spatial distribution of β-radiation associated with [(14)C]-labeled compounds to monitor the development of the concentration profile on the skin surface. It is exemplified by measurements made on three radiolabeled test compounds--caffeine, testosterone, and zinc pyrithione (ZnPT)--administered as solutions. Lateral diffusivity is expected to be an important determinant of the topical bioavailability of ZnPT, which is characteristically administered as a fine suspension and must reach microorganisms in molecular form to exert biocidal activity. Application of the test compounds at levels below and above their estimated saturation doses in the upper stratum corneum allows one to distinguish between diffusion-limited and dissolution rate-limited kinetics. The effective lateral diffusivities of the two chemically stable reference compounds, caffeine and testosterone, were (1-4) × 10(-9) cm(2)/s and (3-9) × 10(-9) cm(2)/s, respectively. Lateral transport of [(14)C] associated with ZnPT was formulation-dependent, with effective diffusivities of (1-2) × 10(-9) cm(2)/s in water and (3-9) × 10(-9) cm(2)/s in a 1% body wash solution. These differences are thought to be related to molecular speciation and/or the presence of a residual surfactant phase on the skin surface. All values were greater than those estimated for the transverse diffusivities of these compounds in stratum corneum by factors ranging from 250 to over 2000. Facile lateral transport on skin, combined with a low transdermal permeation rate, may thus be seen to be a key factor in the safe and effective use of ZnPT as a topical antimicrobial agent.

  1. An analytical model for estimating water exchange rate in white matter using diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Davoodi-Bojd, Esmaeil; Chopp, Michael; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Wang, Shiyang; Ding, Guangliang; Jiang, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Substantial effort is being expended on using micro-structural modeling of the white matter, with the goal of relating diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) to the underlying structure of the tissue, such as axonal density. However, one of the important parameters affecting diffusion is the water exchange rate between the intra- and extra-axonal space, which has not been fully investigated and is a crucial marker of brain injury such as multiple sclerosis (MS), stroke, and traumatic brain injury (TBI). To our knowledge, there is no diffusion analytical model which includes the Water eXchange Rate (WXR) without the requirement of short gradient pulse (SGP) approximation. We therefore propose a new analytical model by deriving the diffusion signal for a permeable cylinder, assuming a clinically feasible pulse gradient spin echo (PGSE) sequence. Simulations based on Markov Random Walk confirm that the exchange parameter included in our model has a linear correlation (R2>0.88) with the actual WXR. Moreover, increasing WXR causes the estimated values of diameter and volume fraction of the cylinders to increase and decrease, respectively, which is consistent with our findings from histology measurements in tissues near TBI regions. This model was also applied to the diffusion signal acquired from ex vivo brains of 14 male (10 TBI and 4 normal) rats using hybrid diffusion imaging. The estimated values of axon diameter and axonal volume fraction are in agreement with their corresponding histological measurements in normal brains, with 0.96 intra-class correlation coefficient value resulting from consistency analysis. Moreover, a significant increase (p = 0.001) in WXR and diameter and decrease in axonal volume fraction in the TBI boundary were detected in the TBI rats compared with the normal rats.

  2. Breakdown of the reaction-diffusion master equation with nonelementary rates.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen; Grima, Ramon

    2016-05-01

    The chemical master equation (CME) is the exact mathematical formulation of chemical reactions occurring in a dilute and well-mixed volume. The reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a stochastic description of reaction-diffusion processes on a spatial lattice, assuming well mixing only on the length scale of the lattice. It is clear that, for the sake of consistency, the solution of the RDME of a chemical system should converge to the solution of the CME of the same system in the limit of fast diffusion: Indeed, this has been tacitly assumed in most literature concerning the RDME. We show that, in the limit of fast diffusion, the RDME indeed converges to a master equation but not necessarily the CME. We introduce a class of propensity functions, such that if the RDME has propensities exclusively of this class, then the RDME converges to the CME of the same system, whereas if the RDME has propensities not in this class, then convergence is not guaranteed. These are revealed to be elementary and nonelementary propensities, respectively. We also show that independent of the type of propensity, the RDME converges to the CME in the simultaneous limit of fast diffusion and large volumes. We illustrate our results with some simple example systems and argue that the RDME cannot generally be an accurate description of systems with nonelementary rates.

  3. Breakdown of the reaction-diffusion master equation with nonelementary rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Stephen; Grima, Ramon

    2016-05-01

    The chemical master equation (CME) is the exact mathematical formulation of chemical reactions occurring in a dilute and well-mixed volume. The reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a stochastic description of reaction-diffusion processes on a spatial lattice, assuming well mixing only on the length scale of the lattice. It is clear that, for the sake of consistency, the solution of the RDME of a chemical system should converge to the solution of the CME of the same system in the limit of fast diffusion: Indeed, this has been tacitly assumed in most literature concerning the RDME. We show that, in the limit of fast diffusion, the RDME indeed converges to a master equation but not necessarily the CME. We introduce a class of propensity functions, such that if the RDME has propensities exclusively of this class, then the RDME converges to the CME of the same system, whereas if the RDME has propensities not in this class, then convergence is not guaranteed. These are revealed to be elementary and nonelementary propensities, respectively. We also show that independent of the type of propensity, the RDME converges to the CME in the simultaneous limit of fast diffusion and large volumes. We illustrate our results with some simple example systems and argue that the RDME cannot generally be an accurate description of systems with nonelementary rates.

  4. Diffusion dependence of proton NMR relaxation rates in the presence of ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Michael; Hammel, P. Chris

    2009-03-01

    Ferritin is the predominant iron-storage protein in living organisms. It may serve as an indicator of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. Measuring brain ferritin concentration non-invasively via MRI could enable better diagnoses and treatments of such diseases. Quantitative MRI determination of the ferritin concentration requires an understanding of the NMR relaxation mechanisms of hydrogen protons in the presence of ferritin. In aqueous solutions, ferritin enhances the transverse relaxation rate (R2) of the protons. This is thought to occur due to a diffusive mechanism, where protons diffusing near ferritin pass through a region of elevated magnetic field, and a chemical exchange mechanism, where protons bind to the protein for a period of time, experiencing an even higher magnetic field. These two mechanisms exhibit different dependencies on the self-diffusion coefficient of the protons. By adding glycerol to aqueous solutions, we control the self-diffusion of protons. We measure the R2 of protons in ferritin-containing binary mixtures of water and glycerol using CPMG sequences, and compare the experimental results to theoretical predictions of diffusion dependence in order to distinguish the relative importance of the mechanisms.

  5. The Extinction of Low Strain Rate Diffusion Flames by a Suppressant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamins, A.; Yang, J.; Puri, I. K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes plans for an experimental and computational study on the structure and extinction of low strain rate diffusion flames by a suppressant added to the oxidizer stream. Stable low strain rate flames will be established through ground based reduced gravity experiments using the 2.2 s drop tower. A variety of agents will be investigated, including both physically and chemically acting agents (He, N2, CO2, and CF3Br) for flames burning methane and propane. A computational model of flame structure and extinction will be modified to include radiative losses, which is thought to be a significant heat loss mechanism at low strain rates.

  6. Water has no effect on oxygen self-diffusion rate in forsterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, H.; Yamazaki, D.; Wiedenbeck, M.; Katsura, T.

    2014-12-01

    Water is thought to play an essential role in dynamical processes in the Earth's interior. Even several tens wt. ppm of water may enhance the creep rates in olivine by orders of magnitude based on deformation experiments [1, 2]. High temperature creep in olivine is believed to be controlled by self-diffusion of the slowest species, which is silicon in olivine. However, silicon self-diffusion experiments suggest that the role of water on olivine rheology is overestimated in previous deformation studies because of the experimental difficulties [3].On the other hand, oxygen is the second slowest species with similar diffusion rate as silicon. It may also play an essential role in olivine creep. By comparing the oxygen self-diffusion coefficient (DO) in olivine at ambient pressure and dry conditions [4] with those at 2 GPa and hydrous conditions, it is found that even 30-50 wt. ppm of water could enhance DO by one order of magnitude [5]. However, comparison of experimental results obtained at different pressures could lead to misinterpretations because different experimental setups have different error sources [6]. In this study, we systematically measured DO in an iron-free olivine, namely, forsterite, at 8 GPa and 1600-1800 K over a wide range of water content (CH2O) from <1 up to 800 wt. ppm. Our results show that DO∝(CH2O)0.05±0.06≈(CH2O)0. Thus, water has no significant effect on oxygen self-diffusion rate in forsterite. Since the water content dependence of silicon self-diffusion rate is also very small [3], the role of water on olivine rheology is not as significant as previously thought by assuming the diffusion controlled creep mechanism. [1] Karato &Jung (2003), Philosophical Mag. 83, 401-414.[2] Hirth & Kohlstedt (2003) Geophys. Monogr. 138, 83-105.[3] Fei et al. (2013), Nature 498, 213-215.[4] Dohmen et al. (2002), GRL 29, 2030.[5] Costa & Chakraborty (2008), PEPI 166, 11-29.[6] Fei et al. (2012), EPSL 345, 95-103.

  7. A new method for measuring the oxygen diffusion constant and oxygen consumption rate of arteriolar walls.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Nobuhiko; Horinouchi, Hirohisa; Ushiyama, Akira; Minamitani, Haruyuki

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen transport is believed to primarily occur via capillaries and depends on the oxygen tension gradient between the vessels and tissues. As blood flows along branching arterioles, the O(2) saturation drops, indicating either consumption or diffusion. The blood flow rate, the O(2) concentration gradient, and Krogh's O(2) diffusion constant (K) of the vessel wall are parameters affecting O(2)delivery. We devised a method for evaluating K of arteriolar wall in vivo using phosphorescence quenching microscopy to measure the partial pressure of oxygen in two areas almost simultaneously. The K value of arteriolar wall (inner diameter, 63.5 ± 11.9 μm; wall thickness, 18.0 ± 1.2 μm) was found to be 6.0 ± 1.2 × 10(-11) (cm(2)/s)(ml O(2)·cm(-3) tissue·mmHg(-1)). The arteriolar wall O(2) consumption rate (M) was 1.5 ± 0.1 (ml O(2)·100 cm(-3) tissue·min(-1)), as calculated using Krogh's diffusion equation. These results suggest that the arteriolar wall consumes a considerable proportion of the O(2) that diffuses through it.

  8. Sandwich mixer-reactor: influence of the diffusion coefficient and flow rate ratios.

    PubMed

    Abonnenc, Mélanie; Josserand, Jacques; Girault, Hubert H

    2009-02-01

    A sandwich mixer consists of mixing two solutions in a channel, one central laminar flow being sandwiched between two outer flow solutions. The present numerical study considers the convection-diffusion of two reacting species A and B, provided respectively by the two incoming solutions. The simulations show how the diffusion coefficient, flow rate and species concentration ratios influence, via the transversal diffusion length and reaction kinetics, the reaction extent at the end of the sandwich mixer. First, this extent can be enhanced up to 60% if the species with the lowest diffusion coefficient is located in the outer solutions where the flow velocity is small compared to that of the central part (higher residence time). Secondly, decreasing the outer flow rates (to confine the reaction close to the walls) and increasing the local concentration to keep the same flux ratio improve the extent by 300%. Comparison with a bi-lamination passive mixer, with an ideal mixer and an electro-osmotic driven flow mixer is presented. These conclusions are also demonstrated for consecutive reactions, showing an amplification of the effects described above. The results are also presented versus the residence time in the mixer-reactor to show the time window for which the gain is appreciable.

  9. Sub-Grid Reactive Diffusion and Apparent Uranyl Adsorption/Desorption Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Kerisit, S.; Ma, R.; Zheng, C.; Zachara, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adsorption/desorption is an important process affecting contaminant fate and transport in subsurface sediments. This presentation will discuss the importance of sub-grid reactive diffusion in both intragranular and inter-grain domains that affect the apparent rates of uranyl adsorption/desorption at the macroscopic scale. Uranyl[U(VI)]-contaminated site at Hanford 300A where U(VI) resides in intragranular domains as surface-complexed species is used as an example in this presentation. Molecular dynamics calculations revealed that uranyl surface complexation reactions are a fast process with a first-order rate constant of 100 per second. Consequently U(VI) adsorption/desorption is treated as an equilibrium process. An equilibrium, Kd-based model, however, significantly over-predicted the historical migration of the uranyl plume at the site. Sub-grain pore-scale simulations and stirred-flow cell experiments indicated that the coupling of intragranular diffusion with surface complexation reactions decreased the apparent rate of U(VI) adsorption/desorption over 4 order of magnitude. The apparent rate of U(VI) adsorption/desorption decreased further over 1 order of magnitude due to the sub-grid pore-scale coupling of diffusive mass transfer and grain-scale U(VI) adsorption/desorption as revealed by column experiments and pore-scale simulations. Field-scale reactive transport models that incorporate the complexity of sub-grid reactive diffusion in the apparent rate of U(VI) adsorption/desorption were consistent with the slow migration of the U(VI) plume at the site.

  10. A full-dimensional model of ozone forming reaction: the absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies.

    PubMed

    Teplukhin, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2016-07-28

    Rigorous calculations of scattering resonances in ozone are carried out for a broad range of rotational excitations. The accurate potential energy surface of Dawes is adopted, and a new efficient method for calculations of ro-vibrational energies, wave functions and resonance lifetimes is employed (which uses hyper-spherical coordinates, the sequential diagonalization/truncation approach, grid optimization and complex absorbing potential). A detailed analysis is carried out to characterize distributions of resonance energies and lifetimes, their rotational/vibrational content and their positions with respect to the centrifugal barrier. Emphasis is on the contribution of these resonances to the recombination process that forms ozone. It is found that major contributions come from localized resonances at energies near the top of the barrier. Delocalized resonances at higher energies should also be taken into account, while very narrow resonances at low energies (trapped far behind the centrifugal barrier) should be treated as bound states. The absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies are obtained using the energy-transfer model developed in the earlier work. Good agreement with experimental data is obtained if one follows the suggestion of Troe, who argued that the energy transfer mechanism of recombination is responsible only for 55% of the recombination rate (with the remaining 45% coming from the competing chaperon mechanism). PMID:27364351

  11. A full-dimensional model of ozone forming reaction: the absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies.

    PubMed

    Teplukhin, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2016-07-28

    Rigorous calculations of scattering resonances in ozone are carried out for a broad range of rotational excitations. The accurate potential energy surface of Dawes is adopted, and a new efficient method for calculations of ro-vibrational energies, wave functions and resonance lifetimes is employed (which uses hyper-spherical coordinates, the sequential diagonalization/truncation approach, grid optimization and complex absorbing potential). A detailed analysis is carried out to characterize distributions of resonance energies and lifetimes, their rotational/vibrational content and their positions with respect to the centrifugal barrier. Emphasis is on the contribution of these resonances to the recombination process that forms ozone. It is found that major contributions come from localized resonances at energies near the top of the barrier. Delocalized resonances at higher energies should also be taken into account, while very narrow resonances at low energies (trapped far behind the centrifugal barrier) should be treated as bound states. The absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies are obtained using the energy-transfer model developed in the earlier work. Good agreement with experimental data is obtained if one follows the suggestion of Troe, who argued that the energy transfer mechanism of recombination is responsible only for 55% of the recombination rate (with the remaining 45% coming from the competing chaperon mechanism).

  12. Measuring the absolute disintegration rate of a radioactive gas with a moveable endplate discharge counter (MEP) and theoretical calculation of wall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffey, A.H.; Gray, J.; Bentley, W.C.; Lerner, J.L.

    1987-09-01

    A precision built moveable endplate Geiger-Mueller counter was used to measure the absolute disintegration rate of a beta-emitting radioactive gas. A Geiger-Mueller counter used for measuring gaseous radioactivity has <100% counting efficiency owing to two factors: (1) ''end effect,'' due to decreased and distorted fields at the ends where wire-insulator joints are placed, and (2) ''wall effect,'' due to non-ionization by beta particles emitted near to and heading into the wall. The end effect was evaluated by making one end of the counter movable and measuring counting rates at a number of endplate positions. Much of the wall effect was calculated theoretically, based on known data for primary ionization of electrons as a function of energy and gas composition. Corrections were then made for the ''shakeoff'' effect in beta decay and for backscattering of electrons from the counter wall. Measurements and calculations were made for a sample of /sup 85/Kr (beta energy, 0.67 MeV). The wall effect calculation is readily extendable to other beta energies.

  13. Planar Strain-Rate-Free Diffusion Flames: Initiation, Properties, and Extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fendell, Francis; Gokoglu, Suleyman; Rungaldier, Harald; Schultz, Donald

    1999-01-01

    An effectively strain-rate-free diffusion flame constitutes the most vigorous laminar combustion of initially unmixed reactive gases. Such a diffusion flame is characterized by a relatively long residence time and by a relatively large characteristic length scale. If such a flame were also planar, providing high symmetry, it would be particularly suitable for experimental and theoretical investigations of key combustion phenomena, such as multicomponent diffusion, chemical kinetics, and soot inception, growth, and oxidation. Unfortunately, a planar strain-rate-free diffusion flame is highly disrupted in earth-gravity (e.g., in a counterflow-diffusion-flame apparatus) because of the very rapid onset (approx. 100 ms) of gravity-induced instability. Accordingly, a specially dedicated apparatus was designed, fabricated, and initially checked out for the examination of a planar strain-rate-free diffusion flame in microgravity. Such a diffusion flame may be formed within a hollowed-out squat container (initially configured as 25 cm x 25 cm x 9 cm), with isothermal, noncatalytic, impervious walls. At test initiation, a thin metallic sheet (approx. 1 mm in thickness) that separates the internal volume into two equal portions, each of dimensions 25 cm x 25 cm x 4.5 cm, is withdrawn, by uniform translation (approx. 50 cm/s) in its own plane, through a tightly fitting slit in one side wall. Thereupon, diluted fuel vapor (initially confined to one half-volume of the container) gains access to diluted oxygen (initially with the same pressure, density, and temperature as the fuel, but initially confined to the other half-volume). After a brief delay (approx. 10 ms), to permit limited but sufficient-for-flammability diffusional interpenetration of fuel vapor and oxidizer, burning is initiated by discharge of a line igniter, located along that side wall from which the trailing edge of the separator withdraws. The ignition spawns a triple-flame propagation across the 25 cm x 25 cm

  14. Diffusion Rates for Hydrogen on Pd(111) from Molecular Quantum Dynamics Calculations.

    PubMed

    Firmino, Thiago; Marquardt, Roberto; Gatti, Fabien; Dong, Wei

    2014-12-18

    The van Hove formula for the dynamical structure factor (DSF) related to particle scattering at mobile adsorbates is extended to include the relaxation of the adsorbates' vibrational states. The total rate obtained from the DSF is assumed to be the sum of a diffusion and a relaxation rate. A simple kinetic model to support this assumption is presented. To illustrate its potential applicability, the formula is evaluated using wave functions, energies, and lifetimes of vibrational states obtained for H/Pd(111) from first-principle calculations. Results show that quantum effects can be expected to be important even at room temperature.

  15. Diffusion Rates and Dispersal Patterns of Unfed versus Recently Fed Bed Bugs (Cimex lectularius L.).

    PubMed

    Goddard, Jerome; Caprio, Michael; Goddard, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Bed bug problems have been increasing since the 1980s, and accordingly, there have been intensive efforts to better understand their biology and behavior for control purposes. Understanding bed bug diffusion rates and dispersal patterns from one site to another (or lack thereof) is a key component in prevention and control campaigns. This study analyzed diffusion rates and dispersal patterns in a population of bed bugs, recently fed and unfed, in both one-dimensional and two-dimensional settings. When placed in the middle of a 71 cm × 2.7 cm artificial lane, approximately half of the bugs regardless of feeding status stayed at or near the release point during the 10 min observation periods, while about a fourth of them walked to the end of the lane. When placed in the middle of an arena measuring 51 cm × 76 cm and allowed to walk in any direction, approximately one-fourth of bed bugs, fed or unfed, still remained near their release point (no significant difference between fed or unfed). As for long-distance dispersal, 11/50 (22%) of recently fed bed bugs moved as far as possible in the arena during the 10 min replications, while only 2/50 (4%) unfed bed bugs moved to the maximum distance. This difference was significantly different (p < 0.0038), and indicates that unfed bed bugs did not move as far as recently fed ones. A mathematical diffusion model was used to quantify bed bug movements and an estimated diffusion rate range of 0.00006 cm²/s to 0.416 cm²/s was determined, which is almost no movement to a predicted root mean squared distance of approximately 19 cm per 10 min. The results of this study suggest that bed bugs, upon initial introduction into a new area, would have a difficult time traversing long distances when left alone to randomly disperse. PMID:26466900

  16. Diffusion Rates and Dispersal Patterns of Unfed versus Recently Fed Bed Bugs (Cimex lectularius L.)

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Jerome; Caprio, Michael; Goddard, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Bed bug problems have been increasing since the 1980s, and accordingly, there have been intensive efforts to better understand their biology and behavior for control purposes. Understanding bed bug diffusion rates and dispersal patterns from one site to another (or lack thereof) is a key component in prevention and control campaigns. This study analyzed diffusion rates and dispersal patterns in a population of bed bugs, recently fed and unfed, in both one-dimensional and two-dimensional settings. When placed in the middle of a 71 cm × 2.7 cm artificial lane, approximately half of the bugs regardless of feeding status stayed at or near the release point during the 10 min observation periods, while about a fourth of them walked to the end of the lane. When placed in the middle of an arena measuring 51 cm × 76 cm and allowed to walk in any direction, approximately one-fourth of bed bugs, fed or unfed, still remained near their release point (no significant difference between fed or unfed). As for long-distance dispersal, 11/50 (22%) of recently fed bed bugs moved as far as possible in the arena during the 10 min replications, while only 2/50 (4%) unfed bed bugs moved to the maximum distance. This difference was significantly different (p < 0.0038), and indicates that unfed bed bugs did not move as far as recently fed ones. A mathematical diffusion model was used to quantify bed bug movements and an estimated diffusion rate range of 0.00006 cm2/s to 0.416 cm2/s was determined, which is almost no movement to a predicted root mean squared distance of approximately 19 cm per 10 min. The results of this study suggest that bed bugs, upon initial introduction into a new area, would have a difficult time traversing long distances when left alone to randomly disperse. PMID:26466900

  17. Absolute, spatially resolved, in situ CO profiles in atmospheric laminar counter-flow diffusion flames using 2.3 μm TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Steven; Klein, Moritz; Kathrotia, Trupti; Riedel, Uwe; Kissel, Thilo; Dreizler, Andreas; Ebert, Volker

    2012-11-01

    We developed a new, spatially traversing, direct tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) for quantitative, calibration-free, and spatially resolved in situ measurements of CO profiles in atmospheric, laminar, non-premixed CH4/air model flames stabilized at a Tsuji counter-flow burner. The spectrometer employed a carefully characterized, room temperature distributed feedback diode laser to detect the R20 line of CO near 2,313 nm (4,324.4 cm-1), which allows to minimize spectral CH4 interference and detect CO even in very fuel-rich zones of the flame. The burner head was traversed through the 0.5 mm diameter laser beam in order to derive spatially resolved CO profiles in the only 60-mm wide CH4/air flame. Our multiple Voigt line Levenberg-Marquardt fitting algorithm and the use of highly efficient optical disturbance correction algorithms for treating transmission and background emission fluctuations as well as careful fringe interference suppression permitted to achieve a fractional optical resolution of up to 2.4 × 10-4 OD (1σ) in the flame ( T up to 1,965 K). Highly accurate, spatially resolved, absolute gas temperature profiles, needed to compute mole fraction and correct for spectroscopic temperature dependencies, were determined with a spatial resolution of 65 μm using ro-vibrational N2-CARS (Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy). With this setup we achieved temperature-dependent CO detection limits at the R20 line of 250-2,000 ppmv at peak CO concentrations of up to 4 vol.%. This permitted local CO detection with signal to noise ratios of more than 77. The CO TDLAS spectrometer was then used to determine absolute, spatially resolved in situ CO concentrations in the Tsuji flame, investigate the strain dependence of the CO Profiles and favorably compare the results to a new flame-chemistry model.

  18. Absolute rate constant and O(3P) yield for the O(1D)+N2O reaction in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranckx, S.; Peeters, J.; Carl, S. A.

    2008-10-01

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction that is the major source of stratospheric NOx, O(1D)+N2O → products, has been determined in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K, and, in the temperature range 248 K to 600 K, the fraction of the reaction that yields O(3P). Both the rate constants and product yields were determined using a recently-developed chemiluminescence technique for monitoring O(1D) that allows for higher precision determinations for both rate constants, and, particularly, O(3P) yields, than do other methods. We found the rate constant, kR1, to be essentially independent of temperature between 400 K and 227 K, having a value of (1.37±0.11)×10-10 cm3 s-1, and for temperatures greater than 450 K a marked decrease in rate constant was observed, with a rate constant of only (0.94±0.11)×10-10 cm3 s-1 at 719 K. The rate constants determined over the 227 K 400 K range show very low scatter and are significantly greater, by 20% at room temperature and 15% at 227 K, than the current recommended values. The fraction of O(3P) produced in this reaction was determined to be 0.002±0.002 at 250 K rising steadily to 0.010±0.004 at 600 K, thus the channel producing O(3P) can be entirely neglected in atmospheric kinetic modeling calculations. A further result of this study is an expression of the relative quantum yields as a function of temperature for the chemiluminescence reactions (kCL1)C2H + O(1D) → CH(A) + CO and (kCL2)C2H + O(3P) → CH(A) + CO, both followed by CH(A) → CH(X) + hν, as kCL1(T)/kCL2(T)=(32.8T-3050)/(6.29T+398).

  19. Wavy membranes and the growth rate of a planar chemical garden: Enhanced diffusion and bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yang; Batista, Bruno; Steinbock, Oliver; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Cardoso, Silvana S S

    2016-08-16

    To model ion transport across protocell membranes in Hadean hydrothermal vents, we consider both theoretically and experimentally the planar growth of a precipitate membrane formed at the interface between two parallel fluid streams in a 2D microfluidic reactor. The growth rate of the precipitate is found to be proportional to the square root of time, which is characteristic of diffusive transport. However, the dependence of the growth rate on the concentrations of hydroxide and metal ions is approximately linear and quadratic, respectively. We show that such a difference in ionic transport dynamics arises from the enhanced transport of metal ions across a thin gel layer present at the surface of the precipitate. The fluctuations in transverse velocity in this wavy porous gel layer allow an enhanced transport of the cation, so that the effective diffusivity is about one order of magnitude higher than that expected from molecular diffusion alone. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with our laboratory measurements of the growth of a manganese hydroxide membrane in a microfluidic channel, and this enhanced transport is thought to have been needed to account for the bioenergetics of the first single-celled organisms.

  20. Wavy membranes and the growth rate of a planar chemical garden: Enhanced diffusion and bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yang; Batista, Bruno; Steinbock, Oliver; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Cardoso, Silvana S S

    2016-08-16

    To model ion transport across protocell membranes in Hadean hydrothermal vents, we consider both theoretically and experimentally the planar growth of a precipitate membrane formed at the interface between two parallel fluid streams in a 2D microfluidic reactor. The growth rate of the precipitate is found to be proportional to the square root of time, which is characteristic of diffusive transport. However, the dependence of the growth rate on the concentrations of hydroxide and metal ions is approximately linear and quadratic, respectively. We show that such a difference in ionic transport dynamics arises from the enhanced transport of metal ions across a thin gel layer present at the surface of the precipitate. The fluctuations in transverse velocity in this wavy porous gel layer allow an enhanced transport of the cation, so that the effective diffusivity is about one order of magnitude higher than that expected from molecular diffusion alone. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with our laboratory measurements of the growth of a manganese hydroxide membrane in a microfluidic channel, and this enhanced transport is thought to have been needed to account for the bioenergetics of the first single-celled organisms. PMID:27486248

  1. Absolute rate constant and O(3P) yield for the O(1D)+N2O reaction in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranckx, S.; Peeters, J.; Carl, S. A.

    2008-05-01

    We have determined, in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K, the absolute rate constant for the reaction O(1D)+N2O → products and, in the temperature range 248 K to 600 K, the fraction of the reaction that yields O(3P). Both the rate constants and product yields were determined using a recently-developed chemiluminescence technique for monitoring O(1D) that allows for higher precision determinations for both rate constants, and, particularly, O(3P) yields, than do other methods. We found the rate constant, kR1, to be essentially independent of temperature between 400 K and 227 K, having a value of (1.37±0.09)×10-10 cm3 s-1. For temperatures greater than 450 K a marked decrease in value was observed, with a rate constant of only (0.94±0.11)×10-10 cm3 s-1 at 719 K. The rate constants determined over the 227 K-400 K range show very low scatter and are significantly greater, by 20% at room temperature and by 15% at 227 K, than the current recommended values. The fraction of O(3P) produced in this reaction was determined to be 0.002±0.002 at 250 K rising steadily to 0.010±0.004 at 600 K, thus the channel producing O(3P) can be entirely neglected in atmospheric kinetic modeling calculations. A further result of this study is an expression of the relative quantum yields as a function of temperature for the chemiluminescence reactions (kCL1) C2H+O(1D) → CH(A)+CO and (kCL2) C2H+O(3P) → CH(A)+CO, both followed by CH(A) → CH(X)+hν, as kCL1(T)/kCL2(T)=(32.8T-3050)/(6.29T+398).

  2. Influence of bubble size, diffuser width, and flow rate on the integral behavior of bubble plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Bruño.; Stoesser, Thorsten

    2016-06-01

    A large-eddy simulation based Eulerian-Lagrangian model is employed to quantify the impact of bubble size, diffuser diameter, and gas flow rate on integral properties of bubble plumes, such as the plume's width, centerline velocity, and mass flux. Calculated quantities are compared with experimental data and integral model predictions. Furthermore, the LES data were used to assess the behavior of the entrainment coefficient, the momentum amplification factor, and the bubble-to-momentum spread ratio. It is found that bubble plumes with constant bubble size and smaller diameter behave in accordance with integral plume models. Plumes comprising larger and non-uniform bubble sizes appear to deviate from past observations and model predictions. In multi-diameter bubble plumes, a bubble self-organisation takes place, i.e., small bubbles cluster in the center of the plume whilst large bubbles are found at the periphery of the plume. Multi-diameter bubble plumes also feature a greater entrainment rate than single-size bubble plumes, as well as a higher spread ratio and lower turbulent momentum rate. Once the plume is fully established, the size of the diffuser does not appear to affect integral properties of bubble plumes. However, plume development is affected by the diffuser width, as larger release areas lead to a delayed asymptotic behavior of the plume and consequently to a lower entrainment and higher spread ratio. Finally, the effect of the gas flow rate on the integral plume is studied and is deemed very relevant with regards to most integral plume properties and coefficients. This effect is already fairly well described by integral plume models.

  3. A reaction-diffusion-based coding rate control mechanism for camera sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Hyodo, Katsuya; Wakamiya, Naoki; Murata, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    A wireless camera sensor network is useful for surveillance and monitoring for its visibility and easy deployment. However, it suffers from the limited capacity of wireless communication and a network is easily overflown with a considerable amount of video traffic. In this paper, we propose an autonomous video coding rate control mechanism where each camera sensor node can autonomously determine its coding rate in accordance with the location and velocity of target objects. For this purpose, we adopted a biological model, i.e., reaction-diffusion model, inspired by the similarity of biological spatial patterns and the spatial distribution of video coding rate. Through simulation and practical experiments, we verify the effectiveness of our proposal. PMID:22163620

  4. A Reaction-Diffusion-Based Coding Rate Control Mechanism for Camera Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Hyodo, Katsuya; Wakamiya, Naoki; Murata, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    A wireless camera sensor network is useful for surveillance and monitoring for its visibility and easy deployment. However, it suffers from the limited capacity of wireless communication and a network is easily overflown with a considerable amount of video traffic. In this paper, we propose an autonomous video coding rate control mechanism where each camera sensor node can autonomously determine its coding rate in accordance with the location and velocity of target objects. For this purpose, we adopted a biological model, i.e., reaction-diffusion model, inspired by the similarity of biological spatial patterns and the spatial distribution of video coding rate. Through simulation and practical experiments, we verify the effectiveness of our proposal. PMID:22163620

  5. Absolute rate coefficients over extended temperature ranges and mechanisms of the CF(X(2)Pi) reactions with F(2), Cl(2) and O(2).

    PubMed

    Vetters, B; Dils, B; Nguyen, T L; Vereecken, L; Carl, S A; Peeters, J

    2009-06-01

    The absolute rate coefficients of the reactions of the carbyne-radical CF(X(2)Pi, nu = 0) with O(2), F(2) and Cl(2) have been measured over extended temperature ranges, using pulsed-laser photodissociation-laser-induced fluorescence (PLP-LIF) techniques. The CF(X(2)Pi) radicals were generated by KrF excimer laser 2-photon photolysis of CF(2)Br(2) at 248 nm and the real-time exponential decays of CF(X(2)Pi, nu = 0) at varying coreactant concentrations, in large excess, were monitored by LIF (A(2)Sigma(+), nu' = 1 <-- X(2)Pi, nu'' = 0 transition). The experimental bimolecular rate coefficients of the CF(X(2)Pi) reactions with F(2) and Cl(2) can be described by simple Arrhenius expressions: k(F2)(295-408 K) = (1.5 +/- 0.2) x 10(-11) exp[-(370 +/- 40)K/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1); and k(Cl2)(295-392 K) = (6.1 +/- 2.1) x 10(-12) exp[+(280 +/- 120)K/T]. The k(F2)(T) and k(Cl2)(T) results can be rationalized in terms of direct halogen-atom abstraction reactions in which the radical character of CF dominates; a quantum chemical CBS-Q//BHandHLYP/6-311G(d,p) study confirms that the ground state reactants CF(X(2)Pi) + F(2)(X(1)Sigma) connect directly with the ground-state products CF(2)(X(1)A(1)) + F((2)P) via a nearly barrierless F-atom abstraction route. The rate coefficient of CF(X(2)Pi) + O(2) can be represented by a two-term Arrhenius expression: k(O2)(258-780 K) = 1.1 x 10(-11) exp(-850 K/T) + 2.3 x 10(-13) exp(500 K/T), with a standard deviation of 5%. The first term dominates at higher temperatures T and the second at lower T where a negative temperature dependence is observed (<290 K). Quantum chemical computations at the CBS-QB3 and CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ levels of theory show that the k(O2)(T) behaviour is consistent with a change of the dominant rate-determining mechanism from a carbyne-type insertion into the O-O bond at high T to a radical-radical combination at low T.

  6. Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements of 1-butanol in helium: a comparative study of a thermal diffusion cloud chamber and a laminar flow diffusion chamber.

    PubMed

    Brus, David; Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Zdímal, Vladimír; Lihavainen, Heikki

    2005-06-01

    Isothermal homogeneous nucleation rates of 1-butanol were measured both in a thermal diffusion cloud chamber and in a laminar flow diffusion chamber built recently at the Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. The chosen system 1-butanol-helium can be studied reasonably well in both devices, in the overlapping range of temperatures. The results were compared with those found in the literature and those measured by Lihavainen in a laminar flow diffusion chamber of a similar design. The same isotherms measured with the thermal diffusion cloud chamber occur at highest saturation ratios of the three devices. Isotherms measured with the two laminar flow diffusion chambers are reasonably close together; the measurements by Lihavainen occur at lowest saturation ratios. The temperature dependences observed were similar in all three devices. The molecular content of critical clusters was calculated using the nucleation theorem and compared with the Kelvin equation. Both laminar flow diffusion chambers provided very similar sizes slightly above the Kelvin equation, whereas the thermal diffusion cloud chamber suggests critical cluster sizes significantly smaller. The results found elsewhere in the literature were in reasonable agreement with our results.

  7. Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements of 1-butanol in helium: a comparative study of a thermal diffusion cloud chamber and a laminar flow diffusion chamber.

    PubMed

    Brus, David; Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Zdímal, Vladimír; Lihavainen, Heikki

    2005-06-01

    Isothermal homogeneous nucleation rates of 1-butanol were measured both in a thermal diffusion cloud chamber and in a laminar flow diffusion chamber built recently at the Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. The chosen system 1-butanol-helium can be studied reasonably well in both devices, in the overlapping range of temperatures. The results were compared with those found in the literature and those measured by Lihavainen in a laminar flow diffusion chamber of a similar design. The same isotherms measured with the thermal diffusion cloud chamber occur at highest saturation ratios of the three devices. Isotherms measured with the two laminar flow diffusion chambers are reasonably close together; the measurements by Lihavainen occur at lowest saturation ratios. The temperature dependences observed were similar in all three devices. The molecular content of critical clusters was calculated using the nucleation theorem and compared with the Kelvin equation. Both laminar flow diffusion chambers provided very similar sizes slightly above the Kelvin equation, whereas the thermal diffusion cloud chamber suggests critical cluster sizes significantly smaller. The results found elsewhere in the literature were in reasonable agreement with our results. PMID:15974753

  8. Theory and simulation of the time-dependent rate coefficients of diffusion-influenced reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, H X; Szabo, A

    1996-01-01

    A general formalism is developed for calculating the time-dependent rate coefficient k(t) of an irreversible diffusion-influenced reaction. This formalism allows one to treat most factors that affect k(t), including rotational Brownian motion and conformational gating of reactant molecules and orientation constraint for product formation. At long times k(t) is shown to have the asymptotic expansion k(infinity)[1 + k(infinity) (pie Dt)-1/2 /4 pie D + ...], where D is the relative translational diffusion constant. An approximate analytical method for calculating k(t) is presented. This is based on the approximation that the probability density of the reactant pair in the reactive region keeps the equilibrium distribution but with a decreasing amplitude. The rate coefficient then is determined by the Green function in the absence of chemical reaction. Within the framework of this approximation, two general relations are obtained. The first relation allows the rate coefficient for an arbitrary amplitude of the reactivity to be found if the rate coefficient for one amplitude of the reactivity is known. The second relation allows the rate coefficient in the presence of conformational gating to be found from that in the absence of conformational gating. The ratio k(t)/k(0) is shown to be the survival probability of the reactant pair at time t starting from an initial distribution that is localized in the reactive region. This relation forms the basis of the calculation of k(t) through Brownian dynamics simulations. Two simulation procedures involving the propagation of nonreactive trajectories initiated only from the reactive region are described and illustrated on a model system. Both analytical and simulation results demonstrate the accuracy of the equilibrium-distribution approximation method. PMID:8913584

  9. Reversible intramolecular hydrogen transfer between cysteine thiyl radicals and glycine and alanine in model peptides: absolute rate constants derived from pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis

    PubMed Central

    Nauser, Thomas; Casi, Giulio; Koppenol, Willem H.; Schöneich, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The intramolecular reaction of cysteine thiyl radicals with peptide and protein αC-H bonds represents a potential mechanism for irreversible protein oxidation. Here, we have measured absolute rate constants for these reversible hydrogen transfer reactions by means of pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis of model peptides. For N-Ac-CysGly6 and N-Ac-CysGly2AspGly3, Cys thiyl radicals abstract hydrogen atoms from Gly with kf = (1.0-1.1)×105 s-1, generating carbon-centered radicals, while the reverse reaction proceeds with kr = (8.0-8.9)×105 s-1. The forward reaction shows a normal kinetic isotope effect of kH/kD = 6.9, while the reverse reaction shows a significantly higher normal kinetic isotope effect of 17.6, suggesting a contribution of tunneling. For N-Ac-CysAla2AspAla3, cysteine thiyl radicals abstract hydrogen atoms from Ala with kf =(0.9-1.0)×104 s-1, while the reverse reaction proceeds with kr = 1.0×105 s-1. The order of reactivity, Gly > Ala, is in accord with previous studies on intermolecular reactions of thiyl radicals with these amino acids. The fact that kf < kr suggests some secondary structure of the model peptides, which prevents the adoption of extended conformations, for which calculations of homolytic bond dissociation energies would have predicted kf > kr. Despite kf < kr, model calculations show that intramolecular hydrogen abstraction by Cys thiyl radicals can lead to significant oxidation of other amino acids in the presence of physiologic oxygen concentrations. PMID:18973367

  10. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  11. What determines drying rates at the onset of diffusion controlled stage-2 evaporation from porous media?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, N.; Or, D.

    2011-09-01

    Early stages of evaporation from porous media are marked by relatively high evaporation rates supplied by capillary liquid flow from a receding drying front to vaporization surface. At a characteristic drying front depth, hydraulic continuity to the surface is disrupted marking the onset of stage-2 evaporation where a lower evaporative flux is supported by vapor diffusion. Observations suggest that in some cases the transition is accompanied by a jump in the vaporization plane from the surface to a certain depth below. The resulting range of evaporation rates at the onset of stage-2 is relatively narrow (0.5-2.5 mm d-1). The objective is to estimate the depth of the vaporization plane that defines vapor diffusion length at the onset of stage-2. The working hypothesis is that the jump length is determined by a characteristic length of connected clusters at the secondary drying front that obeys a power law with the system's Bond number. We conducted evaporation experiments using sands and glass beads of different particle size distributions and extracted experimental data from the literature for model comparison. Results indicate the jump length at the end of stage-1 was affected primarily by porous media properties and less so by boundary conditions. Results show power law relationships between the length of the vaporization plane jump and Bond number with an exponent of -0.48 in good agreement with the percolation theory theoretical exponent of -0.47. The results explain the origins of a relatively narrow range of evaporation rates at the onset of stage-2, and provide a means for estimating these rates.

  12. Evolution of supersaturation of amorphous pharmaceuticals: nonlinear rate of supersaturation generation regulated by matrix diffusion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dajun D; Lee, Ping I

    2015-04-01

    The importance of rate of supersaturation generation on the kinetic solubility profiles of amorphous systems has recently been shown by us; however, the previous focus was limited to constant rates of supersaturation generation. The objective of the current study is to further examine the effect of nonlinear rate profiles of supersaturation generation in amorphous systems, including (1) instantaneous or infinite rate (i.e., initial degree of supersaturation), (2) first-order rate (e.g., from dissolution of amorphous drug particles), and (3) matrix diffusion regulated rate (e.g., drug release from amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) based on cross-linked poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) hydrogels), on the kinetic solubility profiles of a model poorly soluble drug indomethacin (IND) under nonsink dissolution conditions. The previously established mechanistic model taking into consideration both the crystal growth and ripening processes was extended to predict the evolution of supersaturation resulting from nonlinear rates of supersaturation generation. Our results confirm that excessively high initial supersaturation or a rapid supersaturation generation leads to a surge in maximum supersaturation followed by a rapid decrease in drug concentration owing to supersaturation-induced precipitation; however, an exceedingly low degree of supersaturation or a slow rate of supersaturation generation does not sufficiently raise the supersaturation level, which results in a lower but broader maximum kinetic solubility profile. Our experimental data suggest that an optimal area-under-the-curve of the kinetic solubility profiles exists at an intermediate initial supersaturation level for the amorphous systems studied here, which agrees well with the predicted trend. Our model predictions also support our experimental findings that IND ASD in cross-linked PHEMA exhibits a unique kinetic solubility profile because the resulting supersaturation level is governed by a matrix

  13. Extracellular enzyme production and cheating in Pseudomonas fluorescens depend on diffusion rates.

    PubMed

    Allison, Steven D; Lu, Lucy; Kent, Alyssa G; Martiny, Adam C

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria produce extracellular enzymes to obtain resources from complex chemical substrates, but this strategy is vulnerable to cheating by cells that take up reaction products without paying the cost of enzyme production. We hypothesized that cheating would suppress enzyme production in co-cultures of cheater and producer bacteria, particularly under well-mixed conditions. To test this hypothesis, we monitored protease expression and frequencies of Pseudomonas fluorescens producer and cheater genotypes over time in mixed liquid cultures and on agar plates. In mixed culture inoculated with equal frequencies of cheaters and producers, enzyme concentration declined to zero after 20 days, consistent with our hypothesis. We observed a similar decline in cultures inoculated with producers only, suggesting that cheater mutants arose de novo and swept the population. DNA sequencing showed that genetic changes most likely occurred outside the protease operon. In one experimental replicate, the population regained the ability to produce protease, likely due to further genetic changes or population dynamics. Under spatially structured conditions on agar plates, cheaters did not sweep the population. Instead, we observed a significant increase in the variation of enzyme activity levels expressed by clones isolated from the population. Together these results suggest that restricted diffusion favors a diversity of enzyme production strategies. In contrast, well-mixed conditions favor population sweeps by cheater strains, consistent with theoretical predictions. Cheater and producer strategies likely coexist in natural environments with the frequency of cheating increasing with diffusion rate.

