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Sample records for absolute dose difference

  1. Absolute and relative dose measurements with Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT film for high energy electron beams with different doses per pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Fiandra, Christian; Ragona, Riccardo; Ricardi, Umberto; Anglesio, Silvia; Giglioli, Francesca Romana

    2008-12-15

    The authors have evaluated the accuracy, in absolute and relative dose measurements, of the Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT film in pulsed high-energy electron beams. Typically, the electron beams used in radiotherapy have a dose-per-pulse value of less than 0.1 mGy/pulse. However, very high dose-per-pulse electron beams are employed in certain linear accelerators dedicated to intraoperatory radiation therapy (IORT). In this study, the absorbed dose measurements with Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT in both low (less than 0.3 mGy per pulse) and high (30 and 70 mGy per pulse) dose-per-pulse electron beams were compared with ferrous sulfate chemical Fricke dosimetry (operated by the Italian Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory), a method independent of the dose per pulse. A summary of Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT in relative and absolute beam output determination is reported. This study demonstrates the independence of Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT absorption as a function of dose per pulse at different dose levels. A good agreement (within 3%) was found with Fricke dosimeters for plane-base IORT applicators. Comparison with a diode detector is presented for relative dose measurements, showing acceptable agreement both in the steep dose falloff zone and in the homogeneous dose region. This work also provides experimental values for recombination correction factor (K{sub sat}) of a Roos (plane parallel) ionization chamber calculated on the basis of theoretical models for charge recombination.

  2. Absolute dose verifications in small photon fields using BANGTM gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheib, S. G.; Schenkel, Y.; Gianolini, S.

    2004-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters change their magnetic resonance (MR) and optical properties with the absorbed dose when irradiated and are suitable for narrow photon beam dosimetry in radiosurgery. Such dosimeters enable relative and absolute 3D dose verifications in order to check the entire treatment chain from imaging to dose application during commissioning and quality assurance. For absolute 3D dose verifications in radiosurgery using Gamma Knife B, commercially available BANGTM Gels (BANG 25 Gy and BANG 3 Gy) together with dedicated phantoms were chosen in order to determine the potential of absolute gel dosimetry in radiosurgery.

  3. 3D measurement of absolute radiation dose in grid therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapp, J. V.; Warrington, A. P.; Partridge, M.; Philps, A.; Leach, M. O.; Webb, S.

    2004-01-01

    Spatially fractionated radiotherapy through a grid is a concept which has a long history and was routinely used in orthovoltage radiation therapy in the middle of last century to minimize damage to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. With the advent of megavoltage radiotherapy and its skin sparing effects the use of grids in radiotherapy declined in the 1970s. However there has recently been a revival of the technique for use in palliative treatments with a single fraction of 10 to 20 Gy. In this work the absolute 3D dose distribution in a grid irradiation is measured for photons using a combination of film and gel dosimetry.

  4. Comprehensive fluence model for absolute portal dose image prediction.

    PubMed

    Chytyk, K; McCurdy, B M C

    2009-04-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) continue to be investigated as treatment verification tools, with a particular focus on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This verification could be accomplished through a comparison of measured portal images to predicted portal dose images. A general fluence determination tailored to portal dose image prediction would be a great asset in order to model the complex modulation of IMRT. A proposed physics-based parameter fluence model was commissioned by matching predicted EPID images to corresponding measured EPID images of multileaf collimator (MLC) defined fields. The two-source fluence model was composed of a focal Gaussian and an extrafocal Gaussian-like source. Specific aspects of the MLC and secondary collimators were also modeled (e.g., jaw and MLC transmission factors, MLC rounded leaf tips, tongue and groove effect, interleaf leakage, and leaf offsets). Several unique aspects of the model were developed based on the results of detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the linear accelerator including (1) use of a non-Gaussian extrafocal fluence source function, (2) separate energy spectra used for focal and extrafocal fluence, and (3) different off-axis energy spectra softening used for focal and extrafocal fluences. The predicted energy fluence was then convolved with Monte Carlo generated, EPID-specific dose kernels to convert incident fluence to dose delivered to the EPID. Measured EPID data were obtained with an a-Si EPID for various MLC-defined fields (from 1 x 1 to 20 x 20 cm2) over a range of source-to-detector distances. These measured profiles were used to determine the fluence model parameters in a process analogous to the commissioning of a treatment planning system. The resulting model was tested on 20 clinical IMRT plans, including ten prostate and ten oropharyngeal cases. The model predicted the open-field profiles within 2%, 2 mm, while a mean of 96.6% of pixels over all

  5. An absolute dose determination of helical tomotherapy accelerator, TomoTherapy High-Art II

    SciTech Connect

    Bailat, Claude J.; Buchillier, Thierry; Pachoud, Marc; Moeckli, Raphaeel; Bochud, Francois O.

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: A helical tomotherapy accelerator presents a dosimetric challenge because, to this day, there is no internationally accepted protocol for the determination of the absolute dose. Because of this reality, we investigated the different alternatives for characterizing and measuring the absolute dose of such an accelerator. We tested several dosimetric techniques with various metrological traceabilities as well as using a number of phantoms in static and helical modes. Methods: Firstly, the relationship between the reading of ionization chambers and the absorbed dose is dependent on the beam quality value of the photon beam. For high energy photons, the beam quality is specified by the tissue phantom ratio (TPR{sub 20,10}) and it is therefore necessary to know the TPR{sub 20,10} to calculate the dose delivered by a given accelerator. This parameter is obtained through the ratio of the absorbed dose at 20 and 10 cm depths in water and was measured in the particular conditions of the tomotherapy accelerator. Afterward, measurements were performed using the ionization chamber (model A1SL) delivered as a reference instrument by the vendor. This chamber is traceable in absorbed dose to water in a Co-60 beam to a water calorimeter of the American metrology institute (NIST). Similarly, in Switzerland, each radiotherapy department is directly traceable to the Swiss metrology institute (METAS) in absorbed dose to water based on a water calorimeter. For our research, this traceability was obtained by using an ionization chamber traceable to METAS (model NE 2611A), which is the secondary standard of our institute. Furthermore, in order to have another fully independent measurement method, we determined the dose using alanine dosimeters provided by and traceable to the British metrology institute (NPL); they are calibrated in absorbed dose to water using a graphite calorimeter. And finally, we wanted to take into account the type of chamber routinely used in clinical

  6. The impact of water temperature on the measurement of absolute dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Naveed Mehdi

    To standardize reference dosimetry in radiation therapy, Task Group 51 (TG 51) of American Association of Physicist's in Medicine (AAPM) recommends that dose calibration measurements be made in a water tank at a depth of 10 cm and at a reference geometry. Methodologies are provided for calculating various correction factors to be applied in calculating the absolute dose. However the protocol does not specify the water temperature to be used. In practice, the temperature of water during dosimetry may vary considerably between independent sessions and different centers. In this work the effect of water temperature on absolute dosimetry has been investigated. Density of water varies with temperature, which in turn may impact the beam attenuation and scatter properties. Furthermore, due to thermal expansion or contraction air volume inside the chamber may change. All of these effects can result in a change in the measurement. Dosimetric measurements were made using a Farmer type ion chamber on a Varian Linear Accelerator for 6 MV and 23 MV photon energies for temperatures ranging from 10 to 40 °C. A thermal insulation was designed for the water tank in order to maintain relatively stable temperature over the duration of the experiment. Dose measured at higher temperatures were found to be consistently higher by a very small magnitude. Although the differences in dose were less than the uncertainty in each measurement, a linear regression of the data suggests that the trend is statistically significant with p-values of 0.002 and 0.013 for 6 and 23 MV beams respectively. For a 10 degree difference in water phantom temperatures, which is a realistic deviation across clinics, the final calculated reference dose can differ by 0.24% or more. To address this effect, first a reference temperature (e.g.22 °C) can be set as the standard; subsequently a correction factor can be implemented for deviations from this reference. Such a correction factor is expected to be of similar

  7. Auditory working memory predicts individual differences in absolute pitch learning.

    PubMed

    Van Hedger, Stephen C; Heald, Shannon L M; Koch, Rachelle; Nusbaum, Howard C

    2015-07-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is typically defined as the ability to label an isolated tone as a musical note in the absence of a reference tone. At first glance the acquisition of AP note categories seems like a perceptual learning task, since individuals must assign a category label to a stimulus based on a single perceptual dimension (pitch) while ignoring other perceptual dimensions (e.g., loudness, octave, instrument). AP, however, is rarely discussed in terms of domain-general perceptual learning mechanisms. This is because AP is typically assumed to depend on a critical period of development, in which early exposure to pitches and musical labels is thought to be necessary for the development of AP precluding the possibility of adult acquisition of AP. Despite this view of AP, several previous studies have found evidence that absolute pitch category learning is, to an extent, trainable in a post-critical period adult population, even if the performance typically achieved by this population is below the performance of a "true" AP possessor. The current studies attempt to understand the individual differences in learning to categorize notes using absolute pitch cues by testing a specific prediction regarding cognitive capacity related to categorization - to what extent does an individual's general auditory working memory capacity (WMC) predict the success of absolute pitch category acquisition. Since WMC has been shown to predict performance on a wide variety of other perceptual and category learning tasks, we predict that individuals with higher WMC should be better at learning absolute pitch note categories than individuals with lower WMC. Across two studies, we demonstrate that auditory WMC predicts the efficacy of learning absolute pitch note categories. These results suggest that a higher general auditory WMC might underlie the formation of absolute pitch categories for post-critical period adults. Implications for understanding the mechanisms that underlie the

  8. SU-E-T-89: Accuracy of Absolute Three-Dimensional Dose Distribution Measurement Using the Delta4

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, R; Tachibana, H; Ohyoshi, H; Matsumoto, S; Baba, H; Tanaka, F; Ariji, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, we investigated the accuracy of the absolute dose distribution measurement using the Delta4 phantom compared to the measurements using a ionization chamber and EDR2 film Methods: Several conventional and intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans were used to compare the dose distribution measured using the Delta4 phantom to the absolute point dose using the chamber and the relative two-dimensional dose distribution using the EDR2 film. For the absolute dose distribution evaluation, the measurements using the Delta4, the chamber and the film were performed in similar measurement geometry. For point dose measurement using the chamber, an acrylic slab phantom with the PTW Semiflex chamber was inserted into the Delta4 phantom, alternative to the Delta4 main unit. Similarly, for dose distribution measurement using the film, the EDR2 film sandwiched with two acrylic slab phantoms were inserted to the phantom. Dose difference and gamma analysis were done for point dose and relative dose distribution comparisons, respectively. Results: The point dose measurements show slight negative systematic dose difference of −0.5 ± 0.1% and −1.0 ± 0.4% in the conventional and the IMRT plans, respectively. The additional measurement for direction dependency for Delta4 shows similar negative systematic dose difference even the phantom analysis software consider the directional dependency. The pass rate of the gamma evaluation was 77.7 ± 5.8% and 88.8±3.3% in the conventional and the IMRT plans, respectively. Conclusions: The Delta4 phantom shows a 1%-systematic dose difference derived from directional dependency and lower resolution compared to the film. Thus it is necessary to comprehensively evaluate the phantom to verify the IMRT/VMAT plans. Especially, the dosimetry tool is needed to have high resolution and high measurement accuracy in IMRT/VMAT-SBRT plan with small fields using intensity modulation in which the analysis area is limited and the

  9. Evaluation of clinical IMRT treatment planning using the GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform for absolute and relative dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Benhalouche, S.; Le Maitre, A.; Visvikis, D.; Pradier, O.; Boussion, N.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to evaluate and validate the use of the Geant4 application for emission tomography (GATE) Monte Carlo simulation platform for clinical intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) dosimetry studies. Methods: The first step consisted of modeling a 6 MV photon beam linear accelerator (LINAC), with its corresponding validation carried out using percent depth dose evaluation, transverse profiles, tissue phantom ratio, and output factor on water phantom. The IMRT evaluation was performed by comparing simulation and measurements in terms of absolute and relative doses using IMRT dedicated quality assurance phantoms considering seven different patient datasets. Results: Concerning the LINAC simulated model validation tissue phantom ratios at 20 and 10 cm in water TPR{sub 10}{sup 20} obtained from GATE and measurements were 0.672 {+-} 0.063 and 0.675, respectively. In terms of percent depth dose and transverse profiles, error ranges were, respectively: 1.472%{+-} 0.285% and 4.827%{+-} 1.323% for field size of 4 Multiplication-Sign 4, 5 Multiplication-Sign 5, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10, 15 Multiplication-Sign 15, 20 Multiplication-Sign 20, 25 Multiplication-Sign 25, 30 Multiplication-Sign 30, and 40 Multiplication-Sign 40 cm{sup 2}. Most errors were observed at the edge of radiation fields because of higher dose gradient in these areas. Output factors showed good agreement between simulation and measurements with a maximum error of 1.22%. Finally, for IMRT simulations considering seven patient datasets, GATE provided good results with a relative error of 0.43%{+-} 0.25% on absolute dose between simulated and measured beams (measurements at the isocenter, volume 0.125 cm{sup 3}). Planar dose comparisons were also performed using gamma-index analysis. For the whole set of beams considered the mean gamma-index value was 0.497 {+-} 0.152 and 90.8%{+-} 3.6% of the evaluated dose points satisfied the 5%/ 4 mm criterion. Conclusions: These

  10. Pretreatment verification of IMRT absolute dose distributions using a commercial a-Si EPID

    SciTech Connect

    Talamonti, C.; Casati, M.; Bucciolini, M.

    2006-11-15

    A commercial amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been studied to investigate its potential in the field of pretreatment verifications of step and shoot, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), 6 MV photon beams. The EPID was calibrated to measure absolute exit dose in a water-equivalent phantom at patient level, following an experimental approach, which does not require sophisticated calculation algorithms. The procedure presented was specifically intended to replace the time-consuming in-phantom film dosimetry. The dosimetric response was characterized on the central axis in terms of stability, linearity, and pulse repetition frequency dependence. The a-Si EPID demonstrated a good linearity with dose (within 2% from 1 monitor unit), which represent a prerequisite for the application in IMRT. A series of measurements, in which phantom thickness, air gap between the phantom and the EPID, field size and position of measurement of dose in the phantom (entrance or exit) varied, was performed to find the optimal calibration conditions, for which the field size dependence is minimized. In these conditions (20 cm phantom thickness, 56 cm air gap, exit dose measured at the isocenter), the introduction of a filter for the low-energy scattered radiation allowed us to define a universal calibration factor, independent of field size. The off-axis extension of the dose calibration was performed by applying a radial correction for the beam profile, distorted due to the standard flood field calibration of the device. For the acquisition of IMRT fields, it was necessary to employ home-made software and a specific procedure. This method was applied for the measurement of the dose distributions for 15 clinical IMRT fields. The agreement between the dose distributions, quantified by the gamma index, was found, on average, in 97.6% and 98.3% of the analyzed points for EPID versus TPS and for EPID versus FILM, respectively, thus suggesting a great

  11. Absolute depth-dose-rate measurements for an 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source in water using MOSFET detectors.

    PubMed

    Zilio, Valéry Olivier; Joneja, Om Parkash; Popowski, Youri; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Chawla, Rakesh

    2006-06-01

    Reported MOSFET measurements concern mostly external radiotherapy and in vivo dosimetry. In this paper, we apply the technique for absolute dosimetry in the context of HDR brachytherapy using an 192Ir source. Measured radial dose rate distributions in water for different planes perpendicular to the source axis are presented and special attention is paid to the calibration of the R and K type detectors, and to the determination of appropriate correction factors for the sensitivity variation with the increase of the threshold voltage and the energy dependence. The experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo simulated dose rate distributions. The experimental results show a good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulations: the discrepancy between experimental and Monte Carlo results being within 5% for 82% of the points and within 10% for 95% of the points. Moreover, all points except two are found to lie within the experimental uncertainties, confirming thereby the quality of the results obtained.

  12. Individual Differences in Absolute and Relative Metacomprehension Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maki, Ruth H.; Shields, Micheal; Wheeler, Amanda Easton; Zacchilli, Tammy Lowery

    2005-01-01

    The authors investigated absolute and relative metacomprehension accuracy as a function of verbal ability in college students. Students read hard texts, revised texts, or a mixed set of texts. They then predicted their performance, took a multiple-choice test on the texts, and made posttest judgments about their performance. With hard texts,…

  13. Effect of various methods for rectum delineation on relative and absolute dose-volume histograms for prostate IMRT treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Kusumoto, Chiaki; Ohira, Shingo; Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Isono, Masaru; Teshima, Teruki

    2016-07-01

    Several reports have dealt with correlations of late rectal toxicity with rectal dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for high dose levels. There are 2 techniques to assess rectal volume for reception of a specific dose: relative-DVH (R-DVH, %) that indicates relative volume for a vertical axis, and absolute-DVH (A-DVH, cc) with its vertical axis showing absolute volume of the rectum. The parameters of DVH vary depending on the rectum delineation method, but the literature does not present any standardization of such methods. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different delineation methods on rectal DVHs. The enrollment for this study comprised 28 patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer, who had undergone intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with the prescription dose of 78 Gy. The rectum was contoured with 4 different methods using 2 lengths, short (Sh) and long (Lg), and 2 cross sections, rectum (Rec) and rectal wall (Rw). Sh means the length from 1 cm above the seminal vesicles to 1 cm below the prostate and Lg the length from the rectosigmoid junction to the anus. Rec represents the entire rectal volume including the rectal contents and Rw the rectal volume of the area with a wall thickness of 4 mm. We compared dose-volume parameters by using 4 rectal contour methods for the same plan with the R-DVHs as well as the A-DVHs. For the high dose levels, the R-DVH parameters varied widely. The mean of V{sub 70} for Sh-Rw was the highest (19.4%) and nearly twice as high as that for Lg-Rec (10.4%). On the contrary, only small variations were observed in the A-DVH parameters (4.3, 4.3, 5.5, and 5.5 cc for Sh-Rw, Lg-Rw, Sh-Rec, and Lg-Rec, respectively). As for R-DVHs, the parameters of V{sub 70} varied depending on the rectal lengths (Sh-Rec vs Lg-Rec: R = 0.76; Sh-Rw vs Lg-Rw: R = 0.85) and cross sections (Sh-Rec vs Sh-Rw: R = 0.49; Lg-Rec vs Lg-Rw: R = 0.65). For A-DVHs, however, the parameters of Sh rectal A-DVHs hardly changed

  14. TU-A-12A-09: Absolute Blood Flow Measurement in a Cardiac Phantom Using Low Dose CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemer, B; Hubbard, L; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a first pass analysis technique to measure absolute flow from low dose CT images in a cardiac phantom. This technique can be combined with a myocardial mass assignment to yield absolute perfusion using only two volume scans and reduce the radiation dose to the patient. Methods: A four-chamber cardiac phantom and perfusion chamber were constructed from poly-acrylic and connected with tubing to approximate anatomical features. The system was connected to a pulsatile pump, input/output reservoirs and power contrast injector. Flow was varied in the range of 1-2.67 mL/s with the pump operating at 60 beats/min. The system was imaged once a second for 14 seconds with a 320-row scanner (Toshiba Medical Systems) using a contrast-enhanced, prospective-gated cardiac perfusion protocol. Flow was calculated by the following steps: subsequent images of the perfusion volume were subtracted to find the contrast entering the volume; this was normalized by an upstream, known volume region to convert Hounsfield (HU) values to concentration; this was divided by the subtracted images time difference. The technique requires a relatively stable input contrast concentration and no contrast can leave the perfusion volume before the flow measurement is completed. Results: The flow calculated from the images showed an excellent correlation with the known rates. The data was fit to a linear function with slope 1.03, intercept 0.02 and an R{sup 2} value of 0.99. The average root mean square (RMS) error was 0.15 mL/s and the average standard deviation was 0.14 mL/s. The flow rate was stable within 7.7% across the full scan and served to validate model assumptions. Conclusion: Accurate, absolute flow rates were measured from CT images using a conservation of mass model. Measurements can be made using two volume scans which can substantially reduce the radiation dose compared with current dynamic perfusion techniques.

  15. Reduced dose measurement of absolute myocardial blood flow using dynamic SPECT imaging in a porcine model

    SciTech Connect

    Timmins, Rachel; Klein, Ran; Petryk, Julia; Marvin, Brian; Kemp, Robert A. de; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Wells, R. Glenn; Wei, Lihui

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) measurements provide important additional information over traditional relative perfusion imaging. Recent advances in camera technology have made this possible with single-photon emission tomography (SPECT). Low dose protocols are desirable to reduce the patient radiation risk; however, increased noise may reduce the accuracy of MBF measurements. The authors studied the effect of reducing dose on the accuracy of dynamic SPECT MBF measurements. Methods: Nineteen 30–40 kg pigs were injected with 370 + 1110 MBq of Tc-99m sestamibi or tetrofosmin or 37 + 111 MBq of Tl-201 at rest + stress. Microspheres were injected simultaneously to measure MBF. The pigs were imaged in list-mode for 11 min starting at the time of injection using a Discovery NM 530c camera (GE Healthcare). Each list file was modified so that 3/4, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 of the original counts were included in the projections. Modified projections were reconstructed with CT-based attenuation correction and an energy window-based scatter correction and analyzed with FlowQuant kinetic modeling software using a 1-compartment model. A modified Renkin-Crone extraction function was used to convert the tracer uptake rate K1 to MBF values. The SPECT results were compared to those from microspheres. Results: Correlation between SPECT and microsphere MBF values for the full injected activity was r ≥ 0.75 for all 3 tracers and did not significantly degrade over all count levels. The mean MBF and MFR and the standard errors in the estimates were not significantly worse than the full-count data at 1/4-counts (Tc99m-tracers) and 1/2-counts (Tl-201). Conclusions: Dynamic SPECT measurement of MBF and MFR in pigs can be performed with 1/4 (Tc99m-tracers) or 1/2 (Tl-201) of the standard injected activity without significantly reducing accuracy and precision.

  16. Absolute and relative dose surface and dose volume histograms of the bladder: which one is the most representative for the actual treatment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Peeters, Stephanie T. H.; de Bois, Josien; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify to what extent relative and absolute bladder dose-volume and dose-surface histograms of the planning CT scan were representative for the actual treatment. We used data of 17 patients, who each received 11 repeat CT scans and a planning CT scan. The repeat CT scans were matched on the planning CT scan by the bony anatomy. Clinical treatment plans were used to evaluate the impact of bladder filling changes on the four histogram types. The impact was quantified by calculating for this patient group the correlation coefficient between the planning histogram and the treatment histogram. We found that the absolute dose-surface histogram was the most representative one for the actual treatment.

  17. Spatial Variation of Dosimetric Leaf Gap and Its Impact on Absolute Dose Delivery in Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaraswamy, Lalith

    During dose calculation, the Eclipse Treatment Planning system (TPS) retracts the MLC leaf positions by half of the dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) value (measured at central axis) for all leaf positions in a dynamic MLC plan to accurately model the rounded leaf ends. The aim of this study is to map the variation of DLG along the travel path of each MLC leaf pair and quantify how this variation impacts delivered dose. 6 MV DLG values were measured for all MLC leaf pairs in increments of 1.0 cm (from the line intersecting the CAX and perpendicular to MLC motion) to 13.0 cm off axis distance at depth of dose maximum. The measurements were performed on two Varian LINACs, both employing the Millennium 120-leaf MLC. The measurements were performed at several locations in the beam with both a Sun Nuclear MapCHECK device and a PTW pinpoint ion chamber. The measured DLGs for the middle 40 MLC leaf pairs (each 0.5 cm width) at positions along a line through the CAX and perpendicular to MLC leaf travel direction were very similar, varying maximally by only 0.2 mm. The outer 20 MLC leaf pairs (each 1.0 cm width) have much lower DLG values, about 0.3 to 0.5 mm lower than the central MLC leaf pair, at their respective central line position. Overall, the mean and the maximum variation between the 0.5 cm width leaves and the 1.0 cm width leaf pairs is 0.32 mm and 0.65 mm, respectively. The spatial variation in DLG is caused by the variation of intraleaf transmission through MLC leaves. Fluences centered on the CAX would not be affected since DLG does not vary; but any fluences residing significantly off-axis with narrow sweeping leaves may exhibit significant dose differences. This is due to the fact that there are differences in DLG between the true DLG exhibited by the 1.0 cm width outer leaves and the constant DLG value utilized by the TPS for dose calculation. Since there are large differences in DLG between the 0.5 cm width leaf pairs and 1.0 cm width leaf pairs, there is a need

  18. Mass versus molar doses, similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Chmielewska, A; Lamparczyk, H

    2008-11-01

    Generally, they are two systems expressing the amounts of active substance in a given drug product, i.e. mass and molar dose. Currently, the dose system based on the mass is widely used in which doses are expressed in grams or milligrams. On the other hand, the molar dose system is in direct relation to the number of molecules. Hence, the objective of this work was to compare both systems in order to find their advantages and disadvantages. Active substances belonging to the groups of antibiotics, nootropic agents, beta-blockers, vitamins, GABA-analog, COX-2 inhibitors, calcium channel antagonists, benzodiazepine receptor agonists, lipid-modifying agents (fibrates), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (profens), estrogens, neuroleptics, analgesics and benzodiazepines were considered. Moreover, products containing two active substances were also taken into account. These are mixtures of hydrochlorothiazide with active substances influencing the renin-angiotensin system and combined oral contraceptives. For each active substance, belonging to the groups mentioned above molar doses were calculated from mass doses and molar mass. Hence, groups of drugs with a single active substance, drugs with similar pharmacological activities, pharmaceutical alternatives, and drugs with a single active ingredient manufactured in different doses were compared in order to find which dose system describes more adequately differences between and within the groups mentioned above. Comparisons were supported by a number of equations, which theoretically justify the data, and relationships derived from calculations.

  19. Absolute dose measurements by means of a small cylindrical ionization chamber for very high dose per pulse high energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Karaj, E.; Righi, S.; Di Martino, F.

    2007-03-15

    Very high dose per pulse (3-13 cGy/pulse) high energy electron beams are currently produced by special linear accelerators (linac) dedicated to Intra Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT). The electron beams produced by such linacs are collimated by special Perspex applicators of various size and cylindrically shaped. The biggest problems from the dosimetric point of view are caused by the high dose-per-pulse values and the use of inclined applicators. In this work measurements of absolute dose for the inclined applicators were done by using a small cylindrical ionization chamber, type CC01 (Wellhofer), a parallel plane ionization chamber type Markus (PTW 23343) and radiochromic films type EBT. We show a method which allows calculating the quality correction factors for CC01 chamber with an uncertainty of 1% and the absolute dose value for the inclined applicators using CC01 with an uncertainty of 3.1% for electron beams of energy of 6 and 7 MeV produced by the linac dedicated to IORT Novac7.

  20. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  1. Absolute calibration of the Gamma Knife{sup ®} Perfexion™ and delivered dose verification using EPR/alanine dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hornbeck, Amaury E-mail: tristan.garcia@cea.fr; Garcia, Tristan E-mail: tristan.garcia@cea.fr; Cuttat, Marguerite; Jenny, Catherine

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Elekta Leksell Gamma Knife{sup ®} (LGK) is a radiotherapy beam machine whose features are not compliant with the international calibration protocols for radiotherapy. In this scope, the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel and the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital decided to conceive a new LKG dose calibration method and to compare it with the currently used one. Furthermore, the accuracy of the dose delivered by the LGK machine was checked using an “end-to-end” test. This study also aims to compare doses delivered by the two latest software versions of the Gammaplan treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: The dosimetric method chosen is the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of alanine. Dose rate (calibration) verification was done without TPS using a spherical phantom. Absolute calibration was done with factors calculated by Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP-X). For “end-to-end” test, irradiations in an anthropomorphic head phantom, close to real treatment conditions, are done using the TPS in order to verify the delivered dose. Results: The comparison of the currently used calibration method with the new one revealed a deviation of +0.8% between the dose rates measured by ion chamber and EPR/alanine. For simple fields configuration (less than 16 mm diameter), the “end-to-end” tests showed out average deviations of −1.7% and −0.9% between the measured dose and the calculated dose by Gammaplan v9 and v10, respectively. Conclusions: This paper shows there is a good agreement between the new calibration method and the currently used one. There is also a good agreement between the calculated and delivered doses especially for Gammaplan v10.

  2. Relative and Absolute Error Control in a Finite-Difference Method Solution of Poisson's Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, J. S. C.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm for error control (absolute and relative) in the five-point finite-difference method applied to Poisson's equation is described. The algorithm is based on discretization of the domain of the problem by means of three rectilinear grids, each of different resolution. We discuss some hardware limitations associated with the algorithm,…

  3. Determination of absolute threshold and just noticeable difference in the sensory perception of pungency.

    PubMed

    Orellana-Escobedo, L; Ornelas-Paz, J J; Olivas, G I; Guerrero-Beltran, J A; Jimenez-Castro, J; Sepulveda, D R

    2012-03-01

    Absolute threshold and just noticeable difference (JND) were determined for the perception of pungency using chili pepper in aqueous solutions. Absolute threshold and JND were determined using 2 alternative forced-choice sensory tests tests. High-performance liquid chromatography technique was used to determine capsaicinoids concentration in samples used for sensory analysis. Sensory absolute threshold was 0.050 mg capsaicinoids/kg sample. Five JND values were determined using 5 reference solutions with different capsaicinoids concentration. JND values changed proportionally as capsaicinoids concentration of the reference sample solutions changed. Weber fraction remained stable for the first 4 reference capsaicinoid solutions (0.05, 0.11, 0.13, and 0.17 mg/kg) but changed when the most concentrated reference capsaicinoids solution was used (0.23 mg/kg). Quantification limit for instrumental analysis was 1.512 mg/kg capsaicinoids. Sensory methods employed in this study proved to be more sensitive than instrumental methods. Practical Application: A better understanding of the process involved in the sensory perception of pungency is currently required because "hot" foods are becoming more popular in western cuisine. Absolute thresholds and differential thresholds are useful tools in the formulation and development of new food products. These parameters may help in defining how much chili pepper is required in a formulated product to ensure a perceptible level of pungency, as well as in deciding how much more chili pepper is required in a product to produce a perceptible increase in its pungency.

  4. Absolute spectral response measurements of different photodiodes useful for applications in the UV spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelizzo, Maria G.; Ceccherini, Paolo; Garoli, Denis; Masut, Pietro; Nicolosi, Piergiorgio

    2004-09-01

    Long UV radiation exposure can result in damages of biological tissues, as burns, skin aging, erythema and even melanoma cancer. In the past years an increase of melanoma cancer has been observed and associated to the atmospheric ozone deployment. Attendance of sun tanning unit centers has become a huge social phenomena, and the maximum UV radiation dose that a human being can receive is regulated by law. On the other side, UV radiation is largely used for therapeutic and germicidal purposes. In all these areas, spectroradiometer and radiomenter are needed for monitoring UVA (315-400 nm), UVB (280-315 nm) and UVC (100-280 nm) irradiance. We have selected some commercial photodiodes which can be used as solid state detectors in these instruments. We have characterized them by measuring their absolute spectral response in the 200 - 400 nm spectral range.

  5. SU-E-T-519: Investigation of the CyberKnife MultiPlan Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Using EBT3 Film Absolute Dosimetry for Delivery in a Heterogeneous Thorax Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lamberto, M; Chen, H; Huang, K; Mourtada, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To characterize the Cyberknife (CK) robotic system’s dosimetric accuracy of the delivery of MultiPlan’s Monte Carlo dose calculations using EBT3 radiochromic film inserted in a thorax phantom. Methods The CIRS XSight Lung Tracking (XLT) Phantom (model 10823) was used in this study with custom cut EBT3 film inserted in the horizontal (coronal) plane inside the lung tissue equivalent phantom. CK MultiPlan v3.5.3 with Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm (1.5 mm grid size, 2% statistical uncertainty) was used to calculate a clinical plan for a 25-mm lung tumor lesion, as contoured by the physician, and then imported onto the XLT phantom CT. Using the same film batch, the net OD to dose calibration curve was obtained using CK with the 60 mm fixed cone by delivering 0– 800 cGy. The test films (n=3) were irradiated using 325 cGy to the prescription point. Films were scanned 48 hours after irradiation using an Epson v700 scanner (48 bits color scan, extracted red channel only, 96 dpi). Percent absolute dose and relative isodose distribution difference relative to the planned dose were quantified using an in-house QA software program. Multiplan Monte Carlo dose calculation was validated using RCF dosimetry (EBT3) and gamma index criteria of 3%/3mm and 2%/2mm for absolute dose and relative isodose distribution measurement comparisons. Results EBT3 film measurements of the patient plans calculated with Monte Carlo in MultiPlan resulted in an absolute dose passing rate of 99.6±0.4% for the Gamma Index of 3%/3mm, 10% dose threshold, and 95.6±4.4% for 2%/2mm, 10% threshold criteria. The measured central axis absolute dose was within 1.2% (329.0±2.5 cGy) of the Monte Carlo planned dose (325.0±6.5 cGy) for that same point. Conclusion MultiPlan’s Monte Carlo dose calculation was validated using the EBT3 film absolute dosimetry for delivery in a heterogeneous thorax phantom.

  6. The Impact of Different Absolute Solar Irradiance Values on Current Climate Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, David H.; Lean, Judith L.; Jonas, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of the preindustrial and doubled CO2 climates are made with the GISS Global Climate Middle Atmosphere Model 3 using two different estimates of the absolute solar irradiance value: a higher value measured by solar radiometers in the 1990s and a lower value measured recently by the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment. Each of the model simulations is adjusted to achieve global energy balance; without this adjustment the difference in irradiance produces a global temperature change of 0.48C, comparable to the cooling estimated for the Maunder Minimum. The results indicate that by altering cloud cover the model properly compensates for the different absolute solar irradiance values on a global level when simulating both preindustrial and doubled CO2 climates. On a regional level, the preindustrial climate simulations and the patterns of change with doubled CO2 concentrations are again remarkably similar, but there are some differences. Using a higher absolute solar irradiance value and the requisite cloud cover affects the model's depictions of high-latitude surface air temperature, sea level pressure, and stratospheric ozone, as well as tropical precipitation. In the climate change experiments it leads to an underestimation of North Atlantic warming, reduced precipitation in the tropical western Pacific, and smaller total ozone growth at high northern latitudes. Although significant, these differences are typically modest compared with the magnitude of the regional changes expected for doubled greenhouse gas concentrations. Nevertheless, the model simulations demonstrate that achieving the highest possible fidelity when simulating regional climate change requires that climate models use as input the most accurate (lower) solar irradiance value.

  7. SU-E-T-189: First Experimental Verification of the Accuracy of Absolute Dose Reconstruction From PET-CT Imaging of Yttrium 90 Microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Veltchev, I; Fourkal, E; Doss, M; Ma, C; Meyer, J; Yu, M; Horwitz, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In the past few years there have been numerous proposals for 3D dose reconstruction from the PET-CT imaging of patients undergoing radioembolization treatment of the liver with yttrium-90 microspheres. One of the most promising techniques uses convolution of the measured PET activity distribution with a pre-calculated Monte Carlo dose deposition kernel. The goal of the present study is to experimentally verify the accuracy of this method and to analyze the significance of various error sources. Methods: Optically stimulated luminescence detectors (OSLD) were used (NanoDot, Landauer) in this experiment. Two detectors were mounted on the central axis of a cylinder filled with water solution of yttrium-90 chloride. The total initial activity was 90mCi. The cylinder was inserted in a larger water phantom and scanned on a Siemens Biograph 16 Truepoint PET-CT scanner. Scans were performed daily over a period of 20 days to build a calibration curve for the measured absolute activity spanning 7 yttrium-90 half-lives. The OSLDs were mounted in the phantom for a predetermined period of time in order to record 2Gy dose. The measured dose was then compared to the dose reconstructed from the activity density at the location of each dosimeter. Results: Thorough error analysis of the dose reconstruction algorithm takes into account the uncertainties in the absolute PET activity, branching ratios, and nonlinearity of the calibration curve. The measured dose for 105-minute exposure on day 10 of the experiment was 219(11)cGy, while the reconstructed dose at the location of the detector was 215(47)cGy. Conclusion: We present the first experimental verification of the accuracy of the convolution algorithm for absolute dose reconstruction of yttrium-90 microspheres. The excellent agreement between the measured and calculated point doses will encourage the broad clinical adoption of the convolution-based dose reconstruction algorithm, making future quantitative dose

  8. Synchronous absolute EIT in three thoracic planes at different gravity levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, G.; Just, A.; Dittmar, J.; Fromm, K. H.; Quintel, M.

    2013-04-01

    The validity of absolute Electrical Impedance Tomography (a-EIT) for assessment of local lung volume has been investigated far less than the well evaluated ventilation monitoring by functional EIT (f-EIT). To achieve progress in a-EIT we investigated 10 healthy volunteers in an upright sitting position by using a-EIT at normal gravity (1 g), weightlessness (0 g) and approx. double gravity (1.8 g) during parabolic flight manoeuvres. Lung resistivity in three thoracic planes was determined by a-EIT using a multiple-plane synchronised Goe-MF II EIT system. Tomograms of resistivity at end-expiration in normal spontaneous breathing were reconstructed by a modified SIRT algorithm. Local lung resistivity was determined separately for both lungs. The respective resistivity values at 1 g and 1.8 g before and after weightlessness show an almost reversible behaviour along the sequence of gravity changes with a tendency to be lower after occurrence of weightlessness. The results reveal not only the expected varying resistivity of lung tissue in cranio-caudal direction but also a clear difference in these cranio-caudal stratifications of local lung volume between the left and right lung. The resolution and stability of absolute EIT seem to be valid and expressive for future investigations of unilateral lung volume under different physiological and pathological conditions.

  9. Infrared and Visible Absolute and Difference Spectra of Bacteriorhodopsin Photocycle Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Hendler, Richard W.; Meuse, Curtis W.; Braiman, Mark S.; Smith, Paul D.; Kakareka, John W.

    2014-01-01

    We have used new kinetic fitting procedures to obtain IR absolute spectra for intermediates of the main bacteriorhodopsin (bR) photocycle(s). The linear algebra-based procedures of Hendler et al. (2001) J. Phys. Chem. B, 105, 3319–3228, for obtaining clean absolute visible spectra of bR photocycle intermediates, were adapted for use with IR data. This led to isolation, for the first time, of corresponding clean absolute IR spectra, including the separation of the M intermediate into its MF and MS components from parallel photocycles. This in turn permitted the computation of clean IR difference spectra between pairs of successive intermediates, allowing for the most rigorous analysis to date of changes occurring at each step of the photocycle. The statistical accuracy of the spectral calculation methods allows us to identify, with great confidence, new spectral features. One of these is a very strong differential IR band at 1650 cm−1 for the L intermediate at room temperature that is not present in analogous L spectra measured at cryogenic temperatures. This band, in one of the noisiest spectral regions, has not been identified in any previous time-resolved IR papers, although retrospectively it is apparent as one of the strongest L absorbance changes in their raw data, considered collectively. Additionally, our results are most consistent with Arg82 as the primary proton-release group (PRG), rather than a protonated water cluster or H-bonded grouping of carboxylic residues. Notably, the Arg82 deprotonation occurs exclusively in the MF pathway of the parallel cycles model of the photocycle. PMID:21929858

  10. Modeling absolute differences in life expectancy with a censored skew-normal regression approach.

    PubMed

    Moser, André; Clough-Gorr, Kerri; Zwahlen, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Parameter estimates from commonly used multivariable parametric survival regression models do not directly quantify differences in years of life expectancy. Gaussian linear regression models give results in terms of absolute mean differences, but are not appropriate in modeling life expectancy, because in many situations time to death has a negative skewed distribution. A regression approach using a skew-normal distribution would be an alternative to parametric survival models in the modeling of life expectancy, because parameter estimates can be interpreted in terms of survival time differences while allowing for skewness of the distribution. In this paper we show how to use the skew-normal regression so that censored and left-truncated observations are accounted for. With this we model differences in life expectancy using data from the Swiss National Cohort Study and from official life expectancy estimates and compare the results with those derived from commonly used survival regression models. We conclude that a censored skew-normal survival regression approach for left-truncated observations can be used to model differences in life expectancy across covariates of interest.

  11. TH-E-BRE-09: TrueBeam Monte Carlo Absolute Dose Calculations Using Monitor Chamber Backscatter Simulations and Linac-Logged Target Current

    SciTech Connect

    A, Popescu I; Lobo, J; Sawkey, D; Svatos, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To simulate and measure radiation backscattered into the monitor chamber of a TrueBeam linac; establish a rigorous framework for absolute dose calculations for TrueBeam Monte Carlo (MC) simulations through a novel approach, taking into account the backscattered radiation and the actual machine output during beam delivery; improve agreement between measured and simulated relative output factors. Methods: The ‘monitor backscatter factor’ is an essential ingredient of a well-established MC absolute dose formalism (the MC equivalent of the TG-51 protocol). This quantity was determined for the 6 MV, 6X FFF, and 10X FFF beams by two independent Methods: (1) MC simulations in the monitor chamber of the TrueBeam linac; (2) linac-generated beam record data for target current, logged for each beam delivery. Upper head MC simulations used a freelyavailable manufacturer-provided interface to a cloud-based platform, allowing use of the same head model as that used to generate the publicly-available TrueBeam phase spaces, without revealing the upper head design. The MC absolute dose formalism was expanded to allow direct use of target current data. Results: The relation between backscatter, number of electrons incident on the target for one monitor unit, and MC absolute dose was analyzed for open fields, as well as a jaw-tracking VMAT plan. The agreement between the two methods was better than 0.15%. It was demonstrated that the agreement between measured and simulated relative output factors improves across all field sizes when backscatter is taken into account. Conclusion: For the first time, simulated monitor chamber dose and measured target current for an actual TrueBeam linac were incorporated in the MC absolute dose formalism. In conjunction with the use of MC inputs generated from post-delivery trajectory-log files, the present method allows accurate MC dose calculations, without resorting to any of the simplifying assumptions previously made in the True

  12. Excitation power dependent population pathways and absolute quantum yields of upconversion nanoparticles in different solvents.

    PubMed

    Würth, C; Kaiser, M; Wilhelm, S; Grauel, B; Hirsch, T; Resch-Genger, U

    2017-03-23

    The rational design of brighter upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) requires a better understanding of the radiationless deactivation pathways in these materials. Here, we demonstrate the potential of excitation power density (P)-dependent studies of upconversion (UC) luminescence intensities, slope factors, and absolute quantum yields (ΦUC) of popular β-NaYF4:20% Yb(3+),2% Er(3+) UCNPs of different surface chemistries in organic solvents, D2O, and water as a tool to gain deeper insight into the UC mechanism including population and deactivation pathways particularly of the red emission. Our measurements, covering a P regime of three orders of magnitude, reveal a strong difference of the P-dependence of the ratio of the green and red luminescence bands (Ig/r) in water and organic solvents and P-dependent population pathways of the different emissive energy levels of Er(3+). In summary, we provide experimental evidence for three photon processes in UCNPs, particularly for the red emission. Moreover, we demonstrate changes in the excited population dynamics via bi- and triphotonic processes dependent on the environment, surface chemistry, and P, and validate our findings theoretically.

  13. Concurrently examining unrealistic absolute and comparative optimism: Temporal shifts, individual-difference and event-specific correlates, and behavioural outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ruthig, Joelle C; Gamblin, Bradlee W; Jones, Kelly; Vanderzanden, Karen; Kehn, Andre

    2017-02-01

    Researchers have spent considerable effort examining unrealistic absolute optimism and unrealistic comparative optimism, yet there is a lack of research exploring them concurrently. This longitudinal study repeatedly assessed unrealistic absolute and comparative optimism within a performance context over several months to identify the degree to which they shift as a function of proximity to performance and performance feedback, their associations with global individual difference and event-specific factors, and their link to subsequent behavioural outcomes. Results showed similar shifts in unrealistic absolute and comparative optimism based on proximity to performance and performance feedback. Moreover, increases in both types of unrealistic optimism were associated with better subsequent performance beyond the effect of prior performance. However, several differences were found between the two forms of unrealistic optimism in their associations with global individual difference factors and event-specific factors, highlighting the distinctiveness of the two constructs.

  14. Total ionizing dose effects of domestic SiGe HBTs under different dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mo-Han; Lu, Wu; Ma, Wu-Ying; Wang, Xin; Guo, Qi; He, Cheng-Fa; Jiang, Ke; Li, Xiao-Long; Xun, Ming-Zhu

    2016-03-01

    The total ionizing radiation (TID) response of commercial NPN silicon germanium hetero-junction bipolar transistors (SiGe HBTs) produced domestically are investigated under dose rates of 800 mGy(Si)/s and 1.3 mGy(Si)/s with a Co-60 gamma irradiation source. The changes of transistor parameters such as Gummel characteristics, and excess base current before and after irradiation, are examined. The results of the experiments show that for the KT1151, the radiation damage is slightly different under the different dose rates after prolonged annealing, and shows a time dependent effect (TDE). For the KT9041, however, the degradations of low dose rate irradiation is higher than for the high dose rate, demonstrating that there is a potential enhanced low dose rate sensitivity (ELDRS) effect for the KT9041. The possible underlying physical mechanisms of the different dose rates responses induced by the gamma rays are discussed.

  15. Absolute Configuration from Different Multifragmentation Pathways in Light-Induced Coulomb Explosion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pitzer, Martin; Kastirke, Gregor; Kunitski, Maksim; Jahnke, Till; Bauer, Tobias; Goihl, Christoph; Trinter, Florian; Schober, Carl; Henrichs, Kevin; Becht, Jasper; Zeller, Stefan; Gassert, Helena; Waitz, Markus; Kuhlins, Andreas; Sann, Hendrik; Sturm, Felix; Wiegandt, Florian; Wallauer, Robert; Schmidt, Lothar Ph H; Johnson, Allan S; Mazenauer, Manuel; Spenger, Benjamin; Marquardt, Sabrina; Marquardt, Sebastian; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Stohner, Jürgen; Dörner, Reinhard; Schöffler, Markus; Berger, Robert

    2016-08-18

    The absolute configuration of individual small molecules in the gas phase can be determined directly by light-induced Coulomb explosion imaging (CEI). Herein, this approach is demonstrated for ionization with a single X-ray photon from a synchrotron light source, leading to enhanced efficiency and faster fragmentation as compared to previous experiments with a femtosecond laser. In addition, it is shown that even incomplete fragmentation pathways of individual molecules from a racemic CHBrClF sample can give access to the absolute configuration in CEI. This leads to a significant increase of the applicability of the method as compared to the previously reported complete break-up into atomic ions and can pave the way for routine stereochemical analysis of larger chiral molecules by light-induced CEI.

  16. Male Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality Risk in the Japanese Atomic Bomb Survivors – Differences in Excess Relative and Absolute Risk from Female Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Little, Mark P.; McElvenny, Damien M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are well-known associations of ionizing radiation with female breast cancer, and emerging evidence also for male breast cancer. In the United Kingdom, female breast cancer following occupational radiation exposure is among that set of cancers eligible for state compensation and consideration is currently being given to an extension to include male breast cancer. Objectives: We compare radiation-associated excess relative and absolute risks of male and female breast cancers. Methods: Breast cancer incidence and mortality data in the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors were analyzed using relative and absolute risk models via Poisson regression. Results: We observed significant (p ≤ 0.01) dose-related excess risk for male breast cancer incidence and mortality. For incidence and mortality data, there are elevations by factors of approximately 15 and 5, respectively, of relative risk for male compared with female breast cancer incidence, the former borderline significant (p = 0.050). In contrast, for incidence and mortality data, there are elevations by factors of approximately 20 and 10, respectively, of female absolute risk compared with male, both statistically significant (p < 0.001). There are no indications of differences between the sexes in age/time-since-exposure/age-at-exposure modifications to the relative or absolute excess risk. The probability of causation of male breast cancer following radiation exposure exceeds by at least a factor of 5 that of many other malignancies. Conclusions: There is evidence of much higher radiation-associated relative risk for male than for female breast cancer, although absolute excess risks for males are much less than for females. However, the small number of male cases and deaths suggests a degree of caution in interpretation of this finding. Citation: Little MP, McElvenny DM. 2017. Male breast cancer incidence and mortality risk in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors – differences in excess relative and

  17. Interplanetary crew doses and dose equivalents: variations among different bone marrow and skin sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, J. L.; Townsend, L. W.; Zapp, E. N.

    2004-01-01

    Previously, calculations of bone marrow dose from the large solar particle event (SPE) of July 2000 were carried out using the BRYNTRN space radiation transport code and the computerized anatomical man (CAM) model. Results indicated that the dose for a bone marrow site in the mid-thigh might be twice as large as the dose for a site in the pelvis. These large variations may be significant for space radiation protection purposes, which traditionally use an average of many (typically 33) sites throughout the body. Other organs that cover large portions of the body, such as the skin, may also exhibit similar variations with doses differing from site to site. The skin traditionally uses an average of 32 sites throughout the body. Variations also occur from site to site among the dose equivalents, which may be important in determining stochastic effects. In this work, the magnitudes of dose and dose equivalent variations from site to site are investigated. The BRYNTRN and HZETRN transport codes and the CAM model are used to estimate bone marrow and skin doses and dose equivalents as a function of position in the body for several large solar particle events and annual galactic cosmic ray spectra from throughout the space era. These position-specific results are compared with the average values usually used for radiation protection purposes. Various thicknesses of aluminum shielding, representative of nominal spacecraft, are used in the analyses.

  18. Interplanetary Crew Doses and Dose Equivalents: Variations among Different Bone Marrow and Skin Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, J.; Townsend, L.; Zapp, E.

    Previously, calculations of bone marrow dose from the large solar particle event (SPE) of July 2000 were carried out using the BRYNTRN space radiation transport code and the Computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) model. Results indicated that the dose for a bone marrow site in the mid-thigh might be twice as large as the dose for a site in the pelvis. These large variations may be significant for space radiation protection purposes, which traditionally use an average of many (typically 33) sites throughout the body. Other organs that cover large portions of the body, such as the skin, may also exhibit similar variations with doses differing from site to site. The skin traditionally uses an average of 32 sites throughout the body. Variations also occur from site to site among the dose equivalents, which may be important in determining stochastic effects. In this work, the magnitudes of dose and dose equivalent variations from site to site are investigated. The BRYNTRN and HZETRN transport codes and the CAM model are used to estimate bone marrow and skin doses and dose equivalents as a function of position in the body for several large solar particle events and annual galactic cosmic ray (GCR) spectra from throughout the space era. These position-specific results are compared with the average values usually used for radiation protection purposes. Various thicknesses of aluminum shielding, representative of nominal spacecraft and SPE "storm shelter" designs, are used in the analyses.

  19. The performance of different propensity score methods for estimating absolute effects of treatments on survival outcomes: A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Austin, Peter C; Schuster, Tibor

    2016-10-01

    Observational studies are increasingly being used to estimate the effect of treatments, interventions and exposures on outcomes that can occur over time. Historically, the hazard ratio, which is a relative measure of effect, has been reported. However, medical decision making is best informed when both relative and absolute measures of effect are reported. When outcomes are time-to-event in nature, the effect of treatment can also be quantified as the change in mean or median survival time due to treatment and the absolute reduction in the probability of the occurrence of an event within a specified duration of follow-up. We describe how three different propensity score methods, propensity score matching, stratification on the propensity score and inverse probability of treatment weighting using the propensity score, can be used to estimate absolute measures of treatment effect on survival outcomes. These methods are all based on estimating marginal survival functions under treatment and lack of treatment. We then conducted an extensive series of Monte Carlo simulations to compare the relative performance of these methods for estimating the absolute effects of treatment on survival outcomes. We found that stratification on the propensity score resulted in the greatest bias. Caliper matching on the propensity score and a method based on earlier work by Cole and Hernán tended to have the best performance for estimating absolute effects of treatment on survival outcomes. When the prevalence of treatment was less extreme, then inverse probability of treatment weighting-based methods tended to perform better than matching-based methods.

  20. Differences in absolute and relative growth between two shell forms of Pinna nobilis (Mollusca: Bivalvia) along the Tunisian coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaoui, Lotfi; Tlig-Zouari, Sabiha; Katsanevakis, Stelios; Belgacem, Walid; Hassine, Oum Kalthoum Ben

    2011-08-01

    This study investigated the absolute and relative growth patterns of the fan mussel Pinna nobilis along the Tunisian coastline, taking into consideration both the variability among different areas and between the two shell forms "combed" and "straight and wide". Five subpopulations of the species were sampled, one from northern, two from eastern and two from southern Tunisia. Various assumptions on the growth patterns were tested based on an information theory approach and multi-model inference. For absolute growth, the assumption of different growth patterns between the two shell forms of P. nobilis and no difference among subpopulations was the most supported by the data. For the same age, "straight and wide" individuals gained on average greater lengths than the "combed" individuals. The absolute growth of the species was found to be asymptotic and the logistic model was the one most supported by the data. As for the relative growth, apart from the classical allometric model Y = aXb, more complicated models of the form ln Y = f(ln X) that either assumed non-linearities or breakpoints were tested in combination with assumptions for possible differences between the two forms and among subpopulations. Among the eight studied relationships between morphometric characters, the classical allometric model was supported in only two cases, while in all other cases more complicated models were supported. Moreover, the assumption of different growth patterns between the two forms was supported in three cases and the assumption of different growth patterns among subpopulations in four cases. Although precise relationships between the morphometric plasticity of the fan mussel and environmental factors have not been proven in this paper, local small scale constraints might be responsible of the different growth patterns observed in the same locality. A possible co-action of genetic factors should be evaluated in the future.

  1. Comparison of radon doses based on different radon monitoring approaches.

    PubMed

    Vaupotič, Janja; Smrekar, Nataša; Žunić, Zora S

    2017-04-01

    In 43 places (23 schools, 3 kindergartens, 16 offices and one dwelling), indoor radon has been monitored as an intercomparison experiment, using α-scintillation cells (SC - Jožef Stefan Institute, Slovenia), various kinds of solid state nuclear track detectors (KfK - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany; UFO - National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan; RET - University College Dublin, Ireland) and active electronic devices (EQF, Sarad, Germany). At the same place, the radon levels and, consequently, the effective doses obtained with different radon devices differed substantially (by a factor of 2 or more), and no regularity was observed as regards which detector would show a higher or lower dose.

  2. Dose verification with different ion chambers for SRT/SBRT plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmus, I. F.; Tas, B.; Okumus, A.; Uzel, O. E.

    2017-02-01

    Verification of patient plan is very important in stereotactic treatments. VMAT plans were prepared with 6MV-FFF or 10MV-FFF energies for 25 intracranial and extracranial stereotactic patients. Absolute dose was measured for dose verification in each plans. Iba® CC01, Iba® CC04, Iba® CC13 ion chambers placed at a depth of 5cm in solid phantom (RW3). Also we scanned this phantom with ion chambers by Siemens® Biograph mCT. QA plans were prepared by transferring twenty five patient plans to phantom assemblies for three ion chambers. All plans were performed separately for three ion chambers at Elekta® Versa HD linear accelerator. Statistical analysis of results were made by Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Difference between dose values were determined %1.84±3.4 (p: 0.001) with Iba CC13 ion chamber, %1.80±3.4 (p: 0.002) with Iba CC04 ion chamber and %0.29±4.6 (p: 0.667) with Iba CC01 ion chamber. In stereotactic treatments, dosimetric uncertainty increases in small areas. We determined more accurate results with small sized detectors. Difference between TPS calculations and all measurements were founded lower than %2.

  3. Patient dose levels for seven different radiographic examination types.

    PubMed

    Abdelhalim, Mohamed Anwar K

    2010-04-01

    This study was carried out as a part of a comprehensive project to establish a national diagnostic reference level (NDRL), for the first time, in Saudi Arabia. Seven of the most common X-ray examinations (10 projections) were included. This study consisted of 200 patients who were referred for X-ray examinations at King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH). The selected X-ray examinations were skull (PA), kub (AP and LAT), ankle (AP and LAT), foot (AP/OBL and LAT/OBL), hib (AP and LAT) and sinuses paranasal (AP). Mean patient information and exposure parameters for these seven radiographic examinations were recorded at KKUH. Some of these radiographic examinations were compared with their corresponding values at other national places [Security Forces Hospital (SFH); King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST)] in Saudi Arabia. We found that the patient mean dose values recorded at KKUH were varied from those recorded at other national places. Wide variations in patient dose arising from a specific type of X-ray examination at different national places suggests that significant reductions in patient dose would be possible without affecting image quality. Furthermore, variations in patient dose may emerge from the examination technique, clinical condition, radiologist skill, tube current, tube potential and focus to film distance. The data of this study will be useful for the formulation of NDRLs, and it is also provides local diagnostic reference levels for some diagnostic X-ray examinations at KKUH and other national places in Saudi Arabia.

  4. Direct dose mapping versus energy/mass transfer mapping for 4D dose accumulation: fundamental differences and dosimetric consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haisen S.; Zhong, Hualiang; Kim, Jinkoo; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Gulam, Misbah; Nurushev, Teamour S.; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2014-01-01

    The direct dose mapping (DDM) and energy/mass transfer (EMT) mapping are two essential algorithms for accumulating the dose from different anatomic phases to the reference phase when there is organ motion or tumor/tissue deformation during the delivery of radiation therapy. DDM is based on interpolation of the dose values from one dose grid to another and thus lacks rigor in defining the dose when there are multiple dose values mapped to one dose voxel in the reference phase due to tissue/tumor deformation. On the other hand, EMT counts the total energy and mass transferred to each voxel in the reference phase and calculates the dose by dividing the energy by mass. Therefore it is based on fundamentally sound physics principles. In this study, we implemented the two algorithms and integrated them within the Eclipse treatment planning system. We then compared the clinical dosimetric difference between the two algorithms for ten lung cancer patients receiving stereotactic radiosurgery treatment, by accumulating the delivered dose to the end-of-exhale (EE) phase. Specifically, the respiratory period was divided into ten phases and the dose to each phase was calculated and mapped to the EE phase and then accumulated. The displacement vector field generated by Demons-based registration of the source and reference images was used to transfer the dose and energy. The DDM and EMT algorithms produced noticeably different cumulative dose in the regions with sharp mass density variations and/or high dose gradients. For the planning target volume (PTV) and internal target volume (ITV) minimum dose, the difference was up to 11% and 4% respectively. This suggests that DDM might not be adequate for obtaining an accurate dose distribution of the cumulative plan, instead, EMT should be considered.