  14. Extracellular enzyme production and cheating in Pseudomonas fluorescens depend on diffusion rates

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Steven D.; Lu, Lucy; Kent, Alyssa G.; Martiny, Adam C.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria produce extracellular enzymes to obtain resources from complex chemical substrates, but this strategy is vulnerable to cheating by cells that take up reaction products without paying the cost of enzyme production. We hypothesized that cheating would suppress enzyme production in co-cultures of cheater and producer bacteria, particularly under well-mixed conditions. To test this hypothesis, we monitored protease expression and frequencies of Pseudomonas fluorescens producer and cheater genotypes over time in mixed liquid cultures and on agar plates. In mixed culture inoculated with equal frequencies of cheaters and producers, enzyme concentration declined to zero after 20 days, consistent with our hypothesis. We observed a similar decline in cultures inoculated with producers only, suggesting that cheater mutants arose de novo and swept the population. DNA sequencing showed that genetic changes most likely occurred outside the protease operon. In one experimental replicate, the population regained the ability to produce protease, likely due to further genetic changes or population dynamics. Under spatially structured conditions on agar plates, cheaters did not sweep the population. Instead, we observed a significant increase in the variation of enzyme activity levels expressed by clones isolated from the population. Together these results suggest that restricted diffusion favors a diversity of enzyme production strategies. In contrast, well-mixed conditions favor population sweeps by cheater strains, consistent with theoretical predictions. Cheater and producer strategies likely coexist in natural environments with the frequency of cheating increasing with diffusion rate. PMID:24782855

  15. Validation of absolute axial neutron flux distribution calculations with MCNP with 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction rate distribution measurements at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor.

    PubMed

    Radulović, Vladimir; Štancar, Žiga; Snoj, Luka; Trkov, Andrej

    2014-02-01

    The calculation of axial neutron flux distributions with the MCNP code at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor has been validated with experimental measurements of the (197)Au(n,γ)(198)Au reaction rate. The calculated absolute reaction rate values, scaled according to the reactor power and corrected for the flux redistribution effect, are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effect of different cross-section libraries on the calculations has been investigated and shown to be minor. PMID:24316530

  16. In situ measurement and dynamic control of the evaporation rate in vapor diffusion crystallization of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Zhan-Yong; Gong, Hai-Yun; Bi, Ru-Chang

    1998-08-01

    A special device with a weight-sensitive facility was designed for monitoring and controlling the water evaporation in vapor diffusion protein crystallization. The device made it possible to measure the weight of the drop in real time while the crystallization experiment was going on normally. The precise water equilibration curves under different crystallization conditions could be obtained automatically. By monitoring and controlling the evaporation rate, the crystallization of hen egg-white lysozyme and trichosanthin, a plant protein from Chinese herb, was optimized by regulating the reservoir solution dynamically. The experimental results of these two proteins indicate both the feasibility of the device and the usefulness of dynamic control technique. Compared with traditional crystallization experiments, dynamically controlled crystallization can reduce the number of nuclei, increase the crystal size and save experimental time effectively.

  17. Diffusion of electronic defects in calcia-stabilized zirconia from a desorption rate study

    SciTech Connect

    Dou, S. ); Masson, C.R. ); Pacey, P.D. )

    1990-11-01

    This paper reports on rates of desorption of oxygen from samples of calcis-stabilized zirconia (CSZ) measured as a function of oxygen saturation pressure, of temperature, and of the impurity content of CSZ. The results have been interpreted to determine the diffusion coefficient, {ital D}, for electronic defects in CSZ. {ital D} was independent of the oxygen saturation pressure from 0.5 to 101 kPa. The activation energy was 88 kJ/mol for one sample from 1228 to 1577 K and 113 kJ/mol for another from 1515 to 1667 K. {ital D} was inversely proportional to the iron impurity concentration in the CSZ. This observation was interpreted in terms of a mechanism in which electron holes were trapped by iron impurity sites.

  18. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  19. A method to account for acoustic microstreaming when predicting bubble growth rates produced by rectified diffusion.

    PubMed

    Church, C C

    1988-11-01

    A reinterpretation of existing theory for rectified diffusion, the process by which bubbles in a sound field may grow in radius, is presented in order to quantitate the effect of acoustic microstreaming on bubble growth rates. The 1/t term in the growth rate equation is defined as the "decay term" and t as the "decay time," the time required for the gas concentration in the liquid contacting the bubble to rise (or fall) from its initial to its final value. In the absence of microstreaming, t is the duration of sonification. In the presence of microstreaming, t may be calculated from the streaming velocity and the bubble radius. A comparison between theory and the experimental results of Eller [A. Eller, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 46, 1246-1250 (1969)] and of Gould [R.K. Gould, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 56, 1740-1746 (1974)] shows reasonable agreement in the low kHz range. Theoretical results in the frequency range of 1-10 MHz at 1 and 4 bar are also presented.

  20. Instrumentation for video-rate near-infrared diffuse optical tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Piao Daqing; Dehghani, Hamid; Jiang Shudong; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Pogue, Brian W.

    2005-12-15

    This article describes the design, rationale, and system performance of a rapid imaging near-infrared diffuse optical tomography system that is capable of collecting tomographic measurements at video rate. Data-acquisition speed of 35 frames/s is achieved by spectral encoding of the sources, followed by spectral decoding of all detection channels in parallel in a spectrometer and using charge-coupled-device (CCD)-based detection. The combination of spectral decoding of the source lights horizontally in a spectrometer and spatial separation of the detector positions vertically at the entrance slit provides separate data for the entire set of source-detector pairs which can be acquired at the frame rate of the CCD camera. The described system features eight sources at an overall 785 nm center band with an average of 1.25 nm spacing in wavelength and eight detectors evenly deployed in a 27 mm array designed for imaging with small animal tissues. The system performs with localization error of 2.5 mm, and absorption recovering uncertainty of 16.7%. The point spread function of the imaging is estimated to be 4.1 mm when near to the edge and 10.4 mm at the center of the imaging array. Capture of transient changes of absorption coefficient in a dynamic phantom are also presented.

  1. Radiochromic leuco dye micelle hydrogels: II. Low diffusion rate leuco crystal violet gel.

    PubMed

    Babic, Steven; Battista, Jerry; Jordan, Kevin

    2009-11-21

    Radiation-sensitive hydrogels offer the capability of verifying intricate dose distributions in three-dimensional (3D) space conveniently in a single measurement with sub-millimetre spatial resolution. In this study, a new radiochromic hydrogel called leuco crystal violet (LCV) micelle gel is introduced. Upon irradiation, LCV converts to crystal violet (CV(+)). Triton X-100 micelles are used to provide the required hybrid-interfacing environment to dissolve LCV. The diffusion coefficient of the LCV gel has been measured to be 0.036 +/- 0.001 mm(2) h(-1), which is a factor of 25 times less than the standard radiochromic ferrous xylenol-orange (FX) gel; LCV gels without Triton X-100 micelles have a diffusion coefficient of 0.33 +/- 0.02 mm(2) h(-1). The LCV gel formulation contains: 1 mM LCV, 25 mM trichloroacetic acid, 4 mM Triton X-100 and 4% w/w gelatin. The primary innovative feature of this 3D hydrogel is that the radiation-induced CV(+) dye is more soluble in the Triton X-100 micelles than in the surrounding water which consequently leads to more stable post-irradiation dose distributions. A dosimetric characterization revealed that the dose response is reproducible to within 1% over three separate batches, independent of energy, dose rate and dose fractionation but is affected by the temperature ( approximately 4% per degree C) during irradiation. LCV micelle gels scanned optically with a yellow light source are a promising system for 3D dose verification. They may prove to be, especially, useful for scanning large volume dosimeters (i.e. 20 cm) since they are easily manufactured, transparent and near colourless prior to irradiation.

  2. Radiochromic leuco dye micelle hydrogels: II. Low diffusion rate leuco crystal violet gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babic, Steven; Battista, Jerry; Jordan, Kevin

    2009-11-01

    Radiation-sensitive hydrogels offer the capability of verifying intricate dose distributions in three-dimensional (3D) space conveniently in a single measurement with sub-millimetre spatial resolution. In this study, a new radiochromic hydrogel called leuco crystal violet (LCV) micelle gel is introduced. Upon irradiation, LCV converts to crystal violet (CV+). Triton X-100 micelles are used to provide the required hybrid-interfacing environment to dissolve LCV. The diffusion coefficient of the LCV gel has been measured to be 0.036 ± 0.001 mm2 h-1, which is a factor of 25 times less than the standard radiochromic ferrous xylenol-orange (FX) gel; LCV gels without Triton X-100 micelles have a diffusion coefficient of 0.33 ± 0.02 mm2 h-1. The LCV gel formulation contains: 1 mM LCV, 25 mM trichloroacetic acid, 4 mM Triton X-100 and 4% w/w gelatin. The primary innovative feature of this 3D hydrogel is that the radiation-induced CV+ dye is more soluble in the Triton X-100 micelles than in the surrounding water which consequently leads to more stable post-irradiation dose distributions. A dosimetric characterization revealed that the dose response is reproducible to within 1% over three separate batches, independent of energy, dose rate and dose fractionation but is affected by the temperature (~4% per °C) during irradiation. LCV micelle gels scanned optically with a yellow light source are a promising system for 3D dose verification. They may prove to be, especially, useful for scanning large volume dosimeters (i.e. 20 cm) since they are easily manufactured, transparent and near colourless prior to irradiation.

  3. Role of hydraulic diffusivity in the decrease of weathering rates over time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Fernando A. L.; Van der Weijden, Cornelis H.

    2014-05-01

    Springs emerging within massifs of crystalline rocks were monitored for discharge rate (Q), and the Q values combined with geomorphic and hydrographic parameters in a hydrologic model to calculate hydraulic conductivity (K) and effective porosity (ne) of the spring watersheds. The spring waters, several borehole waters and rain water were analyzed for major dissolved compounds, strontium and isotopes (δ18O, δ2H, δ13C and 87Sr/86Sr). With a shift to less negative values, δ18O and δ2H were fitted by a line approximately parallel to the GMWL, but no significant dependence on altitude was found. The δ18O and δ2H values correlate better with those of precipitation amount. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios in drilled well waters correlate positively with the depth of water circulation reported in the borehole logs. The corresponding regression equations were used to extrapolate the depth of hydraulic circuits within the spring watersheds. The previous data, together with groundwater travel times calculated by a water balance model, and with reactions of granite/metassediment plagioclase and biotite precipitating halloysite, gibbsite and vermiculite, were assembled in a mass balance model to calculate solute-flux weathering rates of plagioclase (WPl). The WPl's were described as a function of √{D}∝√{K/n}, where D is the hydraulic diffusivity. The discrepancies between the WPl values and solid-state rates, based on the differences between elemental, isotopic and mineral compositions measured in present-day regoliths and in the assumed protolith, were assigned to a decrease in D over time, from values in the protolith to values in the weathered aquifer.

  4. The time-periodic diffusive competition models with a free boundary and sign-changing growth rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingxin; Zhang, Yang

    2016-10-01

    To understand the spreading of invasive and native species, in this paper we consider the diffusive competition models with a free boundary in the heterogeneous time-periodic environments, in which the variable intrinsic growth rates of these two species change signs and may be very negative in some large regions. We study the spreading-vanishing dichotomy, long-time dynamical behavior of solution, sharp criteria for spreading and vanishing, and estimates of the asymptotic spreading speed of the free boundary. Moreover, we establish the existence of positive solutions to a T-periodic boundary value problem of the diffusive competition system with sign-changing growth rates in the half line.

  5. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  6. Rényi entropy and improved equilibration rates to self-similarity for nonlinear diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, J. A.; Toscani, G.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the large-time asymptotics of nonlinear diffusion equations ut = Δup in dimension n ⩾ 1, in the exponent interval p > n/(n + 2), when the initial datum u0 is of bounded second moment. Precise rates of convergence to the Barenblatt profile in terms of the relative Rényi entropy are demonstrated for finite-mass solutions defined in the whole space when they are re-normalized at each time t > 0 with respect to their own second moment, as proposed by Carrillo et al (2006 Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 180 127-49) and Toscani (2005 J. Evol. Eqns 5 185-203). The analysis shows that, in the range p > max((n - 1)/n, n/(n + 2)), the relative Rényi entropy exhibits a better decay, for intermediate times, with respect to the standard Ralston-Newman entropy. The result follows by a suitable use of sharp Gagliardo-Nirenberg-Sobolev inequalities considered by Dolbeault and Toscani (2013 Ann. Inst. Henri Poincare (C) Non Linear Anal. 30 917-34), and their information-theoretical proof (Savaré and Toscani 2014 IEEE Trans. Inform. Theory 60 2687-93), known as concavity of Rényi entropy power.

  7. Modeling exposure close to air pollution sources in naturally ventilated residences: association of turbulent diffusion coefficient with air change rate.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kai-Chung; Acevedo-Bolton, Viviana; Jiang, Ruo-Ting; Klepeis, Neil E; Ott, Wayne R; Fringer, Oliver B; Hildemann, Lynn M

    2011-05-01

    For modeling exposure close to an indoor air pollution source, an isotropic turbulent diffusion coefficient is used to represent the average spread of emissions. However, its magnitude indoors has been difficult to assess experimentally due to limitations in the number of monitors available. We used 30-37 real-time monitors to simultaneously measure CO at different angles and distances from a continuous indoor point source. For 11 experiments involving two houses, with natural ventilation conditions ranging from <0.2 to >5 air changes per h, an eddy diffusion model was used to estimate the turbulent diffusion coefficients, which ranged from 0.001 to 0.013 m² s⁻¹. The model reproduced observed concentrations with reasonable accuracy over radial distances of 0.25-5.0 m. The air change rate, as measured using a SF₆ tracer gas release, showed a significant positive linear correlation with the air mixing rate, defined as the turbulent diffusion coefficient divided by a squared length scale representing the room size. The ability to estimate the indoor turbulent diffusion coefficient using two readily measurable parameters (air change rate and room dimensions) is useful for accurately modeling exposures in close proximity to an indoor pollution source.

  8. Chaperone salts, polyethylene glycol and rates of equilibration in vapor-diffusion crystallization.

    PubMed

    Luft, J R; DeTitta, G T

    1995-09-01

    The kinetics of water-vapor equilibration in macromolecular crystallization were investigated for sitting droplets of aqueous polyethylene glycol (PEG) 8000 as a function of concentration. Equilibrations, set up with initial concentrations of PEG in the droplet at half those in the reservoir, were very slow for concentrations of relevance to the macromolecular crystal growth problem. At 301 K, 24 micro l droplets at initial concentrations of 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5%(w/v) PEG require 12, 5, and 3 weeks to reach equilibrium, respectively. On the other hand, the addition of modest quantities of sodium chloride to both droplet and reservoir increases the rate of equilibration for aqueous PEG sitting droplets significantly. At 293 K, droplets with initial volumes of 24 micro l and PEG concentrations of 5%(w/v) require 12 weeks to reach equilibrium, while droplets of the same volume and initial concentrations of 5%(w/v) PEG and 200 mM NaCI require less than two weeks to reach equilibrium. The slow vapor-diffusion equilibrations of pure PEG solutions, and the subsequent increase in these rates with colligative agents such as salt, are a consequence of the non-ideality of aqueous PEG solutions. These results are of interest both from a practical and a theoretical viewpoint. They underscore the importance of kinetic factors in macromolecular crystal growth, help to explain apparent inconsistencies of outcome in PEG-mediated crystallizations, and yield another methodology for the optimization of crystal growth conditions, namely the control of the kinetics of equilibration using colligative agents.

  9. UNBIASED MOMENT-RATE SPECTRA AND ABSOLUTE SITE EFFECTS IN THE KACHCHH BASIN, INDIA, FROM THE ANALYSIS OF THE AFTERSHOCKS OF THE 2001 Mw 7.6 BHUJ EARTHQUAKE

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Bodin, P; Mayeda, K; Akinci, A

    2005-05-04

    What can be learned about absolute site effects on ground motions and about earthquake source spectra from recordings at temporary seismic stations, none of which could be considered a 'reference' (hard rock) site, for which no geotechnical information is available, in a very poorly instrumented region? This challenge motivated our current study of aftershocks of the 2001 Mw 7.6 Bhuj earthquake, in Western India. Crustal attenuation and spreading relationships based on the same data used here were determined in an earlier study. In this paper we decouple the ambiguity between absolute source radiation and site effects by first computing robust estimates of moment-rate spectra of about 200 aftershocks in each of two depth ranges. Using these new estimates of sourcespectra, and our understanding of regional wave propagation, we extract the absolute site terms of the sites of the temporary deployment. Absolute site terms (one for each component of the ground motion, for each station) are computed in an average sense, via an L{sub 1}-norm minimization, and results for each site are averaged over wide ranges of azimuths and takeoff angles. The Bhuj deployment is characterized by a variable shallow geology, mostly of soft sedimentary units. Vertical site terms in the region were observed to be almost featureless and slightly < 1.0 within wide frequency ranges. As a result, H/V spectral ratios mimic the absolute behaviors of absolute horizontal site terms, and they generally overpredict them. On the contrary, with respect to the results for sedimentary rock sites (limestone, dolomite) obtained by Malagnini et al. (2004), H/V spectral ratios in their study did not have much in common with absolute horizontal site terms. Spectral ratios between the vector sum of the computed horizontal site terms for the temporary deployment with respect to the same quantity computed at the hardest rock station available, BAC1, are seriously biased by its non-flat, non-unitary site response

  10. Diffusion-driven and excitation-dependent recombination rate in blue InGaN/GaN quantum well structures

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksiejūnas, R.; Gelžinytė, K.; Nargelas, S. Jarašiūnas, K.; Vengris, M.; Armour, E. A.; Byrnes, D. P.; Arif, R. A.; Lee, S. M.; Papasouliotis, G. D.

    2014-01-13

    We report on diffusion-driven and excitation-dependent carrier recombination rate in multiple InGaN/GaN quantum wells by using photoluminescence, light-induced absorption, and diffraction techniques. We demonstrate gradually increasing with excitation carrier diffusivity and its correlation with the recombination rate. At low carrier densities, an increase in radiative emission and carrier lifetime was observed due to partial saturation of non-radiative recombination centers. However, at carrier densities above ∼5 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}, a typical value of photoluminescence efficiency droop, a further increase of diffusivity forces the delocalized carriers to face higher number of fast non-radiative recombination centers leading to an increase of non-radiative losses.

  11. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  12. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  13. Determination of the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in metals from the rate of change in the electrical resistance in desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Mikitishin, S.I.; Fedorov, V.V.; Sergienko, O.M.; Sokolovskii, O.R.; Spas, Y.M.

    1985-07-01

    A proposed method of measuring the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen D from the rate of change in electrical resistance in degassing of hydrogenimpregnated specimens is presented. Distinguished by simplicity, the method makes it possible to determine the coefficients with any method of hydrogen impregnation in a broad temperature range.

  14. Diffusion of Innovation Theory and Xbox Live: Examining Minority Gamers' Responses and Rate of Adoption to Changes in Xbox Live

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Kishonna L.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the response of minority gamers as they adopt new innovations in Xbox Live. Using diffusion of innovation theory, specific attention is given to gamers' rate of adoption of the new Xbox Live environment, which was a recent update to the Xbox Live interface. By employing virtual ethnography, observations, and interviews reveal…

  15. The distribution of cosmic-ray ionization rates in diffuse molecular clouds as probed by H3+.

    PubMed

    Indriolo, Nick

    2012-11-13

    Owing to its simple chemistry, H(3)(+) is widely regarded as the most reliable tracer of the cosmic-ray ionization rate in diffuse interstellar clouds. At present, H(3)(+) observations have been made in over 50 sight lines that probe the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) throughout the Galaxy. This small survey presents the opportunity to investigate the distribution of cosmic-ray ionization rates in the ISM, as well as any correlations between the ionization rate and line-of-sight properties. Some of the highest inferred ionization rates are about 25 times larger than the lowest upper limits, suggesting variations in the underlying low-energy cosmic-ray flux across the Galaxy. Most likely, such variations are caused predominantly by the distance between an observed cloud and the nearest site of particle acceleration.

  16. Determination of H{sub 2} Diffusion Rates through Various Closures on TRU Waste Bag-Out Bags

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip D. Noll, Jr.; E. Larry Callis; Kirsten M. Norman

    1999-06-01

    The amount of H{sub 2} diffusion through twist and tape (horse-tail), wire tie, plastic tie, and heat sealed closures on transuranic (TRU) waste bag-out bags has been determined. H{sub 2} diffusion through wire and plastic tie closures on TRU waste bag-out bags has not been previously characterized and, as such, TRU waste drums containing bags with these closures cannot be certified and/or shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Since wire ties have been used at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) from 1980 to 1991 and the plastic ties from 1991 to the present, there are currently thousands of waste drums that cannot be shipped to the WIPP site. Repackaging the waste would be prohibitively expensive. Diffusion experiments performed on the above mentioned closures show that the diffusion rates of plastic tie and horse-tail closures are greater than the accepted value presented in the TRU-PACT 11 Safety Analysis Report (SAR). Diffusion rates for wire tie closures are not statistically different from the SAR value. Thus, drums containing bags with these closures can now potentially be certified which would allow for their consequent shipment to WIPP.

  17. Diffusion of myosin light chain kinase on actin: A mechanism to enhance myosin phosphorylation rates in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hong, Feng; Brizendine, Richard K; Carter, Michael S; Alcala, Diego B; Brown, Avery E; Chattin, Amy M; Haldeman, Brian D; Walsh, Michael P; Facemyer, Kevin C; Baker, Josh E; Cremo, Christine R

    2015-10-01

    Smooth muscle myosin (SMM) light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates SMM, thereby activating the ATPase activity required for muscle contraction. The abundance of active MLCK, which is tightly associated with the contractile apparatus, is low relative to that of SMM. SMM phosphorylation is rapid despite the low ratio of MLCK to SMM, raising the question of how one MLCK rapidly phosphorylates many SMM molecules. We used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to monitor single molecules of streptavidin-coated quantum dot-labeled MLCK interacting with purified actin, actin bundles, and stress fibers of smooth muscle cells. Surprisingly, MLCK and the N-terminal 75 residues of MLCK (N75) moved on actin bundles and stress fibers of smooth muscle cell cytoskeletons by a random one-dimensional (1-D) diffusion mechanism. Although diffusion of proteins along microtubules and oligonucleotides has been observed previously, this is the first characterization to our knowledge of a protein diffusing in a sustained manner along actin. By measuring the frequency of motion, we found that MLCK motion is permitted only if acto-myosin and MLCK-myosin interactions are weak. From these data, diffusion coefficients, and other kinetic and geometric considerations relating to the contractile apparatus, we suggest that 1-D diffusion of MLCK along actin (a) ensures that diffusion is not rate limiting for phosphorylation, (b) allows MLCK to locate to areas in which myosin is not yet phosphorylated, and (c) allows MLCK to avoid getting "stuck" on myosins that have already been phosphorylated. Diffusion of MLCK along actin filaments may be an important mechanism for enhancing the rate of SMM phosphorylation in smooth muscle.

  18. Diffusion of myosin light chain kinase on actin: A mechanism to enhance myosin phosphorylation rates in smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Feng; Brizendine, Richard K.; Carter, Michael S.; Alcala, Diego B.; Brown, Avery E.; Chattin, Amy M.; Haldeman, Brian D.; Walsh, Michael P.; Facemyer, Kevin C.; Baker, Josh E.

    2015-01-01

    Smooth muscle myosin (SMM) light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates SMM, thereby activating the ATPase activity required for muscle contraction. The abundance of active MLCK, which is tightly associated with the contractile apparatus, is low relative to that of SMM. SMM phosphorylation is rapid despite the low ratio of MLCK to SMM, raising the question of how one MLCK rapidly phosphorylates many SMM molecules. We used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to monitor single molecules of streptavidin-coated quantum dot–labeled MLCK interacting with purified actin, actin bundles, and stress fibers of smooth muscle cells. Surprisingly, MLCK and the N-terminal 75 residues of MLCK (N75) moved on actin bundles and stress fibers of smooth muscle cell cytoskeletons by a random one-dimensional (1-D) diffusion mechanism. Although diffusion of proteins along microtubules and oligonucleotides has been observed previously, this is the first characterization to our knowledge of a protein diffusing in a sustained manner along actin. By measuring the frequency of motion, we found that MLCK motion is permitted only if acto–myosin and MLCK–myosin interactions are weak. From these data, diffusion coefficients, and other kinetic and geometric considerations relating to the contractile apparatus, we suggest that 1-D diffusion of MLCK along actin (a) ensures that diffusion is not rate limiting for phosphorylation, (b) allows MLCK to locate to areas in which myosin is not yet phosphorylated, and (c) allows MLCK to avoid getting “stuck” on myosins that have already been phosphorylated. Diffusion of MLCK along actin filaments may be an important mechanism for enhancing the rate of SMM phosphorylation in smooth muscle. PMID:26415568

  19. Diffusion kinetics of samarium and neodymium in garnet, and a method for determining cooling rates of rocks

    PubMed

    Ganguly; Tirone; Hervig

    1998-08-01

    Experimental determinations of the diffusion coefficients of samarium and neodymium in almandine garnet and theoretical considerations show that one cannot assign a sufficiently restricted range of closure temperature, TC, to the samarium-neodymium decay system in garnet for the purpose of constraining the cooling rate. However, it is shown that the samarium-neodymium cooling age of garnet can be used to calculate both cooling rate and TC if the temperature and age at the peak metamorphic conditions are known.

  20. Functional imaging and assessment of the glucose diffusion rate in epithelial tissues in optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Larin, K V; Tuchin, V V

    2008-06-30

    Functional imaging, monitoring and quantitative description of glucose diffusion in epithelial and underlying stromal tissues in vivo and controlling of the optical properties of tissues are extremely important for many biomedical applications including the development of noninvasive or minimally invasive glucose sensors as well as for therapy and diagnostics of various diseases, such as cancer, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Recent progress in the development of a noninvasive molecular diffusion biosensor based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) is described. The diffusion of glucose was studied in several epithelial tissues both in vitro and in vivo. Because OCT provides depth-resolved imaging of tissues with high in-depth resolution, the glucose diffusion is described not only as a function of time but also as a function of depth. (special issue devoted to application of laser technologies in biophotonics and biomedical studies)

  1. Functional imaging and assessment of the glucose diffusion rate in epithelial tissues in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, K. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2008-06-01

    Functional imaging, monitoring and quantitative description of glucose diffusion in epithelial and underlying stromal tissues in vivo and controlling of the optical properties of tissues are extremely important for many biomedical applications including the development of noninvasive or minimally invasive glucose sensors as well as for therapy and diagnostics of various diseases, such as cancer, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Recent progress in the development of a noninvasive molecular diffusion biosensor based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) is described. The diffusion of glucose was studied in several epithelial tissues both in vitro and in vivo. Because OCT provides depth-resolved imaging of tissues with high in-depth resolution, the glucose diffusion is described not only as a function of time but also as a function of depth.

  2. Estimation of the diffusion rate and crossing probability for biased edge movement between two different types of habitat.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Mingqing; Reeve, John D; Xu, Dashun; Cronin, James T

    2013-09-01

    One of the fundamental goals of ecology is to examine how dispersal affects the distribution and dynamics of insects across natural landscapes. These landscapes are frequently divided into patches of habitat embedded in a matrix of several non-habitat regions, and dispersal behavior could vary within each landscape element as well as the edges between elements. Reaction-diffusion models are a common way of modeling dispersal and species interactions in such landscapes, but to apply these models we also need methods of estimating the diffusion rate and any edge behavior parameters. In this paper, we present a method of estimating the diffusion rate using the mean occupancy time for a circular region. We also use mean occupancy time to estimate a parameter (the crossing probability) that governs one type of edge behavior often used in these models, a biased random walk. These new methods have some advantages over other methods of estimating these parameters, including reduced computational cost and ease of use in the field. They also provide a method of estimating the diffusion rate for a particular location in space, compared to existing methods that represent averages over large areas. We further examine the statistical properties of the new method through simulation, and discuss how mean occupancy time could be estimated in field experiments.

  3. Impact of water boundary layer diffusion on the nitrification rate of submerged biofilter elements from a recirculating aquaculture system.

    PubMed

    Prehn, Jonas; Waul, Christopher K; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming; Arvin, Erik

    2012-07-01

    Total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) removal by microbial nitrification is an essential process in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS). In order to protect the aquatic environment and fish health, it is important to be able to predict the nitrification rates in RAS's. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of hydraulic film diffusion on the nitrification rate in a submerged biofilter. Using an experimental batch reactor setup with recirculation, active nitrifying biofilter units from a RAS were exposed to a range of hydraulic flow velocities. Corresponding nitrification rates were measured following ammonium chloride, NH₄Cl, spikes and the impact of hydraulic film diffusion was quantified. The nitrification performance of the tested biofilter could be significantly increased by increasing the hydraulic flow velocity in the filter. Area based first order nitrification rate constants ranged from 0.065 m d⁻¹ to 0.192 m d⁻¹ for flow velocities between 2.5 m h⁻¹ and 40 m h⁻¹ (18 °C). This study documents that hydraulic film diffusion may have a significant impact on the nitrification rate in fixed film biofilters with geometry and hydraulic flows corresponding to our experimental RAS biofilters. The results may thus have practical implications in relation to the design, operational strategy of RAS biofilters and how to optimize TAN removal in fixed film biofilter systems.

  4. Opposed jet diffusion flames of nitrogen-diluted hydrogen vs air - Axial LDA and CARS surveys; fuel/air rates at extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Pellett, G.L.; Northam, G.B.; Wilson, L.G.; Jarrett, O. Jr.; Antcliff, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study of H-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) is reported. Coaxial tubular opposed jet burners were used to form dish-shaped CFDFs centered by opposing laminar jets of H2/N2 and air in an argon bath at 1 atm. Jet velocities for extinction and flame restoration limits are shown versus input H2 concentration. LDA velocity data and CARS temperature and absolute N2, O2 density data give detailed flame structure on the air side of the stagnation point. The results show that air jet velocity is a more fundamental and appropriate measure of H2-air CFDF extinction than input H2 mass flux or fuel jet velocity. It is proposed that the observed constancy of air jet velocity for fuel mixtures containing 80 to 100 percent H2 measure a maximum, kinetically controlled rate at which the CFDF can consume oxygen in air. Fuel velocity mainly measures the input jet momentum required to center an H2/N2 versus air CFDF. 42 refs.

  5. Opposed jet diffusion flames of nitrogen-diluted hydrogen vs air - Axial LDA and CARS surveys; fuel/air rates at extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.; Wilson, L. G.; Jarrett, Olin, Jr.; Antcliff, R. R.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study of H-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) is reported. Coaxial tubular opposed jet burners were used to form dish-shaped CFDFs centered by opposing laminar jets of H2/N2 and air in an argon bath at 1 atm. Jet velocities for extinction and flame restoration limits are shown versus input H2 concentration. LDA velocity data and CARS temperature and absolute N2, O2 density data give detailed flame structure on the air side of the stagnation point. The results show that air jet velocity is a more fundamental and appropriate measure of H2-air CFDF extinction than input H2 mass flux or fuel jet velocity. It is proposed that the observed constancy of air jet velocity for fuel mixtures containing 80 to 100 percent H2 measure a maximum, kinetically controlled rate at which the CFDF can consume oxygen in air. Fuel velocity mainly measures the input jet momentum required to center an H2/N2 versus air CFDF.

  6. Measurement of lateral diffusion rates in membranes by pulsed magnetic field gradient, magic angle spinning-proton nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gawrisch, Klaus; Gaede, Holly C

    2007-01-01

    Membrane organization, including the presence of domains, can be characterized by measuring lateral diffusion rates of lipids and membrane-bound substances. Magic angle spinning (MAS) yields well-resolved proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of lipids in biomembranes. When combined with pulsed-field gradient NMR (rendering what is called "pulsed magnetic field gradients-MAS-NMR"), it permits precise diffusion measurements on the micrometer lengths scale for any substance with reasonably well-resolved proton MAS-NMR resonances, without the need of preparing oriented samples. Sample preparation procedures, the technical requirements for the NMR equipment, and spectrometer settings are described. Additionally, equations for analysis of diffusion data obtained from unoriented samples, and a method for correcting the data for liposome curvature are provided.

  7. Rate of lateral diffusion of intramembrane particles: measurement by electrophoretic displacement and rerandomization.

    PubMed Central

    Sowers, A E; Hackenbrock, C R

    1981-01-01

    A method combining electrophoresis and freeze-fracture electron microscopy is described; the method was used to determine the lateral diffusion coefficient of intramembrane particles (integral proteins) in the mitochondrial inner membrane. An electric current was passed through microsuspensions of purified, spherical inner membranes at pH 7.4, which caused an electrophoretic migration of intramembrane particles in the membrane plane into a single, crowded patch facing the positive electrode. The membrane microsuspensions were quick-frozen at specified times after the packed particles were released from the electrophoretic force and while the particles were diffusing back to a random distribution. Observed concentration gradients of intramembrane particles during this time were quantitatively compared with and found to follow a mathematical model for Fickian diffusion of particles on a spherical membrane. The results determine the kinetics of free diffusion of integral proteins at the resolution of individual proteins. The diffusion coefficient of the integral proteins in the mitochondrial inner membrane was determined to be 8.3 X 10(-10) cm2/sec at 20 degrees C, from which a root-mean-square displacement of 57 nm in 10 msec is predicted. Images PMID:6947228

  8. Effect of Diffusion on Resonance Energy Transfer Rate Distributions: Implications for Distance Measurements.

    PubMed

    Toptygin, Dmitri; Chin, Alexander F; Hilser, Vincent J

    2015-10-01

    Intrinsically disordered protein regions and many other biopolymers lack the three-dimensional structure that could be determined by X-ray crystallography or NMR, which encourages the application of alternative experimental methods. Time-resolved resonance energy transfer data are often used to measure distances between two fluorophores attached to a flexible biopolymer. This is complicated by the rotational and translational diffusion of the fluorophores and by nonmonoexponential donor decay in the absence of the acceptor. Equation I(DA)(t) = I(D)(t)·F(t) is derived here, which is applicable regardless of whether I(D)(t) is monoexponential. I(D)(t) and I(DA)(t) are the δ-excitation donor emission decays in the absence and in the presence of the acceptor; F(t) contains information about energy transfer, donor-acceptor distance distribution, and diffusion dynamics. It is shown that in the absence of rotational and translational diffusion, F(t) is a continuous distribution of exponentials, whereas in the presence of rotational and translational diffusion, F(t) is a sum of discrete exponentials. For each case it is shown how F(t) is related to the distance distribution. Experimental data obtained with a flexible tetradecapeptide in aqueous solution clearly demonstrate that F(t) is a sum of discrete exponential terms. A partial differential equation describing resonance energy transfer in the presence of both rotational and translational diffusion of the donor and acceptor tethered to the ends of a semiflexible chain is solved in this work using a combination of analytical and numerical methods; the solution is used to fit time-resolved emission of the donor, which makes it possible to determine the model parameters: contour length, persistence length, and the end-to-end translational diffusion coefficient.

  9. First experimental determination of the absolute gas-phase rate coefficient for the reaction of OH with 4-hydroxy-2-butanone (4H2B) at 294 K by vapor pressure measurements of 4H2B.

    PubMed

    El Dib, Gisèle; Sleiman, Chantal; Canosa, André; Travers, Daniel; Courbe, Jonathan; Sawaya, Terufat; Mokbel, Ilham; Chakir, Abdelkhaleq

    2013-01-10

    The reaction of the OH radicals with 4-hydroxy-2-butanone was investigated in the gas phase using an absolute rate method at room temperature and over the pressure range 10-330 Torr in He and air as diluent gases. The rate coefficients were measured using pulsed laser photolysis (PLP) of H(2)O(2) to produce OH and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure the OH temporal profile. An average value of (4.8 ± 1.2) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was obtained. The OH quantum yield following the 266 nm pulsed laser photolysis of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone was measured for the first time and found to be about 0.3%. The investigated kinetic study required accurate measurements of the vapor pressure of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone, which was measured using a static apparatus. The vapor pressure was found to range from 0.056 to 7.11 Torr between 254 and 323 K. This work provides the first absolute rate coefficients for the reaction of 4-hydroxy-2-butanone with OH and the first experimental saturated vapor pressures of the studied compound below 311 K. The obtained results are compared to those of the literature and the effects of the experimental conditions on the reactivity are examined. The calculated tropospheric lifetime obtained in this work suggests that once emitted into the atmosphere, 4H2B may contribute to the photochemical pollution in a local or regional scale.

  10. Diffuse oceanic plate boundaries: Strain rates, vertically averaged rheology, and comparisons with narrow plate boundaries and stable plate interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Richard G.

    Diffuse plate boundaries occur in both oceanic and continental lithosphere and cover ≈ 15% of Earth's solid surface. The fastest plate speeds accommodated across diffuse oceanic plate boundaries are ≈ 15 mm/yr. The smallest strain rates averaged across narrow plate boundaries are at least 102 times larger than the largest strain rates across diffuse oceanic plate boundaries and at least 102 times larger than those across stable plate interiors. The effective viscosity (ηeff) of the lithosphere is estimated from the ratio of vertically averaged shear stresses to strain rates for three tectonic settings: (i) oceanic transform fault zones, for which ηeff = 3 ×1016 to 5×1019 Pa s, comparable to estimates for the asthenosphere, (ii) diffuse oceanic plate boundaries, for which ηeff = 1×1023 to 6×l023 Pa s, ≈ 10 times larger than for diffuse continental plate boundaries, and (iii) stable plate interiors, for which ηeff = 1x1024 to 2×1027 Pa s. The rheology of oceanic lithosphere over times longer than earthquake cycles is modeled as a plastic layer overlying a layer that deforms by creeping flow [Martinod and Davy, 1992]. Oceanic lithosphere deforms when the yield strength of the upper lithosphere is exceeded. The vertically averaged rheology of deforming oceanic lithosphere can be approximated by a power-law fluid for which ɛ. ∝ (τs)n where ɛ. is the rate of shear strain and τs is the shear stress. If the ratio of the yield strength of the upper lithosphere to the force required to deform the lower lithosphere at a strain rate of 10-16 s-1 is varied from 10-2 to 102 , the calculated value of n varies from ≈3 to ≈300. The map-view aspect ratio of a deforming zone in a thin sheet of power-law fluid is proportional to n-½ [England et al., 1985]. A profile of displacement versus distance inferred from a seismic profile across the Central Indian Basin (India-Capricorn diffuse oceanic plate boundary), where the lithosphere is about 60-Myr old

  11. Deriving time-dependent diffusion and relaxation rate in porous systems using eigenfunctions of the Laplace operator.

    PubMed

    Nordin, Matias; Jacobi, Martin Nilsson; Nydén, Magnus

    2009-12-01

    Porous systems are investigated using eigendecomposition of the Laplace matrix. Three parameters; tortuosity, surface-to-pore volume ratio and relaxation rate are derived from the eigenvalue spectrum of the Laplace matrix and connected to the parameters in the Padé approximation, an expression often used to describe the time-dependent diffusion coefficient in porous systems. The Padé length is identified for systems with large pore to connector volume ratio. The results are compared with simulations.

  12. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses. PMID:23586876

  13. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses.

  14. Detection of anomalous diffusion using confidence intervals of the scaling exponent with application to preterm neonatal heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickel, David R.; Verklan, M. Terese; Moon, Jon

    1998-11-01

    The scaling exponent of the root mean square (rms) displacement quantifies the roughness of fractal or multifractal time series; it is equivalent to other second-order measures of scaling, such as the power-law exponents of the spectral density and autocorrelation function. For self-similar time series, the rms scaling exponent equals the Hurst parameter, which is related to the fractal dimension. A scaling exponent of 0.5 implies that the process is normal diffusion, which is equivalent to an uncorrelated random walk; otherwise, the process can be modeled as anomalous diffusion. Higher exponents indicate that the increments of the signal have positive correlations, while exponents below 0.5 imply that they have negative correlations. Scaling exponent estimates of successive segments of the increments of a signal are used to test the null hypothesis that the signal is normal diffusion, with the alternate hypothesis that the diffusion is anomalous. Dispersional analysis, a simple technique which does not require long signals, is used to estimate the scaling exponent from the slope of the linear regression of the logarithm of the standard deviation of binned data points on the logarithm of the number of points per bin. Computing the standard error of the scaling exponent using successive segments of the signal is superior to previous methods of obtaining the standard error, such as that based on the sum of squared errors used in the regression; the regression error is more of a measure of the deviation from power-law scaling than of the uncertainty of the scaling exponent estimate. Applying this test to preterm neonate heart rate data, it is found that time intervals between heart beats can be modeled as anomalous diffusion with negatively correlated increments. This corresponds to power spectra between 1/f2 and 1/f, whereas healthy adults are usually reported to have 1/f spectra, suggesting that the immaturity of the neonatal nervous system affects the scaling

  15. Dispersion in Rectangular Networks: Effective Diffusivity and Large-Deviation Rate Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzella, Alexandra; Vanneste, Jacques

    2016-09-01

    The dispersion of a diffusive scalar in a fluid flowing through a network has many applications including to biological flows, porous media, water supply, and urban pollution. Motivated by this, we develop a large-deviation theory that predicts the evolution of the concentration of a scalar released in a rectangular network in the limit of large time t ≫1 . This theory provides an approximation for the concentration that remains valid for large distances from the center of mass, specifically for distances up to O (t ) and thus much beyond the O (t1 /2) range where a standard Gaussian approximation holds. A byproduct of the approach is a closed-form expression for the effective diffusivity tensor that governs this Gaussian approximation. Monte Carlo simulations of Brownian particles confirm the large-deviation results and demonstrate their effectiveness in describing the scalar distribution when t is only moderately large.

  16. Dispersion in Rectangular Networks: Effective Diffusivity and Large-Deviation Rate Function.

    PubMed

    Tzella, Alexandra; Vanneste, Jacques

    2016-09-01

    The dispersion of a diffusive scalar in a fluid flowing through a network has many applications including to biological flows, porous media, water supply, and urban pollution. Motivated by this, we develop a large-deviation theory that predicts the evolution of the concentration of a scalar released in a rectangular network in the limit of large time t≫1. This theory provides an approximation for the concentration that remains valid for large distances from the center of mass, specifically for distances up to O(t) and thus much beyond the O(t^{1/2}) range where a standard Gaussian approximation holds. A byproduct of the approach is a closed-form expression for the effective diffusivity tensor that governs this Gaussian approximation. Monte Carlo simulations of Brownian particles confirm the large-deviation results and demonstrate their effectiveness in describing the scalar distribution when t is only moderately large. PMID:27661692

  17. Dispersion in Rectangular Networks: Effective Diffusivity and Large-Deviation Rate Function.

    PubMed

    Tzella, Alexandra; Vanneste, Jacques

    2016-09-01

    The dispersion of a diffusive scalar in a fluid flowing through a network has many applications including to biological flows, porous media, water supply, and urban pollution. Motivated by this, we develop a large-deviation theory that predicts the evolution of the concentration of a scalar released in a rectangular network in the limit of large time t≫1. This theory provides an approximation for the concentration that remains valid for large distances from the center of mass, specifically for distances up to O(t) and thus much beyond the O(t^{1/2}) range where a standard Gaussian approximation holds. A byproduct of the approach is a closed-form expression for the effective diffusivity tensor that governs this Gaussian approximation. Monte Carlo simulations of Brownian particles confirm the large-deviation results and demonstrate their effectiveness in describing the scalar distribution when t is only moderately large.

  18. Electrochemistry of cations in diopsidic melt - Determining diffusion rates and redox potentials from voltammetric curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Russell O.; Haskin, Larry A.; Crane, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on determinations of reduction potentials and their temperature dependence of selected ions in diopsidic melt, by using linear sweep voltammetry. Diffusion coefficients were measured for cations of Eu, Mn, Cr, and In. Enthalpies and entropies of reduction were determined for the cations V(V), Cr(3+), Mn(2+), Mn(3+), Fe(2+), Cu(2+), Mo(VI), Sn(IV), and Eu(3+). Reduction potentials were used to study the structural state of cations in the melt.

  19. The rate of water equilibration in vapor-diffusion crystallizations: dependence on the distance from the droplet to the reservoir.

    PubMed

    Luft, J R; Albright, D T; Baird, J K; DeTitta, G T

    1996-11-01

    The rate of water equilibration in hanging-drop vapor-diffusion experiments was studied as a function of the distance separating the hanging drop from the surface of the reservoir solution. Hanging drops of 1.00 M NaCl were allowed to partially equilibrate with reservoirs of 2.00 M NaCl at room temperature. Over the range of droplet-reservoir distances examined, 7.6-119.4 mm, the larger the distance that separated the droplet and reservoir, the slower the droplet equilibrated with the reservoir. The variation of the rate of equilibration with droplet-reservoir distance was non-linear; the rate was most sensitive to variations in the droplet-reservoir separation at short separations. A mathematical model of the equilibration kinetics was developed that fits the experimental data. The model is based on the assumption that the rate-limiting step in vapor-diffusion equilibration is transit of water across the vapor space. A simple device to vary the rate of water equilibration, and thereby optimize macromolecular crystal growth conditions, is described.

  20. Absolute rate constant for the reaction of atomic chlorine with hydrogen peroxide vapor over the temperature range 265-400 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Whytock, D. A.; Lee, J. H.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of atomic chlorine with hydrogen peroxide were measured from 265-400 K using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. Analytical techniques were developed to measure H2O2 under reaction conditions. Due to ambiguity in the interpretation of the analytical results, the data combine to give two equally acceptable representations of the temperature dependence. The results are compared to previous work at 298 K and are theoretically discussed in terms of the mechanism of the reaction. Additional experiments on the H + H2O2 reaction at 298 and 359 K are compared with earlier results from this laboratory and give a slightly revised bimolecular rate constant.

  1. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  2. Measuring radon exhalation rate in two cycles avoiding the effects of back-diffusion and chamber leakage.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yanliang; Xiao, Detao

    2013-10-01

    This paper will present a simple method for measuring the radon exhalation rate from the medium surface in two cycles and also avoiding the effects of back-diffusion and chamber leakage. The method is based on a combination of the "accumulation chamber" technique and a radon monitor. The radon monitor performs the measurement of the radon concentration inside the accumulation chamber, and then the radon exhalation rate can be obtained by simple calculation. For reducing the systematic error and the statistical uncertainty, too short of total measurement time is not appropriate, and the first cycle time should be about 70 % of the total measurement. The radon exhalation rate from the medium surface obtained through this method is in good agreement with the reference value. This simple method can be applied to develop and improve the instruments for measuring radon exhalation rate.

  3. A new approach to the correlation of boundary layer mass transfer rates with thermal diffusion and/or variable properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Rosner, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A rational approach to the correlation of boundary layer mass transport rates, applicable to many commonly encountered laminar flow conditions with thermal diffusion and/or variable properties, is outlined. The correlation scheme builds upon already available constant property blowing/suction solutions by introducing appropriate correction factors to account for the additional ('pseudo' blowing and source) effects identified with variable properties and thermal diffusion. Applications of the scheme to the particular laminar boundary layer mass transfer problems considered herein (alkali and transition metal compound vapor transport) indicates satisfactory accuracy up to effective blowing factors equivalent to about one third of the 'blow off' value. As a useful by-product of the variable property correlation, we extend the heat-mass transfer analogy, for a wide range of Lewis numbers, to include variable property effects.

  4. Concentration effects on the rates of irreversible diffusion-influenced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Minjung; Lee, Sangyoub; Kim, Ji-Hyun

    2014-08-28

    We formulate a new theory of the effects of like-particle interactions on the irreversible diffusion-influenced bimolecular reactions of the type A + B → P + B by considering the evolution equation of the triplet ABB number density field explicitly. The solution to the evolution equation is aided by a recently proposed method for solving the Fredholm integral equation of the second kind. We evaluate the theory by comparing its predictions with the results of extensive computer simulations. The present theory provides a reasonable explanation of the simulation results.

  5. Absolute rate constants of Mo 2 (X 1Σg+) and Mo (a 7S 3) with O 2 at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Yo-ichi; Arai, Shigeyoshi

    1996-07-01

    The gas phase reactivities of ground-state molybdenum dimers and atoms for oxygen molecule have been investigated in a mass-flow controlled cell. Transient concentration of Mo 2 (X 1Σg+, ν = 0) or Mo (a 7S 3) produced by 355 nm multiphoton dissociation (MPD) of Mo(CO) 6 was monitored by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The predictable disturbance caused by free electrons inevitably produced in the MPD of metal carbonyls was examined by an appropriate addition of SF 6 as an electron scavenger. The pseudo-first order decay rates of these molybdenum species were found to depend linearly on O 2 pressure both in the absence and in the presence of SF 6, giving the bimolecular rate constants of (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10 -11 for Mo 2 (X 1Σg+, ν = 0) + O 2 and (1.2 ± 0.1) × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 for Mo (a 7S 3) + O 2 under the 6.5 Torr total pressure with balance Ar at room temperature.

  6. Determination of plate wave velocities and diffuse field decay rates with braod-band acousto-ultrasonic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    Lowest symmetric and lowest antisymmetric plate wave modes were excited and identified in broad-band acousto-ultrasonic (AU) signals collected from various high temperature composite materials. Group velocities have been determined for these nearly nondispersive modes. An algorithm has been developed and applied to determine phase velocities and hence dispersion curves for the frequency ranges of the broad-band pulses. It is demonstrated that these data are sensitive to changes in the various stiffness moduli of the materials, in agreement by analogy, with the theoretical and experimental results of Tang and Henneke on fiber reinforced polymers. Diffuse field decay rates have been determined in the same specimen geometries and AU configuration as for the plate wave measurements. These decay rates are of value in assessing degradation such as matrix cracking in ceramic matrix composites. In addition, we verify that diffuse field decay rates respond to fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength and density in ceramic matrix composites. This work shows that velocity/stiffness and decay rate measurements can be obtained in the same set of AU experiments for characterizing materials and in specimens with geometries useful for mechanical measurements.

  7. The absolute path command

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it canmore » provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.« less

  8. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  9. Binding kinetics of lock-key colloids: surface diffusion enhancement of the rate of specific binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon-Melendez, Laura; Beltran-Villegas, Daniel J.; van Anders, Greg; Liu, Jun; Spellings, Matthew; Sacanna, Stefano; Pine, David J.; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Larson, Ronald G.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2014-03-01

    The kinetics of anisotropic particle assembly are expected to be slow due to specific directional interactions between the assembly building blocks. We investigate the lock-and-key colloidal system (Sacanna et al, Nature 464, 575-578 (2010)), to identify and understand the mechanisms that lead to specific lock-key pair binding. For lock pockets of a particular shape, we experimentally identify the importance of nonspecific lock-key binding as a pathway to specific lock-key pair formation. In this pathway, key particles can diffuse on the surface of the lock and bind specifically to the dimple of the lock. We find that this mechanism can be more important to specific bond formation than the direct binding mechanism. We model the surface diffusion mechanism as a mean first-passage time problem. Using an anisotropic interaction potential between a lock and key particle pair (van Anders et al, arXiv:1309.1187), we compare Stokesian dynamics simulations of lock and key binding to the experiments. We propose that nonspecific interactions can play an important role in accelerating anisotropic particle assembly. This work is supported by the U.S. Army Research Office under Grant Award W911NF-10-1-0518.

  10. Viscous linear stability of axisymmetric low-density jets: Parameters influencing absolute instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, V.; Hallberg, M. P.; Strykowski, P. J.

    2010-02-01

    Viscous linear stability calculations are presented for model low-density axisymmetric jet flows. Absolute growth transitions for the jet column mode are mapped out in a parametric space including velocity ratio, density ratio, Reynolds number, momentum thickness, and subtle differences between velocity and density profiles. Strictly speaking, the profiles used in most jet stability studies to date are only applicable to unity Prandtl numbers and zero pressure gradient flows—the present work relaxes this requirement. Results reveal how subtle differences between the velocity and density profiles generally used in jet stability theory can dramatically alter the absolute growth rate of the jet column mode in these low-density flows. The results suggest heating/cooling or mass diffusion at the outer nozzle surface can suppress absolute instability and potentially global instability in low-density jets.

  11. Diffusion and Monod kinetics to determine in vivo human corneal oxygen-consumption rate during soft contact-lens wear.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Mahendra; Prausnitz, John M; Radke, C J

    2009-07-01

    The rate of oxygen consumption is an important parameter to assess the physiology of the human cornea. Metabolism of oxygen in the cornea is influenced by contact-lens-induced hypoxia, diseases such as diabetes, surgery, and drug treatment. Therefore, estimation of in vivo corneal oxygen-consumption rate is essential for gauging adequate oxygen supply to the cornea. Phosphorescence quenching of a dye coated on the posterior of a soft contact lens provides a powerful technique to measure tear-film oxygen tension (Harvitt and Bonanno, Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1996;37:1026-1036; Bonanno et al., Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2002;43:371-376). Unfortunately, previous work in establishing oxygen-consumption kinetics from transient postlens tear-film oxygen tensions relies on the simplistic assumption of a constant corneal-consumption rate. A more realistic model of corneal metabolism is needed to obtain reliable oxygen-consumption kinetics. Here, physiologically relevant nonlinear Monod kinetics is adopted for describing the local oxygen-consumption rate, thus avoiding aphysical negative oxygen tensions in the cornea. We incorporate Monod kinetics in an unsteady-state reactive-diffusion model for the cornea contact-lens system to determine tear-film oxygen tension as a function of time when changing from closed-eye to open-eye condition. The model was fit to available experimental data of in vivo human postlens tear-film oxygen tension to determine the corneal oxygen-consumption rate. Reliance on corneal oxygen diffusivity and solubility data obtained from rabbits is no longer requisite. Excellent agreement is obtained between the proposed model and experiment. We calculate the spatial-averaged in vivo human maximum corneal oxygen-consumption rate as Q(c)(max) = 1.05 x 10(-4) mL/(cm(3) s). The calculated Monod constant is K(m) = 2.2 mmHg.

  12. Ignition and structure of a laminar diffusion flame in a compressible mixing layer with finite rate chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.; Jackson, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    The ignition and structure of a reacting compressible mixing layer is considered using finite rate chemistry lying between two streams of reactants with different freestream speeds and temperatures. Numerical integration of the governing equations show that the structure of the reacting flow can be quite complicated depending on the magnitude of the Zeldovich number. An analysis of both the ignition a diffusion flame regimes is presented using a combination of large Zeldovich number asymptotics and numerics. This allows to analyze the behavior of these regimes as a function of the parameters of the problem.

  13. Ignition and structure of a laminar diffusion flame in a compressible mixing layer with finite rate chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.; Jackson, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    The ignition and structure of a reacting compressible mixing layer is considered using finite rate chemistry lying between two streams of reactants with different freestream speeds and temperatures. Numerical integration of the governing equations show that the structure of the reacting flow can be quite complicated depending on the magnitude of the Zeldovich number. An analysis of both the ignition and diffusion flame regimes is presented using a combination of large Zeldovich number asymptotics and numerics. This allows to analyze the behavior of these regimes as a function of the parameters of the problem.

  14. The American Foreign Exchange Option in Time-Dependent One-Dimensional Diffusion Model for Exchange Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Rehman, Nasir Shashiashvili, Malkhaz

    2009-06-15

    The classical Garman-Kohlhagen model for the currency exchange assumes that the domestic and foreign currency risk-free interest rates are constant and the exchange rate follows a log-normal diffusion process.In this paper we consider the general case, when exchange rate evolves according to arbitrary one-dimensional diffusion process with local volatility that is the function of time and the current exchange rate and where the domestic and foreign currency risk-free interest rates may be arbitrary continuous functions of time. First non-trivial problem we encounter in time-dependent case is the continuity in time argument of the value function of the American put option and the regularity properties of the optimal exercise boundary. We establish these properties based on systematic use of the monotonicity in volatility for the value functions of the American as well as European options with convex payoffs together with the Dynamic Programming Principle and we obtain certain type of comparison result for the value functions and corresponding exercise boundaries for the American puts with different strikes, maturities and volatilities.Starting from the latter fact that the optimal exercise boundary curve is left continuous with right-hand limits we give a mathematically rigorous and transparent derivation of the significant early exercise premium representation for the value function of the American foreign exchange put option as the sum of the European put option value function and the early exercise premium.The proof essentially relies on the particular property of the stochastic integral with respect to arbitrary continuous semimartingale over the predictable subsets of its zeros. We derive from the latter the nonlinear integral equation for the optimal exercise boundary which can be studied by numerical methods.

  15. Viscosity of hydrogel pharmaceutical products and the rate of diffusion of ibuprofen hydrotropic binding through model phase boundary in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zgoda, Marian Mikołaj; Kołodziejska, Justyna; Nachajski, Michał Jakub

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the carried out investigations was to establish relation between rheological parameters of market hydrogels containing ibuprofen and therapeutic agent diffusion coefficient dependent on their prescription. An attempt was made to estimate rheological parameters (structural viscosity, kinetics of volatile components loss) effect on pharmaceutical availability Q and the order of the process of mass exchange through artificial and natural phase boundary. Designed for skin anti-inflammatory hydrogels containing ibuprofen in the form of hydrotropic adduct with lysine (Ibufen, Dolofast), in the form of sodium salt (Nurofen) and in the form of molecular fragmentation of acidic form (Dolgit) were tested. The rate of volatile components loss was estimated with gravimetric method, viscosity measurements of therapeutic agents aqueous solutions were performed with Ubbelohde viscosimeter, while hydrogels rheological parameters - with cone-plate digital rheometer. The rate of ibuprofen penetration through phase boundary (Viscing dialysis membrane and pig perimastoid dermis) into dialysis fluid was determined in vitro. The kinetics of this process was monitored by measuring electric conduction Deltalambda = f(t) of model dialysis fluid. Viscometric measurements of aqueous solutions of ibuprofen lysine salt and ibuprofen sodium salt, by determining boundary viscosity gradient GLL(eta) and calculation of hydrodynamic radius Robs, enabled the applicative solution of Einstein-Smoluchowski equation (D = kT/6Pi r eta) and the estimation of structural value of therapeutic agent diffusion coefficient. Tracing the dependence between diffusion coefficient and shear rate enabled to recognize the preferences of preparations to the process of mass exchange on the phase boundary. An association was confirmed between the determined and calculated rheological parameters and the process of mass exchange on phase boundary through selected dialysis membranes. Mass exchange on phase

  16. Local carbon diffusion coefficient measurement in the S-1 spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, R.M.; Levinton, F.M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Chu, T.K.; Paul, S.F.; Yamada, M.

    1988-10-01

    The local carbon diffusion coefficient was measured in the S - 1 spheromak by detecting the radial spread of injected carbon impurity. The radial impurity density profile is determined by the balance of ionization and diffusion. Using measured local electron temperature T/sub e/ and density n/sub e/, the ionization rate is determined from which the particle diffusion coefficient is inferred. The results found in this work are consistent with Bohm diffusion. The absolute magnitude of D/sub /perpendicular// was determined to be (4/approximately/6) /times/ D/sub Bohm/. 25 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Estimation of pitch angle diffusion rates and precipitation time scales of electrons due to EMIC waves in a realistic field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Suk-Bin; Min, Kyoung-Wook; Fok, Mei-Ching; Hwang, Junga; Choi, Cheong-Rim

    2015-10-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are closely related to precipitating loss of relativistic electrons in the radiation belts, and thereby, a model of the radiation belts requires inclusion of the pitch angle diffusion caused by EMIC waves. We estimated the pitch angle diffusion rates and the corresponding precipitation time scales caused by H and He band EMIC waves using the Tsyganenko 04 (T04) magnetic field model at their probable regions in terms of geomagnetic conditions. The results correspond to enhanced pitch angle diffusion rates and reduced precipitation time scales compared to those based on the dipole model, up to several orders of magnitude for storm times. While both the plasma density and the magnetic field strength varied in these calculations, the reduction of the magnetic field strength predicted by the T04 model was found to be the main cause of the enhanced diffusion rates relative to those with the dipole model for the same Li values, where Li is defined from the ionospheric foot points of the field lines. We note that the bounce-averaged diffusion rates were roughly proportional to the inversion of the equatorial magnetic field strength and thus suggest that scaling the diffusion rates with the magnetic field strength provides a good approximation to account for the effect of the realistic field model in the EMIC wave-pitch angle diffusion modeling.

  18. The Absolute Rates of the Solution Phase Addition of Atomic Hydrogen to a Vinyl Ether and a Vinyl Ester. The Effect of Oxygen Substitution on Hydrogen Atom Reactivity with Olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, D. D.; Kandanarachchi, P.; Das, N. C.; Franz, James A.

    2003-04-08

    The reactions of vinyl butyl ether and vinyl butyrate with atomic hydrogen and deuterium lead to addition of atomic hydrogen to the terminal position of the olefins. This observation is consistent with the reactions carried out earlier with other olefins. Both the absolute rates of addition to vinylbutyl ether and vinyl butyrate in acetone and hexane were carried out at several temperatures. The relative rates are consistent with only modest stabilization of the transition state of the radical adduct by the ??-o substituent compared with hydrogen atom addition to 1-octene. The relative rates measured in acetone and hexane indicate no significant differential solvation of ground state relative to the transition structures of the hydrogen atom addition. The kinetics reveal that the early transition states of hydrogen atom addition exhibit little selectivity (vinyl ether versus simple olefin) in either abstraction of hydrogen ??- to the oxygen or by terminal addition to the olefinic ether, reflecting the modest influence of the increased enthalpy of reaction associated with resonance stabilization by the oxygen substituent at the developing radical site.

  19. Absolute Rates of the Solution-Phase Addition of Atomic Hydrogen to a Vinyl Ether and a Vinyl Ester: Effect of Oxygen Substitution on Hydrogen Atom Reactivity with Olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, D D.; Kandanarachchi, P; Das, N. C.; Franz, James A.

    2003-04-08

    The reactions of vinyl butyl ether and vinyl butyrate with atomic hydrogen and deuterium lead to addition at the terminal position of the olefins. This observation is consistent with the reactions carried out earlier with other olefins. Both of the absolute rates of addition to vinylbutyl ether and vinyl butyrate, in acetone and hexane, were measured at several temperatures. The relative rates are consistent with only modest stabilization of the transition state of the radical adduct by the R-O substituent compared with that of hydrogen atom addition to 1-octene. The relative rates measured in acetone and hexane indicate no significant differential solvation of the ground state relative to the transition structures of the hydrogen atom addition. The kinetics reveal that the early transition states for hydrogen atom addition exhibit little selectivity (vinyl ether versus simple olefin) in either the abstraction of hydrogen R to the oxygen or by terminal addition to the olefinic ether and reflects the modest influence of the increased enthalpy of reaction associated with resonance stabilization by the oxygen substituent at the developing radical site.

  20. Computational studies of coarsening rates for the Cahn-Hilliard equation with phase-dependent diffusion mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shibin; Du, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    We study computationally coarsening rates of the Cahn-Hilliard equation with a smooth double-well potential, and with phase-dependent diffusion mobilities. The latter is a feature of many materials systems and makes accurate numerical simulations challenging. Our numerical simulations confirm earlier theoretical predictions on the coarsening dynamics based on asymptotic analysis. We demonstrate that the numerical solutions are consistent with the physical Gibbs-Thomson effect, even if the mobility is degenerate in one or both phases. For the two-sided degenerate mobility, we report computational results showing that the coarsening rate is on the order of l ∼ ct 1 / 4, independent of the volume fraction of each phase. For the one-sided degenerate mobility, that is non-degenerate in the positive phase but degenerate in the negative phase, we illustrate that the coarsening rate depends on the volume fraction of the positive phase. For large positive volume fractions, the coarsening rate is on the order of l ∼ ct 1 / 3 and for small positive volume fractions, the coarsening rate becomes l ∼ ct 1 / 4.

  1. Fault slip rates and initiation age based on diffusion equation modeling: Wasatch Fault Zone and eastern Great Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattson, Ann; Bruhn, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    Models of the evolution of fault scarp morphology provide time elapsed since slip initiated on a faulted surface and may therefore provide more accurate estimates of slip rate than the rate calculated by dividing scarp offset by the age of the ruptured surface. To accomplish this task, linear and nonlinear models of sediment transport are calibrated from the morphology of Lake Bonneville shoreline scarps and fault scarps formed by multiple, surface-rupturing earthquakes along the Wasatch Fault Zone (WFZ). Profile modeling of scarps formed by several events distributed through time is done using a constant slip rate (CSR) solution and yields a value of A/κ (1/2 slip rate/diffusivity). Time elapsed since slip initiated on a fault is determined by establishing a value for κ and measuring total scarp offset. CSR nonlinear modeling (κ0 = 2.8 ± 1.1 m2/kyr, WFZ) of faults along the west slope of the Oquirrh Mountains indicates a slip rate of ˜0.1 mm/yr since 50 to 65 ka, which is corroborated by cosmogenic dating (10Be/26Al age = 75 ka). The slip rate along the west flank of the Stansbury Mountains varies from 0.04 to 0.2 mm/yr for time frames of 10 to >100 ka, with the most recent rupture on the northern portion of the fault zone ˜10 ka. Scarp analysis of the southern end of the Nephi segment, WFZ, suggests either temporal clustering or variable slip rate as indicated by differences in the short-term (1.3 mm/yr for 4.3 ka) versus long-term (0.4 mm/yr for 70 ka) slip rates.

  2. Rate theory models for ion transport through rigid pores. III. Continuum vs discrete models in single file diffusion.

    PubMed

    Stephan, W; Kleutsch, B; Frehland, E

    1983-11-21

    In studying the single file model in its discrete as well as in its continuum form the relationship between the phenomenological continuum theory of diffusion and the rate theory approach is analyzed. The single file model in its original form is discrete and represents the most general rate theory model for ion transport through rigid pores in biological membranes. In neglecting the interionic interactions which the single file model takes into account, the Nernst-Planck equation of macroscopic free diffusion can be derived from single file by means of the procedure n leads to infinity (where n is the number of binding sites within a pore) and the classical diffusion theory can thereby be integrated into the more general concept of single filing transport. Moreover, the single file model has been transformed in the limit n leads to infinity into the corresponding continuum form involving interionic interactions. The essential differences between the two derived continuum forms are: In the macroscopic diffusion model, the interionic interactions are regarded in the form of a "mean field". Thus we only get one equation of motion (Nernst-Planck equation) for the ionic concentration c(x, t) within the membrane. In the continuum version of the single file model, however, we obtain a hierarchy of Fokker-Planck equations for the probability density functions Pm(x1, . . . , xm, t) (where m is the number of ions within a pore). The interactions of the single file system are incorporated in detail into the Fokker-Planck equation as well as into the corresponding boundary conditions. As a consequence, the boundary conditions are highly complex in comparison with periodic conditions or Dirichlet conditions often used for the Nernst-Planck equation in electrophysiology. Two types of boundary conditions have been found which are principally different: The first one is to regulate the entry and exit of the ions at the pore mouth by a negative feedback mechanism, the second one

  3. Analysis of turbulent free jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sislian, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of a supersonic axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel coflowing air stream is analyzed. Effective turbulent transport properties are determined using the (K-epsilon) model. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight reactions between six chemical species, H, O, H2O, OH, O2, and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved by an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions are obtained at two downstream locations of variables such as turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent dissipation rate, turbulent scale length, and viscosity. The results show that these variables attain peak values at the axis of symmetry. Computed distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass fraction are also given. A direct analytical approach to account for the effect of species concentration fluctuations on the mean production rate of species (the phenomenon of unmixedness) is also presented. However, the use of the method does not seem justified in view of the excessive computer time required to solve the resulting system of equations.

  4. Is the surface oxygen exchange rate linked to bulk ion diffusivity in mixed conducting Ruddlesden–Popper phases?

    DOE PAGES

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin A.; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-03-02

    There is a possible link between oxygen surface exchange rate and bulk oxygen anion diffusivity in mixed ionic and electronic conducting oxides; it is a topic of great interest and debate. While a large body of experimental evidence and theoretical analyses support a link, observed differences between bulk and surface composition of these materials are hard to reconcile with this observation. This is further compounded by potential problems with simultaneous measurement of both parameters. Here we utilize separate techniques, in situ neutron diffraction and pulsed isotopic surface exchange, to examine bulk ion mobility and surface oxygen exchange rates of threemore » Ruddlesden-Popper phases, general form An-1A2'BnO3n+1, An-1A2'BnX3n+1; LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2) and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3). These measurements are complemented by surface composition determination via high sensitivity-low energy ion scattering. We observe a correlation between bulk ion mobility and surface exchange rate between materials. The surface exchange rates vary by more than one order of magnitude with high anion mobility in the bulk of an oxygen vacancy-rich n = 2 Ruddlesden-Popper material correlating with rapid oxygen exchange. Furthermore this is in contrast with the similar surface exchange rates which we may expect due to similar surface compositions across all three samples. This paper conclude that experimental limitations lead to inherent convolution of surface and bulk rates, and that surface exchange steps are not likely to be rate limiting in oxygen incorporation.« less

  5. Is the surface oxygen exchange rate linked to bulk ion diffusivity in mixed conducting Ruddlesden-Popper phases?

    PubMed

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C; Tamimi, Mazin A; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The possible link between oxygen surface exchange rate and bulk oxygen anion diffusivity in mixed ionic and electronic conducting oxides is a topic of great interest and debate. While a large body of experimental evidence and theoretical analyses support a link, observed differences between bulk and surface composition of these materials are hard to reconcile with this observation. This is further compounded by potential problems with simultaneous measurement of both parameters. Here we utilize separate techniques, in situ neutron diffraction and pulsed isotopic surface exchange, to examine bulk ion mobility and surface oxygen exchange rates of three Ruddlesden-Popper phases, general form A(n-1)A(2)'B(n)O(3n+1), A(n-1)A(2)'B(n)X(3n+1); LaSrCo(0.5)Fe(0.5)O(4-δ) (n = 1), La(0.3)Sr(2.7)CoFeO(7-δ) (n = 2) and LaSr3Co(1.5)Fe(1.5)O(10-δ) (n = 3). These measurements are complemented by surface composition determination via high sensitivity-low energy ion scattering. We observe a correlation between bulk ion mobility and surface exchange rate between materials. The surface exchange rates vary by more than one order of magnitude with high anion mobility in the bulk of an oxygen vacancy-rich n = 2 Ruddlesden-Popper material correlating with rapid oxygen exchange. This is in contrast with the similar surface exchange rates which we may expect due to similar surface compositions across all three samples. We conclude that experimental limitations lead to inherent convolution of surface and bulk rates, and that surface exchange steps are not likely to be rate limiting in oxygen incorporation.

  6. Diffusively cooled thin-sheath high-repetition-rate TEA and TEMA lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsiv, Shaul; Gabay, Amnon; Sintov, Yoav

    1993-05-01

    Transverse electric atmospheric (TEA), or multi atmospheric (TEMA) lasers deliver intense short laser pulses of considerable energies. Recurrent high repetition rate pulse trains afford substantial average power levels. In a high rep-rate operation the gas flows across the cavity and is externally cooled to maintain a reasonably low temperature. The gas flow gear and heat exchanger are bulky and costly. In this work we present a repetitively pulsed TEA or TEMA laser that combines energy and peak power features in an individual pulse with the substantial average power levels of a pulse train in a thin layer of gas. Excess heat is disposed of, by conduction through the gas, to cooled enclosing walls. The gas does not flow. The method applies to vibrational transition molecular lasers in the infrared, where elevated temperatures are deleterious to the laser operation. The gist of the method draws on the law that heat conductivity in gases does not depend on their pressure. The fact lends unique operational flexibility and compactness, desirable for industrial and research purposes.

  7. Lateral Pressure Dependence of the Phospholipid Transmembrane Diffusion Rate in Planar-Supported Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Anglin, Timothy C.; Conboy, John C.

    2008-01-01

    The dependence of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) flip-flop kinetics on the lateral membrane pressure in a phospholipid bilayer was investigated by sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy. Planar-supported lipid bilayers were prepared on fused silica supports using the Langmuir-Blodgett/Langmuir-Schaeffer technique, which allows precise control over the lateral surface pressure and packing density of the membrane. The lipid bilayer deposition pressure was varied from 28 to 42 mN/m. The kinetics of lipid flip-flop in these membranes was measured by sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy at 37°C. An order-of-magnitude difference in the rate constant for lipid translocation (10.9 × 10−4 s−1 to 1.03 × 10−4 s−1) was measured for membranes prepared at 28 mN/m and 42 mN/m, respectively. This change in rate results from only a 7.4% change in the packing density of the lipids in the bilayer. From the observed kinetics, the area of activation for native phospholipid flip-flop in a protein-free DPPC planar-supported lipid bilayer was determined to be 73 ± 12 Å2/molecule at 37°C. Significance of the observed activation area and potential future applications of the technique to the study of phospholipid flip-flop are discussed. PMID:18339755

  8. Analysis of turbulent free-jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sislian, J. P.; Glass, I. I.; Evans, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of the nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of an axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel ambient air stream. The effective turbulent transport properties are determined by means of a two-equation model of turbulence. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight elementary reactions among six chemical species: H, O, H2O, OH, O2 and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations was solved by using an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions were obtained at two downstream locations for some important variables affecting the flow development, such as the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. The results show that these variables attain their peak values on the axis of symmetry. The computed distribution of velocity, temperature, and mass fractions of the chemical species gives a complete description of the flow field. The numerical predictions were compared with two sets of experimental data. Good qualitative agreement was obtained.

  9. Kalman Filtering and Smoothing of the Van Allen Probes Observations to Estimate the Radial, Energy and Pitch Angle Diffusion Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikova, T.; Shprits, Y.; Kellerman, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Kalman filter technique combines the strengths of new physical models of the Earth's radiation belts with long-term spacecraft observations of electron fluxes and therefore provide an extremely useful method for the analysis of the state and evolution of the electron radiation belts. However, to get the reliable data assimilation output, the Kalman filter application is confronted with a set of fundamental problems. E.g., satellite measurements are usually limited to a single location in space, which confines the reconstruction of the global evolution of the radiation environment. The uncertainties arise from the imperfect description of the process dynamics and the presence of observation errors, which may cause the failure of data assimilation solution. The development of adaptive Kalman filter that combines the Van Allen Probes data and 3-D VERB code, its accurate customizations in the reconstruction of model describing the phase space density (PSD) evolution, extension of the possibilities to use measurement information, and the model adjustment by developing the identification techniques of model and measurement errors allowed us to reveal hidden and implicit regularities of the PSD dynamics and obtain quantitative and qualitative estimates of radial, energy and pitch angle diffusion characteristics from satellite observations. In this study we propose an approach to estimate radial, energy and pitch angle diffusion rates, as well as the direction of their propagation.

  10. Combustion rate limits of hydrogen plus hydrocarbon fuel: Air diffusion flames from an opposed jet burner technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Reeves, Ronald N.; Northam, G. Burton

    1987-01-01

    Combustion of H2/hydrocarbon (HC) fuel mixtures may be considered in certain volume-limited supersonic airbreathing propulsion applications. Effects of HC addition to H2 were evaluated, using a recent argon-bathed, coaxial, tubular opposed jet burner (OJB) technique to measure the extinction limits of counterflow diffusion flames. The OJB flames were formed by a laminar jet of (N2 and/or HC)-diluted H2 mixture opposed by a similar jet of air at ambient conditions. The OJB data, derived from respective binary mixtures of H2 and methane, ethylene, or propane HCs, were used to characterize BLOWOFF and RESTORE. BLOWOFF is a sudden breaking of the dish-shaped OJB flame to a stable torus or ring shape, and RESTORE marks sudden restoration of the central flame by radial inward flame propagation. BLOWOFF is a measure of kinetically-limited flame reactivity/speed under highly stretched, but relatively ideal impingement flow conditions. RESTORE measures inward radial flame propagation rate, which is sensitive to ignition processes in the cool central core. It is concluded that relatively small molar amounts of added HC greatly reduce the reactivity characteristics of counterflow hydrogen-air diffusion flames, for ambient initial conditions.

  11. High-Rate and Cycling-Stable Nickel-Rich Cathode Materials with Enhanced Li(+) Diffusion Pathway.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun; Su, Yuefeng; Wu, Feng; Xu, Shaoyu; Chen, Fen; Chen, Renjie; Li, Qing; Li, Jinghui; Sun, Fengchun; Chen, Shi

    2016-01-13

    The nickel-rich LiNi0.7Co0.15Mn0.15O2 material was sintered by Li source with the Ni0.7Co0.15Mn0.15(OH)2 precursor, which was prepared via hydrothermal treatment after coprecipitation. The intensity ratio of I(110)/I(108) obtained from X-ray diffraction patterns and high-resolution transmission electronmicroscopy confirm that the particles have enhanced growth of (110), (100), and (010) surface planes, which supply superior inherent Li(+) deintercalation/intercalation. The electrochemical measurement shows that the LiNi0.7Co0.15Mn0.15O2 material has high cycling stability and rate capability, along with fast charge and discharge ability. Li(+) diffusion coefficient at the oxidation peaks obtained by cyclic voltammogram measurement is as large as 10(-11) (cm(2) s(-1)) orders of magnitude, implying that the nickel-rich material has high Li(+) diffusion capability. PMID:26601895

  12. High-Rate and Cycling-Stable Nickel-Rich Cathode Materials with Enhanced Li(+) Diffusion Pathway.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun; Su, Yuefeng; Wu, Feng; Xu, Shaoyu; Chen, Fen; Chen, Renjie; Li, Qing; Li, Jinghui; Sun, Fengchun; Chen, Shi

    2016-01-13

    The nickel-rich LiNi0.7Co0.15Mn0.15O2 material was sintered by Li source with the Ni0.7Co0.15Mn0.15(OH)2 precursor, which was prepared via hydrothermal treatment after coprecipitation. The intensity ratio of I(110)/I(108) obtained from X-ray diffraction patterns and high-resolution transmission electronmicroscopy confirm that the particles have enhanced growth of (110), (100), and (010) surface planes, which supply superior inherent Li(+) deintercalation/intercalation. The electrochemical measurement shows that the LiNi0.7Co0.15Mn0.15O2 material has high cycling stability and rate capability, along with fast charge and discharge ability. Li(+) diffusion coefficient at the oxidation peaks obtained by cyclic voltammogram measurement is as large as 10(-11) (cm(2) s(-1)) orders of magnitude, implying that the nickel-rich material has high Li(+) diffusion capability.

  13. Equal impact of diffusion and DNA binding rates on the potential spatial distribution of nuclear factor κB transcription factor inside the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sycheva, A M; Kel, A; Nikolaev, E N; Moshkovskii, S A

    2014-06-01

    There are two physical processes that influence the spatial distribution of transcription factor molecules entering the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell, the binding to genomic DNA and the diffusion throughout the nuclear volume. Comparison of the DNA-protein association rate constant and the protein diffusion constant may determine which one is the limiting factor. If the process is diffusion-limited, transcription factor molecules are captured by DNA before their even distribution in the nuclear volume. Otherwise, if the reaction rate is limiting, these molecules diffuse evenly and then find their binding sites. Using well-studied human NF-κB dimer as an example, we calculated its diffusion constant using the Debye-Smoluchowski equation. The value of diffusion constant was about 10(-15) cm(3)/s, and it was comparable to the NF-κB association rate constant for DNA binding known from previous studies. Thus, both diffusion and DNA binding play an equally important role in NF-κB spatial distribution. The importance of genome 3D-structure in gene expression regulation and possible dependence of gene expression on the local concentration of open chromatin can be hypothesized from our theoretical estimate.

  14. Rate of water equilibration in vapor-diffusion crystallization: dependence on the residual pressure of air in the vapor space.

    PubMed

    DeTitta, G T; Luft, J R

    1995-09-01

    The kinetics of water equilibration in vapor-diffusion crystallization experiments are sensitive to the residual pressure of air in the vapor chamber. Experiments with sitting droplets of 10%(w/v) PEG, allowed to equilibrate with reservoirs of 20%(w/v) PEG, were conducted at pressures ranging from 80 to 760 mm Hg. Equilibrations were interrupted after one, four, five and seven days to assess their progress. Even down to the lowest pressures examined it was found that a decrease in pressure leads to an increase in the rate of equilibration. The residual pressure of air in the vapor chamber can be varied to tailor the time course of equilibration in macromolecular crystal growth experiments.

  15. ABSOLUTE POLARIMETRY AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    OKADA; BRAVAR, A.; BUNCE, G.; GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; MAKDISI, Y.; NASS, A.; WOOD, J.; ZELENSKI, Z.; ET AL.

    2007-09-10

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy Of {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} < 5%. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power A{sub N} of this process has allowed us to achieve {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} = 4.2% in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of AN in the CNI region (four-momentum transfer squared 0.001 < -t < 0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2}) are also discussed. We point out the current issues and expected optimum accuracy in 2006 and the future.

  16. Homogenous nucleation rates of n-propanol measured in the Laminar Flow Diffusion Chamber at different total pressures.

    PubMed

    Görke, Hanna; Neitola, Kimmo; Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Lihavainen, Heikki; Wölk, Judith; Strey, Reinhard; Brus, David

    2014-05-01

    Nucleation rates of n-propanol were investigated in the Laminar Flow Diffusion Chamber. Nucleation temperatures between 270 and 300 K and rates between 10(0) and 10(6) cm(-3) s(-1) were achieved. Since earlier measurements of n-butanol and n‑pentanol suggest a dependence of nucleation rates on carrier gas pressure, similar conditions were adjusted for these measurements. The obtained data fit well to results available from literature. A small positive pressure effect was found which strengthen the assumption that this effect is attributed to the carbon chain length of the n-alcohol [D. Brus, A. P. Hyvärinen, J. Wedekind, Y. Viisanen, M. Kulmala, V. Ždímal, J. Smolík, and H. Lihavainen, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 134312 (2008)] and might be less intensive for substances in the homologous series with higher equilibrium vapor pressure. A comparison with the theoretical approach by Wedekind et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 12 (2008)] shows that the effect goes in the same direction but that the intensity is much stronger in experiments than in theory. PMID:24811635

  17. Variations of boundary reaction rate and particle size on the diffusion-induced stress in a phase separating electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; He, Linghui; Ni, Yong; Song, Yicheng

    2014-10-14

    In contrast to the case of single-phase delithiation wherein faster discharging leads to higher diffusion-induced stress (DIS), this paper reports nonmonotonous dependency of the boundary reaction rate on the DIS in nanosized spherical electrode accompanying phase separation. It is attributed to a transition from two-phase to single-phase delithiation driven by increase of the boundary reaction rate leading to narrowing and vanishing of the miscibility gap in a range of the particle size. The profiles of lithium concentration and the DIS are identified during the transition based on a continuum model. The resultant maximum DIS first decreases in the region of two-phase delithiation and later returns to increase in the region of single-phase delithiation with the increase of the boundary reaction rate. A map for the failure behavior in the spherical electrode particle is constructed based on the Tresca failure criterion. These results indicate that the failure caused by the DIS can be avoided by appropriate selection of the said parameters in such electrodes.

  18. Quantifying the rate of biofilm growth of S. meliloti strains in microfluidics via the diffusion coefficient of microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorian, Matthew; Seitaridou, Effrosyni

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the rate of biofilm growth is essential for studying genes and preventing unwanted biofilms. In this study, the diffusion coefficient (D) of polystyrene microspheres was used to quantify biofilm growth rates of Sinorhizobia meliloti, a nitrogen fixing bacteria that forms a symbiotic relationship with alfalfa plants. Five strains were studied, two wild types (8530 expR+ and 1021) and three mutants in the exopolysaccharide (EPS I, EPS II) synthesis (8530 exoY , 9034 expG , and 9030-2 expA 1); 1021 and 9030-2 expA 1 are known to be unable to form biofilms. Each strain was inserted into a microfluidic channel with the microspheres. As the cultures grew, the spheres' D values were obtained every 24 hours for 4 days using fluorescence microscopy. Although the D values for 9030-2 expA 1 were inconclusive, 8530 expR+ , 8530 exoY , and 9034 expG showed significant decreases in D between 3 days of growth (| z | > 2 . 25 , p < 0 . 025). The data also indicated that 8530 expR+ and 8530 exoY grew at similar rates. There was no significant change in D for 1021 (χ2(2) = 5 . 76 , p > 0 . 05), which shows the lack of a structured biofilm community. Thus, D can be used as an indicator of the presence of a biofilm and its development.