  5. Resolving Differences in Absolute Irradiance Measurements Between the SOHO/CELIAS/SEM and the SDO/EVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, S. R.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, D. L.

    2014-08-01

    The Solar EUV Monitor (SEM) onboard SOHO has measured absolute extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray solar irradiance nearly continuously since January 1996. The EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on SDO, in operation since April of 2010, measures solar irradiance in a wide spectral range that encompasses the band passes (26 - 34 nm and 0.1 - 50 nm) measured by SOHO/SEM. However, throughout the mission overlap, irradiance values from these two instruments have differed by more than the combined stated uncertainties of the measurements. In an effort to identify the sources of these differences and eliminate them, we investigate in this work the effect of reprocessing the SEM data using a more accurate SEM response function (obtained from synchrotron measurements with a SEM sounding-rocket clone instrument taken after SOHO was already in orbit) and time-dependent, measured solar spectral distributions - i.e., solar reference spectra that were unavailable prior to the launch of the SDO. We find that recalculating the SEM data with these improved parameters reduces mean differences with the EVE measurements from about 20 % to less than 5 % in the 26 - 34 nm band, and from about 35 % to about 15 % for irradiances in the 0.1 - 7 nm band extracted from the SEM 0.1 - 50 nm channel.

  6. Resolving Differences in Absolute Irradiance Measurements Between the SOHO/CELIAS/SEM and the SDO/EVE.

    PubMed

    Wieman, S R; Didkovsky, L V; Judge, D L

    The Solar EUV Monitor (SEM) onboard SOHO has measured absolute extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray solar irradiance nearly continuously since January 1996. The EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on SDO, in operation since April of 2010, measures solar irradiance in a wide spectral range that encompasses the band passes (26 - 34 nm and 0.1 - 50 nm) measured by SOHO/SEM. However, throughout the mission overlap, irradiance values from these two instruments have differed by more than the combined stated uncertainties of the measurements. In an effort to identify the sources of these differences and eliminate them, we investigate in this work the effect of reprocessing the SEM data using a more accurate SEM response function (obtained from synchrotron measurements with a SEM sounding-rocket clone instrument taken after SOHO was already in orbit) and time-dependent, measured solar spectral distributions - i.e., solar reference spectra that were unavailable prior to the launch of the SDO. We find that recalculating the SEM data with these improved parameters reduces mean differences with the EVE measurements from about 20 % to less than 5 % in the 26 - 34 nm band, and from about 35 % to about 15 % for irradiances in the 0.1 - 7 nm band extracted from the SEM 0.1 - 50 nm channel.

  7. Difference in dose-volumetric data between the analytical anisotropic algorithm, the dose-to-medium, and the dose-to-water reporting modes of the Acuros XB for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Mampuya, Wambaka A; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yoshinori; Kitsuda, Kenji; Ishigaki, Takashi; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2016-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference in dose-volumetric data between the analytical anisotropic algorithms (AAA) and the two dose reporting modes of the Acuros XB, namely, the dose to water (AXB_Dw) and dose to medium (AXB_Dm) in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Thirty-eight plans were generated using the AXB_Dm in Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS) and then recalculated with the AXB_Dw and AAA, using identical beam setup. A dose of 50 Gy in 4 fractions was prescribed to the isocenter and the planning target volume (PTV) D95%. The isocenter was always inside the PTV. The following dose-volumetric parameters were evaluated; D2%, D50%, D95%, and D98% for the internal target volume (ITV) and the PTV. Two-tailed paired Student's t-tests determined the statistical significance. Although for most of the parameters evaluated, the mean differences observed between the AAA, AXB_Dm, and AXB_Dw were statistically significant (p < 0.05), absolute differences were rather small, in general less than 5% points. The maximum mean difference was observed in the ITV D50% between the AXB_Dm and the AAA and was 1.7% points under the isocenter prescription and 3.3% points under the D95 prescription. AXB_Dm produced higher values than AXB_Dw with differences ranging from 0.4 to 1.1% points under isocenter prescription and 0.0 to 0.7% points under the PTV D95% prescription. The differences observed under the PTV D95% prescription were larger compared to those observed for the isocenter prescription between AXB_Dm and AAA, AXB_Dm and AXB_Dw, and AXB_Dw and AAA. Although statistically significant, the mean differences between the three algorithms are within 3.3% points.

  8. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  9. Implementation of an absolute brain 1H-MRS quantification method to assess different tissue alterations in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bagory, Matthieu; Durand-Dubief, Françoise; Ibarrola, Danielle; Comte, Jean-Christophe; Cotton, François; Confavreux, Christian; Sappey-Marinier, Dominique

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy has emerged as a sensitive modality to detect early and diffuse alterations in multiple sclerosis. Recently, the hypothesis of neurodegenerative pathogenesis has highlightened the interest for measurement of metabolites concentrations, to gain specificity, in a large brain volume encompassing different tissue alterations. Therefore, we proposed in this paper the implementation of an absolute quantification method based on localized spectroscopy at short (30 ms) and long (135 ms) echo time of a volume including normal appearing white matter, cortical gray matter, and lesions. First, methodological developments were implemented including external calibration, and corrections of phased-array coil sensitivity and cerebrospinal fluid volume contribution. Second, these improvements were validated and optimized using an original methodology based on simulations of brain images with lesions. Finally, metabolic alterations were assessed in 65 patients including 26 relapsing-remitting, 17 primary-progressive (PP), 22 secondary-progressive (SP) patients, and in 23 normal subjects. Results showed increases of choline, creatine, and myo-inositol concentrations in PP and SP patients compared to controls, whereas the concentration of N-acetyl compounds remained constant. The major finding of this study was the identification of Cho concentration and Cho/tNA ratio as putative markers of progressive onset, suggesting interesting perspectives in detection and followup of neurodegenerative processes.

  10. Absolute binding-free energies between standard RNA/DNA nucleobases and amino-acid sidechain analogs in different environments.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Anita; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2015-01-01

    Despite the great importance of nucleic acid-protein interactions in the cell, our understanding of their physico-chemical basis remains incomplete. In order to address this challenge, we have for the first time determined potentials of mean force and the associated absolute binding free energies between all standard RNA/DNA nucleobases and amino-acid sidechain analogs in high- and low-dielectric environments using molecular dynamics simulations and umbrella sampling. A comparison against a limited set of available experimental values for analogous systems attests to the quality of the computational approach and the force field used. Overall, our analysis provides a microscopic picture behind nucleobase/sidechain interaction preferences and creates a unified framework for understanding and sculpting nucleic acid-protein interactions in different contexts. Here, we use this framework to demonstrate a strong relationship between nucleobase density profiles of mRNAs and nucleobase affinity profiles of their cognate proteins and critically analyze a recent hypothesis that the two may be capable of direct, complementary interactions.

  11. Pharmacokinetic Dashboard-Recommended Dosing Is Different than Standard of Care Dosing in Infliximab-Treated Pediatric IBD Patients.

    PubMed

    Dubinsky, Marla C; Phan, Becky L; Singh, Namita; Rabizadeh, Shervin; Mould, Diane R

    2017-01-01

    Standard of care (SOC; combination of 5-10 mg/kg and an interval every 6-8 weeks) dosing of infliximab (IFX) is associated with significant loss of response. Dashboards using covariates that influence IFX pharmacokinetics (PK) may be a more precise way of optimizing anti-TNF dosing. We tested a prototype dashboard to compare forecasted dosing regimens with actual administered regimens and SOC. Fifty IBD patients completing IFX induction were monitored during maintenance (weeks 14-54). Clinical and laboratory data were collected at each infusion; serum was analyzed for IFX concentrations and anti-drug antibodies (ADA) at weeks 14 and 54 (Prometheus Labs, San Diego). Dosing was blinded to PK data. Dashboard-based assessments were conducted on de-identified clinical, laboratory, and PK data. Bayesian algorithms were used to forecast individualized troughs and determine optimal dosing to maintain target trough concentrations (3 μg/mL). Dashboard forecasted dosing post-week 14 was compared to actual administered dose and frequency and SOC. Using week 14 clinical data only, the dashboard recommended either a dose or an interval change (<0.5 mg/kg or <1 week difference) in 43/50 patients; only 44% recommended to have SOC dosing. When IFX14 concentration and ADA status were added to clinical data, dose and/or interval changes based on actual dosing were recommended in 48/50 (96%) patients; SOC dosing was recommended in only 11/50 (22%). Dashboard recommended SOC IFX dosing in a minority of patients. Dashboards will be an important tool to individualize IFX dosing to improve treatment durability.

  12. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  13. Absolute Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, George

    1990-12-01

    The absolute sensitivity of the FOS will be determined in SV by observing 2 stars at 3 epochs, first in 3 apertures (1.0", 0.5", and 0.3" circular) and then in 1 aperture (1.0" circular). In cycle 1, one star, BD+28D4211 will be observed in the 1.0" aperture to establish the stability of the sensitivity and flat field characteristics and improve the accuracy obtained in SV. This star will also be observed through the paired apertures since these are not calibrated in SV. The stars will be observed in most detector/grating combinations. The data will be averaged to form the inverse sensitivity functions required by RSDP.

  14. Morphological transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells by low doses of fission neutrons delivered at different dose rates

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.A.; Sedita, B.A. ); Hill, C.K. . Cancer Research Lab.); Elkind, M.M. . Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Biology)

    1991-01-01

    Both induction of cell transformation and killing were examined with Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) fibroblasts exposed to low doses of JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons delivered at high (10.3 cGy/min) and low (0.43 and 0.086 cGy/min) dose rates. Second-passage cells were irradiated in mass cultures, then cloned over feeder cells. Morphologically transformed colonies were identified 8-10 days later. Cell killing was independent of dose rate, but the yield of transformation was greater after low-dose-rate irradiations. Decreasing the neutron dose-rate from 10.3 to 0.086 cGy/min resulted in a two- to threefold increase in the yield of transformation for neutron exposures below 50 cGy, and enhancement which was consistently observed in repetitive experiments in different radiosensitive SHE cell preparations. 43 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Absolute and relative blindsight.

    PubMed

    Balsdon, Tarryn; Azzopardi, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The concept of relative blindsight, referring to a difference in conscious awareness between conditions otherwise matched for performance, was introduced by Lau and Passingham (2006) as a way of identifying the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) in fMRI experiments. By analogy, absolute blindsight refers to a difference between performance and awareness regardless of whether it is possible to match performance across conditions. Here, we address the question of whether relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers can be accounted for by response bias. In our replication of Lau and Passingham's experiment, the relative blindsight effect was abolished when performance was assessed by means of a bias-free 2AFC task or when the criterion for awareness was varied. Furthermore, there was no evidence of either relative or absolute blindsight when both performance and awareness were assessed with bias-free measures derived from confidence ratings using signal detection theory. This suggests that both relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers amount to no more than variations in response bias in the assessment of performance and awareness. Consideration of the properties of psychometric functions reveals a number of ways in which relative and absolute blindsight could arise trivially and elucidates a basis for the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 blindsight.

  16. Difference in dose-volumetric data between the analytical anisotropic algorithm, the dose-to-medium, and the dose-to-water reporting modes of the Acuros XB for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Mampuya, Wambaka A; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yoshinori; Ishigaki, Takashi; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference in dose-volumetric data between the analytical anisotropic algorithms (AAA) and the two dose reporting modes of the Acuros XB, namely, the dose to water (AXB-Dw) and dose to medium (AXB-Dm) in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Thirty-eight plans were generated using the AXB-Dm in Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS) and then recalculated with the AXB-Dw and AAA, using identical beam setup. A dose of 50 Gy in 4 fractions was prescribed to the isocenter and the planning target volume (PTV) D95%. The isocenter was always inside the PTV. The following dose-volumetric parameters were evaluated; D2%, D50%, D95%, and D98% for the internal target volume (ITV) and the PTV. Two-tailed paired Student's t-tests determined the statistical significance. Although for most of the parameters evaluated, the mean differences observed between the AAA, AXB-Dmand AXB-Dw were statistically significant (p<0.05), absolute differences were rather small, in general less than 5% points. The maximum mean difference was observed in the ITV D50% between the AXB-Dm and the AAA and was 1.7% points under the isocenter prescription and 3.3% points under the D95 prescription. AXB-Dm produced higher values than AXB-Dw with differences ranging from 0.4 to 1.1% points under isocenter prescription and 0.0 to 0.7% points under the PTV D95% prescription. The differences observed under the PTV D95% prescription were larger compared to those observed for the isocenter prescription between AXB-Dm and AAA, AXB-Dm and AXB-Dw, and AXB-Dw and AAA. Although statistically significant, the mean differences between the three algorithms are within 3.3% points. PACS number(s): 87.55.x, 87.55.D-, 87.55.dk.

  17. COMPARISON OF THE PERIPHERAL DOSES FROM DIFFERENT IMRT TECHNIQUES FOR PEDIATRIC HEAD AND NECK RADIATION THERAPY.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Masahiko; Saigo, Yasumasa; Higuchi, Kenta; Fujimura, Takuya; Koriyama, Chihaya; Yoshiura, Takashi; Akiba, Suminori

    2017-02-25

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can deliver high and homogeneous doses to the target area while limiting doses to organs at risk. We used a pediatric phantom to simulate the treatment of a head and neck tumor in a child. The peripheral doses were examined for three different IMRT techniques [dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC), segmental multileaf collimator (SMLC) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)]. Peripheral doses were evaluated taking thyroid, breast, ovary and testis as the points of interest. Doses were determined using a radio-photoluminescence glass dosemeter, and the COMPASS system was used for three-dimensional dose evaluation. VMAT achieved the lowest peripheral doses because it had the highest monitor unit efficiency. However, doses in the vicinity of the irradiated field, i.e. the thyroid, could be relatively high, depending on the VMAT collimator angle. DMLC and SMLC had a large area of relatively high peripheral doses in the breast region.

  18. Emesis in Ferrets Following Exposure to Different Types of Radiation: A Dose-Response Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    SR92-34 Emesis in Ferrets Following Exposure to Different Types of Radiation: N A Dose -Response Study L51 BERNARD M. RABIN, Ph.D., WALTER A. HUNT...fission neutrons (1500-2000 following exposure to different types o" radiation: a dose -response cGy), Young (13) reported that increasing the propor...order to establish the dose -response relationships monkey, but did not produce an increase in the total for emesis following exposure to different types

  19. A graphite calorimeter for absolute measurements of absorbed dose to water: application in medium-energy x-ray filtered beams.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M; Pimpinella, M; Quini, M; D'Arienzo, M; Astefanoaei, I; Loreti, S; Guerra, A S

    2016-02-21

    The Italian National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology (ENEA-INMRI) has designed and built a graphite calorimeter that, in a water phantom, has allowed the determination of the absorbed dose to water in medium-energy x-rays with generating voltages from 180 to 250 kV. The new standard is a miniaturized three-bodies calorimeter, with a disc-shaped core of 21 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness weighing 1.134 g, sealed in a PMMA waterproof envelope with air-evacuated gaps. The measured absorbed dose to graphite is converted into absorbed dose to water by means of an energy-dependent conversion factor obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. Heat-transfer correction factors were determined by FEM calculations. At a source-to-detector distance of 100 cm, a depth in water of 2 g cm(-2), and at a dose rate of about 0.15 Gy min(-1), results of calorimetric measurements of absorbed dose to water, D(w), were compared to experimental determinations, D wK, obtained via an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of air kerma, according to established dosimetry protocols. The combined standard uncertainty of D(w) and D(wK) were estimated as 1.9% and 1.7%, respectively. The two absorbed dose to water determinations were in agreement within 1%, well below the stated measurement uncertainties. Advancements are in progress to extend the measurement capability of the new in-water-phantom graphite calorimeter to other filtered medium-energy x-ray qualities and to reduce the D(w) uncertainty to around 1%. The new calorimeter represents the first implementation of in-water-phantom graphite calorimetry in the kilovoltage range and, allowing independent determinations of D(w), it will contribute to establish a robust system of absorbed dose to water primary standards for medium-energy x-ray beams.

  20. The performance of different propensity-score methods for estimating differences in proportions (risk differences or absolute risk reductions) in observational studies.

    PubMed

    Austin, Peter C

    2010-09-10

    Propensity score methods are increasingly being used to estimate the effects of treatments on health outcomes using observational data. There are four methods for using the propensity score to estimate treatment effects: covariate adjustment using the propensity score, stratification on the propensity score, propensity-score matching, and inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) using the propensity score. When outcomes are binary, the effect of treatment on the outcome can be described using odds ratios, relative risks, risk differences, or the number needed to treat. Several clinical commentators suggested that risk differences and numbers needed to treat are more meaningful for clinical decision making than are odds ratios or relative risks. However, there is a paucity of information about the relative performance of the different propensity-score methods for estimating risk differences. We conducted a series of Monte Carlo simulations to examine this issue. We examined bias, variance estimation, coverage of confidence intervals, mean-squared error (MSE), and type I error rates. A doubly robust version of IPTW had superior performance compared with the other propensity-score methods. It resulted in unbiased estimation of risk differences, treatment effects with the lowest standard errors, confidence intervals with the correct coverage rates, and correct type I error rates. Stratification, matching on the propensity score, and covariate adjustment using the propensity score resulted in minor to modest bias in estimating risk differences. Estimators based on IPTW had lower MSE compared with other propensity-score methods. Differences between IPTW and propensity-score matching may reflect that these two methods estimate the average treatment effect and the average treatment effect for the treated, respectively.

  1. Comparison of broad beam central axis depth dose curves from different accelerators using the universal depth dose curve model.

    PubMed

    Werner, B L

    1983-01-01

    Electron beam central axis depth dose distribution can be transformed to fluence distributions with geometric depth replaced by a measure of the state of angular dispersion of the beam. A transformed central axis depth dose distribution was called a 'fluence curve.' The transformation was applied to a set of central axis depth dose curves calculated by Monte Carlo code for broad electron beams of energies ranging from 1 to 60 MeV in homogeneous phantoms of water, aluminium, and copper. For the energies and compositions likely to be encountered in external beam radiation therapy, the resulting fluence curves, were found to belong to a single parameter family. A collimator scatter parameter was introduced to take into account the initial angular dispersion produced by the collimator of an accelerator. Given the energy of the beam, the medium in which the beam is passing through, and the collimator scatter parameter, the fluence curve associated with the beam can easily be transformed back to a calculated depth dose curve. The collimator scatter parameter necessary to fit the depth dose curves measured on different accelerators was investigated. The results for the Clinac 18, LMR-13, Mevatron XII, Mevatron 80, Microtron, Sagittaire, Siemens Betatron, and the Therac 20 are presented.

  2. Correlation between scatter radiation dose at height of operator's eye and dose to patient for different angiographic projections.

    PubMed

    Leyton, Fernando; Nogueira, Maria S; Gubolino, Luiz A; Pivetta, Makyson R; Ubeda, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    Studies have reported cases of radiation-induced cataract among cardiology professionals. In view of the evidence of epidemiological studies, the ICRP recommends a new threshold for opacities and a new radiation dose to eye lens limit of 20mSv per year for occupational exposure. The aim of this paper is to report scattered radiation doses at the height of the operator's eye in an interventional cardiology facility without considering radiation protection devices and to correlate these values with different angiographic projections and operational modes. Measurements were taken in a cardiac laboratory with an angiography X-ray system equipped with flat-panel detector. PMMA plates of 30×30×5cm were used with a thickness of 20cm. Measurements were taken in two fluoroscopy modes (low and normal, 15pulses/s) and in cine mode (15frames/s). Four angiographic projections were used: anterior posterior; lateral; left anterior oblique caudal (spider); and left anterior oblique cranial, with a cardiac protocol for patients weighing between 70 and 90kg. Measurements of phantom entrance dose rate and scatter dose rate were performed with two Unfors Xi plus detectors. The detector measuring scatter radiation was positioned at the usual distance of the cardiologist's eyes during working conditions. There is a good linear correlation between the kerma area product and scatter dose at the lens. Experimental correlation factors of 2.3, 12.0, 12.2 and 17.6μSv/Gycm2 were found for different projections. PMMA entrance dose rates for low and medium fluoroscopy and cine modes were 13, 39 and 282mGy/min, respectively, for AP projection.

  3. Effects of four different doses of organic manures in the production of Ceriodaphnia cornuta.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ashutosh; Rathore, Raja Mansingh; Chakrabarti, Rina

    2006-05-01

    Mass culture of Ceriodaphnia cornuta was done by using a mixture of organic manures: cattle manure:poultry droppings:mustard oil cake (1:1:1) at four different doses: 0.263 kg/m3 (first dose), 0.526 kg/m3 (second dose), 1.052 kg/m3 (third dose) and 2.104 kg/m3 (fourth dose). The peak of C. cornuta was found on 10th day of inoculum in first two doses and on 14th and 18th day in third and fourth doses, respectively. Among these four doses, significantly (P<0.01) higher numbers of organisms (1930/l) were found in the fourth dose followed by third (1470/l), second (1017/l) and first (733/l) doses, respectively. The number of organisms decreased faster in two lower doses than higher doses. pH ranged from 7.20 to 8.09, 7.46 to 8.01, 7.55 to 7.89 and 7.61 to 8.03 in first, second, third and fourth doses, respectively. Dissolved oxygen showed inverse relationship with the dose of manures applied and direct relationship with number of organisms. This study showed that 3.28-4.63 mg/l dissolved oxygen was optimum to obtain the bloom of C. cornuta under the present manure schedule. Maximum number of organism was found when unionized ammonia and phosphate levels ranged between 0.65-0.85 mg/l and 0.42-0.98 mg/l, respectively. The fourth dose of organic manure is optimum for the culture of C. cornuta in outdoor condition and the bloom of the live food can be obtained within 18 days of inoculum.

  4. The difference of scoring dose to water or tissues in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low energy brachytherapy photon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The goal of this work is to compare D{sub m,m} (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in medium) and D{sub w,m} (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in water) obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a subset of human tissues of interest in low energy photon brachytherapy. Using low dose rate seeds and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the authors quantify the large cavity theory conversion factors required. The authors also assess whether applying large cavity theory utilizing the sources' initial photon spectra and average photon energy induces errors related to spatial spectral variations. First, ideal spherical geometries were investigated, followed by clinical brachytherapy LDR seed implants for breast and prostate cancer patients. Methods: Two types of dose calculations are performed with the GEANT4 MC code. (1) For several human tissues, dose profiles are obtained in spherical geometries centered on four types of low energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs seeds, as well as an EBS operating at 50 kV. Ratios of D{sub w,m} over D{sub m,m} are evaluated in the 0-6 cm range. In addition to mean tissue composition, compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean are also studied. (2) Four clinical breast (using {sup 103}Pd) and prostate (using {sup 125}I) brachytherapy seed implants are considered. MC dose calculations are performed based on postimplant CT scans using prostate and breast tissue compositions. PTV D{sub 90} values are compared for D{sub w,m} and D{sub m,m}. Results: (1) Differences (D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m}-1) of -3% to 70% are observed for the investigated tissues. For a given tissue, D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m} is similar for all sources within 4% and does not vary more than 2% with distance due to very moderate spectral shifts. Variations of tissue composition about the assumed mean composition influence the conversion factors up to 38%. (2) The ratio of D{sub 90(w

  5. Obtaining fast dissolving disintegrating tablets with different doses of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, H; Castan, H; Clares, B; Ruiz, M A

    2014-06-05

    Fast dissolving disintegrating tablets (FDDTs) containing different dosages of melatonin have been manufactured for administration to a specific target population: pediatric patients, having potential difficulties taking other oral forms. The lower dosages (3 and 5mg) are intended for epileptic children, migraine prevention, neurodevelopmental disability, sleep disorders and blindness. Dosages of 10 and 60 mg are intended for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Two FDDT groups have been designed, one which has excipients for direct compression and others having direct compression and effervescent excipients. Tablets have been produced having disintegration times of less than 25s and with friability and hardness values that require no special storage or packaging conditions.

  6. A different perception of the linear, nonthreshold hypothesis for low-dose irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, V P; Benary, V; Sondhaus, C A

    1991-01-01

    Two equally useful dosimetric quantities, both of which are called dose, are used in toxicology. With radiation measurement, only one--the energy per unit mass D--is called dose. The other--the total energy in the irradiated system--is here distinguished from D by assigning it the name collective energy, epsilon. The collective energy is a more complete statement of dose because it is the product of the energy concentration D and the mass irradiated m. Especially in radioepidemiology, in which epsilon is the total energy imparted to all persons irradiated, the quantity m must be specified because it is situation specific and thus highly variable. At present, radioepidemiological dose-response curves are given only in terms of the toxicological model--i.e., the fraction (probability) of radiation-attributable cancers occurring as a function of D. Because this relation does not involve the number of persons at each value of D, it fosters the illusion that any dose, no matter how small, can result in cancer. However, we show that if the dose-response relationship is expressed in terms of the absolute number of attributable cancers as a function of epsilon, cancer occurs, on average, only if the collective energy exceeds a relatively large minimum value, the magnitude of which will be estimated. Therefore, we conclude that the nonthreshold aspect of the linear hypothesis is misleading and quite probably invalid. For example, in or around a facility in which exposure of humans to relatively low values of D occurs, attributable cancers are most unlikely to appear unless the epsilon to the irradiated population exceeds this minimum value. PMID:1924328

  7. A different perception of the linear, nonthreshold hypothesis for low-dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P. ); Benary, V. Tel Aviv Univ. ); Sondhaus, C.A. )

    1991-10-01

    Two equally useful dosimetric quantities, both of which are called dose, are used in toxicology. With radiation measurement, only one - the energy per unit mass D - is called dose. The other - the total energy in the irradiated system - is here distinguished from D by assigning it the name collective energy, {epsilon}. The collective energy is a more complete statement of dose because it is the product of the energy concentration D and the mass irradiated m. Especially in radioepidemiology, in which {epsilon} is the total energy imparted to all persons irradiated, the quantity m must be specified because it is situation specific and thus highly variable. At present, radioepidemiological dose-response curves are given only in terms of the toxicological model - i.e., the fraction (probability) of radiation-attributable cancers occurring as a function of D. Because this relation does not involve the number of persons at each value of D, it fosters the illusion that any dose, no matter how small, can result in cancer. However, the authors show that if the dose-response relationship is expressed in terms of the absolute number of attributable cancers as a function of {epsilon}, cancer occurs, on average, only if the collective energy exceeds a relatively large minimum value, the magnitude of which will be estimated. Therefore, they conclude that the nonthreshold aspect of the linear hypothesis is misleading and quite probably invalid. For example, in or around a facility in which exposure of humans to relatively low values of D occurs, attributable cancers are most unlikely to appear unless the {epsilon} to the irradiated population exceeds this minimum value.

  8. Comparative transcriptome analysis of rice seedlings induced by different doses of heavy ion radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qian; Sun, Yeqing; Wang, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as a main factor causing biological effects on plant seeds. To investigate the different effects on genome-wide gene expression of low-dose and high-dose ion radiation, we carried out ground-base carbon particle HZE experiments with different cumulative doses (0Gy, 0.2Gy, 2Gy) to rice seeds and then performed comparative transcriptome analysis of the rice seedlings. We identified a total of 2551 and 1464 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in low-dose and high-dose radiation groups, respectively. Gene ontology analyses indicated that low-dose and high-dose ion radiation both led to multiple physiological and biochemical activities changes in rice. By Gene Ontology analyses, the results showed that only one process-oxidation reduction process was enriched in the biological process category after high-dose ion radiation, while more processes such as response to biotic stimulus, heme binding, tetrapyrrole binding, oxidoreductase activity, catalytic activity and oxidoreductase activity were significantly enriched after low-dose ion radiation. The results indicated that the rice plants only focused on the process of oxidation reduction to response to high-dose ion radiation, whereas it was a coordination of multiple biological processes to response to low-dose ion radiation. To elucidate the transcriptional regulation of radiation stress-responsive genes, we identified several DEGs-encoding TFs. AP2/EREBP, bHLH, C2H2, MYB and WRKY TF families were altered significantly in response to ion radiation. Mapman analysis speculated that the biological effects on rice seedlings caused by the radiation stress might share similar mechanisms with the biotic stress. Our findings highlight important alterations in the expression of radiation response genes, metabolic pathways, and TF-encoding genes in rice seedlings exposed to low-dose and high-dose ion radiation.

  9. Comparison of different MC techniques to evaluate BNCT dose profiles in phantom exposed tovarious neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Durisi, E; Koivunoro, H; Visca, L; Borla, O; Zanini, A

    2010-03-01

    The absorbed dose in BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy) consists of several radiation components with different physical properties and biological effectiveness. In order to assess the clinical efficacy of the beams, determining the dose profiles in tissues, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are used. This paper presents a comparison between dose profiles calculated in different phantoms using two techniques: MC radiation transport code, MCNP-4C2 and BNCT MC treatment planning program, SERA (simulation environment for radiotherapy application). In this study MCNP is used as a reference tool. A preliminary test of SERA is performed using six monodirectional and monoenergetic beams directed onto a simple water phantom. In order to deeply investigate the effect of the different cross-section libraries and of the dose calculation methodology, monoenergetic and monodirectional beams directed toward a standard Snyder phantom are simulated. Neutron attenuation curves and dose profiles are calculated with both codes and the results are compared.

  10. The effect of different adaptation strengths on image quality and radiation dose using Siemens Care Dose 4D.

    PubMed

    Söderberg, Marcus; Gunnarsson, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different choices of adaptation strengths on image quality and radiation exposure to the patient with Siemens automatic exposure control system called CARE Dose 4D. An anthropomorphic chest phantom was used to simulate the patient and computed tomography scans were performed with a Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 and 64. Owing to adaptation strengths, a considerable reduction (26.6-51.5 % and 27.5-49.5 % for Sensation 16 and Sensation 64, respectively) in the radiation dose was found when compared with using a fixed tube current. There was a substantial difference in the image quality (image noise) between the adaptation strengths. Independent of selected adaptation strengths, the level of image noise throughout the chest phantom increased when CARE Dose 4D was used (p < 0.0001). We conclude that the adaptation strengths can be used to obtain user-specified modifications to image quality or radiation exposure to the patient.

  11. Morphological changes induced by different doses of gamma irradiation in garlic sprouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, C. N.; Croci, C. A.; Orioli, G. A.

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of different doses of gamma rays applied in dormancy and post-dormancy on garlic bulbs in relation with some morphophysiological parameters. High (commercial) doses cause the complete inhibition of sprouting and mitosis (due to nuclear aberrations). Relatively low doses show no effects on bulbs but doses of 10 Gy applied in post-dormancy reduce sprouting and stop mitosis. This inhibition becomes noticeable from 150 days post-harvest onwards. Exogenous growth regulators can reverse these effects. Results may reinforce the good practice of radioinhibition processes in garlic.

  12. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  13. Electrical synaptic input to ganglion cells underlies differences in the output and absolute sensitivity of parallel retinal circuits.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Gabe J; Rieke, Fred

    2011-08-24

    Parallel circuits throughout the CNS exhibit distinct sensitivities and responses to sensory stimuli. Ambiguities in the source and properties of signals elicited by physiological stimuli, however, frequently obscure the mechanisms underlying these distinctions. We found that differences in the degree to which activity in two classes of Off retinal ganglion cell (RGC) encode information about light stimuli near detection threshold were not due to obvious differences in the cells' intrinsic properties or the chemical synaptic input the cells received; indeed, differences in the cells' light responses were largely insensitive to block of fast ionotropic glutamate receptors. Instead, the distinct responses of the two types of RGCs likely reflect differences in light-evoked electrical synaptic input. These results highlight a surprising strategy by which the retina differentially processes and routes visual information and provide new insight into the circuits that underlie responses to stimuli near detection threshold.

  14. A randomized Phase III trial of weekly or 3-weekly doses of nab-paclitaxel versus weekly doses of Cremophor-based paclitaxel in patients with previously treated advanced gastric cancer (ABSOLUTE Trial).

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Wasaburo; Morita, Satoshi; Sakata, Yuh

    2015-03-01

    Paclitaxel is an agent widely used in second-line chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 3-weekly or weekly doses of nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel compared with weekly doses of Cremophor-based paclitaxel in patients with unresectable or recurrent gastric cancer refractory to first-line chemotherapy comprising fluoropyrimidines. A total of 730 patients will be enrolled from 72 institutions. The primary endpoint is the overall survival, and the secondary endpoints are progression-free survival, time to treatment failure, overall response rate, disease control rate, quality of life (by using the EQ-5D system) and safety.

  15. Neighbourhood socioeconomic inequalities in incidence of acute myocardial infarction: a cohort study quantifying age- and gender-specific differences in relative and absolute terms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Socioeconomic status has a profound effect on the risk of having a first acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Information on socioeconomic inequalities in AMI incidence across age- gender-groups is lacking. Our objective was to examine socioeconomic inequalities in the incidence of AMI considering both relative and absolute measures of risk differences, with a particular focus on age and gender. Methods We identified all patients with a first AMI from 1997 to 2007 through linked hospital discharge and death records covering the Dutch population. Relative risks (RR) of AMI incidence were estimated by mean equivalent household income at neighbourhood-level for strata of age and gender using Poisson regression models. Socioeconomic inequalities were also shown within the stratified age-gender groups by calculating the total number of events attributable to socioeconomic disadvantage. Results Between 1997 and 2007, 317,564 people had a first AMI. When comparing the most deprived socioeconomic quintile with the most affluent quintile, the overall RR for AMI was 1.34 (95 % confidence interval (CI): 1.32 – 1.36) in men and 1.44 (95 % CI: 1.42 – 1.47) in women. The socioeconomic gradient decreased with age. Relative socioeconomic inequalities were most apparent in men under 35 years and in women under 65 years. The largest number of events attributable to socioeconomic inequalities was found in men aged 45–74 years and in women aged 65–84 years. The total proportion of AMIs that was attributable to socioeconomic inequalities in the Dutch population of 1997 to 2007 was 14 % in men and 18 % in women. Conclusions Neighbourhood socioeconomic inequalities were observed in AMI incidence in the Netherlands, but the magnitude across age-gender groups depended on whether inequality was expressed in relative or absolute terms. Relative socioeconomic inequalities were high in young persons and women, where the absolute burden of AMI was low. Absolute

  16. Estimates of absorbed dose in different organs in children treated with radium for skin hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Lundell, M.

    1994-12-01

    Between 1930 and 1959, more than 10,000 infants were treated at Radiumhemmet, Stockholm, with radium ({sup 226}Ra) needles and/or tubes for hemangioma of the skin. Absorbed dose to the brain, eye lenses, parotid glands, thyroid gland, breast enlarge, lungs, stomach, intestine, ovaries, testicles and bone marrow were calculated for each individual. The mean absorbed dose to the different organs ranged from 0.06 to 0.48 Gy. The highest absorbed dose was given to the breast (maximum 47.7 Gy). There was a wide dose range for each organ which was due mainly to differences in the distance between the applicator and the organ. The absorbed dose to all organs decreased on average by 32% during the study period. This was due to a 25% decrease in the treatment time and a change in the distribution of the treatment sites. 17 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Biphasic and triphasic dose responses in zebrafish embryos to low-dose 150 kV X-rays with different levels of hardness

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Eva Yi; Cheng, Shuk Han; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo low-dose responses of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to 150 kV X-rays with different levels of hardness were examined through the number of apoptotic events revealed at 24 h post fertilization by vital dye acridine orange staining. Our results suggested that a triphasic dose response was likely a common phenomenon in living organisms irradiated by X-rays, which comprised an ultra-low-dose inhibition, low-dose stimulation and high-dose inhibition. Our results also suggested that the hormetic zone (or the stimulation zone) was shifted towards lower doses with application of filters. The non-detection of a triphasic dose response in previous experiments could likely be attributed to the use of hard X-rays, which shifted the hormetic zone into an unmonitored ultra-low-dose region. In such cases where the subhormetic zone was missed, a biphasic dose response would be reported instead. PMID:26951078

  18. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DESPOSITION DOSE OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT SIZE FRACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION DOSE OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT SIZE FRACTIONS. Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu**, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; **IIT Research Institute, Chicago, IL; *S...

  19. Evaluation of the medical exposure doses regarding dental examinations with different X-ray instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Chi; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Yu, Cheng-Ching; Chao, Jiunn-Hsing; Hsu, Fang-Yuh

    2015-11-01

    Modern dental X-ray examination that consists of traditional form, panorama, and cone-beamed 3D technologies is one of the most frequent diagnostic applications nowadays. This study used the Rando Phantom and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) to measure the absorbed doses of radiosensitive organs recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and whole body effective doses which were delivered due to dental X-ray examination performed with different types of X-ray instrument. Besides, enamel samples which performed reading with Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) procedure were also used to estimate the tooth doses. EPR is a dose reconstruction method of measuring free radicals induced by radiation exposure to the calcified tissue (mainly in the tooth enamel or bone) to evaluate the accepted high dose. The tooth doses estimated by TLD and EPR methods were compared. Relationships between the tooth doses and effective doses by dental X-ray examinations with different types of X-ray equipment were investigated in this work.

  20. Individual-dose distribution for the population in different regions with radioactive contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Keirim-Markus, I.B.; Kleshchenko, E.D.; Kushnereva, K.K.

    1995-09-01

    The reconstruction of individual doses as a result of the Chernobyl accident often relied on the method of EPR measurement from the enamel from extracted teeth. This method was used reliably, with individual confirmations of its indications being obtained. In determining the relatively small irradiation dose to the population, doubts arise because of the fact that the measured dose is often greater than the dose calculated by an indirect method---from external radiation fields at the location and the contents of radionuclides in foods. It is necessary, therefore, to perform an independent check of the results. In this paper, we describe one method for checking the reliability---comparing the measurements of the dose from several teeth in the same individual---in determining the dose from tooth enamel for the population of the Kamensk-Ural region of Sverdlovsk province. This group lived in the zone of passage for the eastern Ural radioactive wake in 1957. The error of the dose determination for different samples was different, since it depends on the mass and quality of the enamel obtained. The results presented show that the method of EPR dosimetry using the enamel of extracted teeth makes it possible to determine quite reliably the individual dose of external radiation from the background up to several Gy of the measurements. Our method compares measurements.

  1. Dose rate dependence for different dosimeters and detectors: TLD, OSL, EBT films, and diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Karsch, L.; Beyreuther, E.; Burris-Mog, T.; Kraft, S.; Richter, C.; Zeil, K.; Pawelke, J.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: The use of laser accelerators in radiation therapy can perhaps increase the low number of proton and ion therapy facilities in some years due to the low investment costs and small size. The laser-based acceleration technology leads to a very high peak dose rate of about 10{sup 11} Gy/s. A first dosimetric task is the evaluation of dose rate dependence of clinical dosimeters and other detectors. Methods: The measurements were done at ELBE, a superconductive linear electron accelerator which generates electron pulses with 5 ps length at 20 MeV. The different dose rates are reached by adjusting the number of electrons in one beam pulse. Three clinical dosimeters (TLD, OSL, and EBT radiochromic films) were irradiated with four different dose rates and nearly the same dose. A faraday cup, an integrating current transformer, and an ionization chamber were used to control the particle flux on the dosimeters. Furthermore two diamond detectors were tested. Results: The dosimeters are dose rate independent up to 410{sup 9} Gy/s within 2% (OSL and TLD) and up to 1510{sup 9} Gy/s within 5% (EBT films). The diamond detectors show strong dose rate dependence. Conclusions: TLD, OSL dosimeters, and EBT films are suitable for pulsed beams with a very high pulse dose rate like laser accelerated particle beams.

  2. Interfractional trend analysis of dose differences based on 2D transit portal dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persoon, L. C. G. G.; Nijsten, S. M. J. J. G.; Wilbrink, F. J.; Podesta, M.; Snaith, J. A. D.; Lustberg, T.; van Elmpt, W. J. C.; van Gils, F.; Verhaegen, F.

    2012-10-01

    Dose delivery of a radiotherapy treatment can be influenced by a number of factors. It has been demonstrated that the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is valuable for transit portal dosimetry verification. Patient related dose differences can emerge at any time during treatment and can be categorized in two types: (1) systematic—appearing repeatedly, (2) random—appearing sporadically during treatment. The aim of this study is to investigate how systematic and random information appears in 2D transit dose distributions measured in the EPID plane over the entire course of a treatment and how this information can be used to examine interfractional trends, building toward a methodology to support adaptive radiotherapy. To create a trend overview of the interfractional changes in transit dose, the predicted portal dose for the different beams is compared to a measured portal dose using a γ evaluation. For each beam of the delivered fraction, information is extracted from the γ images to differentiate systematic from random dose delivery errors. From the systematic differences of a fraction for a projected anatomical structures, several metrics are extracted like percentage pixels with |γ| > 1. We demonstrate for four example cases the trends and dose difference causes which can be detected with this method. Two sample prostate cases show the occurrence of a random and systematic difference and identify the organ that causes the difference. In a lung cancer case a trend is shown of a rapidly diminishing atelectasis (lung fluid) during the course of treatment, which was detected with this trend analysis method. The final example is a breast cancer case where we show the influence of set-up differences on the 2D transit dose. A method is presented based on 2D portal transit dosimetry to record dose changes throughout the course of treatment, and to allow trend analysis of dose discrepancies. We show in example cases that this method can identify the causes of

  3. Effectiveness of different dosing regimens of risperidone and olanzapine in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Fervaha, Gagan; Lee, Jimmy; Agid, Ofer; Remington, Gary

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of once- versus twice-daily dosing of risperidone and olanzapine on clinical outcomes in patients with schizophrenia. Data from phase 1 of the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) schizophrenia study were used. Patients with schizophrenia were randomly allocated to treatment with risperidone and olanzapine, and were also randomly assigned to once-daily (N=173 and 169, respectively) or twice-daily (N=168 and 167, respectively) dosing and followed for up to 18 months. Discontinuation rate and time to discontinuation were used as primary outcome measures to compare the two groups. The following outcome measures were also analyzed: efficacy, safety, medication adherence, adverse events, and concomitant psychotropic medications. No significant differences in discontinuation rates and time to discontinuation were observed between the once- and twice-daily dosing groups (P>0.05) in patients receiving risperidone or olanzapine. The once-daily dosing group demonstrated significantly lower mean daily doses of risperidone and olanzapine across phase 1, and lower rates of hospitalization for exacerbation of schizophrenia, sleepiness, and orthostatic faintness in patients receiving olanzapine (P<0.05) compared to the twice-daily dosing group. No significant differences were found in any other outcome measures between the two dosing groups. In conclusion, effectiveness and efficacy outcomes between once- and twice-daily dosing for risperidone and olanzapine were not significantly different. However, in view of the lower mean dose and better side effect profile, it is advisable to adhere to a once-daily dosing regimen, especially in the case of olanzapine.

  4. A spatially encoded dose difference maximal intensity projection map for patient dose evaluation: A new first line patient quality assurance tool

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Weigang; Graff, Pierre; Boettger, Thomas; Pouliot, Jean; and others

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To develop a spatially encoded dose difference maximal intensity projection (DD-MIP) as an online patient dose evaluation tool for visualizing the dose differences between the planning dose and dose on the treatment day. Methods: Megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT) images acquired on the treatment day are used for generating the dose difference index. Each index is represented by different colors for underdose, acceptable, and overdose regions. A maximal intensity projection (MIP) algorithm is developed to compress all the information of an arbitrary 3D dose difference index into a 2D DD-MIP image. In such an algorithm, a distance transformation is generated based on the planning CT. Then, two new volumes representing the overdose and underdose regions of the dose difference index are encoded with the distance transformation map. The distance-encoded indices of each volume are normalized using the skin distance obtained on the planning CT. After that, two MIPs are generated based on the underdose and overdose volumes with green-to-blue and green-to-red lookup tables, respectively. Finally, the two MIPs are merged with an appropriate transparency level and rendered in planning CT images. Results: The spatially encoded DD-MIP was implemented in a dose-guided radiotherapy prototype and tested on 33 MVCBCT images from six patients. The user can easily establish the threshold for the overdose and underdose. A 3% difference between the treatment and planning dose was used as the threshold in the study; hence, the DD-MIP shows red or blue color for the dose difference >3% or {<=}3%, respectively. With such a method, the overdose and underdose regions can be visualized and distinguished without being overshadowed by superficial dose differences. Conclusions: A DD-MIP algorithm was developed that compresses information from 3D into a single or two orthogonal projections while hinting the user whether the dose difference is on the skin surface or deeper.

  5. Metoprolol Dose Equivalence in Adult Men and Women Based on Gender Differences: Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Eugene, Andy R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent meta-analyses and publications over the past 15 years have provided evidence showing there are considerable gender differences in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol. Throughout this time, there have not been any research articles proposing a gender stratified dose-adjustment resulting in an equivalent total drug exposure. Metoprolol pharmacokinetic data was obtained from a previous publication. Data was modeled using nonlinear mixed effect modeling using the MONOLIX software package to quantify metoprolol concentration–time data. Gender-stratified dosing simulations were conducted to identify equivalent total drug exposure based on a 100 mg dose in adults. Based on the pharmacokinetic modeling and simulations, a 50 mg dose in adult women provides an approximately similar metoprolol drug exposure to a 100 mg dose in adult men. PMID:28035289

  6. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  7. Linking Different Exposure Patterns to Internal Lung Dose for Heterogeneous Ambient Aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particulate matter (PM) in the ambient air is a complex mixture of particles with different sizes and chemical compositions. Because potential health effects are known to be different for different size particles, specific dose of size-fractionated PM under realistic exposure con...

  8. High and Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Induce Different Secretome Profiles in a Human Skin Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Matzke, Melissa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Hu, Zeping; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.

    2014-03-18

    It is postulated that secreted soluble factors are important contributors of bystander effect and adaptive responses observed in low dose ionizing radiation. Using multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based proteomics, we quantified the changes of skin tissue secretome – the proteins secreted from a full thickness, reconstituted 3-dimensional skin tissue model 48 hr after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. Overall, 135 proteins showed statistical significant difference between the sham (0 cGy) and any of the irradiated groups (3, 10 or 200 cGy) on the basis of Dunnett adjusted t-test; among these, 97 proteins showed a trend of downregulation and 9 proteins showed a trend of upregulation with increasing radiation dose. In addition, there were 21 and 8 proteins observed to have irregular trends with the 10 cGy irradiated group either having the highest or the lowest level among all three radiated doses. Moreover, two proteins, carboxypeptidase E and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 were sensitive to ionizing radiation, but relatively independent of radiation dose. Conversely, proteasome activator complex subunit 2 protein appeared to be sensitive to the dose of radiation, as rapid upregulation of this protein was observed when radiation doses were increased from 3, to 10 or 200 cGy. These results suggest that different mechanisms of action exist at the secretome level for low and high doses of ionizing radiation.

  9. Influence of different dose calculation algorithms on the estimate of NTCP for lung complications.

    PubMed

    Hedin, Emma; Bäck, Anna

    2013-09-06

    Due to limitations and uncertainties in dose calculation algorithms, different algorithms can predict different dose distributions and dose-volume histograms for the same treatment. This can be a problem when estimating the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for patient-specific dose distributions. Published NTCP model parameters are often derived for a different dose calculation algorithm than the one used to calculate the actual dose distribution. The use of algorithm-specific NTCP model parameters can prevent errors caused by differences in dose calculation algorithms. The objective of this work was to determine how to change the NTCP model parameters for lung complications derived for a simple correction-based pencil beam dose calculation algorithm, in order to make them valid for three other common dose calculation algorithms. NTCP was calculated with the relative seriality (RS) and Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) models. The four dose calculation algorithms used were the pencil beam (PB) and collapsed cone (CC) algorithms employed by Oncentra, and the pencil beam convolution (PBC) and anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) employed by Eclipse. Original model parameters for lung complications were taken from four published studies on different grades of pneumonitis, and new algorithm-specific NTCP model parameters were determined. The difference between original and new model parameters was presented in relation to the reported model parameter uncertainties. Three different types of treatments were considered in the study: tangential and locoregional breast cancer treatment and lung cancer treatment. Changing the algorithm without the derivation of new model parameters caused changes in the NTCP value of up to 10 percentage points for the cases studied. Furthermore, the error introduced could be of the same magnitude as the confidence intervals of the calculated NTCP values. The new NTCP model parameters were tabulated as the algorithm was varied from PB

  10. Radiation Pneumonitis After Hypofractionated Radiotherapy: Evaluation of the LQ(L) Model and Different Dose Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Borst, Gerben R.; Ishikawa, Masayori; Nijkamp, Jasper

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the linear quadratic (LQ) model for hypofractionated radiotherapy within the context of predicting radiation pneumonitis (RP) and to investigate the effect if a linear (L) model in the high region (LQL model) is used. Methods and Materials: The radiation doses used for 128 patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy were converted to the equivalent doses given in fractions of 2 Gy for a range of {alpha}/{beta} ratios (1 Gy to infinity) according to the LQ(L) model. For the LQL model, different cut-off values between the LQ model and the linear component were used. The Lyman model parameters were fitted to the events of RP grade 2 or higher to derive the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). The lung dose was calculated as the mean lung dose and the percentage of lung volume (V) receiving doses higher than a threshold dose of xGy (V{sub x}). Results: The best NTCP fit was found if the mean lung dose, or V{sub x}, was calculated with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3 Gy. The NTCP fit of other {alpha}/{beta} ratios and the LQL model were worse but within the 95% confidence interval of the NTCP fit of the LQ model with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3 Gy. The V{sub 50} NTCP fit was better than the NTCP fit of lower threshold doses. Conclusions: For high fraction doses, the LQ model with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3 Gy was the best method for converting the physical lung dose to predict RP.

  11. Gene interaction network analysis suggests differences between high and low doses of acetaminophen

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi . E-mail: toyoshiba.hiroyoshi@nies.go.jp; Sone, Hideko; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Parham, Frederick M.; Irwin, Richard D.; Boorman, Gary A.; Portier, Christopher J.

    2006-09-15

    Bayesian networks for quantifying linkages between genes were applied to detect differences in gene expression interaction networks between multiple doses of acetaminophen at multiple time points. Seventeen (17) genes were selected from the gene expression profiles from livers of rats orally exposed to 50, 150 and 1500 mg/kg acetaminophen (APAP) at 6, 24 and 48 h after exposure using a variety of statistical and bioinformatics approaches. The selected genes are related to three biological categories: apoptosis, oxidative stress and other. Gene interaction networks between all 17 genes were identified for the nine dose-time observation points by the TAO-Gen algorithm. Using k-means clustering analysis, the estimated nine networks could be clustered into two consensus networks, the first consisting of the low and middle dose groups, and the second consisting of the high dose. The analysis suggests that the networks could be segregated by doses and were consistent in structure over time of observation within grouped doses. The consensus networks were quantified to calculate the probability distribution for the strength of the linkage between genes connected in the networks. The quantifying analysis showed that, at lower doses, the genes related to the oxidative stress signaling pathway did not interact with the apoptosis-related genes. In contrast, the high-dose network demonstrated significant interactions between the oxidative stress genes and the apoptosis genes and also demonstrated a different network between genes in the oxidative stress pathway. The approaches shown here could provide predictive information to understand high- versus low-dose mechanisms of toxicity.

  12. Acute and repeated dose toxicity studies of different β-cyclodextrin-based nanosponge formulations.

    PubMed

    Shende, Pravin; Kulkarni, Yogesh A; Gaud, R S; Deshmukh, Kiran; Cavalli, Roberta; Trotta, Francesco; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2015-05-01

    Nanosponges (NS) show promising results in different fields such as medicine, agriculture, water purification, fire engineering and so on. The present study was designed to evaluate toxicity of different NS formulations (namely, S1-S6) synthesized with different cross-linking agents such as carbonyl diimidazole, pyromellitic dianhydride and hexamethylene diisocynate; and preparation methods in experimental animals. Acute and repeated dose toxicity studies of formulations were carried out as per OECD guidelines 423 and 407, respectively. For acute toxicity study, formulations were administered to female rats at doses of 300 and 2000 mg/kg orally. The general behaviour of the rats was continuously monitored for 1 h after dosing, periodically during the first 24 h and daily thereafter for a total of 14 days. On day 14, animals were fasted overnight, weighed, and sacrificed. After sacrification, animals were subjected to necropsy. For repeated dose toxicity study, rats of either sex were orally administered with formulations at the dose of 300 mg/kg per day for a period of 28 days. The maximally tolerated dose of all formulations was found to be 2000 mg/kg. Repeated administration of formulations for 28 days did not show any significant changes in haematological and biochemical parameters in experimental animals. These results indicate that the formulations are safe, when tested in experimental animals.

  13. Absolute-structure reports.

    PubMed

    Flack, Howard D

    2013-08-01

    All the 139 noncentrosymmetric crystal structures published in Acta Crystallographica Section C between January 2011 and November 2012 inclusive have been used as the basis of a detailed study of the reporting of absolute structure. These structure determinations cover a wide range of space groups, chemical composition and resonant-scattering contribution. Defining A and D as the average and difference of the intensities of Friedel opposites, their level of fit has been examined using 2AD and selected-D plots. It was found, regardless of the expected resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, that the Friedel-difference intensities are often dominated by random uncertainty and systematic error. An analysis of data collection strategy is provided. It is found that crystal-structure determinations resulting in a Flack parameter close to 0.5 may not necessarily be from crystals twinned by inversion. Friedifstat is shown to be a robust estimator of the resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, very little affected by the particular space group of a structure nor by the occupation of special positions. There is considerable confusion in the text of papers presenting achiral noncentrosymmetric crystal structures. Recommendations are provided for the optimal way of treating noncentrosymmetric crystal structures for which the experimenter has no interest in determining the absolute structure.

  14. Variation of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in different outdoor and indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Stojanovska, Zdenka; Boev, Blazo; Zunic, Zora S; Ivanova, Kremena; Ristova, Mimoza; Tsenova, Martina; Ajka, Sorsa; Janevik, Emilija; Taleski, Vaso; Bossew, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Subject of this study is an investigation of the variations of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in outdoor and indoor environments of 40 dwellings, 31 elementary schools and five kindergartens. The buildings are located in three municipalities of two, geologically different, areas of the Republic of Macedonia. Indoor radon concentrations were measured by nuclear track detectors, deployed in the most occupied room of the building, between June 2013 and May 2014. During the deploying campaign, indoor and outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were measured simultaneously at the same location. It appeared that the measured values varied from 22 to 990 Bq/m(3) for indoor radon concentrations, from 50 to 195 nSv/h for outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates, and from 38 to 184 nSv/h for indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. The geometric mean value of indoor to outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates was found to be 0.88, i.e. the outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were on average higher than the indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. All measured can reasonably well be described by log-normal distributions. A detailed statistical analysis of factors which influence the measured quantities is reported.

  15. Assessment of leakage doses around the treatment heads of different linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Lonski, P; Taylor, M L; Franich, R D; Harty, P; Kron, T

    2012-12-01

    Out-of-field doses to untargeted organs may have long-term detrimental health effects for patients treated with radiotherapy. It has been observed that equivalent treatments delivered to patients with different accelerators may result in significant differences in the out-of-field dose. In this work, the points of leakage dose are identified about the gantry of several treatment units. The origin of the observed higher doses is investigated. LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosimetry has been employed to quantify the dose at a several points around the linac head of various linear accelerators (linacs): a Varian 600C, Varian 21-iX, Siemens Primus and Elekta Synergy-II. Comparisons are also made between different energy modes, collimator rotations and field sizes. Significant differences in leaked photon doses were identified when comparing the various linac models. The isocentric-waveguide 600C generally exhibits the lowest leakage directed towards the patient. The Siemens and Elekta models generally produce a greater leakage than the Varian models. The leakage 'hotspots' are evident on the gantry section housing the waveguide on the 21-iX. For all machines, there are significant differences in the x and y directions. Larger field sizes result in a greater leakage at the interface plate. There is a greater leakage around the waveguide when operating in a low-energy mode, but a greater leakage for the high-energy mode at the linac face. Of the vendors investigated, the Varian 600C showed the lowest average leakage dose. The Varian 21-iX showed double the dose of the 600C. The Elekta Synergy-II had on average four times the dose leakage than the 600C, and the Siemens Primus showed an average of five times that of the 600C. All vendors show strong differences in the x and y directions. The results offer the potential for patient-positioning strategies, linac choice and shielding strategies to reduce the leakage dose to patients.

  16. Absolutely classical spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

  17. Radiation dose differences between digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis are dependent on breast thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alakhras, Maram M.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Bourne, Roger; Rickard, Mary; Diffey, Jennifer; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose To evaluate the radiation dose derived from digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) at different tube current-exposure time product (mAs) and at 6 phantom thicknesses from 10 to 60 mm. Materials and Methods A total of 240 DM and DBT cranio-caudal (CC) phantom images were acquired at each thickness and at four exposure levels (the baseline mAs, 50%, 25% and 12.5% the baseline mAs). The incident Air Kerma (K) at the surface of the phantoms was measured using a solid state dosimeter. Mean Glandular Doses (MGD) were calculated for both modalities (DM and DBT). Results DBT dose was greater than that of DM for all mAs at each phantom thickness. For a breast thickness of 50 mm (close to average sized breast), the dose for DBT (2.32 mGy) was 13% higher than that for DM (2.05 mGy). The results also show that the difference in MGD between DM and DBT was less for the thicker compared with the thinner phantom, this difference being approximately a factor of 2.58 at 10 mm compared with a factor of 1.08 at 60 mm. While the MGD increased with increasing phantom thickness for both modalities, the dose increase with DBT was less than for DM, with the difference between 10 and 60 mm being a factor of 7 for DM and 3 for DBT. Conclusion The radiation dose from DBT was higher than that of DM and the difference in dose between DM and DBT decreases as phantom thickness increases.