  19. The interaction between apparent diffusion coefficients and transverse relaxation rates of human brain metabolites and water studied by diffusion-weighted spectroscopy at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Branzoli, Francesca; Ercan, Ece; Webb, Andrew; Ronen, Itamar

    2014-05-01

    The dependence of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of molecules in biological tissues on an acquisition-specific timescale is a powerful mechanism for studying tissue microstructure. Unlike water, metabolites are confined mainly to intracellular compartments, thus providing higher specificity to tissue microstructure. Compartment-specific structural and chemical properties may also affect molecule transverse relaxation times (T₂). Here, we investigated the correlation between diffusion and relaxation for N-acetylaspartate, creatine and choline compounds in human brain white matter in vivo at 7 T, and compared them with those of water under the same experimental conditions. Data were acquired in a volume of interest in parietal white matter at two different diffusion times, Δ = 44 and 246 ms, using a matrix of three echo times (T(E)) and five diffusion weighting values (up to 4575 s/mm²). Significant differences in the dependence of the ADCs on T(E) were found between water and metabolites, as well as among the different metabolites. A significant decrease in water ADC as a function of TE was observed only at the longest diffusion time (p < 0.001), supporting the hypothesis that at least part of the restricted water pool can be associated with longer T₂, as suggested by previous studies in vitro. Metabolite data showed an increase of creatine (p < 0.05) and N-acetylaspartate (p < 0.05) ADCs with TE at Δ = 44 ms, and a decrease of creatine (p < 0.05) and N-acetylaspartate (p = 0.1) ADCs with TE at Δ = 246 ms. No dependence of choline ADC on TE was observed. The metabolite results suggest that diffusion and relaxation properties are dictated not only by metabolite distribution in different cell types, but also by other mechanisms, such as interactions with membranes, exchange between "free" and "bound" states or interactions with microsusceptibility gradients.

  20. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  1. Oxidation of cytochrome c peroxidase to compound I by peroxyacids: evidence for rate-limiting diffusion through the protein matrix.

    PubMed

    Palamakumbura, A H; Foshay, M C; Vitello, L B; Erman, J E

    1999-11-23

    The rate of the reaction between p-nitroperoxybenzoic acid and cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) has been investigated as a function of pH and ionic strength. The pH dependence of the reaction between CcP and peracetic acid has also been determined. The rate of the reactions are influenced by two heme-linked ionizations in the protein. The enzyme is active when His-52 (pK(a) 3.8 +/- 0.1) is unprotonated and an unknown group with a pK(a) of 9.8 +/- 0.1 is protonated. The bimolecular rate constant for the reaction between peracetic acid and CcP and between p-nitroperoxybenzoic acid and CcP are (1.8 +/- 0.1) x 10(7) and (1.6 +/- 0.2) x 10(7) M(-)(1) s(-)(1), respectively. These rates are about 60% slower than the reaction between hydrogen peroxide and CcP. A critical comparison of the pH dependence of the reactions of hydrogen peroxide, peracetic acid, and p-nitroperoxybenzoic acid with CcP provides evidence that both the neutral and anionic forms of the two peroxyacids react directly with the enzyme. The peracetate and p-nitroperoxybenzoate anions react with CcP with rates of (1.5 +/- 0.1) x 10(6) and (1.6 +/- 0.2) x 10(6) M(-)(1) s(-)(1), respectively, about 10 times slower than the neutral peroxyacids. These data indicate that CcP discriminates between the neutral peroxyacids and their negatively charged ions. However, the apparent bimolecular rate constant for reaction between p-nitroperoxybenzoate and CcP is independent of ionic strength in the range of 0.01-1.0 M, suggesting that electrostatic repulsion between the anion and CcP is not the cause of the lower reactivity for the peroxybenzoate anion. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the rate-limiting step for the oxidation of CcP to compound I by both neutral peroxyacid and the negatively charged peroxide ion is diffusion of the reactants through the protein matrix, from the surface of the protein to the distal heme pocket. PMID:10569950

  2. Is the surface oxygen exchange rate linked to bulk ion diffusivity in mixed conducting Ruddlesden–Popper phases?

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin A.; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-03-02

    There is a possible link between oxygen surface exchange rate and bulk oxygen anion diffusivity in mixed ionic and electronic conducting oxides; it is a topic of great interest and debate. While a large body of experimental evidence and theoretical analyses support a link, observed differences between bulk and surface composition of these materials are hard to reconcile with this observation. This is further compounded by potential problems with simultaneous measurement of both parameters. Here we utilize separate techniques, in situ neutron diffraction and pulsed isotopic surface exchange, to examine bulk ion mobility and surface oxygen exchange rates of three Ruddlesden-Popper phases, general form An-1A2'BnO3n+1, An-1A2'BnX3n+1; LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2) and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3). These measurements are complemented by surface composition determination via high sensitivity-low energy ion scattering. We observe a correlation between bulk ion mobility and surface exchange rate between materials. The surface exchange rates vary by more than one order of magnitude with high anion mobility in the bulk of an oxygen vacancy-rich n = 2 Ruddlesden-Popper material correlating with rapid oxygen exchange. Furthermore this is in contrast with the similar surface exchange rates which we may expect due to similar surface compositions across all three samples. This paper conclude that experimental limitations lead to inherent convolution of surface and bulk rates, and that surface exchange steps are not likely to be rate limiting in oxygen incorporation.

  3. Towards Stable Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with a Low Self-Discharge Rate: Ion Diffusion Modulation and Anode Protection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Tao; Peng, Hong-Jie; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhao, Chen-Zi; Cheng, Xin-Bing; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-09-01

    The self-discharge of a lithium-sulfur cell decreases the shelf-life of the battery and is one of the bottlenecks that hinders its practical applications. New insights into both the internal chemical reactions in a lithium-sulfur system and effective routes to retard self-discharge for highly stable batteries are crucial for the design of lithium-sulfur cells. Herein, a lithium-sulfur cell with a carbon nanotube/sulfur cathode and lithium-metal anode in lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide/1,3-dioxolane/dimethyl ether electrolyte was selected as the model system to investigate the self-discharge behavior. Both lithium anode passivation and polysulfide anion diffusion suppression strategies are applied to reduce self-discharge of the lithium-sulfur cell. When the lithium-metal anode is protected by a high density passivation layer induced by LiNO3 , a very low shuttle constant of 0.017 h(-1) is achieved. The diffusion of the polysulfides is retarded by an ion-selective separator, and the shuttle constants decreased. The cell with LiNO3 additive maintained a discharge capacity of 97 % (961 mAh g(-1) ) of the initial capacity after 120 days at open circuit, which was around three times higher than the routine cell (32 % of initial capacity, corresponding to 320 mAh g(-1) ). It is expected that lithium-sulfur batteries with ultralow self-discharge rates may be fabricated through a combination of anode passivation and polysulfide shuttle control, as well as optimization of the lithium-sulfur cell configuration.

  4. Experimental Methodology for Estimation of Local Heat Fluxes and Burning Rates in Steady Laminar Boundary Layer Diffusion Flames.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay V; Gollner, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Modeling the realistic burning behavior of condensed-phase fuels has remained out of reach, in part because of an inability to resolve the complex interactions occurring at the interface between gas-phase flames and condensed-phase fuels. The current research provides a technique to explore the dynamic relationship between a combustible condensed fuel surface and gas-phase flames in laminar boundary layers. Experiments have previously been conducted in both forced and free convective environments over both solid and liquid fuels. A unique methodology, based on the Reynolds Analogy, was used to estimate local mass burning rates and flame heat fluxes for these laminar boundary layer diffusion flames utilizing local temperature gradients at the fuel surface. Local mass burning rates and convective and radiative heat feedback from the flames were measured in both the pyrolysis and plume regions by using temperature gradients mapped near the wall by a two-axis traverse system. These experiments are time-consuming and can be challenging to design as the condensed fuel surface burns steadily for only a limited period of time following ignition. The temperature profiles near the fuel surface need to be mapped during steady burning of a condensed fuel surface at a very high spatial resolution in order to capture reasonable estimates of local temperature gradients. Careful corrections for radiative heat losses from the thermocouples are also essential for accurate measurements. For these reasons, the whole experimental setup needs to be automated with a computer-controlled traverse mechanism, eliminating most errors due to positioning of a micro-thermocouple. An outline of steps to reproducibly capture near-wall temperature gradients and use them to assess local burning rates and heat fluxes is provided. PMID:27285827

  5. Experimental Methodology for Estimation of Local Heat Fluxes and Burning Rates in Steady Laminar Boundary Layer Diffusion Flames

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajay V.; Gollner, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling the realistic burning behavior of condensed-phase fuels has remained out of reach, in part because of an inability to resolve the complex interactions occurring at the interface between gas-phase flames and condensed-phase fuels. The current research provides a technique to explore the dynamic relationship between a combustible condensed fuel surface and gas-phase flames in laminar boundary layers. Experiments have previously been conducted in both forced and free convective environments over both solid and liquid fuels. A unique methodology, based on the Reynolds Analogy, was used to estimate local mass burning rates and flame heat fluxes for these laminar boundary layer diffusion flames utilizing local temperature gradients at the fuel surface. Local mass burning rates and convective and radiative heat feedback from the flames were measured in both the pyrolysis and plume regions by using temperature gradients mapped near the wall by a two-axis traverse system. These experiments are time-consuming and can be challenging to design as the condensed fuel surface burns steadily for only a limited period of time following ignition. The temperature profiles near the fuel surface need to be mapped during steady burning of a condensed fuel surface at a very high spatial resolution in order to capture reasonable estimates of local temperature gradients. Careful corrections for radiative heat losses from the thermocouples are also essential for accurate measurements. For these reasons, the whole experimental setup needs to be automated with a computer-controlled traverse mechanism, eliminating most errors due to positioning of a micro-thermocouple. An outline of steps to reproducibly capture near-wall temperature gradients and use them to assess local burning rates and heat fluxes is provided. PMID:27285827

  6. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  7. Understanding supported reactions in spherical compartments: a general algorithm to model and determine rate constants, diffusion coefficients, and spatial product distributions.

    PubMed

    Egelhaaf, Hans-Joachim; Rademann, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    A general algorithm allowing the numerical modeling of the time and space dependence of product formation in spherical reaction volumes is described. The algorithm is described by the complete set of mass balance equations. On the basis of these equations, the effects of the diffusion coefficient, reaction rate, bead size, reagent excess, and packing density of the resin beads on the overall reaction rates are determined for second-order reactions. Experimental data of reaction progress are employed to calculate reaction rates and diffusion coefficients in polymer-supported reactions. In addition, the conditions for shell-like product formation are determined, and various strategies for the radial patterning of resin beads are compared. The effect of diffusion on polymer-supported enzyme-catalyzed reactions of the Michaelis-Menten type is treated, as well. Finally, the effects of typical nonideal solid-phase phenomena, namely, the inhomogeneity of rate constants and the concentration dependence of diffusion coefficients, on overall rates are discussed.

  8. Model compound studies of the beta-O-4 linkage in lignin: absolute rate expressions for beta-scission of phenoxyl radical from 1-phenyl-2-phenoxyethanol-1-yl radical.

    PubMed

    Kandanarachchi, Pramod H; Autrey, Tom; Franz, James A

    2002-11-15

    Arrhenius rate expressions were determined for beta-scission of phenoxyl radical from 1-phenyl-2-phenoxyethanol-1-yl, PhC*(OH)CH2OPh (V). Ketyl radical V was competitively trapped by thiophenol to yield PhCH(OH)CH2OPh in competition with beta-scission to yield phenoxyl radical and acetophenone. A basis rate expression for hydrogen atom abstraction by sec-phenethyl alcohol, PhC*(OH)CH3, from thiophenol, log(k(abs)/M(-1) s(-1)) = (8.88 +/- 0.24) - (6.07 +/- 0.34)/theta, theta = 2.303RT, was determined by competing hydrogen atom abstraction with radical self-termination. Self-termination rates for PhC*(OH)CH3 were calculated using the Smoluchowski equation employing experimental diffusion coefficients of the parent alcohol, PhCH(OH)CH3, as a model for the radical. The hydrogen abstraction basis reaction was employed to determine the activation barrier for the beta-scission of phenoxyl from 1-phenyl-2-phenoxyethanol-1-yl (V): log(k beta)/s(-1)) = (12.85 +/- 0.22) - (15.06 +/- 0.38)/theta, k beta (298 K) ca. (64.0 s(-1) in benzene), and log(k beta /s(-1)) = (12.50 +/- 0.18) - (14.46 +/- 0.30)/theta, k beta (298 K) = 78.7 s(-1) in benzene containing 0.8 M 2-propanol. B3LYP/cc-PVTZ electronic structure calculations predict that intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the alpha-OH and the -OPh leaving group of ketyl radical (V) stabilizes both ground- and transition-state structures. The computed activation barrier, 14.9 kcal/mol, is in good agreement with the experimental activation barrier.

  9. Experimental determination of the diffusion rate of deuterated water vapor in ice and application to the stable isotopes smoothing of ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Baptiste, P.; Jouzel, J.; Stievenard, M.; Ciais, P.

    1998-05-01

    The stable isotope records of δD and δ18O in ice cores show that the isotopic gradients are smoothed out with time by diffusion. Transport of hydrogen and oxygen atoms through solid ice is slow, whereas water vapor diffusion through the interconnected porosity is much faster. Smoothing occurs preferentially in the upper layers of firn, where the density is lowest, and is responsible for the gradual alteration of the isotopic stratigraphy. Results for the diffusion of water vapor in ice are presented. They were obtained from laboratory experiments with diffusion couples prepared using artificial snow with different D/H values. The samples were allowed to diffuse for about one year at a controlled temperature before being cut into thin sections and analyzed with a mass spectrometer. The effects of both temperature and density were investigated. The measured diffusion coefficients are fully consistent with water vapor diffusion through the ice porosity. The computed values are less than the diffusion coefficient of HDO in free-air and imply a tortuosity factor in the range 3.2-6.5 depending on the sample density. The influence of the grain sizes on the timescale of the isotopic homogenization between the vapor phase and the ice matrix was studied. We show that for grain sizes up to 1 mm in diameter, solid diffusion within the grains is not a limiting factor and therefore, the isotopic equilibrium between the vapor and the solid phases can be considered as immediate. The diffusion model developed to compute the diffusion coefficients was further applied to investigate the real case of isotope smoothing in ice cores. The smoothing rate is highly dependent on the wavelength of the isotopic signal, linked to the accumulation rate, and on temperature. Finally, the model was applied to tritium deposition in Antarctica, from a continuous record of artificial fallout at the South Pole (1954-1978). The result shows that in spite of large gradients, the initial distribution

  10. Modeling of Pickup Ion Distributions in the Halley Cometo-Sheath: Empirical Rates of Ionization, Diffusion, Loss and Creation of Fast Neutral Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, D.; Neugebauer, M.; Goldstein, B.

    1994-01-01

    The shape of the velocity distribution of water-group ions observed by the Giotto ion mass spectrometer on its approach to comet Halley is modeled to derive empirical values for the rates on ionization, energy diffusion, and loss in the mid-cometosheath.

  11. Absolute Identification by Relative Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Neil; Brown, Gordon D. A.; Chater, Nick

    2005-01-01

    In unidimensional absolute identification tasks, participants identify stimuli that vary along a single dimension. Performance is surprisingly poor compared with discrimination of the same stimuli. Existing models assume that identification is achieved using long-term representations of absolute magnitudes. The authors propose an alternative…

  12. Be Resolute about Absolute Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret L.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how conceptualization of absolute value can start long before it is introduced. The manner in which absolute value is introduced to students in middle school has far-reaching consequences for their future mathematical understanding. It begins to lay the foundation for students' understanding of algebra, which can change…

  13. INVESTIGATING THE COSMIC-RAY IONIZATION RATE IN THE GALACTIC DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM THROUGH OBSERVATIONS OF H{sup +}{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Indriolo, Nick; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2012-01-20

    Observations of H{sup +}{sub 3} in the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium have led to various surprising results, including the conclusion that the cosmic-ray ionization rate ({zeta}{sub 2}) is about one order of magnitude larger than previously thought. The present survey expands the sample of diffuse cloud sight lines with H{sup +}{sub 3} observations to 50, with detections in 21 of those. Ionization rates inferred from these observations are in the range (1.7 {+-} 1.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} s{sup -1} < {zeta}{sub 2} < (10.6 {+-} 8.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} s{sup -1} with a mean value of {zeta}{sub 2} = (3.5{sup +5.3}{sub -3.0}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} s{sup -1}. Upper limits (3{sigma}) derived from non-detections of H{sup +}{sub 3} are as low as {zeta}{sub 2} < 0.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} s{sup -1}. These low upper limits, in combination with the wide range of inferred cosmic-ray ionization rates, indicate variations in {zeta}{sub 2} between different diffuse cloud sight lines. A study of {zeta}{sub 2} versus N{sub H} (total hydrogen column density) shows that the two parameters are not correlated for diffuse molecular cloud sight lines, but that the ionization rate decreases when N{sub H} increases to values typical of dense molecular clouds. Both the difference in ionization rates between diffuse and dense clouds and the variation of {zeta}{sub 2} among diffuse cloud sight lines are likely the result of particle propagation effects. The lower ionization rate in dense clouds is due to the inability of low-energy (few MeV) protons to penetrate such regions, while the ionization rate in diffuse clouds is controlled by the proximity of the observed cloud to a site of particle acceleration.

  14. Electrochemical evidences and consequences of significant differences in ions diffusion rate in polyacrylate-based ion-selective membranes.

    PubMed

    Woźnica, Emilia; Mieczkowski, Józef; Michalska, Agata

    2011-11-21

    The origin and effect of surface accumulation of primary ions within the ion-selective poly(n-butyl acrylate)-based membrane, obtained by thermal polymerization, is discussed. Using a new method, based on the relation between the shape of a potentiometric plot and preconditioning time, the diffusion of copper ions in the membrane was found to be slow (the diffusion coefficient estimated to be close to 10(-11) cm(2) s(-1)), especially when compared to ion-exchanger counter ions--sodium cations diffusion (a diffusion coefficient above 10(-9) cm(2) s(-1)). The higher mobility of sodium ions than those of the copper-ionophore complex results in exposed ion-exchanger role leading to undesirably exposed sensitivity to sodium or potassium ions. PMID:21957488

  15. Surface diffusion in reversed-phase liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Miyabe, Kanji; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    More than 40 years ago, Giddings pointed out in 'Dynamics of Chromatography' that surface diffusion should become an important research topic in the kinetics of chromatographic phenomena. However, few studies on surface diffusion in adsorbents used in chromatography were published since then. Most scientists use ordinary rate equations to study mass transfer kinetics in chromatography. They take no account of surface diffusion and overlook the significant contributions of this mass transfer process to chromatographic behavior and to column efficiency at high mobile phase flow rate. Only recently did the significance of surface diffusion in separation processes begin to be recognized in connection with the development of new techniques of fast flow, high efficiency chromatography. In this review, we revisit the reports on experimental data on surface diffusion and introduce a surface-restricted molecular diffusion model, derived as a first approximation for the mechanism of surface diffusion, on the basis of the absolute rate theory. We also explain how this model accounts for many intrinsic characteristics of surface diffusion that cannot properly be explained by the conventional models of surface diffusion.

  16. Fe Mg interdiffusion in wadsleyite: The role of pressure, temperature and composition and the magnitude of jump in diffusion rates at the 410 km discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzapfel, C.; Chakraborty, S.; Rubie, D. C.; Frost, D. J.

    2009-01-01

    The limited stability range of wadsleyite seriously impedes our ability to constrain kinetic parameters (e.g. activation energy, activation volume) using experiments carried out over a wide range of temperature and pressure. We have carried out a new measurement to extend the experimental temperature range of the dataset of Chakraborty et al. [Chakraborty, S., Knoche, R., Schulze, H., Rubie, D.C., Dobson, D., Ross, N.L., Angel, R.J., 1999. Enhancement of cation diffusion rates across the 410-kilometer discontinuity in Earth's mantle. Science 283, 362-365] to the maximum possible limit for that experimental setup. This result allows us to (i) obtain a better constrained value for activation energy for Fe-Mg diffusion in wadsleyite at 15 GPa (˜230 kJ/mol), and (ii) characterize the compositional dependence of Fe-Mg diffusion in wadsleyite. Evaluation of all data available in the literature [i.e. this study; Chakraborty et al., 1999; Farber, D.L., Williams, Q., Ryerson, F.J., 2000. Divalent cation diffusion in Mg 2SiO 4 spinel (ringwoodite), β-phase (wadsleyite), and olivine: implications for the electrical conductivity of the mantle. J. Geophys. Res. 105, 513-529; Kubo, T., Shimojuko, A., Ohtani, E., 2004. Fe-Mg interdiffusion rates in wadsleyite and the diffusivity jump at the 410 km discontinuity. Phys. Chem. Miner. 31, 456-464] reveals that there is a strong pressure dependence of the diffusion coefficient (activation volume ≈14 cm 3/mol). The expression D (m/s)=1.24×10-6 exp[11.8(0.86-X)] exp{-[]229,000+(P-15)×13.9×10 J/mol}/{RT} is an excellent description of all experimentally measured diffusion coefficients in wadsleyite and points to consistency between the various studies from different laboratories that used different methods. This expression should provide a robust basis for extrapolation of diffusion data for wadsleyite to conditions removed from the experimental ones, e.g. for modeling processes in the interiors of cold subducting slabs. Moreover

  17. Modeling of pickup ion distributions in the Halley cometosheath: Empirical limits on rates of ionization, diffusion, loss and creation of fast neutral atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, D. E.; Neugebauer, M.; Goldstein, B. E.

    1994-01-01

    The shape of the velocity distribution of water group ions observed by the Giotto ion mass spectrometer on its approach to comet Halley is modeled to derive empirical values for the rates of ionization, energy diffusion, and loss in the midcometosheath. The model includes the effect of rapid pitch angle scattering into a bispherical shell distribution as well as the effect of the magnetization of the plasma on the charge exchange loss rate. It is found that the average rate of ionization of cometary neutrals in this region of the cometosheath appears to be of the order of a factor 3 faster than the `standard' rates approx. 1 x 10(exp -6)/s that are generally assumed to model the observations in most regions of the comet environment. For the region of the coma studied in the present work (approx. 1 - 2 x 10(exp 5) km from the nucleus), the inferred energy diffusion coefficient is D(sub 0) approx. equals 0.0002 to 0.0005 sq km/cu s, which is generally lower than values used in other models. The empirically obtained loss rate appears to be about an order of magnitude greater than can be explained by charge exchange with the `standard' cross section of approx. 2 x 10(exp -15)sq cm. However such cross sections are not well known and for water group ion/water group neutral interactions, rates as high as 8 x 10(exp -15) sq cm have previously been suggested in the literature. Assuming the entire loss rate is due to charge exchange yields a rate of creation of fast neutral atoms of the order of approx. 10(exp -4)/s or higher, depending on the level of velocity diffusion. The fast neutrals may, in turn, be partly responsible for the higher-than-expected ionization rate.

  18. Singular perturbation of absolute stability.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.

    1972-01-01

    It was previously shown (author, 1969) that the regions of absolute stability in the parameter space can be determined when the parameters appear on the right-hand side of the system equations, i.e., the regular case. Here, the effect on absolute stability of a small parameter attached to higher derivatives in the equations (the singular case) is studied. The Lur'e-Postnikov class of nonlinear systems is considered.

  19. Short time scale dynamics and a second correlation between liquid and gas phase chemical rates: diffusion processes in noble gas fluids.

    PubMed

    Cox, Pelin; Adelman, Steven A

    2010-12-01

    A theoretical formula for single-atom diffusion rates that predicts an isothermal correlation relation between the liquid (l) and gas (g) phase diffusion coefficients, D(T, ρl) and D(T, ρg) is developed. This formula is based on a molecular level expression for the atom’s diffusion coefficient, D(T, ρ), and on numerical results for 1715 thermodynamic states of 25 rare gas fluids. These numerical results show that at fixed temperature, T, the decay time, τDIF, which governs the shortest time decay of an appropriate force autocorrelation function, F(t) F0, is density (ρ)-independent. This independence holds since τDIF arises from the ρ-independent shortest time inertial motions of the solvent. The ρ independence implies the following l−g diffusion coefficient correlation equation: D−1(T, ρl) = (ρl/ρg) D−1(T, ρg) [ρl−1F0,l2/ρg−1F0,g2]. This relation is identical in form to the familiar (isolated binary-collision-like) empirical correlation formula for vibrational energy relaxation rate constants. This is because both correlation relations arise from inertial dynamics. Inertial dynamics always determines short-time fluid motions, so it is likely that similar correlation relations occur for all liquid phase chemical processes. These correlation relations will be most valuable for phenomena dominated by short time scale dynamics.

  20. Upwelling Rates and Vertical Diffusivities Determined During the 2013 US GEOTRACES Eastern Tropical Pacific Zonal Transect: Results from 7Be Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadko, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Upwelling is an important physical process affecting biogeochemical cycling within the global ocean. Direct measurements are difficult because of the relatively small velocities involved, and must therefore be inferred by indirect methods such as those provided by tracer observations. Measurements of the cosmogenic radioisotope 7Be (half-life = 53.3 d) were used to derive upwelling rates and upper thermocline vertical diffusivities during the 2013 US GEOTRACES Eastern Tropical Pacific Zonal Transect. In the eastern, upwelling zone of this transect, the 7Be activity in the mixed layer varied between low values of 63 dpm/m3 in areas with the coldest sea surface temperatures (SSTs) to values of 190 dpm/m3 associated with warm SSTs. The 7Be inventory in the coldest water was only 5,150 dpm/m2 while that in the warmer water was 19,000 dpm/m2. The decrease in mixed layer 7Be with decrease in temperature occurs as 7Be ''dead'', cold water is upwelled from below. The deficit of the 7Be inventory relative to the non-upwelling stations provides a measure of the upwelling rate. For the eastern-most station with the lowest SST (17.6 deg C) an upwelling rate of 2.56 m/d was derived. Towards the west, as SST increased, derived upwelling rates decreased. At SST of 20.9 deg C, upwelling was zero. With knowledge of upwelling rates, 7Be and temperature profiles were used to constrain vertical diffusivity within the upper thermocline. Diffusivities derived from 7Be profiles were approximately twice that derived from temperature, likely reflecting the difference in vertical resolution of these measurements. Diffusivities derived from temperature were on the order of 1-4 x 10-4 m2/s. These parameters will be applied to profiles of nutrients and trace elements to derive fluxes of these species into the mixed layer.

  1. Vaneless diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senoo, Y.

    The influence of vaneless diffusers on flow in centrifugal compressors, particularly on surge, is discussed. A vaneless diffuser can demonstrate stable operation in a wide flow range only if it is installed with a backward leaning blade impeller. The circumferential distortion of flow in the impeller disappears quickly in the vaneless diffuser. The axial distortion of flow at the diffuser inlet does not decay easily. In large specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is distorted axially. Pressure recovery of diffusers at distorted inlet flow is considerably improved by half guide vanes. The best height of the vanes is a little 1/2 diffuser width. In small specific speed compressors, flow out of the impeller is not much distorted and pressure recovery can be predicted with one-dimensional flow analysis. Wall friction loss is significant in narrow diffusers. The large pressure drop at a small flow rate can cause the positive gradient of the pressure-flow rate characteristic curve, which may cause surging.

  2. Rate of Contamination Removal of Two Phyto-remediation Sites at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes applications of phyto-remediation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), a Department of Energy (DOE) Facility that enriched uranium from the early 1950's until 2000. Phyto-remediation has been implemented to assist in the removal of TCE (trichloroethylene) in the groundwater at two locations at the PORTS facility: the X-740 area and the X-749/X-120 area. Phyto-remediation technology is based on the ability of certain plants species (in this case hybrid poplar trees) and their associated rhizo-spheric microorganisms to remove, degrade, or contain chemical contaminants located in the soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater, and possibly even the atmosphere. Phyto-remediation technology is a promising clean-up solution for a wide variety of pollutants and sites. Mature trees, such as the hybrid poplar, can consume up to 3,000 gallons of groundwater per acre per day. Organic compounds are captured in the trees' root systems. These organic compounds are degraded by ultraviolet light as they are transpired along with the water vapor through the leaves of the trees. The phyto-remediation system at the X-740 area encompasses 766 one-year old hybrid poplar trees (Populus nigra x nigra, Populus nigra x maximowiczii, and Populus deltoides x nigra) that were planted 10 feet apart in rows 10 feet to 20 feet apart, over an area of 2.6 acres. The system was installed to manage the VOC contaminant plume. At the X749/X-120 area, a phyto-remediation system of 2,640 hybrid poplar trees (Populus nigra x maximowiczii) was planted in seven areas/zones to manage the VOC contaminant plume. The objectives of these systems are to remove contamination from the groundwater and to prevent further migration of contaminants. The goal of these remediation procedures is to achieve completely mature and functional phyto-remediation systems within two years of the initial planting of the hybrid poplar trees at each planting location. There is a direct

  3. The relative diffusive transport rate of SrI2 in water changes over the nanometer length scale as measured by coherent quasielastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Rubinson, Kenneth A; Faraone, Antonio

    2016-05-14

    X-ray and neutron scattering have been used to provide insight into the structures of ionic solutions for over a century, but the probes have covered distances shorter than 8 Å. For the non-hydrolyzing salt SrI2 in aqueous solution, a locally ordered lattice of ions exists that scatters slow neutrons coherently down to at least 0.1 mol L(-1) concentration, where the measured average distance between scatterers is over 18 Å. To investigate the motions of these scatterers, coherent quasielastic neutron scattering (CQENS) data on D2O solutions with SrI2 at 1, 0.8, 0.6, and 0.4 mol L(-1) concentrations was obtained to provide an experimental measure of the diffusive transport rate for the motion between pairs of ions relative to each other. Because CQENS measures the motion of one ion relative to another, the frame of reference is centered on an ion, which is unique among all diffusion measurement methods. We call the measured quantity the pairwise diffusive transport rate Dp. In addition to this ion centered frame of reference, the diffusive transport rate can be measured as a function of the momentum transfer q, where q = (4π/λ)sin θ with a scattering angle of 2θ. Since q is related to the interion distance (d = 2π/q), for the experimental range 0.2 Å(-1)≤q≤ 1.0 Å(-1), Dp is, then, measured over interion distances from 40 Å to ≈6 Å. We find the measured diffusional transport rates increase with increasing distance between scatterers over the entire range covered and interpret this behavior to be caused by dynamic coupling among the ions. Within the model of Fickian diffusion, at the longer interionic distances Dp is greater than the Nernst-Hartley value for an infinitely dilute solution. For these nm-distance diffusional transport rates to conform with the lower, macroscopically measured diffusion coefficients, we propose that local, coordinated counter motion of at least pairs of ions is part of the transport process. PMID:27096293

  4. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonality of Influenza (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaman, J. L.; Pitzer, V.; Viboud, C.; Grenfell, B.; Goldstein, E.; Lipsitch, M.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent re-analysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here we show that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. In addition, we show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility and changes in population mixing and contact rates.

  5. Low temperature diffusion coefficients in the Fe-Ni and FeNiP systems: Application to meteorite cooling rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, D. C.; Goldstein, J. I.

    1984-01-01

    The interdiffusion coefficient of FeNi in fcc taenite (gamma) of Fe-Ni and Fe-Ni-0.2 P alloys was measured as a function of temperature between 600 and 900 C. This temperature range is directly applicable to the nucleation and growth of the Widmanstatten pattern in iron meteorites and metal regions of stony and stony-iron meteorites. Diffusion couples were made from FeNi or FeNiP alloys which ensured that the couples were in the taenite phase at the diffusion temperature. The presence or absence of grain boundary diffusion was determined by measuring the Ni profile normal to the existing grain boundaries with the AEM. Ignoring any variation of interdiffusion coefficient with composition, the measured data was plotted versus the reciprocal of the diffusion temperature. The FeNi data generally follow the extrapolated Goldstein, et al. (1965) data from high temperatures. The FeNiP data indicates that small additions of P (0.2 wt%) cause a 3 to 10 fold increase in the FeNi interdifussion coefficient increasing with decreasing temperature. This increase is about the same as that predicted by Narayan and Goldstein (1983) at the Widmanstatten growth temperature.

  6. Effect of diffusion layer pH and solubility on the dissolution rate of pharmaceutical acids and their sodium salts. II: Salicylic acid, theophylline, and benzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Serajuddin, A T; Jarowski, C I

    1985-02-01

    The pH-solubility profiles of salicylic acid and theophylline, as determined by the addition of HCl or NaOH to their aqueous suspensions, were identical with those of their sodium salts except during phase transitions from acid to salt or vice versa. Supersaturated solutions were formed during phase transitions. Unlike the solubility profiles, the pH-intrinsic dissolution rate profiles of an acid and its salt differed greatly. Good conformity with the Noyes-Whitney equation was demonstrated when the solubility values under pH conditions as the diffusion layer thickness, h, approaches zero (Cs,h = 0) were used rather than solubilities under pH conditions of the bulk media (Cs). The pH when h approaches zero (pHh = 0) was estimated by equilibration of a dissolution medium with an excess of material. Good correlation was shown between the pHh = 0 values of benzoic acid estimated according to this method and the pHh = 0 values reported in the literature. The intrinsic dissolution rate constant, the ratio of the diffusion coefficient to the diffusion layer thickness (D/h), may be assumed constant when comparing the dissolution rates of salicylic acid, theophylline and sodium theophylline. On the other hand, D/h decreased significantly during dissolution of sodium salicylate due to a large increase in Cs,h = 0 and the consequent increase in viscosity in the diffusion layer. A simple method of predicting the dissolution rate of an acid or a salt at different pH values has been developed.

  7. Absolute radiometry and the solar constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of active cavity radiometers (ACRs) are described which have been developed as standard detectors for the accurate measurement of irradiance in absolute units. It is noted that the ACR is an electrical substitution calorimeter, is designed for automatic remote operation in any environment, and can make irradiance measurements in the range from low-level IR fluxes up to 30 solar constants with small absolute uncertainty. The instrument operates in a differential mode by chopping the radiant flux to be measured at a slow rate, and irradiance is determined from two electrical power measurements together with the instrumental constant. Results are reported for measurements of the solar constant with two types of ACRs. The more accurate measurement yielded a value of 136.6 plus or minus 0.7 mW/sq cm (1.958 plus or minus 0.010 cal/sq cm per min).

  8. Passive absolute age and temperature history sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Alex; Vianco, Paul T.

    2015-11-10

    A passive sensor for historic age and temperature sensing, including a first member formed of a first material, the first material being either a metal or a semiconductor material and a second member formed of a second material, the second material being either a metal or a semiconductor material. A surface of the second member is in contact with a surface of the first member such that, over time, the second material of the second member diffuses into the first material of the first member. The rate of diffusion for the second material to diffuse into the first material depends on a temperature of the passive sensor. One of the electrical conductance, the electrical capacitance, the electrical inductance, the optical transmission, the optical reflectance, or the crystalline structure of the passive sensor depends on the amount of the second material that has diffused into the first member.

  9. Experimental determination of the velocity and strain rate field in a laminar H2/Air counter-flow diffusion flame via LDA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeo, S. H.; Dancey, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the axial and radial components of velocity on the air side of stagnation in an axisymmetric H2/Air laminar counter-flow diffusion flame are reported. Results include the two-dimensional velocity field and computed velocity gradients (strain rates) along the stagnation streamline at two 'characteristic' strain rates, below the extinction limit. The measurements generally verify the modeling assumptions appropriate to the model of Kee et al. (1988). The 'traditional' potential flow model is not consistent with the measured results.

  10. Single Molecule Microscopy Reveals an Increased Hyaluronan Diffusion Rate in Synovial Fluid from Knees Affected by Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kohlhof, Hendrik; Gravius, Sascha; Kohl, Sandro; Ahmad, Sufian S; Randau, Thomas; Schmolders, Jan; Rommelspacher, Yorck; Friedrich, Max; Kaminski, Tim P

    2016-02-12

    Osteoarthritis is a common and progressive joint disorder. Despite its widespread, in clinical practice only late phases of osteoarthritis that are characterized by severe joint damage are routinely detected. Since osteoarthritis cannot be cured but relatively well managed, an early diagnosis and thereby early onset of disease management would lower the burden of osteoarthritis. Here we evaluated if biophysical parameters of small synovial fluid samples extracted by single molecule microscopy can be linked to joint damage. In healthy synovial fluid (ICRS-score < 1) hyaluronan showed a slower diffusion (2.2 μm(2)/s, N = 5) than in samples from patients with joint damage (ICRS-score > 2) (4.5 μm(2)/s, N = 16). More strikingly, the diffusion coefficient of hyaluronan in healthy synovial fluid was on average 30% slower than expected by sample viscosity. This effect was diminished or missing in samples from patients with joint damage. Since single molecule microscopy needs only microliters of synovial fluid to extract the viscosity and the specific diffusion coefficient of hyaluronan this method could be of use as diagnostic tool for osteoarthritis.

  11. Single Molecule Microscopy Reveals an Increased Hyaluronan Diffusion Rate in Synovial Fluid from Knees Affected by Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kohlhof, Hendrik; Gravius, Sascha; Kohl, Sandro; Ahmad, Sufian S.; Randau, Thomas; Schmolders, Jan; Rommelspacher, Yorck; Friedrich, Max; Kaminski, Tim P.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common and progressive joint disorder. Despite its widespread, in clinical practice only late phases of osteoarthritis that are characterized by severe joint damage are routinely detected. Since osteoarthritis cannot be cured but relatively well managed, an early diagnosis and thereby early onset of disease management would lower the burden of osteoarthritis. Here we evaluated if biophysical parameters of small synovial fluid samples extracted by single molecule microscopy can be linked to joint damage. In healthy synovial fluid (ICRS-score < 1) hyaluronan showed a slower diffusion (2.2 μm2/s, N = 5) than in samples from patients with joint damage (ICRS-score > 2) (4.5 μm2/s, N = 16). More strikingly, the diffusion coefficient of hyaluronan in healthy synovial fluid was on average 30% slower than expected by sample viscosity. This effect was diminished or missing in samples from patients with joint damage. Since single molecule microscopy needs only microliters of synovial fluid to extract the viscosity and the specific diffusion coefficient of hyaluronan this method could be of use as diagnostic tool for osteoarthritis. PMID:26868769

  12. Absolute flux scale for radioastronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V.P.; Stankevich, K.S.

    1986-07-01

    The authors propose and provide support for a new absolute flux scale for radio astronomy, which is not encumbered with the inadequacies of the previous scales. In constructing it the method of relative spectra was used (a powerful tool for choosing reference spectra). A review is given of previous flux scales. The authors compare the AIS scale with the scale they propose. Both scales are based on absolute measurements by the ''artificial moon'' method, and they are practically coincident in the range from 0.96 to 6 GHz. At frequencies above 6 GHz, 0.96 GHz, the AIS scale is overestimated because of incorrect extrapolation of the spectra of the primary and secondary standards. The major results which have emerged from this review of absolute scales in radio astronomy are summarized.

  13. Sentinel-2/MSI absolute calibration: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonjou, V.; Lachérade, S.; Fougnie, B.; Gamet, P.; Marcq, S.; Raynaud, J.-L.; Tremas, T.

    2015-10-01

    Sentinel-2 is an optical imaging mission devoted to the operational monitoring of land and coastal areas. It is developed in partnership between the European Commission and the European Space Agency. The Sentinel-2 mission is based on a satellites constellation deployed in polar sun-synchronous orbit. It will offer a unique combination of global coverage with a wide field of view (290km), a high revisit (5 days with two satellites), a high resolution (10m, 20m and 60m) and multi-spectral imagery (13 spectral bands in visible and shortwave infra-red domains). CNES is involved in the instrument commissioning in collaboration with ESA. This paper reviews all the techniques that will be used to insure an absolute calibration of the 13 spectral bands better than 5% (target 3%), and will present the first results if available. First, the nominal calibration technique, based on an on-board sun diffuser, is detailed. Then, we show how vicarious calibration methods based on acquisitions over natural targets (oceans, deserts, and Antarctica during winter) will be used to check and improve the accuracy of the absolute calibration coefficients. Finally, the verification scheme, exploiting photometer in-situ measurements over Lacrau plain, is described. A synthesis, including spectral coherence, inter-methods agreement and temporal evolution, will conclude the paper.

  14. A Simple and Accurate Method To Calculate Free Energy Profiles and Reaction Rates from Restrained Molecular Simulations of Diffusive Processes.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Victor; Nam, Kwangho; Karplus, Martin

    2016-08-25

    A method is developed to obtain simultaneously free energy profiles and diffusion constants from restrained molecular simulations in diffusive systems. The method is based on low-order expansions of the free energy and diffusivity as functions of the reaction coordinate. These expansions lead to simple analytical relationships between simulation statistics and model parameters. The method is tested on 1D and 2D model systems; its accuracy is found to be comparable to or better than that of the existing alternatives, which are briefly discussed. An important aspect of the method is that the free energy is constructed by integrating its derivatives, which can be computed without need for overlapping sampling windows. The implementation of the method in any molecular simulation program that supports external umbrella potentials (e.g., CHARMM) requires modification of only a few lines of code. As a demonstration of its applicability to realistic biomolecular systems, the method is applied to model the α-helix ↔ β-sheet transition in a 16-residue peptide in implicit solvent, with the reaction coordinate provided by the string method. Possible modifications of the method are briefly discussed; they include generalization to multidimensional reaction coordinates [in the spirit of the model of Ermak and McCammon (Ermak, D. L.; McCammon, J. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1978, 69, 1352-1360)], a higher-order expansion of the free energy surface, applicability in nonequilibrium systems, and a simple test for Markovianity. In view of the small overhead of the method relative to standard umbrella sampling, we suggest its routine application in the cases where umbrella potential simulations are appropriate.

  15. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  16. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  17. Experimental and computational results on exciton/free-carrier ratio, hot/thermalized carrier diffusion, and linear/nonlinear rate constants affecting scintillator proportionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. T.; Grim, Joel Q.; Li, Qi; Ucer, K. B.; Bizarri, G. A.; Kerisit, S.; Gao, Fei; Bhattacharya, P.; Tupitsyn, E.; Rowe, E.; Buliga, V. M.; Burger, A.

    2013-09-01

    Models of nonproportional response in scintillators have highlighted the importance of parameters such as branching ratios, carrier thermalization times, diffusion, kinetic order of quenching, associated rate constants, and radius of the electron track. For example, the fraction ηeh of excitations that are free carriers versus excitons was shown by Payne and coworkers to have strong correlation with the shape of electron energy response curves from Compton-coincidence studies. Rate constants for nonlinear quenching are implicit in almost all models of nonproportionality, and some assumption about track radius must invariably be made if one is to relate linear energy deposition dE/dx to volume-based excitation density n (eh/cm3) in terms of which the rates are defined. Diffusion, affecting time-dependent track radius and thus density of excitations, has been implicated as an important factor in nonlinear light yield. Several groups have recently highlighted diffusion of hot electrons in addition to thermalized carriers and excitons in scintillators. However, experimental determination of many of these parameters in the insulating crystals used as scintillators has seemed difficult. Subpicosecond laser techniques including interband z scan light yield, fluence-dependent decay time, and transient optical absorption are now yielding experimental values for some of the missing rates and ratios needed for modeling scintillator response. First principles calculations and Monte Carlo simulations can fill in additional parameters still unavailable from experiment. As a result, quantitative modeling of scintillator electron energy response from independently determined material parameters is becoming possible on an increasingly firmer data base. This paper describes recent laser experiments, calculations, and numerical modeling of scintillator response.