  18. Meta-analysis of the impact of thioprine S-methyltransferase polymorphisms on the tolerable 6-mercaptopurine dose considering initial dose and ethnic difference

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myeong Gyu; Ko, Minoh; Kim, In-Wha; Oh, Jung Mi

    2016-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to decide whether to reduce an initial 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) dose in TPMT heterozygote in the case of an initial 6-MP dose of <75 mg/m2/d and to compare the tolerable 6-MP dose among different ethnic groups. The study was undertaken according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. The differences in mean values of the tolerable 6-MP dose were calculated by using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis version 3. The results of the meta-analysis indicated that the tolerable 6-MP dose was significantly lower in the TPMT heterozygote group (difference in mean values =11.729, 95% confidence interval =7.617–15.842, P<0.001) even when the initial 6-MP dose was <75 mg/m2/d. The TPMT*3C allele-dominant ethnic group (Asian) needed less reduction in mean 6-MP dose in comparison to the TPMT*3A allele-dominant ethnic group (Caucasian, Mediterranean, South American) (difference in mean values =8.884 vs 15.324). In conclusion, the initial 6-MP dose needs to be reduced in TPMT heterozygote when compared to the wild-type, and ethnic difference might influence the tolerable 6-MP dose in TPMT heterozygotes. PMID:27920553

  19. Tumor Induction in Mice After Localized Single- or Fractionated-Dose Irradiation: Differences in Tumor Histotype and Genetic Susceptibility Based on Dose Scheduling

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Elijah F.; Hunter, Nancy R.; Weil, Michael M.; Mason, Kathryn A.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate differences in tumor histotype, incidence, latency, and strain susceptibility in mice exposed to single-dose or clinically relevant, fractioned-dose γ-ray radiation. Methods and Materials: C3Hf/Kam and C57BL/6J mice were locally irradiated to the right hindlimb with either single large doses between 10 and 70 Gy or fractionated doses totaling 40 to 80 Gy delivered at 2-Gy/d fractions, 5 d/wk, for 4 to 8 weeks. The mice were closely evaluated for tumor development in the irradiated field for 800 days after irradiation, and all tumors were characterized histologically. Results: A total of 210 tumors were induced within the radiation field in 788 mice. An overall decrease in tumor incidence was observed after fractionated irradiation (16.4%) in comparison with single-dose irradiation (36.1%). Sarcomas were the predominant postirradiation tumor observed (n=201), with carcinomas occurring less frequently (n=9). The proportion of mice developing tumors increased significantly with total dose for both single-dose and fractionated schedules, and latencies were significantly decreased in mice exposed to larger total doses. C3Hf/Kam mice were more susceptible to tumor induction than C57BL/6J mice after single-dose irradiation; however, significant differences in tumor susceptibilities after fractionated radiation were not observed. For both strains of mice, osteosarcomas and hemangiosarcomas were significantly more common after fractionated irradiation, whereas fibrosarcomas and malignant fibrous histiocytomas were significantly more common after single-dose irradiation. Conclusions: This study investigated the tumorigenic effect of acute large doses in comparison with fractionated radiation in which both the dose and delivery schedule were similar to those used in clinical radiation therapy. Differences in tumor histotype after single-dose or fractionated radiation exposures provide novel in vivo evidence for differences in tumor

  20. Microinjection of different doses of norepinephrine into the caudate putamen produces opposing effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-wen; Yang, Chun-xiao; Gao, He-ren; Zhang, Duo; Zhang, Ying; Jiao, Run-sheng; Zhang, Hui; Liang, Yu; Xu, Man-ying

    2010-03-03

    It has been proven that norepinephrine (NE) regulates antinociception through its action on alpha-adrenoceptors located in brain nuclei, spinal cord, and peripheral organs. However, the supraspinal mechanism of noradrenergic pain modulation is controversial. The present study was aimed at investigating the nociceptive effects induced by injecting different doses of NE and phentolamine into the caudate putamen (CPU) of rats. The thermal pain threshold of the rats was measured by performing a tail-flick test. The tail-flick latency (TFL) was measured at 2-60 min after microinjection of the drugs. Our results revealed that the thermal pain threshold increased (long TFL) after the administration of a low dose of NE (2 microg/2 microl) and decreased (short TFL) after injection of a high dose of NE (8 microg/2 microl). In contrast, the pain threshold decreased after the administration of a low dose of phentolamine (1 microg/2 microl), while it increased after injection of a high dose of phentolamine (4 microg/2 microl). These results indicated that the injection of different doses of NE in the CPU of the rats produced opposite effects on the pain threshold, as determined by the tail-flick tests.

  1. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  2. An example of problems in dose reconstruction from doses formed by electromagnetic irradiation by different energy sources.

    PubMed

    Kirillov, Vladimir; Kuchuro, Joseph; Tolstik, Sergey; Leonova, Tatyana

    2010-02-01

    Dose reconstruction for citizens of Belarus affected by the Chernobyl accident showed an unexpectedly wide range of doses. Using the EPR tooth enamel dosimetry method, it has been demonstrated that when the tooth enamel dose was formed due to x-rays with effective energy of 34 keV and the additional irradiation of enamel samples was performed by gamma radiation with mean energy of 1,250 keV, it led to a considerable increase in the reconstructed absorbed dose as compared with the applied. In the case when the dose was formed due to gamma radiation and the additional irradiation was performed by x-rays, it led to a considerable decrease in the reconstructed dose as compared with the applied. When the dose formation and the additional irradiation were carried out from external sources of electromagnetic radiation of equal energy, the reconstructed dose value was close to that of the applied. The obtained data show that for adequate reconstruction of individual absorbed doses by the EPR tooth enamel spectra, it is necessary to take into account the contribution from diagnostic x-ray examination of the teeth, jaw, and skull of some individuals who were exposed to a combined effect of the external gamma radiation and x-rays.

  3. Mitigation of Atmospheric Delay in SAR Absolute Ranging Using Global Numerical Weather Prediction Data: Corner Reflector Experiments at 3 Different Test Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Xiaoying; Balss, Ulrich; Eineder, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric delay due to vertical stratification, the so-called stratified atmospheric delay, has a great impact on both interferometric and absolute range measurements. In our current researches [1][2][3], centimeter-range accuracy has been proven based on Corner Reflector (CR) based measurements by applying atmospheric delay correction using the Zenith Path Delay (ZPD) corrections derived from nearby Global Positioning System (GPS) stations. For a global usage, an effective method has been introduced to estimate the stratified delay based on global 4-dimensional Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) products: the direct integration method [4][5]. Two products, ERA-Interim and operational data, provided by European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) are used to integrate the stratified delay. In order to access the integration accuracy, a validation approach is investigated based on ZPD derived from six permanent GPS stations located in different meteorological conditions. Range accuracy at centimeter level is demonstrated using both ECMWF products. Further experiments have been carried out in order to determine the best interpolation method by analyzing the temporal and spatial correlation of atmospheric delay using both ECMWF and GPS ZPD. Finally, the integrated atmospheric delays in slant direction (Slant Path Delay, SPD) have been applied instead of the GPS ZPD for CR experiments at three different test sites with more than 200 TerraSAR-X High Resolution SpotLight (HRSL) images. The delay accuracy is around 1-3 cm depending on the location of test site due to the local water vapor variation and the acquisition time/date. [1] Eineder M., Minet C., Steigenberger P., et al. Imaging geodesy - Toward centimeter-level ranging accuracy with TerraSAR-X. Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on, 2011, 49(2): 661-671. [2] Balss U., Gisinger C., Cong X. Y., et al. Precise Measurements on the Absolute Localization Accuracy of TerraSAR-X on the

  4. Detection of lung nodules in chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT): effects of the different angular dose distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Byungdu; Lee, Youngjin; Kim, Dohyeon; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Jin, Seong-Soo; Mu, Shou-Chih; Kim, Hye-Mi; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-03-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently introduced new imaging modality for better detection of high- and smallcontrast lung nodules compared to conventional X-ray radiography. In CDT system, several projection views need to be acquired with limited angular range. The acquisition of insufficient number of projection data can degrade the reconstructed image quality. This image degradation easily affected by acquisition parameters such as angular dose distribution, number of projection views and reconstruction algorithm. To investigate the imaging characteristics, we evaluated the impact of the angular dose distribution on image quality by simulation studies with Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE). We designed the different angular dose distribution conditions. The results showed that the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) improves when exposed the higher dose at central projection views than peripheral views. While it was found that increasing angular dose distribution at central views improved lung nodule detectability, although both peripheral regions slightly suffer from image noise due to low dose distribution. The improvements of CNR by using proposed image acquisition technique suggest possible directions for further improvement of CDT system for lung nodule detection with high quality imaging capabilities.

  5. SBRT of lung tumours: Monte Carlo simulation with PENELOPE of dose distributions including respiratory motion and comparison with different treatment planning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panettieri, Vanessa; Wennberg, Berit; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Amor Duch, Maria; Ginjaume, Mercè; Lax, Ingmar

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to simulate with the Monte Carlo (MC) code PENELOPE the dose distribution in lung tumours including breathing motion in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Two phantoms were modelled to simulate a pentagonal cross section with chestwall (unit density), lung (density 0.3 g cm-3) and two spherical tumours (unit density) of diameters respectively of 2 cm and 5 cm. The phase-space files (PSF) of four different SBRT field sizes of 6 MV from a Varian accelerator were calculated and used as beam sources to obtain both dose profiles and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) in different volumes of interest. Dose distributions were simulated for five beams impinging on the phantom. The simulations were conducted both for the static case and including the influence of respiratory motion. To reproduce the effect of breathing motion different simulations were performed keeping the beam fixed and displacing the phantom geometry in chosen positions in the cranial and caudal and left-right directions. The final result was obtained by combining the different position with two motion patterns. The MC results were compared with those obtained with three commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs), two based on the pencil beam (PB) algorithm, the TMS-HELAX (Nucletron, Sweden) and Eclipse (Varian Medical System, Palo Alto, CA), and one based on the collapsed cone algorithm (CC), Pinnacle3 (Philips). Some calculations were also carried out with the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) in the Eclipse system. All calculations with the TPSs were performed without simulated breathing motion, according to clinical practice. In order to compare all the TPSs and MC an absolute dose calibration in Gy/MU was performed. The analysis shows that the dose (Gy/MU) in the central part of the gross tumour volume (GTV) is calculated for both tumour sizes with an accuracy of 2-3% with PB and CC algorithms, compared to MC. At the periphery of the GTV the TPSs overestimate

  6. SBRT of lung tumours: Monte Carlo simulation with PENELOPE of dose distributions including respiratory motion and comparison with different treatment planning systems.

    PubMed

    Panettieri, Vanessa; Wennberg, Berit; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Duch, Maria Amor; Ginjaume, Mercè; Lax, Ingmar

    2007-07-21

    The purpose of this work was to simulate with the Monte Carlo (MC) code PENELOPE the dose distribution in lung tumours including breathing motion in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Two phantoms were modelled to simulate a pentagonal cross section with chestwall (unit density), lung (density 0.3 g cm(-3)) and two spherical tumours (unit density) of diameters respectively of 2 cm and 5 cm. The phase-space files (PSF) of four different SBRT field sizes of 6 MV from a Varian accelerator were calculated and used as beam sources to obtain both dose profiles and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) in different volumes of interest. Dose distributions were simulated for five beams impinging on the phantom. The simulations were conducted both for the static case and including the influence of respiratory motion. To reproduce the effect of breathing motion different simulations were performed keeping the beam fixed and displacing the phantom geometry in chosen positions in the cranial and caudal and left-right directions. The final result was obtained by combining the different position with two motion patterns. The MC results were compared with those obtained with three commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs), two based on the pencil beam (PB) algorithm, the TMS-HELAX (Nucletron, Sweden) and Eclipse (Varian Medical System, Palo Alto, CA), and one based on the collapsed cone algorithm (CC), Pinnacle(3) (Philips). Some calculations were also carried out with the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) in the Eclipse system. All calculations with the TPSs were performed without simulated breathing motion, according to clinical practice. In order to compare all the TPSs and MC an absolute dose calibration in Gy/MU was performed. The analysis shows that the dose (Gy/MU) in the central part of the gross tumour volume (GTV) is calculated for both tumour sizes with an accuracy of 2-3% with PB and CC algorithms, compared to MC. At the periphery of the GTV the TPSs

  7. Pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of doxycycline in ostriches (Struthio camelus) at two different dose rates

    PubMed Central

    Idkaidek, Nasir M.; Hantash, Tareq M.

    2006-01-01

    A bioavailability and pharmacokinetics study of doxycycline was carried out on 30 healthy ostriches after a single intravenous (IV), intramuscular (IM) and oral dose of 15 mg/kg body weight. The plasma doxycycline concentration was determined by HPLC/UV at 0 (pretreatment), 0.08, 0.25, 0.5 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h after administration. The plasma concentration-time curves were examined using non-compartmental methods based on the statistical moment theory for only the higher dose. After IV administration, the elimination half-life (t1/2β), mean residence time (MRT), volume of distribution at the steady-state (Vss), volume of distribution (Vdarea) and total body clearance (ClB) were 7.67 ± 0.62 h, 6.68 ± 0.86 h, 0.86 ± 0.16 l/kg, 1.67 ± 0.52 l/kg and 2.51 ± 0.63 ml/min/kg, respectively. After IM and oral dosing, the mean peak plasma concentrations (Cmax) were 1.34 ± 0.33 and 0.30 ± 0.04 µg/ml, respectively, which were achieved at a post-administration time (tmax) of 0.75 ± 0.18, 3.03 ± 0.48 h, respectively. The t1/2β, Vdarea and ClB after IM administration were 25.02 ± 3.98 h, 23.99 ± 3.4 l/kg and 12.14 ± 1.71 ml/min/kg, respectively and 19.25 ± 2.53 h, 61.49 ± 7 l/kg and 40.19 ± 3.79 ml/min/kg after oral administration, respectively. The absolute bioavailability (F) of doxycycline was 5.03 and 17.52% after oral and IM administration, respectively. These results show that the dose data from other animals particularly mammals cannot be extrapolated to ostriches. Therefore, based on these results along with those reported in the literature, further studies on the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic, in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration values and clinical applications of doxycycline in ostriches are required. PMID:17106222

  8. The dose delivery effect of the different Beam ON interval in FFF SBRT: TrueBEAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawonwong, T.; Suriyapee, S.; Oonsiri, S.; Sanghangthum, T.; Oonsiri, P.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the dose delivery effect of the different Beam ON interval in Flattening Filter Free Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (FFF-SBRT). The three 10MV-FFF SBRT plans (2 half rotating Rapid Arc, 9 to10 Gray/Fraction) were selected and irradiated in three different intervals (100%, 50% and 25%) using the RPM gating system. The plan verification was performed by the ArcCHECK for gamma analysis and the ionization chamber for point dose measurement. The dose delivery time of each interval were observed. For gamma analysis (2%&2mm criteria), the average percent pass of all plans for 100%, 50% and 25% intervals were 86.1±3.3%, 86.0±3.0% and 86.1±3.3%, respectively. For point dose measurement, the average ratios of each interval to the treatment planning were 1.012±0.015, 1.011±0.014 and 1.011±0.013 for 100%, 50% and 25% interval, respectively. The average dose delivery time was increasing from 74.3±5.0 second for 100% interval to 154.3±12.6 and 347.9±20.3 second for 50% and 25% interval, respectively. The same quality of the dose delivery from different Beam ON intervals in FFF-SBRT by TrueBEAM was illustrated. While the 100% interval represents the breath-hold treatment technique, the differences for the free-breathing using RPM gating system can be treated confidently.

  9. Immunological responses following experimental endobronchial infection of badgers (Meles meles) with different doses of Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Lesellier, Sandrine; Corner, Leigh; Costello, Eamon; Sleeman, Paddy; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P; Greenwald, Rena; Esfandiari, Javan; Glyn Hewinson, R; Chambers, Mark; Gormley, Eamonn

    2009-01-15

    The Eurasian badger (Meles meles) is a wildlife reservoir for Mycobacterium bovis infection in Ireland and Great Britain and has been implicated in the transmission of tuberculosis to cattle. Vaccination of badgers is an option that could be used as part of a strategy to control the disease. In this study we used an endobronchial infection procedure to inoculate groups of badgers with three different doses (3x10(3), 2x10(2) and <10 Colony Forming Units (CFUs)) of M. bovis. After 17 weeks the disease status of each animal was determined by post-mortem pathology and culture for M. bovis. Each of the inoculum doses resulted in establishment of infection in the badgers. The cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were measured by lymphocyte transformation assay (LTA) of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cultured with bovine tuberculin (PPD-B). In each infected group the CMI responses increased with a kinetic profile corresponding to the delivered dose and the post-mortem pathology. The serological responses were measured by ELISA and a multi-antigen print immunoassay (MAPIA) in order to investigate any changes in the antigenic repertoire associated with different infective doses. In contrast to the CMI responses, the ELISA and MAPIA showed that the recognition of antigens by the badgers was intermittent and not strongly influenced by the dose of M. bovis.

  10. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  11. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  12. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS.
    Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu*, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, ...

  13. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  14. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS.
    Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu**, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; **IIT Research Institute, Chicago, IL; *South...

  15. Calculation of fluence and absorbed dose in head tissues due to different photon energies.

    PubMed

    Azorín, C; Vega-Carrillo, H R; Rivera, T; Azorín, J

    2014-01-01

    Calculations of fluence and absorbed dose in head tissues due to different photon energies were carried out using the MCNPX code, to simulate two models of a patient's head: one spherical and another more realistic ellipsoidal. Both head models had concentric shells to describe the scalp skin, the cranium and the brain. The tumor was located at the center of the head and it was a 1 cm-radius sphere. The MCNPX code was run for different energies. Results showed that the fluence decreases as the photons pass through the different head tissues. It can be observed that, although the fluence into the tumor is different for both head models, absorbed dose is the same.

  16. Dose distributions in phantoms irradiated in thermal columns of two different nuclear reactors.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, G; Agosteo, S; Altieri, S; Bortolussi, S; Carrara, M; Gay, S; Nava, E; Petrovich, C; Rosi, G; Valente, M

    2007-01-01

    In-phantom dosimetry studies have been carried out at the thermal columns of a thermal- and a fast-nuclear reactor for investigating: (a) the spatial distribution of the gamma dose and the thermal neutron fluence and (b) the accuracy at which the boron concentration should be estimated in an explanted organ of a boron neutron capture therapy patient. The phantom was a cylinder (11 cm in diameter and 12 cm in height) of tissue-equivalent gel. Dose images were acquired with gel dosemeters across the axial section of the phantom. The thermal neutron fluence rate was measured with activation foils in a few positions of this phantom. Dose and fluence rate profiles were also calculated with Monte Carlo simulations. The trend of these profiles do not show significant differences for the thermal columns considered in this work.

  17. Effects of different food doses on cadmium toxicity to Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Kluettgen, B.; Ratte, H.T. )

    1994-10-01

    Chronic toxicity tests were conducted with Daphnia magma using cadmium concentrations of 0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 5 [mu]g/L Cd with algae doses of 0.8, 4, 8, and 16 [center dot] 10[sup 6] cells/d of Chlorella saccharophila for each. In this way, the authors were able to determine the effects of cadmium on the life-table data of individuals, under different nutritional conditions. The development of juveniles was found to be inhibited by cadmium at low food doses, whereas body length and reproduction were strongly affected at higher food levels. The molting interval of adults and the development rate of embryos proved to be unaffected by cadmium. Cadmium-stressed animals lived longer than did the unstressed controls. The intrinsic rate of natural increase was generally reduced by cadmium, independent of the food dose.

  18. Optimum dose variation caused by post exposure bake temperature difference inside photoresist over different sublayers and thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Young-Min; An, Ilsin; Kim, Do Wan; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2008-03-01

    In principle, the dose should not be changed to make the same linewidth if a perfect anti-reflection coating (ARC) is used for all the sublayers underneath the resist. However, the optimum dose for different sublayers and thicknesses are different even though perfect ARC is used. The post exposure bake (PEB) process of a chemically amplified resist is one of the key processes to make very small features of semiconductor device. The photo-generated acid makes the deprotection of protected polymer, and this deprotection highly depends on the PEB temperature and time. The diffusion length of acid is also strongly dependent on PEB temperature and time. As the linewidth of the device decreases, smaller diffusion length is required to reduce the roughness of the line edge and width. One of the key factors to determine the deprotection and acid diffusion is the initial temperature rising and the final real temperature inside the resist. The unpredictable temperature rising to the pre-set temperature mainly causes the variation of linewidth and the optimum dose. In order to predict the accurate PEB temperature and time dependency of the linewidth and dose, the heat transfer from the hot plate to the resist on the top of the multiply stacked sublayers over the silicon wafer has to be known since the reaction and diffusion occur inside the resist, not on the top of the bare silicon wafer. We studied heat transfer from the hot plate to the top of the resist including conductivity and thickness of each sublayer. For this purpose, a novel numerical approach incorporated with analytic method was proposed to solve the heat conduction problem. The unknowns for temperature are located only at the interfaces between layers, so that it is fast and efficient. We calculated the time that is consumed for the resist to attain the prescribed PEB temperature for the different multi stacks and thicknesses. Calculation shows that the temperature rising is different and final temperature on

  19. Comparative Study of Different {beta}-Radiation Doses for Preventing Pterygium Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Takayuki; Mochizuki, Hideki; Ue, Takahiro; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Oinaka, Matsuyoshi

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the pterygium recurrence rates after treatment with two different {beta}-radiation doses. Methods and Materials: A total of 84 patients with a mean age of 63.0 {+-} 10.3 years (men, 48 eyes, and women, 47 eyes) and initially treated with {beta}-radiation after pterygium excision were recruited. The mean follow-up period was 49.9 {+-} 51.3 months. The patients were assigned to two dose groups: a high-dose (40 Gy) or a low-dose (20 Gy) group. The statistical significance of differences in patient age, pterygium size, and interval between surgery and radiotherapy were analyzed in the 20-Gy group using the Cox proportional hazard model at p < .05. Results: The high- and low-dose groups included 28 and 67 eyes, respectively. Pterygia recurred in 11 eyes, all in the low-dose group. The interval between surgery and radiotherapy was not a significant predictor of recurrence. Smaller pterygia had a lower risk of recurrence than pterygia that had encroached the pupillary area (pterygium located within one-third of the corneal radius from the limbus, corrected hazard ratio [HR], 0.069; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.006-0.766; p = .030; pterygium extending beyond one-third of the corneal radius, corrected HR, 0.188; 95% CI, 0.018-0.696; p = 0.019; and pterygium reaching the pupillary area, corrected HR, 0.184; 95% CI, 0.036-0.929; p = .040). Older age was marginally significant as a negative predictor of recurrence (HR, 0.943; 95% CI, 0.887-1.003; p = .061). No scleromalacia developed during the follow-up period. Conclusions: {beta}-Radiation at 40 Gy was more efficacious than at 20 Gy in preventing pterygium recurrence without scleromalacia development, particularly for large-size pterygia and those in young patients.

  20. Effects on QTc Interval of 2 Different Doses of Spinal Anesthesia in Inguinal Hernia Operations

    PubMed Central

    Hanbeyoglu, Onur; Urfalioglu, Aykut; Yazar, Fatih Mehmet; Ozcan, Sibel

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiac arrhythmia is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In this study, through examination of the effects on the QTc interval of different doses of hyperbaric bupivacaine, we investigated the relationship with arrhythmia. Material/Methods A total of 60 patients were separated into 2 groups: spinal block was applied with 10 mg bupivacaine to Group S1 and with 15 mg to Group S2. The mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) values were recorded before the spinal block and at 5 and 30 min after the block and at 60 min postoperatively. By recording the time of the spinal sensory block to reach T10 dermatome (Anaesth T) and the duration of the surgical procedure (Surg T.), the QTc intervals were calculated. Results The demographic data were similar in both groups. A statistically significant difference was determined between the S1 and S2 groups between the baseline and the 30 mins after spinal block QTc intervals (p=0.001). No statistically significant difference in HR values was determined between the groups at baseline, 5 min after spinal block, and 1 h after surgery (all p>0.05), but at 30 min after spinal block value there was a statistically significant difference (p=0.010). No statistically significant difference was determined in MAP values between the groups at baseline and 1 h after surgery (p>0.05). Conclusions The QTc interval lengthened in a dose-dependent manner after spinal anesthesia was applied with different doses of bupivacaine, but the doses used did not cause any severe arrhythmia. PMID:28285318

  1. Onset of leptin resistance shows temporal differences related to dose or pulsed treatment.

    PubMed

    Strehler, Kevin Y E; Matheny, Michael; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Sakarya, Yasemin; Bruce, Erin; Toklu, Hale Zerrin; Carter, Christy S; Morgan, Drake; Tümer, Nihal; Scarpace, Philip J

    2016-05-15

    Leptin administration results in leptin resistance presenting a significant barrier to therapeutic use of leptin. Consequently, we examined two hypotheses. The first examined the relationship between leptin dose and development of physiological and biochemical signs of leptin resistance. We hypothesized lower doses of leptin would produce proportional reductions in body weight without the adverse leptin-induced leptin resistance. The second compared pulsed central leptin infusion to continuous leptin infusion. We hypothesized that pulsed infusion at specific times of the day would evoke favorable body weight reductions while tempering the development of leptin-induced leptin resistance. The first experiment examined leptin responsiveness, including food intake, body weight and hypothalamic STAT3 phosphorylation to increasing doses of viral gene delivery of leptin. Varying the dose proved inconsequential with respect to long-term therapy and demonstrated proportional development of leptin resistance. The second experiment examined leptin responsiveness to pulsed central leptin infusion, comparing pulsed versus constant infusion of 3μg/day leptin or a 2h morning versus a 2h evening pulsed leptin infusion. Pulsed delivery of the supramaximal dose of 3μg/day was not different than constant delivery. Morning pulsed infusion of the submaximal dose of 0.25μg reduces food intake only over subsequent immediate meal period and was associated with body weight reductions, but results in cellular leptin resistance. Evening pulsed infusion did not decrease food intake but reduces body weight and maintains full leptin signaling. The positive benefit for pulsed delivery remains speculative, yet potentially may provide an alternative mode of leptin therapy.

  2. Influence of different doses of coffee on post-exercise blood pressure response

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Alesandra A; Silva, Raquel SB; Silva, Tais F; Tavares, Renata L; Silva, Alexandre S

    2016-01-01

    The reduction in blood pressure after the physical exercise practice is called postexercise hypotension (PEH). Previous studies have demonstrated that the ingestion of caffeine at levels corresponding to three doses of coffee eliminates this phenomenon. Thus, we evaluated the influence of different doses of coffee in the PEH in twelve hypertensives, who performed four experimental sessions of aerobic exercise on a cycle ergometer (lasting 40 minutes, with intensity between 60% and 80% of maximum heart rate), followed by the ingestion of one (CAF-1), two (CAF-2), or three (CAF-3) doses of caffeinated coffee, or three doses of decaffeinated coffee (DESC). The blood pressure was measured at rest and at 10-minute intervals during 120 minutes of recovery post exercise. DESC resulted in systolic PEH at all moments of measurement, with averages of -4.1±1.2 mmHg and -1.8±1.3 mmHg on the 1st and 2nd hours post exercise, respectively. In CAF-1, both systolic hypotensive and hypertensive responses to the exercise were identified, with averages of -1.2±1.7 and 0.5±0.4 mmHg after one and two hours of recovery. Conversely, hypertensive systolic response occurred in all measurements compared rest blood pressure. The 1st and 2nd hours post exercise was 4.5±1.1 and 6.5+1.1 mmHg in CAF-2 and 5.1+0.9 and 6.5+1.0 mmHg to CAF-3. Diastolic PEH was not found in any of the experimental sessions. Therefore, the ingestion of two and three doses of caffeinated coffee completely blunts the PEH, while one dose results in partial elimination of the PEH. PMID:28078174

  3. Serious complications in experiments in which UV doses are affected by using different lamp heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, Stephan D.; Ryel, Ronald J.; Caldwell, Martyn M.

    2004-10-01

    Many experiments examining plant responses to enhanced UV-B radiation simply compare an enhanced UV-B radiation treatment with ambient UV-B (or no UV-B in most greenhouse and controlled environment studies). However, some experiments utilize multiple doses of UV-B radiation. A number of different techniques have been used to adjust the UV dose, each with advantages and disadvantages. One common technique is to place racks of fluorescent UV-B lamps at different heights above the plant canopy. A generally ignored consequence of this technique is that the pattern of shade which plants receive from the lamps is distributed differently over the course of the day at different lamp heights. To determine the effects of using lamps at different heights above the canopy, we grew three species (canola, sunflower, and maize) in the greenhouse under racks of unenergized lamps that were placed at two different heights above the plant canopy. Many plant growth characteristics differed between plants grown under the two lamp heights. These differences can potentially enhance or obscure true UV-B effects. Even more troubling is that changes in leaf mass per foliage area, which were observed in this experiment, could contribute to differences in plant UV-B sensitivity. We recommend the use of other techniques for achieving multiple doses of UV-B radiation. These range from simple and inexpensive approaches (wrapping individual fluorescent tubes in different layers of a neutral density filter such as cheese cloth) to more technical and expensive alternatives (electronically modulated lamp control systems). These choices should be determined by the goals of the particular experiment.

  4. The effects of different doses of caffeine on endurance cycling time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Desbrow, Ben; Biddulph, Caren; Devlin, Brooke; Grant, Gary D; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; Leveritt, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of two different doses of caffeine on endurance cycle time trial performance in male athletes. Using a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study design, sixteen well-trained and familiarised male cyclists (Mean ± s: Age = 32.6 ± 8.3 years; Body mass = 78.5 ± 6.0 kg; Height = 180.9 ± 5.5 cm VO2(peak) = 60.4 ± 4.1 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) completed three experimental trials, following training and dietary standardisation. Participants ingested either a placebo, or 3 or 6 mg x kg(-1) body mass of caffeine 90 min prior to completing a set amount of work equivalent to 75% of peak sustainable power output for 60 min. Exercise performance was significantly (P < 0.05) improved with both caffeine treatments as compared to placebo (4.2% with 3 mg x kg(-1) body mass and 2.9% with 6 mg x kg(-1) body mass). The difference between the two caffeine doses was not statistically significant (P = 0.24). Caffeine ingestion at either dose resulted in significantly higher heart rate values than the placebo conditions (P < 0.05), but no statistically significant treatment effects in ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were observed (P = 0.39). A caffeine dose of 3 mg x kg(-1) body mass appears to improve cycling performance in well-trained and familiarised athletes. Doubling the dose to 6 mg x kg(-1) body mass does not confer any additional improvements in performance.

  5. Idiorrhythmic dose-rate variability in dietary zinc intake generates a different response pattern of zinc metabolism than conventional dose-response feeding.

    PubMed

    Momcilović, B; Reeves, P G; Blake, M J

    1997-07-01

    We compared the effects of idiorrhythmic dose-rate feeding and conventional dose-response on the induction of intestinal metallothionein (iMT), expression of aortal heat-shock protein mRNA (HSP70mRNA) induced by restraint stress, and accumulation of Zn in the femur and incisor of young growing male rats. An idiorrhythmic approach requires that the average dietary Zn concentration (modulo, M) over the whole experiment (epoch, E) is kept constant across different groups. This is done by adjusting the Zn concentration of the supplemented diet supplied to compensate for the reduction in the number of days on which Zn-supplemented diet is fed, the latter being spread evenly over the experiment. Idiorrhythms involve offering the diet with n times the overall Zn concentration (M) only every nth day with Zn-deficient diet offered on other days. Idiorrythmic Zn dose-rate feeding changed Zn accumulation in the femur and incisor in a complex bi-modal fashion, indicating that metabolic efficiency of dietary Zn is not constant but depends on Zn dose-rate. In contrast to feeding Zn in the conventional dose-response scheme, iMT and HSP70mRNA were not affected by idiorrhythmic dose-rate feeding. Idiorrhythmic cycling in dietary Zn load posed no risk of a biochemical overload nor caused the animals to be stressed. Idiorrhythmic dose-rate feeding brings the dimension of time to the conventional dose-response model.

  6. Changes in soil aggregate stability under different irrigation doses of waste water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morugán, Alicia; García-Orenes, Fuensanta; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Arcenegui, Victoria; Bárcenas, Gema

    2010-05-01

    Freshwater availability and soil degradation are two of the most important environmental problems in the Mediterranean area acerbated by incorrect agricultural use of irrigation in which organic matter is not correctly managed, the use of low quality water for irrigation, and the inefficiency of dose irrigation. For these reasons strategies for saving water and for the restoration of the mean properties of soil are necessary. The use of treated waste water for the irrigation of agricultural land could be a good solution to these problems, as it reduces the utilization of fresh water and could potentially improve key soil properties. In this work we have been studying, for more than three years, the effects on soil properties of different doses of irrigation with waste water. Here we show the results on aggregate stability. The study is located in an agricultural area at Biar (Alicante, SE of Spain), with a crop of grape (Vitis labrusca). Three types of waters are being used in the irrigation of the soil: fresh water (control) (TC), and treated waste water from secondary (T2) and tertiary treatment (T3). Three different doses of irrigation have been applied to fit the efficiency of the irrigation to the crop and soil type: D10 (10 L m-2 every week during 17 months), D50 (50 L m-2 every fifteen days during 14 moths) and D30 (30 L m-2 every week during 6 months up to present day). The results showed a clear decrease of aggregate stability during the period we used the second dose (D50) independent of the type of water used. That dose of irrigation and frequency produced strong wetting and drying cycles (WD) in the soil, and this is suspected to be the main factor responsible for the results. When we changed the dose of irrigation to D30, reducing the quantity per event and increasing the frequency, the soil aggregate stability started to improve. This dose avoids strong drying periods between irrigation events and the aggregate stability is confirmed to be slowly

  7. Combination of carbamazepine and valproate in different dose proportions in maximal electroshock seizure model in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei zhen; van Rijn, Clementina M; Liu, Yu xi; Wang, Ming zheng

    2002-09-01

    Rational polypharmacy of antiepileptic drugs is one of the treatment strategies for refractory epilepsy. To investigate whether it may be rational to combine carbamazepine (CBZ) and valproate (VPA), we tested both the anti-convulsant effect and the toxicity of combinations of CBZ and VPA in different dose proportions. CBZ/VPA dose ratios were, respectively, 1:6.66, 1:10, 1:13.3 and 1:20. The median effect doses of monotherapy and polytherapy in maximal electroshock seizure test and the median lethal (within 3 days after administration) doses were determined. These parameters were analyzed with the isobologram method. We found that the anti-convulsant effect of all combinations was additive. The toxicity of combination 1, 2 and 3 (CBZ/VPA, 1:6.66, 1:10, 1:13.3) was additive, but the toxicity of combination 4 (CBZ/VPA, 1:20) was infra-additive. Thus, in mice, using this model, a combination of CBZ/VPA 1:20 has an advantage over each of the drugs alone.

  8. Doses delivered to normal brain under different treatment protocols at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Capala, J.; Coderre, J.A.; Liu, H.B.

    1996-12-31

    As of October 31, 1996, 23 glioblastoma multiforme patients underwent BNCT under several treatment protocols at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. For treatment planning and dosimetry purposes, these protocols may be divided into four groups. The first group comprises protocols that used an 8-cm collimator and allowed a peak normal brain dose of 10.5 Gy-Eq to avolume of 1 cm{sup 3} were the thermal neutron flux was maximal (even if it happened to be in the tumor volume). The second group differs from the first in that it allowed a peak normal brain dose of 12.6 Gy-Eq. The protocols of the third and fourth groups allowed the prescribed peak normal brain dose of 12.6 Gy-Eq to be outside of the tumor volume, used a 12-cm collimator and, respectively, uni- or bilateral irradiations. We describe the treatment planning procedures and report the doses delivered to various structures of the brain.

  9. Genetic differences in Native Americans and tacrolimus dosing after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chakkera, H A; Chang, Y-H; Bodner, J K; Behmen, S; Heilman, R L; Reddy, K S; Mulligan, D C; Moss, A A; Khamash, H; Katariya, N; Hewitt, W R; Pitta, T L; Frassetto, L A

    2013-01-01

    Tacrolimus pharmacokinetics vary due to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in metabolizing enzymes and membrane transporters that alter drug elimination. Clinically we observed that Native Americans require lower dosages of tacrolimus to attain trough levels similar to Caucasians. We previously demonstrated that Native Americans have decreased oral clearance of tacrolimus, suggesting that Native Americans may have more variant SNPs and, therefore, altered tacrolimus pharmacokinetic parameters. We conducted 12-hour pharmacokinetic studies on 24 adult Native American kidney transplant recipients on stable doses of tacrolimus for at least 1 month posttransplantation. Twenty-four Caucasian kidney transplant recipients were compared as controls. SNPs encoding the genes for the enzymes (CYP3A4, CYP3A5) and transporters (ABCB1, BCRP, and MRP1) were typed using TaqMan. The mean daily tacrolimus dose in the Native Americans was 0.03 ± 0.02 compared with the Caucasians 0.5 ± 0.3 (mg/kg/d; P = .002), with no significant differences in trough levels, (6.7 ± 3.1 vs 7.4 ± 2.1 ng/dL; P = .4). Many Native Americans, but not Caucasians, demonstrated the 3/*3 - C3435T CC and the *3/*3 -G2677T GG genotype combination previously associated with low tacrolimus dosing. Native Americans required significantly lower tacrolimus doses than Caucasians to achieve similar tacrolimus trough levels, in part due to lower tacrolimus clearance from decreased drug metabolism and excretion.

  10. Dose-dependent difference of nuclear receptors involved in murine liver hypertrophy by piperonyl butoxide.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yohei; Yoshida, Midori; Tamura, Kei; Takahashi, Miwa; Kodama, Yukio; Inoue, Kaoru

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear receptors play important roles in chemically induced liver hypertrophy in rodents. To clarify the involvement of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and other nuclear receptors in mouse liver hypertrophy induced by different doses of piperonyl butoxide (PBO), wild-type and CAR-knockout mice were administered PBO (200, 1,000, or 5,000 ppm) in the basal diet for 1 week. Increased liver weight and diffuse hepatocellular hypertrophy were observed at 5,000 ppm for both genotypes, accompanied by increased Cyp3a11 mRNA and CYP3A protein expression, suggesting that CAR-independent pathway, possibly pregnane X receptor (PXR), plays a major role in the induction of hypertrophy. Moreover, wild-type mice at 5,000 ppm showed enhanced hepatocellular hypertrophy and strong positive staining for CYP2B in the centrilobular area, suggesting the localized contribution of CAR. At 1,000 ppm, only wild-type mice showed liver weight increase and centrilobular hepatocellular hypertrophy concurrent with elevated Cyp2b10 mRNA expression and strong CYP2B staining, indicating that CAR was essential at 1,000 ppm. We concluded that high-dose PBO induced hypertrophy via CAR and another pathway, while lower dose of PBO induced a pathway mediated predominantly by CAR. The dose-responsiveness on liver hypertrophy is important for understanding the involvement of nuclear receptors.

  11. Effective Dose of Radon 222 Bottled Water in Different Age Groups Humans: Bandar Abbas City, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, Yadolah; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Langarizadeh, Ghazaleh; Zandsalimi, Yahya; Amirhajeloo, Leila Rasouli; Kargosha, Morteza; Moradi, Mahboobeh; Moradi, Bigard; Mirzaei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Radon 222 is a natural radioactive element with a half-life of 3.8 days. It is odorless and colorless as well as water-soluble. Consuming waters which contain high concentration of 222Rn would increase the effective dose received by different age groups. It would also be followed by an increased prevalence of cancer. In this research, 72 samples of the most commonly used bottled water in Bandar Abbas were collected in 3 consecutive months, May, June and July of 2013. Concentration 222Rn of was measured by radon-meter model RTM166-2. The effective dose received by the 4 age groups, male and female adults as well as children and infants was estimated using the equation proposed by UNSCEAR. The results revealed that the mean and range concentration of 222Rn in bottled waters were 641±9 Bq/m3 and 0-901 Bq/m3, respectively. The mean concentration of 222Rn in the well-known Marks followed this Zam Zam>Bishe>Koohrng>Dassani>Christal>Polour>Damavand>Sivan. Infants were observed to receive a higher effective dose than children. The highest and lowest effective dose received was found to belong to male adults and children, respectively. PMID:26383192

  12. Effective Dose of Radon 222 Bottled Water in Different Age Groups Humans: Bandar Abbas City, Iran.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Yadolah; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Langarizadeh, Ghazaleh; Zandsalimi, Yahya; Amirhajeloo, Leila Rasouli; Kargosha, Morteza; Moradi, Mahboobeh; Moradi, Bigard; Mirzaei, Maryam

    2015-06-04

    Radon 222 is a natural radioactive element with a half-life of 3.8 days. It is odorless and colorless as well as water-soluble. Consuming waters which contain high concentration of 222Rn would increase the effective dose received by different age groups. It would also be followed by an increased prevalence of cancer. In this research, 72 samples of the most commonly used bottled water in Bandar Abbas were collected in 3 consecutive months, May, June and July of 2013. Concentration 222Rn of was measured by radon-meter model RTM166-2. The effective dose received by the 4 age groups, male and female adults as well as children and infants was estimated using the equation proposed by UNSCEAR. The results revealed that the mean and range concentration of 222Rn in bottled waters were 641±9 Bq/m3 and 0-901 Bq/m3, respectively. The mean concentration of 222Rn in the well-known Marks followed this Zam Zam>Bishe>Koohrng>Dassani>Christal>Polour>Damavand>Sivan. Infants were observed to receive a higher effective dose than children. The highest and lowest effective dose received was found to belong to male adults and children, respectively.

  13. Effect of different doses of Manuka honey in experimentally induced inflammatory bowel disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A; Medhi, B; Avti, P K; Saikia, U N; Pandhi, P; Khanduja, K L

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of different doses of Manuka honey in experimentally induced inflammatory bowel disease in rats. Adult Wistar rats of either sex were used (n = 30). Colitis was induced by a single intracolonic administration of TNBS dissolved in 35% ethanol. The rats (n = 30) were divided into five groups (n = 6) and were treated with vehicle (ethanol), TNBS, Manuka honey (5 g/kg, p.o.), Manuka honey (10 g/kg, p.o.) or sulfasalazine (360 mg/kg, p.o.) body weight for 14 days. After completion of treatment, the animals were killed and the following parameters were assessed: morphological score, histological score and different antioxidant parameters.Manuka honey at different doses provided protection against TNBS-induced colonic damage. There was significant protection with Manuka honey 5 g/kg as well as with 10 g/kg body weight compared with the control (p < 0.001). All the treated groups showed reduced colonic inflammation and all the biochemical parameters were significantly reduced compared with the control in the Manuka honey treated groups (p < 0.001). Manuka honey at different doses restored lipid peroxidation as well as improved antioxidant parameters. Morphological and histological scores were significantly reduced in the low dose Manuka honey treated group (p < 0.001). In the inflammatory model of colitis, oral administration of Manuka honey 5 g/kg and Manuka honey 10 g/kg body weight significantly reduced the colonic inflammation. The present study indicates that Manuka honey is efficacious in the TNBS-induced rat colitis model, but these results require further confirmation in human studies.

  14. Effects of different doses of caffeine on anaerobic exercise in boys.

    PubMed

    Turley, Ken; Eusse, Paola A; Thomas, Myles M; Townsend, Jeremy R; Morton, Aaron B

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated effects of low (1 mg·kg-1), moderate (3 mg·kg-1) and high (5 mg·kg-1) doses of caffeine on anaerobic performance in boys. Twenty-six 8- to 10-year-old boys participated in a double-blind, crossover, counter-balanced study. Boys received in random order a placebo (PL) or anhydrous caffeine: 1 (CAF-1), 3 (CAF-3), or 5 (CAF-5) mg caffeine·kg-1 body mass in cherry flavored Sprite. Sixty minutes following consumption boys performed a static handgrip test and then a 30-s Wingate test. Maximal grip strength (21.5 ± 4.9 & 21.6 ± 4.7 vs. 20.4 ± 4.0 kg) was significantly higher in CAF-5 & CAF-3 vs PL, respectively. Absolute and relative peak power (287 ± 72 vs 281 ± 69 W & 8.0 ± 0.9 vs 7.8 ± 1.0 W·kg-1) were significantly higher in CAF-3 vs PL, respectively. Mean power (153 ± 48 vs 146 ± 43 W) was significantly higher in CAF-5 vs PL, respectively. Peak Wingate HR was significantly higher (189 ± 8 vs 185 ± 9 beats·min-1) in CAF-5 vs PL, respectively. These findings suggest that in boys CAF-1 did not affect performance. During the Wingate test CAF-3 resulted in higher peak power while CAF-5 increased mean power. The significant increase in peak HR following the Wingate test is likely related to greater mean power generated during CAF-5.

  15. SU-E-T-430: Feasibility Study On Using Overlap Volume Histogram to Predict the Dose Difference by Respiratory Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, D; Kang, S; Kim, D; Kim, T; Kim, K; Cho, M; Suh, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The dose difference between three-dimensional dose (3D dose) and 4D dose which considers motion due to respiratory can be varied according to geometrical relationship between planning target volume (PTV) and organ at risk (OAR). The purpose of the study is to investigate the dose difference between 3D and 4D dose using overlap volume histogram (OVH) which is an indicator that quantify geometrical relationship between a PTV and an OAR. Methods: Five liver cancer patients who previously treated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) were investigated. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images were acquired for all patients. ITV-based treatment planning was performed. 3D dose was calculated on the end-exhale phase image as a reference phase image. 4D dose accumulation was implemented from all phase images using dose warping technique used deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm (Horn and Schunck optical flow) in DIRART. In this study OVH was used to quantify geometrical relationship between a PTV and an OAR. OVH between a PTV and a selected OAR was generated for each patient case and compared for all cases. The dose difference between 3D and 4D dose for normal organ was calculated and compared for all cases according to OVH. Results: The 3D and 4D dose difference for OAR was analyzed using dose-volume histogram (DVH). On the basis of a specific point which corresponds to 10% of OAR volume overlapped with expanded PTV, mean dose difference was 34.56% in minimum OVH distance case and 13.36% in maximum OVH distance case. As the OVH distance increased, mean dose difference between 4D and 3D dose was decreased. Conclusion: The tendency of dose difference variation was verified according to OVH. OVH is seems to be indicator that has a potential to predict the dose difference between 4D and 3D dose. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A10050270) through

  16. Levels and functionality of antibodies after pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in schedules with different timing of the booster dose.

    PubMed

    van Westen, Els; Rodenburg, Gerwin D; van Gils, Elske J M; Tcherniaeva, Irina; Berbers, Guy A M; Cowell, Lucy; Goldblatt, David; Rots, Nynke Y; van den Dobbelsteen, Germie P J M; Sanders, Elisabeth A M

    2013-12-02

    The seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) has been introduced in most high-income countries, although with differences in age, timing and number of primary doses before 6 months of age and presence and timing of a booster vaccination. The objective was to determine and compare the IgG antibody levels and functionality of IgG responses (avidity and opsonophagocytoses) at 1 and 2 years of age following 2 primary doses with a booster at 11 or 24 months of age. Children received PCV7 at 2 and 4 months (2-dose group), or at 2, 4 and 11 months (2+1-dose group), or no PCV7 (controls) before 1 year of age. All children received a PCV7 dose at 24 months of age. At the age of 12 months, the 2+1-dose group had higher IgG levels and functional antibody levels, compared to the 2-dose group for all serotypes, but at 25 months the difference between the 2-dose and 2+1-dose groups had disappeared for most serotypes. The kinetics of opsonophagocytic antibodies were in line with the specific IgG antibody levels for most serotypes, although differences between the 2-dose and the 2+1-dose group were more pronounced in OPA activity as compared to the IgG levels especially at the age of 24 months. Delaying the booster dose from 11 months to 24 months after 2 primary doses resulted in significantly higher OPA GMTs one month after the booster dose. This must, however, be balanced against the risk of leaving children unboosted between the age of 11 and 24 months at a time when disease risk is still high. Local decisions about the timing of a booster dose should also take into account vaccine coverage and the indirect herd effect in a well vaccinated population. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00189020.

  17. Effect of different doses of Malaysian honey on reproductive parameters in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, M; Sulaiman, S A; Jaafar, H; Sirajudeen, K N S

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different doses of Malaysian honey on male reproductive parameters in adult rats. Thirty-two healthy adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (eight rats per group). Group 1 (control group) was given 0.5 ml of distilled water. Groups 2, 3 and 4 were given 0.2, 1.2 and 2.4 g kg(-1) body weight of honey respectively. The rats were treated orally by gavage once daily for 4 weeks. Honey did not significantly alter body and male reproductive organs weights. The rats in Group 3 which received honey at 1.2 g kg(-1) had significantly higher epididymal sperm count than those in Groups 1, 2 and 4. No significant differences were found for the percentage of abnormal sperm, elongated spermatid count, reproductive hormonal levels as well as the histology of the testis among the groups. In conclusion, Malaysian honey at a dose of 1.2 g kg(-1) daily significantly increased epididymal sperm count without affecting spermatid count and reproductive hormones. These findings might suggest that oral administration of honey at this dose for 4 weeks may enhance spermiogenesis in adult rats.

  18. Predictors of adherence to different types and doses of supervised exercise during breast cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise is beneficial for breast cancer patients during chemotherapy but adherence to different types and doses of exercise is a challenge. The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of adherence to different types and doses of exercise during breast cancer chemotherapy in a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Methods Breast cancer patients in Edmonton, Vancouver, and Ottawa, Canada receiving chemotherapy (N = 301) were randomized to a standard dose of 25–30 minutes of aerobic exercise (STAN), a higher dose of 50–60 minutes of aerobic exercise (HIGH), or a higher dose of 50–60 minutes of combined aerobic and resistance exercise (COMB). Predictors included demographic, medical, fitness, and quality of life variables. Exercise adherence was measured as the percentage of supervised exercise sessions completed. Results Overall adherence to the supervised exercise sessions was 73% (SD = 24%). In a multivariate regression model, six independent predictors explained 26.4% (p < 0.001) of the variance in exercise adherence. Higher exercise adherence was achieved by breast cancer patients in Vancouver (p < 0.001), with fewer endocrine symptoms (p = 0.009), randomized to STAN (p = 0.009), with fewer exercise limitations (p = 0.009), receiving shorter chemotherapy protocols (p = 0.015), and with higher VO2peak (p = 0.017). Disease stage (p for interaction = 0.015) and body mass index (p for interaction = 0.030) interacted with group assignment to predict adherence. For disease stage, patients with stage I/IIa disease adhered equally well to all three exercise interventions whereas patients with stage IIb/III disease adhered better to the STAN intervention than the two higher dose exercise interventions. For body mass index, healthy weight patients adhered equally well to all three exercise interventions whereas overweight patients adhered best to STAN and worst to COMB; and obese patients adhered best

  19. Analysis of the space radiation doses obtained simultaneously at two different locations outside the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachev, T. P.

    2013-12-01

    Space weather and related ionizing radiation has been recognized as one of the main health concerns for the International Space Station (ISS) crew. The estimation of the radiation effect on humans outside the ISS requires at first order accurate knowledge of their accumulated absorbed dose rates, which depend on the global space radiation distribution, solar cycle and local variations generated by the 3D mass distribution surrounding the ISS. The R3DE (Radiation Risks Radiometer-Dosimeter for the EXPOSE-E platform) on the European Technological Exposure Facility (EuTEF) worked successfully outside of the European Columbus module between February 2008 and September 2009. A very similar instrument named R3DR for the EXPOSE-R platform worked outside the Russian Zvezda module of the ISS between March 2009 and August 2010. Both are Liulin-type detectors, Bulgarian-built miniature spectrometer-dosimeters. The acquired approximately 5 million deposited energy spectra from which the flux and absorbed dose rate were calculated with 10 s resolution behind less than 0.41 g cm-2 shielding. This paper analyses the spectra collected in 2009 by the R3DE/R instruments and the long-term variations in the different radiation environments of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR), inner radiation belt trapped protons in the region of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) and relativistic electrons from the Outer Radiation Belt (ORB). The R3DE instrument, heavily shielded by the surrounding structures, measured smaller primary fluxes and dose rates from energetic protons from the SAA and relativistic electrons from the ORB but higher values from GCRs because of the contribution from secondary particles. The main conclusion from this investigation is that the dose rates from different radiation sources around the International Space Station (ISS) have a large special and temporal dynamic range. The collected data can be interpreted as possible doses obtained by the cosmonauts and astronauts during

  20. Treatment planning using MRI data: an analysis of the dose calculation accuracy for different treatment regions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Because of superior soft tissue contrast, the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a complement to computed tomography (CT) in the target definition procedure for radiotherapy is increasing. To keep the workflow simple and cost effective and to reduce patient dose, it is natural to strive for a treatment planning procedure based entirely on MRI. In the present study, we investigate the dose calculation accuracy for different treatment regions when using bulk density assignments on MRI data and compare it to treatment planning that uses CT data. Methods MR and CT data were collected retrospectively for 40 patients with prostate, lung, head and neck, or brain cancers. Comparisons were made between calculations on CT data with and without inhomogeneity corrections and on MRI or CT data with bulk density assignments. The bulk densities were assigned using manual segmentation of tissue, bone, lung, and air cavities. Results The deviations between calculations on CT data with inhomogeneity correction and on bulk density assigned MR data were small. The maximum difference in the number of monitor units required to reach the prescribed dose was 1.6%. This result also includes effects of possible geometrical distortions. Conclusions The dose calculation accuracy at the investigated treatment sites is not significantly compromised when using MRI data when adequate bulk density assignments are made. With respect to treatment planning, MRI can replace CT in all steps of the treatment workflow, reducing the radiation exposure to the patient, removing any systematic registration errors that may occur when combining MR and CT, and decreasing time and cost for the extra CT investigation. PMID:20591179

  1. Postoperative analgesia in children: A comparison of three different doses of caudal epidural morphine

    PubMed Central

    Baduni, Neha; Sanwal, Manoj Kumar; Vajifdar, Homay; Agarwala, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal epidural block is the most commonly used neuraxial block in children. Morphine has been used as a caudal additive for more than three decades. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and duration of analgesia of three different doses of caudal epidural morphine (CEM), and to find out the incidence of side effects. Material and Methods: This study was conducted on 75 patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists grades I and II, aged 2-12 years, undergoing lower abdominal and urogenital surgeries. Patients were randomly allocated to one of the three groups according to the dose of morphine. Group I received 30 μg/kg, group II 50 μg/kg, and group III 70 μg/kg. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, electrocardiogram, pain score, sedation score, duration of analgesia, and side-effects were noted. Results: The mean duration of analgesia was 8.63 h in group I, 13.36 h in group II and 19.19 h in group III. Respiratory depression was noted in three patients in group III. One patient in group I had itching. One patient each in groups I, II, and III had nausea/vomiting. Conclusion: CEM significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia, though with a higher dose the risk of respiratory depression should always be kept in mind. PMID:27275053

  2. Comparison of different approaches of estimating effective dose from reported exposure data in 3D imaging with interventional fluoroscopy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Hansson, Jonny; Bâth, Magnus

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging with interventional fluoroscopy systems is today a common examination. The examination includes acquisition of two-dimensional projection images, used to reconstruct section images of the patient. The aim of the present study was to investigate the difference in resulting effective dose obtained using different levels of complexity in calculations of effective doses from these examinations. In the study the Siemens Artis Zeego interventional fluoroscopy system (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) was used. Images of anthropomorphic chest and pelvis phantoms were acquired. The exposure values obtained were used to calculate the resulting effective doses from the examinations, using the computer software PCXMC (STUK, Helsinki, Finland). The dose calculations were performed using three different methods: 1. using individual exposure values for each projection image, 2. using the mean tube voltage and the total DAP value, evenly distributed over the projection images, and 3. using the mean kV and the total DAP value, evenly distributed over smaller selection of projection images. The results revealed that the difference in resulting effective dose between the first two methods was smaller than 5%. When only a selection of projection images were used in the dose calculations the difference increased to over 10%. Given the uncertainties associated with the effective dose concept, the results indicate that dose calculations based on average exposure values distributed over a smaller selection of projection angles can provide reasonably accurate estimations of the radiation doses from 3D imaging using interventional fluoroscopy systems.

  3. Serious complications in experiments in which UV doses are effected by using different lamp heights.

    PubMed

    Flint, Stephan D; Ryel, Ronald J; Hudelson, Timothy J; Caldwell, Martyn M

    2009-10-06

    Many experiments examining plant responses to enhanced ultraviolet-B radiation (280-315nm) simply compare an enhanced UV-B treatment with ambient UV-B (or no UV-B radiation in most greenhouse and controlled-environment studies). Some more detailed experiments utilize multiple levels of UV-B radiation. A number of different techniques have been used to adjust the UV dose. One common technique is to place racks of fluorescent UV-emitting lamps at different heights above the plant canopy. However, the lamps and associated support structure cast shadows on the plant bed below. We calculated one example of the sequence of shade intervals for two common heights of lamp racks and show the patterns and duration of shade which the plants receive is distributed differently over the course of the day for different heights of the lamp racks. We also conducted a greenhouse experiment with plants (canola, sunflower and maize) grown under unenergized lamp racks suspended at the same two heights above the canopy. Growth characteristics differed in unpredictable ways between plants grown under the two heights of lamp racks. These differences could enhance or obscure potential UV-B effects. Also, differences in leaf mass per unit foliage area, which were observed in this experiment, could contribute to differences in plant UV-B sensitivity. We recommend the use of other techniques for achieving multiple doses of UV-B radiation. These range from simple and inexpensive approaches (e.g., wrapping individual fluorescent tubes in layers of a neutral-density filter such as cheese cloth) to more technical and expensive alternatives (e.g., electronically modulated lamp control systems). These choices should be determined according to the goals of the particular experiment.