  18. Parallel velocity diffusion and slowing-down rate from long-range collisions in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2014-05-15

    This paper derives an expression for the rate of collisional slowing of charges in a magnetized plasma for which r{sub c} < λ{sub D}, where r{sub c} is the mean thermal cyclotron radius and λ{sub D} is the Debye length. The rate depends on a new fundamental length scale d that separates collisions into two impact parameter ranges that yield different slowing rates: a Boltzmann rate due to isolated binary collisions for impact parameters ρ < d and a Fokker-Planck rate due to multiple small scatterings for ρ > d. Slowing due to Boltzmann collisions is also shown to depend on the sign of the Coulomb interaction: for repulsive interactions, the slowing is enhanced by “collisional caging,” while for attractive interactions the Boltzmann slowing rate is zero.

  19. Absolute quantification of superoxide dismutase (SOD) using species-specific isotope dilution analysis.

    PubMed

    Deitrich, Christian L; Braukmann, Sandra; Raab, Andrea; Munro, Caroline; Pioselli, Barbara; Krupp, Eva M; Thomas-Oates, Jane E; Feldmann, Jörg

    2010-08-01

    Here we report for the first time the use of species-specific isotope dilution mass spectrometry for the absolute quantification of a metalloprotein using nondenaturing gel electrophoresis laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GE-LA-ICP-MS). The concept utilises the intrinsic metals of the metalloprotein for labelling of the isotopically labelled spike ((65)Cu, (68)Zn SOD). The stability of the metal-protein complex under non-denaturing conditions during 1-D PAGE was confirmed and the performance of the method evaluated. Between 4 and 64 microg, SOD was quantified with a recovery rate between 82% and 110% in a standard. The use of the isotopically enriched SOD was utilised to identify the extent of orthogonal diffusion in 1-D gel electrophoresis. Orthogonal diffusion of natural and isotopically enriched SOD in the gel can interfere with the correct determination of the isotope ratios. The matrix effect of a cytosolic liver extract on the non-covalently bound copper and zinc in SOD was evaluated and no significant metal loss from the SOD spike was observed. This study represents the first step necessary for establishing and evaluating the use of a species-specific isotope dilution approach for the absolute quantification of SOD in real samples based on the combination of gel electrophoresis and LA-ICP-MS.

  20. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  1. Optical coherent tomography measurements of the diffusion rate of water and drugs in an isolated and whole cornea

    SciTech Connect

    Larin, Kirill V; Ghosn, M G

    2006-12-31

    The passive diffusion of drugs through the epithelial surfaces of an eye (the most widespread method for medical treatment of various diseases) is considered. The permeability of water and drugs through rabbit cornea was measured in the isolated cornea (separate from an eye) and in the whole cornea. The permeability coefficients of water and dexamethasone were estimated by the method of optical coherence tomography (OCT). Because multiple photon scattering introduces noise and distortions to the OCT signal, measurements were performed at depths up to 500 {mu}m where most likely single scattering of light occurs in cornea. It is shown that the permeability coefficients in the isolated and whole cornea strongly differ from each other. For example, the water permeability in the isolated and whole cornea is (7.09{+-}0.12)x10{sup -5} and (1.71{+-}0.51)x10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1}, respectively. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  2. Water isotope diffusion rates from the NorthGRIP ice core for the last 16,000 years - Glaciological and paleoclimatic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkinis, V.; Simonsen, S. B.; Buchardt, S. L.; White, J. W. C.; Vinther, B. M.

    2014-11-01

    A high resolution (0.05 m) water isotopic record (δO18) is available from the NorthGRIP ice core. In this study we look into the water isotope diffusion history as estimated by the spectral characteristics of the δO18 time series covering the last 16,000 years. The diffusion of water vapor in the porous medium of the firn pack attenuates the initial isotopic signal, predominantly having an impact on the high frequency components of the power spectrum. Higher temperatures induce higher rates of smoothing and thus the signal can be used as a firn paleothermometer. We use a water isotope diffusion model coupled to a steady-state densification model in order to infer the temperature signal from the site, assuming the accumulation and strain rate history as estimated using the GICC05 layer counted chronology and a Dansgaard-Johnsen ice flow model. The temperature reconstruction accurately captures the timing and magnitude of the Bølling-Allerød and Younger Dryas transitions. A Holocene climatic optimum is seen between 7 and 9 ky b2k with an apparent cooling trend thereafter. Our temperature estimate for the Holocene climatic optimum, points to a necessary adjustment of the ice thinning function indicating that the ice flow model overestimates past accumulation rates by about 10% at 8 ky b2k. This result, is supported by recent gas isotopic fractionation studies proposing a similar reduction for glacial conditions. Finally, the record presents a climatic variability over the Holocene spanning millennial and centennial scales with a profound cooling occurring at approximately 4000 years b2k. The new reconstruction technique is able to provide past temperature estimates by overcoming the issues apparent in the use of the classical δO18 slope method. It can at the same time resolve temperature signals at low and high frequencies.

  3. Diffusive sampling of 25 volatile organic compounds in indoor air: Uptake rate determination and application in Flemish homes for the elderly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walgraeve, C.; Demeestere, K.; Dewulf, J.; Van Huffel, K.; Van Langenhove, H.

    2011-10-01

    Passive sampling of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air has received increasing attention in recent years. However, in order to use passive sampling as a reliable sampling technique a compound and sampler specific uptake rate is needed. Therefore, the scope of our study was threefold. First, uptake rates for 25 VOCs were determined under real indoor and outdoor conditions using axial-sampling tube-type samplers filled with Tenax TA, and active (pumped) sampling as a reference technique. Secondly, the mechanisms of passive sampling were investigated by comparing the experimentally determined uptake rates (0.13-0.46 ml min-1) to the ideal uptake rates, calculated based on Fick's first law of diffusion and sampler geometry. Sampling efficiency SE, defined as the ratio between the experimental and ideal uptake rate, was introduced as a correction factor and showed that ideal uptake rates may underestimate VOC concentrations by a factor up to 4. This compound dependent SE is explained in terms of the partitioning coefficient K, i.e. the compound's Tenax TA to air concentration equilibrium ratio. Compounds with a low K-value showed the most pronounced non-ideal sorptive behavior. Third, the experimentally determined uptake rates were used to determine VOC concentrations (between 12 and 311 μg m-3) in 6 homes for the elderly in Antwerp (Belgium). This study provides unique data for indoor air quality at care centers in Flanders.

  4. Understanding the Low Photosynthetic Rates of Sun and Shade Coffee Leaves: Bridging the Gap on the Relative Roles of Hydraulic, Diffusive and Biochemical Constraints to Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Samuel C. V.; Galmés, Jeroni; Cavatte, Paulo C.; Pereira, Lucas F.; Ventrella, Marília C.; DaMatta, Fábio M.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been held that the low photosynthetic rates (A) of coffee leaves are largely associated with diffusive constraints to photosynthesis. However, the relative limitations of the stomata and mesophyll to the overall diffusional constraints to photosynthesis, as well as the coordination of leaf hydraulics with photosynthetic limitations, remain to be fully elucidated in coffee. Whether the low actual A under ambient CO2 concentrations is associated with the kinetic properties of Rubisco and high (photo)respiration rates also remains elusive. Here, we provide a holistic analysis to understand the causes associated with low A by measuring a variety of key anatomical/hydraulic and photosynthetic traits in sun- and shade-grown coffee plants. We demonstrate that leaf hydraulic architecture imposes a major constraint on the maximisation of the photosynthetic gas exchange of coffee leaves. Regardless of the light treatments, A was mainly limited by stomatal factors followed by similar limitations associated with the mesophyll and biochemical constraints. No evidence of an inefficient Rubisco was found; rather, we propose that coffee Rubisco is well tuned for operating at low chloroplastic CO2 concentrations. Finally, we contend that large diffusive resistance should lead to large CO2 drawdown from the intercellular airspaces to the sites of carboxylation, thus favouring the occurrence of relatively high photorespiration rates, which ultimately leads to further limitations to A. PMID:24743509

  5. Hydrodynamic enhancement of the diffusion rate in the region between two fluctuating membranes in close opposition: a theoretical and computational study.

    PubMed

    Pannuzzo, Martina; Grassi, Antonio; Raudino, Antonio

    2014-07-24

    Periodic variation of the distance between two weakly adhering bodies gives rise to a huge tangential motions of the sandwiched solvent layer (squeezing flow). Oscillations either can be induced by an external applied field or can spontaneously arise from the coupling with the solvent heat bath. First we calculated by the Navier-Stokes equation the components of the fluid velocity near two oscillating juxtaposed plates. Then we evaluated the influence of plate oscillations on the transport properties of a trace diffusant dissolved at t = 0 in the outer medium for both deterministic and stochastic excitations. By employing both analytical (Fokker-Planck) and coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we proved that the entry and migration rates of the diffusant sharply increases with the oscillation amplitudes. Enhancement was related to relevant parameters like oscillation frequency, fluid layer thickness, fluid viscosity, and temperature. An extension to the case of oscillating multistacked lamellae has been also made. Theoretical and MD results suggest a significant enhancement of the diffusant flux even in the worse situation of thermally excited small amplitude fluctuations. Excitation arising from other sources (e.g., microwave or ultrasound irradiation of solid-fluid layered systems) could have a dramatic effect on the transport phenomena. Possible implications to relevant biological problems have been discussed.

  6. An Effective Continuum Model for the Liquid-to-Gas Phase Change in a Porous Medium Driven by Solute Diffusion: II. Constant Liquid Withdrawal Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N.; Yortsos, Yanis C.

    2001-08-15

    This report describes the development of an effective continuum model to describe the nucleation and subsequent growth of a gas phase from a supersaturated, slightly compressible binary liquid in a porous medium, driven by solute diffusion.This report also focuses on the processes resulting from the withdrawal of the liquid at a constant rate. As before, the model addresses two stages before the onset of bulk gas flow, nucleation and gas phase growth. Because of negligible gradients due to gravity or viscous forces, the critical gas saturation, is only a function of the nucleation fraction.

  7. Power Law Tailing in Column Air-sparging Experiments and Invasion-percolation Model for Calculating Diffusion Rates in the Liquid Phase.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawanishi, T.; Ninagawa, K.; Hayashi, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Power law tailings are often seen in removal of pollutants from soil or ground water. We have found that the power law tailing can also be seen in laboratory scale column air-sparging experiments. Researchers so far have found that power law tailings can occur due to the distribution of the micro-pore diffusion rates, or Freundlich type adsorption equilibrium. In addition to that we propose the following hypothesis. Introducing gas to the water saturated glass bead column causes some fractal-like gas flow path, which causes the power law distribution of distance that solute has to travel until it reaches the gas-water interface, this causes the power law tailing. In order to prove this, we constructed a model for removal of solute by diffusion to gas/water interface based on the invasion percolation. In a simple cubic bond lattice, invasion percolation is performed, assuming that the invading phase is gas and remaining phase is water. Then, set the initial concentration in water uniformly unity, set the boundary conditions as the concentration of the solute at the gas/water interfacial nodes is zero. Then diffusion calculation is performed by assuming that in the local scale (in a bond) the diffusion is Fickian. The model successfully reproduced the power law tailings. In the 80x80x80 and 100x100x100 node-lattice, the estimated slope in double-log plots raged from -1.08 to -0.72. The values are different from the normal diffusion in infinite media, -0.50, suggesting that the non-uniform shape of gas/water interface caused this kind of power law tailing. In the column experiments, we found the slope in double-log plots ranging from -0.77 to - 0.54, these values lie mostly between the calculated results and Fickian diffusion, 0.5. This, we consider, is reasonable that the real flow paths should be somewhere between the invading cluster and the straight line.

  8. Moral absolutism and ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, C

    2001-02-01

    If one accepts a version of absolutism that excludes the intentional killing of any innocent human person from conception to natural death, ectopic pregnancy poses vexing difficulties. Given that the embryonic life almost certainly will die anyway, how can one retain one's moral principle and yet adequately respond to a situation that gravely threatens the life of the mother and her future fertility? The four options of treatment most often discussed in the literature are non-intervention, salpingectomy (removal of tube with embryo), salpingostomy (removal of embryo alone), and use of methotrexate (MXT). In this essay, I review these four options and introduce a fifth (the milking technique). In order to assess these options in terms of the absolutism mentioned, it will also be necessary to discuss various accounts of the intention/foresight distinction. I conclude that salpingectomy, salpingostomy, and the milking technique are compatible with absolutist presuppositions, but not the use of methotrexate.

  9. Moral absolutism and ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, C

    2001-02-01

    If one accepts a version of absolutism that excludes the intentional killing of any innocent human person from conception to natural death, ectopic pregnancy poses vexing difficulties. Given that the embryonic life almost certainly will die anyway, how can one retain one's moral principle and yet adequately respond to a situation that gravely threatens the life of the mother and her future fertility? The four options of treatment most often discussed in the literature are non-intervention, salpingectomy (removal of tube with embryo), salpingostomy (removal of embryo alone), and use of methotrexate (MXT). In this essay, I review these four options and introduce a fifth (the milking technique). In order to assess these options in terms of the absolutism mentioned, it will also be necessary to discuss various accounts of the intention/foresight distinction. I conclude that salpingectomy, salpingostomy, and the milking technique are compatible with absolutist presuppositions, but not the use of methotrexate. PMID:11262641

  10. Classification images predict absolute efficiency.

    PubMed

    Murray, Richard F; Bennett, Patrick J; Sekuler, Allison B

    2005-02-24

    How well do classification images characterize human observers' strategies in perceptual tasks? We show mathematically that from the classification image of a noisy linear observer, it is possible to recover the observer's absolute efficiency. If we could similarly predict human observers' performance from their classification images, this would suggest that the linear model that underlies use of the classification image method is adequate over the small range of stimuli typically encountered in a classification image experiment, and that a classification image captures most important aspects of human observers' performance over this range. In a contrast discrimination task and in a shape discrimination task, we found that observers' absolute efficiencies were generally well predicted by their classification images, although consistently slightly (approximately 13%) higher than predicted. We consider whether a number of plausible nonlinearities can account for the slight under prediction, and of these we find that only a form of phase uncertainty can account for the discrepancy.

  11. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  12. Bimolecular electron transfer reactions in coumarin amine systems: Donor acceptor orientational effect on diffusion-controlled reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satpati, A. K.; Nath, S.; Kumbhakar, M.; Maity, D. K.; Senthilkumar, S.; Pal, H.

    2008-04-01

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions between excited coumarin dyes and different aliphatic amine (AlA) and aromatic amine (ArA) donors have been investigated in acetonitrile solution using steady-state (SS) and time-resolved (TR) fluorescence quenching measurements. No ground state complex or emissive exciplex formation has been indicated in these systems. SS and TR measurements give similar quenching constants ( kq) for each of the coumarin-amine pairs, suggesting dynamic nature of interaction in these systems. On correlating kq values with the free energy changes (Δ G0) of the ET reactions show the typical Rehm-Weller type of behavior as expected for bimolecular ET reactions under diffusive condition, where kq increases with -Δ G0 at the lower exergonicity (-Δ G0) region but ultimately saturate to a diffusion-limited value (kqDC) at the higher exergonicity region. It is, however, interestingly observed that the kqDC values vary largely depending on the type of the amines used. Thus, kqDC is much higher with ArAs than AlAs. Similarly, the kqDC for cyclic monoamine 1-azabicyclo-[2,2,2]-octane (ABCO) is distinctly lower and that for cyclic diamine 1,4-diazabicyclo-[2,2,2]-octane (DABCO) is distinctly higher than the kqDC value obtained for other noncyclic AlAs. These differences in the kqDC values have been rationalized on the basis of the differences in the orientational restrictions involved in the ET reactions with different types of amines. As understood, n-type donors (AlAs) introduce large orientational restriction and thus significantly reduces the ET efficiency in comparison to the π-type donors (ArAs). Structural constrains are inferred to be the reason for the differences in the kqDC values involving ABCO, DABCO donors in comparison to other noncyclic AlAs. Supportive evidence for the orientational restrictions involving different types of amines donors has also been obtained from DFT based quantum chemical calculations on the molecular orbitals of

  13. Numerical analysis of reaction-diffusion effects on species mixing rates in turbulent premixed methane-air combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, E.S.; Grout, R.W.; Chen, J.H.; Sankaran, R.

    2010-03-15

    The scalar mixing time scale, a key quantity in many turbulent combustion models, is investigated for reactive scalars in premixed combustion. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of three-dimensional, turbulent Bunsen flames with reduced methane-air chemistry have been analyzed in the thin reaction zones regime. Previous conclusions from single step chemistry DNS studies are confirmed regarding the role of dilatation and turbulence-chemistry interactions on the progress variable dissipation rate. Compared to the progress variable, the mixing rates of intermediate species is found to be several times greater. The variation of species mixing rates are explained with reference to the structure of one-dimensional premixed laminar flames. According to this analysis, mixing rates are governed by the strong gradients which are imposed by flamelet structures at high Damkoehler numbers. This suggests a modeling approach to estimate the mixing rate of individual species which can be applied, for example, in transported probability density function simulations. Flame-turbulence interactions which modify the flamelet based representation are analyzed. (author)

  14. Raman measurement of mixing and finite-rate chemistry in a supersonic hydrogen-air diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, T.S.; Wehrmeyer, J.A.; Pitz, R.W. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Jarrett, O. Jr.; Northam, G.B. . Langley Research Center)

    1994-10-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) spontaneous vibrational Raman scattering and laser-induced predissociative fluorescence (LIPF) from a KrF excimer laser are combined to simultaneously measure temperature, major species concentrations (H[sub 2], O[sub 2], N[sub 2], H[sub 2]O), and OH radical concentration in a supersonic lifted co-flowing hydrogen-air diffusion flame. The axisymmetric flame is formed when a sonic jet of hydrogen mixes with a Mach 2 annular jet of vitiated air. Mean and rms profiles of temperature, species concentrations, and mixture fraction are obtained throughout the supersonic flame. Simultaneous measurements of the chemical species and temperature are compared with frozen chemistry and equilibrium chemistry limits to assess the local state of the mixing and chemistry. Upstream of the lifted flame base, a very small amount of reaction occurs form mixing with hot vitiated air. Downstream of the lifted flame base, strong turbulent mixing leads to sub equilibrium values of temperature and OH concentration. Due to the interaction of velocity and temperature in supersonic compressible flames, the fluctuations of temperature and species concentrations are found to be higher than subsonic flames. Farther downstream, slow three-body recombination reactions result in super equilibrium OH concentrations that depress temperatures below their equilibrium values.

  15. Counterflow diffusion flames of hydrogen, and hydrogen plus methane, ethylene, propane, and silane vs. air - Strain rates at extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. Burton; Wilson, L. G.

    1991-01-01

    Five coaxial tubular opposed jet burners (OJBs) with tube diameter D(T) of 1.8-10 mm and 5 mm conical nozzles were used to form dish-shaped counterflow diffusion flames centered by opposing laminar jets of nitrogen and hydrocarbon-diluted H2 versus air in an argon-purged chamber at 1 atm. Area-averaged air jet velocities at blowoff of the central flame, U(air), characterized extinction of the airside flame as functions of input H2 concentration on the fuelside. A master plot of extensive U(air) data at blowoff versus D(T) shows that U(air) varies linearly with D(T). This and other data sets are used to find that nozzle OJB results for U(air)/diameter average 4.24 + or - 0.28 times larger than tubular OJB results for the same fuel compositions. Critical radial velocity gradients consistent with one-dimensional stagnation point boundary theory and with plug flow inputs are estimated. The results compare favorably with published numerical results based only on potential flow.

  16. Tactile perception of thermal diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Tiest, Wouter M Bergmann; Kappers, Astrid M L

    2009-04-01

    The thermal diffusivity of an object is a parameter that controls the rate at which heat is extracted from the hand when it touches that object. It is an important feature for distinguishing materials by means of touch. In order to quantitatively describe the ability of human observers to discriminate between materials on the basis of heat extraction rate, we conducted an experiment in which this heat extraction was performed in a controlled way. In different conditions, subjects were repeatedly asked to select from two stimuli the one that cooled faster. The discrimination threshold was around 43% of the extraction rate. A rate that was twice as slow also yielded twice the absolute threshold. When we halved the temperature difference between the beginning and end of the stimulus, the threshold did not change as much. In separate experiments, we investigated the different cues that were available in the stimulus: initial cooling rate and end temperature. Both cues were used for discrimination, but cooling rate seemed to be the most important.

  17. Rocket observations of the diffuse ultraviolet background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakobsen, P.; Bowyer, S.; Kimble, R.; Jelinsky, P.; Grewing, M.; Kraemer, G.; Wulf-Mathies, C.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of the experiment reported here was to obtain additional information on the absolute intensity level and spatial variation of the diffuse ultraviolet background and thereby gain insight into the origin of this radiation. The experiment used three ultraviolet sensitive photometers placed in the focal plane of a 95-cm, f/2.8 normal incidence telescope flown on board an Aries sounding rocket. The measured intensities clearly refute the hypothesis of an isotropic background, the intensities of the high galactic latitude being definitely lower than the intensities seen at intermediate latitudes. Moreover, the count rates in all three channels along the slow scan exhibit local enhancements as well as an overall trend. In general, the spatial variations exhibited by the data correlate with the line of sight of neutral hydrogen column density as determined from 21-cm radio observations. This fact demonstrates that there is a galactic component to the diffuse ultraviolet radiation field.

  18. Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibrationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappatou, A.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Delabie, E.; Marchuk, O.; Biel, W.; Jakobs, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

  19. The AFGL absolute gravity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. A.; Iliff, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A brief discussion of the AFGL's (Air Force Geophysics Laboratory) program in absolute gravity is presented. Support of outside work and in-house studies relating to gravity instrumentation are discussed. A description of the current transportable system is included and the latest results are presented. These results show good agreement with measurements at the AFGL site by an Italian system. The accuracy obtained by the transportable apparatus is better than 0.1 microns sq sec 10 microgal and agreement with previous measurements is within the combined uncertainties of the measurements.

  20. Familial Aggregation of Absolute Pitch

    PubMed Central

    Baharloo, Siamak; Service, Susan K.; Risch, Neil; Gitschier, Jane; Freimer, Nelson B.

    2000-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is a behavioral trait that is defined as the ability to identify the pitch of tones in the absence of a reference pitch. AP is an ideal phenotype for investigation of gene and environment interactions in the development of complex human behaviors. Individuals who score exceptionally well on formalized auditory tests of pitch perception are designated as “AP-1.” As described in this report, auditory testing of siblings of AP-1 probands and of a control sample indicates that AP-1 aggregates in families. The implications of this finding for the mapping of loci for AP-1 predisposition are discussed. PMID:10924408

  1. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOEpatents

    Oborny, Michael C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2008-07-15

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  2. Shaken and Stirred: A Combined Reaction-Diffusion and Random Rate Model for the Temporal Evolution and Earthquake-induced Hydrodynamics of Silicate Mineral Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evaristo, J. A.; Willenbring, J.

    2013-12-01

    The time dependency of silicate mineral weathering has been explored in the literature in terms of processes and features that are intrinsic and extrinsic to the mineral [1]. However, although the advent of sophisticated reactive transport models has allowed for coupling increasingly complex reaction and transport processes [2,3], a simple and fundamental understanding of the temporal evolution of weathering is lacking. Here, we propose that a purely deterministic approach may not be sufficient given the inherent differences in reactivity over space and time. Therefore, we explore how a combined reaction-diffusion and random rate model - informed by a stochastic distribution of weathering rates K (T-1) - might be able to explain not only the temporal evolution but also the hydrodynamics of weathering during earthquakes; the latter being purportedly described by time-dependent property permeability (L2). Preliminary model results show that (1) an increase in dimensionless quantity βrp, where β is the diffusion length (L-1) and rp is the distance between pores (L), leads to a decrease in minimum reaction rate with time from the relation Kmin ∝ e-βrp/rp ; (2) at a given porosity, a time-dependent decrease in reactivity arises as permeability decreases due to decreasing pore size (and therefore increasing rp), which in turn may be related to the time-dependent feedback between dissolution and precipitation; (3) while permeability is lower in older soils, transient stresses as during earthquakes [4], may induce more efficient "declogging" of pores in these soils than in younger soils due to higher hydrodynamic viscous shear stress, thereby, resulting in a coseismic change in stream discharge Q; and (4) subsequent weathering beyond t~Kmin-1 exhibits a fall in rates, marking the cessation of logarithmic decay possibly due to dissolution-precipitation feedback. [1] White and Brantley (2003), Chem. Geol. 202, 479. [2] Lichtner P.C. (1996), Mineralogical Society of

  3. Diffusion and Monod kinetics model to determine in vivo human corneal oxygen-consumption rate during soft contact lens wear

    PubMed Central

    Del Castillo, Luis F.; da Silva, Ana R. Ferreira; Hernández, Saul I.; Aguilella, M.; Andrio, Andreu; Mollá, Sergio; Compañ, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We present an analysis of the corneal oxygen consumption Qc from non-linear models, using data of oxygen partial pressure or tension (pO2) obtained from in vivo estimation previously reported by other authors.1 Methods Assuming that the cornea is a single homogeneous layer, the oxygen permeability through the cornea will be the same regardless of the type of lens that is available on it. The obtention of the real value of the maximum oxygen consumption rate Qc,max is very important because this parameter is directly related with the gradient pressure profile into the cornea and moreover, the real corneal oxygen consumption is influenced by both anterior and posterior oxygen fluxes. Results Our calculations give different values for the maximum oxygen consumption rate Qc,max, when different oxygen pressure values (high and low pO2) are considered at the interface cornea-tears film. Conclusion Present results are relevant for the calculation on the partial pressure of oxygen, available at different depths into the corneal tissue behind contact lenses of different oxygen transmissibility. PMID:25649636

  4. Transient absolute robustness in stochastic biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Enciso, German A

    2016-08-01

    Absolute robustness allows biochemical networks to sustain a consistent steady-state output in the face of protein concentration variability from cell to cell. This property is structural and can be determined from the topology of the network alone regardless of rate parameters. An important question regarding these systems is the effect of discrete biochemical noise in the dynamical behaviour. In this paper, a variable freezing technique is developed to show that under mild hypotheses the corresponding stochastic system has a transiently robust behaviour. Specifically, after finite time the distribution of the output approximates a Poisson distribution, centred around the deterministic mean. The approximation becomes increasingly accurate, and it holds for increasingly long finite times, as the total protein concentrations grow to infinity. In particular, the stochastic system retains a transient, absolutely robust behaviour corresponding to the deterministic case. This result contrasts with the long-term dynamics of the stochastic system, which eventually must undergo an extinction event that eliminates robustness and is completely different from the deterministic dynamics. The transiently robust behaviour may be sufficient to carry out many forms of robust signal transduction and cellular decision-making in cellular organisms. PMID:27581485

  5. Diffusion-Based Density-Equalizing Maps: an Interdisciplinary Approach to Visualizing Homicide Rates and Other Georeferenced Statistical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzitello, Karina I.; Candia, Julián

    2012-12-01

    In every country, public and private agencies allocate extensive funding to collect large-scale statistical data, which in turn are studied and analyzed in order to determine local, regional, national, and international policies regarding all aspects relevant to the welfare of society. One important aspect of that process is the visualization of statistical data with embedded geographical information, which most often relies on archaic methods such as maps colored according to graded scales. In this work, we apply nonstandard visualization techniques based on physical principles. We illustrate the method with recent statistics on homicide rates in Brazil and their correlation to other publicly available data. This physics-based approach provides a novel tool that can be used by interdisciplinary teams investigating statistics and model projections in a variety of fields such as economics and gross domestic product research, public health and epidemiology, sociodemographics, political science, business and marketing, and many others.

  6. Absolute flux measurements for swift atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M.; Kohl, D. A.; Keto, J. W.; Antoniewicz, P.

    1987-01-01

    While a torsion balance in vacuum can easily measure the momentum transfer from a gas beam impinging on a surface attached to the balance, this measurement depends on the accommodation coefficients of the atoms with the surface and the distribution of the recoil. A torsion balance is described for making absolute flux measurements independent of recoil effects. The torsion balance is a conventional taut suspension wire design and the Young modulus of the wire determines the relationship between the displacement and the applied torque. A compensating magnetic field is applied to maintain zero displacement and provide critical damping. The unique feature is to couple the impinging gas beam to the torsion balance via a Wood's horn, i.e., a thin wall tube with a gradual 90 deg bend. Just as light is trapped in a Wood's horn by specular reflection from the curved surfaces, the gas beam diffuses through the tube. Instead of trapping the beam, the end of the tube is open so that the atoms exit the tube at 90 deg to their original direction. Therefore, all of the forward momentum of the gas beam is transferred to the torsion balance independent of the angle of reflection from the surfaces inside the tube.

  7. A Numerical Investigation of the Extinction of Low Strain Rate Diffusion Flames by an Agent in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puri, Ishwar K.

    2004-01-01

    Our goal has been to investigate the influence of both dilution and radiation on the extinction process of nonpremixed flames at low strain rates. Simulations have been performed by using a counterflow code and three radiation models have been included in it, namely, the optically thin, the narrowband, and discrete ordinate models. The counterflow flame code OPPDIFF was modified to account for heat transfer losses by radiation from the hot gases. The discrete ordinate method (DOM) approximation was first suggested by Chandrasekhar for solving problems in interstellar atmospheres. Carlson and Lathrop developed the method for solving multi-dimensional problem in neutron transport. Only recently has the method received attention in the field of heat transfer. Due to the applicability of the discrete ordinate method for thermal radiation problems involving flames, the narrowband code RADCAL was modified to calculate the radiative properties of the gases. A non-premixed counterflow flame was simulated with the discrete ordinate method for radiative emissions. In comparison with two other models, it was found that the heat losses were comparable with the optically thin and simple narrowband model. The optically thin model had the highest heat losses followed by the DOM model and the narrow-band model.

  8. Measurement of absolute state-to-state rate constants for collision-induced transitions between spin-orbit and rotational states of NO(X 2Π, v = 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudbø, Aa. S.; Loy, M. M. T.

    1982-04-01

    Using a pulsed, time resolved IR-UV double resonance technique, we have measured initial and final state specific rates for collision-induced rotational and spin-orbit transitions in NO in its (X 2Π, v = 2) vibronic state. A systematic study of the rates was done for initial and final rotational states with J between 1/2 and 35/2, for both Ω = 1/2 and the Ω = 3/2 spin-orbit components of the X 2Π state. Collision partners were room temperature NO, He, Ar, N2, CO, and SF6. No propensity rules favoring ΔΩ = 0 or ΔJ = 0,±1 were observed, except in NO-He collisions, where ΔΩ = 0 was favored. The state-to-state rates do not vary much with initial state and fall off slowly with increasing ΔJ. Total cross sections for collision-induced rotational transitions were found to be tens of Å2, insensitive to initial state, and correlated with the size of the collision partner.

  9. The reaction NH2 + PH3 yields NH3 + PH2: Absolute rate constant measurement and implication for NH3 and PH3 photochemistry in the atmosphere of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Brobst, W. D.; Nava, D. F.; Stief, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    The rate constant is measured over the temperature interval 218-456 K using the technique of flash photolysis-laser-induced fluorescence. NH2 radicals are produced by the flash photolysis of ammonia highly diluted in argon, and the decay of fluorescent NH2 photons is measured by multiscaling techniques. For each of the five temperatures employed in the study, the results are shown to be independent of variations in PH3 concentration, total pressure (argon), and flash intensity. It is found that the rate constant results are best represented for T between 218 and 456 K by the expression k = (1.52 + or - 0.16) x 10 to the -12th exp(-928 + or - 56/T) cu cm per molecule per sec; the error quoted is 1 standard deviation. This is the first determination of the rate constant for the reaction NH2 + PH3. The data are compared with an estimate made in order to explain results of the radiolysis of NH3-PH3 mixtures. The Arrhenius parameters determined here for NH2 + PH3 are then constrasted with those for the corresponding reactions of H and OH with PH3.

  10. The reaction NH2 + PH3 yields NH3 + PH2 - Absolute rate constant measurement and implication for NH3 and PH3 photochemistry in the atmosphere of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Brobst, W. D.; Nava, D. F.; Stief, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    The rate constant is measured over the temperature interval 218-456 K using the technique of flash photolysis-laser-induced fluorescence. NH2 radicals are produced by the flash photolysis of ammonia highly diluted in argon, and the decay of fluorescent NH2 photons is measured by multiscaling techniques. For each of the five temperatures employed in the study, the results are shown to be indepenent of variations in PH3 concentration, total pressure (argon), and flash intensity. It is found that the rate constant results are best represented for T between 218 and 456 K by the expression k = (1.52 + or - 0.16) x 10 to the -12th exp(-928 + or - 56/T) cu cm per molecule per sec; the error quoted is 1 standard deviation. This is the first determination of the rate constant for the reaction NH2 + PH3. The data are compared with an estimate made in order to explain results of the radiolysis of NH3-PH3 mixtures. The Arrhenius parameters determined here for NH2 + PH3 are then contrasted with those for the corresponding reactions of H and OH with PH3.

  11. Some Like it Hot: Linking Diffuse X-Ray Luminosity, Baryonic Mass, and Star Formation Rate in Compact Groups of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Mulchaey, John S.; Walker, Lisa May; Brandt, Willian N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission in 19 compact groups (CGs) of galaxies observed with Chandra. The hottest, most X-ray luminous CGs agree well with the galaxy cluster X-ray scaling relations in L(x-T) and (L(x-sigma), even in CGs where the hot gas is associated with only the brightest galaxy. Using Spitzer photometry, we compute stellar masses and classify Hickson CGs 19, 22, 40, and 42, and RSCGs 32, 44, and 86 as fossil groups using a new definition for fossil systems that includes a broader range of masses. We find that CGs with total stellar and Hi masses are great than or equal to 10(sup (11.3) solar mass are often X-ray luminous, while lower-mass CGs only sometimes exhibit faint, localized X-ray emission. Additionally, we compare the diffuse X-ray luminosity against both the total UV and 24 micron star formation rates of each CG and optical colors of the most massive galaxy in each of the CGs. The most X-ray luminous CGs have the lowest star formation rates, likely because there is no cold gas available for star formation, either because the majority of the baryons in these CGs are in stars or the X-ray halo, or due togas stripping from the galaxies in CGs with hot halos. Finally, the optical colors that trace recent star formation histories of the most massive group galaxies do not correlate with the X-ray luminosities of the CGs, indicating that perhaps the current state of the X-ray halos is independent of the recent history of stellar mass assembly in the most massive galaxies.

  12. Some like it hot: Linking diffuse X-ray luminosity, baryonic mass, and star formation rate in compact groups of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.

    2014-08-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission in 19 compact groups (CGs) of galaxies observed with Chandra. The hottest, most X-ray luminous CGs agree well with the galaxy cluster X-ray scaling relations in L{sub X} -T and L{sub X} -σ, even in CGs where the hot gas is associated with only the brightest galaxy. Using Spitzer photometry, we compute stellar masses and classify Hickson CGs 19, 22, 40, and 42, and RSCGs 32, 44, and 86 as fossil groups using a new definition for fossil systems that includes a broader range of masses. We find that CGs with total stellar and H I masses ≳ 10{sup 11.3} M{sub ☉} are often X-ray luminous, while lower-mass CGs only sometimes exhibit faint, localized X-ray emission. Additionally, we compare the diffuse X-ray luminosity against both the total UV and 24 μm star formation rates of each CG and optical colors of the most massive galaxy in each of the CGs. The most X-ray luminous CGs have the lowest star formation rates, likely because there is no cold gas available for star formation, either because the majority of the baryons in these CGs are in stars or the X-ray halo, or due to gas stripping from the galaxies in CGs with hot halos. Finally, the optical colors that trace recent star formation histories of the most massive group galaxies do not correlate with the X-ray luminosities of the CGs, indicating that perhaps the current state of the X-ray halos is independent of the recent history of stellar mass assembly in the most massive galaxies.

  13. Determination of convective diffusion heat/mass transfer rates to burner rig test targets comparable in size to cross-stream jet diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Santoro, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two sets of experiments have been performed to be able to predict the convective diffusion heat/mass transfer rates to a cylindrical target whose height and diameter are comparable to, but less than, the diameter of the circular cross-stream jet, thereby simulating the same geometric configuration as a typical burner rig test specimen located in the cross-stream of the combustor exit nozzle. The first set exploits the naphthalene sublimation technique to determine the heat/mass transfer coefficient under isothermal conditions for various flow rates (Reynolds numbers). The second set, conducted at various combustion temperatures and Reynolds numbers, utilized the temperature variation along the surface of the above-mentioned target under steady-state conditions to estimate the effect of cooling (dilution) due to the entrainment of stagnant room temperature air. The experimental information obtained is used to predict high temperature, high velocity corrosive salt vapor deposition rates in burner rigs on collectors that are geometrically the same. The agreement with preliminary data obtained from Na2SO4 vapor deposition experiments is found to be excellent.

  14. Determination of convective diffusion heat/mass transfer rates to burner rig test targets comparable in size to cross-stream jet diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Santoro, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    Two sets of experiments have been performed to be able to predict the convective diffusion heat/mass transfer rates to a cylindrical target whose height and diameter are comparable to, but less than, the diameter of the circular cross-stream jet, thereby simulating the same geometric configuration as a typical burner rig test specimen located in the cross-stream of the combustor exit nozzlle. The first set exploits the naphthalene sublimation technique to detetermine the heat/mass transfer coefficient under isothermal conditions for various flow rates (Reynolds numbers). The second set, conducted at various combustion temperatures and Reynolds numbers, utilized the temperature variation along the surface of the above-mentioned target under steady-state conditions to estimate the effect of cooling (dilution) due to the entrainment of stagnant room temperature air. The experimental information obtained is used to predict high temperature, high velocity corrosive salt vapor deposition rates in burner rigs on collectors that are geometrically the same. The agreement with preliminary data obtained from Na2S04 vapor deposition experiments is found to be excellent.

  15. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < ‑1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  16. Apparatus for absolute pressure measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, R. (Inventor)

    1969-01-01

    An absolute pressure sensor (e.g., the diaphragm of a capacitance manometer) was subjected to a superimposed potential to effectively reduce the mechanical stiffness of the sensor. This substantially increases the sensitivity of the sensor and is particularly useful in vacuum gauges. An oscillating component of the superimposed potential induced vibrations of the sensor. The phase of these vibrations with respect to that of the oscillating component was monitored, and served to initiate an automatic adjustment of the static component of the superimposed potential, so as to bring the sensor into resonance at the frequency of the oscillating component. This establishes a selected sensitivity for the sensor, since a definite relationship exists between resonant frequency and sensitivity.

  17. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  18. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometer metrological performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, J.; Fratter, I.; Bertrand, F.; Jager, T.; Morales, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) has been developed for the ESA Earth Observation Swarm mission, planned for launch in November 2012. As its Overhauser magnetometers forerunners flown on Oersted and Champ satellites, it will deliver high resolution scalar measurements for the in-flight calibration of the Vector Field Magnetometer manufactured by the Danish Technical University. Latest results of the ground tests carried out to fully characterize all parameters that may affect its accuracy, both at instrument and satellite level, will be presented. In addition to its baseline function, the ASM can be operated either at a much higher sampling rate (burst mode at 250 Hz) or in a dual mode where it also delivers vector field measurements as a by-product. The calibration procedure and the relevant vector performances will be discussed.

  19. U-Pb age of zircon crystals from the upper banner tonstein (Middle Pennsylvanian), Virginia: Absolute age of the Lower Pennsylvanian-Middle Pennsylvanian boundary and depositional rates for the Middle Pennsylvanian, central appalachian basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, P.C.; Krogh, T.E.; Kwok, Y.Y.; Zodrow, E.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Upper Banner tonstein, a kaolinized volcanic ash bed that occurs about 90 m above the base of the Middle Pennsylvanian Series in Virginia, is the oldest known Middle Pennsylvanian tonstein in the Appalachian basin. On the basis of palynostratigraphy, the Upper Banner coal bed correlates approximately with the Langsettian-Duckmantian (ex Westphalian A-B) boundary in Europe. Stratigraphically, the Upper Banner tonstein occurs 440-480 m below the Fire Clay tonstein, which in turn is 25-50 m below the marine Magoffin Member of the Breathitt Formation, the approximate correlative of the Agir Marine Band that marks the Dunckmantian-Bolsovian (ex Westphalian C) boundary in Europe. Six single-crystal U-Pb zircon ages were determined for the Upper Banner tonstein. Of these, four overlap concordia within uncertainties and have 206Pb/238U ages that range from 306 to 310??1 Ma. Another analysis falls in the same group but plots slightly to the right of the curve, whereas a single analysis of a low uranium zircon grain gives an age of 316??1 Ma. Variation in ages is outside of analytical uncertainty; hence, variable amounts of recent Pb loss is implied, and the most probable (minimum) depositional age is given by the oldest value at 316??1 Ma - an age consistent with a mean sanidine 40Ar/39Ar plateau age of 311.2??0.7 Ma for the stratigraphically younger Fire Clay tonstein. Thus, the Upper Banner tonstein-Fire Clay tonstein interval is about 5 ?? 1 m.y. This period of time for the Dunckmantian Stage is in good agreement with the Hess and Lippolt (1986) and Hess et al. (1988) chronology for the Duckmantian based on 40Ar/39Ar plateau methods for Westphalian tonsteins. Also, on the basis of this period of time, calculated sedimentation rates (decompacted) od 66-165 m/m.y. were determined for the lower part of the Middle Pennsylvanian Series in the central Appalachian basin. These rates are consistent with the sedimentation rates for shallow-water marine siliciclastic sediments

  20. Model Compound Studies of the Beta-O-4 Linkage in Lignin: Absolute Rate Expressions for Beta-Scission of Phenoxyl Radical from 1-Phenyl-2-phenoxyethanol-1-yl Radical.

    SciTech Connect

    Kandanarachchi, Pramod H.; Autrey, S Thomas ); Franz, James A. )

    2002-11-15

    The lifetime of the lignin radical model compound, 1-phenyl-2-phenoxyethanol-1-yl, PhC?(OH)CH2-OPh is several orders of magnitude greater than suggested by the previous experimental studies. The ketyl radical is competitively trapped by thiophenol to yield PhCH(OH)CH2-OPh in competition with? -scission to yield phenoxyl radical and acetophenone. A basis rate expression, hydrogen atom abstraction by sec-phenethyl alcohol, PhC?(OH)CH3, from thiophenol, log(kabs/M -1 s -1 )=(8.88?0.24)? (6.07?0.34)/? ,?= 2.303RT,was determined by competing reduction and radical termination pathways. The Smoluchowski equation was used to calculate the temperature dependent rate of PhC?(OH)CH3 termination. The hydrogen abstraction pathway was used as a basis reaction to determine the activation barrier for the? -scission of phenoxyl from 1-phenyl-2-phenoxyethanol-1-yl: log(k? -sci/s -1 )= (12.85?0.22)?(15.06?0.38)/?, k? -sci(298K) ca. (64.0s -1 in benzene), log(k? -sci/s -1 )= (12.50?0.18)?(14.46?0.30)/? , k? -sc i(298K) ca. (78.7s -1 in benzene containing 0.8 M 2-propanol).B3LYP/cc-PVZT methods predict intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the? -OH on the ketyl radical and the?OPh leaving group stabilize both the ground state and transition state structures. At this level of theory the activation barrier (14.9 kcal/mol) is in fair agreement with the experimentally determined activation barrier.