  4. Organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices in adult CT: Comparison of four types of reference phantoms across different examination protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yakun; Li Xiang; Paul Segars, W.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) to the public has increased the concern among radiation protection professionals. Being able to accurately assess the radiation dose patients receive during CT procedures is a crucial step in the management of CT dose. Currently, various computational anthropomorphic phantoms are used to assess radiation dose by different research groups. It is desirable to better understand how the dose results are affected by different choices of phantoms. In this study, the authors assessed the uncertainties in CT dose and risk estimation associated with different types of computational phantoms for a selected group of representative CT protocols. Methods: Routinely used CT examinations were categorized into ten body and three neurological examination categories. Organ doses, effective doses, risk indices, and conversion coefficients to effective dose and risk index (k and q factors, respectively) were estimated for these examinations for a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). Four methods were used, each employing a different type of reference phantoms. The first and second methods employed a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated in our laboratory. In the first method, the reference male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were used, which were initially created from the Visible Human data and later adjusted to match organ masses defined in ICRP publication 89. In the second method, the reference male and female phantoms described in ICRP publication 110 were used, which were initially developed from tomographic data of two patients and later modified to match ICRP 89 organ masses. The third method employed a commercial dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT group, London, England) with its own hermaphrodite stylized phantom. In the fourth method, another widely used dosimetry spreadsheet (CT-Expo, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany) was employed together with its associated

  5. The Difference in Backscatter Factors of Diagnostic X-rays by the Difference in the Scattering Medium and in the Objective Dose.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideki; Sakai, Keita; Uchiyama, Mizuki; Suzuki, Kentaro

    The diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) of the general X-ray radiography are defined by the absorbed dose of air at the entrance surface with backscattered radiation from a scattering medium. Generally, the entrance surface dose of the general X-ray radiography is calculated from measured air kerma of primary X-ray multiplied by a backscatter factor (BSF). However, the BSF data employed at present used water for scattering medium, and was calculated based on the water-absorbed dose by incident primary photons and backscattered photons from the scattering medium. In the calculation of air dose at the entrance surface defined in DRLs, there are no theoretical consistencies for using BSF based on water dose, and this may be a cause of calculation error. In this paper, we verified the difference in BSF by the difference in the scattering medium and by the difference in the objective dose by means of the Monte Carlo simulation. In this calculation, the scattering medium was set as water and the soft-tissue, and the objective dose was set as air dose, water dose, soft-tissue dose, and skin dose. The difference in BSF calculated by the respective combination was at most about 1.3% and was less than 1% in most cases. In conclusion, even if the entrance surface dose defined by DRLs of general X-ray radiography is calculated using BSF, which set both the scattering medium and the object substance of the absorbed dose as water, a so big error doesn't show.

  6. Absolute neutrino mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Silvia; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2013-04-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments firmly established non-vanishing neutrino masses, a result that can be regarded as a strong motivation to extend the Standard Model. In spite of being the lightest massive particles, neutrinos likely represent an important bridge to new physics at very high energies and offer new opportunities to address some of the current cosmological puzzles, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter. In this context, the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale is a key issue within modern High Energy Physics. The talks in this parallel session well describe the current exciting experimental activity aiming to determining the absolute neutrino mass scale and offer an overview of a few models beyond the Standard Model that have been proposed in order to explain the neutrino masses giving a prediction for the absolute neutrino mass scale and solving the cosmological puzzles.

  7. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  8. Safety profile of different low-molecular weight heparins used at therapeutic dose.

    PubMed

    Gouin-Thibault, Isabelle; Pautas, Eric; Siguret, Virginie

    2005-01-01

    Low-molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) have been shown to be as safe and effective as unfractionated heparin (UFH) for the treatment of acute venous thrombosis and non-life-threatening pulmonary embolism. Different reports have shown that LMWHs may also be used to treat patients with unstable angina or non-Q-wave infarction. The safety of LMWHs used at therapeutic dose has been widely studied in pivotal clinical trials and analysed in several meta-analyses. However, despite the wide development and use of LMWHs, several issues regarding the safety and optimal use of LMWHs remain unanswered. The main adverse effect of LMWHs is bleeding and it is uncertain whether a weight-adjusted dosage regimen without laboratory monitoring can be used in patients with a high risk of bleeding, such as patients with renal failure, elderly patients, obese patients or pregnant women. These patients are usually excluded from clinical trials and only a few studies, not sufficiently powered to estimate efficacy and safety, have been carried out in these special populations. Most of the available data comes from pharmacokinetic or population pharmacodynamic studies or clinical reports. Results in patients with renal impairment who are not undergoing haemodialysis suggest that a reduction in calculated creatinine clearance levels is associated with an increased risk of accumulation of anti-Xa activity, the extent of which differs depending on the individual LMWH and the extent to which the compound is cleared by the kidney. The limited data available regarding the use of therapeutic doses of LMWHs in obese patients suggest that there is no need to cap the dose at a maximal allowable dose. Long-term (3-month) treatment with LMWHs appears to be as effective and safe as oral anticoagulant therapy for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. It appears that each LMWH is a distinct compound with unique pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. Until more data are available regarding these

  9. Comparison of Two Different Doses of Intrathecal Levobupivacaine for Transurethral Endoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dizman, Secil; Turker, Gurkan; Gurbet, Alp; Mogol, Elif Basagan; Turkcan, Suat; Karakuzu, Ziyaatin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of two different spinal isobaric levobupivacaine doses on spinal anesthesia characteristics and to find the minimum effective dose for surgery in patients undergoing transurethral resection (TUR) surgery. Materials and Methods: Fifty male patients undergoing TUR surgery were included in the study and were randomized into two equal groups: Group LB10 (n=25): 10 mg 0.5% isobaric levobupivacaine (2 ml) and Group LB15 (n=25): 15 mg 0.75% isobaric levobupivacaine (2 ml). Spinal anesthesia was administered via a 25G Quincke spinal needle through the L3–4 intervertebral space. Sensorial block levels were evaluated using the ‘pin-prick test’, and motor block levels were evaluated using the ‘Bromage scale’. The sensorial and motor block characteristics of patients during intraoperative and postoperative periods and recovery time from spinal anesthesia were evaluated. Results: In three cases in the Group LB10, sensorial block did not reach the T10 level. Complete motor block (Bromage=3) did not occur in eight cases in the Group LB10 and in five cases in the Group LB15. The highest sensorial dermatomal level detected was higher in Group LB15. In Group LB15, sensorial block initial time and the time of complete motor block occurrence were significantly shorter than Group LB10. Hypotension was observed in one case in Group LB15. No significant difference between groups was detected in two segments of regression times: the time to S2 regression and complete sensorial block regression time. Complete motor block regression time was significantly longer in Group LB15 than in Group LB10 (p<0.01). Conclusion: Our findings showed that the minimum effective spinal isobaric levobupivacaine dose was 10 mg for TUR surgery. PMID:25610173

  10. The effects of different doses of silibinin in combination with methotrexate on testicular tissue of mice.

    PubMed

    Oufi, Hayder Gaeed; Al-Shawi, Nada Naji

    2014-05-05

    Methotrexate (MTX) is widely used chemotherapeutic agent with different side effects including germ cells toxicities. Silibinin is one of the structural isomers of silymarin, with different phytotherapeutic applications, and its possible protective effects against MTX induced germ cells damage were investigated in this work. Twenty five male mice were divided into five groups (n=5) allocated as follows: Group 1 received buffer for five days given by single intraperitoneal (IP) injection per day; Group 2 in addition to buffer for five days, animals received at day five single dose of 20mg/kg of MTX IP. Groups (3, 4, and 5) received respectively, (50, 100, or 150mg/kg body weight) of silibinin IP single daily dose for five days then at day five 20mg/kg of MTX IP. Microscopic examinations of sperms, histological examinations of testis and serum testosterone had been measured. Silibinin showed a significant decrease in the percent of dead/live sperm with significant changes in interstitial space and in the diameter of spermatide. The results indicate that silibinin can mitigate some of the toxic effects of MTX in testicular tissue.

  11. SU-E-T-422: Correlation Between 2D Passing Rates and 3D Dose Differences for Pretreatment VMAT QA

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, X; Xie, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) quality assurance (QA) is typically using QA methods and action levels taken from fixedbeam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) QA methods. However, recent studies demonstrated that there is no correlation between the percent gamma passing rate (%GP) and the magnitude of dose discrepancy between the planned dose and the actual delivered dose for IMRT. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether %GP is correlated with clinical dosimetric difference for VMAT. Methods: Twenty nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients treated with dual-arc simultaneous integrated boost VMAT and 20 esophageal cancer patients treated with one-arc VMAT were enrolled in this study. Pretreatment VMAT QA was performed by a 3D diode array ArcCheck. Acceptance criteria of 2%/2mm, 3%/3mm, and 4%/4mm were applied for 2D %GP. Dose values below 10% of the per-measured normalization maximum dose were ignored.Mean DVH values obtained from 3DVH software and TPS were calculated and percentage dose differences were calculated. Statistical correlation between %GP and percent dose difference was studied by using Pearson correlation. Results: The %GP for criteria 2%/2mm, 3%/3mm, and 4%/4mm were 82.33±4.45, 93.47±2.31, 97.13±2.41, respectively. Dose differences calculated from 3DVH and TPS for beam isocenter, mean dose of PTV, maximum dose of PTV, D2 of PTV and D98 of PTV were -1.04±3.24, -0.74±1.71, 2.92±3.62, 0.89±3.29, -1.46±1.97, respectively. No correction were found between %GP and dose differences. Conclusion: There are weak correlations between the 2D %GP and dose differences calculated from 3DVH. The %GP acceptance criteria of 3%/3mm usually applied for pretreatment QA of IMRT and VMAT is not indicating strong clinical correlation with 3D dose difference. 3D dose reconstructions on patient anatomy may be necessary for physicist to predict the accuracy of delivered dose for VMAT QA.

  12. SU-E-T-347: Effect of MLC Leaf Position Inaccuracy On Dose Distribution for Spinal SBRT with Different Energies and Dose Rates

    SciTech Connect

    You, T; Dang, J; Dai, C; Yin, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric impact of spinal SBRT when MLC leaf positions deviate from planning positions for different energies and doserates. Methods and Materials: 18 localized spinal metastases patients were selected for SBRT using IMRT planning with 9 posterior beams delivered at gantry angles ranging between 100°–260°. A modern linear accelerator(Varian Turebeam STX with HDMLC 2.5 mm thick leaf at isocenter) IMRT plans were generated using both 6X and 6X-FFF(Flattening filter free) beams with a nominal prescription dose of 6 Gy/fraction to PTV. Doserates ranging from 200–600 MU/min for 6X and 400–1400 MU/min for 6X-FFF, with 200 increments were examined. A fixed amount(0.3, 0.5, 1, and 2 mm) of MLC-leaf position deviation was simulated to each plan under following conditions: 1)only along X1 collimator; 2)with increments at both X1 and X2 collimator directions;3)with reductions at both X1 and X2 collimator directions. Dose was recalculated for each modified plans. Both original and modified plans were delivered using Turebeam STX machine and measured using both portal dosimetry and a 3D dosimeter(Delta4 of ScandiDos). Each field’s Result were compared using following three parameters: the 95% iso-dose level Conformal Index(95%CI), the spinal cord maximum dose(SCDmax), and the planned target volume(PTV) mean dose. Results: Dosimetric impacts on the 95%CI, SCDmax and the PTV mean dose are: 1)negligible if MLC-leaf position deviation only along a single collimator direction ≥1.0 mm,2)substantial if MLC-leaf position increment along both collimator directions ≥0.3 mm(95% CI decreases while SCDmax and PTV mean-dose increase), 3)substantial if MLC-leaf position reduction along both collimator directions ≥0.3 mm(95% CI first increases and then decreases while SCDmax and PTV mean-dose decrease). Different energies and doserates demonstrated comparable dosimetric impacts. Conclusion: Substantial dose deviations could happen for spinal SBRT using

  13. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency) by removing the source spectrum (moment-rate spectrum) from

  14. A 3-lever discrimination procedure reveals differences in the subjective effects of low and high doses of MDMA.

    PubMed

    Harper, David N; Langen, Anna-Lena; Schenk, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Drug discrimination studies have suggested that the subjective effects of low doses of (±)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) are readily differentiated from those of d-amphetamine (AMPH) and that the discriminative stimulus properties are mediated by serotonergic and dopaminergic mechanisms, respectively. Previous studies, however, have primarily examined responses to doses that do not produce substantial increases in extracellular dopamine. The present study determined whether doses of MDMA that produce increases in synaptic dopamine would also produce subjective effects that were more like AMPH and were sensitive to pharmacological manipulation of D1-like receptors. A three-lever drug discrimination paradigm was used. Rats were trained to respond on different levers following saline, AMPH (0.5mg/kg, IP) or MDMA (1.5mg/kg, IP) injections. Generalization curves were generated for a range of different doses of both drugs and the effect of the D1-like antagonist, SCH23390 on the discriminative stimulus effects of different doses of MDMA was determined. Rats accurately discriminated MDMA, AMPH and saline. Low doses of MDMA produced almost exclusive responding on the MDMA lever but at doses of 3.0mg/kg MDMA or higher, responding shifted to the AMPH lever. The AMPH response produced by higher doses of MDMA was attenuated by pretreatment with SCH23390. The data suggest that low doses and higher doses of MDMA produce distinct discriminative stimuli. The shift to AMPH-like responding following administration of higher doses of MDMA, and the decrease in this response following administration of SCH23390 suggests a dopaminergic component to the subjective experience of MDMA at higher doses.

  15. Circulating inflammatory miRNA signature in response to different doses of aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    de Gonzalo-Calvo, David; Dávalos, Alberto; Montero, Ana; García-González, Ángela; Tyshkovska, Iryna; González-Medina, Antonio; Soares, Sara M A; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Casas-Agustench, Patricia; Rabadán, Manuel; Díaz-Martínez, Ángel E; Úbeda, Natalia; Iglesias-Gutiérrez, Eduardo

    2015-07-15

    While moderate acute exercise has been associated with strong anti-inflammatory mechanisms, strenuous exercise has been linked to deleterious inflammatory perturbations. It is therefore fundamental to elucidate the mechanisms that regulate the exercise-induced inflammatory cascade. Information on novel regulators such as circulating inflammatory microRNAs (c-inflammamiRs) is incomplete. In this study, we evaluated the response of a panel of c-inflammamiRs to different doses of acute aerobic exercise. We first studied the exercise-induced inflammatory cascade in serum samples of nine active middle-aged males immediately before and after (0 h, 24 h, 72 h) 10-km, half-marathon, and marathon races. Next, we analyzed the circulating profile of 106 specific c-inflammamiRs immediately before) and after (0 h, 24 h) 10-km (low inflammatory response) and marathon (high inflammatory response) races. Analysis of classical inflammatory parameters revealed a dose-dependent effect of aerobic exercise on systemic inflammation, with higher levels detected after marathon. We observed an increase in miR-150-5p immediately after the 10-km race. Levels of 12 c-inflammamiRs were increased immediately after the marathon (let-7d-3p, let-7f-2-3p, miR-125b-5p, miR-132-3p, miR-143-3p, miR-148a-3p, miR-223-3p, miR-223-5p, miR-29a-3p, miR-34a-5p, miR-424-3p, and miR-424-5p). c-inflammamiRs returned to basal levels after 24 h. Correlation and in silico analyses supported a close association between the observed c-inflammamiR pattern and regulation of the inflammatory process. In conclusion, we found that different doses of acute aerobic exercise induced a distinct and specific c-inflammamiR response, which may be associated with control of the exercise-induced inflammatory cascade. Our findings point to c-inflammamiRs as potential biomarkers of exercise-induced inflammation, and hence, exercise dose.

  16. Effect of different doses of Manuka honey in experimentally induced mouse typhoid.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Abdul; Jabeen, Kokab; Saleem, Sidrah

    2015-05-01

    Typhoid fever is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. Data from World Health Organization (WHO) shows that 21 million cases of typhoid occur globally every year and over 200,000 die each year; most of them at a very young age. The situation in Pakistan is similar. Typhi and other typhoidal salmonellae have developed resistance to chloramphenicol and other first line anti-typhoid. There is a rapid increase in multi-drug resistance (MDR) throughout the world. There is an urgent need to find out alternative medicine to sort out this problem. This study was conducted to establish preventive as well as therapeutic potential of Manuka honey. A total of eighty pathogen free BALB/C mice between 8 weeks to 12 weeks of age, weighing 25-30 grams were taken and divided into 4 groups. Group A, B and C were infected through oral route with 10(8) colony forming unit (CFU) of Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 14028 to produce typhoid like disease in mice. Group A, which comprised of 20 mice was further divided in A1 and A2 given Manuka honey at a dose of 15ml/kg and 20 ml/kg respectively. Group B, which comprised of 20 mice was further divided in B1 and B2 was given Manuka honey at dose of 20ml/kg and 25ml/kg respectively. Clinical features of mouse typhoid, like body temperature, respiratory rate, number of stools and general behavior were recorded twice daily. Blood cultures of mice in different groups were taken at different days to evaluate the establishment of infection as well as to observe the therapeutic and preventive potential of Manuka honey in mouse typhoid. Fisher's Exact, Chi- Square and t-test were used to analyze the data. Significant association was observed in the ultimate fate of mice in Group A1 and Group A2 (P<0.001), showing that from a total of 20 mice in both groups, 10 mice fall in Group A1 of which 10 (100%) developed infection as it was not prevented by honey at a dose of 15ml/kg body weight (15.00±0.00) in Group A1 and ten mice

  17. Assessment of different folic acid supplementation doses for low-birth-weight infants

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Fatma Çakmak; Aygün, Canan; Gülten, Sedat; Bedir, Abdulkerim; Çetinoğlu, Erhan; Küçüködük, Şükrü; Bek, Yüksel

    2016-01-01

    Aim The adequacy of 50 mcg folic acid supplementation given to low-birth-weight babies was investigated. The folate levels of the mothers and infants, and breastmilk, and the optimum dose for folic acid supplementation were also investigated. Material and Methods After obtaining blood from 141 low-birth-weight infants on the 1st day of life for serum and red cell folate levels, the infants were randomly allocated into three groups according to the folic acid supplement dose. Forty-six infants were given 25 μg/d folic acid, 39 were given 50 μg/d folic acid, and 44 were given 75 μg/d folic acid. Folic acid could not be given to 12 infants. Follow-up blood samples were obtained at the end of folic acid supplementation. Maternal samples for red cell and serum folate levels and breast milk folate levels were obtained within the first 48 hours and the samples for measuring breastmilk folate level were obtained on the 3rd day postnatally. The feeding modes of the infants, maternal folic acid intake, and details of neonate intensive care unit course were recorded. Results The mean birth weight and gestational age of the infants were found as 1788.2±478.4 g and 33.5±2.9 weeks, respectively. The mean serum and red cell folate levels on admission were found as 21.2±12.2 ng/mL and 922.7±460.7 ng/mL, respectively. The mean maternal serum and red cell folate levels and the mean breast milk folate levels were found as 12.3±7.5 ng/mL, 845.5±301.4 ng/mL, and 30.6±33.0 ng/m, respectively. The breast milk folate levels of mothers who were supplemented with folic acid during pregnancy were significantly higher compared with mothers who were not supplemented with folic acid (p<0.001). Infants who were supplemented with folic acid had higher follow-up serum folate levels compared with the basal level in all groups, but there was no statistically significant difference between the groups. Conclusion This study showed that the folic acid doses of 25, 50, and 75 μcg/d affected

  18. The use of displacement damage dose to correlate degradation in solar cells exposed to different radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Geoffrey P.; Burke, Edward A.; Shapiro, Philip; Statler, Richard; Messenger, Scott R.; Walters, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    It has been found useful in the past to use the concept of 'equivalent fluence' to compare the radiation response of different solar cell technologies. Results are usually given in terms of an equivalent 1 MeV electron or an equivalent 10 MeV proton fluence. To specify cell response in a complex space-radiation environment in terms of an equivalent fluence, it is necessary to measure damage coefficients for a number of representative electron and proton energies. However, at the last Photovoltaic Specialist Conference we showed that nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) could be used to correlate damage coefficients for protons, using measurements for GaAs as an example. This correlation means that damage coefficients for all proton energies except near threshold can be predicted from a measurement made at one particular energy. NIEL is the exact equivalent for displacement damage of linear energy transfer (LET) for ionization energy loss. The use of NIEL in this way leads naturally to the concept of 10 MeV equivalent proton fluence. The situation for electron damage is more complex, however. It is shown that the concept of 'displacement damage dose' gives a more general way of unifying damage coefficients. It follows that 1 MeV electron equivalent fluence is a special case of a more general quantity for unifying electron damage coefficients which we call the 'effective 1 MeV electron equivalent dose'.

  19. Low-intensity laser therapy to treat dentin hypersensitivity: comparative clinical study using different light doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarelli, Rosane F. Z.; Mazzetto, Marcello O.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2001-04-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is the most common patient's complain related to pain. In fact, this is a challenge to treat specially if conventional techniques are used. The possibility to treat pain through a low intensity laser gives us an opportunity to solve this important clinical problem without promote a discomfort to patient. The main point here is not if this kind of treatment is anti- inflammatory to pulp and/or biostimulatory to production of irregular secondary dentin. The most important point here is to understand how much energy is necessary to reach conditions where to tooth become insensible to external stimulus. Our double-blinded study compared a group without laser (Placebo) with five other groups where different doses at 660 nm low intensity laser were employed. The final conclusion is that for 660 nm laser therapy, the doses from 0.13 to 2.0 J/cm2 were more efficiency than the others. The follow up care in this study was of 45 days.

  20. Biochemical and histologic presentations of female Wistar rats administered with different doses of paracetamol/methionine.

    PubMed

    Iyanda, A A; Adeniyi, F A A

    2011-12-20

    This study was carried out to compare the hepatoprotective effect of methionine on paracetamol treated rats at both the peaks of toxicity and absorption. Female Wistar rats were divided into 17 groups consisting of eight rats per group and treated with different doses of paracetamol/methionine (5:1). Each control rat received 5 ml of physiologic saline. The study was terminated at two different end points -the 4th and 16th hours. Results show that rats administered with toxic doses (1000 mg/kg, 3000 mg/kg, 5000 mg/kg BW) of paracetamol exhibited significant increases in the levels of ALT, AST, γ- GT compared with controls. These increases were much higher at the 16th than 4th hour but serum total protein, albumin and globulin were significantly decreased by the end of the 16th hour. Histology results of rats in the 3000 and 5000 mg/kg (by the end of the 16th hour) confirmed hepatic damage, light microscopic evaluation of liver showed remarkable centrilobular necrosis. Moreover, the presence of mononuclear cells in liver section of rats intoxicated with APAP (5000 mg/kg) suggests a possible involvement of inflammatory process which resulted in regurgitation of bilirubin leading to its elevated level as well as increase activity of ALP. The hepatoprotective effect of methionine, on the other hand, was demonstrated in these rats at the 4th and 16th hours, and both results were comparable and therefore not significantly different but elevation in GGT level still persisted. In conclusion, data obtained from this study suggest that these agents may be capable of inducing GGT, although further study is required to establish a possible relationship between methionine and this enzyme in some other animal species.

  1. Multistep introduction of bacteria to natural substrates at different initial inoculation doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupriyanov, A. A.; Semenov, A. M.; Kunenkova, N. N.; van Bruggen, A. H. C.

    2009-09-01

    The population dynamics of the saprotrophic Pseudomonas fluorescens 32 gfp bacteria and two conventionally pathogenic enterobacteria ( Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and Salmonella enterica var. Typhimurium) were investigated in their inoculation at different doses into cattle excreta and their subsequent entering soil and plants and migration through the gastroenteric tract of invertebrates. All the introduced bacteria investigated are shown to be able to overcome ecological barriers as they migrate through the natural substrates and habitats. The introduce microorganisms maintain their high population density even at the lowest initial inoculation dose—105 CFU/g of dry matter. Plants were found to be a favorable substrate for the survival of the bacteria investigated (for enteropathogens, in particular). Enteropathogens are able to pass through the gastroenteric tract of invertebrates. Therefore, these organisms can function as incubators and carriers of enteroinfections in nature.

  2. Response of Cellulose detectors to different doses of 62 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, S. P.; Mishra, R.; Dwivedi, K. K.; Ghosh, S.; Fink, D.; Khathing, D. T.

    2003-08-01

    Optical and thermal responses of two cellulose detectors, Cellulose triacetate (Triafol-TN) and Cellulose acetate butyrate (Triafol-BN), to four different doses of 62 MeV protons were studied using spectroscopic, thermal and track-etching techniques. The spectroscopic analysis revealed that though the optical band-gap in the polymers was affected by proton irradiation, the polymers showed high resistance against any major structural modification by radiation. The thermal stability of the polymers was found to be affected by proton irradiation. The activation energy of etching was found to be almost constant for both the polymers even after irradiation. It is hoped that the findings in this work would be of significant relevance to material science and applications of polymers.

  3. Absolute calibration of optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Viana, N.B.; Mazolli, A.; Maia Neto, P.A.; Nussenzveig, H.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Mesquita, O.N.

    2006-03-27

    As a step toward absolute calibration of optical tweezers, a first-principles theory of trapping forces with no adjustable parameters, corrected for spherical aberration, is experimentally tested. Employing two very different setups, we find generally very good agreement for the transverse trap stiffness as a function of microsphere radius for a broad range of radii, including the values employed in practice, and at different sample chamber depths. The domain of validity of the WKB ('geometrical optics') approximation to the theory is verified. Theoretical predictions for the trapping threshold, peak position, depth variation, multiple equilibria, and 'jump' effects are also confirmed.

  4. Behavioral, neuroendocrine and biochemical effects of different doses of 5-HTP in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, I M; Slaap, B R; Westenberg, H G; Den Boer, J A

    1996-05-01

    To investigate the role of serotonin (5-HT) in the pathophysiology of panic disorder (PD) a challenge test with L-5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) was conducted. Seven patients suffering from PD and seven healthy controls received an i.v. challenge with 10 mg, 20 mg and 40 mg 5-HTP and placebo in random order on four different occasions. Before, during and until 2 h after 5-HTP administration anxious and depressive symptomatology was assessed. In addition, plasma levels of 5-HTP, cortisol, and 5-HIAA were measured at several timepoints. During and after infusion of placebo or any of the different dosages of 5-HTP, none of the patients or controls experienced a panic attack or showed an increase in anxiety or depressive symptoms. There was a dose-related increase in side effects, like nausea, dizziness and fatigue. Only infusion with 40 mg 5-HTP led to an increase in plasma cortisol in both patients and controls. The observed increase in plasma cortisol level was higher for patients compared to controls only at 30 min after infusion. In conclusion, stimulation of the serotonergic neuronal system by three different dosages of 5-HTP did not induce panic or anxiety in PD patients and healthy controls. The 5-HT hypersensitivity hypothesis of PD could not be confirmed in the present study.

  5. The Effect of Different Doses of Cigarette Smoke in a Mouse Lung Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Ludmilla Nadir; de Camargo Fenley, Juliana; Braga, Lúcia Campanario; Cordeiro, José Antônio; Cury, Patrícia M.

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have used Balb/c mice as an animal model for lung carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effect of different doses of cigarette smoking in the urethane-induced Balb/c mouse lung cancer model. After injection of 3mg/kg urethane intraperitoneally, the mice were then exposed to tobacco smoke once or twice a day, five times a week, in a closed chamber. The animals were randomly divided into four groups. The control group (G0) received urethane only. The experimental groups (G1, G2 and G3) received urethane and exposure to the smoke of 3 cigarettes for 10 minutes once a day, 3 cigarettes for 10 minutes twice a day, and 6 cigarettes for 10 minutes twice a day, respectively. The mice were sacrificed after 16 weeks of exposure, and the number of nodules and hyperplasia in the lungs was counted. The results showed no statistically significant difference in the mean number of nodules and hyperplasia among the different groups, suggesting that the Balb/c mice are not suitable to study the pathogenesis of tobacco smoking-induced tumor progression in the lungs. PMID:19079653

  6. Dose Distributions of an 192Ir Brachytherapy Source in Different Media

    PubMed Central

    Wu, C. H.; Liao, Y. J.; Liu, Y. W. Hsueh; Hung, S. K.; Lee, M. S.; Hsu, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    This study used MCNPX code to investigate the brachytherapy 192Ir dose distributions in water, bone, and lung tissue and performed radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter measurements to verify the obtained MCNPX results. The results showed that the dose-rate constant, radial dose function, and anisotropy function in water were highly consistent with data in the literature. However, the lung dose near the source would be overestimated by up to 12%, if the lung tissue is assumed to be water, and, hence, if a tumor is located in the lung, the tumor dose will be overestimated, if the material density is not taken into consideration. In contrast, the lung dose far from the source would be underestimated by up to 30%. Radial dose functions were found to depend not only on the phantom size but also on the material density. The phantom size affects the radial dose function in bone more than those in the other tissues. On the other hand, the anisotropy function in lung tissue was not dependent on the radial distance. Our simulation results could represent valid clinical reference data and be used to improve the accuracy of the doses delivered during brachytherapy applied to patients with lung cancer. PMID:24804263

  7. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed.

  8. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Raffaele, L.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Marchetto, F.; Sacchi, R.; Giordanengo, S.; Monaco, V.

    2013-07-01

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  9. Absolute x-ray dosimetry on a synchrotron medical beam line with a graphite calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Harty, P. D. Ramanathan, G.; Butler, D. J.; Johnston, P. N.; Lye, J. E.; Hall, C. J.; Stevenson, A. W.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The absolute dose rate of the Imaging and Medical Beamline (IMBL) on the Australian Synchrotron was measured with a graphite calorimeter. The calorimetry results were compared to measurements from the existing free-air chamber, to provide a robust determination of the absolute dose in the synchrotron beam and provide confidence in the first implementation of a graphite calorimeter on a synchrotron medical beam line. Methods: The graphite calorimeter has a core which rises in temperature when irradiated by the beam. A collimated x-ray beam from the synchrotron with well-defined edges was used to partially irradiate the core. Two filtration sets were used, one corresponding to an average beam energy of about 80 keV, with dose rate about 50 Gy/s, and the second filtration set corresponding to average beam energy of 90 keV, with dose rate about 20 Gy/s. The temperature rise from this beam was measured by a calibrated thermistor embedded in the core which was then converted to absorbed dose to graphite by multiplying the rise in temperature by the specific heat capacity for graphite and the ratio of cross-sectional areas of the core and beam. Conversion of the measured absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water was achieved using Monte Carlo calculations with the EGSnrc code. The air kerma measurements from the free-air chamber were converted to absorbed dose to water using the AAPM TG-61 protocol. Results: Absolute measurements of the IMBL dose rate were made using the graphite calorimeter and compared to measurements with the free-air chamber. The measurements were at three different depths in graphite and two different filtrations. The calorimetry measurements at depths in graphite show agreement within 1% with free-air chamber measurements, when converted to absorbed dose to water. The calorimetry at the surface and free-air chamber results show agreement of order 3% when converted to absorbed dose to water. The combined standard uncertainty is 3

  10. Absolute realization of low BRDF value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zilong; Liao, Ningfang; Li, Ping; Wang, Yu

    2010-10-01

    Low BRDF value is widespread used in many critical domains such as space and military fairs. These values below 0.1 Sr-1 . So the Absolute realization of these value is the most critical issue in the absolute measurement of BRDF. To develop the Absolute value realization theory of BRDF , defining an arithmetic operators of BRDF , achieving an absolute measurement Eq. of BRDF based on radiance. This is a new theory method to solve the realization problem of low BRDF value. This theory method is realized on a self-designed common double orientation structure in space. By designing an adding structure to extend the range of the measurement system and a control and processing software, Absolute realization of low BRDF value is achieved. A material of low BRDF value is measured in this measurement system and the spectral BRDF value are showed within different angles allover the space. All these values are below 0.4 Sr-1 . This process is a representative procedure about the measurement of low BRDF value. A corresponding uncertainty analysis of this measurement data is given depend on the new theory of absolute realization and the performance of the measurement system. The relative expand uncertainty of the measurement data is 0.078. This uncertainty analysis is suitable for all measurements using the new theory of absolute realization and the corresponding measurement system.

  11. Gender differences of low-dose aspirin-associated gastroduodenal ulcer in Japanese patients

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kazuhisa; Inamori, Masahiko; Imajyo, Kento; Chiba, Hideyuki; Nonaka, Takashi; Shiba, Tadahiko; Sakaguchi, Takashi; Atsukawa, Kazuhiko; Takahashi, Hisao; Hoshino, Etsuo; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the gender differences about the clinical features and risk factors of low-dose aspirin (LDA) (81-100 mg daily)-associated peptic ulcer in Japanese patients. METHODS: There were 453 patients under treatment with LDA (298 males, 155 females) who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy at the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology of Hiratsuka City Hospital between January 2003 and December 2007. They had kept taking the LDA or started treatment during the study period and kept taking LDA during the whole period of observation. Of these, 119 patients (87 males, 32 females) were diagnosed as having LDA-associated peptic ulcer. We examined the clinical factors associated with LDA-associated peptic ulcer in both sexes. RESULTS: A history of peptic ulcer was found to be the risk factor for LDA-associated peptic ulcer common to both sexes. In female patients, age greater than 70 years (prevalence ORs 8.441, 95% CI: 1.797-33.649, P = 0.0069) was found to be another significant risk factor, and the time to diagnosis as having LDA-associated peptic ulcer by endoscopy was significantly shorter than that in the male patients (P = 0.0050). CONCLUSION: We demonstrated gender differences about the clinical features and risk factors of LDA-associated peptic ulcer. Special attention should be paid to aged female patients taking LDA. PMID:20397269

  12. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle.

  13. Small angle neutron scattering on an absolute intensity scale and the internal surface of diatom frustules from three species of differing morphologies.

    PubMed

    Garvey, C J; Strobl, M; Percot, A; Saroun, J; Haug, J; Vyverman, W; Chepurnov, V A; Ferris, J M

    2013-05-01

    The internal nanostructure of the diatoms Cyclotella meneghiniana, Seminavis robusta and Achnanthes subsessilis was investigated using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to examine thin biosilica samples, consisting of isotropic (powder) from their isolated cell walls. The interpretation of SANS data was assisted by several other measurements. The N2 adsorption, interpreted within the Branuer-Emmet-Teller isotherm, yielded the specific surface area of the material. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy indicates that the isolated material is amorphous silica with small amounts of organic cell wall materials acting as a filling material between the silica particles. A two-phase (air and amorphous silica) model was used to interpret small angle neutron scattering data. After correction for instrumental resolution, the measurements on two SANS instruments covered an extended range of scattering vectors 0.0011 nm(-1) < q < 5.6 nm(-1), giving an almost continuous SANS curve over a range of scattering vectors, q, on an absolute scale of intensity for each sample. Each of the samples gave a characteristic scattering curve where log (intensity) versus log (q) has a -4 dependence, with other features superimposed. In the high-q regime, departure from this behaviour was observed at a length-scales equivalent to the proposed unitary silica particle. The limiting Porod scattering law was used to determine the specific area per unit of volume of each sample illuminated by the neutron beam. The Porod behaviour, and divergence from this behaviour, is discussed in terms of various structural features and the proposed mechanisms for the bio-assembly of unitary silica particles in frustules.

  14. Sterility and Sexual Competitiveness of Tapachula-7 Anastrepha ludens Males Irradiated at Different Doses.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Dávila, Dina; Adriano-Anaya, Maria de Lourdes; Quintero-Fong, Luis; Salvador-Figueroa, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A genetic sexing strain of Anastrepha ludens (Loew), Tapachula-7, was developed by the Mexican Program Against Fruit Flies to produce and release only males in programs where the sterile insect technique (SIT) is applied. Currently, breeding are found at a massive scale, and it is necessary to determine the optimum irradiation dose that releases sterile males with minimum damage to their sexual competitiveness. Under laboratory and field conditions, we evaluated the effects of gamma irradiation at doses of 0, 20, 40, 60 and 80 Gy on the sexual competitiveness of males, the induction of sterility in wild females and offspring survivorship. The results of the study indicate that irradiation doses have a significant effect on the sexual behavior of males. A reduction of mating capacity was inversely proportional to the irradiation dose of males. It is estimated that a dose of 60 Gy can induce more than 99% sterility in wild females. In all treatments, the degree of offspring fertility was correlated with the irradiation dose of the parents. In conclusion, the results of the study indicate that a dose of 60 Gy can be applied in sterile insect technique release programs. The application of this dose in the new genetic sexing strain of A. ludens is discussed.

  15. Sterility and Sexual Competitiveness of Tapachula-7 Anastrepha ludens Males Irradiated at Different Doses

    PubMed Central

    Orozco-Dávila, Dina; Adriano-Anaya, Maria de Lourdes; Quintero-Fong, Luis; Salvador-Figueroa, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A genetic sexing strain of Anastrepha ludens (Loew), Tapachula-7, was developed by the Mexican Program Against Fruit Flies to produce and release only males in programs where the sterile insect technique (SIT) is applied. Currently, breeding are found at a massive scale, and it is necessary to determine the optimum irradiation dose that releases sterile males with minimum damage to their sexual competitiveness. Under laboratory and field conditions, we evaluated the effects of gamma irradiation at doses of 0, 20, 40, 60 and 80 Gy on the sexual competitiveness of males, the induction of sterility in wild females and offspring survivorship. The results of the study indicate that irradiation doses have a significant effect on the sexual behavior of males. A reduction of mating capacity was inversely proportional to the irradiation dose of males. It is estimated that a dose of 60 Gy can induce more than 99% sterility in wild females. In all treatments, the degree of offspring fertility was correlated with the irradiation dose of the parents. In conclusion, the results of the study indicate that a dose of 60 Gy can be applied in sterile insect technique release programs. The application of this dose in the new genetic sexing strain of A. ludens is discussed. PMID:26274926

  16. SU-E-J-07: IGRT Gently: Evaluating Imaging Dose in Phantoms of Different Sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, B; Duggar, W; Stanford, J; Yang, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: IGRT imaging procedures have emerged as a common method of patient position verification in radiotherapy, though imaging dose is generally neglected in the treatment plan. Consequently, evaluating and optimizing the dose from these procedures is worthwhile. This process is especially important for children, who are more radiosensitive than adults. The aim of this work was to gain some understanding of the relative doses involved with various XVI-preset parameters for an “adult” and “child” phantom set, with the hopes that imaging dose for a child can be reduced. Methods: 32 and 16cm CTDI-phantoms were used as surrogates for adult and child torsos, respectively. Dose was measured in the central and peripheral chamber positions of the phantoms. CBCT scans were made for both phantoms using Elekta’s Chest-preset to establish a dose baseline. The child-phantom was then scanned using the Elekta Head and Neck (HN) preset. A modified HN-preset (named Peds Abd-pelvis) was also created with a doubled mAs to maintain a reduction in dose to the child-phantom (relative to the baseline), while providing clinically-usable image quality. Results: The baseline dose to the child-phantom from the Chest-preset was 310% that of the adult-phantom for the center chamber position and 150% at the periphery. An average dose reduction of 97% was obtained in the childphantom by switching from the Chest-preset to the HN-preset, while the Peds Abd-pelvis-preset similarly reduced the dose by an average of 92%. Conclusion: XVI-preset parameters significantly affect dose, and should be optimized to reduce dose, while ensuring clinically-usable image quality. Using a modified imaging preset (Peds Abd-pelvis-preset) greatly reduced the dose to the child-phantom compared to the dose for the Chest-preset for both the child and adult-phantoms. This outcome provides support for the development of child-specific protocols for IGRT imaging in pediatric patients.

  17. The use of isotretinoin in low doses and unconventional treatment regimens in different types of acne: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dziankowska-Bartkowiak, Bożena; Gerlicz-Kowalczuk, Zofia; Wozniacka, Anna

    2017-01-01

    High effectiveness of isotretinoin treatment for severe types of acne resistant to antibiotics has been widely recognized. However, the recommended doses in conventional therapy, according to consensus of the Polish Dermatological Society, may cause serious adverse effects. Thus, research into less stressful, alternative treatment regimens with the use of low doses of isotretinoin has been carried out. The aim of the paper was to review the selected papers where authors present the results of their studies on different regimens with the use of isotretinoin in low doses in patients with acne, evaluate their efficacy, patient satisfaction, frequency of adverse effects, recurrences and also treatment costs. PMID:28261025

  18. Efficacy of different doses of sugammadex after continuous infusion of rocuronium

    PubMed Central

    Soto Mesa, Diego; Fayad Fayad, Mounir; Pérez Arviza, Laura; Del Valle Ruiz, Verónica; Cosío Carreño, Fernando; Arguelles Tamargo, Luis; Amorín Díaz, Manuel; Fernández-Pello Montes, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of two different doses of sugammadex after maintenance anesthesia with sevofluorane and remifentanil and deep rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade (NMB). METHODS: Patients between 20 and 65 years of age, with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification I-II, undergoing gynecological surgery were included in a prospective, comparative and randomized study. NMB was induced with an injection of 0.6 mg/kg of rocuronium followed by continuous infusion of 0.3-0.6 mg/kg per hour to maintain a deep block. Anesthesia was maintained with sevofluorane and remifentanil. Finally, when surgery was finished, a bolus of 2 mg/kg (group A) or 4 mg/kg (group B) of sugammadex was applied when the NMB first response in the train-of-four was reached. The primary clinical endpoint was time to recovery to a train-of-four ratio of 0.9. Other variables recorded were the time until recovery of train-of-four ratio of 0.7, 0.8, hemodynamic variables (arterial blood pressure and heart rate at baseline, starting sugammadex, and minutes 2, 5 and 10) and adverse events were presented after one hour in the post-anesthesia care unit. RESULTS: Thirty-two patients were included in the study: 16 patients in group A and 16 patients in group B. Only 14 patients each group were recorded because arterial pressure values were lost in two patients from each group in minute 10. The two groups were comparable. Median recovery time from starting of sugammadex administration to a train-of-four ratio of 0.9 in group A and B was 129 and 110 s, respectively. The estimated difference in recovery time between groups was 24 s (95%CI: 0 to 45 s, Hodges-Lehmann estimator), entirely within the predefined equivalence interval. Times to recovery to train-of-four ratios of 0.8 (group A: 101 s; group B: 82.5 s) and 0.7 (group A: 90 s; group B: 65 s) from start of sugammadex administration were not equivalent between groups. There was not a significant variation in

  19. Variations in radiation dose between the same model of multislice CT scanner at different hospitals.

    PubMed

    Koller, C J; Eatough, J P; Bettridge, A

    2003-11-01

    The variation in exposure factors and patient dose, between seven centres using identical multislice CT scanners, was investigated for six standard examinations. Dose values were compared with each other and the relevant diagnostic reference level (DRL) for each examination. The range in weighted CT dose index (CTDI(w)) values between the seven centres was small for abdominal scans and head scans. For other scans however, such as functional endoscopic sinonasal surgery (FESS) the variations in CTDI(w) were as high as a factor of seven between the lowest and the highest values. At one centre a program of dose optimization had been undertaken and this centre had CTDI(w) values ranging from 3% to 64% lower than the average value for the seven centres. This demonstrates that significant dose reduction can be achieved through close collaboration between medical physicists, radiologists and radiographers.

  20. Apparent absence of a proton beam dose rate effect and possible differences in RBE between Bragg peak and plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Taeko; Egashira, Yusuke; Nishio, Teiji; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Wada, Mami; Koike, Sachiko; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Kohno, Ryosuke; Nishioka, Shie; Kameoka, Satoru; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Respiration-gated irradiation for a moving target requires a longer time to deliver single fraction in proton radiotherapy (PRT). Ultrahigh dose rate (UDR) proton beam, which is 10-100 times higher than that is used in current clinical practice, has been investigated to deliver daily dose in single breath hold duration. The purpose of this study is to investigate the survival curve and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of such an ultrahigh dose rate proton beam and their linear energy transfer (LET) dependence. Methods: HSG cells were irradiated by a spatially and temporally uniform proton beam at two different dose rates: 8 Gy/min (CDR, clinical dose rate) and 325 Gy/min (UDR, ultrahigh dose rate) at the Bragg peak and 1.75 (CDR) and 114 Gy/min (UDR) at the plateau. To study LET dependence, the cells were positioned at the Bragg peak, where the absorbed dose-averaged LET was 3.19 keV/{mu}m, and at the plateau, where it was 0.56 keV/{mu}m. After the cell exposure and colony assay, the measured data were fitted by the linear quadratic (LQ) model and the survival curves and RBE at 10% survival were compared. Results: No significant difference was observed in the survival curves between the two proton dose rates. The ratio of the RBE for CDR/UDR was 0.98{+-}0.04 at the Bragg peak and 0.96{+-}0.06 at the plateau. On the other hand, Bragg peak/plateau RBE ratio was 1.15{+-}0.05 for UDR and 1.18{+-}0.07 for CDR. Conclusions: Present RBE can be consistently used in treatment planning of PRT using ultrahigh dose rate radiation. Because a significant increase in RBE toward the Bragg peak was observed for both UDR and CDR, further evaluation of RBE enhancement toward the Bragg peak and beyond is required.

  1. Characterization of differences in calculated and actual measured skin doses to canine limbs during stereotactic radiosurgery using Gafchromic film

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Jerri; Ryan, Stewart; Harmon, Joseph F.

    2012-07-01

    Accurate calculation of absorbed dose to the skin, especially the superficial and radiosensitive basal cell layer, is difficult for many reasons including, but not limited to, the build-up effect of megavoltage photons, tangential beam effects, mixed energy scatter from support devices, and dose interpolation caused by a finite resolution calculation matrix. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been developed as an alternative limb salvage treatment option at Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for dogs with extremity bone tumors. Optimal dose delivery to the tumor during SBRT treatment can be limited by uncertainty in skin dose calculation. The aim of this study was to characterize the difference between measured and calculated radiation dose by the Varian Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) AAA treatment planning algorithm (for 1-mm, 2-mm, and 5-mm calculation voxel dimensions) as a function of distance from the skin surface. The study used Gafchromic EBT film (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ), FilmQA analysis software, a limb phantom constructed from plastic water Trade-Mark-Sign (fluke Biomedical, Everett, WA) and a canine cadaver forelimb. The limb phantom was exposed to 6-MV treatments consisting of a single-beam, a pair of parallel opposed beams, and a 7-beam coplanar treatment plan. The canine forelimb was exposed to the 7-beam coplanar plan. Radiation dose to the forelimb skin at the surface and at depths of 1.65 mm and 1.35 mm below the skin surface were also measured with the Gafchromic film. The calculation algorithm estimated the dose well at depths beyond buildup for all calculation voxel sizes. The calculation algorithm underestimated the dose in portions of the buildup region of tissue for all comparisons, with the most significant differences observed in the 5-mm calculation voxel and the least difference in the 1-mm voxel. Results indicate a significant difference between measured and calculated data

  2. Subgroup effects in a randomised trial of different types and doses of exercise during breast cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Courneya, K S; McKenzie, D C; Mackey, J R; Gelmon, K; Friedenreich, C M; Yasui, Y; Reid, R D; Vallerand, J R; Adams, S C; Proulx, C; Dolan, L B; Wooding, E; Segal, R J

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Combined Aerobic and Resistance Exercise Trial tested different types and doses of exercise in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Here, we explore potential moderators of the exercise training responses. Methods: Breast cancer patients initiating chemotherapy (N=301) were randomly assigned to three times a week, supervised exercise of a standard dose of 25–30 min of aerobic exercise, a higher dose of 50–60 min of aerobic exercise, or a higher dose of 50–60 min of combined aerobic and resistance exercise. Outcomes were patient-reported symptoms and health-related fitness. Moderators were baseline demographic, exercise/fitness, and cancer variables. Results: Body mass index moderated the effects of the exercise interventions on bodily pain (P for interaction=0.038), endocrine symptoms (P for interaction=0.029), taxane/neuropathy symptoms (P for interaction=0.013), aerobic fitness (P for interaction=0.041), muscular strength (P for interaction=0.007), and fat mass (P for interaction=0.005). In general, healthy weight patients responded better to the higher-dose exercise interventions than overweight/obese patients. Menopausal status, age, and baseline fitness moderated the effects on patient-reported symptoms. Premenopausal, younger, and fitter patients achieved greater benefits from the higher-dose exercise interventions. Conclusions: Healthy weight, fitter, and premenopausal/younger breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy are more likely to benefit from higher-dose exercise interventions. PMID:25144625

  3. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay: dose estimation and inter-individual differences in the response to γ-radiation.

    PubMed

    Antunes, A C; Martins, V; Cardoso, J; Santos, L; Monteiro Gil, O

    2014-01-15

    Biological dosimetry plays an important role in case of a radiation accident or incident, either when it is the only way to estimate the dose or when it is used to complement physical dosimetry. A cytogenetic study was conducted in a group of 16 Portuguese individuals by use of the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay. A dose-response curve for micronuclei yield was established with a linear-quadratic model: Y=(0.0122±0.0010)+(0.0241±0.0023)D+(0.0193±0.0007)D(2). Also, baseline values for the micronucleus formation in the 16 donors were analyzed, with results in close agreement with those from other laboratories. A validation experiment was carried out with three individuals. The real and the estimated doses obtained with the dose-response curve were in very good agreement, allowing the use of the micronucleus dose-response calibration curve in biological dosimetry for estimation of radiation dose in case of overexposure. The results obtained for the cytogenetic endpoints, studied in the same group of 16 individuals, were also analyzed as a function of age and gender. A higher inter-variability was observed for the higher dose points and differences in response were identified between genders, above 2Gy, for all endpoints.

  4. Nanoindentation and in situ microcompression in different dose regimes of proton beam irradiated 304 SS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, A.; Lupinacci, A.; Frazer, D.; Bailey, N.; Vo, H.; Howard, C.; Jiao, Z.; Minor, A. M.; Chou, P.; Hosemann, P.

    2017-04-01

    Recent developments in micromechanical testing have allowed for the efficient evaluation of radiation effects in micron-scale volumes of ion-irradiated materials. In this study, both nanoindentation and in situ SEM microcompression testing are carried out on 10 dpa proton beam irradiated 304 stainless steel to assess radiation hardening and radiation-induced deformation mechanisms in the material. Using a focused ion beam (FIB), arrays of 2 μm × 2 μm cross-section microcompression pillars are fabricated in multiple dose regimes within the same grain, providing dose-dependent behavior in a single crystal orientation. Analysis of the microcompression load-displacement data and real-time SEM imaging during testing indicates significant hardening, as well as increased localization of deformation in the irradiated material. Although nanoindentation results suggest that irradiation hardening saturates at low doses, microcompression results indicate that the pillar yield stress continues to rise with dose above 10 dpa in the tested orientation.

  5. Physical properties of biaxially oriented poly(ethylene terephtalate) irradiated at different temperatures and doses with electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adem, E.; Hernández-Sampelayo, A. Rubio; Báez, J. E.; Miranda, J.; Labrada-Delgado, G. J.; Marcos-Fernández, A.

    2017-01-01

    The electron beam irradiation of a biaxially oriented PET film was carried out in air over a range of 50-3000 kGy at different temperatures and a dose rate of 4.48 kGy min-1. The effects of the irradiation at temperatures above and below the glass transition temperature (Tg) on the thermal and mechanical properties were studied. Melting temperature decreased slightly and crystallization temperature and crystallinity increased significantly with the increase in dose, more at higher irradiation temperature, whereas Tg did not show any significant change with dose or temperature. Mechanical properties were adversely affected by irradiation. Stress and strain at break were strongly reduced, more at higher irradiation temperature, and Young's Modulus slightly increased with the increase in dose. The changes in properties were related to the chain scission produced by the electron beam irradiation leading to a decrease in molecular weight.

  6. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m‑1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  7. The effects of intravenous dexmedetomidine on spinal anesthesia: comparision of different dose of dexmedetomidine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Hyeon; Ko, Jae Houn; Kim, Eun Mi; Cheung, Mi Hwa; Choi, Young Ryong

    2014-01-01

    Background In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we tried to find out appropriate amounts of single-dose dexmedetomidine to prolong the duration of spinal anesthesia in a clinical setting. Methods Sixty patients who were scheduled for unilateral lower limb surgery under spinal anesthesia were randomized into three groups receiving normal saline (control group, n = 20) or 0.5 or 1.0 ug/kg dexmedetomidine (D-0.5 group, n = 20; D-1, n = 20) intravenously prior to spinal anesthesia with 12 mg of bupivacaine. The two-dermatome pinprick sensory regression time, duration of the motor block, Ramsay sedation score (RSS), and side effects of dexmedetomidine were assessed. Results The two-dermatome pinprick sensory regression time (57.6 ± 23.2 vs 86.5 ± 24.3 vs 92.5 ± 30.7, P = 0.0002) and duration of the motor block (98.8 ± 34.1 vs 132.9 ± 43.4 vs 130.4 ± 50.4, P = 0.0261) were significantly increased in the D-0.5 and D-1 groups than in the control group. The RSS were significantly higher in the D-0.5 and D-1 groups than in the control group. However, there were no patients with oxygen desaturation in dexmedetomidine groups. The incidences of hypotension and bradycardia showed no differences among the three groups. Conclusions Both 0.5 and 1.0 ug/kg of dexmedetomidine administered as isolated boluses in the absence of maintenance infusions prolonged the duration of spinal anesthesia. PMID:25368783

  8. Open-Label Comparative Clinical Study of Chlorproguanil−Dapsone Fixed Dose Combination (Lapdap™) Alone or with Three Different Doses of Artesunate for Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Wootton, Daniel G.; Opara, Hyginus; Biagini, Giancarlo A.; Kanjala, Maxwell K.; Duparc, Stephan; Kirby, Paula L.; Woessner, Mary; Neate, Colin; Nyirenda, Maggie; Blencowe, Hannah; Dube-Mbeye, Queen; Kanyok, Thomas; Ward, Stephen; Molyneux, Malcolm; Dunyo, Sam; Winstanley, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the appropriate dose of artesunate for use in a fixed dose combination therapy with chlorproguanil−dapsone (CPG−DDS) for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Methods Open-label clinical trial comparing CPG−DDS alone or with artesunate 4, 2, or 1 mg/kg at medical centers in Blantyre, Malawi and Farafenni, The Gambia. The trial was conducted between June 2002 and February 2005, including 116 adults (median age 27 years) and 107 children (median age 38 months) with acute uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Subjects were randomized into 4 groups to receive CPG–DDS alone or plus 4, 2 or 1 mg/kg of artesunate once daily for 3 days. Assessments took place on Days 0−3 in hospital and follow-up on Days 7 and 14 as out-patients. Efficacy was evaluated in the Day 3 per-protocol (PP) population using mean time to reduce baseline parasitemia by 90% (PC90). A number of secondary outcomes were also included. Appropriate artesunate dose was determined using a pre-defined decision matrix based on primary and secondary outcomes. Treatment emergent adverse events were recorded from clinical assessments and blood parameters. Safety was evaluated in the intent to treat (ITT) population. Results In the Day 3 PP population for the adult group (N = 85), mean time to PC90 was 19.1 h in the CPG−DDS group, significantly longer than for the +artesunate 1 mg/kg (12.5 h; treatment difference −6.6 h [95%CI −11.8, −1.5]), 2 mg/kg (10.7 h; −8.4 h [95%CI −13.6, −3.2]) and 4 mg/kg (10.3 h; −8.7 h [95%CI −14.1, −3.2]) groups. For children in the Day 3 PP population (N = 92), mean time to PC90 was 21.1 h in the CPG−DDS group, similar to the +artesunate 1 mg/kg group (17.7 h; −3.3 h [95%CI −8.6, 2.0]), though the +artesunate 2 mg/kg and 4 mg/kg groups had significantly shorter mean times to PC90 versus CPG−DDS; 14.4 h (treatment difference −6.4 h [95%CI −11.7, −1.0]) and 12.8 h (−7

  9. Model of radiation-induced gain degradation of NPN bipolar junction transistor at different dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qifeng, Zhao; Yiqi, Zhuang; Junlin, Bao; Wei, Hu

    2015-06-01

    Ionizing-radiation-induced current gain degradation in NPN bipolar junction transistors is due to an increase in base current as a result of recombination at the surface of the device. A model is presented which identifies the physical mechanism responsible for current gain degradation. The increase in surface recombination velocity due to interface states results in an increase in base current. Besides, changing the surface potential along the base surface induced by the oxide-trapped charges can also lead to an increased base current. By combining the production mechanisms of oxide-trapped charges and interface states, this model can explain the fact that the current gain degradation is more severe at a low dose rate than at a high dose rate. The radiations were performed in a Co60 source up to a total dose of 70 krad(Si). The low dose rate was 0.1 rad(Si)/s and the high dose rate was 10 rad(Si)/s. The model accords well with the experimental results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61076101, 61204092).

  10. Automatic image registration performance for two different CBCT systems; variation with imaging dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, J.; Sykes, J. R.; Holloway, L.; Thwaites, D. I.

    2014-03-01

    The performance of an automatic image registration algorithm was compared on image sets collected with two commercial CBCT systems, and the relationship with imaging dose was explored. CBCT images of a CIRS Virtually Human Male Pelvis phantom (VHMP) were collected on Varian TrueBeam/OBI and Elekta Synergy/XVI linear accelerators, across a range of mAs settings. Each CBCT image was registered 100 times, with random initial offsets introduced. Image registration was performed using the grey value correlation ratio algorithm in the Elekta XVI software, to a mask of the prostate volume with 5 mm expansion. Residual registration errors were calculated after correcting for the initial introduced phantom set-up error. Registration performance with the OBI images was similar to that of XVI. There was a clear dependence on imaging dose for the XVI images with residual errors increasing below 4mGy. It was not possible to acquire images with doses lower than ~5mGy with the OBI system and no evidence of reduced performance was observed at this dose. Registration failures (maximum target registration error > 3.6 mm on the surface of a 30mm sphere) occurred in 5% to 9% of registrations except for the lowest dose XVI scan (31%). The uncertainty in automatic image registration with both OBI and XVI images was found to be adequate for clinical use within a normal range of acquisition settings.

  11. Radiation-induced 1/f noise degradation of PNP bipolar junction transistors at different dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi-Feng, Zhao; Yi-Qi, Zhuang; Jun-Lin, Bao; Wei, Hu

    2016-04-01

    It is found that ionizing-radiation can lead to the base current and the 1/f noise degradations in PNP bipolar junction transistors. In this paper, it is suggested that the surface of the space charge region of the emitter-base junction is the main source of the base surface 1/f noise. A model is developed which identifies the parameters and describes their interactive contributions to the recombination current at the surface of the space charge region. Based on the theory of carrier number fluctuation and the model of surface recombination current, a 1/f noise model is developed. This model suggests that 1/f noise degradations are the result of the accumulation of oxide-trapped charges and interface states. Combining models of ELDRS, this model can explain the reason why the 1/f noise degradation is more severe at a low dose rate than at a high dose rate. The radiations were performed in a Co60 source up to a total dose of 700 Gy(Si). The low dose rate was 0.001 Gy(Si)/s and the high dose rate was 0.1 Gy(Si)/s. The model accords well with the experimental results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61076101 and 61204092).

  12. Oxycodone/paracetamol: a low-dose synergic combination useful in different types of pain.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Antonio; Sabato, Elisabetta; Di Paolo, Anna Rita; Mammucari, Massimo; Sabato, Alessandro Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    The combination of two analgesic agents offers several advantages in the treatment of chronic pain. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) has central analgesic activity without a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-like or opioid-like effect. Oxycodone is a semisynthetic opioid agonist. The oral fixed-dose combination of oxycodone and paracetamol immediate-release formulation has a synergistic mechanism of action that is useful for moderate-to-severe pain and for nonresponders to NSAIDs or paracetamol alone. This fixed-dose combination offers several advantages: lower individual drug doses can be used because of their synergistic mechanisms of action, its opioid-sparing effect and it has a good efficacy and tolerability profile. Efficacy and safety of this fixed-dose combination were assessed in a wide range of clinical settings: in patients with osteoarthritis or chronic musculoskeletal pain, including when complicated by a neuropathic component; for chronic pain in elderly patients; cancer-related pain; postoperative pain; and for neuropathic pain, in the latter case usually given in combination with an NSAID or other drugs. The large variety of indications for which this fixed-dose combination may be useful can be attributed to the pharmacological synergy between oxycodone and paracetamol and because lower individual drug dosages can be used, suggesting that this should be a first-line agent for the treatment of chronic moderate-to-severe pain.

  13. Treatment with chemical coagulants at different dosing levels changes ecotoxicity of stormwater from the Tahoe basin, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Bachand, P A M; Bachand, S M; Lopus, S E; Heyvaert, A; Werner, I

    2010-01-01

    In recent decades, the transport of stormwater-associated fine particles and phosphorus into Lake Tahoe has led to decreased water clarity and related ecological changes. Polyaluminum chloride coagulants (PACs) have shown great promise in removing these constituents from stormwater before it enters the lake. However, the potential risks of coagulant treatment to aquatic organisms are not well understood. This study investigated stormwater and coagulant toxicity under non-dosed, optimally-dosed, and over-dosed conditions using the US EPA 3-species test through growth of green algae (Selenastrum capricornutum), zooplankton (waterflea, Ceriodaphnia dubia) mortality and reproduction, and larval fish (fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas) mortality and biomass. Stormwater samples were collected during a 2005 spring snowmelt runoff event from three sites representing various forms of developed regions around Lake Tahoe. Samples were dosed with two different coagulants (a chitosan and a PAC) at levels optimized with a streaming current detector (SCD). Non-treated highway runoff was toxic to zooplankton and fish. Optimal coagulant dosing increased algal growth and reduced zooplankton toxicity. Overdosing at two and three times the optimal level of a PAC decreased zooplankton reproduction and increased fish mortality. PAC-related toxicity was correlated with increasing total unfiltered aluminum and decreasing alkalinity, pH, and DOC. Because of toxicity risks, we recommend keeping PAC coagulant dosing at or below optimal levels in practice.

  14. Indoor terrestrial gamma dose rate mapping in France: a case study using two different geostatistical models.

    PubMed

    Warnery, E; Ielsch, G; Lajaunie, C; Cale, E; Wackernagel, H; Debayle, C; Guillevic, J

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma dose rates show important spatial variations in France. Previous studies resulted in maps of arithmetic means of indoor terrestrial gamma dose rates by "departement" (French district). However, numerous areas could not be characterized due to the lack of data. The aim of our work was to obtain more precise estimates of the spatial variability of indoor terrestrial gamma dose rates in France by using a more recent and complete data base and geostatistics. The study was based on the exploitation of 97,595 measurements results distributed in 17,404 locations covering all of France. Measurements were done by the Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) using RPL (Radio Photo Luminescent) dosimeters, exposed during several months between years 2011 and 2012 in French dentist surgeries and veterinary clinics. The data used came from dosimeters which were not exposed to anthropic sources. After removing the cosmic rays contribution in order to study only the telluric gamma radiation, it was decided to work with the arithmetic means of the time-series measurements, weighted by the time-exposure of the dosimeters, for each location. The values varied between 13 and 349 nSv/h, with an arithmetic mean of 76 nSv/h. The observed statistical distribution of the gamma dose rates was skewed to the right. Firstly, ordinary kriging was performed in order to predict the gamma dose rate on cells of 1*1 km(2), all over the domain. The second step of the study was to use an auxiliary variable in estimates. The IRSN achieved in 2010 a classification of the French geological formations, characterizing their uranium potential on the bases of geology and local measurement results of rocks uranium content. This information is georeferenced in a map at the scale 1:1,000,000. The geological uranium potential (GUP) was classified in 5 qualitative categories. As telluric gamma rays mostly come from the progenies of the (238)Uranium series present in rocks, this

  15. Real-time RT-PCR for detection, identification and absolute quantification of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus using different types of standards.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vazquez, C; Bandín, I; Dopazo, C P

    2015-05-21

    In the present study, 2 systems of real-time RT-PCR-one based on SYBR Green and the other on TaqMan-were designed to detect strains from any genotype of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), with high sensitivity and repeatability/reproducibility. In addition, the method was optimized for quantitative purposes (qRT-PCR), and standard curves with different types of reference templates were constructed and compared. Specificity was tested against 26 isolates from 4 genotypes. The sensitivity of the procedures was first tested against cell culture isolation, obtaining a limit of detection (LD) of 100 TCID50 ml-1 (100-fold below the LD using cell culture), at a threshold cycle value (Ct) of 36. Sensitivity was also evaluated using RNA from crude (LD = 1 fg; 160 genome copies) and purified virus (100 ag; 16 copies), plasmid DNA (2 copies) and RNA transcript (15 copies). No differences between both chemistries were observed in sensitivity and dynamic range. To evaluate repeatability and reproducibility, all experiments were performed in triplicate and on 3 different days, by workers with different levels of experience, obtaining Ct values with coefficients of variation always <5. This fact, together with the high efficiency and R2 values of the standard curves, encouraged us to analyse the reliability of the method for viral quantification. The results not only demonstrated that the procedure can be used for detection, identification and quantification of this virus, but also demonstrated a clear correlation between the regression lines obtained with different standards, which will help scientists to compare sensitivity results between different studies.

  16. Estimation of the action of three different mechlorethamine doses on biochemical parameters during experimentally induced pleuritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Całkosiński, Ireneusz; Rosińczuk-Tonderys, Joanna; Dzierzba, Katarzyna; Bronowicka-Szydełko, Agnieszka; Seweryn, Ewa; Majda, Jacek; Całkosińska, Monika; Gamian, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogranulogen (NTG) may modify the character of inflammatory reactions. These modifications are a result of cytotoxic and mutagenic effects. NTG has high affinity to DNA and causes disorders in the synthesis of acute phase proteins (e.g., haptoglobin, transferrin, fibrinogen, and complement protein C3). Our previous studies have shown that small doses of NTG can enhance immunological defense reactions in the organism. The aim of the current studies was to determine how different NTG doses cause changes in the values of biochemical parameters in pleuritis-induced rats. The animals were randomized into five groups: Group I - control group; Group II - IP (induced pleuritis) group; Group III - NTG5 group; Group IV - NTG50 group; Group V - NTG600 group. Blood was collected from all groups of animals at 24, 48, and 72 h after the initiation of the carrageenin-induced inflammatory reaction. These investigations revealed that a dose of 5 μg NTG/kg b.w. (body weight) can change the character of the inflammation. Our studies also show that a dose of 600 μg NTG/kg b.w. causes a rapid decrease in the level of C3 at the 72 h of the experiment (after 3 applications every 24 h), which indicates a cytotoxic action of such a large NTG dose. NTG used at doses of 50 and 600 μg/kg b.w. causes the opposite metabolism of albumins and other serum proteins. Our studies show that the different doses of NTG have distinct effects on the inflammatory reaction.

  17. Detection of calcification clusters in digital breast tomosynthesis slices at different dose levels utilizing a SRSAR reconstruction and JAFROC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timberg, P.; Dustler, M.; Petersson, H.; Tingberg, A.; Zackrisson, S.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate detection performance for calcification clusters in reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) slices at different dose levels using a Super Resolution and Statistical Artifact Reduction (SRSAR) reconstruction method. Method: Simulated calcifications with irregular profile (0.2 mm diameter) where combined to form clusters that were added to projection images (1-3 per abnormal image) acquired on a DBT system (Mammomat Inspiration, Siemens). The projection images were dose reduced by software to form 35 abnormal cases and 25 normal cases as if acquired at 100%, 75% and 50% dose level (AGD of approximately 1.6 mGy for a 53 mm standard breast, measured according to EUREF v0.15). A standard FBP and a SRSAR reconstruction method (utilizing IRIS (iterative reconstruction filters), and outlier detection using Maximum-Intensity Projections and Average-Intensity Projections) were used to reconstruct single central slices to be used in a Free-response task (60 images per observer and dose level). Six observers participated and their task was to detect the clusters and assign confidence rating in randomly presented images from the whole image set (balanced by dose level). Each trial was separated by one weeks to reduce possible memory bias. The outcome was analyzed for statistical differences using Jackknifed Alternative Free-response Receiver Operating Characteristics. Results: The results indicate that it is possible reduce the dose by 50% with SRSAR without jeopardizing cluster detection. Conclusions: The detection performance for clusters can be maintained at a lower dose level by using SRSAR reconstruction.

  18. Effects of Different Doses of Levetiracetam on Aquaporin 4 Expression in Rats with Brain Edema Following Fluid Percussion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hongbo; Li, Wenling; Dong, Changzheng; Ma, Li; Wu, Jiang; Zhao, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was designed to investigate the effects of different doses of levetiracetam on aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rats after fluid percussion injury. Material/Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: sham operation group, traumatic brain injury group, low-dose levetiracetam group, and high-dose levetiracetam group. Brain edema models were established by fluid percussion injury, and intervened by the administration of levetiracetam. Samples from the 4 groups were collected at 2, 6, 12, and 24 h, and at 3 and 7 days after injury. Histological observation was performed using hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemical staining. AQP4 and AQP4 mRNA expression was detected using Western blot assay and RT-PCR. Brain water content was measured by the dry-wet method. Results Compared with the traumatic brain injury group, brain water content, AQP4 expression, and AQP4 mRNA expression were lower in the levetiracetam groups at each time point and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The intervention effects of high-dose levetiracetam were more apparent. Conclusions Levetiracetam can lessen brain edema from fluid percussion injury by down-regulating AQP4 and AQP4 mRNA expression. There is a dose-effect relationship in the preventive effect of levetiracetam within a certain extent. PMID:26927633

  19. Effects of Different Doses of Levetiracetam on Aquaporin 4 Expression in Rats with Brain Edema Following Fluid Percussion Injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hongbo; Li, Wenling; Dong, Changzheng; Ma, Li; Wu, Jiang; Zhao, Wenqing

    2016-02-29

    BACKGROUND This study was designed to investigate the effects of different doses of levetiracetam on aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rats after fluid percussion injury. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: sham operation group, traumatic brain injury group, low-dose levetiracetam group, and high-dose levetiracetam group. Brain edema models were established by fluid percussion injury, and intervened by the administration of levetiracetam. Samples from the 4 groups were collected at 2, 6, 12, and 24 h, and at 3 and 7 days after injury. Histological observation was performed using hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemical staining. AQP4 and AQP4 mRNA expression was detected using Western blot assay and RT-PCR. Brain water content was measured by the dry-wet method. RESULTS Compared with the traumatic brain injury group, brain water content, AQP4 expression, and AQP4 mRNA expression were lower in the levetiracetam groups at each time point and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The intervention effects of high-dose levetiracetam were more apparent. CONCLUSIONS Levetiracetam can lessen brain edema from fluid percussion injury by down-regulating AQP4 and AQP4 mRNA expression. There is a dose-effect relationship in the preventive effect of levetiracetam within a certain extent.

  20. In vitro photodynamic inactivation of Candida spp. by different doses of low power laser light.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, A S; Trajano, V N; Lima, E O; Ferreira, A F M; Queiroga, A S; Limeira, F A

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of PDT in photoinactivation of Candida species using methylene blue (MB) and irradiation with a diode laser (660nm, 40mW). Suspensions of Candida species were obtained containing 10(6)cfu/ml, transferred to 96-holes plates and exposed to 03 doses of laser light (60J/cm(2), 120J/cm(2), 180J/cm(2)) in the presence of MB. Additional suspensions were treated with only the MB, the laser light or with 0.85% saline (control groups). After the treatments, 1μl aliquot of the suspensions was plated in duplicate on SDA. The plates were incubated at 37°C for 24-48h and after this period there was the counting of colonies (cfu/ml). The three evaluated doses determined meaningful inactivation of Candida spp. (p<0.05). The 180J/cm(2) dose was the most effective, inactivating 78% of cfu/ml. At a dose of 180J/cm(2)C. albicans was the most susceptible specie. PDT has demonstrated effectiveness in the inactivation of Candida spp.

  1. [Renoprotective efficacy of different doses of statins in experimental acute renal failure].

    PubMed

    Zeleniuk, V H; Zamors'kyĭ, I I; Horoshko, O M

    2014-01-01

    The effect of three statins (atorvastatin, lovastatin, simvastatin) on the renal function under conditions of experimental acute renal failure in rats was studied. The relatively effective doses were found to possess the most considerable renoprotective properties. All the statins were established to cause the restoration of functional activity of the kidneys under conditions of experimental rhabdomyolytic acute renal failure at various doses, but with the dose of 20 mg/kg they showed the most significant improvement in key indices of kidney function: an increase in diuresis by an average of 32% and glomerular filtration rate by an average of 90%, reduction of proteinuria in more than twice. At the same time, in the animals with acute renal failure the level of creatine phosphokinase was increased by 141%. However, the activity of blood plasma creatine phosphokinase of all animals treated with statins was 14% higher than in the intact control, indicating the minor myotrphic activity of statins in selected mode of administration. Thus, the use of 20 mg/kg dose is the most reasonable from the standpoint of renoprotective efficacy and safety.

  2. Analyzing the impact of intrafraction motion: Correlation of different dose metrics with changes in target D{sub 95%}

    SciTech Connect

    Waghorn, Ben J.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Langen, Katja M.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: A number of techniques are available to determine the dosimetric impact of intrafraction motion during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Motion-induced dose perturbations can be determined both computationally and experimentally using a number of different dosimetric metrics. However, these measures may lead to different conclusions regarding the clinical impact of motion. This study compares the analysis of identical dose perturbations using different dosimetric metrics. Calculated changes in target D{sub 95%} are used as a reference. Methods: A total of 3768 motion-encoded dose distributions were calculated for nine lung tumor patients. The motion-encoded dose distributions were compared to static dose distributions using three dosimetric metrics: 2D {gamma}, 3D {gamma}, and histogram analysis. Each of these metrics was used to analyze dose perturbations both globally and within the target structure. Furthermore, the failing voxels were analyzed separately according to failure mode, i.e., under vs. over-dosed voxels. Metrics were evaluated based on their agreement with changes in target D{sub 95%}. Evaluations included the metrics' maximum average sensitivity and specificity (MASS) in detecting unacceptable deliveries, a coefficient correlated to ranking ({tau}), and the linear correlation coefficient, r. Results: Of the evaluated metrics, the histogram metric restricted to the under-dosed voxels within the target agreed best with changes in target D{sub 95%}. This metric achieved a MASS of 0.93, a {tau} of 0.69, and an r-value of 0.85. In comparison, the unrestricted 2D {gamma} metric achieved MASS = 0.77, {tau} = 0.40, and r = 0.67. Restricting the 2D {gamma} test both geographically and in failure mode increased the MASS to 0.85, {tau} to 0.70, and the r-value to 0.80. Conclusions: This study suggests that any clinical decisions based solely on an unrestricted 2D {gamma} metric are suboptimal. A geographic and failure mode restriction can

  3. Dose-response and time-course of neurobehavioral changes following oral chlorpyrifos in rats of different ages.

    PubMed

    Moser, V C

    2000-01-01

    Young rats have been shown in several laboratories to be more sensitive to the neurotoxic effects of acute exposure to chlorpyrifos. To examine the neurobehavioral effects of chlorpyrifos as a function of age and dose, we conducted dose-response and time-course assessments in rats of three different ages (postnatal day, or PND, 17, 27, and adults). Doses were selected to span the effective dose range in each age group: PND17 - 4, 10, 20 mg/kg; PND27 - 10, 25, 50 mg/kg; adult - 10, 50, 100 mg/kg. Rats were tested at the time of peak effect on the day of dosing, and again at 1 and 3 days, and at 1 and 2 weeks after a single oral dose. There were age- and sex-related differences in the recovery of these behavioral effects; the adult males recovered from the behavioral effects more quickly than the other age groups, and the adult females showed the slowest recovery (up to at least 3 days). Although these doses had been shown previously to produce a similar degree of cholinesterase inhibition, the neurobehavioral alterations fell into the following three patterns of effect as a function of age. (1) Some endpoints (e.g., gait abnormalities, tremor) showed a dose-response curve that was shifted to the right in the older animals. Calculated ED50 values indicated that the PND17 rats were three- to five-fold more sensitive than the adults. (2) Some measures showed less effect in the youngest rats; for example, maximal motor activity decreases were half as great as with adults. (3) A few effects that were typically observed in adults, e.g., salivation, were not seen at all in the PND17 rats. Thus, differential responses on these neurobehavioral endpoints were observed as a function of age. These data suggest that, for some endpoints, young rats are more sensitive to a range of chlorpyrifos doses; however, the magnitude of age-related differences depends on the specific endpoint and time of assessment, as well as age and sex of the test subject.

  4. Salmonella enteritidis deposition in eggs after experimental infection of laying hens with different oral doses.

    PubMed

    Gast, Richard K; Guraya, Rupa; Guard, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The continuing attribution of human Salmonella Enteritidis infections to internally contaminated eggs has necessitated the commitment of substantial public and private resources to Salmonella Enteritidis testing and control programs in commercial laying flocks. Cost-effective risk-reduction requires a detailed and comprehensive understanding of how Salmonella Enteritidis infections in hens result in deposition of the pathogen inside eggs. The present study sought to resolve some incompletely defined aspects of the relationship between Salmonella Enteritidis oral-exposure dose levels in experimentally infected laying hens and the frequency and location of subsequent egg contamination. In two trials, groups of specific-pathogen-free hens were experimentally inoculated with oral doses of 10(4), 10(6), or 10(8) CFU of a phage type 4 Salmonella Enteritidis strain. Eggs were collected 5 to 23 days postinoculation, and the yolk and albumen of each egg were cultured separately to detect Salmonella Enteritidis contamination. Larger oral doses of Salmonella Enteritidis administered to hens were associated with significant increases in the frequencies of both yolk and albumen contamination. Moreover, Salmonella Enteritidis was found in the albumen of a far-higher proportion of contaminated eggs from hens given the largest dose than from the other two groups. Salmonella Enteritidis contamination was detected in 0.7% of yolk and 0.2% of albumen samples after inoculation of hens with 10(4) CFU, 4.0% of yolk and 1.7% of albumen samples after inoculation with 10(6) CFU, and 6.5% of yolk and 10.8% of albumen samples after inoculation with 10(8) CFU. These results demonstrate that oral-exposure doses of Salmonella Enteritidis for laying hens can significantly affect both the frequency and location of deposition of this pathogen inside eggs.

  5. The effect of different doses and different routes of acetylsalicylic acid administration on platelet aggregation in healthy volunteers and ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Chýlová, Miroslava; Moťovská, Zuzana; Osmančík, Pavel; Procházka, Bohumír; Kalvach, Pavel

    2015-04-01

    The purpose was to assess the effect of different doses and different routes of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) administration on platelet aggregation and the comparison between platelet aggregation after the single and the repetitive administration of ASA in healthy individuals and in patients after ischemic stroke. The study group consists of 22 healthy individuals and 30 patients with documented ischemic stroke. Platelet aggregation was measured in healthy individuals: (a) twice before ASA and (b) 2 h after different single doses and different routes of ASA administration-(b1) 500 mg orally, (b2) 500 mg intravenously, and (b3) 100 mg orally. We measured aggregability in healthy individuals after five consecutive days of 100 mg of ASA q.d. and in patients on chronic ASA 100 mg q.d. The VerifyNow was used with results expressed in aspirin reaction units (ARU). In healthy individuals, the dose-(b1) 500 mg orally-reduced the aggregability to mean (SD) 392 (36) ARU (p < 0.001), (b2) 500 mg intravenously to 428 (46) (p < 0.001) and (b3) 100 mg orally to 460 (76) (p < 0.001). The suppression of aggregation after 500 mg was (p = 0.029) higher after the oral compared to intravenous administration, and the same is true for the suppression after single dose of 500 mg orally and 100 mg orally (p = 0.011). Oral dose 100 mg for 5 days in healthy individuals reduced aggregation to 405 (37) and in post-stroke patients to 433 (54). All doses of ASA, both orally and intravenously, have produced a significant reduction of platelet aggregation. Preference of the parenteral to oral application has not been established.

  6. Sex differences in nicotine self-administration in rats during progressive unit dose reduction: Implications for nicotine regulation policy

    PubMed Central

    Grebenstein, Patricia; Burroughs, Danielle; Zhang, Yan; LeSage, Mark G.

    2013-01-01

    Reducing the nicotine content in tobacco products is being considered by the FDA as a policy to reduce the addictiveness of tobacco products. Understanding individual differences in response to nicotine reduction will be critical to developing safe and effective policy. Animal and human research demonstrating sex differences in the reinforcing effects of nicotine suggests that males and females may respond differently to nicotine-reduction policies. However, no studies have directly examined sex differences in the effects of nicotine unit-dose reduction on nicotine self-administration (NSA) in animals. The purpose of the present study was to examine this issue in a rodent self-administration model. Male and female rats were trained to self-administer nicotine (0.06 mg/kg) under an FR 3 schedule during daily 23 h sessions. Rats were then exposed to saline extinction and reacquisition of NSA, followed by weekly reductions in the unit dose (0.03 to 0.00025 mg/kg) until extinction levels of responding were achieved. Males and females were compared with respect to baseline levels of intake, resistance to extinction, degree of compensatory increases in responding during dose reduction, and the threshold reinforcing unit dose of nicotine. Exponential demand-curve analysis was also conducted to compare the sensitivity of males and females to increases in the unit price (FR/unit dose) of nicotine (i.e., elasticity of demand or reinforcing efficacy). Females exhibited significantly higher baseline intake and less compensation than males. However, there were no sex differences in the reinforcement threshold or elasticity of demand. Dose–response relationships were very well described by the exponential demand function (r2 values > 0.96 for individual subjects). These findings suggest that females may exhibit less compensatory smoking in response to nicotine reduction policies, even though their nicotine reinforcement threshold and elasticity of demand may not differ from

  7. Effect of different phenylephrine bolus doses for treatment of hypotension during spinal anaesthesia in patients undergoing elective caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Mohta, M; Harisinghani, P; Sethi, A K; Agarwal, D

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of phenylephrine might be improved by giving doses higher than that traditionally used (100 µg). This study compared the effects of three initial bolus doses of intravenous phenylephrine; 100 µg (group P100), 125 µg (group P125) and 150 µg (group P150), for the treatment of post-spinal hypotension in patients undergoing elective caesarean delivery. If hypotension was not corrected by this dose, additional boluses of 25 µg were given every minute. Further hypotensive episodes were treated with half the initial bolus dose, followed by 25 µg boluses, as required. Umbilical arterial and venous blood samples were obtained for blood gas analysis and Apgar scores recorded. One hundred and twenty subjects (40 per group) who developed post-spinal hypotension (75%) were included in this randomised, double blind trial. Although systolic blood pressure was higher at certain time-points after 150 µg phenylephrine, there were no statistically significant differences in the effectiveness of the first bolus of phenylephrine to treat hypotension (85%, 95% and 95% in groups P100, P125 and P150, respectively, P=0.215); the additional dose of phenylephrine after the first bolus (P=0.810); the number of additional boluses (P=0.318) or of hypotensive episodes (P=0.118). There were no significant differences in the number of patients developing reactive hypertension or bradycardia, in maternal side-effects or in neonatal outcomes. Although the study may have been underpowered, initial phenylephrine bolus doses of 100 µg, 125 µg and 150 µg did not significantly differ in efficacy to treat post-spinal hypotension in these patients.

  8. Pathogenesis of highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (H7N1) infection in chickens inoculated with three different doses.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Aida J; Busquets, Nuria; Campos, Naiana; Ramis, Antonio; Dolz, Roser; Rivas, Raquel; Valle, Rosa; Abad, F Xavier; Darji, Ayub; Majo, Natalia

    2011-04-01

    To study the pathogenesis of a H7N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus strain, specific pathogen free chickens were inoculated with decreasing concentrations of virus: 10(5.5) median embryo lethal dose (ELD(50)) (G1), 10(3.5) ELD(50) (G2) and 10(1.5) ELD(50) (G3). Disease progression was monitored over a period of 16 days and sequential necropsies and tissue samples were collected for histological and immunohistochemical examination. Viral RNA loads were also quantified in different tissues, blood, oropharyngeal swabs, and cloacal swabs using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Clinical signs of depression, apathy, listlessness, huddling and ruffled feathers were recorded in G1 and a few G2 birds, whilst neurological signs were only observed in chickens inoculated with the highest dose. Gross lesions of haemorrhages were observed in the unfeathered skin of the comb and legs, and skeletal muscle, lung, pancreas and kidneys of birds inoculated with 10(5.5) ELD(50) and 10(3.5) ELD(50) doses. Microscopic lesions and viral antigen were demonstrated in cells of the nasal cavity, lung, heart, skeletal muscle, brain, spinal cord, gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, liver, bone marrow, thymus, bursa of Fabricius, spleen, kidney, adrenal gland and skin. Viral RNA was detected by RT-qPCR in kidney, lung, intestine, and brain samples of G1 and G2 birds. However, in birds infected with the lowest dose, viral RNA was detected only in brain and lung samples in low amounts at 5 and 7 days post infection. Interestingly, viral shedding was observed in oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs with proportionate decrease with the inoculation dose. We conclude that although an adequate infectious dose is critical in reproducing the clinical infection, chickens exposed to lower doses can be infected and shed virus representing a risk for the dissemination of the viral agent.

  9. Dosimetric verification of surface and superficial doses for head and neck IMRT with different PTV shrinkage margins

    SciTech Connect

    Shiau, An-Cheng; Lai, Pei-Ling; Liang, Ji-An; and others

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Dosimetric uncertainty in the surface and superficial regions is still a major concern for radiation therapy and becomes more important when using the inverse planning algorithm for IMRT. The purpose of this study was to measure dose distributions and to evaluate the calculation accuracy in the superficial region for different planning target volume (PTV) shrinkage methods for head and neck IMRT plans. Methods: A spherical polystyrene phantom 160 mm in diameter (ball phantom) was used to simulate the shape of the head. Strips of superflab bolus with thicknesses of 3.5 and 7.0 mm were spread on the surface of the ball phantom. Three sets of CT images were acquired for the ball phantom without and with the bolus. The hypothetical clinical target volume (CTV) and critical structures (spinal cord and parotid glands) were outlined on each set of CT images. The PTVs were initially created by expanding an isotropic 3 mm margin from the CTV and then margins of 0, 3, and 5 mm were shrunk from the phantom surface for dosimetric analysis. Seven-field IMRT plans with a prescribed dose of 180 cGy and same dose constraints were designed using an Eclipse treatment planning system. Superficial doses at depths of 0, 3.5, and 7.0 mm and at seven beam axis positions (gantry angles of 0 deg., 30 deg., 60 deg., 80 deg., 330 deg., 300 deg., and 280 deg.) were measured for each PTV shrinkage margin using 0.1 mm ultrathin thermoluminescent dosimeters. For each plan, the measured doses were compared to the calculated doses. Results: The PTV without shrinkage had the highest intensity and the steepest dose gradient in the superficial region. The mean measured doses for different positions at depths of 0, 3.5, and 7.0 mm were 106{+-}18, 185{+-}16, and 188{+-}12 cGy, respectively. For a PTV with 3 mm shrinkage, the mean measured doses were 94{+-}13, 183{+-}8, and 191{+-}8 cGy. For a PTV with 5 mm shrinkage, the mean measured doses were 86{+-}11, 173{+-}8, and 187{+-}5 cGy. The

  10. Development of a graphite probe calorimeter for absolute clinical dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Renaud, James; Seuntjens, Jan; Sarfehnia, Arman; Marchington, David

    2013-02-15

    The aim of this work is to present the numerical design optimization, construction, and experimental proof of concept of a graphite probe calorimeter (GPC) conceived for dose measurement in the clinical environment (U.S. provisional patent 61/652,540). A finite element method (FEM) based numerical heat transfer study was conducted using a commercial software package to explore the feasibility of the GPC and to optimize the shape, dimensions, and materials used in its design. A functioning prototype was constructed inhouse and used to perform dose to water measurements under a 6 MV photon beam at 400 and 1000 MU/min, in a thermally insulated water phantom. Heat loss correction factors were determined using FEM analysis while the radiation field perturbation and the graphite to water absorbed dose conversion factors were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. The difference in the average measured dose to water for the 400 and 1000 MU/min runs using the TG-51 protocol and the GPC was 0.2% and 1.2%, respectively. Heat loss correction factors ranged from 1.001 to 1.002, while the product of the perturbation and dose conversion factors was calculated to be 1.130. The combined relative uncertainty was estimated to be 1.4%, with the largest contributors being the specific heat capacity of the graphite (type B, 0.8%) and the reproducibility, defined as the standard deviation of the mean measured dose (type A, 0.6%). By establishing the feasibility of using the GPC as a practical clinical absolute photon dosimeter, this work lays the foundation for further device enhancements, including the development of an isothermal mode of operation and an overall miniaturization, making it potentially suitable for use in small and composite radiation fields. It is anticipated that, through the incorporation of isothermal stabilization provided by temperature controllers, a subpercent overall uncertainty will be achieved.

  11. [Genetic changes in yeast cells Saccharomyces irradiated by fast neutrons with different dose rate].

    PubMed

    Malinova, I V; Tsyb, T S; Komarova, E V

    2009-01-01

    No neutron dose rate effects in the wide range of 10(-3) Gy/s to 10(6) Gy/s were observed in yeast diploid cells for induction of mitotic segregation and crossing-over. The RBE values for these effects were determined as doses ratio (Dgamma/D(n)) at maximum effects. The RBE were 2.2-1.9 for neutrons of the reactor BR-10 (E = = 0.85 MeV) and the pulse reactor BARS-6 (E = 1.44 MeV). The RBE values for genetic effects were 1.0 at the equal survival level for neutrons and gamma-rays 60Co.

  12. Influence of seed extract of Syzygium Cumini (Jamun) on mice exposed to different doses of gamma-radiation.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath; Venkatesh, Ponemone

    2005-03-01

    The radioprotective activity of the hydroalcoholic extract of jamun seeds (SCE) was studied in mice exposed to different doses of gamma radiation. The mice were injected with 0, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, 140 or 160 mg/kg body weight of SCE, before exposure to 10 Gy of gamma radiation, to select the optimum dose of radiation protection. The 80 mg/kg SCE was found to offer highest protection, therefore, further studies were carried out using this dose. The drug was more effective when administered through the intraperitoneal route at equimolar doses than the oral route. Since higher survival was observed for the i.p. route (50%), than the oral route (29.2%), all other studies were carried out by injecting SCE intraperitoneally. The mice treated with 80 mg/kg body weight SCE intraperitoneally before exposure to 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 Gy of gamma radiation showed reduction in the symptoms of radiation sickness and mortality at all exposure doses and caused a significant increase in the animal survival when compared with the concurrent double distilled water (DDW) + irradiation group. The SCE treatment protected mice against the gastrointestinal as well as bone marrow deaths and the DRF was found to be 1.24.

  13. The absolute bioavailability and effect of food on the pharmacokinetics of zolmitriptan in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Seaber, Emma J; Peck, Richard W; Smith, Deborah A; Allanson, John; Hefting, Nanco R; van Lier, Jan J; Sollie, Frans A E; Wemer, Johan; Jonkman, Jan H G

    1998-01-01

    Aims Zolmitriptan (Zomig (formerly 311C90)) is a novel 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonist developed for the acute oral treatment of migraine. A highly sensitive LCMS-MS assay has been developed which allows quantification of plasma concentrations of zolmitriptan and its active metabolite, 183C91, after therapeutic doses. Two studies using this assay method were conducted to investigate the pharmacokinetics, including absolute bioavailability, of 2.5 and 5 mg oral doses of zolmitriptan in men and women, the dose-proportionality of 2.5, 5 and 10 mg doses and the effect of food on the pharmacokinetics of a 5 mg oral dose. Methods Two randomized, balanced, open-label, 4-period crossover studies were conducted in a total of 32 healthy volunteers. The first study determined the absolute bioavailability of 2.5 and 5 mg doses of zolmitriptan and compared the pharmacokinetics in men and women. The second study examined the dose-proportionality in pharmacokinetics after fasting doses of 2.5, 5 and 10 mg, and the effect of food on a 5 mg dose. Blood pressure, heart rate, ECG, clinical chemistry, haematology and adverse events were also monitored. Results The mean (s.d.) absolute oral bioavailability was 0.41 (0.14 and 0.40) 0.09 after 2.5 mg and 0.48±0.14 and 0.36±0.07 after 5 mg in women and men, respectively. Without adjustment for bodyweight, plasma concentrations of zolmitriptan, but not 183C91, were higher in women than men. Mean (±s.d.) AUC was 32.7±10.1 and 60.2±26.8 ng ml−1 h after 5 mg in men and women, respectively (95% CI for ratio 0.43–0.77). After 2.5 mg mean (±s.d.) AUC was 18.4±5.4 and 23.1±9.9 ng ml−1 h in men and women, respectively (95% CI for ratio 0.61–1.09). However, these differences were of no clinical significance. Cmax and AUC of oral zolmitriptan were dose-proportional and there was a 13 and 16% fall in mean zolmitriptan Cmax and AUC, respectively, when administered after food. Adverse effects were minor, predominantly mild and transient, and

  14. The Quantitative Relationship Between ISO 15197 Accuracy Criteria and Mean Absolute Relative Difference (MARD) in the Evaluation of Analytical Performance of Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) Systems.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Scott; Simmons, David A

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between International Organization for Standardization (ISO) accuracy criteria and mean absolute relative difference (MARD), 2 methods for assessing the accuracy of blood glucose meters, is complex. While lower MARD values are generally better than higher MARD values, it is not possible to define a particular MARD value that ensures a blood glucose meter will satisfy the ISO accuracy criteria. The MARD value that ensures passing the ISO accuracy test can be described only as a probabilistic range. In this work, a Bayesian model is presented to represent the relationship between ISO accuracy criteria and MARD. Under the assumptions made in this work, there is nearly a 100% chance of satisfying ISO 15197:2013 accuracy requirements if the MARD value is between 3.25% and 5.25%.

  15. Randomized controlled trial of Hepatitis B virus vaccine in HIV-1-infected patients comparing two different doses

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo-Juárez, Patricia; Volkow-Fernández, Patricia; Escobedo-López, Kenia; Vilar-Compte, Diana; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo; Soto-Ramírez, Luis Enrique

    2006-01-01

    Background Co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is not infrequent as both share same route of exposure. The risk of developing chronic hepatitis B virus is 6%, in general population but can reach 10–20% in HBV/HIV co-infected patients. When compared to general population, the response rate to HBV vaccine in HIV-infected patients is diminished, so previous studies have tried to improve this response using variety of schedules, doses and co-administration of immunomodulators. The purpose of this study was to evaluate two doses of recombinant HBV vaccine (10 or 40 μg), IM at 0, 1 and 6 months. Vaccination response was measured 30–50 days after last dose; titers of >9.9 IU/L were considered positive. Results Seventy-nine patients were included, 48 patients (60.7%) serconverted. Thirty-nine patients (49.3%) received 10 μg vaccine dose, 24 patients (61.5%) seroconverted. Forty patients (50.7%) received 40 μg vaccine dose, 24 (60%) seroconverted. There were no differences between two doses. A statistically significant higher seroconversion rate was found for patients with CD4 cell counts at vaccination ≥ 200 cel/mm3 (33 of 38 patients, 86.8%), compared with those with CD4 < 200 cel/mm3 (15 of 41, 36.6%), [OR 11.44, 95% IC 3.67–35.59, p = 0.003], there were no differences between two vaccine doses. Using the logistic regression model, CD4 count <200 cel/mm3 were significantly associated with non serologic response (p = 0.003). None other variables such as gender, age, risk exposure for HIV, viral load, type or duration of HAART or AIDS-defining illness, were asociated with seroconversion. Conclusion In this study, an increase dose of HBV vaccine did not show to increase the rate of response in HIV infected subjects. The only significant findings associated to the response rate was that a CD4 count ≥ 200 cel/mm3, we suggest this threshold at which HIV patients should be vaccinated. PMID:16600028

  16. [Influence of small doses human interferon-alpha intranasal injection on behavior of rats of different age].

    PubMed

    Loseva, E V; Pasikova, N V; Loginova, N A; Biriukova, L M; Mats, V M

    2007-01-01

    Behavior of young (3-4 month old) and ageing (12-15 month old) rats was studied during chronic intranasal application of low doses (10 ME or 350 ME) of human interferon-alpha (HIA). In ageing rats HIA did not affect dynamics (days 0th, 8th and 16th) of (a) locomotive and (b) investigative activity in the "open field" test and in two-side defensive conditioning, and (c) decreased anxiety ("open field", "light-darkness" test). In young rats HIA (a) increased locomotive activity by 16th day (it decreased in control), (b) investigative activity did not change (in control it decreased by 8th day; "open field" test), (c) anxiety decreased in the "open field" and increased in "light-darkness" tests, (d) development of conditioned reflex improved (during 2nd learning session in 5 days after the first one). Thus, small doses of HIA differently affected behavior of rats depending on the age and experimental situation. However, both HIA doses changed rats' behavior in the same direction. We suggest that chronic low doses of HIA can regulate different aspects of behavior, but not suppress activity as it is commonly thought. This regulation can be performed via modulation of neuro-immuno-endocrine complex.

  17. Long-term metabolic effects of different doses of niacin-bound chromium on Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Perricone, N V; Bagchi, D; Echard, B; Preuss, Harry G

    2010-05-01

    We simultaneously assessed benefits and risks of niacin-bound chromium (NBC) intake at varying doses over a prolonged period of time (>1.2 years) in male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. We performed the study in two phases. First, we followed 60 male and 60 female SD rats, each gender divided into six groups. Through day 150 (phase 1A), all SD rats received a high sucrose diet (30% w/w) with or without different concentrations of NBC. The male/female groups were: 1] control without NBC n = 10, 2] low NBC (2.8 ppm, n = 10), 3] medium NBC (8.7 ppm, n = 20), 4] high NBC (28.0 ppm, n = 20). Based on dosing, we refer to the three treatment groups as 1X, 3X, and 10X. During days 151-312 (phase 1B), NBC was removed from diets of one half of the 3X and 10X groups. These are referred to as 3X satellite and 10X satellite. In phase 2 (days 313-460), males from groups 1X, 3X, 10X, 3X satellite, and 10X satellite received the same 3X dose of NBC (8.7 ppm). The last two groups also ingested different doses of a formulation of natural products in addition to NBC. We examined blood pressure, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), nitric oxide (NO), and insulin systems and inflammatory parameters. Results in male and female SD rats were comparable. NBC lowered systolic blood pressure (SBP) in a dose-dependent fashion; however, after 200 days, the SBP of the low dose group (1X) began to rise and returned to baseline control. After raising the dose of NBC to 3X, the SBP in the 1X group decreased significantly once more. When half the test rats (3X and 10X) were deprived of NBC, SBP rose gradually to control levels after 2 to 3 months. However, the SBP decreased significantly once more when each satellite group returned to the 3X dose. Special testing suggests that NBC at adequate dosing increases insulin sensitivity, lowers HbA1C, decreases activity of the RAS, at least in part, through ACE inhibition, enhances NO activity, and is without signs of toxicity. The addition of a

  18. The effect of different dose regimens of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss during hip surgery

    PubMed Central

    Thipparampall, Anil Kumar; Gurajala, Indira; Gopinath, R

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Antifibrinolytics may help bleeding in orthopaedic surgeries. The present study was undertaken to compare two dose regimens of tranexamic acid (TA) on perioperative blood loss in patients undergoing hip surgeries. Methods: In a prospective, randomised, controlled study, 59 patients scheduled for hip surgery were divided into Group C: receiving normal saline (n – 20), Group B: receiving single dose of TA (10 mg/kg) (n – 21), and Group I: receiving a bolus (10 mg/kg) plus infusion (1 mg/kg/h) of TA up to 4 h postoperatively (n – 18). Blood loss, haemoglobin and allogeneic blood transfusions were compared between the groups. For parametric data, P was calculated by ANOVA. Intergroup comparison was done by post hoc analysis with Bonferroni test. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The intra-operative blood loss was lower in the patients who received TA (525 ± 150, 456 ± 156 and 400 ± 133 ml in Group C, B and I respectively; P = 0.05). The 6th hourly drain collection in Group I was lower than Group B and C (41 ± 18, 46 ± 14 and 31 ± 14 ml in Group C, B, and I respectively; P = 0.018). The blood loss at 24 h was less in groups receiving TA (146 ± 32, 120 ± 76, 107 ± 37 ml for Group C, B and I, respectively; P = 0.02). The requirement of blood transfusions was lower in Group I. Conclusions: A bolus of tranexamic acid followed by infusion is more useful than a single dose in decreasing perioperative blood loss in patients undergoing hip surgeries. It reduces allogenic blood transfusion without increasing risk of thromboembolic events.

  19. Single-Dose Pharmacokinetics of Different Oral Sodium Nitrite Formulations in Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Predmore, Benjamin L.; Flanagan, Douglas R.; Giordano, Tony; Qiu, Yang; Brandon, Angela; Lefer, David J.; Patel, Rakesh P.; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Diabetic foot ulcers, although associated with macrovascular disease and neuropathy, have a microvascular disease causing ischemia not amenable to surgical intervention. Nitrite selectively releases nitric oxide in ischemic tissues, and diabetes subjects have low nitrite levels that do not increase with exercise. This study explores the safety and pharmacokinetics of a single dose of sodium nitrite in subjects with diabetic foot ulcers. Subjects and Methods Using a blinded, randomized crossover study design, 12 subjects with diabetes mellitus and active or healed foot ulcers received a single dose of sodium nitrite on two occasions 7–28 days apart, once with an immediate release (IR) formulation and once with an enteric-coated (EC) formulation for delayed release. Serum nitrite, nitrate, methemoglobin, sulfhemoglobin, blood pressure, pulse rate, complete blood count, chemistry panel, electrocardiogram, and adverse events were followed for up to 6 h after each dose. The IR and EC nitrite levels were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and by pharmacokinetic modeling. Results The IR formulation elevated nitrite levels between 0.25 and 0.75 h (P<0.05). The EC formulation did not elevate nitrite levels significantly, but both formulations gave plasma nitrite levels previously suggested to be therapeutic (approximately 2–5 μM). The IR formulation gave an asymptomatic blood pressure drop of 10/6 mm Hg (P<0.003), and two subjects experienced mild flushing. There was no elevation of methemoglobin or other safety concerns. Pharmacokinetic modeling of plama nitrite levels gave r2 values of 0.81 and 0.97 for the fits for IR and EC formulations, respectively. Conclusions Oral sodium nitrite administration is well tolerated in diabetes patients. PMID:22468627

  20. Absolute Measurements of Radiation Damage in Nanometer Thick Films

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Sanche, Léon

    2013-01-01

    We address the problem of absolute measurements of radiation damage in films of nanometer thicknesses. Thin films of DNA (~ 2–160nm) are deposited onto glass substrates and irradiated with varying doses of 1.5 keV X-rays under dry N2 at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. For each different thickness, the damage is assessed by measuring the loss of the supercoiled configuration as a function of incident photon fluence. From the exposure curves, the G-values are deduced, assuming that X-ray photons interacting with DNA, deposit all of their energy in the film. The results show that the G-value (i.e., damage per unit of deposited energy) increases with film thickness and reaches a plateau at 30±5 nm. This thickness dependence provides a correction factor to estimate the actual G-value for films with thicknesses below 30nm thickness. Thus, the absolute values of damage can be compared with that of films of any thickness under different experimental conditions. PMID:22562941

  1. Influence of robust optimization in intensity-modulated proton therapy with different dose delivery techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Li Yupeng; Li Xiaoqiang; Cao Wenhua; Zhang Xiaodong

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: The distal edge tracking (DET) technique in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) allows for high energy efficiency, fast and simple delivery, and simple inverse treatment planning; however, it is highly sensitive to uncertainties. In this study, the authors explored the application of DET in IMPT (IMPT-DET) and conducted robust optimization of IMPT-DET to see if the planning technique's sensitivity to uncertainties was reduced. They also compared conventional and robust optimization of IMPT-DET with three-dimensional IMPT (IMPT-3D) to gain understanding about how plan robustness is achieved. Methods: They compared the robustness of IMPT-DET and IMPT-3D plans to uncertainties by analyzing plans created for a typical prostate cancer case and a base of skull (BOS) cancer case (using data for patients who had undergone proton therapy at our institution). Spots with the highest and second highest energy layers were chosen so that the Bragg peak would be at the distal edge of the targets in IMPT-DET using 36 equally spaced angle beams; in IMPT-3D, 3 beams with angles chosen by a beam angle optimization algorithm were planned. Dose contributions for a number of range and setup uncertainties were calculated, and a worst-case robust optimization was performed. A robust quantification technique was used to evaluate the plans' sensitivity to uncertainties. Results: With no uncertainties considered, the DET is less robust to uncertainties than is the 3D method but offers better normal tissue protection. With robust optimization to account for range and setup uncertainties, robust optimization can improve the robustness of IMPT plans to uncertainties; however, our findings show the extent of improvement varies. Conclusions: IMPT's sensitivity to uncertainties can be improved by using robust optimization. They found two possible mechanisms that made improvements possible: (1) a localized single-field uniform dose distribution (LSFUD) mechanism, in which the

  2. Difference in performance between 3D and 4D CBCT for lung imaging: a dose and image quality analysis.

    PubMed

    Thengumpallil, Sheeba; Smith, Kathleen; Monnin, Pascal; Bourhis, Jean; Bochud, François; Moeckli, Raphaël

    2016-11-08

    The study was to describe and to compare the performance of 3D and 4D CBCT imaging modalities by measuring and analyzing the delivered dose and the image quality. The 3D (Chest) and 4D (Symmetry) CBCT Elekta XVI lung IGRT protocols were analyzed. Dose profiles were measured with TLDs inside a dedicated phantom. The dosimetric indicator cone-beam dose index (CBDI) was evaluated. The image quality analysis was performed by assessing the contrast transfer function (CTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS) and the noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ). Artifacts were also evaluated by simulating irregular breathing variations. The two imaging modalities showed different dose distributions within the phantom. At the center, the 3D CBCT delivered twice the dose of the 4D CBCT. The CTF was strongly reduced by motion compared to static conditions, resulting in a CTF reduction of 85% for the 3D CBCT and 65% for the 4D CBCT. The amplitude of the NPS was two times higher for the 4D CBCT than for the 3D CBCT. In the presence of motion, the NEQ of the 4D CBCT was 50% higher than the 3D CBCT. In the presence of breathing irregularities, the 4D CBCT protocol was mainly affected by view-aliasing artifacts, which were typically cone-beam artifacts, while the 3D CBCT protocol was mainly affected by duplication artifacts. The results showed that the 4D CBCT ensures a reasonable dose and better image quality when mov-ing targets are involved compared to 3D CBCT. Therefore, 4D CBCT is a reliable imaging modality for lung free-breathing radiation therapy.

  3. A pharmacokinetic study to evaluate the absolute bioavailability of triamcinolone acetonide following inhalation administration.

    PubMed

    Argenti, D; Shah, B; Heald, D

    1999-07-01

    Triamcinolone acetonide is a glucocorticoid administered by oral inhalation in the management of asthma. With oral inhalation of glucocorticoids, systemic absorption can come from oropharyngeal, gastrointestinal, or airway deposition of the drug. The objectives of this study were to determine the absolute bioavailability of triamcinolone acetonide following inhalation administration and to delineate the airway contribution of triamcinolone acetonide absorption relative to the absolute bioavailability. All subjects received a 5-minute 400 mcg intravenous infusion of triamcinolone acetonide and a single 800 mcg dose of inhaled triamcinolone acetonide with and without oral charcoal administration in a randomized three-way crossover fashion. The oral charcoal allowed for isolating the pulmonary component of absorption by adsorbing the oropharyngeal and gastrointestinal deposited drug. The mean (+/- SD) absolute bioavailability value for inhaled triamcinolone acetonide was 25% (8.75%). Delineation of the airway contribution of triamcinolone acetonide absorption showed that 10.4% of an inhaled dose is absorbed as triamcinolone acetonide from the lungs. Mean (+/- SD) total body clearance was rapid at 0.57 (0.12) L/hr/kg. The mean (+/- SD) apparent volume of distribution following the intravenous dose was a low 1.96 (0.31) L/kg. No significant differences were noted in the apparent terminal elimination half-life of triamcinolone acetonide (approximately 2.4 hr) between treatments.

  4. The absolute systemic availability of a new oral formulation of co-dergocrine in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Dominiak, P; Grevel, J; Abisch, E; Grobecker, H; Dennler, H J; Welzel, D

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the absolute systemic availability (f) of an oral formulation (Hydergin spezial = Hydergine FASR 4 mg per tablet) of co-dergocrine by three different methods. Twelve healthy volunteers received single doses of 0.9 mg co-dergocrine intravenously and 8.0 mg orally in a randomized crossover design. The pharmacological effect of co-dergocrine was monitored as a reduction in plasma prolactin. Maximal plasma concentrations of co-dergocrine after oral dosing ranged between 0.181 and 1.307 ng.ml-1. Maximal urinary excretion ranged between 4.7 and 9.9 micrograms.h-1 and between 0.3 and 2.3 micrograms.h-1 after intravenous and oral doses respectively. Clearance was measured as 90 +/- 22 l.h-1 and the absolute systemic availability (f) as 2.25 +/- 0.65% by using the areas under the plasma concentration-time curves extrapolated to infinity. Calculation of f by comparing areas up to 32 h or the fractions of the dose excreted in urine led to identical results. The intravenous and oral doses produced similar pharmacological effects (reduction of plasma prolactin concentrations) despite the small value of f.

  5. Evaluation of dose-response curve analysis in delineating shared or different molecular sites of action for osteolathyrogens.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Douglas A; Scott, Brenda D; Ellenberger, M Jason; Pöch, Gerald; Rinaldi, Andrea C

    2004-03-01

    Single-chemical and mixture concentration-response curves generated using a frog embryo model were examined for value in assessing whether chemicals exert toxic effects at the same or at different molecular sites of action. Toxicity tests were conducted on a series of osteolathyrogens, i.e. chemicals that inhibit cross-linking of developing connective tissue fibers. Induction of osteolathyrism, which manifests as lesions in the notochord of exposed tadpoles, has several possible molecular sites of action, including agent-cofactor reactivity during the enzyme-mediated cross-linking process. UV-VIS spectrophotometry of osteolathyrogen-cofactor reactivity (i.e. in vitro analysis) was coupled with the 96-h frog embryo mixture toxicity assay (i.e. in vivo toxicity) to compare molecular sites of action for several osteolathyrogens with the combined osteolathyritic effects of the agents. Single-chemical concentration-response curves were used to calculate theoretical curves for the dose-addition model of combined effect. Slope and EC(50) values for both theoretical and experimental mixture curves were then generated to statistically examine the hypothesis that agents with shared sites of action have dose-response curve (DRC) slopes that are similar when given alone and in combination, and slope and EC(50) values that, when administered together, are consistent with those calculated for dose-addition. For combinations of cofactor-binding agents (semicarbazide, thiosemicarbazide, aminoacetonitrile), slope values were generally similar with additivity quotients near 1.0 (1.0=dose-additive) and combined osteolathyritic effects that were consistent with dose-addition. None of these were true for combinations that included agents that did not show rapid cofactor binding (β-aminopropionitrile, methyleneaminoacetonitrile). The results suggest that DRC analysis could be a useful tool for delineating common or different molecular sites of toxic action and that the approaches used

  6. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to cumulative dose. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 004

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 004) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to cumulative dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in calculation 002. This calculation specifically addresses cumulative radiation doses to infants and adults resulting from releases occurring over the period 1945 through 1972.

  7. Selenium metabolite levels in human urine after dosing selenium in different chemical forms

    SciTech Connect

    Hasunuma, Ryoichi; Tsuda, Morizo; Ogawa, Tadao; Kawanishi, Yasuhiro

    1993-11-01

    It has been well known that selenium in marine fish such as tuna and swordfish protects the toxicity of methylmercury in vivo. The protective potency might depend on the chemical forms of selenium in the meat of marine fish sebastes and sperm whale. Little has been revealed, however, on the chemical forms of selenium in the meat of these animals or the selenium metabolites in urine, because the amount of the element is very scarce. Urine is the major excretory route for selenium. The chemical forms of urinary selenium may reflect the metabolism of the element. We have developed methodology for analysis of selenium-containing components in human urine. Using this method, we have observed the time courses of excretory levels of urinary selenium components after a single dose of selenium as selenious acid, selenomethionine, trimethylselenonium ion or tuna meat. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Countrywide radiation dose in different locations, dwellings and free spaces of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Shyamal Ranjan; Alam, Md Kowsar

    2014-12-01

    The research work was aimed to determine the fatal cancer risk due to the radiation exposure on population of Bangladesh. The total risk is somewhat higher. However, the average total fatal probability coefficient was found to be 101 cases per million people, the range of which was from 78 to 144 per million people. The lowest risk was found for the people of Srimangal (Maulavibazar) and Sandweep, while the risk was highest for the people of Nachole (Chapai Nawabgonj) and Badalgachhi (Naogaon), the two locations are in the Borendra region. The risk factors were found to be around average level for the people of Dhaka, Chittagong and Rajshahi. Since a very significant portion of people of Bangladesh live in these areas, the calculated average risk factor become more meaningful. Moreover, as both the average effective dose equivalents and the population density in Bangladesh are higher than those of the countries compared, the people of Bangladesh are in more risk than those countries.

  9. Effect of low dose levodopa on motor outcome of different types of stroke.

    PubMed

    Masihuzzaman, A M; Uddin, M J; Majumder, S; Barman, K K; Ullah, M A

    2011-10-01

    This case control study interventional study was carried out in Neurology out patient department of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) from January 2004 to June 2005. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of low dose levodopa on motor outcome of patients with stroke both ischaemic and haemorrhagic. A total of 97 patients of stroke confirmed by computerized tomography (CT) scan of brain were included in the study. Of them 51 were treated with levodopa 125mg (L group) and physiotherapy while 46 patients (NL group) were treated only with physiotherapy without levodopa. The patients were followed up every 2 weeks interval for 8 weeks. Motor outcome was measured in Rivermead Mobility Index (RMI). Comparison was made between L & NL group irrespective of stroke types at the end of 4th visit. Also the effect of levodopa was assessed separately in ischaemic & haemorrhaegic stroke. The results of the study showed that the age of stroke patients was 54.70±15.07 years in L group & 58.10±14.69 years in NL group. Ischaemic stroke patients were 72% and haemorrhagic stroke patients were 28%. The mean increase RMI score in L group irrespective of stroke subtypes was 6.9 while in NL group was 3.0. The increase in motor outcome was significantly higher in levodopa group than non-levodopa group (p<0.001). Similarly motor outcome measured in RMI score were significantly better individually in ischaemic & haemorrhagic stroke patients of L group than NL (p<0.001). So, the study result concludes that low dose levodopa improves motor outcome in patient with stroke both ischaemic and haemorrhagic.