  1. Modeling tumor growth in the presence of a therapy with an effect on rate growth and variability by means of a modified Gompertz diffusion process.

    PubMed

    Román-Román, Patricia; Román-Román, Sergio; Serrano-Pérez, Juan José; Torres-Ruiz, Francisco

    2016-10-21

    In experimental studies on tumor growth, whenever the time evolution of the relative volume of a tumor in an untreated (control) group can be fitted by a Gompertz diffusion process there is a possibility that an antiproliferative therapy, which modifies the growth rate of the process that fits the treated group, may also affect its variability. The present paper proposes several procedures for the estimation of the time function included in the infinitesimal variance of the new process, as well as the time function affecting the growth rate (which is included in the infinitesimal mean). Also, a hypothesis testing is designed to confirm or refute the need for including such a time-dependent function in the infinitesimal variance. In order to validate and compare the proposed procedures a simulation study has been carried out. In addition, a proposal is made for a strategy aimed at finding the optimal combination of procedures for each case. A real data application concerning the effects of cisplatin on a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor model showcases the advantages of this model over others that have been used in the past.

  2. Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Haddad, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet have extended to short wavelengths by use of rare-gas ionization chambers. The technique involves the measurement of the ion current as a function of the gas pressure in the ion chamber. The true value of the ion current, and hence the absolute photon flux, is obtained by extrapolating the ion current to zero gas pressure. Examples are given at 162 and 266 A. The short-wavelength limit is determined only by the sensitivity of the current-measuring apparatus and by present knowledge of the photoionization processes that occur in the rate gases.

  3. Absolute configuration of isovouacapenol C

    PubMed Central

    Fun, Hoong-Kun; Yodsaoue, Orapun; Karalai, Chatchanok; Chantrapromma, Suchada

    2010-01-01

    The title compound, C27H34O5 {systematic name: (4aR,5R,6R,6aS,7R,11aS,11bR)-4a,6-dihy­droxy-4,4,7,11b-tetra­methyl-1,2,3,4,4a,5,6,6a,7,11,11a,11b-dodeca­hydro­phenanthro[3,2-b]furan-5-yl benzoate}, is a cassane furan­oditerpene, which was isolated from the roots of Caesalpinia pulcherrima. The three cyclo­hexane rings are trans fused: two of these are in chair conformations with the third in a twisted half-chair conformation, whereas the furan ring is almost planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.003 Å). An intra­molecular C—H⋯O inter­action generates an S(6) ring. The absolute configurations of the stereogenic centres at positions 4a, 5, 6, 6a, 7, 11a and 11b are R, R, R, S, R, S and R, respectively. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked into infinite chains along [010] by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. C⋯O [3.306 (2)–3.347 (2) Å] short contacts and C—H⋯π inter­actions also occur. PMID:21588364

  4. Frequency-domain analysis of absolute gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svitlov, S.

    2012-12-01

    An absolute gravimeter is analysed as a linear time-invariant system in the frequency domain. Frequency responses of absolute gravimeters are derived analytically based on the propagation of the complex exponential signal through their linear measurement functions. Depending on the model of motion and the number of time-distance coordinates, an absolute gravimeter is considered as a second-order (three-level scheme) or third-order (multiple-level scheme) low-pass filter. It is shown that the behaviour of an atom absolute gravimeter in the frequency domain corresponds to that of the three-level corner-cube absolute gravimeter. Theoretical results are applied for evaluation of random and systematic measurement errors and optimization of an experiment. The developed theory agrees with known results of an absolute gravimeter analysis in the time and frequency domains and can be used for measurement uncertainty analyses, building of vibration-isolation systems and synthesis of digital filtering algorithms.

  5. Measuring Postglacial Rebound with GPS and Absolute Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; vanDam, Tonie

    2000-01-01

    We compare vertical rates of deformation derived from continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) observations and episodic measurements of absolute gravity. We concentrate on four sites in a region of North America experiencing postglacial rebound. The rates of uplift from gravity and GPS agree within one standard deviation for all sites. The GPS vertical deformation rates are significantly more precise than the gravity rates, primarily because of the denser temporal spacing provided by continuous GPS tracking. We conclude that continuous GPS observations are more cost efficient and provide more precise estimates of vertical deformation rates than campaign style gravity observations where systematic errors are difficult to quantify.

  6. Variation in the electrical properties of 100 V/100 a rated mesh and stripe TDMOSFETs (Trench Double-Diffused MOSFETs) for motor drive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Kyoung-Il; Kah, Dong-Ha; Kim, Sang-Gi; Koo, Jin-Gun; Kim, Jongdae; Yang, Yil-Suk; Lee, Jin-Ho

    2012-05-01

    The vertical power metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) with deep trench structures are the most promising candidates to overcome the trade-off relationship between the ON-resistance (R ON ) and the blocking voltage (BV DS ). Especially, 100 V/100 A rated trench power MOSFETs are used in components of many power systems, such as motors and LED lighting drive ICs, DC-DC converters in electric vehicles, and so on. In this work, we studied variations of the electrical characteristics, such as threshold voltage (V TH ), BV DS , and drain current drivability, with p-well doping concentration via the SILVACO simulator. From simulation results, we found the BV DS and the drain current (I D ) as functions of the p-well doping concentration at an ion implantation energy of 80 keV. With increasing of p-well doping concentration in the guard ring region, both V TH and BV DS slowly increased, but I D decreased, because the boron lateral diffusion during the fabrication process below gate trench region affected the doping concentration of the p-body at the active region. Additionally, 100 V/100 A rated trench double-diffused MOSFETs (TDMOSFETs) with meshes and stripes were successfully developed by using a silicon deep etching process. The variations in the electrical properties, such as V TH , BV DS , and drain current drivability, of the two different kinds of fabricated devices, with cell design and density in TDMOSFETs were also studied. The BV DS and the V TH in the stripe-type TDMOSFET were 110 and 3 V, respectively. However, the V TH of mesh-type device was smaller 0.5 V than that of stripe-type because of corner effect. The BV DS improved about 20 V compared to stripe-type TDMOSFET due to edge termination, and the maximum drain current (I D.MAX ) was improved by about 10% due to an increase in the gate width at the same chip size. These effects were reflected in devices with different cell densities. When the cell density was increased, however

  7. Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Zachara, John M.

    2011-12-14

    Rigorous numerical description of multi-species diffusion requires coupling of species, charge, and aqueous and surface complexation reactions that collectively affect diffusive fluxes. The applicability of a fully coupled diffusion model is, however, often constrained by the availability of species self-diffusion coefficients, as well as by computational complication for imposing charge conservation. In this study, several diffusion models with variable complexity in charge and species coupling were formulated and compared to describe reactive multi-species diffusion in groundwater. Diffusion of uranyl [U(VI)] species was used as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the models in describing multi-species diffusion. Numerical simulations found that a diffusion model with a single, common diffusion coefficient for all species was sufficient to describe multi-species U(VI) diffusion under steady-state condition of major chemical composition, but not under transient chemical conditions. Simulations revealed that a fully coupled diffusion model can be well approximated by a component-based diffusion model, which considers difference in diffusion coefficients between chemical components, but not between the species within each chemical component. This treatment significantly enhanced computational efficiency at the expense of minor charge conservation. The charge balance in the component-based diffusion model can be rigorously enforced, if necessary, by adding an artificial kinetic reaction term induced by the charge separation. The diffusion models were applied to describe U(VI) diffusive mass transfer in intragranular domains in two sediments collected from US Department of Energy's Hanford 300A where intragrain diffusion is a rate-limiting process controlling U(VI) adsorption and desorption. The grain-scale reactive diffusion model was able to describe U(VI) adsorption/desorption kinetics that has been described using a semi-empirical, multi-rate model

  8. The relationship between node degree and dissipation rate in networks of diffusively coupled oscillators and its significance for pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Gosak, Marko; Stožer, Andraž; Markovič, Rene; Dolenšek, Jurij; Marhl, Marko; Rupnik, Marjan Slak; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-07-01

    Self-sustained oscillatory dynamics is a motion along a stable limit cycle in the phase space, and it arises in a wide variety of mechanical, electrical, and biological systems. Typically, oscillations are due to a balance between energy dissipation and generation. Their stability depends on the properties of the attractor, in particular, its dissipative characteristics, which in turn determine the flexibility of a given dynamical system. In a network of oscillators, the coupling additionally contributes to the dissipation, and hence affects the robustness of the oscillatory solution. Here, we therefore investigate how a heterogeneous network structure affects the dissipation rate of individual oscillators. First, we show that in a network of diffusively coupled oscillators, the dissipation is a linearly decreasing function of the node degree, and we demonstrate this numerically by calculating the average divergence of coupled Hopf oscillators. Subsequently, we use recordings of intracellular calcium dynamics in pancreatic beta cells in mouse acute tissue slices and the corresponding functional connectivity networks for an experimental verification of the presented theory. We use methods of nonlinear time series analysis to reconstruct the phase space and calculate the sum of Lyapunov exponents. Our analysis reveals a clear tendency of cells with a higher degree, that is, more interconnected cells, having more negative values of divergence, thus confirming our theoretical predictions. We discuss these findings in the context of energetic aspects of signaling in beta cells and potential risks for pathological changes in the tissue. PMID:26232966

  9. The role of external electric fields in enhancing ion mobility, drift velocity, and drift-diffusion rates in aqueous electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, Sohail

    2011-03-01

    Molecular simulations have been carried out using the method of molecular dynamics to investigate the role of external electric fields on the ion mobility, drift velocity, and drift-diffusion rate of ions in aqueous electrolyte solutions. These properties are critical for a range of processes including electrodialysis, electro-deionization, electrophoresis, and electroosmosis. Our results show that external electric fields relax the hydrated ion structure at significantly larger time scales (between 300 and 800 ps), than most other relaxation processes in solutions (generally of the order of 1 ps). Previous studies that did not account for the much longer relaxation times did not observe this behavior for ions even with very high electric fields. External electric fields must also overcome several (at least two or more) activation energy barriers to significantly change the structure of hydrated ions. As a result, the dynamic behavior changes almost in bands as a function of electric field strengths, rather than linearly. Finally, the effect of the field is much less dramatic on water than the ions. Thus electric fields will be of more significance in processes that involve the transport of ions (such as electro-deionization) than the transport of water (electroosmosis).

  10. The relationship between node degree and dissipation rate in networks of diffusively coupled oscillators and its significance for pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Gosak, Marko; Stožer, Andraž; Markovič, Rene; Dolenšek, Jurij; Marhl, Marko; Rupnik, Marjan Slak; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-07-01

    Self-sustained oscillatory dynamics is a motion along a stable limit cycle in the phase space, and it arises in a wide variety of mechanical, electrical, and biological systems. Typically, oscillations are due to a balance between energy dissipation and generation. Their stability depends on the properties of the attractor, in particular, its dissipative characteristics, which in turn determine the flexibility of a given dynamical system. In a network of oscillators, the coupling additionally contributes to the dissipation, and hence affects the robustness of the oscillatory solution. Here, we therefore investigate how a heterogeneous network structure affects the dissipation rate of individual oscillators. First, we show that in a network of diffusively coupled oscillators, the dissipation is a linearly decreasing function of the node degree, and we demonstrate this numerically by calculating the average divergence of coupled Hopf oscillators. Subsequently, we use recordings of intracellular calcium dynamics in pancreatic beta cells in mouse acute tissue slices and the corresponding functional connectivity networks for an experimental verification of the presented theory. We use methods of nonlinear time series analysis to reconstruct the phase space and calculate the sum of Lyapunov exponents. Our analysis reveals a clear tendency of cells with a higher degree, that is, more interconnected cells, having more negative values of divergence, thus confirming our theoretical predictions. We discuss these findings in the context of energetic aspects of signaling in beta cells and potential risks for pathological changes in the tissue.

  11. Diffusion coefficients significant in modeling the absorption rate of carbon dioxide into aqueous blends of N-methyldiethanolamine and diethanolamine and of hydrogen sulfide into aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.E.; Marshall, T.L.; Rowley, R.L.

    1998-07-01

    Absorption rates of gaseous CO{sub 2} into aqueous blends of N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and diethanolamine (DEA) and of gaseous H{sub 2}S into aqueous MDEA were measured in a quiescent, inverted-tube diffusiometer by monitoring the rate of pressure drop. A numerical model for absorption, diffusion, and reaction of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S in blends of MDEA, DEA, and water was developed. The model was used to regress diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate, carbamate, and MDEAH{sub 2}CO{sub 3} for the case of CO{sub 2} absorption and of bisulfide ion for the case of H{sub 2}S absorption from measured absorption rates. CO{sub 2} absorption rates and diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate, carbamate, and MDEAH{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were obtained at 298.2 K and 318.2 K in aqueous solutions containing 50 mass % total amine at DEA:MDEA mole ratios of 1:20, 1:4, 1L3, and 2:3. H{sub 2}S absorption rates and diffusion coefficients of bisulfide ion were obtained at 298.2 K and 318.2 K in aqueous solutions containing 20, 35, and 50 mass % MDEA.

  12. Absolute Income, Relative Income, and Happiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Richard; Chernova, Kateryna

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses data from the World Values Survey to investigate how an individual's self-reported happiness is related to (i) the level of her income in absolute terms, and (ii) the level of her income relative to other people in her country. The main findings are that (i) both absolute and relative income are positively and significantly…

  13. Investigating Absolute Value: A Real World Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret; Pagni, David

    2009-01-01

    Making connections between various representations is important in mathematics. In this article, the authors discuss the numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of sums of absolute values of linear functions. The initial explanations are accessible to all students who have experience graphing and who understand that absolute value simply…

  14. Preschoolers' Success at Coding Absolute Size Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, James

    1980-01-01

    Forty-five 2-year-old and forty-five 3-year-old children coded relative and absolute sizes using 1.5-inch, 6-inch, and 18-inch cardboard squares. Results indicate that absolute coding is possible for children of this age. (Author/RH)

  15. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  16. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    DOEpatents

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  17. Estimating the absolute wealth of households

    PubMed Central

    Gerkey, Drew; Hadley, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the absolute wealth of households using data from demographic and health surveys. Methods We developed a new metric, the absolute wealth estimate, based on the rank of each surveyed household according to its material assets and the assumed shape of the distribution of wealth among surveyed households. Using data from 156 demographic and health surveys in 66 countries, we calculated absolute wealth estimates for households. We validated the method by comparing the proportion of households defined as poor using our estimates with published World Bank poverty headcounts. We also compared the accuracy of absolute versus relative wealth estimates for the prediction of anthropometric measures. Findings The median absolute wealth estimates of 1 403 186 households were 2056 international dollars per capita (interquartile range: 723–6103). The proportion of poor households based on absolute wealth estimates were strongly correlated with World Bank estimates of populations living on less than 2.00 United States dollars per capita per day (R2 = 0.84). Absolute wealth estimates were better predictors of anthropometric measures than relative wealth indexes. Conclusion Absolute wealth estimates provide new opportunities for comparative research to assess the effects of economic resources on health and human capital, as well as the long-term health consequences of economic change and inequality. PMID:26170506

  18. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  19. Overspecification of color, pattern, and size: salience, absoluteness, and consistency

    PubMed Central

    Tarenskeen, Sammie; Broersma, Mirjam; Geurts, Bart

    2015-01-01

    The rates of overspecification of color, pattern, and size are compared, to investigate how salience and absoluteness contribute to the production of overspecification. Color and pattern are absolute and salient attributes, whereas size is relative and less salient. Additionally, a tendency toward consistent responses is assessed. Using a within-participants design, we find similar rates of color and pattern overspecification, which are both higher than the rate of size overspecification. Using a between-participants design, however, we find similar rates of pattern and size overspecification, which are both lower than the rate of color overspecification. This indicates that although many speakers are more likely to include color than pattern (probably because color is more salient), they may also treat pattern like color due to a tendency toward consistency. We find no increase in size overspecification when the salience of size is increased, suggesting that speakers are more likely to include absolute than relative attributes. However, we do find an increase in size overspecification when mentioning the attributes is triggered, which again shows that speakers tend to refer in a consistent manner, and that there are circumstances in which even size overspecification is frequently produced. PMID:26594190

  20. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  1. Orion Absolute Navigation System Progress and Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The absolute navigation design of NASA's Orion vehicle is described. It has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to benchmark the current state of the design and some of the rationale and analysis behind it. There are specific challenges to address when preparing a timely and effective design for the Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1), while still looking ahead and providing software extensibility for future exploration missions. The primary onboard measurements in a Near-Earth or Mid-Earth environment consist of GPS pseudo-range and delta-range, but for future explorations missions the use of star-tracker and optical navigation sources need to be considered. Discussions are presented for state size and composition, processing techniques, and consider states. A presentation is given for the processing technique using the computationally stable and robust UDU formulation with an Agee-Turner Rank-One update. This allows for computational savings when dealing with many parameters which are modeled as slowly varying Gauss-Markov processes. Preliminary analysis shows up to a 50% reduction in computation versus a more traditional formulation. Several state elements are discussed and evaluated, including position, velocity, attitude, clock bias/drift, and GPS measurement biases in addition to bias, scale factor, misalignment, and non-orthogonalities of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Another consideration is the initialization of the EKF in various scenarios. Scenarios such as single-event upset, ground command, and cold start are discussed as are strategies for whole and partial state updates as well as covariance considerations. Strategies are given for dealing with latent measurements and high-rate propagation using multi-rate architecture. The details of the rate groups and the data ow between the elements is discussed and evaluated.

  2. Li diffusion in zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.

    2010-09-01

    Diffusion of Li under anhydrous conditions at 1 atm and under fluid-present elevated pressure (1.0-1.2 GPa) conditions has been measured in natural zircon. The source of diffusant for 1-atm experiments was ground natural spodumene, which was sealed under vacuum in silica glass capsules with polished slabs of zircon. An experiment using a Dy-bearing source was also conducted to evaluate possible rate-limiting effects on Li diffusion of slow-diffusing REE+3 that might provide charge balance. Diffusion experiments performed in the presence of H2O-CO2 fluid were run in a piston-cylinder apparatus, using a source consisting of a powdered mixture of spodumene, quartz and zircon with oxalic acid added to produce H2O-CO2 fluid. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) with the resonant nuclear reaction 7Li(p,γ)8Be was used to measure diffusion profiles for the experiments. The following Arrhenius parameters were obtained for Li diffusion normal to the c-axis over the temperature range 703-1.151°C at 1 atm for experiments run with the spodumene source: D_{text{Li}} = 7.17 × 10^{ - 7} { exp }( - 275 ± 11 {text{kJmol}}^{ - 1} /{text{RT}}){text{m}}2 {text{s}}^{ - 1}. Diffusivities are similar for transport parallel to the c-axis, indicating little anisotropy for Li diffusion in zircon. Similar Li diffusivities were also found for experiments run under fluid-present conditions and for the experiment run with the Dy-bearing source. Li diffusion is considerably faster than diffusion of other cations in zircon, with a smaller activation energy for diffusion. Although Li diffusion in zircon is comparatively rapid, zircons will be moderately retentive of Li signatures at mid-crustal metamorphic temperatures, but they are unlikely to retain this information for geologically significant times under high-grade metamorphism.

  3. On the Absolute Continuity of the Blackwell Measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bárány, Balázs; Kolossváry, István

    2015-04-01

    In 1957, Blackwell expressed the entropy of hidden Markov chains using a measure which can be characterised as an invariant measure for an iterated function system with place-dependent weights. This measure, called the Blackwell measure, plays a central role in understanding the entropy rate and other important characteristics of fundamental models in information theory. We show that for a suitable set of parameter values the Blackwell measure is absolutely continuous for almost every parameter in the case of binary symmetric channels.

  4. Absolute magnitudes of trans-neptunian objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffard, R.; Alvarez-candal, A.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Ortiz, J. L.; Morales, N.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Thirouin, A.

    2015-10-01

    Accurate measurements of diameters of trans- Neptunian objects are extremely complicated to obtain. Radiomatric techniques applied to thermal measurements can provide good results, but precise absolute magnitudes are needed to constrain diameters and albedos. Our objective is to measure accurate absolute magnitudes for a sample of trans- Neptunian objects, many of which have been observed, and modelled, by the "TNOs are cool" team, one of Herschel Space Observatory key projects grantes with ~ 400 hours of observing time. We observed 56 objects in filters V and R, if possible. These data, along with data available in the literature, was used to obtain phase curves and to measure absolute magnitudes by assuming a linear trend of the phase curves and considering magnitude variability due to rotational light-curve. In total we obtained 234 new magnitudes for the 56 objects, 6 of them with no reported previous measurements. Including the data from the literature we report a total of 109 absolute magnitudes.

  5. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  6. The Simplicity Argument and Absolute Morality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the author has maintained that there is a similarity of thought to be found in the writings of Cudworth, Emerson, and Husserl in his investigation of an absolute system of morality. (Author/RK)

  7. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  8. Continuous fluorescence microphotolysis of anthracene-labeled phospholipids in membranes. Theoretical approach of the simultaneous determination of their photodimerization and lateral diffusion rates.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrières, X; Lopez, A; Altibelli, A; Dupou-Cezanne, L; Lagouanelle, J L; Tocanne, J F

    1989-01-01

    Anthracene is a fluorescent and photoactivatable (dimerization) group which can be used for investigating the lateral distribution and dynamics of lipids in membranes. In fluorescence recovery after photobleaching or in microphotolysis experiments, and when using this fluorophore, the bleaching (or microphotolysis) step in the illuminated part of the membrane is in fact the sum of two antagonistic processes: fluorescence decay, which is due to dimerization of anthracene residues, and fluorescence recovery, which is due to a diffusion mediated exchange of bleached and unbleached particles between the illuminated and diffusion area in the membrane. Here, we propose a new mathematical algorithm that enables such a second-order reaction-diffusion process to be analyzed. After coupling a fluorescence recovery step to a microphotolysis step, this algorithm allows us to calculate the lateral diffusion coefficient D and the photodimerization constant K of anthracene-labeled lipids in membranes, two parameters which contribute to the understanding of the fluidity of the lipid phase in membranes. This algorithm also provides us with a complete description of the anthracene-labeled molecules distribution in the illuminated and diffusion area, at any time of the experiment. The fluorescence recovery after microphotolysis procedure we propose was tested with an anthracene-labeled phosphatidylcholine inserted in egg-phosphatidylcholine multilayers, in monolayers adsorbed onto alkylated glass surfaces and in the plasma membrane of Chinese hamster ovary cells. It is shown that this procedure can also be used to evaluate the important parameters of probe mobile fraction and to determine the relative size of the illuminated and diffusion areas. This will enable membranes to be explored in terms of microdomains and/or macrodomains. PMID:2765646

  9. Absolute determination of local tropospheric OH concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armerding, Wolfgang; Comes, Franz-Josef

    1994-01-01

    Long path absorption (LPA) according to Lambert Beer's law is a method to determine absolute concentrations of trace gases such as tropospheric OH. We have developed a LPA instrument which is based on a rapid tuning of the light source which is a frequency doubled dye laser. The laser is tuned across two or three OH absorption features around 308 nm with a scanning speed of 0.07 cm(exp -1)/microsecond and a repetition rate of 1.3 kHz. This high scanning speed greatly reduces the fluctuation of the light intensity caused by the atmosphere. To obtain the required high sensitivity the laser output power is additionally made constant and stabilized by an electro-optical modulator. The present sensitivity is of the order of a few times 10(exp 5) OH per cm(exp 3) for an acquisition time of a minute and an absorption path length of only 1200 meters so that a folding of the optical path in a multireflection cell was possible leading to a lateral dimension of the cell of a few meters. This allows local measurements to be made. Tropospheric measurements have been carried out in 1991 resulting in the determination of OH diurnal variation at specific days in late summer. Comparison with model calculations have been made. Interferences are mainly due to SO2 absorption. The problem of OH self generation in the multireflection cell is of minor extent. This could be shown by using different experimental methods. The minimum-maximum signal to noise ratio is about 8 x 10(exp -4) for a single scan. Due to the small size of the absorption cell the realization of an open air laboratory is possible in which by use of an additional UV light source or by additional fluxes of trace gases the chemistry can be changed under controlled conditions allowing kinetic studies of tropospheric photochemistry to be made in open air.

  10. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed.

  11. Enumeration of absolute cell counts using immunophenotypic techniques.

    PubMed

    Mandy, F; Brando, B

    2001-05-01

    Absolute counting of cells or cell subsets has a number of significant clinical applications: monitoring the disease status of HIV-infected patients, enumerating residual white blood cells in leukoreduced blood products, and assessing immunodeficiency in a variety of situations. The single-platform method (flow cytometry alone) has emerged as the method of choice for absolute cell enumeration. This technology counts only the cells of interest in a precisely determined blood volume. Exact cell identification is accomplished by a logical electronic gating algorithm capable of identifying lineage-specific immunofluorescent markers. Exclusion of unwanted cells is automatic. This extensive and detailed unit presents protocols for both volumetric and flow-rate determination of residual white blood cells and of leukocyte subsets. PMID:18770719

  12. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  13. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonal Onset of Influenza in the Continental United States

    PubMed Central

    Shaman, Jeffrey; Pitzer, Virginia E.; Viboud, Cécile; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Lipsitch, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent reanalysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here, we extend these findings to the human population level, showing that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. PMID:20186267

  14. Cryogenic absolute radiometers as laboratory irradiance standards, remote sensing detectors, and pyroheliometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foukal, Peter V.; Hoyt, C.; Kochling, H.; Miller, P.

    1990-01-01

    The dramatic improvement in heat diffusivity of pure Cu at liquid-He temperatures makes possible very important advances in the absolute accuracy, reproducibility, sensitivity, and time constant of cryogenic electrical substitution radiometers (ESRs), relative to conventional ESRs. The design and characterization of a table-top cryogenic ESR now available for detector calibration work to the 0.01-percent level of absolute accuracy under laser illumination is discussed. A sensitive cryogenic ESR recently delivered to the NIST for radiometric calibrations of black bodies is also described, along with the design and testing of a very fast cryogenic ESR developed for NASA remote-sensing studies of the earth's radiation budget.

  15. Absolute calibration of a laser system for atmospheric probing.

    PubMed

    Hall, F F; Ageno, H Y

    1970-08-01

    In order to obtain quantitative data on the backscatter function from laser irradiance backscattered from the atmosphere, the ratio of power transmitted to power received must be accurately known. No absolute measurements of power, optical system transmittance, detector quantum efficiency, or electronic gain are necessarily required. The technique of measuring the power ratio by irradiating a smoked or painted target of known diffuse reflectance at a fixed range is used to calibrate a complete lidar system. The relative area of the output power pulse is monitored by a fast response photodiode, and the relative area of the returned pulse is also recorded after passing through a filter of known high optical density. It is essential to control the temperatures of the laser rod and receiver interference prefilter to ensure proper spectral matching. Field experience gained using this technique is described, and examples of calibration measurements and backscatter functions for smog and cirrus clouds are presented.

  16. Quantum theory allows for absolute maximal contextuality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Barbara; Cunha, Marcelo Terra; Cabello, Adán

    2015-12-01

    Contextuality is a fundamental feature of quantum theory and a necessary resource for quantum computation and communication. It is therefore important to investigate how large contextuality can be in quantum theory. Linear contextuality witnesses can be expressed as a sum S of n probabilities, and the independence number α and the Tsirelson-like number ϑ of the corresponding exclusivity graph are, respectively, the maximum of S for noncontextual theories and for the theory under consideration. A theory allows for absolute maximal contextuality if it has scenarios in which ϑ /α approaches n . Here we show that quantum theory allows for absolute maximal contextuality despite what is suggested by the examination of the quantum violations of Bell and noncontextuality inequalities considered in the past. Our proof is not constructive and does not single out explicit scenarios. Nevertheless, we identify scenarios in which quantum theory allows for almost-absolute-maximal contextuality.

  17. Absolute calibration in vivo measurement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kruchten, D.A.; Hickman, D.P.

    1991-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating a new method for obtaining absolute calibration factors for radiation measurement systems used to measure internally deposited radionuclides in vivo. Absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems will eliminate the need to generate a series of human surrogate structures (i.e., phantoms) for calibrating in vivo measurement systems. The absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems utilizes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to define physiological structure, size, and composition. The MRI image provides a digitized representation of the physiological structure, which allows for any mathematical distribution of radionuclides within the body. Using Monte Carlo transport codes, the emission spectrum from the body is predicted. The in vivo measurement equipment is calibrated using the Monte Carlo code and adjusting for the intrinsic properties of the detection system. The calibration factors are verified using measurements of existing phantoms and previously obtained measurements of human volunteers. 8 refs.

  18. Stimulus probability effects in absolute identification.

    PubMed

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of presentation probability on both proportion correct and response times. The effects were moderated by the ubiquitous stimulus position effect. The accuracy and response time data were predicted by an exemplar-based model of perceptual cognition (Kent & Lamberts, 2005). The bow in discriminability was also attenuated when presentation probability for middle items was relatively high, an effect that will constrain future model development. The study provides evidence for item-specific learning in absolute identification. Implications for other theories of absolute identification are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. Quantitative standards for absolute linguistic universals.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Steven T; Gibson, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Absolute linguistic universals are often justified by cross-linguistic analysis: If all observed languages exhibit a property, the property is taken to be a likely universal, perhaps specified in the cognitive or linguistic systems of language learners and users. In many cases, these patterns are then taken to motivate linguistic theory. Here, we show that cross-linguistic analysis will very rarely be able to statistically justify absolute, inviolable patterns in language. We formalize two statistical methods--frequentist and Bayesian--and show that in both it is possible to find strict linguistic universals, but that the numbers of independent languages necessary to do so is generally unachievable. This suggests that methods other than typological statistics are necessary to establish absolute properties of human language, and thus that many of the purported universals in linguistics have not received sufficient empirical justification.

  20. Absolute photoacoustic thermometry in deep tissue.

    PubMed

    Yao, Junjie; Ke, Haixin; Tai, Stephen; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-12-15

    Photoacoustic thermography is a promising tool for temperature measurement in deep tissue. Here we propose an absolute temperature measurement method based on the dual temperature dependences of the Grüneisen parameter and the speed of sound in tissue. By taking ratiometric measurements at two adjacent temperatures, we can eliminate the factors that are temperature irrelevant but difficult to correct for in deep tissue. To validate our method, absolute temperatures of blood-filled tubes embedded ~9 mm deep in chicken tissue were measured in a biologically relevant range from 28°C to 46°C. The temperature measurement accuracy was ~0.6°C. The results suggest that our method can be potentially used for absolute temperature monitoring in deep tissue during thermotherapy.

  1. Molecular iodine absolute frequencies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, C.J.

    1990-06-25

    Fifty specified lines of {sup 127}I{sub 2} were studied by Doppler-free frequency modulation spectroscopy. For each line the classification of the molecular transition was determined, hyperfine components were identified, and one well-resolved component was selected for precise determination of its absolute frequency. In 3 cases, a nearby alternate line was selected for measurement because no well-resolved component was found for the specified line. Absolute frequency determinations were made with an estimated uncertainty of 1.1 MHz by locking a dye laser to the selected hyperfine component and measuring its wave number with a high-precision Fabry-Perot wavemeter. For each line results of the absolute measurement, the line classification, and a Doppler-free spectrum are given.

  2. Absolute Stability And Hyperstability In Hilbert Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John Ting-Yung

    1989-01-01

    Theorems on stabilities of feedback control systems proved. Paper presents recent developments regarding theorems of absolute stability and hyperstability of feedforward-and-feedback control system. Theorems applied in analysis of nonlinear, adaptive, and robust control. Extended to provide sufficient conditions for stability in system including nonlinear feedback subsystem and linear time-invariant (LTI) feedforward subsystem, state space of which is Hilbert space, and input and output spaces having finite numbers of dimensions. (In case of absolute stability, feedback subsystem memoryless and possibly time varying. For hyperstability, feedback system dynamical system.)

  3. The diffusion of ions in unconsolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Diffusion in unconsolidated sediments generally proceeds at rates ranging from half to one twentieth of those applying to diffusion of ions and molecules in free solution. Diffusion rates are predictable with respect to porosity and path tortuosity in host sediments, and can be conveniently measured by determinations of electrical resistivity on bulk sediment samples. Net ion flux is further influenced by reactions of diffusing species with enclosing sediments, but such influences should not be confused with or lumped with diffusion processes. ?? 1970.

  4. Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Zachara, John M.

    2011-12-01

    , where intragranular diffusion is a rate-limiting process controlling U(VI) adsorption and desorption. The grain-scale reactive diffusion model was able to describe U(VI) adsorption/desorption kinetics that had been previously described using a semiempirical, multirate model. Compared with the multirate model, the diffusion models have the advantage to provide spatiotemporal speciation evolution within the diffusion domains.

  5. Absolute Points for Multiple Assignment Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adlakha, V.; Kowalski, K.

    2006-01-01

    An algorithm is presented to solve multiple assignment problems in which a cost is incurred only when an assignment is made at a given cell. The proposed method recursively searches for single/group absolute points to identify cells that must be loaded in any optimal solution. Unlike other methods, the first solution is the optimal solution. The…

  6. Absolute partial photoionization cross sections of ozone.

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Chemistry

    2008-04-01

    Despite the current concerns about ozone, absolute partial photoionization cross sections for this molecule in the vacuum ultraviolet (valence) region have been unavailable. By eclectic re-evaluation of old/new data and plausible assumptions, such cross sections have been assembled to fill this void.

  7. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  8. Teaching Absolute Value Inequalities to Mature Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierpinska, Anna; Bobos, Georgeana; Pruncut, Andreea

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an account of a teaching experiment on absolute value inequalities, whose aim was to identify characteristics of an approach that would realize the potential of the topic to develop theoretical thinking in students enrolled in prerequisite mathematics courses at a large, urban North American university. The potential is…

  9. Solving Absolute Value Equations Algebraically and Geometrically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiyuan, Wei

    2005-01-01

    The way in which students can improve their comprehension by understanding the geometrical meaning of algebraic equations or solving algebraic equation geometrically is described. Students can experiment with the conditions of the absolute value equation presented, for an interesting way to form an overall understanding of the concept.

  10. Increasing Capacity: Practice Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Pennie; Donkin, Christopher; Brown, Scott D.; Heathcote, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In most of the long history of the study of absolute identification--since Miller's (1956) seminal article--a severe limit on performance has been observed, and this limit has resisted improvement even by extensive practice. In a startling result, Rouder, Morey, Cowan, and Pfaltz (2004) found substantially improved performance with practice in the…

  11. Absolute Radiometric Calibration Of The Thematic Mapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, P. N.; Biggar, S. F.; Holm, R. G.; Jackson, R. D.; Mao, Y.; Moran, M. S.; Palmer, J. M.; Yuan, B.

    1986-11-01

    The results are presented of five in-flight absolute radiometric calibrations, made in the period July 1984 to November 1985, at White Sands, New Mexico, of the solar reflective bands of the Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) . The 23 bandcalibrations made on the five dates show a ± 2.8% RMS variation from the mean as a percentage of the mean.

  12. On Relative and Absolute Conviction in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Keith; Mejia-Ramos, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Conviction is a central construct in mathematics education research on justification and proof. In this paper, we claim that it is important to distinguish between absolute conviction and relative conviction. We argue that researchers in mathematics education frequently have not done so and this has lead to researchers making unwarranted claims…

  13. Effects of H2O, CO2, and N2 air contaminants on critical airside strain rates for extinction of hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.; Wilson, L. G.; Guerra, Rosemary

    1989-01-01

    Dish-shaped counterflow diffusion flames centered by opposing laminar jets of H2 and clean and contaminant O2/N2 mixtures in an argon bath at 1 atm were used to study the effects of contaminants on critical airside strain. The jet velocities for both flame extinction and restoration are found for a wide range of contaminant and O2 concentrations in the air jet. The tests are also conducted for a variety of input H2 concentrations. The results are compared with those from several other studies.

  14. Combined Use of Absolute and Differential Seismic Arrival Time Data to Improve Absolute Event Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, S.; Johannesson, G.

    2012-12-01

    Arrival time measurements based on waveform cross correlation are becoming more common as advanced signal processing methods are applied to seismic data archives and real-time data streams. Waveform correlation can precisely measure the time difference between the arrival of two phases, and differential time data can be used to constrain relative location of events. Absolute locations are needed for many applications, which generally requires the use of absolute time data. Current methods for measuring absolute time data are approximately two orders of magnitude less precise than differential time measurements. To exploit the strengths of both absolute and differential time data, we extend our multiple-event location method Bayesloc, which previously used absolute time data only, to include the use of differential time measurements that are based on waveform cross correlation. Fundamentally, Bayesloc is a formulation of the joint probability over all parameters comprising the multiple event location system. The Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method is used to sample from the joint probability distribution given arrival data sets. The differential time component of Bayesloc includes scaling a stochastic estimate of differential time measurement precision based the waveform correlation coefficient for each datum. For a regional-distance synthetic data set with absolute and differential time measurement error of 0.25 seconds and 0.01 second, respectively, epicenter location accuracy is improved from and average of 1.05 km when solely absolute time data are used to 0.28 km when absolute and differential time data are used jointly (73% improvement). The improvement in absolute location accuracy is the result of conditionally limiting absolute location probability regions based on the precise relative position with respect to neighboring events. Bayesloc estimates of data precision are found to be accurate for the synthetic test, with absolute and differential time measurement

  15. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-03

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  16. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2008-10-21

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  17. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-17

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  18. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-10-02

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  19. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2009-09-01

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  20. A computational investigation of the effect of alloying elements on the thermodynamic and diffusion properties of fcc nickel alloys, with application to the creep rate of dilute nickel-X alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacherl, Chelsey L.

    In this dissertation, two computational techniques have been employed to understand the alloying effects of various transition elements in Ni and its alloys. To aid in the process of narrowing down the large composition space for the design of future Ni-base superalloys, a thermodynamic model using the CALPHAD approach is developed, where Gibbs energy functions of individual phases are parameterized based on fittings to experimentally measured phase equilibria or thermochemical data and computationally predicted thermochemical data. Multi-component Ni-base superalloys can be accurately described within the CALPHAD approach through the extrapolation of the Gibbs energy functions of the simpler sub-systems which are modeled where experimental and computational data is usually more abundant. The Re-Y and Re-Ti systems, integral binary alloy systems in the Ni-base superalloy database, are modeled in the present work. In addition to studying thermodynamic and phase stability properties of Ni-base superalloys, this thesis also highlights the importance of the kinetic properties of these materials through their diffusion coefficients. Vacancy mediated self-diffusion coefficients are calculated on ferromagnetic and non-magnetic fcc Ni as a function of temperature. Within Eyring’s reaction rate theory, minimum energy pathways for the diffusing atom is calculated using the Nudged Elastic Band method. The present work demonstrates that the mid-row 5d transition row element impurities have the highest activation barriers for impurity diffusion, and subsequently are the slowest diffusers in Ni. The fastest diffusers in Ni coupled with the lowest activation barriers for impurity diffusion are demonstrated to be at the far left of the 3d and 4d transition element rows on the periodic table. The present work also demonstrates that the primary mechanism driving the variation in the impurity diffusion coefficient from element to element is the migration barrier for impurity

  1. An Effective Continuum Model for the Liquid-to-Gas Phase Change in a Porous Medium Driven by Solute Diffusion: I. Constant Pressure Decline Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N.; Yortsos, Yanis C.

    2001-08-15

    This report, focuses on the isothermal gas phase growth from a supersaturated, slightly compressible, binary liquid in a porous medium. This is driven by mass transfer, the extent of which is controlled by the application of either a constant-rate decline of the system pressure or the withdrawal of the liquid at a constant rate. This report deals with the first process. Pressure depletion due to constant-rate liquid withdrawal is analyzed in a companion report .

  2. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  3. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum. PMID:25423049

  4. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  5. Impact of Winko on absolute discharges.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, Krishna; Swaminath, Sam; Litman, Larry C

    2004-01-01

    In Canada, case laws have had a significant impact on the way mentally ill offenders are managed, both in the criminal justice system and in the forensic mental health system. The Supreme Court of Canada's decision with respect to Winko has set a major precedent in the application of the test of significant risk to the safety of the public in making dispositions by the Ontario Review Board and granting absolute discharges to the mentally ill offenders in the forensic health system. Our study examines the impact of the Supreme Court of Canada's decision before and after Winko. The results show that the numbers of absolute discharges have increased post-Winko, which was statistically significant, but there could be other factors influencing this increase.

  6. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  7. Absolute-magnitude distributions of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Dean; Wright, John; Jenkins III, Robert L.; Maddox, Larry

    2014-05-01

    The absolute-magnitude distributions of seven supernova (SN) types are presented. The data used here were primarily taken from the Asiago Supernova Catalogue, but were supplemented with additional data. We accounted for both foreground and host-galaxy extinction. A bootstrap method is used to correct the samples for Malmquist bias. Separately, we generate volume-limited samples, restricted to events within 100 Mpc. We find that the superluminous events (M{sub B} < –21) make up only about 0.1% of all SNe in the bias-corrected sample. The subluminous events (M{sub B} > –15) make up about 3%. The normal Ia distribution was the brightest with a mean absolute blue magnitude of –19.25. The IIP distribution was the dimmest at –16.75.

  8. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    SciTech Connect

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Romano, F.; Carpinelli, M.; Presti, D. Lo; Raffaele, L.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Sacchi, R.; Monaco, V.; Marchetto, F.; Giordanengo, S.

    2013-07-26

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  9. Hydrogen Diffusion in Forsterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demouchy, S.; Mackwell, S.

    2002-12-01

    Physical and chemical properties of Earth's mantle are readily modified by interaction with volatiles, such as water. Thus, characterization of solubility and kinetics of incorporation for water in nominally anhydrous minerals is important in order to understand the behavior of Earth's interior under hydrous conditions. Experimental studies on the olivine-water system indicate that significant amounts of OH can dissolve within olivine as point defects (Bell and Rossman, 1992; Kohlstedt et al. 1996). Extending Kohlstedt and Mackwell's (1998) work, our study concerns the kinetics of hydrogen transport in the iron-free olivine-water system. This study is based on hydrogenation of forsterite samples during piston-cylinder and TZM cold-seal vessel experiments. We use infrared analyses in order to constrain the speciation of the mobile water-derived defects in forsterite single-crystal sample, and the rates of diffusion of such species under uppermost mantle conditions (0.2 to 1.5 GPa, 900 to 1100° C). Hydrogen defect transport in single crystals of forsterite is investigated for diffusion parallel to each crystallographic axis. Defect diffusivities are obtained by fitting a diffusion law to the OH content as a function of position in the sample. Our current results indicate that incorporation of hydroxyl species into iron-free olivine is a one-stage process with hydrogen diffusion linked to magnesium vacancy self-diffusion DV, such that DV = D~/3 = 10-12 m2/s at 1000° C parallel to [001], where D~ represents the chemical diffusivity. Those diffusion rates are slightly lower than in iron-bearing olivine for the same incorporation mechanism. The different concentration profiles show a clear anisotropy of diffusion, with fastest diffusion parallel to [001] as in iron-bearing olivine. Thus, while hydrogen solubilities are dependent on iron content, the rate of incorporation of water-derived species in olivine is not strongly coupled to the concentration of iron. This

  10. Absolute photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.

    1985-01-01

    The absolute values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.

  11. Absolute photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The absolute values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.

  12. Relative errors can cue absolute visuomotor mappings.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Loes C J; Ernst, Marc O

    2015-12-01

    When repeatedly switching between two visuomotor mappings, e.g. in a reaching or pointing task, adaptation tends to speed up over time. That is, when the error in the feedback corresponds to a mapping switch, fast adaptation occurs. Yet, what is learned, the relative error or the absolute mappings? When switching between mappings, errors with a size corresponding to the relative difference between the mappings will occur more often than other large errors. Thus, we could learn to correct more for errors with this familiar size (Error Learning). On the other hand, it has been shown that the human visuomotor system can store several absolute visuomotor mappings (Mapping Learning) and can use associated contextual cues to retrieve them. Thus, when contextual information is present, no error feedback is needed to switch between mappings. Using a rapid pointing task, we investigated how these two types of learning may each contribute when repeatedly switching between mappings in the absence of task-irrelevant contextual cues. After training, we examined how participants changed their behaviour when a single error probe indicated either the often-experienced error (Error Learning) or one of the previously experienced absolute mappings (Mapping Learning). Results were consistent with Mapping Learning despite the relative nature of the error information in the feedback. This shows that errors in the feedback can have a double role in visuomotor behaviour: they drive the general adaptation process by making corrections possible on subsequent movements, as well as serve as contextual cues that can signal a learned absolute mapping. PMID:26280315

  13. The absolute spectrophotometric catalog by Anita Cochran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnashev, V. I.; Burnasheva, B. A.; Ruban, E. V.; Hagen-Torn, E. I.

    2014-06-01

    The absolute spectrophotometric catalog by Anita Cochran is presented in a machine-readable form. The catalog systematizes observations acquired at the McDonald Observatory in 1977-1978. The data are compared with other sources, in particular, the calculated broadband stellar magnitudes are compared with photometric observations by other authors, to show that the observational data given in the catalog are reliable and suitable for a variety of applications. Observations of variable stars of different types make Cochran's catalog especially valuable.

  14. Absolute magnitudes and kinematics of barium stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, A. E.; Luri, X.; Grenier, S.; Prevot, L.; Mennessier, M. O.; Figueras, F.; Torra, J.

    1997-03-01

    The absolute magnitude of barium stars has been obtained from kinematical data using a new algorithm based on the maximum-likelihood principle. The method allows to separate a sample into groups characterized by different mean absolute magnitudes, kinematics and z-scale heights. It also takes into account, simultaneously, the censorship in the sample and the errors on the observables. The method has been applied to a sample of 318 barium stars. Four groups have been detected. Three of them show a kinematical behaviour corresponding to disk population stars. The fourth group contains stars with halo kinematics. The luminosities of the disk population groups spread a large range. The intrinsically brightest one (M_v_=-1.5mag, σ_M_=0.5mag) seems to be an inhomogeneous group containing barium binaries as well as AGB single stars. The most numerous group (about 150 stars) has a mean absolute magnitude corresponding to stars in the red giant branch (M_v_=0.9mag, σ_M_=0.8mag). The third group contains barium dwarfs, the obtained mean absolute magnitude is characteristic of stars on the main sequence or on the subgiant branch (M_v_=3.3mag, σ_M_=0.5mag). The obtained mean luminosities as well as the kinematical results are compatible with an evolutionary link between barium dwarfs and classical barium giants. The highly luminous group is not linked with these last two groups. More high-resolution spectroscopic data will be necessary in order to better discriminate between barium and non-barium stars.

  15. Chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil.

    PubMed

    Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-10

    Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) absolute oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the absolute oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound. PMID:20070087

  16. Measurement of absolute gravity acceleration in Firenze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, M.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the University of Firenze (Italy). In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the Newtonian law at short distances are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. The only available datum, pertaining to the italian zero-order gravity network, was taken more than 20 years ago at a distance of more than 60 km from the study site. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 absolute gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The absolute accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are (980 492 160.6 ± 4.0) μGal and (980 492 048.3 ± 3.0) μGal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the absolute value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.

  17. A Methodology for Absolute Isotope Composition Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J. J.; Lee, D.; Liang, W.

    2007-12-01

    Double spike technique was a well defined method for isotope composition measurement by TIMS of samples which have natural mass fractionation effect, but it is still a problem to define the isotope composition for double spike itself. In this study, we modified the old double spike technique and found that we could use the modified technique to solve the ¡§true¡¨ isotope composition of double spike itself. According the true isotope composition of double spike, we can measure the absolute isotope composition if the sample has natural fractionation effect. A new vector analytical method has been developed in order to obtain the true isotopic composition of a 42Ca-48Ca double spike, and this is achieved by using two different sample-spike mixtures combined with the double spike and the natural Ca data. Because the natural sample, the two mixtures, and the spike should all lie on a single mixing line, we are able to constrain the true isotopic composition of our double spike using this new approach. This method not only can be used in Ca system but also in Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, Mo, Ba and Pb systems. The absolute double spike isotopic ratio is important, which can save a lot of time to check different reference standards. Especially for Pb, radiogenic isotope system, the decay systems embodied in three of four naturally occurring isotopes induce difficult to obtain true isotopic ratios for absolute dating.

  18. Chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil.

    PubMed

    Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-10

    Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) absolute oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the absolute oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound.

  19. The Carina Project: Absolute and Relative Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsi, C. E.; Bono, G.; Walker, A. R.; Brocato, E.; Buonanno, R.; Caputo, F.; Castellani, M.; Castellani, V.; Dall'Ora, M.; Marconi, M.; Monelli, M.; Nonino, M.; Pulone, L.; Ripepi, V.; Smith, H. A.

    We discuss the reduction strategy adopted to perform the relative and the absolute calibration of the Wide Field Imager (WFI) available at the 2.2m ESO/MPI telescope and of the Mosaic Camera (MC) available at the 4m CTIO Blanco telescope. To properly constrain the occurrence of deceptive systematic errors in the relative calibration we observed with each chip the same set of stars. Current photometry seems to suggest that the WFI shows a positional effect when moving from the top to the bottom of individual chips. Preliminary results based on an independent data set collected with the MC suggest that this camera is only marginally affected by the same problem. To perform the absolute calibration we observed with each chip the same set of standard stars. The sample covers a wide color range and the accuracy both in the B and in the V-band appears to be of the order of a few hundredths of magnitude. Finally, we briefly outline the observing strategy to improve both relative and absolute calibrations of mosaic CCD cameras.

  20. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  1. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  2. Photon diffusion in a homogeneous medium bounded externally or internally by an infinitely long circular cylindrical applicator. III. Synthetic study of continuous-wave photon fluence rate along unique spiral paths.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Anqi; Piao, Daqing; Bunting, Charles F

    2012-04-01

    This is Part III of the work that examines photon diffusion in a scattering-dominant medium enclosed by a "concave" circular cylindrical applicator or enclosing a "convex" circular cylindrical applicator. In Part II of this work Zhang et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A, 66 (2011)] predicted that, on the tissue-applicator interface of either "concave" or "convex" geometry, there exists a unique set of spiral paths, along which the steady-state photon fluence rate decays at a rate equal to that along a straight line on a planar semi-infinite interface, for the same line-of-sight source-detector distance. This phenomenon of steady-state photon diffusion is referred to as "straight-line-resembling-spiral paths" (abbreviated as "spiral paths"). This Part III study develops analytic approaches to the spiral paths associated with geometry of a large radial dimension and presents spiral paths found numerically for geometry of a small radial dimension. This Part III study also examines whether the spiral paths associated with a homogeneous medium are a good approximation for the medium containing heterogeneity. The heterogeneity is limited to an anomaly that is aligned azimuthally with the spiral paths and has either positive or negative contrast of the absorption or scattering coefficient over the background medium. For a weak-contrast anomaly the perturbation by it to the photon fluence rate along the spiral paths is found by applying a well-established perturbation analysis in cylindrical coordinates. For a strong-contrast anomaly the change by it to the photon fluence rate along the spiral paths is computed using the finite-element method. For the investigated heterogeneous-medium cases the photon fluence rate along the homogeneous-medium associated spiral paths is macroscopically indistinguishable from, and microscopically close to, that along a straight line on a planar semi-infinite interface.

  3. Transdermal diffusion of xenon in vitro using diffusion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovsky, A.; Petrov, E.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this research was to study the diffusion rate of xenon through guinea pig skin and how viscosity of cosmetic component capryl/capric triglyceride (CCT) facilitates to deliver xenon to surface of skin patches. They were placed in Franz cell for 24 hours and diffusion rate and permeability of xenon were calculated. Thus diffusion rate was 0.031 mg/hour*cm2 and permeability was 0.003 cm/hour. Using Brookfield viscometer it was shown that viscosity of CCT decreased upon increasing xenon concentration. Obtained results can be utilized in developing of new xenon containing drugs for topical administration.

  4. Landsat-7 ETM+ radiometric stability and absolute calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markham, B.L.; Barker, J.L.; Barsi, J.A.; Kaita, E.; Thome, K.J.; Helder, D.L.; Palluconi, Frank Don; Schott, J.R.; Scaramuzza, P.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Launched in April 1999, the Landsat-7 ETM+ instrument is in its fourth year of operation. The quality of the acquired calibrated imagery continues to be high, especially with respect to its three most important radiometric performance parameters: reflective band instrument stability to better than ??1%, reflective band absolute calibration to better than ??5%, and thermal band absolute calibration to better than ??0.6 K. The ETM+ instrument has been the most stable of any of the Landsat instruments, in both the reflective and thermal channels. To date, the best on-board calibration source for the reflective bands has been the Full Aperture Solar Calibrator, which has indicated changes of at most -1.8% to -2.0% (95% C.I.) change per year in the ETM+ gain (band 4). However, this change is believed to be caused by changes in the solar diffuser panel, as opposed to a change in the instrument's gain. This belief is based partially on ground observations, which bound the changes in gain in band 4 at -0.7% to +1.5%. Also, ETM+ stability is indicated by the monitoring of desert targets. These image-based results for four Saharan and Arabian sites, for a collection of 35 scenes over the three years since launch, bound the gain change at -0.7% to +0.5% in band 4. Thermal calibration from ground observations revealed an offset error of +0.31 W/m 2 sr um soon after launch. This offset was corrected within the U. S. ground processing system at EROS Data Center on 21-Dec-00, and since then, the band 6 on-board calibration has indicated changes of at most +0.02% to +0.04% (95% C.I.) per year. The latest ground observations have detected no remaining offset error with an RMS error of ??0.6 K. The stability and absolute calibration of the Landsat-7 ETM+ sensor make it an ideal candidate to be used as a reference source for radiometric cross-calibrating to other land remote sensing satellite systems.

  5. Landsat-7 ETM+ radiometric stability and absolute calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markham, Brian L.; Barker, John L.; Barsi, Julia A.; Kaita, Ed; Thome, Kurtis J.; Helder, Dennis L.; Palluconi, Frank D.; Schott, John R.; Scaramuzza, Pat

    2003-04-01

    Launched in April 1999, the Landsat-7 ETM+ instrument is in its fourth year of operation. The quality of the acquired calibrated imagery continues to be high, especially with respect to its three most important radiometric performance parameters: reflective band instrument stability to better than +/-1%, reflective band absolute calibration to better than +/-5%, and thermal band absolute calibration to better than +/- 0.6 K. The ETM+ instrument has been the most stable of any of the Landsat instruments, in both the reflective and thermal channels. To date, the best on-board calibration source for the reflective bands has been the Full Aperture Solar Calibrator, which has indicated changes of at most -1.8% to -2.0% (95% C.I.) change per year in the ETM+ gain (band 4). However, this change is believed to be caused by changes in the solar diffuser panel, as opposed to a change in the instrument's gain. This belief is based partially on ground observations, which bound the changes in gain in band 4 at -0.7% to +1.5%. Also, ETM+ stability is indicated by the monitoring of desert targets. These image-based results for four Saharan and Arabian sites, for a collection of 35 scenes over the three years since launch, bound the gain change at -0.7% to +0.5% in band 4. Thermal calibration from ground observations revealed an offset error of +0.31 W/m2 sr um soon after launch. This offset was corrected within the U. S. ground processing system at EROS Data Center on 21-Dec-00, and since then, the band 6 on-board calibration has indicated changes of at most +0.02% to +0.04% (95% C.I.) per year. The latest ground observations have detected no remaining offset error with an RMS error of +/- 0.6 K. The stability and absolute calibration of the Landsat-7 ETM+ sensor make it an ideal candidate to be used as a reference source for radiometric cross-calibrating to other land remote sensing satellite systems.

  6. Advanced manufacturing: Technology diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tesar, A.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we examine how manufacturing technology diffuses rom the developers of technology across national borders to those who do not have the capability or resources to develop advanced technology on their own. None of the wide variety of technology diffusion mechanisms discussed in this paper are new, yet the opportunities to apply these mechanisms are growing. A dramatic increase in technology diffusion occurred over the last decade. The two major trends which probably drive this increase are a worldwide inclination towards ``freer`` markets and diminishing isolation. Technology is most rapidly diffusing from the US In fact, the US is supplying technology for the rest of the world. The value of the technology supplied by the US more than doubled from 1985 to 1992 (see the Introduction for details). History shows us that technology diffusion is inevitable. It is the rates at which technologies diffuse to other countries which can vary considerably. Manufacturers in these countries are increasingly able to absorb technology. Their manufacturing efficiency is expected to progress as technology becomes increasingly available and utilized.

  7. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  8. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  9. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  10. Ammonia diffusion through Nalophan™ bags.

    PubMed

    Sironi, Selena; Eusebio, Lidia; Dentoni, Licinia; Capelli, Laura; Del Rosso, Renato

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the work is to verify the diffusion rate of ammonia through the Nalophan™ film that constitutes the sampling bag, considering storage times ranging from 1 to 26 h. The ammonia decay over time was evaluated using gas-chromatography for the quantification of ammonia concentration inside the bag. The research assesses the roles of both of ammonia and water concentration gradients at the polymeric film interface on the diffusion process. The results show that both the ammonia concentration gradient and, in a less pronounced way, the water concentration gradient are the main 'engines' of ammonia diffusion. Double bags seem to represent a simple solution for preventing ammonia losses during storage. Another interesting result concerns the role of the bag surface on the ammonia diffusion rate: the higher the surface/volume (S/V) ratio, the higher the ammonia diffusion rate through the polymeric film.

  11. Absolute calibration of the Auger fluorescence detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauleo, P.; Brack, J.; Garrard, L.; Harton, J.; Knapik, R.; Meyhandan, R.; Rovero, A.C.; Tamashiro, A.; Warner, D.

    2005-07-01

    Absolute calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors uses a light source at the telescope aperture. The technique accounts for the combined effects of all detector components in a single measurement. The calibrated 2.5 m diameter light source fills the aperture, providing uniform illumination to each pixel. The known flux from the light source and the response of the acquisition system give the required calibration for each pixel. In the lab, light source uniformity is studied using CCD images and the intensity is measured relative to NIST-calibrated photodiodes. Overall uncertainties are presently 12%, and are dominated by systematics.

  12. Characterization of the DARA solar absolute radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finsterle, W.; Suter, M.; Fehlmann, A.; Kopp, G.

    2011-12-01

    The Davos Absolute Radiometer (DARA) prototype is an Electrical Substitution Radiometer (ESR) which has been developed as a successor of the PMO6 type on future space missions and ground based TSI measurements. The DARA implements an improved thermal design of the cavity detector and heat sink assembly to minimize air-vacuum differences and to maximize thermal symmetry of measuring and compensating cavity. The DARA also employs an inverted viewing geometry to reduce internal stray light. We will report on the characterization and calibration experiments which were carried out at PMOD/WRC and LASP (TRF).

  13. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  14. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  15. Feasibility of interstitial diffuse optical tomography using cylindrical diffusing fiber for prostate PDT

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xing; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has been used to characterize spatial distribution of optical properties for prostate photodynamic therapy (PDT) dosimetry. We have developed an interstitial DOT method using cylindrical diffuse fibers (CDFs) as light sources, so that the same light sources can be used for both DOT measurement and PDT treatment. In this novel interstitial CDF-DOT method, absolute light fluence per source strength (in unit of 1/cm2) is used to separate absorption and scattering coefficients. A mathematical phantom and a solid prostate phantom including anomalies with known optical properties were used, respectively, to test the feasibility of reconstructing optical properties using interstitial CDF-DOT. Three dimension spatial distributions of the optical properties were reconstructed for both scenarios. Our studies show that absorption coefficient can be reliably extrapolated while there are some cross talks between absorption and scattering properties. Even with the suboptimal reduced scattering coefficients, the reconstructed light fluence rate agreed with the measured values to within ±10%, thus the proposed CDF-DOT allows greatly improved light dosimetry calculation for interstitial PDT. PMID:23629149

  16. Effects of H2O, CO2, and N2 Air Contaminants on Critical Airside Strain Rates for Extinction of Hydrogen-Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.; Guerra, Rosemary

    1989-01-01

    Coaxial tubular opposed jet burners (OJB) were used to form dish shaped counterflow diffusion flames (CFDF), centered by opposing laminar jets of H2, N2 and both clean and contaminated air (O2/N2 mixtures) in an argon bath at 1 atm. Jet velocities for flame extinction and restoration limits are shown versus wide ranges of contaminant and O2 concentrations in the air jet, and also input H2 concentration. Blowoff, a sudden breaking of CFDF to a stable ring shape, occurs in highly stretched stagnation flows and is generally believed to measure kinetically limited flame reactivity. Restore, a sudden restoration of central flame, is a relatively new phenomenon which exhibits a H2 dependent hysteresis from Blowoff. For 25 percent O2 air mixtures, mole for mole replacement of 25 percent N2 contaminant by steam increased U(air) or flame strength at Blowoff by about 5 percent. This result is consistent with laminar burning velocity results from analogous substitution of steam for N2 in a premixed stoichiometric H2-O2-N2 (or steam) flame, shown by Koroll and Mulpuru to promote a 10 percent increase in experimental and calculated laminar burning velocity, due to enhanced third body efficiency of water in: H + O2 + M yields HO2 + M. When the OJB results were compared with Liu and MacFarlane's experimental laminar burning velocity of premixed stoichiometric H2 + air + steam, a crossover occurred, i.e., steam enhanced OJB flame strength at extinction relative to laminar burning velocity.

  17. [Observations on the diffusion of hepatitis A and B virus during an epidemic in a Sicilian town with a high rate of infection].

    PubMed

    D'Amico, G; Dardanoni, L; Gulì, V; La Rosa, G; Palazzo, U; Pasta, L; Romano, N; Terrana, B; Vetro, S

    1979-01-31

    Epidemiological investigations were carried out during a viral hepatitis outbreak occurring in a Sicilian town of 30,000 inhabitants with poor sanitary standards, with the aim to study the mode of spread of HAV and HBV in conditions of high incidence of infections. HBsAg, anti HBs, anti HAV (RIA), HBeAg, anti HBe and anti HBc were investigated in serum samples from patients, their family contacts and from healthy individuals of different age groups. Morbidity was inferred from case notifications; search of unreported cases among school children, through the study of absenteeism, did not reveal further cases. In all 148 cases, occurred from August 1976 through July 1977 with a peak in January, 44% were under 5 and 93% under 10 years of age. All but 8 of 59 cases in which laboratory data were available were due to HAV. Anti HAV antibodies were highly prevalent in serum samples obtained in February through April 1977: 62% were positive in the 1 to 3 years age group, and more than 90% among school children. Prevalence of HBsAg was age and sex dependent, ranging from 4% to 15%; anti HBs was present in 8% of the children 1-10 years and in 30% or more in age groups 30-41 and over. It is suggested that direct contact between very young children was the main mode of spread of HAV, and inapparent cases the main source of infection, although ambient diffusion through water contamination could not ruled out. HBV was probably propagated mostly by intrafamilial spread with little overt pathology.

  18. Experimental results for absolute cylindrical wavefront testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, Patrick J.; Alatawi, Ayshah

    2014-09-01

    Applications for Cylindrical and near-cylindrical surfaces are ever-increasing. However, fabrication of high quality cylindrical surfaces is limited by the difficulty of accurate and affordable metrology. Absolute testing of such surfaces represents a challenge to the optical testing community as cylindrical reference wavefronts are difficult to produce. In this paper, preliminary results for a new method of absolute testing of cylindrical wavefronts are presented. The method is based on the merging of the random ball test method with the fiber optic reference test. The random ball test assumes a large number of interferograms of a good quality sphere with errors that are statistically distributed such that the average of the errors goes to zero. The fiber optic reference test utilizes a specially processed optical fiber to provide a clean high quality reference wave from an incident line focus from the cylindrical wave under test. By taking measurements at different rotation and translations of the fiber, an analogous procedure can be employed to determine the quality of the converging cylindrical wavefront with high accuracy. This paper presents and discusses the results of recent tests of this method using a null optic formed by a COTS cylindrical lens and a free-form polished corrector element.

  19. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  20. Why to compare absolute numbers of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the absolute number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to absolute mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations.

  1. Absolute Proper Motions of Southern Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinescu, D. I.; Girard, T. M.; van Altena, W. F.

    1996-05-01

    Our program involves the determination of absolute proper motions with respect to galaxies for a sample of globular clusters situated in the southern sky. The plates cover a 6(deg) x 6(deg) area and are taken with the 51-cm double astrograph at Cesco Observatory in El Leoncito, Argentina. We have developed special methods to deal with the modelling error of the plate transformation and we correct for magnitude equation using the cluster stars. This careful astrometric treatment leads to accuracies of from 0.5 to 1.0 mas/yr for the absolute proper motion of each cluster, depending primarily on the number of measurable cluster stars which in turn is related to the cluster's distance. Space velocities are then derived which, in association with metallicities, provide key information for the formation scenario of the Galaxy, i.e. accretion and/or dissipational collapse. Here we present results for NGC 1851, NGC 6752, NGC 6584, NGC 6362 and NGC 288.

  2. Relational versus absolute representation in categorization.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Darren J; Pothos, Emmanuel M; Perlman, Amotz

    2012-01-01

    This study explores relational-like and absolute-like representations in categorization. Although there is much evidence that categorization processes can involve information about both the particular physical properties of studied instances and abstract (relational) properties, there has been little work on the factors that lead to one kind of representation as opposed to the other. We tested 370 participants in 6 experiments, in which participants had to classify new items into predefined artificial categories. In 4 experiments, we observed a predominantly relational-like mode of classification, and in 2 experiments we observed a shift toward an absolute-like mode of classification. These results suggest 3 factors that promote a relational-like mode of classification: fewer items per group, more training groups, and the presence of a time delay. Overall, we propose that less information about the distributional properties of a category or weaker memory traces for the category exemplars (induced, e.g., by having smaller categories or a time delay) can encourage relational-like categorization.

  3. A Conceptual Approach to Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. When absolute value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…

  4. Using, Seeing, Feeling, and Doing Absolute Value for Deeper Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponce, Gregorio A.

    2008-01-01

    Using sticky notes and number lines, a hands-on activity is shared that anchors initial student thinking about absolute value. The initial point of reference should help students successfully evaluate numeric problems involving absolute value. They should also be able to solve absolute value equations and inequalities that are typically found in…

  5. Effect of channelling on water balance, oxygen diffusion and oxidation rate in mine waste rock with an inclined multilayer soil cover.

    PubMed

    Song, Qing; Yanful, Ernest K

    2010-05-20

    Engineered soil covers provide an option to mitigate acid rock drainage through reduced water flow and gaseous oxygen influx to underlying mine waste. Channels such as fissures, cracks or fractures developed in the barrier may influence the long-term performance of the soil cover. However, limited published information is available on the extent to which soil cover performance is impacted by these fissures and cracks. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of channelling in a barrier layer on water flow and oxygen transport in a soil cover. Two inclined (a slope of 20%) multilayer soil covers were examined under laboratory conditions. One cover had a 10-cm wide sand-filled channel in a compacted barrier layer (silty clay) at the upslope section, while the other cover was a normal one without the channel pathway. The soil covers were installed in plastic boxes measuring 120 cm x 120 cm x 25 cm (width x height x thickness). The sand-filled channel was designed to represent the aggregate of fissures and cracks that may be present in the compacted barrier. The soil covers were subjected to controlled drying and wetting periods selected to simulate field situation at the Whistle mine site near Capreol, Ontario, Canada. The measured results indicated that interflow decreased from 72.8% of the total precipitation in the soil cover without channel flow to 35.3% in the cover with channel flow, and percolation increased from zero in the normal soil cover to 43.0% of the total precipitation in the cover with channel flow. Gaseous oxygen transfer into the waste rock below the cover soils was 1091 times greater in the cover with channel than in the soil cover without channel. The channel pathway present in the barrier layer acted as a major passage for water movement and gaseous oxygen diffusion into the waste rock layer, thus decreasing the performance of the soil cover. The spacing of the channel with respect to the length of the test box is similar to those found

  6. Effect of channelling on water balance, oxygen diffusion and oxidation rate in mine waste rock with an inclined multilayer soil cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qing; Yanful, Ernest K.

    2010-05-01

    Engineered soil covers provide an option to mitigate acid rock drainage through reduced water flow and gaseous oxygen influx to underlying mine waste. Channels such as fissures, cracks or fractures developed in the barrier may influence the long-term performance of the soil cover. However, limited published information is available on the extent to which soil cover performance is impacted by these fissures and cracks. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of channelling in a barrier layer on water flow and oxygen transport in a soil cover. Two inclined (a slope of 20%) multilayer soil covers were examined under laboratory conditions. One cover had a 10-cm wide sand-filled channel in a compacted barrier layer (silty clay) at the upslope section, while the other cover was a normal one without the channel pathway. The soil covers were installed in plastic boxes measuring 120 cm × 120 cm × 25 cm (width × height × thickness). The sand-filled channel was designed to represent the aggregate of fissures and cracks that may be present in the compacted barrier. The soil covers were subjected to controlled drying and wetting periods selected to simulate field situation at the Whistle mine site near Capreol, Ontario, Canada. The measured results indicated that interflow decreased from 72.8% of the total precipitation in the soil cover without channel flow to 35.3% in the cover with channel flow, and percolation increased from zero in the normal soil cover to 43.0% of the total precipitation in the cover with channel flow. Gaseous oxygen transfer into the waste rock below the cover soils was 1091 times greater in the cover with channel than in the soil cover without channel. The channel pathway present in the barrier layer acted as a major passage for water movement and gaseous oxygen diffusion into the waste rock layer, thus decreasing the performance of the soil cover. The spacing of the channel with respect to the length of the test box is similar to those

  7. Relativistic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Z.

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed.

  8. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  9. Relativistic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Haba, Z

    2009-02-01

    We discuss relativistic diffusion in proper time in the approach of Schay (Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 1961) and Dudley [Ark. Mat. 6, 241 (1965)]. We derive (Langevin) stochastic differential equations in various coordinates. We show that in some coordinates the stochastic differential equations become linear. We obtain momentum probability distribution in an explicit form. We discuss a relativistic particle diffusing in an external electromagnetic field. We solve the Langevin equations in the case of parallel electric and magnetic fields. We derive a kinetic equation for the evolution of the probability distribution. We discuss drag terms leading to an equilibrium distribution. The relativistic analog of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is not unique. We show that if the drag comes from a diffusion approximation to the master equation then its form is strongly restricted. The drag leading to the Tsallis equilibrium distribution satisfies this restriction whereas the one of the Jüttner distribution does not. We show that any function of the relativistic energy can be the equilibrium distribution for a particle in a static electric field. A preliminary study of the time evolution with friction is presented. It is shown that the problem is equivalent to quantum mechanics of a particle moving on a hyperboloid with a potential determined by the drag. A relation to diffusions appearing in heavy ion collisions is briefly discussed.

  10. Absolute position total internal reflection microscopy with an optical tweezer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lulu; Woolf, Alexander; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Capasso, Federico

    2014-01-01

    A noninvasive, in situ calibration method for total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) based on optical tweezing is presented, which greatly expands the capabilities of this technique. We show that by making only simple modifications to the basic TIRM sensing setup and procedure, a probe particle’s absolute position relative to a dielectric interface may be known with better than 10 nm precision out to a distance greater than 1 μm from the surface. This represents an approximate 10× improvement in error and 3× improvement in measurement range over conventional TIRM methods. The technique’s advantage is in the direct measurement of the probe particle’s scattering intensity vs. height profile in situ, rather than relying on assumptions, inexact system analogs, or detailed knowledge of system parameters for calibration. To demonstrate the improved versatility of the TIRM method in terms of tunability, precision, and range, we show our results for the hindered near-wall diffusion coefficient for a spherical dielectric particle. PMID:25512542

  11. Gray- and white-matter anatomy of absolute pitch possessors.

    PubMed

    Dohn, Anders; Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Hansen, Mads; Lerch, Jason P; Vuust, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Absolute pitch (AP), the ability to identify a musical pitch without a reference, has been examined behaviorally in numerous studies for more than a century, yet only a few studies have examined the neuroanatomical correlates of AP. Here, we used MRI and diffusion tensor imaging to investigate structural differences in brains of musicians with and without AP, by means of whole-brain vertex-wise cortical thickness (CT) analysis and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis. APs displayed increased CT in a number of areas including the bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG), the left inferior frontal gyrus, and the right supramarginal gyrus. Furthermore, we found higher fractional anisotropy in APs within the path of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, the uncinate fasciculus, and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus. The findings in gray matter support previous studies indicating an increased left lateralized posterior STG in APs, yet they differ from previous findings of thinner cortex for a number of areas in APs. Finally, we found a relation between the white-matter results and the CT in the right parahippocampal gyrus. In this study, we present novel findings in AP research that may have implications for the understanding of the neuroanatomical underpinnings of AP ability.

  12. Review of enhanced vapor diffusion in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.W.; Ho, C.K.

    1998-08-01

    Vapor diffusion in porous media in the presence of its own liquid has often been treated similar to gas diffusion. The gas diffusion rate in porous media is much lower than in free space due to the presence of the porous medium and any liquid present. However, enhanced vapor diffusion has also been postulated such that the diffusion rate may approach free-space values. Existing data and models for enhanced vapor diffusion, including those in TOUGH2, are reviewed in this paper.

  13. The Absolute Radiometric Calibration of Space - Sensors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Ronald Gene

    1987-09-01

    The need for absolute radiometric calibration of space-based sensors will continue to increase as new generations of space sensors are developed. A reflectance -based in-flight calibration procedure is used to determine the radiance reaching the entrance pupil of the sensor. This procedure uses ground-based measurements coupled with a radiative transfer code to characterize the effects the atmosphere has on the signal reaching the sensor. The computed radiance is compared to the digital count output of the sensor associated with the image of a test site. This provides an update to the preflight calibration of the system and a check on the on-board internal calibrator. This calibration procedure was used to perform a series of five calibrations of the Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM). For the 12 measurements made in TM bands 1-3, the RMS variation from the mean as a percentage of the mean is (+OR-) 1.9%, and for measurements in the IR, TM bands 4,5, and 7, the value is (+OR-) 3.4%. The RMS variation for all 23 measurements is (+OR-) 2.8%. The absolute calibration techniques were put to another test with a series of three calibration of the SPOT-1 High Resolution Visible, (HRV), sensors. The ratio, HRV-2/HRV-1, of absolute calibration coefficients compared very well with ratios of histogrammed data obtained when the cameras simultaneously imaged the same ground site. Bands PA, B1 and B3 agreed to within 3%, while band B2 showed a 7% difference. The procedure for performing a satellite calibration was then used to demonstrate how a calibrated satellite sensor can be used to quantitatively evaluate surface reflectance over a wide range of surface features. Predicted reflectance factors were compared to values obtained from aircraft -based radiometer data. This procedure was applied on four dates with two different surface conditions per date. A strong correlation, R('2) = .996, was shown between reflectance values determined from satellite imagery and low-flying aircraft

  14. Use of Absolute and Comparative Performance Feedback in Absolute and Comparative Judgments and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Don A.; Klein, William M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Which matters more--beliefs about absolute ability or ability relative to others? This study set out to compare the effects of such beliefs on satisfaction with performance, self-evaluations, and bets on future performance. In Experiment 1, undergraduate participants were told they had answered 20% correct, 80% correct, or were not given their…

  15. Absolute radiometric calibration of the CCRS SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulander, Lars M. H.; Hawkins, Robert K.; Livingstone, Charles E.; Lukowski, Tom I.

    1991-11-01

    Determining the radar scattering coefficients from SAR (synthetic aperture radar) image data requires absolute radiometric calibration of the SAR system. The authors describe an internal calibration methodology for the airborne Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) SAR system, based on radar theory, a detailed model of the radar system, and measurements of system parameters. The methodology is verified by analyzing external calibration data acquired over a 6-month period in 1988 by the C-band radar using HH polarization. The results indicate that the overall error is +/- 0.8 dB (1-sigma) for incidence angles +/- 20 deg from antenna boresight. The dominant error contributions are due to the antenna radome and uncertainties in the elevation angle relative to the antenna boresight.

  16. Absolute calibration of ultraviolet filter photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, R. C.; Fairchild, T.; Code, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The essential features of the calibration procedure can be divided into three parts. First, the shape of the bandpass of each photometer was determined by measuring the transmissions of the individual optical components and also by measuring the response of the photometer as a whole. Secondly, each photometer was placed in the essentially-collimated synchrotron radiation bundle maintained at a constant intensity level, and the output signal was determined from about 100 points on the objective. Finally, two or three points on the objective were illuminated by synchrotron radiation at several different intensity levels covering the dynamic range of the photometers. The output signals were placed on an absolute basis by the electron counting technique described earlier.

  17. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium

    SciTech Connect

    Roshan, M. V.; Springham, S. V.; Rawat, R. S.; Lee, P.; Krishnan, M.

    2010-08-15

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f{sub n}{approx}4.1x10{sup -4} with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10{sup 8} neutrons per discharge.

  18. Absolute geostrophic currents in global tropical oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lina; Yuan, Dongliang

    2016-11-01

    A set of absolute geostrophic current (AGC) data for the period January 2004 to December 2012 are calculated using the P-vector method based on monthly gridded Argo profiles in the world tropical oceans. The AGCs agree well with altimeter geostrophic currents, Ocean Surface Current Analysis-Real time currents, and moored current-meter measurements at 10-m depth, based on which the classical Sverdrup circulation theory is evaluated. Calculations have shown that errors of wind stress calculation, AGC transport, and depth ranges of vertical integration cannot explain non-Sverdrup transport, which is mainly in the subtropical western ocean basins and equatorial currents near the Equator in each ocean basin (except the North Indian Ocean, where the circulation is dominated by monsoons). The identified non-Sverdrup transport is thereby robust and attributed to the joint effect of baroclinicity and relief of the bottom (JEBAR) and mesoscale eddy nonlinearity.

  19. Absolute Measurement of Electron Cloud Density

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Seidl, P A; Logan, G; Bieniosek, F; Baca, D; Vay, J; Orlando, E; Vujic, J L

    2007-06-21

    Beam interaction with background gas and walls produces ubiquitous clouds of stray electrons that frequently limit the performance of particle accelerator and storage rings. Counterintuitively we obtained the electron cloud accumulation by measuring the expelled ions that are originated from the beam-background gas interaction, rather than by measuring electrons that reach the walls. The kinetic ion energy measured with a retarding field analyzer (RFA) maps the depressed beam space-charge potential and provides the dynamic electron cloud density. Clearing electrode current measurements give the static electron cloud background that complements and corroborates with the RFA measurements, providing an absolute measurement of electron cloud density during a 5 {micro}s duration beam pulse in a drift region of the magnetic transport section of the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL.

  20. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  1. Absolute calibration of remote sensing instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggar, S. F.; Bruegge, C. J.; Capron, B. A.; Castle, K. R.; Dinguirard, M. C.; Holm, R. G.; Lingg, L. J.; Mao, Y.; Palmer, J. M.; Phillips, A. L.

    1985-12-01

    Source-based and detector-based methods for the absolute radiometric calibration of a broadband field radiometer are described. Using such a radiometer, calibrated by both methods, the calibration of the integrating sphere used in the preflight calibration of the Thematic Mapper was redetermined. The results are presented. The in-flight calibration of space remote sensing instruments is discussed. A method which uses the results of ground-based reflectance and atmospheric measurements as input to a radiative transfer code to predict the radiance at the instrument is described. A calibrated, helicopter-mounted radiometer is used to determine the radiance levels at intermediate altitudes to check the code predictions. Results of such measurements for the calibration of the Thematic Mapper on Landsat 5 and an analysis that shows the value of such measurements are described.

  2. Absolute radiometric calibration of the Thematic Mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.; Biggar, S. F.; Holm, R. G.; Jackson, R. D.; Mao, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Calibration data for the solar reflective bands of the Landsat-5 TM obtained from five in-flight absolute radiometric calibrations from July 1984-November 1985 at White Sands, New Mexico are presented and analyzed. Ground reflectance and atmospheric data were utilized to predict the spectral radiance at the entrance pupil of the TM and the average number of digital counts in each TM band. The calibration of each of the TM solar reflective bands was calculated in terms of average digital counts/unit spectral radiance for each band. It is observed that for the 12 reflectance-based measurements the rms variation from the means as a percentage of the mean is + or - 1.9 percent; for the 11 measurements in the IR bands, it is + or - 3.4 percent; and the rms variation for all 23 measurements is + or - 2.8 percent.

  3. MAGSAT: Vector magnetometer absolute sensor alignment determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for accurately determining the absolute alignment of the magnetic axes of a triaxial magnetometer sensor with respect to an external, fixed, reference coordinate system. The method does not require that the magnetic field vector orientation, as generated by a triaxial calibration coil system, be known to better than a few degrees from its true position, and minimizes the number of positions through which a sensor assembly must be rotated to obtain a solution. Computer simulations show that accuracies of better than 0.4 seconds of arc can be achieved under typical test conditions associated with existing magnetic test facilities. The basic approach is similar in nature to that presented by McPherron and Snare (1978) except that only three sensor positions are required and the system of equations to be solved is considerably simplified. Applications of the method to the case of the MAGSAT Vector Magnetometer are presented and the problems encountered discussed.

  4. First Absolutely Calibrated Localized Measurements of Ion Velocity in the MST in Locked and Rotating Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltzer, M.; Craig, D.; den Hartog, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Munaretto, S.

    2015-11-01

    An Ion Doppler Spectrometer (IDS) is used on MST for high time-resolution passive and active measurements of impurity ion emission. Absolutely calibrated measurements of flow are difficult because the spectrometer records data within 0.3 nm of the C+5 line of interest, and commercial calibration lamps do not produce lines in this narrow range . A novel optical system was designed to absolutely calibrate the IDS. The device uses an UV LED to produce a broad emission curve in the desired region. A Fabry-Perot etalon filters this light, cutting transmittance peaks into the pattern of the LED emission. An optical train of fused silica lenses focuses the light into the IDS with f/4. A holographic diffuser blurs the light cone to increase homogeneity. Using this light source, the absolute Doppler shift of ion emissions can be measured in MST plasmas. In combination with charge exchange recombination spectroscopy, localized ion velocities can now be measured. Previously, a time-averaged measurement along the chord bisecting the poloidal plane was used to calibrate the IDS; the quality of these central chord calibrations can be characterized with our absolute calibration. Calibration errors may also be quantified and minimized by optimizing the curve-fitting process. Preliminary measurements of toroidal velocity in locked and rotating plasmas will be shown. This work has been supported by the US DOE.

  5. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR V335 SERPENTIS

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Fekel, Francis C.; Claret, Antonio E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu

    2012-08-15

    V335 Ser is now known to be an eccentric double-lined A1+A3 binary star with fairly deep (0.5 mag) partial eclipses. Previous studies of the system are improved with 7456 differential photometric observations from the URSA WebScope and 5666 from the NFO WebScope, and 67 high-resolution spectroscopic observations from the Tennessee State University 2 m automatic spectroscopic telescope. From dates of minima, the apsidal period is about 880 years. Accurate (better than 2%) masses and radii are determined from analysis of the two new light curves and the radial velocity curve. Theoretical models match the absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 380 Myr, though the age agreement for the two components is poor. Tidal theory correctly confirms that the orbit should still be eccentric, but we find that standard tidal theory is unable to match the observed asynchronous rotation rates of the components' surface layers.

  6. Absolute properties of the eclipsing binary star IM Persei

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Torres, Guillermo; Fekel, Francis C.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Southworth, John E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: matthew1@coe.tsuniv.edu

    2015-01-01

    IM Per is a detached A7 eccentric eclipsing binary star. We have obtained extensive measurements of the light curve (28,225 differential magnitude observations) and radial velocity curve (81 spectroscopic observations) which allow us to fit orbits and determine the absolute properties of the components very accurately: masses of 1.7831 ± 0.0094 and 1.7741 ± 0.0097 solar masses, and radii of 2.409 ± 0.018 and 2.366 ± 0.017 solar radii. The orbital period is 2.25422694(15) days and the eccentricity is 0.0473(26). A faint third component was detected in the analysis of the light curves, and also directly observed in the spectra. The observed rate of apsidal motion is consistent with theory (U = 151.4 ± 8.4 year). We determine a distance to the system of 566 ± 46 pc.

  7. BEAM DIFFUSION MEASUREMENTS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FLILLER,R.P.,IIIDREES,A.GASSNER,D.MCINTYRE,G.PEGGS,S.TRBOJEVIC,D.

    2003-05-12

    During a store, particles from the beam core continually diffuse outwards into the halo through a variety of mechanisms. Understanding the diffusion rate as a function of particle amplitude can help discover which processes are important to halo growth. A collimator can be used to measure the amplitude growth rate as a function of the particle amplitude. In this paper we present results of diffusion measurements performed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with fully stripped gold ions, deuterons, and protons. We compare these results with measurements from previous years, and simulations, and discuss any factors that relate to beam growth in RHIC.