  10. Cytoprotective doses of erythropoietin or carbamylated erythropoietin have markedly different procoagulant and vasoactive activities

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Thomas R.; Westenfelder, Christof; Tögel, Florian E.; Yang, Ying; Hu, Zhuma; Swenson, LeAnne; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; d’Uscio, Livius V.; Katusic, Zvonimir S.; Ghezzi, Pietro; Zanetti, Adriana; Kaushansky, Kenneth; Fox, Norma E.; Cerami, Anthony; Brines, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) is receiving increasing attention as a potential therapy for prevention of injury and restoration of function in nonhematopoietic tissues. However, the minimum effective dose required to mimic and augment these normal paracrine functions of erythropoietin (EPO) in some organs (e.g., the brain) is higher than for treatment of anemia. Notably, a dose-dependent risk of adverse effects has been associated with rhEPO administration, especially in high-risk groups, including polycythemia–hyperviscosity syndrome, hypertension, and vascular thrombosis. Of note, several clinical trials employing relatively high dosages of rhEPO in oncology patients were recently halted after an increase in mortality and morbidity, primarily because of thrombotic events. We recently identified a heteromeric EPO receptor complex that mediates tissue protection and is distinct from the homodimeric receptor responsible for the support of erythropoiesis. Moreover, we developed receptor-selective ligands that provide tools to assess which receptor isoform mediates which biological consequence of rhEPO therapy. Here, we demonstrate that rhEPO administration in the rat increases systemic blood pressure, reduces regional renal blood flow, and increases platelet counts and procoagulant activities. In contrast, carbamylated rhEPO, a heteromeric receptor-specific ligand that is fully tissue protective, increases renal blood flow, promotes sodium excretion, reduces injury-induced elevation in procoagulant activity, and does not effect platelet production. These preclinical findings suggest that nonerythropoietic tissue-protective ligands, which appear to elicit fewer adverse effects, may be especially useful in clinical settings for tissue protection. PMID:16585502

  11. Assessment of Mean Glandular Dose in Mammography System with Different Anode-Filter Combinations Using MCNP Code

    PubMed Central

    Gholamkar, Lida; Mowlavi, Ali Asghar; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Athari, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    Background X-ray mammography is one of the general methods for early detection of breast cancer. Since glandular tissue in the breast is sensitive to radiation and it increases the risk of cancer, the given dose to the patient is very important in mammography. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the average absorbed dose of X-ray radiation in the glandular tissue of the breast during mammography examinations as well as investigating factors that influence the mean glandular dose (MGD). One of the precise methods for determination of MGD absorbed by the breast is Monte Carlo simulation method which is widely used to assess the dose. Materials and Methods We studied some different X-ray sources and exposure factors that affect the MGD. “Midi-future” digital mammography system with amorphous-selenium detector was simulated using the Monte Carlo N-particle extended (MCNPX) code. Different anode/filter combinations such as tungsten/silver (W/Ag), tungsten/rhodium (W/Rh), and rhodium/aluminium (Rh/Al) were simulated in this study. The voltage of X-ray tube ranged from 24 kV to 32 kV with 2 kV intervals and the breast phantom thickness ranged from 3 to 8 cm, and glandular fraction g varied from 10% to 100%. Results MGD was measured for different anode/filter combinations and the effects of changing tube voltage, phantom thickness, combination and glandular breast tissue on MGD were studied. As glandular g and X-ray tube voltage increased, the breast dose increased too, and the increase of breast phantom thickness led to the decrease of MGD. The obtained results for MGD were consistent with the result of Boone et al. that was previously reported. Conclusion By comparing the results, we saw that W/Rh anode/filter combination is the best choice in breast mammography imaging because of the lowest delivered dose in comparison with W/Ag and Rh/Al. Moreover, breast thickness and g value have significant effects on MGD. PMID:27895876

  12. Comparison of the effect of two different doses of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine on immunogenicity in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yao, Jun; Shan, Huan; Chen, Yongdi; Jiang, Zheng-gang; Ren, Jing-jing; Xu, Kai-jin; Ruan, Bing; Yang, Shi-gui; Wang, Bing; Xie, Tian-sheng; Li, Qian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the one-month immune response to 2 different doses (10 and 20 μg) of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine in adults aged 20-46 y. Subjects who were negative for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B antibody (anti-HBs), and hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) were recruited. The participants were divided into 2 groups: group I received 3 doses of 10 μg hepatitis B vaccine at 0, 1 and 3 months, and group II received 3 doses of 20 μg at the same time points. The anti-HBs levels were measured one month after the third vaccination. Among 739 subjects, 62 (9.70%) were positive for HBsAg, and 317 subjects were eligible. The anti-HBs seroprotection rates (anti-HBs ≥ 10 mIU/mL was considered to indicate seroprotection) after the third vaccination were 88.05% and 94.06% in group I and group II respectively, and the geometric mean titers were 91.69 and 290.23 mIU/mL respectively. The difference in the seroprotection rate was not significant (χ(2) = 2.566, P > 0.05), but the GMT after the third dose was significantly lower for group I than for group II (F = 20.587, P < 0.05). Better responses were observed in young adults, especially in group I. In group I, the seroprotection rate and GMT were significantly higher in the 20-35 y group than in the 36-46 y group (P < 0.05); there was no significant difference compared to group II (P > 0.05). The hepatitis B vaccine has good immunological effect; the 20 μg dose can be used in adults aged 20-46 y and the 10 μg dose can be used in subjects aged 20-35 years, and it should be tested on a larger number of subjects before recommending it for adult routine vaccination.

  13. Defining Dose across Different Experimental Designs: Fiber Equivalent Diameter and Surface Area

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhaled fibers (elongated bio-durable particles) of all lengths have been shown to induce pathological responses, but different sizes are respirable in different species. To be able to accurately assess the health effects observed in toxicological or epidemiological studies,...

  14. Protection of Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) from tuberculosis after intra-muscular vaccination with different doses of BCG.

    PubMed

    Lesellier, Sandrine; Palmer, Si; Gowtage-Sequiera, Sonya; Ashford, Roland; Dalley, Deanna; Davé, Dipesh; Weyer, Ute; Salguero, F Javier; Nunez, Alejandro; Crawshaw, Timothy; Corner, Leigh A L; Hewinson, R Glyn; Chambers, Mark A

    2011-05-12

    Mycobacterium bovis infection is widespread in Eurasian badger (Meles meles) populations in Great Britain and the Republic of Ireland where they act as a wildlife reservoir of infection for cattle. Removal of infected badgers can significantly reduce the incidence of bovine tuberculosis (TB) in local cattle herds. However, control measures based on culling of native wildlife are contentious and may even be detrimental to disease control. Vaccinating badgers with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been shown to be efficacious against experimentally induced TB of badgers when administered subcutaneously and orally. Vaccination may be an alternative or complementary strategy to other disease control measures. As the subcutaneous route is impractical for vaccinating wild badgers and an oral vaccine bait formulation is currently unavailable, we evaluated the intramuscular (IM) route of BCG administration. It has been demonstrated that the IM route is safe in badgers. IM administration has the practical advantage of being relatively easy to perform on trapped wild badgers without recourse to chemical immobilisation. We report the evaluation of the efficacy of IM administration of BCG Danish strain 1331 at two different doses: the dose prescribed for adult humans (2-8×10(5)colony forming units) and a 10-fold higher dose. Vaccination generated a dose-dependent cell-mediated immune response characterised by the production of interferon-γ (IFNγ) and protection against endobronchial challenge with virulent M. bovis. Protection, expressed in terms of a significant reduction in the severity of disease, the number of tissues containing acid-fast bacilli, and reduced bacterial excretion was statistically significant with the higher dose only.

  15. In vitro gas production of foliage from three browse tree species treated with different dose levels of exogenous fibrolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    López, D; Vázquez-Armijo, J F; López-Villalobos, N; Lee-Rangel, H A; Salem, A Z M; Borquez-Gastelum, J L; Domínguez-Vara, I A; Rojo-Rubio, R

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different dose levels of exogenous fibrolytic enzymes (EFE) on in vitro ruminal fermentation kinetics and energy utilization of foliages from three browse trees (Pithecellobium dulce, Heliocarpus velutinus and Guazuma ulmifolia). Mixture of EFE product was added to the leaves of the three browse tree species at three dose levels: 0 (control), 3.5 and 7.0 mg/g of DM. Chemical composition of the foliages, including plant secondary metabolites such as total phenolics (TP), saponins (SAP) and aqueous fraction (AF), was determined. In addition, in vitro assaying of ruminal gas production kinetics was determined for the three browse three foliages treated with EFE. P. dulce had the highest crude protein content (p < 0.05), whereas G. ulmifolia had the highest content of neutral detergent fibre and SAP (p < 0.05) and H. velutinus had the lowest content of TP (p < 0.05). The interaction between tree species and dose level of EFE was significant (p < 0.05) for gas production (GP) at 24 h of incubation, parameters b and c of the accumulated GP curve, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and metabolizable energy (ME). The lowest (p < 0.01) extent of accumulated GP as well as the b and c values occurred in G. ulmifolia at 0 mg EFE/g DM. P. dulce had the highest (p < 0.05) values for ME and SCFA at the highest dose of EFE. Tree species and dose level had significant (p < 0.05) effects on all parameters describing in vitro ruminal fermentation kinetics and energy utilization. Addition of EFE improved the fermentation kinetics of the browse species considered in this study.

  16. SU-E-J-11: Measurement of Eye Lens Dose for Varian On-Board Imaging with Different CBCT Acquisition Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, S; Dhote, D; Kumar, R; Thakur, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure actual patient eye lens dose for different cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquisition protocol of Varian’s On Board Imagining (OBI) system using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dosimeter and study the eye lens dose with patient geometry and distance of isocenter to the eye lens Methods: OSL dosimeter was used to measure eye lens dose of patient. OSL dosimeter was placed on patient forehead center during CBCT image acquisition to measure eye lens dose. For three different cone beam acquisition protocol (standard dose head, low dose head and high quality head) of Varian On-Board Imaging, eye lens doses were measured. Measured doses were correlated with patient geometry and distance between isocenter to eye lens. Results: Measured eye lens dose for standard dose head was in the range of 1.8 mGy to 3.2 mGy, for high quality head protocol dose was in range of 4.5mGy to 9.9 mGy whereas for low dose head was in the range of 0.3mGy to 0.7mGy. Dose to eye lens is depends upon position of isocenter. For posterioraly located tumor eye lens dose is less. Conclusion: From measured doses it can be concluded that by proper selection of imagining protocol and frequency of imaging, it is possible to restrict the eye lens dose below the new limit set by ICRP. However, undoubted advantages of imaging system should be counter balanced by careful consideration of imaging protocol especially for very intense imaging sequences for Adoptive Radiotherapy or IMRT.

  17. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  18. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 0.50 x 10^9/L. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results. The example above shows the common measurements for results of these tests. Some laboratories use ...

  19. Spectral studies of photomodification of blood by therapeutic doses of optical radiation at different wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Maslova, T. O.

    2011-02-01

    We analyze changes in electronic and IR absorption spectra of samples of blood and its components, in the fluorescence spectra of plasma, as well as in the gas composition of blood, the hemoglobin concentration, and acid-base balance indices, upon the irradiation of blood by therapeutic doses of optical radiation at 254, 632.8, 670, and 806 nm. We show that the irradiation of blood by radiation at these wavelengths initiates similar molecular changes in blood and its components and that monochromatic incoherent light acts equally as efficiently as laser radiation. We find that, if the blood irradiation wavelength is in the range of the absorption bands of hemoglobin, the hemoglobin acts as a primary photoacceptor and that the dissociation of hemoglobin complexes with ligands directly in erythrocytes is a primary photoprocess. We conclude that the photomodification of blood should be attributed to therapeutic methods capable of controlling the balance between the production of active forms of oxygen and their inhibition by antioxidant systems of the organism.

  20. Different behavioral effect dose-response profiles in mice exposed to two-carbon chlorinated hydrocarbons: influence of structural and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Umezu, Toyoshi; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to clarify whether dose-response profiles of acute behavioral effects of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCE), trichloroethylene (TRIC), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC) differ. A test battery involving 6 behavioral endpoints was applied to evaluate the effects of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC in male ICR strain mice under the same experimental conditions. The behavioral effect dose-response profiles of these compounds differed. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the dose-response profiles and structural and physical properties of the compounds. Dose-response profile differences correlated significantly with differences in specific structural and physical properties. These results suggest that differences in specific structural and physical properties of DCE, TCE, TRIC, and PERC are responsible for differences in behavioral effects that lead to a variety of dose-response profiles.

  1. In Vivo Imaging of Differences in Early Donor Cell Proliferation in Graft-Versus-Host Disease Hosts with Different Pre-Conditioning Doses

    PubMed Central

    Song, Myung Geun; Kang, Bora; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Chang, Jun; Lee, Seungbok; Min, Chang-Ki; Youn, Hyewon; Choi, Eun Young

    2012-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) results from immune-mediated attacks on recipient tissues by donor-originated cells through the recognition of incompatible antigens expressed on host cells. The pre-conditioning irradiation dose is a risk factor influencing GVHD severity. In this study, using newly generated luciferase transgenic mice on a B6 background (B6.LucTg) as bone marrow and splenocyte donors, we explored the effects of irradiation doses on donor cell dynamics in major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-matched allogeneic GVHD hosts via bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Results from BLI of GVHD hosts showed higher emission intensities of luminescence signals from hosts irradiated with 900 cGy as compared with those irradiated with 400 cGy. In particular, BLI signals from target organs, such as the spleen, liver, and lung, and several different lymph nodes fluctuated with similar time kinetics soon after transplantation, reflecting the synchronous proliferation of donor cells in the different organs in hosts irradiated with 900 cGy. The kinetic curves of the BLI signals were not synchronized between the target organs and the secondary organs in hosts irradiated with 400 cGy. These results demonstrate that pre-conditioning doses influence the kinetics and degree of proliferation in the target organs soon after transplantation. The results from this study are the first describing donor cell dynamics in MHC-matched allogeneic GVHD hosts and the influence of irradiation doses on proliferation dynamics, and will provide spatiotemporal information to help understand GVHD pathophysiology. PMID:22228184

  2. Six iterative reconstruction algorithms in brain CT: a phantom study on image quality at different radiation dose levels

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, M-L; Siemund, R; Stålhammar, F; Björkman-Burtscher, I M; Söderberg, M

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the image quality produced by six different iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms in four CT systems in the setting of brain CT, using different radiation dose levels and iterative image optimisation levels. Methods: An image quality phantom, supplied with a bone mimicking annulus, was examined using four CT systems from different vendors and four radiation dose levels. Acquisitions were reconstructed using conventional filtered back-projection (FBP), three levels of statistical IR and, when available, a model-based IR algorithm. The evaluated image quality parameters were CT numbers, uniformity, noise, noise-power spectra, low-contrast resolution and spatial resolution. Results: Compared with FBP, noise reduction was achieved by all six IR algorithms at all radiation dose levels, with further improvement seen at higher IR levels. Noise-power spectra revealed changes in noise distribution relative to the FBP for most statistical IR algorithms, especially the two model-based IR algorithms. Compared with FBP, variable degrees of improvements were seen in both objective and subjective low-contrast resolutions for all IR algorithms. Spatial resolution was improved with both model-based IR algorithms and one of the statistical IR algorithms. Conclusion: The four statistical IR algorithms evaluated in the study all improved the general image quality compared with FBP, with improvement seen for most or all evaluated quality criteria. Further improvement was achieved with one of the model-based IR algorithms. Advances in knowledge: The six evaluated IR algorithms all improve the image quality in brain CT but show different strengths and weaknesses. PMID:24049128

  3. Estimating radiation doses from multidetector CT using Monte Carlo simulations: effects of different size voxelized patient models on magnitudes of organ and effective dose.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, J J; Cagnon, C H; Cody, D D; Stevens, D M; McCollough, C H; Zankl, M; Angel, E; McNitt-Gray, M F

    2007-05-07

    The purpose of this work is to examine the effects of patient size on radiation dose from CT scans. To perform these investigations, we used Monte Carlo simulation methods with detailed models of both patients and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. A family of three-dimensional, voxelized patient models previously developed and validated by the GSF was implemented as input files using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. These patient models represent a range of patient sizes and ages (8 weeks to 48 years) and have all radiosensitive organs previously identified and segmented, allowing the estimation of dose to any individual organ and calculation of patient effective dose. To estimate radiation dose, every voxel in each patient model was assigned both a specific organ index number and an elemental composition and mass density. Simulated CT scans of each voxelized patient model were performed using a previously developed MDCT source model that includes scanner specific spectra, including bowtie filter, scanner geometry and helical source path. The scan simulations in this work include a whole-body scan protocol and a thoracic CT scan protocol, each performed with fixed tube current. The whole-body scan simulation yielded a predictable decrease in effective dose as a function of increasing patient weight. Results from analysis of individual organs demonstrated similar trends, but with some individual variations. A comparison with a conventional dose estimation method using the ImPACT spreadsheet yielded an effective dose of 0.14 mSv mAs(-1) for the whole-body scan. This result is lower than the simulations on the voxelized model designated 'Irene' (0.15 mSv mAs(-1)) and higher than the models 'Donna' and 'Golem' (0.12 mSv mAs(-1)). For the thoracic scan protocol, the ImPACT spreadsheet estimates an effective dose of 0.037 mSv mAs(-1), which falls between the calculated values for Irene (0.042 mSv mAs(-1)) and Donna (0.031 mSv mAs(-1)) and is higher relative

  4. Comparison of Effects of Different Dexmedetomidine and Chloral Hydrate Doses Used in Sedation on Electroencephalography in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Gumus, Hakan; Bayram, Ayşe Kacar; Poyrazoglu, Hatice Gamze; Canpolat, Dilek Gunay; Per, Huseyin; Canpolat, Mehmet; Yildiz, Karamehmet; Kumandas, Sefer

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of different oral chloral hydrate and dexmedetomidine doses used for sedation during electroencephalography (EEG) in children. One hundred sixty children aged 1 to 9 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II who were uncooperative during EEG recording or who were referred to our electrodiagnostic unit for sleep EEG were included to the study. The patients were randomly assigned into 4 groups. In groups D1 and D2, patients received oral dexmedetomidine doses of 2 and 3 µg/kg, respectively. In group C1 and C2, patients received oral chloral hydrate doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg, respectively. The induction time was significantly shorter in group C2 compared with other groups (P = .000). The rate of adverse effects was significantly higher in group C2 compared with the dexmedetomidine groups (D1 and D2; P = .004). In conclusion, dexmedetomidine can be used safely for sedation during EEG in children.

  5. Pharmacokinetic differences between chlorofluorocarbon and chlorofluorocarbon-free metered dose inhalers of beclomethasone dipropionate in adult asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Harrison, L I; Soria, I; Cline, A C; Ekholm, B P

    1999-11-01

    We have compared the serum pharmacokinetics of the metabolites of beclomethasone dipropionate after inhalation from chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrofluoroalkane HFA-134a (HFA) formulations in asthmatic patients. Twenty-three patients completed this open-label, randomized, single-dose, three-period crossover study. Each patient received in separate periods 200 microg or 400 microg HFA-beclomethasone dipropionate, or 400 microg CFC-beclomethasone dipropionate. Venous blood samples were collected over 24 h for the determination of beclomethasone esters and beclomethasone in the serum. Significant differences in pharmacokinetics following HFA- and CFC-beclomethasone dipropionate were observed. Following a 400 microg beclomethasone dipropionate dose, the HFA formulation gave mean maximum concentrations (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC) values of beclomethasone esters of 1153 pg mL(-1) and 4328 pg h mL(-1), respectively, and beclomethasone Cmax and AUC values of 69 pg mL(-1) and 682 pg h mL(-1), respectively. These values were approximately 2-3-fold those seen with the CFC formulation (beclomethasone esters Cmax and AUC of 380 pg mL(-1) and 1764 pg h mL(-1), respectively; beclomethasone Cmax and AUC of 41 pg ml(-1) and 366 pg h mL(-1), respectively). Beclomethasone esters, the major component of beclomethasone dipropionate in the serum, peaked significantly earlier for the HFA formulation (0.8 h) than for the CFC formulation (2 h). Tests for dose proportionality of beclomethasone esters pharmacokinetics following HFA-beclomethasone dipropionate showed that the two hydrofluoroalkane strengths were proportional. The more rapid and greater efficiency of systemic drug delivery of the HFA formulation compared with the CFC formulation can be explained if most of each inhalation from CFC-beclomethasone dipropionate is swallowed and absorbed orally, whereas most of each inhalation from HFA-beclomethasone dipropionate is absorbed through the lungs. There is a need for

  6. Gender Differences in Predictors of Treatment Attrition with High Dose Naltrexone in Cocaine and Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jesse J.; Pettinati, Helen M.; Kampman, Kyle M.; O’Brien, Charles P.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, we reported that naltrexone at 150mg/day significantly decreased cocaine and alcohol use for men, but not women with co-occurring cocaine and alcohol dependence. The present study is an exploratory investigation of predictors that explain the different gender response to naltrexone, with a particular focus on differential predictors of treatment attrition. No significant predictors were associated with treatment discontinuation in men. Women, however, were more likely to discontinue treatment when reporting severe pre-treatment psychiatric problems, or nausea while in treatment. Further research on the impact of pre-treatment and in-treatment gender differences with naltrexone is warranted. PMID:19034737

  7. Electronic brachytherapy for superficial and nodular basal cell carcinoma: a report of two prospective pilot trials using different doses

    PubMed Central

    Pons-Llanas, Olga; Candela-Juan, Cristian; Celada-Álvarez, Francisco Javier; Barker, Christopher A.; Tormo-Micó, Alejandro; Pérez-Calatayud, Jose; Botella-Estrada, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a very common cancer in the Caucasian population. Treatment aims to eradicate the tumor with the lowest possible functional and aesthetic impact. Electronic brachytherapy (EBT) is a treatment technique currently emerging. This study aims to show the outcomes of two consecutive prospective pilot clinical trials using different radiation doses of EBT with Esteya® EB system for the treatment of superficial and nodular basal cell carcinoma. Material and methods Two prospective, single-center, non-randomized, pilot studies were conducted. Twenty patients were treated in each study with different doses. The first group (1) was treated with 36.6 Gy in 6 fractions of 6.1 Gy, and the second group (2) with 42 Gy in 6 fractions of 7 Gy. Cure rate, acute toxicity, and late toxicity related to cosmesis were analyzed in the two treatment groups. Results In group 1, a complete response in 90% of cases was observed at the first year of follow-up, whereas in group 2, the complete response was 95%. The differences with reference to acute toxicity and the cosmetic results between the two treatment groups were not statistically significant. Conclusions Our initial experience with Esteya® EB system to treat superficial and nodular BCC shows that a dose of 36.6 Gy and 42 Gy delivered in 6 fraction of 7 Gy achieves a 90% and 95% clinical cure rate at 1 year, respectively. Both groups had a tolerable toxicity and a very good cosmesis. The role of EBT in the treatment of BCC is still to be defined. It will probably become an established option for selected patients in the near future. PMID:26985197

  8. Different doses of prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in people with haematological disorders after myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Stanworth, Simon; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Blanco, Patricia; Murphy, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Background Platelet transfusions are used in modern clinical practice to prevent and treat bleeding in people who are thrombocytopenic due to bone marrow failure. Although considerable advances have been made in platelet transfusion therapy in the last 40 years, some areas continue to provoke debate, especially concerning the use of prophylactic platelet transfusions for the prevention of thrombocytopenic bleeding. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2004, and updated in 2012 that addressed four separate questions: prophylactic versus therapeutic-only platelet transfusion policy; prophylactic platelet transfusion threshold; prophylactic platelet transfusion dose; and platelet transfusions compared to alternative treatments. This review has now been split into four smaller reviews; this review compares different platelet transfusion doses. Objectives To determine whether different doses of prophylactic platelet transfusions (platelet transfusions given to prevent bleeding) affect their efficacy and safety in preventing bleeding in people with haematological disorders undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy with or without haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 6), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1950), and ongoing trial databases to 23 July 2015. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials involving transfusions of platelet concentrates, prepared either from individual units of whole blood or by apheresis, and given to prevent bleeding in people with malignant haematological disorders or undergoing HSCT that compared different platelet component doses (low dose 1.1 × 1011/m2 ± 25%, standard dose 2.2 × 1011/m2 ± 25%, high dose 4.4 × 1011/m2 ± 25%). Data collection and analysis We used the standard

  9. Morphological differences in the response of mouse small intestine to radiobiologically equivalent doses of X and neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, K.E.; Hamlet, R.; Nias, A.H.; Watt, C.

    1984-01-01

    A scale has been developed to describe the effects of radiation on small intestinal villi. The scale has been used to compare the damage done to the villi in the period 0-5 days after irradiation by X-irradiation or neutron irradiation, using 10 Gy X-rays and 5 Gy neutrons, doses which are radiobiologically equivalent when assessed by the microcolony assay method. Use of the scale indicates that the damage done to the villi by neutrons is greater than that produced by X-rays. This has implications for the interpretation of radiobiological equivalent doses (R.B.E.). Resin light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (T.E.M.) have also been used to examine small intestinal damage after 10 Gy X-irradiation and 5 Gy neutron irradiation. Differences include variations in crypt shape, mitotic activity and the proportion of crypts which are heavily parasitised. As well as the differences in villous shape which have been reflected in the different values on the scoring system, there are also variations in the response of the constituent cells of the epithelial compartment of the villi. In general, the effect of the neutron irradiation is more severe than that of the X-rays, particularly as would be suggested by a simple quantitation of crypt regeneration.

  10. Database applicaton for absolute spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, Valery V.; Shumko, Sergiy

    2002-12-01

    32-bit database application with multidocument interface for Windows has been developed to calculate absolute energy distributions of observed spectra. The original database contains wavelength calibrated observed spectra which had been already passed through apparatus reductions such as flatfielding, background and apparatus noise subtracting. Absolute energy distributions of observed spectra are defined in unique scale by means of registering them simultaneously with artificial intensity standard. Observations of sequence of spectrophotometric standards are used to define absolute energy of the artificial standard. Observations of spectrophotometric standards are used to define optical extinction in selected moments. FFT algorithm implemented in the application allows performing convolution (deconvolution) spectra with user-defined PSF. The object-oriented interface has been created using facilities of C++ libraries. Client/server model with Windows Socket functionality based on TCP/IP protocol is used to develop the application. It supports Dynamic Data Exchange conversation in server mode and uses Microsoft Exchange communication facilities.

  11. The Effects of Different Doses of Ketamine on Quality of Normal Ejaculated Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Absalan, Forouzan; Ghannadi, Alireza; Zabihi, Abdollah

    2014-01-01

    Background Ketamine, an injectable anesthetic in human and animal medicine, is also a recreational drug used by young adults. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of ketamine on membrane integrity, DNA fragmentation and sperm parameters in humans. Materials and Methods This prospective study was conducted on 40 males with normal semen samples over one month (August 2012). Subjects were randomly allocated to four groups (Control and case I, II and III) whose semen samples were adjusted to different concentrations of ketamine (1, 3, 5 µL) for one hour. Sperm analysis was performed for routine parameters, motility and morphology. Evaluation of membrane integrity and DNA fragmentation was done by eosin-Y staining and the sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) test, respectively. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey’s tests. P≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Total sperm motility in all case groups were significantly lower compared with the control group. In case group III, progressive motility showed significant difference with case group II. After addition of ketamine, sperm had evidence of coiled tails in all case groups compared to the control group however this observation was not significant. Evaluation of membrane integrity showed the rate of necrospermia increased in all case groups. However, ketamine only significantly affected membrane integrity in case group III. SCD staining showed that in the control group nucleoids with medium halos (63.44 ± 1.2) were significantly different compared to the case groups I (15.44 ± 0.45), II (9.05±1.16) and III (10.55 ± 1.14), respectively. Between case groups, nucleoids with large and medium halos showed significant differences in case groups II and III compared with case group I. Nucleoids with medium halos were significantly different between case groups II and III. Conclusion Ketamine, through its effect on membrane integrity and DNA fragmentation, decreased sperm viability

  12. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT): differences in target volumes and improvement in clinically relevant doses to small bowel in rectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A strong dose-volume relationship exists between the amount of small bowel receiving low- to intermediate-doses of radiation and the rates of acute, severe gastrointestinal toxicity, principally diarrhea. There is considerable interest in the application of highly conformal treatment approaches, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), to reduce dose to adjacent organs-at-risk in the treatment of carcinoma of the rectum. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive dosimetric evaluation of IMRT compared to 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in standard, preoperative treatment for rectal cancer. Methods Using RTOG consensus anorectal contouring guidelines, treatment volumes were generated for ten patients treated preoperatively at our institution for rectal carcinoma, with IMRT plans compared to plans derived from classic anatomic landmarks, as well as 3DCRT plans treating the RTOG consensus volume. The patients were all T3, were node-negative (N = 1) or node-positive (N = 9), and were planned to a total dose of 45-Gy. Pairwise comparisons were made between IMRT and 3DCRT plans with respect to dose-volume histogram parameters. Results IMRT plans had superior PTV coverage, dose homogeneity, and conformality in treatment of the gross disease and at-risk nodal volume, in comparison to 3DCRT. Additionally, in comparison to the 3DCRT plans, IMRT achieved a concomitant reduction in doses to the bowel (small bowel mean dose: 18.6-Gy IMRT versus 25.2-Gy 3DCRT; p = 0.005), bladder (V40Gy: 56.8% IMRT versus 75.4% 3DCRT; p = 0.005), pelvic bones (V40Gy: 47.0% IMRT versus 56.9% 3DCRT; p = 0.005), and femoral heads (V40Gy: 3.4% IMRT versus 9.1% 3DCRT; p = 0.005), with an improvement in absolute volumes of small bowel receiving dose levels known to induce clinically-relevant acute toxicity (small bowel V15Gy: 138-cc IMRT versus 157-cc 3DCRT; p = 0.005). We found that the IMRT treatment volumes were typically larger than that covered by classic

  13. Absolute classification with unsupervised clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An absolute classification algorithm is proposed in which the class definition through training samples or otherwise is required only for a particular class of interest. The absolute classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering when one cluster is known initially. The definitions and statistics of the other classes are automatically developed through the weighted unsupervised clustering procedure, which is developed to keep the cluster corresponding to the class of interest from losing its identity as the class of interest. Once all the classes are developed, a conventional relative classifier such as the maximum-likelihood classifier is used in the classification.

  14. Sex differences in Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol metabolism and in vivo pharmacology following acute and repeated dosing in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jenny L; Burston, James J

    2014-07-25

    Mechanisms that may underlie age and sex differences in the pharmacological effects of cannabinoids are relatively unexplored. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether sex differences in metabolism of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), similar to those observed previously in adult rats, also occurred in adolescent rats and might contribute to age and sex differences in its in vivo pharmacology. Male and female adolescent rats were exposed to THC acutely or repeatedly for 10 days. Subsequently, some of the rats were sacrificed and blood and brain levels of THC and one of its metabolites, 11-hydroxy-Δ(9)-THC (11-OH-THC), were measured. Other rats were evaluated in a battery of in vivo tests that are sensitive to cannabinoids. Concentrations of 11-OH-THC in the brains of female adult and adolescent rats exceeded those observed in male conspecifics, particularly after repeated THC administration. In contrast, brain levels of THC did not differ between the sexes. In vivo, acute THC produced dose-related hypothermia, catalepsy and suppression of locomotion in adolescent rats of both sexes, with tolerance developing after repeated administration. With a minor exception, sex differences in THC's effects in the in vivo assays were not apparent. Together with previous findings, the present results suggest that sex differences in pharmacokinetics cannot fully explain the patterns of sex differences (and lack of sex differences) in cannabinoid effects across behaviors. Hormonal and/or pharmacodynamic factors are also likely to play a role.

  15. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  16. Mercury demethylation in waterbird livers: Dose-response thresholds and differences among species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eagles-Smith, C. A.; Ackerman, J.T.; Julie, Y.E.E.; Adelsbach, T.L.

    2009-01-01

    We assessed methylmercury (MeHg) demethylation in the livers of adults and chicks of four waterbird species that commonly breed in San Francisco Bay: American avocets, black-necked stilts, Caspian terns, and Forster's terns. In adults (all species combined), we found strong evidence for a threshold, model where MeHg demethylation occurred above a hepatic total mercury concentration threshold of 8.51 ?? 0.93 ??g/g dry weight, and there was a strong decline in %MeHg values as total mercury (THg) concentrations increased above 8.51 ??g/g dry weight. Conversely, there was no evidence for a demethylation threshold in chicks, and we found that %MeHg values declined linearly with increasing THg concentrations. For adults, we also found taxonomie differences in the demethylation responses, with avocets and stilts showing a higher demethylation rate than that of terns when concentrations exceeded the threshold, whereas terns had a lower demethylation threshold (7.48 ?? 1.48 ??g/g dry wt) than that of avocets and stilts (9.91 ?? 1.29 ??g/g dry wt). Finally, we assessed the role of selenium (Se) in the demethylation process. Selenium concentrations were positively correlated with inorganic Hg in livers of birds above the demethylation threshold but not below. This suggests that Se may act as a binding site for demethylated Hg and may reduce the potential for secondary toxicity. Our findings indicate that waterbirds demethylate mercury in their livers if exposure exceeds a threshold value and suggest that taxonomie differences in demethylation ability may be an important factor in evaluating species-specific risk to MeHg exposure. Further, we provide strong evidence for a threshold of approximately 8.5 ??g/g dry weight of THg in the liver where demethylation is initiated. ?? 2009 SETAC.

  17. Bortezomib cumulative dose, efficacy, and tolerability with three different bortezomib-melphalan-prednisone regimens in previously untreated myeloma patients ineligible for high-dose therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mateos, María-Victoria; Bringhen, Sara; Richardson, Paul G.; Lahuerta, Juan Jose; Larocca, Alessandra; Oriol, Albert; Boccadoro, Mario; García-Sanz, Ramón; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Esseltine, Dixie-Lee; van de Velde, Helgi; Desai, Avinash; Londhe, Anil; San Miguel, Jesús F.; Palumbo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Substantial efficacy has been demonstrated with bortezomib-melphalan-prednisone in phase III studies in transplant-ineligible myeloma patients using various twice-weekly and once-weekly bortezomib dosing schedules. In VISTA, the regimen comprised four 6-week twice-weekly cycles, plus five 6-week once-weekly cycles. In the GIMEMA MM-03-05 study, the bortezomib-melphalan-prednisone regimen was either per VISTA (‘GIMEMA twice-weekly’), or comprised nine 5-week once-weekly cycles (‘GIMEMA once-weekly’). In the GEM2005MAS65 study, the regimen comprised one 6-week twice-weekly cycle, plus five 5-week once-weekly cycles. We evaluated the cumulative bortezomib dose administered during bortezomib-melphalan-prednisone, as well as efficacy and tolerability, using patient-level study data. Over all bortezomib-melphalan-prednisone cycles (nine in VISTA/GIMEMA; six in GEM2005MAS65), the median cumulative bortezomib dose administered was 38.5, 42.1, 40.3, and 32.9 mg/m2 in VISTA, GIMEMA twice-weekly, GIMEMA once-weekly, and GEM2005MAS65, respectively, and the respective proportions of planned bortezomib dose actually delivered were 57.0%, 62.3%, 86.1%, and 90.4%. Response rates following bortezomib-melphalan-prednisone were 74–87% and appeared generally similar between studies. Three-year survival rates were 67.9–75.7% across studies. Grade 3/4 peripheral neuropathy rates were 13% in VISTA and 14% in GIMEMA twice-weekly, but were lower at 2% in GIMEMA once-weekly and 7% in GEM2005MAS65. Discontinuations and bortezomib dose reductions due to peripheral neuropathy were reduced in GIMEMA once-weekly versus VISTA and GIMEMA twice-weekly. Exclusive or predominant use of once-weekly bortezomib dosing in GIMEMA once-weekly and GEM2005MAS65 resulted in high efficacy, comparable with that demonstrated in VISTA, and similar cumulative bortezomib dose with reduced toxicity. Trials are registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: VISTA (Identifier:00111319), GIMEMA MM-03-05 (Identifier

  18. Determination of dose distributions and parameter sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Farris, W.T.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 005) examined the contributions of numerous parameters to the uncertainty distribution of doses calculated for environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow's milk and the third scoping study, which added additional pathways. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from Feeding Regime 1 as described in Calculation 001.

  19. Annealing behaviors of residual defects in high-dose BF +2-implanted (001)Si under different implantation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, C. H.; Tsai, E. L.; Chao, W. Y.; Chen, L. J.

    1991-04-01

    The annealing behavior of residual defects in high-dose BF +2-implanted (001)Si under different implantation conditions has been studied by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and four-point probe sheet resistance measurements. Three kinds of samples were prepared with different implanters. M, MC and H samples were implanted with 80 keV, 4×10 15/cm 2 BF +2 in a medium-current implanter without deliberate end-station cooling, a medium-current implanter with a freon-cooled end station, and a high-current implanter with a water-cooled end station, respectively. The BF +2 ion dissociation effects were revealed by the comparison of M or MC and H samples. Rod-like and equi-axial dislocation loops beneath the original a/c interface were observed in the M and MC samples. The dopant activation of the annealed samples was found to correlate well with microstructural changes.

  20. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  1. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  2. Absolute Standards for Climate Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, J.

    2016-10-01

    In a world of changing climate, political uncertainty, and ever-changing budgets, the benefit of measurements traceable to SI standards increases by the day. To truly resolve climate change trends on a decadal time scale, on-orbit measurements need to be referenced to something that is both absolute and unchanging. One such mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to definitively quantify climate change. In the CLARREO mission, we will utilize phase change cells in which a material is melted to calibrate the temperature of a blackbody that can then be observed by a spectrometer. A material's melting point is an unchanging physical constant that, through a series of transfers, can ultimately calibrate a spectrometer on an absolute scale. CLARREO consists of two primary instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer and a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy to calibrate other space-based instrumentation and thus transferring the absolute traceability. The status of various mission options will be presented.

  3. Comparative study between 2 different doses of pregabalin and lidocaine on pain following propofol injection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eunkyung; Kim, Donggyeong; Jeon, Younghoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Propofol, an intravenous anesthetic, often causes pain on injection, which can be very distressful to patients. We investigated the analgesic effect of pregabalin on pain following propofol injection, compared with lidocaine. Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, prospective trial, 120 patients were randomized into 3 groups of 40 each; who received oral placebo and intravenous lidocaine 40 mg with venous occlusion for 1 minute (group L, n = 40), oral pregabalin 75 mg and intravenous normal saline with venous occlusion for 1 minute (group LP, n = 40), and oral pregabalin 150 mg and intravenous normal saline with venous occlusion for 1 minute (group HP, n = 40) as pretreatment, followed by administration of 1% propofol 0.5 mg/kg. Pain intensity was measured on a 4-point scale (0 = no, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, and 3 = severe pain). Any side effects associated with pretreatment substances were recorded during the first 24 hours after surgery. Results: A total of 120 patients completed this trial. Demographic data were similar between groups. The incidence of pain following propofol injection was significantly reduced in group HP (50%) and group L (55%) compared with group LP (92.5%) (P < 0.05, respectively). The incidences of moderate pain in group HP (12.5%) and group L (15%) were significantly decreased compared with group LP (37.5%; both, P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the incidence of side effects such as headache and dizziness between groups. Conclusion: Pretreatment with oral pregabalin 150 mg and intravenous lidocaine 40 mg with venous occlusion equally reduced pain from propofol injection. PMID:28002316

  4. SU-E-P-39: Characterization of Dose Impact On Different Beam Fields Size Attenuation for Elekta IGRT Couch

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R; Bai, W; Xiaomei, F; Chi, Z; Runxiao, L; Ren, Q; Gao, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of the dosimetric impact of the Elekta IGRT treatment couch in different beam field sizes. Established the relationship of relative dose versus beam angle at different beam field sizes. Methods: Measurements of couch attenuation were performed at gantry angles from 180° to 120°, using a 0.125cc semiflex ionization chamber, isocentrically placed in the center of a homogeneous cylindric sliced RW3 phantom for 6 photon beams. Measurements were performed at six different field sizes (3×3, 5×5, 7×7,10×10, 12×12 and 15×15 cm2). The phantom were positioned at the center of the couche,100 MU were delivered at every gantry angle. The dose difference to the ion chamber was determined. Results: For oblique fields with 6 MV photons at the same gantry angle the attenuation coefficient value from the lagest to the smallest the order is field size 7 cm2,5 cm2,10 cm2,12 cm2,15 cm2 and 3 cm2. The biggest couch attenuation by up to 4.15% at the gantry angle of 140°for the field size of 7 cm2, while for the field size of 3 cm2 the couch attenuated value only 3.5%. The other field size couch attenuation values are between the couch attenuated value of field size of 7 cm2 and 3 cm2 Conclusion: The recommended treatment couch attenuation measured beam field size is 10×10 or 12×12 cm2. When measured using the beam field size 3×3 cm2 the tested value will be lower, while measuerd using the beam field size 7×7 cm2 the tested value will be higer than the recommended beam field size. This should be noted when modeling the treatment couch in the treatment planning system.

  5. Evaluation of the Effect of Two Different Systemic Doses of Viola Odorata on Prevention of Induced Tongue Dysplasia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Helli, Sanaz; Damghani, Hossein; Mohajeri, Daryoush; Mesgari Abbasi, Mehran; Attaran, Rana; Zahed, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Oral cancer is among the ten most common cancers worldwide. It affects the life quality of patients in many ways. Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the effects of two different systemic doses of Viola Odorata syrup on the prevention of 4-Nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) induced tongue dysplasia in rats. Materials and Method Forty-eight male Wistar rats were divided into four groups of A, B, C and D. Group A served as the control group. The rats in groups B to D received 30 ppm of 4-NQO in drinking water for 12 weeks. Additionally, the rats in groups B and C received Viola Odorata syrup at doses of 15 and 5 ml/kg, respectively, 3 times a week. Body weights were measured three times a week. At the end, the rats were euthanized and the tongue was removed. Histological evaluations for carcinogenesis were carried out under a light microscope. Results The mean body weight of the rats in groups B, C, and D were lower than that in group A (p< 0.01). After 12 weeks of treatment, microscopically no histological changes of the tongue base epithelia were observed in the control group. The rats in group B did not show severe dysplastic changes; only mild to moderate histological changes including hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis were evident. These incidences were significantly more apparent in groups C with moderate to severe changes (p< 0.05) and group D with severe dysplastic changes (p< 0.01). Almost all rats in group D had hyperplasia and manifested all of the stages of dysplasia. Conclusion Viola Odorata extract has dose-dependent inhibitory effects on the development of tongue induced dysplasia. PMID:27602393

  6. Curtailing patient-specific IMRT QA procedures from 2D dose error distribution

    PubMed Central

    Kurosu, Keita; Sumida, Iori; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Otani, Yuki; Oda, Michio; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    A patient-specific quality assurance (QA) test is conducted to verify the accuracy of dose delivery. It generally consists of three verification processes: the absolute point dose difference, the planar dose differences at each gantry angle, and the planar dose differences by 3D composite irradiation. However, this imposes a substantial workload on medical physicists. The objective of this study was to determine whether our novel method that predicts the 3D delivered dose allows certain patient-specific IMRT QAs to be curtailed. The object was IMRT QA for the pelvic region with regard to point dose and composite planar dose differences. We compared measured doses, doses calculated in the treatment planning system, and doses predicted by in-house software. The 3D predicted dose was reconstructed from the per-field measurement by incorporating the relative dose error distribution into the original dose grid of each beam. All point dose differences between the measured and the calculated dose were within ±3%, whereas 93.3% of them between the predicted and the calculated dose were within ±3%. As for planar dose differences, the gamma passing rates between the calculated and the predicted dose were higher than those between the calculated and the measured dose. Comparison and statistical analysis revealed a correlation between the predicted and the measured dose with regard to both point dose and planar dose differences. We concluded that the prediction-based approach is an accurate substitute for the conventional measurement-based approach in IMRT QA for the pelvic region. Our novel approach will help medical physicists save time on IMRT QA. PMID:26661854

  7. Curtailing patient-specific IMRT QA procedures from 2D dose error distribution.

    PubMed

    Kurosu, Keita; Sumida, Iori; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Otani, Yuki; Oda, Michio; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    A patient-specific quality assurance (QA) test is conducted to verify the accuracy of dose delivery. It generally consists of three verification processes: the absolute point dose difference, the planar dose differences at each gantry angle, and the planar dose differences by 3D composite irradiation. However, this imposes a substantial workload on medical physicists. The objective of this study was to determine whether our novel method that predicts the 3D delivered dose allows certain patient-specific IMRT QAs to be curtailed. The object was IMRT QA for the pelvic region with regard to point dose and composite planar dose differences. We compared measured doses, doses calculated in the treatment planning system, and doses predicted by in-house software. The 3D predicted dose was reconstructed from the per-field measurement by incorporating the relative dose error distribution into the original dose grid of each beam. All point dose differences between the measured and the calculated dose were within ±3%, whereas 93.3% of them between the predicted and the calculated dose were within ±3%. As for planar dose differences, the gamma passing rates between the calculated and the predicted dose were higher than those between the calculated and the measured dose. Comparison and statistical analysis revealed a correlation between the predicted and the measured dose with regard to both point dose and planar dose differences. We concluded that the prediction-based approach is an accurate substitute for the conventional measurement-based approach in IMRT QA for the pelvic region. Our novel approach will help medical physicists save time on IMRT QA.

  8. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum.

  9. A developmental study of latent absolute pitch memory.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Müllensiefen, Daniel; Stewart, Lauren

    2017-03-01

    The ability to recall the absolute pitch level of familiar music (latent absolute pitch memory) is widespread in adults, in contrast to the rare ability to label single pitches without a reference tone (overt absolute pitch memory). The present research investigated the developmental profile of latent absolute pitch (AP) memory and explored individual differences related to this ability. In two experiments, 288 children from 4 to12 years of age performed significantly above chance at recognizing the absolute pitch level of familiar melodies. No age-related improvement or decline, nor effects of musical training, gender, or familiarity with the stimuli were found in regard to latent AP task performance. These findings suggest that latent AP memory is a stable ability that is developed from as early as age 4 and persists into adulthood.

  10. Angular dependence of dose sensitivity of nanoDot optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters in different radiation geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Jursinic, Paul A.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: A type of in vivo dosimeter, an optically stimulated luminescent dosimeter, OSLD, may have dose sensitivity that depends on the angle of incidence of radiation. This work measures how angular dependence of a nanoDot changes with the geometry of the phantom in which irradiation occurs and with the intrinsic structure of the nanoDot. Methods: The OSLDs used in this work were nanoDot dosimeters (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL), which were read with a MicroStar reader (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL). Dose to the OSLDs was delivered by 6 MV x-rays. NanoDots with various intrinsic sensitivities were irradiated in numerous phantoms that had geometric shapes of cylinders, rectangles, and a cube. Results: No angular dependence was seen in cylindrical phantoms, cubic phantoms, or rectangular phantoms with a thickness to width ratio of 0.3 or 1.5. An angular dependence of 1% was observed in rectangular phantoms with a thickness to width of 0.433–0.633. A group of nanoDots had sensitive layers with mass density of 2.42–2.58 g/cm{sup 3} and relative sensitivity of 0.92–1.09 and no difference in their angular dependence. Within experimental uncertainty, nanoDot measurements agree with a parallel-plate ion chamber at a depth of maximum dose. Conclusions: When irradiated in cylindrical, rectangular, and cubic phantoms, nanoDots show a maximum angular dependence of 1% or less at an incidence angle of 90°. For a sample of 78 new nanoDots, the range of their relative intrinsic sensitivity is 0.92–1.09. For a sample of ten nanoDots, on average, the mass in the sensitive layer is 73.1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and 26.9% polyester. The mass density of the sensitive layer of a nanoDot disc is between 2.42 and 2.58 g/cm{sup 3}. The angular dependence is not related to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C loading of the nanoDot disc. The nanoDot at the depth of maximum dose has no more angular dependence than a parallel-plate ion chamber.

  11. Short Communication: Rheological properties of blood serum of rats after irradiation with different gamma radiation doses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abdelhalim, Mohamed Anwar K; Moussa, Sherif Aa; Ms, Al-Ayed

    2016-01-01

    The blood serum rheological properties open the door to find suitable radio-protectors and convenient therapy for many cases of radiation exposure. The present study aimed to investigate the rheological properties of rat blood serum at wide range of shear rates after whole body irradiation with different gamma radiation doses in vivo. Healthy male rats were divided into five groups; one control group and 4 irradiated groups. The irradiation process was carried out using Co60 source with dose rate of 0.883cG/sec. Several rheological parameters were measured using Brookfield LVDV-III Programmable rheometer. A significant increase in viscosity and shear stress was observed with 25 and 50Gy corresponding to each shear rate compared with the control; while a significant decrease observed with 75 and 100Gy. The viscosity exhibited a Non-Newtonian behaviour with the shear rate while shear stress values were linearly related with shear rate. The decrease in blood viscosity might be attributed to changes in molecular weight, pH sensitivity and protein structure. The changes in rheological properties of irradiated rats' blood serum might be attributed to destruction changes in the haematological and dimensional properties of rats' blood products.

  12. Evaluation of radiation dose of triple rule-out coronary angiography protocols with different scan length using 256-slice CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chia-Jung; Lee, Jason J. S.; Chen, Liang-Kuang; Mok, Greta S. P.; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2011-10-01

    Triple rule-out coronary CT angiography (TRO-CTA) is a new approach for providing noninvasive visualization of coronary arteries with simultaneous evaluation of pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta and other intrathoracic structures. The increasing use of TRO-CTA examination with longer scan length is associated with the concerns about radiation dose and their corresponding cancer risk. The purpose of this study is to evaluate organ dose and effective dose for the TRO-CTA examination with 2 scan lengths: TRO std and TRO ext, using 256-slice CT. TRO-CTA examinations were performed on a 256-slice CT scanner without ECG-based tube current modulation. Absorbed organ doses were measured using an anthropomorphic phantom and thermal-luminance dosimeters (TLDs). Effective dose was determined by taking a sum of the measured absorbed organ doses multiplied with the tissue weighting factor based on ICRP-103, and compared to that calculated using the dose-length product (DLP) method. We obtained high organ doses in the thyroid, esophagus, breast, heart and lung in both TRO-CTA protocols. Effective doses of the TRO std and TRO ext protocols with the phantom method were 26.37 and 42.49 mSv, while those with the DLP method were 19.68 and 38.96 mSv, respectively. Our quantitative dose information establishes a relationship between radiation dose and scanning length, and can provide a practical guidance to best clinical practice.

  13. Anxiolytic, Psychostimulant, and Analgesic Effects of Various Volumes of Ethanol Solution in Different Concentrations, but in the Same Dose.

    PubMed

    Sudakov, S K; Alekseeva, E V; Bogdanova, N G; Kolpakov, A A; Nazarova, G A

    2016-05-01

    We studied the effect of ethanol (dose 2 g/kg) in various concentrations (5, 13, and 40%) and different volumes (40, 15.5, and 5 ml/kg) on the level of anxiety, locomotor activity, and pain sensitivity in rats. Administration of 40 ml/kg water to animals was followed by a significant increase in the time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze. Administration of water in a volume of 5 or 15.5 ml/kg had little effect on the level of anxiety. The greater was the volume of intragastrically administered ethanol, the stronger was the anxiolytic effect. The psychostimulant and analgesic effects of ethanol were more pronounced after administration of medium volumes and intermediate concentrations of ethanol-containing solutions. Since administration of these solutions cannot produce maximum blood concentration of ethanol, we believe that the observed effects are mainly related to the direct effect of ethanol on the stomach tissue.

  14. Comparison of rocuronium at two different doses and succinylcholine for endotracheal intubation in adult patients for elective surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, SG; Gangadharan, S; Gopakumar, AK

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effects of rocuronium at two different doses, that is, 0.6 mg/kg (2 × ED95) and 0.9 mg/kg (3 × ED95), were compared with succinylcholine (2 mg/kg) when used for endotracheal intubation in adult patients for elective surgeries under general anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Ninety patients were divided into three groups of 30 each. Groups A, B received injection rocuronium at 0.6 mg/kg, 0.9 mg/kg respectively and Group C received succinylcholine at 2 mg/kg. Onset of action of relaxant, intubation conditions, time taken to intubate and duration of action were compared. Statistical Analysis Used: To compare the statistical difference in the age, weight, height of the study subjects, onset of action of relaxant, intubation conditions, time taken to intubate, and duration of action analysis of variance and unpaired t-test were used. Results: The onset time was considerably shorter with rocuronium 0.9 mg/kg than 0.6 mg/kg. The onset time of rocuronium 0.9 mg/kg was found to be significantly longer than succinylcholine 2 mg/kg. Time taken to intubate was shortest with succinylcholine 2 mg/kg. The time taken to intubate with the rocuronium 0.9 mg/kg was found to be comparable to that of rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg. Intubation score of rocuronium 0.9 mg/kg was the best (17.75), which was comparable with succinylcholine. However, the intubation score obtained with rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg was inferior. Duration of action was shortest with succinylcholine. The duration of action is prolonged when the dose of rocuronium is increased from 0.6 to 0.9 mg/kg. Conclusion: Rapid sequence induction of anesthesia with propofol and fentanyl, succinylcholine allowed a more rapid endotracheal intubation sequence and created superior intubation conditions than rocuronium. However, the technique of using a large dose of rocuronium to achieve perfect conditions for tracheal intubation may have application whenever succinylcholine is relatively contraindicated. PMID:27833478

  15. Experimental Evaluation of the Impact of Different Head-and-Neck Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning Techniques on Doses to the Skin and Shallow Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Court, Laurence E. Tishler, Roy B.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate experimentally the impact of different head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning techniques on doses to the skin and shallow targets. Methods and Materials: A semicylindrical phantom was constructed with micro-MOSFET dosimeters (Thomson-Nielson, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) at 0-, 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-mm depths. The planning target volume (PTV) was pulled back 0, 3, or 5 mm from the body contour. The IMRT plans were created to maximize PTV coverage, with one of the following strategies: (a) aim for a maximum 110% hotspot, with 115% allowed; (b) aims for a maximum 105% hotspot; (c) aims for a maximum 105% hotspot and 50% of skin to get a maximum 70% of the prescribed dose; and (d) aim for 99% of the PTV volume to receive 90-93% of prescribed dose, with a maximum 105% hotspot, and with the dose to the skin structure minimized. Doses delivered using a linear accelerator were measured. Setup uncertainty was simulated by intentionally shifting the phantom in a range of {+-}8 mm, and calculating the delivered dose for a range of systematic and random uncertainties. Results: From lowest to highest skin dose, the planning strategies were in the order of c, d, b, and a, but c showed a tendency to underdose tissues at depth. Delivered doses varied by 10-20%, depending on planning strategy. For typical setup uncertainties, cumulative dose reduction to a point 6 mm deep was <4%. Conclusions: It is useful to use skin as a sensitive structure, but a minimum dose constraint must be used for the PTV if unwanted reductions in dose to nodes near the body surface are to be avoided. Setup uncertainties are unlikely to give excessive reductions in cumulative dose.

  16. System for absolute measurements by interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Douglas A.

    1993-03-01

    The most common problem of interferometric sensors is their inability to measure absolute path imbalance. Presented in this paper is a signal processing system that gives absolute, unambiguous reading of optical path difference for almost any style of interferometric sensor. Key components are a wide band (incoherent) optical source, a polychromator, and FFT electronics. Advantages include no moving parts in the signal processor, no active components at the sensor location, and the use of standard single mode fiber for sensor illumination and signal transmission. Actual absolute path imbalance of the interferometer is determined without using fringe counting or other inferential techniques. The polychromator extracts the interference information that occurs at each discrete wavelength within the spectral band of the optical source. The signal processing consists of analog and digital filtering, Fast Fourier analysis, and a peak detection and interpolation algorithm. This system was originally designed for use in a remote pressure sensing application that employed a totally passive fiber optic interferometer. A performance qualification was made using a Fabry-Perot interferometer and a commercially available laser interferometer to measure the reference displacement.

  17. Chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil.

    PubMed

    Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-10

    Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) absolute oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the absolute oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound.

  18. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  19. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  20. Physics of negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  1. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  2. SU-E-I-57: Evaluation and Optimization of Effective-Dose Using Different Beam-Hardening Filters in Clinical Pediatric Shunt CT Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, K; Aldoohan, S; Collier, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Study image optimization and radiation dose reduction in pediatric shunt CT scanning protocol through the use of different beam-hardening filters Methods: A 64-slice CT scanner at OU Childrens Hospital has been used to evaluate CT image contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and measure effective-doses based on the concept of CT dose index (CTDIvol) using the pediatric head shunt scanning protocol. The routine axial pediatric head shunt scanning protocol that has been optimized for the intrinsic x-ray tube filter has been used to evaluate CNR by acquiring images using the ACR approved CT-phantom and radiation dose CTphantom, which was used to measure CTDIvol. These results were set as reference points to study and evaluate the effects of adding different filtering materials (i.e. Tungsten, Tantalum, Titanium, Nickel and Copper filters) to the existing filter on image quality and radiation dose. To ensure optimal image quality, the scanner routine air calibration was run for each added filter. The image CNR was evaluated for different kVps and wide range of mAs values using above mentioned beam-hardening filters. These scanning protocols were run under axial as well as under helical techniques. The CTDIvol and the effective-dose were measured and calculated for all scanning protocols and added filtration, including the intrinsic x-ray tube filter. Results: Beam-hardening filter shapes energy spectrum, which reduces the dose by 27%. No noticeable changes in image low contrast detectability Conclusion: Effective-dose is very much dependent on the CTDIVol, which is further very much dependent on beam-hardening filters. Substantial reduction in effective-dose is realized using beam-hardening filters as compare to the intrinsic filter. This phantom study showed that significant radiation dose reduction could be achieved in CT pediatric shunt scanning protocols without compromising in diagnostic value of image quality.

  3. LDL-cholesterol-lowering effect of plant sterols and stanols across different dose ranges: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled studies.