  8. Central 300 PC of the Galaxy Probed by the Infrared Spectra of H_3^+ and Co: I. Predominance of Warm and Diffuse Gas and High H_2 Ionization Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Takeshi; Geballe, Thomas R.; Goto, Miwa; Usuda, Tomonori; Indriolo, Nick

    2016-06-01

    A low-resolution 2.0-2.5 μm survey of ˜500 very red point-like objects in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) of our Galaxy, initiated in 2008, has revealed many new bright objects with featureless spectra that are suitable for high resolution absorption spectroscopy of H_3^+ and CO. We now have altogether 48 objects mostly close to the Galactic plane located from 142 pc to the west of Sgr A* to 120 pc east allowing us to probe dense and diffuse gas by H_3^+ and dense gas by CO. Our observations demonstrate that the warm (˜250 K) and diffuse (≤100 cm-3) gas with a large column length (≥30 pc) initially observed toward the brightest star in the CMZ, GCS3-2 of the Quintuplet Cluster, exists throughout the CMZ with the surface filling factor of ˜ 100% dominating the region. The column densities of CO in the CMZ are found to be much less than those in the three foreground spiral arms except in the directions of Sgr B and Sgr E complexes and indicate that the volume filling factor of dense clouds of 10% previously estimated is a gross overestimate for the front half of the CMZ. Nevertheless the predominance of the newly found diffuse molecular gas makes the term "Central Molecular Zone" even more appropriate. The ultra-hot X-rays emitting plasma which some thought to dominate the region must be non existent except near the stars and SNRs. Recently the H_2 fraction f(H_2) in diffuse gas of the CMZ has been reported to be ˜0.6. If we use this value, the cosmic ray H_2 ionization rate ζ of a few times 10-15 s-1 reported earlier^b on the assumption of f(H_2)=1 needs to be increased by a factor of ˜3 since the value is approximately inversely proportional to f(H_2)^2. Geballe, T. R., Oka, T., Lambridges, E., Yeh, S. C. C., Schlegelmilch, B., Goto, M., Westrick, C. W., WI07 at the 70th ISMS, Urbana, IL, USA,2015 Oka, T., Geballe, T. R., Goto, M., Usuda, T., McCall, B. J. 2005, ApJ, 632, 882 Le Petit, F., Ruaud, M., Bron, E., Godard, B., Roueff, E., Languignon, D., Le

  9. Using light transmission to watch hydrogen diffuse

    PubMed Central

    Pálsson, Gunnar K.; Bliersbach, Andreas; Wolff, Max; Zamani, Atieh; Hjörvarsson, Björgvin

    2012-01-01

    Because of its light weight and small size, hydrogen exhibits one of the fastest diffusion rates in solid materials, comparable to the diffusion rate of liquid water molecules at room temperature. The diffusion rate is determined by an intricate combination of quantum effects and dynamic interplay with the displacement of host atoms that is still only partially understood. Here we present direct observations of the spatial and temporal changes in the diffusion-induced concentration profiles in a vanadium single crystal and we show that the results represent the experimental counterpart of the full time and spatial solution of Fick's diffusion equation. We validate the approach by determining the diffusion rate of hydrogen in a single crystal vanadium (001) film, with net diffusion in the [110] direction. PMID:22692535

  10. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  11. Equilibration Kinetics and Chemical Diffusion of Indium-Doped TiO2.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, Janusz; Alim, Mohammad A

    2015-04-30

    The present work reports the gas/solid equilibration kinetics for In-doped TiO2 (0.4 atom % In) at elevated temperatures (1023-1273 K) in the gas phase of controlled oxygen activity [10(-13) Pa < p(O2) < 10(5) Pa]. Thus, the determined chemical diffusion coefficient is considered in terms of a microdiffusion coefficient that is reflective of the transport kinetics within very narrow ranges of oxygen activities. In analogy to pure TiO2, the chemical diffusion coefficient for In-doped TiO2 exhibits a maximum at the n-p transition point. The activation energy of the chemical diffusion exhibits a decrease with temperature from 200 kJ/mol at 1023 K to an insignificant value at 1273 K. This effect is reflective of a segregation-induced electrical potential barrier blocking the transport of defects. The absolute value of the chemical diffusion coefficient for In-doped TiO2 is larger from that of pure TiO2 by a factor of approximately 10. The effect of indium on the diffusion rate is considered in terms of the associated concentration of oxygen vacancies, which are formed in order to satisfy the charge neutrality for In-doped TiO2.

  12. Temperature dependence of soliton diffusion in trans-polyacetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.; Norris, J.R.; Isoya, J.

    1997-07-01

    The temperature dependence of 1-D diffusion rate of solitons in transpolyacetylene is determined by time-domain analysis of ESR measurements. The diffusion rate appears to obey a simple power law. Monte Carlo simulation of 1-D diffusion process in impure chains indicates that overall diffusion can be much slower than that without traps.

  13. Diffusion of Ca and Mg in Calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, R.T.; Fisler, D.K.

    1999-02-10

    The self-diffusion of Ca and the tracer diffusion of Mg in calcite have been experimentally measured using isotopic tracers of {sup 25}Mg and {sup 44}Ca. Natural single crystals of calcite were coated with a thermally-sputtered oxide thin film and then annealed in a CO{sub 2} gas at one atmosphere total pressure and temperatures from 550 to 800 C. Diffusion coefficient values were derived from the depth profiles obtained by ion microprobe analysis. The resultant activation energies for Mg tracer diffusion and Ca self-diffusion are respectively: E{sub a}(Mg) = 284 {+-} 74 kJ/mol and E{sub a}(Ca) = 271 {+-} 80 kJ/mol. For the temperature ranges in these experiments, the diffusion of Mg is faster than Ca. The results are generally consistent in magnitude with divalent cation diffusion rates obtained in previous studies and provide a means of interpreting the thermal histories of carbonate minerals, the mechanism of dolomitization, and other diffusion-controlled processes. The results indicate that cation diffusion in calcite is relatively slow and cations are the rate-limiting diffusing species for the deformation of calcite and carbonate rocks. Application of the calcite-dolomite geothermometer to metamorphic assemblages will be constrained by cation diffusion and cooling rates. The direct measurement of Mg tracer diffusion in calcite indicates that dolomitization is unlikely to be accomplished by Mg diffusion in the solid state but by a recrystallization process.

  14. Absolute and convective instabilities and their roles in the forecasting of large frontal meanderings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X. San; Robinson, Allan R.

    2013-10-01

    Frontal meanderings are generally difficult to predict. In this study, we demonstrate through an exercise with the Iceland-Faeroe Front (IFF) that satisfactory predictions may be achieved with the aid of hydrodynamic instability analysis. As discovered earlier on, underlying the IFF meandering is a convective instability in the western boundary region followed by an absolute instability in the interior; correspondingly the disturbance growth reveals a switch of pattern from spatial amplification to temporal amplification. To successfully forecast the meandering, the two instability processes must be faithfully reproduced. This sets stringent constraints for the tunable model parameters, e.g., boundary relaxation, temporal relaxation, eddy diffusivity, etc. By analyzing the instability dispersion properties, these parameters can be rather accurately set and their respective ranges of sensitivity estimated. It is shown that too much relaxation inhibits the front from varying; on the other hand, too little relaxation may have the model completely skip the spatial growth phase, leading to a meandering way more upstream along the front. Generally speaking, dissipation/diffusion tends to stabilize the simulation, but unrealistically large dissipation/diffusion could trigger a spurious absolute instability, and hence a premature meandering intrusion. The belief that taking in more data will improve the forecast does not need to be true; it depends on whether the model setup admits the two instabilities. This study may help relieve modelers from the laborious and tedious work of parameter tuning; it also provides us criteria to distinguish a physically relevant forecast from numerical artifacts.

  15. Configurational diffusion of asphaltenes in fresh and aged catalysts extrudates. [Mathematical configurational diffusion model

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the relationship between the size and shape of coal and petroleum macromolecules and their diffusion rates i.e., effective diffusivities, in catalyst pore structures. That is, how do the effective intrapore diffusivities depend on molecule configuration and pore geometry. This quarter we made a more comprehensive literature survey concerning configurational diffusion in porous catalysts or catalyst supports. A detailed literature review is reported. Also, a mathematical configurational diffusion model was developed. By using this model, the effective diffusivity for model compounds diffusing in porous media and a linear adsorption constant can be determined by fitting experimental data.

  16. Surface self-diffusion of organic glasses.

    PubMed

    Brian, Caleb W; Yu, Lian

    2013-12-19

    Surface self-diffusion coefficients have been determined for the organic glass Nifedipine using the method of surface grating decay. The flattening of 1000 nm surface gratings occurs by viscous flow at 12 K or more above the glass transition temperature and by surface diffusion at lower temperatures. Surface diffusion is at least 10(7) times faster than bulk diffusion, indicating a highly mobile surface. Nifedipine glasses have faster surface diffusion than the previously studied Indomethacin glasses, despite their similar bulk relaxation times. Both glasses exhibit fast surface crystal growth, and its rate scales with surface diffusivity. The observed rate of surface diffusion implies substantial surface rearrangement during the preparation of low-energy glasses by vapor deposition. The Random First Order Transition Theory and the Coupling Model successfully predict the large surface-enhancement of mobility and its increase on cooling, but disagree with the experimental observation of the faster surface diffusion of Nifedipine.

  17. Primacy and frequency effects in absolute judgments of visual velocity.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, A; Pavlova, M; Ehrenstein, W H

    2000-07-01

    In absolute judgment tasks, identical stimuli are rated higher (or lower) when presented in a series of more frequent small (or large) stimuli. Using visual stimuli differing in velocity, we show that this conventional frequency effect is largely modulated by the primacy effect--that is, by the stimuli occurring on the early trials of a run. In Experiment 1, a frequency-like primacy effect was obtained with equal-frequent velocities. Identical velocities were rated faster when mainly slow rather than fast ones occurred on initial trials. In Experiment 2, we contrasted the frequency effect and the primacy effect: In runs with frequent slow velocities, mainly fast ones occurred earlier, whereas in runs with infrequent slow velocities, mainly slow ones did so. Lack of differences of ratings in the two conditions suggests that the two effects canceled each other. In Experiment 3, when mainly frequent velocities occurred earlier, the conventional frequency effect was obtained. We conclude that the conventional frequency effect represents a combination of the primacy effect and the pure frequency effect.

  18. On the absolute alignment of GONG images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    In order to combine data from the six instruments in the GONG network the alignment of all of the images must be known to a fairly high precision (~0°.1 for GONG Classic and ~0°.01 for GONG+). The relative orientation is obtained using the angular cross-correlation method described by (Toner & Harvey, 1998). To obtain the absolute orientation the Project periodically records a day of drift scans, where the image of the Sun is allowed to drift across the CCD repeatedly throughout the day. These data are then analyzed to deduce the direction of Terrestrial East-West as a function of hour angle (i.e., time) for that instrument. The transit of Mercury on Nov. 15, 1999, which was recorded by three of the GONG instruments, provided an independent check on the current alignment procedures. Here we present a comparison of the alignment of GONG images as deduced from both drift scans and the Mercury transit for two GONG sites: Tucson (GONG+ camera) and Mauna Loa (GONG Classic camera). The agreement is within ~0°.01 for both cameras, however, the scatter is substantially larger for GONG Classic: ~0°.03 compared to ~0°.01 for GONG+.

  19. Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a mission, led and developed by NASA, that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to quantify and attribute climate change. CLARREO consists of three separate instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer, a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer, and a radio occultation (RO) instrument. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy, including on orbit verification, to calibrate other space-based instrumentation, increasing their respective accuracy by as much as an order of magnitude. The IR spectrometer is a Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) working in the 5 to 50 microns wavelength region with a goal of 0.1 K (k = 3) accuracy. The FTS will achieve this accuracy using phase change cells to verify thermistor accuracy and heated halos to verify blackbody emissivity, both on orbit. The RS spectrometer will measure the reflectance of the atmosphere in the 0.32 to 2.3 microns wavelength region with an accuracy of 0.3% (k = 2). The status of the instrumentation packages and potential mission options will be presented.

  20. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  1. Swarm Absolute Scalar Magnetometers first in-orbit results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratter, Isabelle; Léger, Jean-Michel; Bertrand, François; Jager, Thomas; Hulot, Gauthier; Brocco, Laura; Vigneron, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The ESA Swarm mission will provide the best ever survey of the Earth's magnetic field and its temporal evolution. This will be achieved by a constellation of three identical satellites, launched together on the 22nd of November 2013. In order to observe the magnetic field thoroughly, each satellite carries two magnetometers: a Vector Field Magnetometer (VFM) coupled with a star tracker camera, to measure the direction of the magnetic field in space, and an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM), to measure its intensity. The ASM is the French contribution to the Swarm mission. This new generation instrument was designed by CEA-Leti and developed in close partnership with CNES, with scientific support from IPGP. Its operating principle is based on the atomic spectroscopy of the helium 4 metastable state. It makes use of the Zeeman's effect to transduce the magnetic field into a frequency, the signal being amplified by optical pumping. The primary role of the ASM is to provide absolute measurements of the magnetic field's strength at 1 Hz, for the in-flight calibration of the VFM. As the Swarm magnetic reference, the ASM scalar performance is crucial for the mission's success. Thanks to its innovative design, the ASM offers the best precision, resolution and absolute accuracy ever attained in space, with similar performance all along the orbit. In addition, thanks to an original architecture, the ASM implements on an experimental basis a capacity for providing simultaneously vector measurements at 1 Hz. This new feature makes it the first instrument capable of delivering both scalar and vector measurements simultaneously at the same point. Swarm offers a unique opportunity to validate the ASM vector data in orbit by comparison with the VFM's. Furthermore, the ASM can provide scalar data at a much higher sampling rate, when run in "burst" mode at 250 Hz, with a 100 Hz measurement bandwidth. An analysis of the spectral content of the magnetic field above 1 Hz becomes thus

  2. Extended source model for diffusive coupling.

    PubMed

    González-Ochoa, Héctor O; Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Reyes, Luz M; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the prevailing approach to diffusion coupling phenomena which considers point-like diffusing sources, we derived an analogous expression for the concentration rate of change of diffusively coupled extended containers. The proposed equation, together with expressions based on solutions to the diffusion equation, is intended to be applied to the numerical solution of systems exclusively composed of ordinary differential equations, however is able to account for effects due the finite size of the coupled sources.

  3. Extended source model for diffusive coupling.

    PubMed

    González-Ochoa, Héctor O; Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Reyes, Luz M; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the prevailing approach to diffusion coupling phenomena which considers point-like diffusing sources, we derived an analogous expression for the concentration rate of change of diffusively coupled extended containers. The proposed equation, together with expressions based on solutions to the diffusion equation, is intended to be applied to the numerical solution of systems exclusively composed of ordinary differential equations, however is able to account for effects due the finite size of the coupled sources. PMID:26802012

  4. Approximate Solutions Of Equations Of Steady Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    1992-01-01

    Rigorous analysis yields reliable criteria for "best-fit" functions. Improved "curve-fitting" method yields approximate solutions to differential equations of steady-state diffusion. Method applies to problems in which rates of diffusion depend linearly or nonlinearly on concentrations of diffusants, approximate solutions analytic or numerical, and boundary conditions of Dirichlet type, of Neumann type, or mixture of both types. Applied to equations for diffusion of charge carriers in semiconductors in which mobilities and lifetimes of charge carriers depend on concentrations.

  5. Issues in Absolute Spectral Radiometric Calibration: Intercomparison of Eight Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Kindel, Bruce; Pilewskie, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The application of atmospheric models to AVIRIS and other spectral imaging data to derive surface reflectance requires that the sensor output be calibrated to absolute radiance. Uncertainties in absolute calibration are to be expected, and claims of 92% accuracy have been published. Measurements of accurate surface albedos and cloud absorption to be used in radiative balance calculations depend critically on knowing the absolute spectral-radiometric response of the sensor. The Earth Observing System project is implementing a rigorous program of absolute radiometric calibration for all optical sensors. Since a number of imaging instruments that provide output in terms of absolute radiance are calibrated at different sites, it is important to determine the errors that can be expected among calibration sites. Another question exists about the errors in the absolute knowledge of the exoatmospheric spectral solar irradiance.

  6. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  7. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Mano K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2015-12-01

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  8. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-06-05

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  9. Antifungal activity of tuberose absolute and some of its constituents.

    PubMed

    Nidiry, Eugene Sebastian J; Babu, C S Bujji

    2005-05-01

    The antifungal activity of the absolute of tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa ) and some of its constituents were evaluated against the mycelial growth of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides on potato-dextrose-agar medium. Tuberose absolute showed only mild activity at a concentration of 500 mg/L. However, three constituents present in the absolute, namely geraniol, indole and methyl anthranilate exhibited significant activity showing total inhibition of the mycelial growth at this concentration.

  10. The absolute disparity anomaly and the mechanism of relative disparities.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Adrien; Levi, Dennis; Knill, David; Bavelier, Daphne

    2016-06-01

    There has been a long-standing debate about the mechanisms underlying the perception of stereoscopic depth and the computation of the relative disparities that it relies on. Relative disparities between visual objects could be computed in two ways: (a) using the difference in the object's absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1) or (b) using relative disparities based on the differences in the monocular separations between objects (Hypothesis 2). To differentiate between these hypotheses, we measured stereoscopic discrimination thresholds for lines with different absolute and relative disparities. Participants were asked to judge the depth of two lines presented at the same distance from the fixation plane (absolute disparity) or the depth between two lines presented at different distances (relative disparity). We used a single stimulus method involving a unique memory component for both conditions, and no extraneous references were available. We also measured vergence noise using Nonius lines. Stereo thresholds were substantially worse for absolute disparities than for relative disparities, and the difference could not be explained by vergence noise. We attribute this difference to an absence of conscious readout of absolute disparities, termed the absolute disparity anomaly. We further show that the pattern of correlations between vergence noise and absolute and relative disparity acuities can be explained jointly by the existence of the absolute disparity anomaly and by the assumption that relative disparity information is computed from absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1).

  11. The absolute disparity anomaly and the mechanism of relative disparities

    PubMed Central

    Chopin, Adrien; Levi, Dennis; Knill, David; Bavelier, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    There has been a long-standing debate about the mechanisms underlying the perception of stereoscopic depth and the computation of the relative disparities that it relies on. Relative disparities between visual objects could be computed in two ways: (a) using the difference in the object's absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1) or (b) using relative disparities based on the differences in the monocular separations between objects (Hypothesis 2). To differentiate between these hypotheses, we measured stereoscopic discrimination thresholds for lines with different absolute and relative disparities. Participants were asked to judge the depth of two lines presented at the same distance from the fixation plane (absolute disparity) or the depth between two lines presented at different distances (relative disparity). We used a single stimulus method involving a unique memory component for both conditions, and no extraneous references were available. We also measured vergence noise using Nonius lines. Stereo thresholds were substantially worse for absolute disparities than for relative disparities, and the difference could not be explained by vergence noise. We attribute this difference to an absence of conscious readout of absolute disparities, termed the absolute disparity anomaly. We further show that the pattern of correlations between vergence noise and absolute and relative disparity acuities can be explained jointly by the existence of the absolute disparity anomaly and by the assumption that relative disparity information is computed from absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1). PMID:27248566

  12. Cervical Gross Tumor Volume Dose Predicts Local Control Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Diffusion-Weighted Imaging—Guided High-Dose-Rate and Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography—Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dyk, Pawel; Jiang, Naomi; Sun, Baozhou; DeWees, Todd A.; Fowler, Kathryn J.; Narra, Vamsi; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose L.; Schwarz, Julie K.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion weighted-imaging (MRI/DWI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) — positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer is a novel treatment technique. The purpose of this study was to report our analysis of dose-volume parameters predicting gross tumor volume (GTV) control. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the records of 134 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1-IVB cervical cancer treated with combined MRI-guided HDR and IMRT from July 2009 to July 2011. IMRT was targeted to the metabolic tumor volume and lymph nodes by use of FDG-PET/CT simulation. The GTV for each HDR fraction was delineated by use of T2-weighted or apparent diffusion coefficient maps from diffusion-weighted sequences. The D100, D90, and Dmean delivered to the GTV from HDR and IMRT were summed to EQD2. Results: One hundred twenty-five patients received all irradiation treatment as planned, and 9 did not complete treatment. All 134 patients are included in this analysis. Treatment failure in the cervix occurred in 24 patients (18.0%). Patients with cervix failures had a lower D100, D90, and Dmean than those who did not experience failure in the cervix. The respective doses to the GTV were 41, 58, and 136 Gy for failures compared with 67, 99, and 236 Gy for those who did not experience failure (P<.001). Probit analysis estimated the minimum D100, D90, and Dmean doses required for ≥90% local control to be 69, 98, and 260 Gy (P<.001). Conclusions: Total dose delivered to the GTV from combined MRI-guided HDR and PET/CT-guided IMRT is highly correlated with local tumor control. The findings can be directly applied in the clinic for dose adaptation to maximize local control.

  13. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath plate interiors may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the sub-asthenospheric mantle. Here we analyze two global sets of shear-wave splitting data, that of Kreemer [2009] and an updated and expanded data set, to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. We also explore the effect of using geologically current plate velocities (i.e., the MORVEL set of angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]) compared with geodetically current plate velocities (i.e., the GSRM v1.2 angular velocities [Kreemer et al. 2014]). We demonstrate that the errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. The SKS-MORVEL absolute plate angular velocities (based on the Kreemer [2009] data set) are determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2° ) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6° ). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4° ) than for continental

  14. Evaluation of the Absolute Regional Temperature Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Absolute Regional Temperature Potential (ARTP) is one of the few climate metrics that provides estimates of impacts at a sub-global scale. The ARTP presented here gives the time-dependent temperature response in four latitude bands (90-28degS, 28degS-28degN, 28-60degN and 60-90degN) as a function of emissions based on the forcing in those bands caused by the emissions. It is based on a large set of simulations performed with a single atmosphere-ocean climate model to derive regional forcing/response relationships. Here I evaluate the robustness of those relationships using the forcing/response portion of the ARTP to estimate regional temperature responses to the historic aerosol forcing in three independent climate models. These ARTP results are in good accord with the actual responses in those models. Nearly all ARTP estimates fall within +/-20%of the actual responses, though there are some exceptions for 90-28degS and the Arctic, and in the latter the ARTP may vary with forcing agent. However, for the tropics and the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in particular, the +/-20% range appears to be roughly consistent with the 95% confidence interval. Land areas within these two bands respond 39-45% and 9-39% more than the latitude band as a whole. The ARTP, presented here in a slightly revised form, thus appears to provide a relatively robust estimate for the responses of large-scale latitude bands and land areas within those bands to inhomogeneous radiative forcing and thus potentially to emissions as well. Hence this metric could allow rapid evaluation of the effects of emissions policies at a finer scale than global metrics without requiring use of a full climate model.

  15. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  16. Experimental observation of the flow in impellers and diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krain, H.

    Conventional and optical measurements were carried out within centrifugal compressor impellers and diffusers. A highly distorted impeller discharge flow, pointing to a mass flow concentration in the hub area and a wake flow close to the shroud, is indicated by the conventional measurements. This flow character causes a highly nonuniform flow incidence angle distribution at the diffuser vane leading edge resulting in a strong impeller/diffuser interaction. These results are confirmed by laser measurements, which also reveal the fully three-dimensional flow character within the impeller and diffuser. The unsteady flow behavior within the diffuser inlet area was studied. Due to the distorted impeller discharge flow, fluctuations of the absolute flow angle up to 17 deg occur in the vaned diffuser inlet area. An incidence angle difference between hub and shroud of 27 deg is present at the diffuser vane leading edge.

  17. Diffuse Microwave Emission Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, R. A.; Mather, J.; Kogut, A.; Fixsen, D. J.; Seiffert, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Levin, S. M.

    1996-12-01

    The Diffuse Microwave Emission Survey (DIMES) is a mission concept selected by NASA in 1995 to answer fundamental questions about the content and history of the universe. DIMES will use a set of absolutely calibrated cryogenic radiometers from a space platform to measure the frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at wavelengths 15--0.3 cm (frequency 2--100 GHz) to precision 0.1 mK or better. Measurements at centimeter wavelengths probe different physical processes than the COBE-FIRAS spectra at shorter wavelengths, and complement the anisotropy measurements from DMR, balloon and ground-based instruments, and the planned MAP and COBRAS/SAMBA satellites. DIMES will observe the free-free signal from early photoionization to establish the precise epoch of structure formation, and will measure or limit energy release at redshift 10(4) < z < 10(7) by measuring the chemical potential distortion of the CMB spectrum. Both are likely under current cosmological theory and allowed by current measurement limits; even an upper limit at the expected sensitivity 10(-5) MJy/sr will place important constraints on the matter content, structure, and evolution of the universe. Detecting these distortions or showing that they do not exist constitutes the last frontier of CMB observations.

  18. Water vapor diffusion membranes, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F.; Klein, E.; Smith, J. K.; Eyer, C.

    1976-01-01

    Transport mechanisms were investigated for the three different types of water vapor diffusion membranes. Membranes representing porous wetting and porous nonwetting structures as well as dense diffusive membrane structures were investigated for water permeation rate as a function of: (1) temperature, (2) solids composition in solution, and (3) such hydrodynamic parameters as sweep gas flow rate, solution flow rate and cell geometry. These properties were measured using nitrogen sweep gas to collect the effluent. In addition, the chemical stability to chromic acid-stabilized urine was measured for several of each type of membrane. A technology based on the mechanism of vapor transport was developed, whereby the vapor diffusion rates and relative susceptibility of membranes to fouling and failure could be projected for long-term vapor recovery trials using natural chromic acid-stabilized urine.

  19. Mid-infrared absolute spectral responsivity scale based on an absolute cryogenic radiometer and an optical parametric oscillator laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Shi, Xueshun; Chen, Haidong; Liu, Yulong; Liu, Changming; Chen, Kunfeng; Li, Ligong; Gan, Haiyong; Ma, Chong

    2016-06-01

    We are reporting on a laser-based absolute spectral responsivity scale in the mid-infrared spectral range. By using a mid-infrared tunable optical parametric oscillator as the laser source, the absolute responsivity scale has been established by calibrating thin-film thermopile detectors against an absolute cryogenic radiometer. The thin-film thermopile detectors can be then used as transfer standard detectors. The extended uncertainty of the absolute spectral responsivity measurement has been analyzed to be 0.58%–0.68% (k  =  2).

  20. Mid-infrared absolute spectral responsivity scale based on an absolute cryogenic radiometer and an optical parametric oscillator laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Shi, Xueshun; Chen, Haidong; Liu, Yulong; Liu, Changming; Chen, Kunfeng; Li, Ligong; Gan, Haiyong; Ma, Chong

    2016-06-01

    We are reporting on a laser-based absolute spectral responsivity scale in the mid-infrared spectral range. By using a mid-infrared tunable optical parametric oscillator as the laser source, the absolute responsivity scale has been established by calibrating thin-film thermopile detectors against an absolute cryogenic radiometer. The thin-film thermopile detectors can be then used as transfer standard detectors. The extended uncertainty of the absolute spectral responsivity measurement has been analyzed to be 0.58%-0.68% (k  =  2).

  1. Gender equality and women's absolute status: a test of the feminist models of rape.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kimberly; Vieraitis, Lynne M; Britto, Sarah

    2006-04-01

    Feminist theory predicts both a positive and negative relationship between gender equality and rape rates. Although liberal and radical feminist theory predicts that gender equality should ameliorate rape victimization, radical feminist theorists have argued that gender equality may increase rape in the form of male backlash. Alternatively, Marxist criminologists focus on women's absolute socioeconomic status rather than gender equality as a predictor of rape rates, whereas socialist feminists combine both radical and Marxist perspectives. This study uses factor analysis to overcome multicollinearity limitations of past studies while exploring the relationship between women's absolute and relative socioeconomic status on rape rates in major U.S. cities using 2000 census data. The findings indicate support for both the Marxist and radical feminist explanations of rape but no support for the ameliorative hypothesis. These findings support a more inclusive socialist feminist theory that takes both Marxist and radical feminist hypotheses into account. PMID:16567334

  2. Gender equality and women's absolute status: a test of the feminist models of rape.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kimberly; Vieraitis, Lynne M; Britto, Sarah

    2006-04-01

    Feminist theory predicts both a positive and negative relationship between gender equality and rape rates. Although liberal and radical feminist theory predicts that gender equality should ameliorate rape victimization, radical feminist theorists have argued that gender equality may increase rape in the form of male backlash. Alternatively, Marxist criminologists focus on women's absolute socioeconomic status rather than gender equality as a predictor of rape rates, whereas socialist feminists combine both radical and Marxist perspectives. This study uses factor analysis to overcome multicollinearity limitations of past studies while exploring the relationship between women's absolute and relative socioeconomic status on rape rates in major U.S. cities using 2000 census data. The findings indicate support for both the Marxist and radical feminist explanations of rape but no support for the ameliorative hypothesis. These findings support a more inclusive socialist feminist theory that takes both Marxist and radical feminist hypotheses into account.

  3. Cooling rates of LL, L and H chondrites and constraints on the duration of peak thermal conditions: Diffusion kinetic modeling and implications for fragmentation of asteroids and impact resetting of petrologic types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Jibamitra; Tirone, Massimiliano; Domanik, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out detailed thermometric and cooling history studies of several LL-, L- and H-chondrites of petrologic types 5 and 6. Among the selected samples, the low-temperature cooling of St. Séverin (LL6) has been constrained in an earlier study by thermochronological data to an average rate of ∼2.6 °C/My below 500 °C. However, numerical simulations of the development of Fe-Mg profiles in Opx-Cpx pairs using this cooling rate grossly misfit the measured compositional profiles. Satisfactory simulation of the latter and low temperature thermochronological constraints requires a two-stage cooling model with a cooling rate of ∼50-200 °C/ky from the peak metamorphic temperature of ∼875 °C down to 450 °C, and then transitioning to very slow cooling with an average rate of ∼2.6 °C/My. Similar rapid high temperature cooling rates (200-600 °C/ky) are also required to successfully model the compositional profiles in the Opx-Cpx pairs in the other samples of L5, L6 chondrites. For the H-chondrite samples, the low temperature cooling rates were determined earlier to be 10-20 °C/My by metallographic method. As in St. Séverin, these cooling rates grossly misfit the compositional profiles in the Opx-Cpx pairs. Modeling of these profiles requires very rapid cooling, ∼200-400 °C/ky, from the peak temperatures (∼810-830 °C), transitioning to the metallographic rates at ∼450-500 °C. We interpret the rapid high temperature cooling rates to the exposure of the samples to surface or near surface conditions as a result of fragmentation of the parent body by asteroidal impacts. Using the thermochronological data, the timing of the presumed impact is constrained to be ∼4555-4560 My before present for St. Séverin. We also deduced similar two stage cooling models in earlier studies of H-chondrites and mesosiderites that could be explained, using the available geochronological data, by impact induced fragmentation at around the same time. Diffusion kinetic

  4. Novalis' Poetic Uncertainty: A "Bildung" with the Absolute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mika, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Novalis, the Early German Romantic poet and philosopher, had at the core of his work a mysterious depiction of the "absolute." The absolute is Novalis' name for a substance that defies precise knowledge yet calls for a tentative and sensitive speculation. How one asserts a truth, represents an object, and sets about encountering things…

  5. Absolute Pitch in Infant Auditory Learning: Evidence for Developmental Reorganization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saffran, Jenny R.; Griepentrog, Gregory J.

    2001-01-01

    Two experiments examined 8-month-olds' use of absolute and relative pitch cues in a tone-sequence statistical learning task. Results suggest that, given unsegmented stimuli that do not conform to rules of musical composition, infants are more likely to track patterns of absolute pitches than of relative pitches. A third experiment found that adult…

  6. Supplementary and Enrichment Series: Absolute Value. Teachers' Commentary. SP-25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgess, M. Philbrick, Ed.

    This is one in a series of manuals for teachers using SMSG high school supplementary materials. The pamphlet includes commentaries on the sections of the student's booklet, answers to the exercises, and sample test questions. Topics covered include addition and multiplication in terms of absolute value, graphs of absolute value in the Cartesian…

  7. Supplementary and Enrichment Series: Absolute Value. SP-24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgess, M. Philbrick, Ed.

    This is one in a series of SMSG supplementary and enrichment pamphlets for high school students. This series is designed to make material for the study of topics of special interest to students readily accessible in classroom quantity. Topics covered include absolute value, addition and multiplication in terms of absolute value, graphs of absolute…

  8. Absolute dimensions of unevolved O type close binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Doom, C.; de Loore, C.

    1984-03-15

    A method is presented to derive the absolute dimensions of early-type detached binaries by combining the observed parameters with results of evolutionary computations. The method is used to obtain the absolute dimensions of nine close binaries. We find that most systems have an initial masss ratio near 1.

  9. Determination of Absolute Zero Using a Computer-Based Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple computer-based laboratory experiment for evaluating absolute zero in degrees Celsius, which can be performed in college and undergraduate physical sciences laboratory courses. With a computer, absolute zero apparatus can help demonstrators or students to observe the relationship between temperature and pressure and use…

  10. Thermal diffusivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gfroerer, Tim; Phillips, Ryan; Rossi, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The tip of a rod is heated with a torch and brought into contact with the center of a metal sheet. A thermal camera is then used to image the temperature profile of the surface as a function of time. The infrared camera is capable of recording radiometric data with 1 mK resolution in nearly 105 pixels, so thermal diffusion can be monitored with unprecedented precision. With a frame rate of approximately 10 Hz, the pace of the data acquisition minimizes the loss of accuracy due to inevitable cooling mechanisms. We report diffusivity constants equal to 1.23 ± 0.06 cm2/s in copper and 0.70 ± 0.05 cm2/s in aluminum. The behavior is modeled with a straightforward but oddly under-utilized one-dimensional finite difference method.

  11. Absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The distinction between the uses of relative and absolute spectroradiometric calibration of remote sensing systems is discussed. The advantages of detector-based absolute calibration are described, and the categories of relative and absolute system calibrations are listed. The limitations and problems associated with three common methods used for the absolute calibration of remote sensing systems are addressed. Two methods are proposed for the in-flight absolute calibration of advanced multispectral linear array systems. One makes use of a sun-illuminated panel in front of the sensor, the radiance of which is monitored by a spectrally flat pyroelectric radiometer. The other uses a large, uniform, high-radiance reference ground surface. The ground and atmospheric measurements required as input to a radiative transfer program to predict the radiance level at the entrance pupil of the orbital sensor are discussed, and the ground instrumentation is described.

  12. Absolute Position Encoders With Vertical Image Binning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2005-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic patternrecognition encoders that measure rotary and linear 1-dimensional positions at conversion rates (numbers of readings per unit time) exceeding 20 kHz have been invented. Heretofore, optoelectronic pattern-recognition absoluteposition encoders have been limited to conversion rates <15 Hz -- too low for emerging industrial applications in which conversion rates ranging from 1 kHz to as much as 100 kHz are required. The high conversion rates of the improved encoders are made possible, in part, by use of vertically compressible or binnable (as described below) scale patterns in combination with modified readout sequences of the image sensors [charge-coupled devices (CCDs)] used to read the scale patterns. The modified readout sequences and the processing of the images thus read out are amenable to implementation by use of modern, high-speed, ultra-compact microprocessors and digital signal processors or field-programmable gate arrays. This combination of improvements makes it possible to greatly increase conversion rates through substantial reductions in all three components of conversion time: exposure time, image-readout time, and image-processing time.

  13. [Study on the absolute spectral irradiation calibration method for far ultraviolet spectrometer in remote sensing].

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Lin, Guan-Yu; Chen, Bin

    2013-01-01

    The present paper studied spectral irradiation responsivities calibration method which can be applied to the far ultraviolet spectrometer for upper atmosphere remote sensing. It is difficult to realize the calibration for far ultraviolet spectrometer for many reasons. Standard instruments for far ultraviolet waveband calibration are few, the degree of the vacuum experiment system is required to be high, the stabilities of the experiment are hardly maintained, and the limitation of the far ultraviolet waveband makes traditional diffuser and the integrating sphere radiance calibration method difficult to be used. To solve these problems, a new absolute spectral irradiance calibration method was studied, which can be applied to the far ultraviolet calibration. We build a corresponding special vacuum experiment system to verify the calibration method. The light source system consists of a calibrated deuterium lamp, a vacuum ultraviolet monochromater and a collimating system. We used the calibrated detector to obtain the irradiance responsivities of it. The three instruments compose the calibration irradiance source. We used the "calibration irradiance source" to illuminate the spectrometer prototype and obtained the spectral irradiance responsivities. It realized the absolute spectral irradiance calibration for the far ultraviolet spectrometer utilizing the calibrated detector. The absolute uncertainty of the calibration is 7.7%. The method is significant for the ground irradiation calibration of the far ultraviolet spectrometer in upper atmosphere remote sensing.

  14. Noninvasive absolute cerebral oximetry with frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallacoglu, Bertan

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements of absolute concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin in the human brain can provide critical information about cerebral physiology in terms of cerebral blood volume, blood flow, oxygen delivery, and metabolic rate of oxygen. We developed several frequency domain NIRS data acquisition and analysis methods aimed at absolute measurements of hemoglobin concentration and saturation in cerebral tissue of adult human subjects. Extensive experimental investigations were carried out in various homogenous and two-layered tissue-mimicking phantoms, and biological tissues. The advantages and limitations of commonly used homogenous models and inversion strategies were thoroughly investigated. Prior to human subjects, extensive studies were carried out in in vivo animal models. In rabbits, absolute hemoglobin oxygen desaturation was shown to depend strongly on surgically induced testicular torsion. Methods developed in this study were then adapted for measurements in the rat brain. Absolute values were demonstrated to discern cerebrovascular impairment in a rat model of diet-induced vascular cognitive impairment. These results facilitated the development of clinically useful optical measures of cerebrovascular health. In a large group of human subjects, employing a homogeneous model for absolute measurements was shown to be reliable and robust. However, it was also shown to be limited due to the relatively thick extracerebral tissue. The procedure we develop in this work and the thesis thereof performs a nonlinear inversion procedure with six unknown parameters with no other prior knowledge for the retrieval of the optical coefficients and top layer thickness with high accuracy on two-layered media. Our absolute measurements of cerebral hemoglobin concentration and saturation are based on the discrimination of extracerebral and cerebral tissue layers, and they can enhance the impact of NIRS for cerebral hemodynamics and

  15. Absolute Geodetic Rotation Measurement Using Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stockton, J. K.; Takase, K.; Kasevich, M. A.

    2011-09-23

    We demonstrate a cold-atom interferometer gyroscope which overcomes accuracy and dynamic range limitations of previous atom interferometer gyroscopes. We show how the instrument can be used for precise determination of latitude, azimuth (true north), and Earth's rotation rate. Spurious noise terms related to multiple-path interferences are suppressed by employing a novel time-skewed pulse sequence. Extended versions of this instrument appear capable of meeting the stringent requirements for inertial navigation, geodetic applications of Earth's rotation rate determination, and tests of general relativity.

  16. Hybrid diffuse optical techniques for continuous hemodynamic measurement in gastrocnemius during plantar flexion exercise.

    PubMed

    Henry, Brad; Zhao, Mingjun; Shang, Yu; Uhl, Timothy; Thomas, D Travis; Xenos, Eleftherios S; Saha, Sibu P; Yu, Guoqiang

    2015-12-01

    Occlusion calibrations and gating techniques have been recently applied by our laboratory for continuous and absolute diffuse optical measurements of forearm muscle hemodynamics during handgrip exercises. The translation of these techniques from the forearm to the lower limb is the goal of this study as various diseases preferentially affect muscles in the lower extremity. This study adapted a hybrid near-infrared spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy system with a gating algorithm to continuously quantify hemodynamic responses of medial gastrocnemius during plantar flexion exercises in 10 healthy subjects. The outcomes from optical measurement include oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations, blood oxygen saturation, and relative changes in blood flow (rBF) and oxygen consumption rate (rV̇O2). We calibrated rBF and rV̇O2 profiles with absolute baseline values of BF and V̇O2 obtained by venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Results from this investigation were comparable to values from similar studies. Additionally, significant correlation was observed between resting local muscle BF measured by the optical technique and whole limb BF measured concurrently by a strain gauge venous plethysmography. The extensive hemodynamic and metabolic profiles during exercise will allow for future comparison studies to investigate the diagnostic value of hybrid technologies in muscles affected by disease. PMID:26720871

  17. Hybrid diffuse optical techniques for continuous hemodynamic measurement in gastrocnemius during plantar flexion exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Brad; Zhao, Mingjun; Shang, Yu; Uhl, Timothy; Thomas, D. Travis; Xenos, Eleftherios S.; Saha, Sibu P.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2015-12-01

    Occlusion calibrations and gating techniques have been recently applied by our laboratory for continuous and absolute diffuse optical measurements of forearm muscle hemodynamics during handgrip exercises. The translation of these techniques from the forearm to the lower limb is the goal of this study as various diseases preferentially affect muscles in the lower extremity. This study adapted a hybrid near-infrared spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy system with a gating algorithm to continuously quantify hemodynamic responses of medial gastrocnemius during plantar flexion exercises in 10 healthy subjects. The outcomes from optical measurement include oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations, blood oxygen saturation, and relative changes in blood flow (rBF) and oxygen consumption rate (rV˙O2). We calibrated rBF and rV˙O2 profiles with absolute baseline values of BF and V˙O2 obtained by venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Results from this investigation were comparable to values from similar studies. Additionally, significant correlation was observed between resting local muscle BF measured by the optical technique and whole limb BF measured concurrently by a strain gauge venous plethysmography. The extensive hemodynamic and metabolic profiles during exercise will allow for future comparison studies to investigate the diagnostic value of hybrid technologies in muscles affected by disease.

  18. Absolute calorimetric calibration of low energy brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stump, Kurt E.

    In the past decade there has been a dramatic increase in the use of permanent radioactive source implants in the treatment of prostate cancer. A small radioactive source encapsulated in a titanium shell is used in this type of treatment. The radioisotopes used are generally 125I or 103Pd. Both of these isotopes have relatively short half-lives, 59.4 days and 16.99 days, respectively, and have low-energy emissions and a low dose rate. These factors make these sources well suited for this application, but the calibration of these sources poses significant metrological challenges. The current standard calibration technique involves the measurement of ionization in air to determine the source air-kerma strength. While this has proved to be an improvement over previous techniques, the method has been shown to be metrologically impure and may not be the ideal means of calbrating these sources. Calorimetric methods have long been viewed to be the most fundamental means of determining source strength for a radiation source. This is because calorimetry provides a direct measurement of source energy. However, due to the low energy and low power of the sources described above, current calorimetric methods are inadequate. This thesis presents work oriented toward developing novel methods to provide direct and absolute measurements of source power for low-energy low dose rate brachytherapy sources. The method is the first use of an actively temperature-controlled radiation absorber using the electrical substitution method to determine total contained source power of these sources. The instrument described operates at cryogenic temperatures. The method employed provides a direct measurement of source power. The work presented here is focused upon building a metrological foundation upon which to establish power-based calibrations of clinical-strength sources. To that end instrument performance has been assessed for these source strengths. The intent is to establish the limits of

  19. Kramers turnover: From energy diffusion to spatial diffusion using metadynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwary, Pratyush; Berne, B. J.

    2016-04-01

    We consider the rate of transition for a particle between two metastable states coupled to a thermal environment for various magnitudes of the coupling strength using the recently proposed infrequent metadynamics approach [P. Tiwary and M. Parrinello, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 230602 (2013)]. We are interested in understanding how this approach for obtaining rate constants performs as the dynamics regime changes from energy diffusion to spatial diffusion. Reassuringly, we find that the approach works remarkably well for various coupling strengths in the strong coupling regime, and to some extent even in the weak coupling regime.

  20. Concepts for optical control of diffuse discharge opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, K.H.; Guenther, A.H.; Hatfield, L.L.; Kristiansen, M.; Schaefer, G.

    1982-12-01

    Optical control of diffuse discharges is discussed as opening mechanism for rep-rated switches. Diffuse discharges can be sustained or terminated by making use of optogalvanic effects, that means resonant interaction of laser radiation with diffuse plasma. Independent of control mechanisms, the performance of diffuse discharge opening switches is strongly affected by such fill gas properties as attachment and electron mobility.