    PubMed

    Ras, Rouyanne T; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Trautwein, Elke A

    2014-07-28

    Phytosterols (PS, comprising plant sterols and plant stanols) have been proven to lower LDL-cholesterol concentrations. The dose-response relationship for this effect has been evaluated in several meta-analyses by calculating averages for different dose ranges or by applying continuous dose-response functions. Both approaches have advantages and disadvantages. So far, the calculation of averages for different dose ranges has not been done for plant sterols and stanols separately. The objective of the present meta-analysis was to investigate the combined and separate effects of plant sterols and stanols when classified into different dose ranges. Studies were searched and selected based on predefined criteria. Relevant data were extracted. Average LDL-cholesterol effects were calculated when studies were categorised by dose, according to random-effects models while using the variance as weighing factor. This was done for plant sterols and stanols combined and separately. In total, 124 studies (201 strata) were included. Plant sterols and stanols were administered in 129 and fifty-nine strata, respectively; the remaining used a mix of both. The average PS dose was 2.1 (range 0.2-9.0) g/d. PS intakes of 0.6-3.3 g/d were found to gradually reduce LDL-cholesterol concentrations by, on average, 6-12%. When plant sterols and stanols were analysed separately, clear and comparable dose-response relationships were observed. Studies carried out with PS doses exceeding 4 g/d were not pooled, as these were scarce and scattered across a wide range of doses. In conclusion, the LDL-cholesterol-lowering effect of both plant sterols and stanols continues to increase up to intakes of approximately 3 g/d to an average effect of 12%.

  4. Jasminum sambac flower absolutes from India and China--geographic variations.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Sim, Sherina

    2012-05-01

    Seven Jasminum sambac flower absolutes from different locations in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Focus was placed on 41 key ingredients to investigate geographic variations in this species. These seven absolutes were compared with an Indian bud absolute and commercially available J. sambac flower absolutes from India and China. All absolutes showed broad variations for the 10 main ingredients between 8% and 96%. In addition, the odor of Indian and Chinese J. sambac flower absolutes were assessed.

  5. Effect of single dose pretreatment analgesia with three different analgesics on postoperative endodontic pain: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Priyank; Agarwal, Manish; Chourasia, Hemant Ramesh; Singh, Mahesh Pratap

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: One of the aims of root canal treatment is to prevent or eliminate pain. Postoperative endodontic pain control continues to be a significant challenge. Aim: To compare and evaluate the effect of single oral dose of 100 mg of tapentadol, 400 mg of etodolac, or 10 mg of ketorolac as a pretreatment analgesic for the prevention and control of postoperative endodontic pain in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. The incidence of side effects was recorded as secondary outcome. Materials and Methods: Sixty emergency patients with moderate to severe pain, diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis were randomly allocated (1:1:1) to any of the three groups; tapentadol, etodolac, or ketorolac. Medications were administered 30 min before beginning of the endodontic treatment. Patients recorded pain intensity on 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) after treatment, for upto 24 h. Results: At 24 h, mean ±standard deviation (SD) of VAS scores (in cm) for tapentadol, etodolac, and ketorolac were 0.89 ± 0.83, 2.68 ± 2.29, and 0.42 ± 0.69, respectively. Kruskal-Wallis (K-W) test showed significant difference among the three groups (P = 0.001). Mann-Whitney test showed significantly lower VAS scores in tapentadol and ketorolac than etodolac group (P = 0.013 and 0.001, respectively). Conclusions: Single oral dose of 10 mg of ketorolac and 100mg of tapentadol as a pretreatment analgesic significantly reduced postoperative endodontic pain in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis when compared to 400 mg of etodolac. PMID:25506136

  6. Microscopic examination on cytological changes in Allium cepa and shift in phytoplankton population at different doses of Atrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Nabarun; Finger, Kristen; Usnick, Samantha; Rogers, William J.; Das, A. B.; Smith, Don W.

    2010-06-01

    Atrazine is a wide-range herbicide. For over 50 years, atrazine has been used as a selective broadleaf herbicide in many capacities, from pre-plant to pre-emergence to post-emergence, depending on the crop and application. Currently, 96% of all atrazine used is for commercial applications in fields for the control of broadleaf and grassy weeds in crops such as sorghum, corn, sugarcane, pineapple and for the control of undesirable weeds in rangeland. Many panhandle wells have also detected atrazine in samples taken. The concern for the public is the long-term effect of atrazine with its increasing popularity, and the impact on public health. We investigated the effect of different concentrations of atrazine on Allium cepa (onion), a standard plant test system. We established a control with the Allium bulbs grown on hydroponics culture. Varying concentrations of atrazine was used on the standard plant test system, Allium cepa grown hydroponically. The mitotic indices varied and with higher doses, we observed various chromosomal abnormalities including sticky bridges, early and late separations, and lag chromosomes with higher doses of treatments. In the second part of the experiment, 0.1ppb, 1ppb, 10ppb, and 100ppb concentrations of atrazine were applied to established phytoplankton cultures from the Lake Tanglewood, Texas. Study with a Sedgwick-Rafter counter, a BX-40 Olympus microscope with DP-70 camera revealed a gradual shift in the phytoplankton community from obligatory to facultative autotroph and finally to a parasitic planktonic community. This explains the periodic fish kill in the lakes after applications of atrazine in crop fields.

  7. Prostate cancer boost using high-dose-rate brachytherapy: early toxicity analysis of 3 different fractionation schemes

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Hussam; Chevallier, Daniel; Gal, Jocelyn; Chand, Marie-Eve; Gautier, Mathieu; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To analyse early toxicity of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost for prostate cancer using 3 fractionation schemes. Material and methods From February 2009 to May 2012, after the first course of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT 46 Gy/23 f), 124 patients underwent HDRB boost for low (7%), intermediate (19%), and high-risk (73%) prostate cancers. From February to December 2009, Group 1 (G1) = 18 Gy/3 f/2 d (24%); from January 2010 to April 2011, Group 2 (G2) = 18 Gy/2 f/2 d (42%), and from May to September 2011, Group 3 (G3) = 14 Gy/1 f/1 d (34%). Planning and CT-scan was performed before each fraction. Dose constraints for G1/G2 were V100 rectum = 0 and V125 urethra = 0, while for G3 V90 rectum = 0 and V115 urethra = 0. Genito-urinary (GU) and Gastro-intestinal (GI) acute toxicities were assessed at 1 month (for the 3 fractionation schemes) and 6 months (for 18 Gy/3 f and 18 Gy/2 f) after the boost (CTCv3.0). Results Median follow-up was 25 months (8-46.9), median age was 71 years (50-82), and median CTV was 31 cc (16-71). The grades of acute GI and GU toxicities at 1 and 6 months after HDRB were mainly Grade 1 with few Grade 2 (GU: 5% at 1 month; GI: 1% at 6 months). One patient developed G4 sepsis toxicity 2 days after HDRB and recovered without after-effects. No significant differences were observed at 1 and 6 months after the HDRB between treatment groups. Conclusions The right fractionation remains under discussion, but prostate cancer HDRB boost using a single fraction (providing similar results in terms of acute toxicity) is more comfortable for the patient, and less time consuming for the medical staff. PMID:24474968

  8. Dose optimization for different medical imaging tasks from exposure index, exposure control factor, and MAS in digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Menglong; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Yaying; Chen, Weixia; Hou, Lixia

    2012-09-01

    In radiographic examination, not all medical imaging tasks require the same level of image quality or diagnostic information. Criteria should be established for different imaging tasks to avoid excessive doses where there is no clear net benefit in the diagnosis or the image quality. An exposure index provided by manufacturers would be a useful tool for this purpose. This study aims to establish an optimum exposure index to be used as a guideline for clinical imaging tasks to minimize radiation exposure for chest digital radiography. A three-level classification of image quality (high, medium, and low) for chest imaging tasks was carried out. An anthropomorphic phantom was employed to establish minimum exposure index and exposure (mAs) for clinical imaging task type I (corresponding to high image quality). The exposures of medium and low quality images derived from it. Thirty patients were exposed consecutively with these optimized exposure factors, and clinical tasks were considered, while another 30 patients were exposed with the exposure factors routinely used in practice. Image quality was assessed objectively by a consensus panel. The optimized exposure provided a significant reduction of the mean exposure index from 1,556 to 1,207 (p < 0.0001) and mean patient's entrance surface dose from 0.168 mGy to 0.092 mGy (p < 0.0001). The results show that a clinical-task-determined radiographic procedure is more conducive to radiation protection of patients. In this study, the posteroanterior chest imaging examination was chosen as an example. This procedure can also apply to other body parts and views.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of ruthenium eye plaques with GEANT4: influence of multiple scattering algorithms, the spectrum and the geometry on depth dose profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, H.; Ebenau, M.; Spaan, B.; Eichmann, M.

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies show remarkable differences in the simulation of electron depth dose profiles of ruthenium eye plaques. We examined the influence of the scoring and simulation geometry, the source spectrum and the multiple scattering algorithm on the depth dose profile using GEANT4. The simulated absolute dose deposition agrees with absolute dose data from the manufacturer within the measurement uncertainty. Variations in the simulation geometry as well as the source spectrum have only a small influence on the depth dose profiles. However, the multiple scattering algorithms have the largest influence on the depth dose profiles. They deposit up to 20% less dose compared to the single scattering implementation. We recommend researchers who are interested in simulating low- to medium-energy electrons to examine their simulation under the influence of different multiple scattering settings. Since the simulation and scoring geometry as well as the exact physics settings are best described by the source code of the application, we made the code publicly available.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of ruthenium eye plaques with GEANT4: influence of multiple scattering algorithms, the spectrum and the geometry on depth dose profiles.

    PubMed

    Sommer, H; Ebenau, M; Spaan, B; Eichmann, M

    2017-03-07

    Previous studies show remarkable differences in the simulation of electron depth dose profiles of ruthenium eye plaques. We examined the influence of the scoring and simulation geometry, the source spectrum and the multiple scattering algorithm on the depth dose profile using GEANT4. The simulated absolute dose deposition agrees with absolute dose data from the manufacturer within the measurement uncertainty. Variations in the simulation geometry as well as the source spectrum have only a small influence on the depth dose profiles. However, the multiple scattering algorithms have the largest influence on the depth dose profiles. They deposit up to 20% less dose compared to the single scattering implementation. We recommend researchers who are interested in simulating low- to medium-energy electrons to examine their simulation under the influence of different multiple scattering settings. Since the simulation and scoring geometry as well as the exact physics settings are best described by the source code of the application, we made the code publicly available.

  11. Treatment of simple and complex endometrial non-atypical hyperplasia with natural progesterone: response rate to different doses.

    PubMed

    Marra, Chiara; Penati, Cristina; Ferrari, Luisa; Cantù, Maria Grazia; Bargossi, Lorena; Fruscio, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the response rate to natural progesterone in non-atypical endometrial hyperplasia and to identify the lowest effective dose. A total of 197 patients of childbearing age with simple or complex hyperplasia were retrospectively identified. The women were treated with a cyclic administration of progesterone at different dosages (100 versus 200 versus 300 mg daily). Endometrial biopsies were performed at 6, 12, 18 months. In comparing progesterone to a regimen of no therapy, a significantly higher remission rate was observed in the progesterone group than in the latter (95 versus 75%, p = 0.05 for simple hyperplasia; 89 versus 35%, p < 0.001 for complex hyperplasia). Out of 60 women with simple hyperplasia, remission was observed in 9/11 (81.8%), 40/41 (97.5%) and 8/8 (100%) patients treated, respectively, with progesterone 100, 200 and 300 mg daily. Out of 72 women with complex hyperplasia, remission was observed in 3/5 (60%), 49/53 (92.4%) and 12/14 (85.7%) patients treated with progesterone 100, 200 and 300 mg daily, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the response rate in the two groups, neither with simple nor with complex hyperplasia. In conclusion, progesterone increased the regression rate of both simple and complex hyperplasia.

  12. Time- and dose-dependent induction of HSP70 in Lemna minor exposed to different environmental stressors.

    PubMed

    Tukaj, Stefan; Bisewska, Joanna; Roeske, Katarzyna; Tukaj, Zbigniew

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of different stressors, including cadmium (heavy metal), anthracene (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-PAH) and chloridazon (herbicide), on population growth and biosynthesis of cytoplasmic HSP70 in Lemna minor (duckweed) in short (4 h)- and long (7 days)-term tests. A heat shock response was confirmed in Lemna exposed to high temperature: 35, 37.5, 40, or 42.5°C in short-term (4 h) treatments. The chemicals tested stimulated the biosynthesis of the cytoplasmic HSP70 protein in a concentration-dependent way (0.5-5 μM), higher in fronds exposed to lower doses of stressors. Additionally, production of HSP70 was greater after 4 h of incubation than after 7 days. The results suggest that HSP70 could be applied as a non-specific and sensitive detector of stress induced by different chemicals at concentrations below those that produce the type of response observed in classical cytotoxicity tests, such as growth inhibition.

  13. Why to compare absolute numbers of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the absolute number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to absolute mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations.

  14. Effect of toremifene on clinical chemistry, hematology and hormone levels at different doses in healthy postmenopausal volunteers: phase I study.

    PubMed

    Kivinen, S; Mäenpää, J

    1990-06-22

    Toremifene was given within the dose range of 3-680 mg as a single dose or on five consecutive days to 72 postmenopausal volunteers. Blood samples for clinical chemistry were taken hourly up to 7 h and 1, 2, 3, 7, 10 and 15 days after the last dose of toremifene. The concentrations of serum bilirubin, creatinine, amylase, free thyroxine, cortisol, prolactin, electrolytes and blood glucose remained unchanged at all dose levels. A statistically significant decrease was observed in liver enzymes (ASAT, ALAT, ALP) at the dose levels of 220-680 mg, whereas gamma-GT remained unchanged. A decrease in the concentration of LH and FSH was observed at the dose levels of 46 mg or higher and 220 mg or higher, respectively. These hormonal changes including the increase of SHBG at the dose levels of 220-680 mg and the decrease of antithrombin III (220-680 mg) may be attributed to a weak estrogen-like effect of toremifene. Side effects were minimal: pulse rate, blood pressure and ECG remained unchanged during the test period. Only two patients on 680 mg dose suffered from nausea and vertigo, and one of them discontinued the medication.

  15. Absolute Rate Theories of Epigenetic Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, Jose N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2006-03-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape, and the transmission factor, depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates.

  16. Absolute rate theories of epigenetic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-12-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape and the transmission factor depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic, and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates. rate theory | stochastic gene expression | gene switches

  17. Evaluation of Imaging Dose From Different Image Guided Systems During Head and Neck Radiotherapy: A Phantom Study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chun Shing; Jong, Wei Loong; Ung, Ngie Min; Wong, Jeannie Hsiu Ding

    2016-12-09

    This work evaluated and compared the absorbed doses to selected organs in the head and neck region from the three image guided radiotherapy systems: cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and kilovoltage (kV) planar imaging using the On-board Imager(®) (OBI) as well as the ExacTrac(®) X-ray system, all available on the Varian Novalis TX linear accelerator. The head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom was used to simulate patients' head within the imaging field. Nanodots optically stimulated luminescent dosemeters were positioned at selected sites to measure the absorbed doses. CBCT was found to be delivering the highest dose to internal organs while OBI-2D gave the highest doses to the eye lenses. The setting of half-rotation in CBCT effectively reduces the dose to the eye lenses. Daily high-quality CBCT verification was found to increase the secondary cancer risk by 0.79%.

  18. Rectal Dose-Volume Differences Using Proton Radiotherapy and a Rectal Balloon or Water Alone for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos Mahajan, Chaitali; Fryer, Amber; Indelicato, Daniel; Henderson, Randal H.; McKenzie, Craig C.; Horne, David C.; Chellini, Angela; Lawlor, Paula C.; Li Zuofeng; Oliver, Kenneth; Keole, Sameer

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To describe dose-volume values with the use of water alone vs. a rectal balloon (RB) for the treatment of prostate cancer with proton therapy. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 30 proton plans for 15 patients who underwent CT and MRI scans with an RB or water alone. Simulation was performed with a modified MRI endorectal coil and an RB with 100 mL of water or water alone. Doses of 78-82 gray equivalents were prescribed to the planning target volume. The two groups were compared for three structures: rectum, rectal wall (RW), and rectal wall 7 cm (RW7) at the level of the planning target volume. Results: Rectum and RW volumes radiated to low, intermediate, and high doses were small: rectum V10, 33.7%; V50, 17.3%; and V70, 10.2%; RW V10, 32.4%; V50, 20.4%; and V70, 14.6%. The RB effectively increased the rectal volume for all cases (139.8 {+-} 44.9 mL vs. 217.7 {+-} 32.2 mL (p < 0.001). The RB also decreased the volume of the rectum radiated to doses V10-V65 (p {<=} 0.05); RW for V10-V50; and RW7 for V10-V35. An absolute rectum V50 improvement >5% was seen for the RB in 5 of 15 cases, for a benefit of 9.2% {+-} 2.3% compared with 2.4% {+-} 1.3% for the remaining 10 cases (p < 0.001). Similar benefit was seen for the rectal wall. No benefit was seen for doses {>=}70 gray equivalents for the rectum, RW, or RW7. No benefit of {<=}1% was seen with an RB in 46% for the rectum V70 and in 40% for the rectal wall V70. Conclusions: Rectum and rectal wall doses with proton radiation were low whether using water or an RB. Selected patients will have a small but significant advantage with an RB; however, water alone was well tolerated and will be an alternative for most patients.

  19. Constraint on Absolute Accuracy of Metacomprehension Assessments: The Anchoring and Adjustment Model vs. the Standards Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Heekyung

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a systematic account of three typical phenomena surrounding absolute accuracy of metacomprehension assessments: (1) the absolute accuracy of predictions is typically quite low; (2) there exist individual differences in absolute accuracy of predictions as a function of reading skill; and (3) postdictions…

  20. A Special Application of Absolute Value Techniques in Authentic Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stupel, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    There are at least five different equivalent definitions of the absolute value concept. In instances where the task is an equation or inequality with only one or two absolute value expressions, it is a worthy educational experience for learners to solve the task using each one of the definitions. On the other hand, if more than two absolute value…

  1. A comparison of organs at risk doses in GYN intracavitary brachytherapy for different tandem lengths and bladder volumes.

    PubMed

    Siavashpour, Zahra; Aghamiri, Mahmoud Reza; Jaberi, Ramin; ZareAkha, Naser; Dehghan Manshadi, Hamid Reza; Kirisits, Christian; Sedaghat, Mahbod

    2016-05-08

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the concurrent effects of tandem length and bladder volume on dose to pelvic organs at risk (OARs) in HDR intracavitary brachytherapy treatment of cervical cancer. Twenty patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were selected for brachytherapy using Rotterdam applicators. The patients were CT scanned twice with empty and full bladder. Two treatment plans were prepared on each of the image sets. Patients were categorized into two groups; those treated with a tandem length of 4 cm or smaller (T ≤ 4 cm) and those with tandem length larger than 4 cm (T > 4 cm). Only one tandem tip angle of 30° was studied. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of OARs were calculated and compared. Bladder dose was significantly affected by both bladder volume and tandem physical length for T ≤ 4 cm. This was reflected on the values obtained for D2cm³, D1cm³, and D0.1cm³ for both empty and full bladder cases. When T > 4 cm, no correlation could be established between variations in bladder dose and blad-der volume. Rectum dose was generally lower when the bladder was empty and T > 4 cm. Dose to sigmoid was increased when T > 4 cm; this increase was larger when the bladder was full. Our results suggest that, for tandems longer than 4 cm, keeping the bladder empty may reduce the dose to rectum and sigmoid. This is contrary to cases where a shorter than 4 cm tandem is used in which a full bladder (about 50-120 cm³) tends to result in a lower dose to rectum and sigmoid. Attention should be given to doses to sigmoid with long tandem lengths, as a larger tandem generally results in a larger dose to sigmoid.

  2. Optimal dose selection of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea for the rat comet assay to evaluate DNA damage in organs with different susceptibility to cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kitamoto, Sachiko; Matsuyama, Ryoko; Uematsu, Yasuaki; Ogata, Keiko; Ota, Mika; Yamada, Toru; Miyata, Kaori; Funabashi, Hitoshi; Saito, Koichi

    2015-07-01

    The in vivo rodent alkaline comet assay (comet assay) is a promising technique to evaluate DNA damage in vivo. However, there is no agreement on a method to evaluate DNA damage in organs where cytotoxicity is observed. As a part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiative international validation study of the comet assay, we examined DNA damage in the liver, stomach, and bone marrow of rats given three oral doses of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) up to the maximum tolerated dose based on systemic toxicity. MNU significantly increased the % tail DNA in all the organs. Histopathological analysis showed no cytotoxic effect on the liver, indicating clearly that MNU has a genotoxic potential in the liver. In the stomach, however, the cytotoxic effects were very severe at systemically non-toxic doses. Low-dose MNU significantly increased the % tail DNA even at a non-cytotoxic dose, indicating that MNU has a genotoxic potential also in the stomach. Part of the DNA damage at cytotoxic doses was considered to be a secondary effect of severe cell damage. In the bone marrow, both the % tail DNA and incidence of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes significantly increased at non-hematotoxic doses, which were different from the non-cytotoxic doses for liver and stomach. These findings indicate that an optimal dose for detecting DNA damage may vary among organs and that careful attention is required to select an optimum dose for the comet assay based on systemic toxicity such as mortality and clinical observations. The present study shows that when serious cytotoxicity is suggested by increased % hedgehogs in the comet assay, histopathological examination should be included for the evaluation of a positive response.

  3. Metabolomic profiling of urine samples from mice exposed to protons reveals radiation quality and dose specific differences.

    PubMed

    Laiakis, Evagelia C; Trani, Daniela; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Strawn, Steven J; Fornace, Albert J

    2015-04-01

    As space travel is expanding to include private tourism and travel beyond low-Earth orbit, so is the risk of exposure to space radiation. Galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events have the potential to expose space travelers to significant doses of radiation that can lead to increased cancer risk and other adverse health consequences. Metabolomics has the potential to assess an individual's risk by exploring the metabolic perturbations in a biofluid or tissue. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 0.5 and 2 Gy of 1 GeV/nucleon of protons and the levels of metabolites were evaluated in urine at 4 h after radiation exposure through liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Significant differences were identified in metabolites that map to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and fatty acid metabolism, suggesting that energy metabolism is severely impacted after exposure to protons. Additionally, various pathways of amino acid metabolism (tryptophan, tyrosine, arginine and proline and phenylalanine) were affected with potential implications for DNA damage repair and cognitive impairment. Finally, presence of products of purine and pyrimidine metabolism points to direct DNA damage or increased apoptosis. Comparison of these metabolomic data to previously published data from our laboratory with gamma radiation strongly suggests a more pronounced effect on metabolism with protons. This is the first metabolomics study with space radiation in an easily accessible biofluid such as urine that further investigates and exemplifies the biological differences at early time points after exposure to different radiation qualities.

  4. Low-Dose Topical 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy in the Treatment of Different Severity of Acne Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shi-Qin; Li, Fei; Cao, Lei; Xia, Ru-Shan; Fan, Hua; Fan, Ying; Sun, Hui; Jing, Cheng; Yang, Li-Jia

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate the effectiveness and safety of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with 3.6 % topical aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and a short incubation time with red light in moderate to severe acne. One hundred and thirty-six patients with moderate to severe acne were treated with 3.6 % topical ALA-PDT for three sessions with an interval of 2 weeks. Patients were evaluated for efficacy and safety on week 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 after the initial treatment. Most patients showed apparent clearance of acne lesions at the treated site after three sessions. The effective treatment rates were increased after the multiple therapies. The clinical outcomes are the best at 4 weeks after the final treatment. The total effectiveness rate and cure rate of the low-dose ALA-PDT procedure is 92.65 and 47.06 %, respectively. Thirty-one patients and nineteen patients showed apparent exacerbation of acne lesions before the 2nd and 3rd treatment, respectively, but all of them showed good or excellent improvement after a three-course treatment. A few patients showed mild relapse including papules and comedos at 8 weeks after the final treatment. No significant differences are found in the effects of different acne severity and different genders. Adverse reactions are mild and transient. A 3.6 % topical ALA-PDT with a short time incubation with red light is a simple and an effective treatment option for moderate to severe acne with mild side effects in Chinese people.

  5. SU-E-T-491: Importance of Energy Dependent Protons Per MU Calibration Factors in IMPT Dose Calculations Using Monte Carlo Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Randeniya, S; Mirkovic, D; Titt, U; Guan, F; Mohan, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT), energy dependent, protons per monitor unit (MU) calibration factors are important parameters that determine absolute dose values from energy deposition data obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Purpose of this study was to assess the sensitivity of MC-computed absolute dose distributions to the protons/MU calibration factors in IMPT. Methods: A “verification plan” (i.e., treatment beams applied individually to water phantom) of a head and neck patient plan was calculated using MC technique. The patient plan had three beams; one posterior-anterior (PA); two anterior oblique. Dose prescription was 66 Gy in 30 fractions. Of the total MUs, 58% was delivered in PA beam, 25% and 17% in other two. Energy deposition data obtained from the MC simulation were converted to Gy using energy dependent protons/MU calibrations factors obtained from two methods. First method is based on experimental measurements and MC simulations. Second is based on hand calculations, based on how many ion pairs were produced per proton in the dose monitor and how many ion pairs is equal to 1 MU (vendor recommended method). Dose distributions obtained from method one was compared with those from method two. Results: Average difference of 8% in protons/MU calibration factors between method one and two converted into 27 % difference in absolute dose values for PA beam; although dose distributions preserved the shape of 3D dose distribution qualitatively, they were different quantitatively. For two oblique beams, significant difference in absolute dose was not observed. Conclusion: Results demonstrate that protons/MU calibration factors can have a significant impact on absolute dose values in IMPT depending on the fraction of MUs delivered. When number of MUs increases the effect due to the calibration factors amplify. In determining protons/MU calibration factors, experimental method should be preferred in MC dose calculations

  6. Acceleration of wound repair by curcumin in the excision wound of mice exposed to different doses of fractionated γ radiation.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Rajanikant, Golgod Krishnamurthy

    2012-02-01

    Fractionated irradiation (IR) before or after surgery of malignant tumours causes a high frequency of wound healing complications. Our aim was to investigate the effect of curcumin (CUM) on the healing of deep excision wound of mice exposed to fractionated IR by mimicking clinical conditions. A full-thickness dermal excision wound was created on the shaved dorsum of mice that were orally administered or not with 100 mg of CUM per kilogram body weight before partial body exposure to 10, 20 or 40 Gy given as 2 Gy/day for 5, 10 or 20 days. The wound contraction was determined periodically by capturing video images of the wound from day 1 until complete healing of wounds. Fractionated IR caused a dose-dependent delay in the wound contraction and prolonged wound healing time, whereas CUM administration before fractionated IR caused a significant elevation in the wound contraction and reduced mean wound healing time. Fractionated IR reduced the synthesis of collagen, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and nitric oxide (NO) at different post-IR times and treatment of mice with CUM before IR elevated the synthesis of collagen, DNA and NO significantly. Histological examination showed a reduction in the collagen deposition, fibroblast and vascular densities after fractionated IR, whereas CUM pre-treatment inhibited this decline significantly. Our study shows that CUM pre-treatment accelerated healing of irradiated wound and could be a substantial therapeutic strategy in the management of irradiated wounds.

  7. [Long-term evacuation after the nuclear accident in Fukushima ~Different daily living under low-dose radioactive suffering~].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kazunobu

    2013-01-01

    One year has passed since the Great East Japan Earthquake and the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant accident. Even currently, more than 150,000 evacuees in Fukushima Prefecture are forced to leave their home and to move throughout Japan. Because of the limited space of temporary housing and the weakening of personal ties in local communities, many families need to move and have separate lives. As a consequence, Fukushima has a serious shortage of caregivers for the elderly. There have been more than 1,300 disaster-related deaths due to shock and stress after long-distance drifts from town to town. Most of the victims were the elderly, who collapsed, caught pneumonia, suffered stroke and heart attack. Concerns about the safety of low-dose radiation exposure deprived the elderly of important contact with playing outside with their grandchildren in Fukushima. Fear of invisible radioactive contamination inactivated outdoor activities such as farming, dairy, fishing, gardening, hiking and wild-vegetable/mushroom hunting, although most of these activities have been traditionally supported by the wisdom of the elderly. Several recent questionnaire investigations revealed that older evacuees wish to go home even if the environment has significant contamination. In contrast, more than half of younger generation with small children have a different attitude. Nuclear accident brought serious social pains although it did not acutely hurt our bodies.

  8. Generalized eMC implementation for Monte Carlo dose calculation of electron beams from different machine types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, Michael K.; Cygler, Joanna; Frei, Daniel; Volken, Werner; Neuenschwander, Hans; Born, Ernst J.; Manser, Peter

    2013-05-01

    The electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm available in the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems) is based on the macro MC method and uses a beam model applicable to Varian linear accelerators. This leads to limitations in accuracy if eMC is applied to non-Varian machines. In this work eMC is generalized to also allow accurate dose calculations for electron beams from Elekta and Siemens accelerators. First, changes made in the previous study to use eMC for low electron beam energies of Varian accelerators are applied. Then, a generalized beam model is developed using a main electron source and a main photon source representing electrons and photons from the scattering foil, respectively, an edge source of electrons, a transmission source of photons and a line source of electrons and photons representing the particles from the scrapers or inserts and head scatter radiation. Regarding the macro MC dose calculation algorithm, the transport code of the secondary particles is improved. The macro MC dose calculations are validated with corresponding dose calculations using EGSnrc in homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms. The validation of the generalized eMC is carried out by comparing calculated and measured dose distributions in water for Varian, Elekta and Siemens machines for a variety of beam energies, applicator sizes and SSDs. The comparisons are performed in units of cGy per MU. Overall, a general agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions for all machine types and all combinations of parameters investigated is found to be within 2% or 2 mm. The results of the dose comparisons suggest that the generalized eMC is now suitable to calculate dose distributions for Varian, Elekta and Siemens linear accelerators with sufficient accuracy in the range of the investigated combinations of beam energies, applicator sizes and SSDs.

  9. Differences in rates of decrease of environmental radiation dose rates by ground surface property in Fukushima City after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Kakamu, Takeyasu; Kanda, Hideyuki; Tsuji, Masayoshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Miyake, Masao; Hayakawa, Takehito; Katsuda, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Yayoi; Okouchi, Toshiyasu; Hazama, Akihiro; Fukushima, Tetsuhito

    2013-01-01

    After the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011, the environmental radiation dose in Fukushima City increased. On 11 April, 1 mo after the earthquake, the environmental radiation dose rate at various surfaces in the same area differed greatly by surface property. Environmental radiation measurements continue in order to determine the estimated time to 50% reduction in environmental radiation dose rates by surface property in order to make suggestions for decontamination in Fukushima. The measurements were carried out from 11 April to 11 November 2011. Forty-eight (48) measurement points were selected, including four kinds of ground surface properties: grass (13), soil (5), artificial turf (7), and asphalt (23). Environmental radiation dose rate was measured at heights of 100 cm above the ground surface. Time to 50% reduction of environmental radiation dose rates was estimated for each ground surface property. Radiation dose rates on 11 November had decreased significantly compared with those on 11 April for all surface properties. Artificial turf showed the longest time to 50% reduction (544.32 d, standard error: 96.86), and soil showed the shortest (213.20 d, standard error: 35.88). The authors found the environmental radiation dose rate on artificial materials to have a longer 50% reduction time than that on natural materials. These results contribute to determining an order of priority for decontamination after nuclear disasters.

  10. Different Dose-Dependent Mechanisms Are Involved in Early Cyclosporine A-Induced Cholestatic Effects in HepaRG Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharanek, Ahmad; Azzi, Pamela Bachour-El; Al-Attrache, Houssein; Savary, Camille C.; Humbert, Lydie; Rainteau, Dominique; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Guillouzo, André

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms involved in drug-induced cholestasis in humans remain poorly understood. Although cyclosporine A (CsA) and tacrolimus (FK506) share similar immunosuppressive properties, only CsA is known to cause dose-dependent cholestasis. Here, we have investigated the mechanisms implicated in early cholestatic effects of CsA using the differentiated human HepaRG cell line. Inhibition of efflux and uptake of taurocholate was evidenced as early as 15 min and 1 h respectively after addition of 10μM CsA; it peaked at around 2 h and was reversible. These early effects were associated with generation of oxidative stress and deregulation of cPKC pathway. At higher CsA concentrations (≥50μM) alterations of efflux and uptake activities were enhanced and became irreversible, pericanalicular F-actin microfilaments were disorganized and bile canaliculi were constricted. These changes were associated with induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress that preceded generation of oxidative stress. Concentration-dependent changes were observed on total bile acid disposition, which were characterized by an increase and a decrease in culture medium and cells, respectively, after a 24-h treatment with CsA. Accordingly, genes encoding hepatobiliary transporters and bile acid synthesis enzymes were differently deregulated depending on CsA concentration. By contrast, FK506 induced limited effects only at 25–50μM and did not alter bile canaliculi. Our data demonstrate involvement of different concentration-dependent mechanisms in CsA-induced cholestasis and point out a critical role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in the occurrence of the major cholestatic features. PMID:24973091

  11. Bioavailability of Pyrene Associated with Suspended Sediment of Different Grain Sizes to Daphnia magna as Investigated by Passive Dosing Devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Xia, Xinghui; Li, Husheng; Zhu, Baotong; Dong, Jianwei

    2015-08-18

    Suspended sediment (SPS) is widely present in rivers around the world. However, the bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) associated with SPS is not well understood. In this work, the influence of SPS grain size on the bioavailability of SPS-associated pyrene to Daphnia magna was studied using a passive dosing device, which maintained a constant freely dissolved pyrene concentration (Cfree) in the exposure systems. The immobilization and protein as well as enzymatic activities of Daphnia magna were investigated to study the bioavailability of SPS-associated pyrene. With Cfree of pyrene ranging from 20.0 to 60.0 μg L(-1), the immobilization of Daphnia magna in the presence of 1 g L(-1) SPS was 1.11-2.89 times that in the absence of SPS. The immobilization caused by pyrene associated with different grain size SPS was on the order of 50-100 μm > 0-50 μm > 100-150 μm. When pyrene Cfree was 20.0 μg L(-1), the immobilization caused by pyrene associated with 50-100 μm SPS was 1.42 and 2.43 times that with 0-50 and 100-150 μm SPS, respectively. The protein and enzymatic activities of Daphnia magna also varied with the SPS grain size. The effect of SPS grain size on the bioavailability of SPS-associated pyrene was mainly due to the difference in SPS ingestion by Daphnia magna and SPS composition, especially the organic carbon type, among the three size fractions. This study suggests that not only the concentration but also the size distribution of SPS should be considered for the development of a biological effect database and establishment of water quality criteria for HOCs in natural waters.

  12. Absolute Antenna Calibration at the US National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, G. L.; Bilich, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Geodetic GNSS applications routinely demand millimeter precision and extremely high levels of accuracy. To achieve these accuracies, measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level must be understood. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the apparent point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers; additional research suggests that the addition of a radome or the choice of antenna mount can significantly alter those a priori phase center patterns. For the more demanding GNSS positioning applications and especially in cases of mixed-antenna networks, it is all the more important to know antenna phase center variations as a function of both elevation and azimuth in the antenna reference frame and incorporate these models into analysis software. Determination of antenna phase center behavior is known as "antenna calibration". Since 1994, NGS has computed relative antenna calibrations for more than 350 antennas. In recent years, the geodetic community has moved to absolute calibrations - the IGS adopted absolute antenna phase center calibrations in 2006 for use in their orbit and clock products, and NGS's CORS group began using absolute antenna calibration upon the release of the new CORS coordinates in IGS08 epoch 2005.00 and NAD 83(2011,MA11,PA11) epoch 2010.00. Although NGS relative calibrations can be and have been converted to absolute, it is considered best practice to independently measure phase center characteristics in an absolute sense. Consequently, NGS has developed and operates an absolute calibration system. These absolute antenna calibrations accommodate the demand for greater accuracy and for 2-dimensional (elevation and azimuth) parameterization. NGS will continue to provide calibration values via the NGS web site www.ngs.noaa.gov/ANTCAL, and will publish calibrations in the ANTEX format as well as the legacy ANTINFO

  13. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to cumulative dose

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 004) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to cumulative dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in calculation 002. This calculation specifically addresses cumulative radiation doses to infants and adults resulting from releases occurring over the period 1945 through 1972.

  14. Comparison of dosimetric and radiobiological parameters on plans for prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy using an endorectal balloon for different dose-calculation algorithms and delivery-beam modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sang-Won; Suh, Tae-Suk; Chung, Jin-Beom; Eom, Keun-Yong; Song, Changhoon; Kim, In-Ah; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Cho, Woong

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of dosimetric and radiobiological parameters on treatment plans by using different dose-calculation algorithms and delivery-beam modes for prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy using an endorectal balloon. For 20 patients with prostate cancer, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plans were generated by using a 10-MV photon beam with flattening filter (FF) and flattening-filter-free (FFF) modes. The total treatment dose prescribed was 42.7 Gy in 7 fractions to cover at least 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) with 95% of the prescribed dose. The dose computation was initially performed using an anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) in the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and was then re-calculated using Acuros XB (AXB V. 11.0.34) with the same monitor units and multileaf collimator files. The dosimetric and the radiobiological parameters for the PTV and organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed from the dose-volume histogram. An obvious difference in dosimetric parameters between the AAA and the AXB plans was observed in the PTV and rectum. Doses to the PTV, excluding the maximum dose, were always higher in the AAA plans than in the AXB plans. However, doses to the other OARs were similar in both algorithm plans. In addition, no difference was observed in the dosimetric parameters for different delivery-beam modes when using the same algorithm to generate plans. As a result of the dosimetric parameters, the radiobiological parameters for the two algorithm plans presented an apparent difference in the PTV and the rectum. The average tumor control probability of the AAA plans was higher than that of the AXB plans. The average normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) to rectum was lower in the AXB plans than in the AAA plans. The AAA and the AXB plans yielded very similar NTCPs for the other OARs. In plans using the same algorithms, the NTCPs for delivery

  15. A critical analysis of racial difference with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) dosing, clinical outcomes and adverse effects in pediatric kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Jensen, C J; Shrivastava, S; Taber, D J; Weimert, N A; Shatat, I F; Orak, J; Chavin, K D; Baliga, P K

    2011-01-01

    There is paucity in the data examining the differences in mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) dosing and outcomes among pediatric kidney transplant recipients (PKTX) between races. The aims of this study were as follows (i) to assess whether higher doses of MMF are being utilized in African American (AA) PKTX (ii) to determine whether there is a correlation between MMF dose and outcomes between races, and (iii) to assess the adverse effects of MMF between races. This study analyzed 109 PKTX who received MMF between 7/99 and 5/08. Demographics were similar between groups. Fewer AAs received kidneys from living donors (18% vs. 44%), spent more time on dialysis (1.0 vs. 0.5 yr), and had more human leukocyte antigen mismatches (4 vs. 3). MMF doses among AA patients were higher throughout the study, with statistical differences at week 4, month 3, and month 18. AA patients had significantly higher acute rejection rates and trended toward poorer graft survival; infections, adverse events from MMF and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease tended to be lower in the AA patients. AA PKTX received higher MMF doses within the first three yr post-transplant compared to their non-AA counterparts, yet demonstrate significantly more acute rejection episodes. Importantly, MMF caused fewer adverse events in AA patients, despite these patients receiving higher doses.

  16. Effects of Low-Dose-Gamma Rays on the Immune System of Different Animal Models of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Noriko; Kojima, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed the beneficial or harmful effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on several diseases based on a search of the literature. The attenuation of autoimmune manifestations in animal disease models irradiated with low-dose γ-rays was previously reported by several research groups, whereas the exacerbation of allergic manifestations was described by others. Based on a detailed examination of the literature, we divided animal disease models into two groups: one group consisting of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), experimental encephalomyelitis (EAE), and systemic lupus erythematosus, the pathologies of which were attenuated by low-dose irradiation, and another group consisting of atopic dermatitis, asthma, and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, the pathologies of which were exacerbated by low-dose irradiation. The same biological indicators, such as cytokine levels and T-cell subpopulations, were examined in these studies. Low-dose irradiation reduced inter-feron (IFN)-gamma (γ) and interleukin (IL)-6 levels and increased IL-5 levels and the percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+Treg cells in almost all immunological disease cases examined. Variations in these biological indicators were attributed to the attenuation or exacerbation of the disease’s manifestation. We concluded that autoimmune diseases caused by autoantibodies were attenuated by low-dose irradiation, whereas diseases caused by antibodies against external antigens, such as atopic dermatitis, were exacerbated. PMID:25249835

  17. Different doses of low-level laser irradiation modulate the in vitro response of osteoblast-like cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incerti Parenti, Serena; Checchi, Luigi; Fini, Milena; Tschon, Matilde

    2014-10-01

    Because osteoblasts play a key role in bone remodeling and the influence of low-level laser therapy on this process is not clear, Saos-2 human osteoblast-like cells were irradiated by a gallium-aluminum-arsenide diode laser (915 nm) for 10, 48, 96, 193, and 482 s using doses 1, 5, 10, 20, and 50 J/cm2, respectively. A control group was not irradiated. Morphology, viability, and cytotoxicity analyses were carried out after 1 hr, 1 day, and 3 days. Deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) content and release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) were evaluated. Viability was modulated by laser irradiation in a dose-dependent manner, with 10 J/cm2 inducing a biostimulatory response and 20 to 50 J/cm2 determining a bioinhibitory and cytotoxic effect. Accordingly, DNA content was generally increased for the 10 J/cm2 dose and decreased for the 50 J/cm2 dose. A rapid and transitory trend toward increased RANKL/OPG ratio and a tendency toward a delayed increase in VEGF release for doses of 1 to 10 J/cm2 was found. Further investigations using the biostimulatory dose of 10 J/cm2 emerged from this study are needed to establish the ideal treatment regimens in the laboratory as well as in clinical practice.

  18. Determination of key radionuclides and parameters related to dose from the Columbia River pathway. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1993-03-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. These scoping calculations may include some radionuclides and pathways that were included in the Phase 1 Columbia River pathway dose evaluations, as well as other potential exposure pathways being evaluated for possible inclusion in future Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project (HEDR) modeling efforts. This scoping calculation (Calculation 009) examines the contributions of numerous radionuclides to dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in water, fish, and other aquatic biota. Addressed in these calculations are the contributions to effective dose from (1) external exposure to contaminated river water, ( 2) ingestion of contaminated drinking water, and (3) ingestion of contaminated resident Columbia River fish. Additional information on contamination of anadromous fish and waterfowl is provided.

  19. Gender Differences in Radiation Dose from Nuclear Cardiology Studies Across the World: Findings from the International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Study (INCAPS) Registry

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lynn; Dorbala, Sharmila; Paez, Diana; Shaw, Leslee J.; Zukotynski, Katherine A.; Pascual, Thomas N. B.; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Vitola, João V.; Better, Nathan; Bokhari, Nadia; Rehani, Madan M.; Kashyap, Ravi; Dondi, Maurizio; Mercuri, Mathew; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to investigate gender-based differences in nuclear cardiology practice, globally, with particular focus on laboratory volume, radiation dose, protocols, and best practices. BACKGROUND It is unclear if gender-based differences exist in radiation exposure for nuclear cardiology procedures. METHODS In a large multicenter observational cross-sectional study encompassing 7911 patients in 65 countries, radiation effective dose was estimated for each examination. Patient-level best practices relating to radiation exposure were compared between genders. Analysis of covariance was utilized to determine any difference in radiation exposure according to gender, region, and the interaction between gender and region. Linear, logistic, and hierarchical regression models were developed to evaluate gender-based differences in radiation exposure and laboratory adherence to best practices. We also included the United Nations’ gender inequality and human development indices as covariates in multivariable models. RESULTS The proportion of MPI studies performed in women varied between countries, however there was no significant correlation with gender inequality index. Globally, mean effective dose for nuclear cardiology procedures was only slightly lower in women (9.6±4.5 mSv) than in men (10.3±4.5 mSv men, p<0.001), with a difference of only 0.3 mSv in a multivariable model adjusting for patient age and weight. Stress-only imaging was performed more frequently in women (12.5% vs. 8.4%, p<0.001), however camera-based dose-reduction strategies were used less frequently in women (58.6% vs. 65.5%, p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Despite significant worldwide variation in best practice use and radiation doses from nuclear cardiology procedures, only small differences were observed between genders worldwide. Regional variations noted in MPI use and radiation dose offer potential opportunities to address gender-related differences in delivery of nuclear

  20. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  1. A double-blind randomized clinical trial of different doses of transdermal nicotine patch for smoking reduction and cessation in long-term hospitalized schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsing-Kang; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Wu, Bo-Jian

    2013-02-01

    There have been many studies of smoking cessation using nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) with schizophrenic patients, but none exploring the smoking-reduction effects of varying doses of NRT in long-stay patients with schizophrenia. This study aimed to examine the effect of different doses of the nicotine transdermal patch on smoking-reduction and cessation outcomes in long-term hospitalized schizophrenic patients. A total of 184 subjects participated in a randomized, controlled, double-blind 8-week clinical trial. Participants were randomized into two groups using two different doses of NRT: a high-dose NRT group (31.2 mg for the first 4 weeks, then 20.8 mg for 4 weeks, n = 92) or a low-dose NRT group (20.8 mg for 8 weeks, n = 92). The 7-day point prevalence of abstinence was 2.7 % (5/184). Participants in the low-dose NRT group reduced smoking by 3.1 more cigarettes on average than those in the high-dose group (p = 0.005). However, a repeated measures analysis of variance revealed that the main effect of changes in the number of cigarettes smoked, comparing the two types of treatment across periods, was not significant (p = 0.35, partial eta square = 0.018). In summary, among a cohort of chronic institutionalized schizophrenic patients, smoking cessation and reduction outcomes were not correlated with NRT dose, and the cessation rate was much lower than rates in similar studies. It indicates that long-term hospitalized schizophrenic patients have more difficulties with quitting smoking. More effective integrative smoking cessation programs should be addressed for these patients.

  2. Consolidation Radiotherapy in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphomas: Impact on Outcome of Different Fields and Doses in Patients in Complete Remission After Upfront Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreri, Andres Jose Maria; Verona, Chiara; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Chiara, Anna; Perna, Lucia; Villa, Eugenio; Reni, Michele

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Avoidance radiotherapy or reduction of irradiation doses in patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) in complete remission (CR) after high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX)-based chemotherapy has been proposed to minimize the neurotoxicity risk. Nevertheless, no study has focused on the survival impact of radiation parameters, as far as we know, and the optimal radiation schedule remains to be defined. Methods and Materials: The impact on outcome and neurologic performance of different radiation fields and doses was assessed in 33 patients with PCNSL who achieved CR after MTX-containing chemotherapy and were referred to consolidation whole-brain irradiation (WBRT). Patterns of relapse were analyzed on computed tomography-guided treatment planning, and neurologic impairment was assessed by the Mini Mental Status Examination. Results: At a median follow-up of 50 months, 21 patients are relapse-free (5-year failure-free survival [FFS], 51%). WBRT doses {>=}40 Gy were not associated with improved disease control in comparison with a WBRT dose of 30 to 36 Gy (relapse rate, 46% vs. 30%; 5-year FFS, 51% vs. 50%; p = 0.26). Disease control was not significantly different between patients irradiated to the tumor bed with 45 to 54 Gy or with 36 to 44 Gy, with a 5-year FFS of 35% and 44% (p = 0.43), respectively. Twenty patients are alive (5-year overall survival, 54%); WB and tumor bed doses did not have an impact on survival. Impairment as assessed by the Mini Mental Status Examination was significantly more common in patients treated with a WBRT dose {>=}40 Gy. Conclusion: Consolidation with WBRT 36 Gy is advisable in patients with PCNSL in CR after HD-MTX-based chemotherapy. Higher doses do not change the outcome and could increase the risk of neurotoxicity.

  3. Tolerance doses for treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman, J.T.

    1985-10-01

    Data for the tolerance of normal tissues or organs to (low-LET) radiation has been compiled from a number of sources which are referenced at the end of this document. This tolerance dose data are ostensibly for uniform irradiation of all or part of an organ, and are for either 5% (TD/sub 5/) or 50% (TD/sub 50/) complication probability. The ''size'' of the irradiated organ is variously stated in terms of the absolute volume or the fraction of the organ volume irradiated, or the area or the length of the treatment field. The accuracy of these data is questionable. Much of the data represents doses that one or several experienced therapists have estimated could be safely given rather than quantitative analyses of clinical observations. Because these data have been obtained from multiple sources with possible different criteria for the definition of a complication, there are sometimes different values for what is apparently the same endpoint. The data from some sources shows a tendancy to be quantized in 5 Gy increments. This reflects the size of possible round off errors. It is believed that all these data have been accumulated without the benefit of 3-D dose distributions and therefore the estimates of the size of the volume and/or the uniformity of the irradiation may be less accurate than is now possible. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Comparison of two different doses of lidocaine on the pain sensation during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Ateş, Ferhat; Dursun, Furkan; Malkoç, Ercan; Yılmaz, Ömer; Soydan, Hasan; Şen, Hüseyin; Başal, Şeref; Zekey, Fatih; Karademir, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare two different doses of lidocaine used for periprostatic nerve block on pain perception during transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy. Material and methods A total of 288 patients with elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels and/or abnormal digital rectal examination who underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were included in the study. The patients were divided into 3 groups: Group 1 (n=103) prostate biopsy were performed after administering perianal intrarectal application of 10 mL 2% lidocaine gel, Group 2 (n=98) 2 mL of 2% lidocaine injection on each side following rectal installation of lidocaine gel and Group 3 (n=87) 4 mL of 2% lidocaine injection on each side after rectal instillation of lidocaine gel. Patients’ pain scores during biopsy procedure were reported using visual analogue score (VAS). Independent sample t test, ANOVA test and Tukey test were used for statistical evaluation. Results The mean age, prostate volume and PSA level were 65.6±8.4 years, 58.2±34.8 mL, and 11.8±3.4 ng/mL respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in baseline characteristics between the groups. The mean VAS scores were 2.4±1.8 in Group 1, 2.5±1.9 in Group 2 and 1.6±1.6 in Group 3. Patients in Group 3, reported significant pain reduction compared with patients in Groups 1 and 2 (p=0.002, and 0.001, respectively). However, there was no statistically significant difference in VAS scores between Groups 1 and 2 (p=0.815). Conclusion According to our results we recommend the use of perianal intrarectal lidocain gel application, and periprostatic nerve block with injection of 4 ml 2% lidocaine per side combination in TRUS-guided prostate biopsies. Further large-scale randomized control studies are needed to validate these finding. PMID:27635288

  5. Female rats display dose-dependent differences to the rewarding and aversive effects of nicotine in an age-, hormone-, and sex-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Oscar V.; Natividad, Luis A.; Tejeda, Hugo A.; Van Weelden, Susan A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to examine age-, hormone-, and sex-dependent differences to the behavioral effects of nicotine using place-conditioning procedures in female rats. Methods Animals received nicotine in their initially non-preferred side and saline on alternate days in their initially preferred side. Following four conditioning trials, rats were retested for their preference. To examine developmental differences, we compared the effects of various nicotine doses in female and male adolescent and adult rats. To examine whether our developmental differences are specific to nicotine, we included adolescent and adult females that were conditioned with various amphetamine doses. To examine the influence of hormones on the behavioral effects of nicotine, we compared the effects of various nicotine doses in intact females that were tested during different phases of the estrous cycle and in separate females that were ovariectomized. Result The rewarding effects of nicotine were observed at a lower nicotine dose in adolescents versus adults. Amphetamine produced similar rewarding effects across age groups in females. The shifts in preference produced by nicotine were similar across the different phases of estrous. Females lacking ovarian hormones did not display rewarding effects of nicotine at any dose. The rewarding effects of nicotine were enhanced in adult female versus male rats. An intermediate nicotine dose produced rewarding effects in adolescent male but not female rats, suggesting that developmental differences to nicotine may be enhanced in males. Conclusion In females, nicotine reward is enhanced during adolescence and is facilitated by the presence of ovarian hormones. PMID:19629450

  6. [Dyslipidemic patients with coronary cardiopathy. Effect of different doses of OMEGA-3 fatty acids on serum lipids and lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Arteaga, A; Villanueva, C L; Skorin, C; Guasch, V; Solís de Ovando, F; Velasco, N; Acosta, A M; Leighton, F

    1993-06-01

    Twenty one male patients aged 35 to 70 years, with coronary artery disease and dislipidemia refractory to dietary treatment, were assigned to three parallel groups of 7 individuals each that received a supplemental dose of 2, 4 and 6 g/day of omega-3 fatty acids during 60 days. After a 30 days wash-out period and 60 of supplementation, subjects were weighed, a dietary survey was performed, serum levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides, the lipid content of serum lipoproteins and the content of EPA+DHA in plasma phospholipids were measured. A dose dependent increase in EPA+DHA content of phospholipids and no changes in weight or nutrient intake were observed during the supplementation period. With the 6 g dose, a significant reduction in total cholesterol, with a reduction in VLDL and increase in LDL cholesterol and a decline in VLDL triglycerides was observed. With the 4 g dose a reduction in total cholesterol at the expense of VLDL and HDL cholesterol and a reduction in VLDL triglycerides but no changes in total triglycerides was observed. No changes in serum lipids were observed with 2 g dose. In patients with type IIA hyperlipidemia, a significant positive correlation was observed between DHA+EPA content of plasma phospholipids and LDL cholesterol, this correlation was not observed in patients with IIB or IV phenotypes. It is concluded that omega-3 fatty acids are ineffective as the only treatment for dislipidemias refractory to diet.

  7. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  8. SU-E-J-109: Evaluation of Deformable Accumulated Parotid Doses Using Different Registration Algorithms in Adaptive Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S; Liu, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Three deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms are utilized to perform deformable dose accumulation for head and neck tomotherapy treatment, and the differences of the accumulated doses are evaluated. Methods: Daily MVCT data for 10 patients with pathologically proven nasopharyngeal cancers were analyzed. The data were acquired using tomotherapy (TomoTherapy, Accuray) at the PLA General Hospital. The prescription dose to the primary target was 70Gy in 33 fractions.Three DIR methods (B-spline, Diffeomorphic Demons and MIMvista) were used to propagate parotid structures from planning CTs to the daily CTs and accumulate fractionated dose on the planning CTs. The mean accumulated doses of parotids were quantitatively compared and the uncertainties of the propagated parotid contours were evaluated using Dice similarity index (DSI). Results: The planned mean dose of the ipsilateral parotids (32.42±3.13Gy) was slightly higher than those of the contralateral parotids (31.38±3.19Gy)in 10 patients. The difference between the accumulated mean doses of the ipsilateral parotids in the B-spline, Demons and MIMvista deformation algorithms (36.40±5.78Gy, 34.08±6.72Gy and 33.72±2.63Gy ) were statistically significant (B-spline vs Demons, P<0.0001, B-spline vs MIMvista, p =0.002). And The difference between those of the contralateral parotids in the B-spline, Demons and MIMvista deformation algorithms (34.08±4.82Gy, 32.42±4.80Gy and 33.92±4.65Gy ) were also significant (B-spline vs Demons, p =0.009, B-spline vs MIMvista, p =0.074). For the DSI analysis, the scores of B-spline, Demons and MIMvista DIRs were 0.90, 0.89 and 0.76. Conclusion: Shrinkage of parotid volumes results in the dose increase to the parotid glands in adaptive head and neck radiotherapy. The accumulated doses of parotids show significant difference using the different DIR algorithms between kVCT and MVCT. Therefore, the volume-based criterion (i.e. DSI) as a quantitative evaluation of

  9. In vivo absorption spectroscopy for absolute measurement.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiromitsu; Fukuda, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    In in vivo spectroscopy, there are differences between individual subjects in parameters such as tissue scattering and sample concentration. We propose a method that can provide the absolute value of a particular substance concentration, independent of these individual differences. Thus, it is not necessary to use the typical statistical calibration curve, which assumes an average level of scattering and an averaged concentration over individual subjects. This method is expected to greatly reduce the difficulties encountered during in vivo measurements. As an example, for in vivo absorption spectroscopy, the method was applied to the reflectance measurement in retinal vessels to monitor their oxygen saturation levels. This method was then validated by applying it to the tissue phantom under a variety of absorbance values and scattering efficiencies.

  10. Radiobiological basis of total body irradiation with different dose rate and fractionation: repair capacity of hemopoietic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, C.W.; Kim, T.H.; Khan, F.M.; Kersey, J.H.; Levitt, S.H.

    1981-12-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) followed by bone marrow transplantation is being used in the treatment of malignant or non-malignant hemopoietic disorders. It has been believed that the ability of hemopoietic cells to repair sublethal radiation damage is negligible. Therefore, several schools of investigators suggested that TBI in a single exposure at extremely low dose rate (5 rad/min) over several hours, or in several fractions in 2-3 days, should yield a higher therapeutic gain, as compared with a single exposure at a high dose rate (25 rad/min). We reviewed the existing data in the literature, in particular, the response of hemopoietic cells to fractionated doses of irradiation and found that the repair capacity of both malignant and non-malignant hemopoietic cells might be greater than has been thought. It is concluded that we should not underestimate the ability of hemopoietic cells to repair sublethal radiation damage in using TBI.

  11. Radiobiological basis of total body irradiation with different dose rate and fractionation: repair capacity of hemopoietic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, C.W.; Kim, T.H.; Khan, F.M.; Kersey, J.H.; Levitt, S.H.

    1981-12-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) followed by bone marrow transplantation is being used in the treatment of malignant or non-malignant hemopoietic disorders. It has been believed that the ability of hemopoietic cells to repair sublethal radiation damage is negligible. Therefore, several schools of investigators suggested that TBI in a single exposure at extremely low dose rate (5 rad/min) over several hours, or in several fractions in 2-3 days, should yield a higher therapeutic gain, as compared with a single exposure at a high dose rate (26 rad/min). We reviewed the existing data in the literature, in particular, the response of hemopoietic cells to fractionated doses of irradiation and found that the repair capacity of both malignant and non-malignant hemopoietic cells might be greater than has been thought. It is concluded that we should not underestimate the ability of hemopoietic cells to repair sublethal radiation damage in using TBI.

  12. Photon and neutron dose contributions and mean quality factors phantoms of different size irradiated by monoenergetic neutrons.

    PubMed

    Dietze, G; Siebert, B R

    1994-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its Publication 60 introduced important changes in the concept of risk-related quantities. For external neutron radiation in particular the introduction of the equivalent dose with the radiation weighting factor wR instead of the dose equivalent concept with the quality factor Q(L) has many consequences. The value of wR is defined by the external neutron radiation field, while the radiation quality in the phantom depends on the radiation field at the position of interest and hence on the size of and the position in the phantom. It has been investigated to what extent the size of the phantom influences the mean radiation quality in the phantoms. For incident monoenergetic neutrons, mean photon dose contributions and mean quality factors have been calculated. Results are presented for various phantoms which characterize the conditions for a mouse, a rat, the ICRU sphere and a human body.

  13. Absolute and relative family affluence and psychosomatic symptoms in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Elgar, Frank J; De Clercq, Bart; Schnohr, Christina W; Bird, Phillippa; Pickett, Kate E; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Hofmann, Felix; Currie, Candace

    2013-08-01

    Previous research on the links between income inequality and health and socioeconomic differences in health suggests that relative differences in affluence impact health and well-being more than absolute affluence. This study explored whether self-reported psychosomatic symptoms in adolescents relate more closely to relative affluence (i.e., relative deprivation or rank affluence within regions or schools) than to absolute affluence. Data on family material assets and psychosomatic symptoms were collected from 48,523 adolescents in eight countries (Austria, Belgium, Canada, Norway, Scotland, Poland, Turkey, and Ukraine) as part of the 2009/10 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study. Multilevel regression analyses of the data showed that relative deprivation (Yitzhaki Index, calculated in regions and in schools) and rank affluence (in regions) (1) related more closely to symptoms than absolute affluence, and (2) related to symptoms after differences in absolute affluence were held constant. However, differences in family material assets, whether they are measured in absolute or relative terms, account for a significant variation in adolescent psychosomatic symptoms. Conceptual and empirical issues relating to the use of material affluence indices to estimate socioeconomic position are discussed.

  14. Detection of changes in DNA methylation induced by different doses of ground-base ion radiation in rice(oryza sativa L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qian; Sun, Yeqing; Wang, Wei; Wen, Bin

    Spaceflight represents a very complex environmental condition with highly ionizing radiations (HZE). To further investigate the incentives of ion effects in space environment, we performed on-ground simulated HZE particle radiations to rice seeds with different cumulative doses (0Gy, 0.01Gy, 0.02Gy, 0.1Gy, 0.2Gy, 1Gy , 2Gy, 5Gy, 20Gy ). Using Methylation-Sensitive Amplification Polymorphism (MSAP) analysis technology, differential polymorphism sites of DNA methylation of seedlings were analysed and acquired. The results showed that changes of methylation and demethylation on CCGG sites had taken place after irradiated treatments in all doses. It was noted that there was a stimulating effect in low-dose radiation(≤1 Gy). The minimum proportion of DNA methylation polymorphism level was 3.15% in 0.1Gy, whereas the maximum proportion was 9.87% in 2Gy, interestingly the proportion reduced with radiation doses increased, suggesting the dosage effects of radiation. We further found that the CG site tended to have a higher proportion of cytosine methylation alterations than CNG site in six of the eight dose groups. The results also indicated that different dose treatment groups showed various frequencies of methylation variation patterns: The type of CG hypermethylation was higher than CG hypormethylation in four low-dose groups (<≤2 Gy) ,whereas the result presented the opposite trends in all high-dose groups(>≥1 Gy). In addition, the type of CNG hypormethylation was obviously higher than the CNG hypermethylation in seven dose groups. This result indicated that the methylation variation patterns caused by radiation had site preferences. To investigate the mechanisms of sequences underlying alterations in DNA methylation after ion irradiation, we isolated, cloned and sequenced a subset of bands which showed obvious mutational bias. BLAST analysis indicated that many sequences showed significant homology to known function genes, most of which were related to

  15. Determination of the contribution of livestock water ingestion to dose from the cow-milk pathway. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 002

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, a series of calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to thyroid doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. These evaluations include some pathways that were included in the Phase I air-pathway dose evaluations (HEDR staff 1991, page xx), as well as other potential exposure pathways being evaluated for possible inclusion in the future HEDR modeling efforts. This calculation (002) examined the possible doses that may have been received by individuals who drank milk from cows that drank from sources of water (stock tanks and farm ponds) exposed to iodine-131 in the atmosphere during 1945.

  16. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to dose in 1945. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 003

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 003) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow`s milk (calculation 001). Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in Calculation 001.

  17. Antimuscarinic-induced convulsions in fasted animals after food intake: evaluation of the effects of levetiracetam, topiramate and different doses of atropine.

    PubMed

    Büget, Bahar; Türkmen, Aslı Zengin; Allahverdiyev, Oruc; Enginar, Nurhan

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of different doses of atropine and new antiepileptics, levetiracetam and topiramate, on the development of convulsions triggered by food intake in antimuscarinic-treated fasted animals. Mice deprived of food for 24 h and treated i.p. with atropine at a dose of 2.4 or 24 mg/kg developed convulsions after being allowed to eat ad libitum. No convulsions were observed in fasted animals treated with 0.24 mg/kg atropine. There was no difference in the incidence of convulsions between the two atropine treatments, but latency to convulsions was longer in 24 mg/kg atropine treated animals. The lowest dose of atropine, 0.24 mg/kg, caused stage 1 and stage 2 activity, but did not provide the convulsive endpoint (stage 3, 4, 5 activity). Administration of levetiracetam (50 or 200 mg/kg) or topiramate (50 or 100 mg/kg) to another group of 24-h fasted mice was ineffective in reducing the incidence of convulsions developed in the animals after 2.4 mg/kg atropine treatment and food intake. However, the higher dose of levetiracetam prolonged the onset of convulsions. Present results demonstrated the efficacy of low and high doses of atropine on the development of convulsions in fasted animals and provided additional evidence for the ineffectiveness of antiepileptic treatment in these seizures.

  18. Comparison of planned and measured rectal dose in-vivo during high dose rate Cobalt-60 brachytherapy of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Z K; Ung, N M; Malik, R A; Ho, G F; Phua, V C E; Jamalludin, Z; Baharuldin, M T H; Ng, K H

    2014-12-01

    Cobalt-60 (Co-60) is a relatively new source for the application of high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Radiation dose to the rectum is often a limiting factor in achieving the full prescribed dose to the target during brachytherapy of cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to measure radiation doses to the rectum in-vivo during HDR Co-60 brachytherapy. A total of eleven HDR brachytherapy treatments of cervical cancer were recruited in this study. A series of diodes incorporated in a rectal probe was inserted into the patient's rectum during each brachytherapy procedure. Real-time measured rectal doses were compared to calculated doses by the treatment planning system (TPS). The differences between calculated and measured dose ranged from 8.5% to 41.2%. This corresponds to absolute dose differences ranging from 0.3 Gy to 1.5 Gy. A linear relationship was observed between calculated and measured doses with linear regression R(2) value of 0.88, indicating close association between the measured and calculated doses. In general, absorbed doses for the rectum as calculated by TPS were observed to be higher than the doses measured using the diode probe. In-vivo dosimetry is an important quality assurance method for HDR brachytherapy of cervical cancer. It provides information that can contribute to the reduction of errors and discrepancies in dose delivery. Our study has shown that in-vivo dosimetry is feasible and can be performed to estimate the dose to the rectum during HDR brachytherapy using Co-60.

  19. Scoping calculation for components of the cow-milk dose pathway for evaluating the dose contribution from iodine-131. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations have been undertaken to evaluate The absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 001) examined the contributions of the various exposure pathways associated with environmental transport and accumulation of iodine-131 in the pasture-cow-milk pathway. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants and adult from (1) the ingestion by dairy cattle of various feedstuffs (pasturage, silage, alfalfa hay, and grass hay) in four different feeding regimes; (2) ingestion of soil by dairy cattle; (3) ingestion of stared feed on which airborne iodine-131 had been deposited; and (4) inhalation of airborne iodine-131 by dairy cows.

  20. SU-E-J-203: Investigation of 1.5T Magnetic Field Dose Effects On Organs of Different Density

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H; Rubinstein, A; Ibbott, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For the combined 1.5T/6MV MRI-linac system, the perpendicular magnetic field to the radiation beam results in altered radiation dose distributions. This Monte Carlo study investigates the change in dose at interfaces for common organs neighboring soft tissue. Methods: MCNP6 was used to simulate the effects of a 1.5T magnetic field when irradiating tissues with a 6 MV beam. The geometries used in this study were not necessarily anatomically representative in size in order to directly compare quantitative dose effects for each tissue at the same depths. For this purpose, a 512 cm{sup 3} cubic material was positioned at the center of a 2744 cm{sup 3} cubic soft tissue material phantom. The following tissue materials and their densities were used in this study: lung (0.296 g/cm{sup 3}), fat (0.95), spinal cord (1.038), soft tissue (1.04), muscle (1.05), eye (1.076), trabecular bone (1.40), and cortical bone (1.85). Results: The addition of a 1.5T magnetic field caused dose changes of +46.5%, +2.4%, −0.9%, −0.8%, −1.5%, −6.5%, and −8.8% at the entrance interface between soft tissue and lung, fat, spinal cord, muscle, eye, trabecular bone, and cortical bone tissues respectively. Dose changes of −39.4%, −4.1%, −0.8%, −0.8%, +0.5%, +6.7%, and +10.9% were observed at the second interface between the same tissues respectively and soft tissue. On average, the build-up distance was reduced by 0.6 cm, and a dose increase of 62.7% was observed at the exit interface between soft tissue and air of the entire phantom. Conclusion: The greatest changes in dose were observed at interfaces containing lung and bone tissues. Due to the prevalence and proximity of bony anatomy to soft tissues throughout the human body, these results encourage further examination of these tissues with anatomically representative geometries using multiple beam configurations for safe treatment using the MRI-linac system.

  1. Absolute bioavailability of quinine formulations in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Babalola, C P; Bolaji, O O; Ogunbona, F A; Ezeomah, E

    2004-09-01

    This study compared the absolute bioavailability of quinine sulphate as capsule and as tablet against the intravenous (i.v.) infusion of the drug in twelve male volunteers. Six of the volunteers received intravenous infusion over 4 h as well as the capsule formulation of the drug in a cross-over manner, while the other six received the tablet formulation. Blood samples were taken at predetermined time intervals and plasma analysed for quinine (QN) using reversed-phase HPLC method. QN was rapidly absorbed after the two oral formulations with average t(max) of 2.67 h for both capsule and tablet. The mean elimination half-life of QN from the i.v. and oral dosage forms varied between 10 and 13.5 hr and were not statistically different (P > 0.05). On the contrary, the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and area under the curve (AUC) from capsule were comparable to those from i.v. (P > 0.05), while these values were markedly higher than values from tablet formulation (P < 0.05). The therapeutic QN plasma levels were not achieved with the tablet formulation. The absolute bioavailability (F) were 73% (C.l., 53.3 - 92.4%) and 39 % (C.I., 21.7 - 56.6%) for the capsule and tablet respectively and the difference was significant (P < 0.05). The subtherapeutic levels obtained from the tablet form used in this study may cause treatment failure during malaria and caution should be taken when predictions are made from results obtained from different formulations of QN.

  2. Dose-Volume Differences for Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Segmentation and Planning for Proton Prostate Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, Anamaria R.; Vargas, Carlos E. Falchook, Aaron; Louis, Debbie C.; Olivier, Kenneth; Keole, Sameer; Yeung, Daniel; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Li Zuofeng

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI)-vs. computed-tomography (CT)-based prostate and normal structure delineation on the dose to the target and organs at risk during proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients were simulated in the supine position using both CT and T2 MRI. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were delineated on both imaging modalities. The planning target volume (PTV) was generated from the delineated prostates with a 5-mm axial and 8-mm superior and inferior margin. Two plans were generated and analyzed for each patient: an MRI plan based on the MRI-delineated PTV, and a CT plan based on the CT-delineated PTV. Doses of 78 Gy equivalents (GE) were prescribed to the PTV. Results: Doses to normal structures were lower when MRI was used to delineate the rectum and bladder compared with CT: bladder V50 was 15.3% lower (p = 0.04), and rectum V50 was 23.9% lower (p = 0.003). Poor agreement on the definition of the prostate apex was seen between CT and MRI (p = 0.007). The CT-defined prostate apex was within 2 mm of the apex on MRI only 35.7% of the time. Coverage of the MRI-delineated PTV was significantly decreased with the CT-based plan: the minimum dose to the PTV was reduced by 43% (p < 0.001), and the PTV V99% was reduced by 11% (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Using MRI to delineate the prostate results in more accurate target definition and a smaller target volume compared with CT, allowing for improved target coverage and decreased doses to critical normal structures.

  3. Sex Differences in Dose Escalation and Overdose Death during Chronic Opioid Therapy: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kaplovitch, Eric; Gomes, Tara; Camacho, Ximena; Dhalla, Irfan A.; Mamdani, Muhammad M.; Juurlink, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of opioids for noncancer pain is widespread, and more than 16,000 die of opioid-related causes in the United States annually. The patients at greatest risk of death are those receiving high doses of opioids. Whether sex influences the risk of dose escalation or opioid-related mortality is unknown. Methods and Findings We conducted a cohort study using healthcare records of 32,499 individuals aged 15 to 64 who commenced chronic opioid therapy for noncancer pain between April 1, 1997 and December 31, 2010 in Ontario, Canada. Patients were followed from their first opioid prescription until discontinuation of therapy, death from any cause or the end of the study period. Among patients receiving chronic opioid therapy, 589 (1.8%) escalated to high dose therapy and n = 59 (0.2%) died of opioid-related causes while on treatment. After multivariable adjustment, men were more likely than women to escalate to high-dose opioid therapy (adjusted hazard ratio 1.44; 95% confidence interval 1.21 to 1.70) and twice as likely to die of opioid-related causes (adjusted hazard ratio 2.04; 95% confidence interval 1.18 to 3.53). These associations were maintained in a secondary analysis of 285,520 individuals receiving any opioid regardless of the duration of therapy. Conclusions Men are at higher risk than women for escalation to high-dose opioid therapy and death from opioid-related causes. Both outcomes were more common than anticipated. PMID:26291716

  4. Absorbed dose to water reference dosimetry using solid phantoms in the context of absorbed-dose protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Seuntjens, Jan; Olivares, Marina; Evans, Michael; Podgorsak, Ervin

    2005-09-15

    For reasons of phantom material reproducibility, the absorbed dose protocols of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) (TG-51) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (TRS-398) have made the use of liquid water as a phantom material for reference dosimetry mandatory. In this work we provide a formal framework for the measurement of absorbed dose to water using ionization chambers calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water but irradiated in solid phantoms. Such a framework is useful when there is a desire to put dose measurements using solid phantoms on an absolute basis. Putting solid phantom measurements on an absolute basis has distinct advantages in verification measurements and quality assurance. We introduce a phantom dose conversion factor that converts a measurement made in a solid phantom and analyzed using an absorbed dose calibration protocol into absorbed dose to water under reference conditions. We provide techniques to measure and calculate the dose transfer from solid phantom to water. For an Exradin A12 ionization chamber, we measured and calculated the phantom dose conversion factor for six Solid Water{sup TM} phantoms and for a single Lucite phantom for photon energies between {sup 60}Co and 18 MV photons. For Solid Water{sup TM} of certified grade, the difference between measured and calculated factors varied between 0.0% and 0.7% with the average dose conversion factor being low by 0.4% compared with the calculation whereas for Lucite, the agreement was within 0.2% for the one phantom examined. The composition of commercial plastic phantoms and their homogeneity may not always be reproducible and consistent with assumed composition. By comparing measured and calculated phantom conversion factors, our work provides methods to verify the consistency of a given plastic for the purpose of clinical reference dosimetry.

  5. Determining Absolute Zero Using a Tuning Fork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldader, Jeffrey D.

    2008-04-01

    The Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales, we tell our students, are related. We explain that a change in temperature of 1°C corresponds to a change of 1 Kelvin and that atoms and molecules have zero kinetic energy at zero Kelvin, -273°C. In this paper, we will show how students can derive the relationship between the Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales using a simple, well-known physics experiment. By making multiple measurements of the speed of sound at different temperatures, using the classic physics experiment of determining the speed of sound with a tuning fork and variable-length tube, they can determine the temperature at which the speed of sound is zero—absolute zero.

  6. Determination of optimal PTV margin for patients receiving CBCT-guided prostate IMRT: comparative analysis based on CBCT dose calculation with four different margins.

    PubMed

    Gill, Sukhdeep K; Reddy, Krishna; Campbell, Nina; Chen, Changhu; Pearson, David

    2015-11-08

    Variations in daily setup and rectum/bladder filling lead to uncertainties in the delivery of prostate IMRT. The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal PTV margin for CBCT-guided prostate IMRT based on daily CBCT dose calculations using four different margins. Five patients diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer were treated with prostate IMRT to 70 Gy in 28 fractions using daily CBCT for image guidance. The prostate CTV and OARs were contoured on all CBCTs. IMRT plans were created using 1 mm, 3 mm, 5 mm, and 7 mm CTV to PTV expansions. For each delivered fraction, dose calculations were generated utilizing the pretreatment CBCT translational shifts performed and dosimetric analysis was performed. One hundred and forty total treatment fractions (CBCT sessions) were evaluated. The planned prostate CTV V100% was 100% for all PTV margins. Based on CBCT analysis, the actual cumulative CTVs V100% were 96.55% ± 2.94%, 99.49% ± 1.36%, 99.98% ± 0.26%, and 99.99% ± 0.05% for 1, 3, 5, and 7 mm uniform PTV margins, respectively. Delivered rectum and bladder doses were different as compared to expected planned doses, with the magnitude of differences increasing with PTV margin. Daily setup variation during prostate IMRT yields differences in the actual vs. expected doses received by the prostate CTV, rectum, and bladder. The magnitude of these differences is significantly affected by the PTV margin utilized. It was found that when daily CBCT was used for soft-tissue alignment of the prostate, a 3 mm PTV margin allowed for CTV to be covered for 99% of cases.

  7. Role of RAAS and adipokines in cardiovascular protection: effect of different doses of angiotensin II receptor blocker on adipokines level in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Hass, Anat; Oz, Hadar; Mashavi, Margarita; Shargorodsky, Marina

    2014-10-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effect of different doses of the angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), candesartan, on circulating adiponectin and leptin levels as well as leptin adiponectin ratio (LAR) in hypertensive patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors.Sixty-nine hypertensive patients were randomized to three groups: group 1 included patients treated with high doses of Candesartan (32 mg); group 2 included patients treated with conventional doses of Candesartan (16 mg); and group 3 included patients that received antihypertensive treatment other than ARBs or angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors. Patients were evaluated for lipid profile, HbA1C, insulin, C-peptide, c-reactive protein, aldosterone, renin, Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, leptin, adiponectin and LAR. Baseline adiponectin, leptin, and LAR levels did not differ significantly between the three groups. After 6 months of treatment, LAR was significantly higher in group 3 than group 1 (P = .007) or group 2 (P = .023). Differences between effects of high (32 mg) and conventional doses (16 mg) of Candesartan on LAR were not observed (P = .678). Marginal across-group differences were detected for posttreatment circulating adiponectin level (P = .064). Univariate general linear model (GLM) analysis of posttreatment LAR detected significant by-group differences even after adjustment for age, gender, baseline values of LAR, and blood pressure. In this model, group was the only significant predictor of LAR after controlling for these variables. Treatment with high doses of the ARB, candesartan, is associated with significantly reduced LAR and marginally increased circulating adiponectin levels in hypertensive patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors.

  8. SU-E-T-371: Validation of Organ Doses Delivered During Craniospinal Irradiation with Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Andujar, A; Chen, J; Garcia, A; Haas-Kogan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: New techniques have been developed to deliver more conformal treatments to the craniospinal axis. One concern, however, is the widespread low dose delivered and implications for possible late effects. The purpose of this work is for the first time to validate the organ doses calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS), including out-of-field doses for a pediatric craniospinal treatment (CSI). Methods: A CSI plan prescribed to 23.4 Gy and a posterior fossa boost plan to 30.6 Gy (total dose 54.0 Gy) was developed for a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom representing a 13 yearold- child. For the CSI plan, the planning target volumes (PTV) consisted of the brain and spinal cord with 2 mm and 5 mm expansions, respectively. Organs at risk (OAR) were contoured and included in the plan optimization. The plans were delivered on a helical tomotherapy unit. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the dose at 54 positions within the PTV and OARs. Results: For the CSI treatment, the mean percent difference between TPS dose calculations and measurements was 5% for the PTV and 10% for the OARs. For the boost, the average was 3% for the PTV. The percent difference for the OARs, which lie outside the field and received a small fraction of the prescription dose, varied from 15% to 200%. However in terms of absolute dose, the average difference between measurement and TPS per treatment Gy was 2 cGy/Gy and 3 mGy/Gy for the CSI and boost plans, respectively. Conclusion: There was good agreement between doses calculated by the TPS and measurements for the CSI treatment. Higher percent differences were observed for out-of-field doses in the boost plan, but absolute dose differences were very small compared to the prescription dose. These findings can help in the estimation of late effects after radiotherapy for pediatric patients.

  9. Accurate absolute GPS positioning through satellite clock error estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.-C.; Kwon, J. H.; Jekeli, C.

    2001-05-01

    An algorithm for very accurate absolute positioning through Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite clock estimation has been developed. Using International GPS Service (IGS) precise orbits and measurements, GPS clock errors were estimated at 30-s intervals. Compared to values determined by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the agreement was at the level of about 0.1 ns (3 cm). The clock error estimates were then applied to an absolute positioning algorithm in both static and kinematic modes. For the static case, an IGS station was selected and the coordinates were estimated every 30 s. The estimated absolute position coordinates and the known values had a mean difference of up to 18 cm with standard deviation less than 2 cm. For the kinematic case, data obtained every second from a GPS buoy were tested and the result from the absolute positioning was compared to a differential GPS (DGPS) solution. The mean differences between the coordinates estimated by the two methods are less than 40 cm and the standard deviations are less than 25 cm. It was verified that this poorer standard deviation on 1-s position results is due to the clock error interpolation from 30-s estimates with Selective Availability (SA). After SA was turned off, higher-rate clock error estimates (such as 1 s) could be obtained by a simple interpolation with negligible corruption. Therefore, the proposed absolute positioning technique can be used to within a few centimeters' precision at any rate by estimating 30-s satellite clock errors and interpolating them.

  10. [Hypoglycemic action of different doses of nopal (Opuntia streptacantha Lemaire) in patients with type II diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Frati-Munari, A C; Del Valle-Martínez, L M; Ariza-Andraca, C R; Islas-Andrade, S; Chávez-Negrete, A

    1989-01-01

    To assess the relationship between the doses of O. streptacantha Lem. and its acute hypoglycemic action in diabetics, eight patients with type II diabetes mellitus were studied. Four test were performed to each patient with the intake of: (a) 400 ml of water, (b) 100 g (c) 300 g and (d) 500 g of broiled stems of O. streptacantha Lem. Serum glucose was measured at 0, 60, 120 and 180 minutes. Maximal decrease of serum glucose was noticed at 180 minutes, with a mean of 2.3, 10, 30.1 and 46.7 mg/dl less than basal value with 0, 100, 300 and 500 g respectively (P = NS, less than 0.05, less than 0.001 and less than 0.001 respectively). A significant direct correlation (r = 0.690, P less than 0.001) was noticed between the doses and the hypoglycemic effect.

  11. Comparative assessment of efficacy of two different pretreatment single oral doses of betamethasone on inter-appointment and postoperative discomfort: An in vivo clinical evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Gyanani, Hitesh; Chhabra, Naveen; Parmar, Ghanshyam R.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of two different pretreatment single oral doses of betamethasone on the incidence of inter-appointment flare up and postoperative discomfort. Materials and Methods: Fifty-four patients aged 18–59 years requiring endodontic treatment were selected and randomly assigned to three groups; single pretreatment oral dose of placebo or betamethasone in two different oral doses of 0.5 mg and 1 mg, respectively. Endodontic therapy was completed in two visits using triple antibiotic paste as intracanal medicament. Patients were given a questionnaire to record their pain at 1, 2, 3, and 7 days after treatment. In the second visit, obturation was done, and the patients were again instructed to record their pain scores after treatment and discharged. The verbal rating scale was used for recording the pain scores. Statistical analysis was done using ANOVA and the Friedman test. Results: 0.5 mg betamethasone group showed least mean pain scores among all experimental groups; however, there was no statistically significant difference between any of the groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Pretreatment single oral dose of betamethasone is an effective in managing endodontic flare-ups; however, the results were statistically insignificant. PMID:27994320

  12. Effects of four different meal types on the population pharmacokinetics of single-dose rifapentine in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Zvada, Simbarashe P; Van Der Walt, Jan-Stefan; Smith, Peter J; Fourie, P Bernard; Roscigno, Giorgio; Mitchison, Denis; Simonsson, Ulrika S H; McIlleron, Helen M

    2010-08-01

    Rifapentine and its primary metabolite, 25-desacetyl rifapentine, are active against mycobacterium tuberculosis. The objectives of this study were to describe the population pharmacokinetics of rifapentine and 25-desacetyl rifapentine in fasting and fed states. Thirty-five male healthy volunteers were enrolled in an open-label, randomized, sequential, five-way crossover study. Participants received a single 900-mg dose of rifapentine after meals with high fat (meal A), bulk and low fat (meal B), bulk and high fat (meal C), high fluid and low fat (meal D), or 200 ml of water (meal E). Venous blood samples were collected over 72 h after each rifapentine dose, and plasma was analyzed for rifapentine and 25-desacetyl rifapentine using high-performance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic data were analyzed by nonlinear mixed-effect modeling using NONMEM. Compared with the fasting state, meal A had the greatest effect on rifapentine oral bioavailability, increasing it by 86%. Meals B, C, and D resulted in 33%, 46%, and 49% increases in rifapentine oral bioavailability, respectively. Similar trends were observed for 25-desacetyl rifapentine. As meal behavior has a substantial impact on rifapentine exposure, it should be considered in the evaluation of optimal dosing approaches.

  13. Effects of Four Different Meal Types on the Population Pharmacokinetics of Single-Dose Rifapentine in Healthy Male Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Zvada, Simbarashe P.; Van Der Walt, Jan-Stefan; Smith, Peter J.; Fourie, P. Bernard; Roscigno, Giorgio; Mitchison, Denis; Simonsson, Ulrika S. H.; McIlleron, Helen M.

    2010-01-01

    Rifapentine and its primary metabolite, 25-desacetyl rifapentine, are active against mycobacterium tuberculosis. The objectives of this study were to describe the population pharmacokinetics of rifapentine and 25-desacetyl rifapentine in fasting and fed states. Thirty-five male healthy volunteers were enrolled in an open-label, randomized, sequential, five-way crossover study. Participants received a single 900-mg dose of rifapentine after meals with high fat (meal A), bulk and low fat (meal B), bulk and high fat (meal C), high fluid and low fat (meal D), or 200 ml of water (meal E). Venous blood samples were collected over 72 h after each rifapentine dose, and plasma was analyzed for rifapentine and 25-desacetyl rifapentine using high-performance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic data were analyzed by nonlinear mixed-effect modeling using NONMEM. Compared with the fasting state, meal A had the greatest effect on rifapentine oral bioavailability, increasing it by 86%. Meals B, C, and D resulted in 33%, 46%, and 49% increases in rifapentine oral bioavailability, respectively. Similar trends were observed for 25-desacetyl rifapentine. As meal behavior has a substantial impact on rifapentine exposure, it should be considered in the evaluation of optimal dosing approaches. PMID:20516273

  14. Blast cell methotrexate-polyglutamate accumulation in vivo differs by lineage, ploidy, and methotrexate dose in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Synold, T W; Relling, M V; Boyett, J M; Rivera, G K; Sandlund, J T; Mahmoud, H; Crist, W M; Pui, C H; Evans, W E

    1994-01-01

    High-dose methotrexate (HDMTX) is a component of most treatment protocols for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), yet recent studies of receptor-mediated transport and saturable polyglutamylation have questioned its rationale. To investigate this in vivo, methotrexate and its active polyglutamated metabolites (MTX-PG) were measured in bone marrow blasts obtained from 101 children randomized to single-agent therapy with either HDMTX (1 g/m2 per 24 h i.v., n = 47) or low-dose MTX (LDMTX, 30 mg/m2 by mouth every 6 h x 6, n = 54), before remission induction therapy. Blast concentrations of total MTX-PGs (median 460 vs 1380 pmol/10(9) cells) and of long-chain MTX-glu4-6 were both significantly higher after HDMTX (P < 0.001). With either treatment, MTX-PGs were significantly higher in B-lineage blasts than in T-lineage blasts (LDMTX P = 0.001, HDMTX P = 0.03). In a multiple regression analysis of B-lineage ALL, blast MTX-PG was significantly related to MTX dose (or plasma MTX concentration), lymphoblast ploidy (hyperdiploid > nonhyperdiploid), and percentage S-phase. This is the first evidence that HDMTX achieves higher MTX-PG concentrations in ALL blasts in vivo, establishing a rationale for HDMTX in the treatment of childhood ALL, especially T-lineage or nonhyperdiploid B-lineage ALL, disease characteristics associated with a poor prognosis on conventional therapy. Images PMID:7525652

  15. Alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra under different shieldings in the Los Alamos high-energy neutron field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Huff, H.; Wilkins, R.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear interactions of space radiation with shielding materials result in alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra that depend on the specific elemental composition, density and thickness of the material. The shielding characteristics of materials have been studied using charged-particle beams and radiation transport models by examining the risk reduction using the conventional dose-equivalent approach. Secondary neutrons contribute a significant fraction of the total radiation exposure in space. An experiment to study the changes in dose and lineal energy spectra by shielding materials was carried out at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center neutron facility. In the energy range of about 2 to 200 MeV, this neutron spectrum is similar in shape within a factor of about 2 to the spectrum expected in the International Space Station habitable modules. It is shown that with a shielding thickness of about 5 g cm(-2), the conventional radiation risk increases, in some cases by as much as a factor of 2, but decreases with thicknesses of about of 20 g cm(-2). This suggests that care must be taken in evaluating the shielding effectiveness of a given material by including both the charged-particle and neutron components of space radiation.

  16. Quantification of the bla(CMY-2) in feces from beef feedlot cattle administered three different doses of ceftiofur in a longitudinal controlled field trial.

    PubMed

    Alali, W Q; Scott, H M; Norby, B; Gebreyes, W; Loneragan, G H

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this longitudinal controlled trial was to quantitatively compare carriage of a gene encoding for ceftiofur-resistance (bla(CMY-2)), standardized to a reference gene (16SrRNA), among total community DNA extracted from fecal samples collected from cattle treated with three different dose regimens of ceftiofur crystalline-free acid (CCFA) versus those untreated (controls). Sixty-one steers were assigned to three treatment regimens and housed in six pens. In each pen, five steers were treated and five were controls (one of the pens had six controls). CCFA administration was as follows: two-thirds dose treatment (4.4 mg/kg, on day 0), single-dose treatment (6.6 mg/kg, on day 0), and three-dose treatment (6.6 mg/kg, on days 0, 6, and 13). Fecal samples were collected on days 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 18, 21, and 28. The gene copy numbers/gram of feces for bla(CMY-2) and 16SrRNA were determined in total community DNA samples using quantitative real-time PCR. The relationships between the quantities of standardized bla(CMY-2), nonstandardized bla(CMY-2), and nonstandardized 16SrRNA, and the explanatory variables (treatment, time, and treatment x time) were assessed using repeated measures mixed models. There were significant differences in each of the three models with respect to each explanatory variable. Overall, while steers administered three doses and two-thirds dose of CCFA had significantly higher quantities of nonstandardized bla(CMY-2) than controls, the standardized values were lower. The administration of CCFA in feedlot cattle may provide selection pressure favoring higher levels of bla(CMY-2) carriage, but this may also lead to concurrent reductions in the total bacterial population (as reflected by lowered 16SrRNA) during the treatment period.

  17. The Protective Effect of Low-Dose Aspirin against Colorectal Cancer Is Unlikely Explained by Selection Bias: Results from Three Different Study Designs in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Cea Soriano, Lucía; Soriano-Gabarró, Montse; García Rodríguez, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Background We conducted three differently designed nested case–control studies to evaluate whether the protective effect of low-dose aspirin against colorectal cancer (CRC) is explained by selection bias. Methods Using a large validated UK primary care database, we followed different cohorts of patients, who varied in their demographic and clinical characteristics, to identify first ever cases of CRC. In Studies 1 and 2, two cohorts were followed, i) new users of low-dose aspirin at start of follow-up (N = 170,336 in Study 1, N = 171,527 in Study 2) and either ii) non-users of low-dose aspirin (Study 1, N = 170,336) or new users of paracetamol (Study 2, N = 149,597) at start of follow-up. In Study 3 a single cohort of individuals näive to low-dose aspirin at the start of observation was followed. Controls were selected using incidence sampling and logistic regression used to obtain an unbiased estimate of the incidence rate ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Low-dose aspirin exposure was analyzed ‘as-treated’ before the index date (CRC date for cases, random date for controls). Results In the three studies, median (maximum) follow-up was 5.1 (12), 5.8 (12) and 7.5 (13) years, respectively. 3033 incident CRC cases were identified in Study 1, 3174 in Study 2, and 12,333 in Study 3. Current use of low-dose aspirin was associated with a significantly reduced risk of 34%, 29% and 31% in the three studies, respectively; corresponding RRs (95% CIs) were 0.66 (0.60–0.73), 0.71 (0.63–0.80) and 0.69 (0.64–0.74). In each study, significantly reduced risks of CRC were seen when low-dose aspirin was used for primary or secondary cardiovascular disease prevention, in both sexes, and across all age groups evaluated. Conclusion Low-dose aspirin is associated with a significantly reduced risk of CRC. The consistency of our findings across different studies makes selection bias an unlikely explanation. PMID:27428004

  18. Estimation of dose to man from environmental tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwer, P S; Etnier, E L

    1980-01-01

    Factors important for characterization of tritium in environmental pathways leading to exposure of man are reviewed and quantification of those factors is discussed. Parameters characterizing the behavior of tritium in man are also subjected to review. Factors to be discussed include organic binding, bioaccumulation, quality factor and transmutation. A variety of models are presently in use to estimate dose to man from environmental releases of tritium. Results from four representative models are compared and discussed. Site-specific information is always preferable when parameterizing models to estimate dose to man. There may be significant differences in dose potential among geographic regions due to variable factors. An example of one such factor examined is absolute humidity. It is concluded that adequate methodologies exist for estimation of dose to man from environmental tritium although a number of areas are identified where additional tritium research is desirable.

  19. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to dose in 1945

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 003) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow's milk (calculation 001). Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in Calculation 001.

  20. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  1. ON A SUFFICIENT CONDITION FOR ABSOLUTE CONTINUITY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The formulation of a condition which yields absolute continuity when combined with continuity and bounded variation is the problem considered in the...Briefly, the formulation is achieved through a discussion which develops a proof by contradiction of a sufficiently theorem for absolute continuity which uses in its hypothesis the condition of continuity and bounded variation .

  2. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  3. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  4. Measured and modelled absolute gravity in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, E.; Forsberg, R.; Strykowski, G.

    2012-12-01

    Present day changes in the ice volume in glaciated areas like Greenland will change the load on the Earth and to this change the lithosphere will respond elastically. The Earth also responds to changes in the ice volume over a millennial time scale. This response is due to the viscous properties of the mantle and is known as Glaical Isostatic Adjustment (GIA). Both signals are present in GPS and absolute gravity (AG) measurements and they will give an uncertainty in mass balance estimates calculated from these data types. It is possible to separate the two signals if both gravity and Global Positioning System (GPS) time series are available. DTU Space acquired an A10 absolute gravimeter in 2008. One purpose of this instrument is to establish AG time series in Greenland and the first measurements were conducted in 2009. Since then are 18 different Greenland GPS Network (GNET) stations visited and six of these are visited more then once. The gravity signal consists of three signals; the elastic signal, the viscous signal and the direct attraction from the ice masses. All of these signals can be modelled using various techniques. The viscous signal is modelled by solving the Sea Level Equation with an appropriate ice history and Earth model. The free code SELEN is used for this. The elastic signal is modelled as a convolution of the elastic Greens function for gravity and a model of present day ice mass changes. The direct attraction is the same as the Newtonian attraction and is calculated as this. Here we will present the preliminary results of the AG measurements in Greenland. We will also present modelled estimates of the direct attraction, the elastic and the viscous signals.

  5. Absolute GPS Positioning Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, G.

    A new inverse approach for restoring the absolute coordinates of a ground -based station from three or four observed GPS pseudo-ranges is proposed. This stochastic method is based on simulations of natural evolution named genetic algorithms (GA). These iterative procedures provide fairly good and robust estimates of the absolute positions in the Earth's geocentric reference system. For comparison/validation, GA results are compared to the ones obtained using the classical linearized least-square scheme for the determination of the XYZ location proposed by Bancroft (1985) which is strongly limited by the number of available observations (i.e. here, the number of input pseudo-ranges must be four). The r.m.s. accuracy of the non -linear cost function reached by this latter method is typically ~10-4 m2 corresponding to ~300-500-m accuracies for each geocentric coordinate. However, GA can provide more acceptable solutions (r.m.s. errors < 10-5 m2), even when only three instantaneous pseudo-ranges are used, such as a lost of lock during a GPS survey. Tuned GA parameters used in different simulations are N=1000 starting individuals, as well as Pc=60-70% and Pm=30-40% for the crossover probability and mutation rate, respectively. Statistical tests on the ability of GA to recover acceptable coordinates in presence of important levels of noise are made simulating nearly 3000 random samples of erroneous pseudo-ranges. Here, two main sources of measurement errors are considered in the inversion: (1) typical satellite-clock errors and/or 300-metre variance atmospheric delays, and (2) Geometrical Dilution of Precision (GDOP) due to the particular GPS satellite configuration at the time of acquisition. Extracting valuable information and even from low-quality starting range observations, GA offer an interesting alternative for high -precision GPS positioning.

  6. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  7. Differences in Clinical Results After LINAC-Based Single-Dose Radiosurgery Versus Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Patients With Vestibular Schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Welzel, Thomas; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Huber, Peter E.; Debus, Juergen

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) vs. those treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: This study is based on an analysis of 200 patients with 202 VSs treated with FSRT (n = 172) or SRS (n = 30). Patients with tumor progression and/or progression of clinical symptoms were selected for treatment. In 165 out of 202 VSs (82%), RT was performed as the primary treatment for VS, and for 37 VSs (18%), RT was conducted for tumor progression after neurosurgical intervention. For patients receiving FSRT, a median total dose of 57.6 Gy was prescribed, with a median fractionation of 5 x 1.8 Gy per week. For patients who underwent SRS, a median single dose of 13 Gy was prescribed to the 80% isodose. Results: FSRT and SRS were well tolerated. Median follow-up time was 75 months. Local control was not statistically different for both groups. The probability of maintaining the pretreatment hearing level after SRS with doses of <=13 Gy was comparable to that of FSRT. The radiation dose for the SRS group (<=13 Gy vs. >13 Gy) significantly influenced hearing preservation rates (p = 0.03). In the group of patients treated with SRS doses of <=13 Gy, cranial nerve toxicity was comparable to that of the FSRT group. Conclusions: FSRT and SRS are both safe and effective alternatives for the treatment of VS. Local control rates are comparable in both groups. SRS with doses of <=13 Gy is a safe alternative to FSRT. While FSRT can be applied safely for the treatment of VSs of all sizes, SRS should be reserved for smaller lesions.

  8. Faraday cup: absolute dosimetry for ELIMED beam line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leanza, R.; Romano, F.; Scuderi, V.; Amico, A. G.; Cuttone, G.; Larosa, G.; Margarone, D.; Milluzzo, G.; Petringa, G.; Pipek, J.; Schillaci, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.

    2017-03-01

    The scientific community has shown a growing interest towards multidisciplinary applications of laser-driven beams. In this framework, the ELIMED (ELI-Beamlines MEDical and multidisciplinary applications) beamline will be the first transport beamline dedicated to the medical and multidisciplinary studies with laser-accelerated ion beams. Detectors for dosimetry represent one of key-element of the ELIMED beamline, allowing a dose delivering with good result as required in the clinical applications. In this contribution, a Faraday Cup for absolute dosimetry, designed and realized at INFN-LNS, is described.

  9. Absolute distance sensing by two laser optical interferometry.

    PubMed

    Thurner, Klaus; Braun, Pierre-François; Karrai, Khaled

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a method for absolute distance sensing by two laser optical interferometry. A particularity of this technique is that a target distance is determined in absolute and is no longer limited to within an ambiguity range affecting usually multiple wavelength interferometers. We implemented the technique in a low-finesse Fabry-Pérot miniature fiber based interferometer. We used two diode lasers, both operating in the 1550 nm wavelength range. The wavelength difference is chosen to create a 25 μm long periodic beating interferometric pattern allowing a nanometer precise position measurement but limited to within an ambiguity range of 25 μm. The ambiguity is then eliminated by scanning one of the wavelengths over a small range (3.4 nm). We measured absolute distances in the sub-meter range and this with just few nanometer repeatability.

  10. Enhancement of Peroxidase Release from Non-Malignant and Malignant Cells through Low-Dose Irradiation with Different Radiation Quality.

    PubMed

    Abdelrazzak, Abdelrazek B; Pottgießer, Stefanie J; Hill, Mark A; O'Neill, Peter; Bauer, Georg

    2016-02-01

    The release of peroxidase by nontransformed or transformed fibroblasts or epithelial cells (effector cells) triggers apoptosis induction selectively in transformed fibroblasts or transformed epithelial cells (target cells) through intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. The release of peroxidase can be induced either by treatment with transforming growth factor beta 1 or by low doses of alpha particles, gamma rays or ultrasoft X rays. In addiation, data indicates that radiation quality does not determine the overall efficiency of peroxidase release and the effects among a wide range of radiation doses are indistinguishable. These findings suggested that peroxidase release might be being triggered through intercellular bystander signaling. We show here that maximal peroxidase release does indeed occur after coculture of a small number of irradiated cells with an excess of unirradiated cells and demonstrate an enhanced effector function of nontransformed cells after the addition of a small number of irradiated cells. These data strongly indicate that peroxidase release is indeed triggered through bystander signaling mechanisms in mammalian cells.

  11. [Correction of the combined vitamin deficiency in growing rats fed fiber enriched diets with different doses of vitamins].

    PubMed

    Beketova, N A; Kodentsova, V M; Vrzhesinskaia, O A; Kosheleva, O V; Pereverzeva, O G; Sokol'nikov, A A; Aksenov, I V

    2014-01-01

    The effect of 5% dietary wheat bran (WB) on the correction of combined vitamin deficiency by two doses of vitamins (physiological and enhanced) has been analyzed using a rat model (8 groups, n = 8/group). Vitamin deficiency in male weanling Wistar rats (58.1 ± 0.5 g) was induced by 5-fold reduction of vitamin mixture amount in the feed and complete vitamin E, B1 and B2 exclusion from the mixture for 30 days, then deficit was corrected within 5 days. Rats from control group were fed a complete semisynthetic diet containing microcrystalline cellulose 2%. Vitamin deficient diet for 35 days resulted in reduced (p < 0.05) levels of vitamin A in the liver by 25 fold, vitamin E and B1--2.0-2.3 fold, vitamin B2--by 40%, 25(OH)D blood plasma concentration--by 21% compared with the control. Feed consumption of the animals treated with vitamin deficient diet and WB was higher by 43% than in rats with vitamin deficit. Their rate of weight occupied the intermediate position between the rates of weight in deficit and in control animals, and they could not serve a full control to evaluate the WB impact on vitamin sufficiency. After filling the vitamin diet content to an adequate level vitamin E liver content was fully restored. To restore vitamins B1 and B2 liver level higher doses of vitamins (120-160% of adequate content) were required, and to restore the reduced levels of vitamin A in rat liver even 2-fold increased dose of vitamin A was insufficient. The diet enrichment with WB had no effect on vitamin B1 and B2 liver content, regardless of the amount of vitamins in the diet. Adding fiber to the diet of animals adequately provided with vitamins resulted in significantly 1,3-fold increase of 25(OH)D blood plasma concentration and a slight but significant decrease of α-tocopherol liver level by 16% as compared to rats not receiving WB. The enrichment of rat diet with dietary fibers worsened restoration of the reduced vitamin E status not only by filling vitamin content in the

  12. Investigation into image quality and dose for different patient geometries with multiple cone-beam CT systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Stephen J.; Studenski, Matthew T.; Giaddui, Tawfik; Galvin, James; Yu, Yan; Xiao, Ying; Cui, Yunfeng

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To provide quantitative and qualitative image quality metrics and imaging dose for modern Varian On-board Imager (OBI) (ver. 1.5) and Elekta X-ray Volume Imager (XVI) (ver. 4.5R) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems in a clinical adaptive radiation therapy environment by accounting for varying patient thickness. Methods: Image quality measurements were acquired with Catphan 504 phantom (nominal diameter and with additional 10 cm thickness) for OBI and XVI systems and compared to planning CT (pCT) (GE LightSpeed). Various clinical protocols were analyzed for the OBI and XVI systems and analyzed using image quality metrics, including spatial resolution, low contrast detectability, uniformity, and HU sensitivity. Imaging dose measurements were acquired in Wellhofer Scanditronix i'mRT phantom at nominal phantom diameter and with additional 4 cm phantom diameter using GafChromic XRQA2 film. Calibration curves were generated using previously published in-air Air Kerma calibration method. Results: The OBI system full trajectory scans exhibited very little dependence on phantom thickness for accurate HU calculation, while half-trajectory scans with full-fan filter exhibited dependence of HU calculation on phantom thickness. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for the OBI scans decreased with additional phantom thickness. The uniformity of Head protocol scan was most significantly affected with additional phantom thickness. The spatial resolution and CNR compared favorably with pCT, while the uniformity of the OBI system was slightly inferior to pCT. The OBI scan protocol dose levels for nominal phantom thickness at the central portion of the phantom were 2.61, 0.72, and 1.88 cGy, and for additional phantom thickness were 1.95, 0.48, and 1.52 cGy, for the Pelvis, Thorax, and Spotlight protocols, respectively. The XVI system scans exhibited dependence on phantom thickness for accurate HU calculation regardless of trajectory. The CNR for the XVI scans decreased

  13. Investigation into image quality and dose for different patient geometries with multiple cone-beam CT systems

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Stephen J.; Studenski, Matthew T.; Giaddui, Tawfik; Cui, Yunfeng; Galvin, James; Yu, Yan; Xiao, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To provide quantitative and qualitative image quality metrics and imaging dose for modern Varian On-board Imager (OBI) (ver. 1.5) and Elekta X-ray Volume Imager (XVI) (ver. 4.5R) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems in a clinical adaptive radiation therapy environment by accounting for varying patient thickness. Methods: Image quality measurements were acquired with Catphan 504 phantom (nominal diameter and with additional 10 cm thickness) for OBI and XVI systems and compared to planning CT (pCT) (GE LightSpeed). Various clinical protocols were analyzed for the OBI and XVI systems and analyzed using image quality metrics, including spatial resolution, low contrast detectability, uniformity, and HU sensitivity. Imaging dose measurements were acquired in Wellhofer Scanditronix i'mRT phantom at nominal phantom diameter and with additional 4 cm phantom diameter using GafChromic XRQA2 film. Calibration curves were generated using previously published in-air Air Kerma calibration method. Results: The OBI system full trajectory scans exhibited very little dependence on phantom thickness for accurate HU calculation, while half-trajectory scans with full-fan filter exhibited dependence of HU calculation on phantom thickness. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for the OBI scans decreased with additional phantom thickness. The uniformity of Head protocol scan was most significantly affected with additional phantom thickness. The spatial resolution and CNR compared favorably with pCT, while the uniformity of the OBI system was slightly inferior to pCT. The OBI scan protocol dose levels for nominal phantom thickness at the central portion of the phantom were 2.61, 0.72, and 1.88 cGy, and for additional phantom thickness were 1.95, 0.48, and 1.52 cGy, for the Pelvis, Thorax, and Spotlight protocols, respectively. The XVI system scans exhibited dependence on phantom thickness for accurate HU calculation regardless of trajectory. The CNR for the XVI scans decreased

  14. Differences in 3D dose distributions due to calculation method of voxel S-values and the influence of image blurring in SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacilio, Massimiliano; Amato, Ernesto; Lanconelli, Nico; Basile, Chiara; Torres, Leonel Alberto; Botta, Francesca; Ferrari, Mahila; Cornejo Diaz, Nestor; Coca Perez, Marco; Fernández, María; Lassmann, Michael; Vergara Gil, Alex; Cremonesi, Marta

    2015-03-01

    This study compares 3D dose distributions obtained with voxel S values (VSVs) for soft tissue, calculated by several methods at their current state-of-the-art, varying the degree of image blurring. The methods were: 1) convolution of Dose Point Kernel (DPK) for water, using a scaling factor method; 2) an analytical model (AM), fitting the deposited energy as a function of the source-target distance; 3) a rescaling method (RSM) based on a set of high-resolution VSVs for each isotope; 4) local energy deposition (LED). VSVs calculated by direct Monte Carlo simulations were assumed as reference. Dose distributions were calculated considering spheroidal clusters with various sizes (251, 1237 and 4139 voxels of 3 mm size), uniformly filled with 131I, 177Lu, 188Re or 90Y. The activity distributions were blurred with Gaussian filters of various widths (6, 8 and 12 mm). Moreover, 3D-dosimetry was performed for 10 treatments with 90Y derivatives. Cumulative Dose Volume Histograms (cDVHs) were compared, studying the differences in D95%, D50% or Dmax (ΔD95%, ΔD50% and ΔDmax) and dose profiles. For unblurred spheroidal clusters, ΔD95%, ΔD50% and ΔDmax were mostly within some percents, slightly higher for 177Lu with DPK (8%) and RSM (12%) and considerably higher for LED (ΔD95% up to 59%). Increasing the blurring, differences decreased and also LED yielded very similar results, but D95% and D50% underestimations between 30-60% and 15-50%, respectively (with respect to 3D-dosimetry with unblurred distributions), were evidenced. Also for clinical images (affected by blurring as well), cDVHs differences for most methods were within few percents, except for slightly higher differences with LED, and almost systematic for dose profiles with DPK (-1.2%), AM (-3.0%) and RSM (4.5%), whereas showed an oscillating trend with LED. The major concern for 3D-dosimetry on clinical SPECT images is more strongly represented by image blurring than by differences among the VSVs

  15. Differences in 3D dose distributions due to calculation method of voxel S-values and the influence of image blurring in SPECT.

    PubMed

    Pacilio, Massimiliano; Amato, Ernesto; Lanconelli, Nico; Basile, Chiara; Torres, Leonel Alberto; Botta, Francesca; Ferrari, Mahila; Diaz, Nestor Cornejo; Perez, Marco Coca; Fernández, María; Lassmann, Michael; Gil, Alex Vergara; Cremonesi, Marta

    2015-03-07

    This study compares 3D dose distributions obtained with voxel S values (VSVs) for soft tissue, calculated by several methods at their current state-of-the-art, varying the degree of image blurring. The methods were: 1) convolution of Dose Point Kernel (DPK) for water, using a scaling factor method; 2) an analytical model (AM), fitting the deposited energy as a function of the source-target distance; 3) a rescaling method (RSM) based on a set of high-resolution VSVs for each isotope; 4) local energy deposition (LED). VSVs calculated by direct Monte Carlo simulations were assumed as reference. Dose distributions were calculated considering spheroidal clusters with various sizes (251, 1237 and 4139 voxels of 3 mm size), uniformly filled with (131)I, (177)Lu, (188)Re or (90)Y. The activity distributions were blurred with Gaussian filters of various widths (6, 8 and 12 mm). Moreover, 3D-dosimetry was performed for 10 treatments with (90)Y derivatives. Cumulative Dose Volume Histograms (cDVHs) were compared, studying the differences in D95%, D50% or Dmax (ΔD95%, ΔD50% and ΔDmax) and dose profiles.For unblurred spheroidal clusters, ΔD95%, ΔD50% and ΔDmax were mostly within some percents, slightly higher for (177)Lu with DPK (8%) and RSM (12%) and considerably higher for LED (ΔD95% up to 59%). Increasing the blurring, differences decreased and also LED yielded very similar results, but D95% and D50% underestimations between 30-60% and 15-50%, respectively (with respect to 3D-dosimetry with unblurred distributions), were evidenced. Also for clinical images (affected by blurring as well), cDVHs differences for most methods were within few percents, except for slightly higher differences with LED, and almost systematic for dose profiles with DPK (-1.2%), AM (-3.0%) and RSM (4.5%), whereas showed an oscillating trend with LED.The major concern for 3D-dosimetry on clinical SPECT images is more strongly represented by image blurring than by differences among the VSVs

  16. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM

  17. Ophthalmoplegic migraine. Two patients with an absolute response to indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Pareja, J A; Churruca, J; de la Casa Fages, B; de Silanes, C López; Sánchez, C; Barriga, F J

    2010-06-01

    Two patients suffering from ophthalmoplegic migraine had a strictly unilateral headache absolutely responsive to indomethacin, but not to other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, analgesics or corticosteroids. Such observations raise a therapeutic alternative and suggest that ophthalmoplegic migraine may present with different headache phenotypes.

  18. Analysis of standard reference materials by absolute INAA

    SciTech Connect

    Heft, R.E.; Koszykowski, R.F.

    1981-07-01

    Three standard reference materials, flyash, soil, and ASI 4340 steel, were analyzed by a method of absolute instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Two different light water pool-type reactors were used to produce equivalent analytical results even though the epithermal to thermal flux ratio in one reactor was higher than that in the other by a factor of two.

  19. Differences in HCV Viral Decline between Low and Standard-Dose Pegylated-Interferon-Alpha-2a with Ribavirin in HIV/HCV Genotype 3 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rivero-Juárez, Antonio; Lopez-Cortes, Luis F.; Camacho, Angela; Torres-Cornejo, Almudena; Pineda, Juan A.; Marquez-Solero, Manuel; Caruz, Antonio; Ruiz-Valderas, Rosa; Torre-Cisneros, Julian; Gutierrez-Valencia, Alicia; Rivero, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to analyze the different impact of standard and low-dose Peg-IFN-α2a/RBV therapies on HCV viral decline in HIV/HCV genotype 3 co-infected patients during the first weeks of treatment. Methods Plasma HCV viral decline was analyzed between baseline and weeks 1, 2 and 4 in two groups of treatment-naïve HCV genotype 3 patients with HIV co-infection. The Standard Dose Group (SDG) included patients who received Peg-IFN at 180 µg/per week with a weight-adjusted dose of ribavirin; Low-Dose Group (LDG) patients received Peg-IFN at 135 µg/per week with 800 mg/day ribavirin. The effect of IL28B genotype on HCV viral decline was evaluated in both groups. HCV viral decline was analyzed using a multivariate linear regression model. Results One hundred and six patients were included: 48 patients in the SDG and 58 in the LDG. HCV viral decline for patients in the LDG was less than for those in the SDG (week 1∶1.72±0.74 log10 IU/mL versus 1.78±0.67 log10 IU/mL, p = 0.827; week 2∶2.3±0.89 log10 IU/mL versus 3.01±1.02 log10 IU/mL, p = 0.013; week 4∶3.52±1.2 log10 IU/mL versus 4.09±1.1 log10 IU/mL, p = 0.005). The linear regression model identified the Peg-IFN/RBV dose as an independent factor for HCV viral decline at week 4. Conclusions Our results showed that HCV viral decline was less for patients in the low-dose group compared to those receiving the standard dose. Until a randomized clinical trial is conducted, clinicians should be cautious about using lower doses of Peg-IFN/RBV in HIV/HCV genotype 3 co-infected patients. PMID:23145040

  20. Angular on-line tube current modulation in multidetector CT examinations of children and adults: The influence of different scanning parameters on dose reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Papadakis, Antonios E.; Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John

    2007-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of angular on-line tube current modulation on dose reduction in pediatric and adult patients undergoing multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) examinations. Five physical anthropomorphic phantoms that simulate the average individual as neonate, 1-year-old, 5-year-old, 10-year-old, and adult were employed in the current study. Phantoms were scanned with the use of on-line tube current modulation (TCM). Percent dose reduction (%DR) factors achieved by applying TCM, were determined for standard protocols used for head and neck, shoulder, thorax, thorax and abdomen, abdomen, abdomen and pelvis, pelvis, and whole body examinations. A preliminary study on the application of TCM in MDCT examinations of adult patients was performed to validate the results obtained in anthropomorphic phantoms. Dose reduction was estimated as the percentage difference of the modulated milliamperes for each scan and the preset milliamperes prescribed by the scan protocol. The dose reduction in children was found to be much lower than the corresponding reduction achieved for adults. For helical scans the %DR factors, ranged between 1.6% and 7.4% for the neonate, 2.9% and 8.7% for the 1-year old, 2% and 6% for the 5-year-old, 5% and 10.9% for the 10-year-old, and 10.4% and 20.7% for the adult individual. For sequential scans the corresponding %DR factors ranged between 1.3% and 6.7%, 4.5% and 11%, 4.2% and 6.6%, 6.4% and 12.3%, and 8.9% and 23.3%, respectively. Broader beam collimations are associated with decreased %DR factors, when other scanning parameters are held constant. TCM did not impair image noise. In adult patients, the %DR values were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding results obtained in the anthropomorphic adult phantom. In conclusion, on-line TCM may be considered as a valuable tool for reducing dose in routine CT examinations of pediatric and adult patients. However, the dose reduction achieved with TCM

  1. Mobilization and collection of CD34+ cells for autologous transplantation of peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells in children: analysis of two different granulocyte-colony stimulating factor doses

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Kátia Aparecida de Brito; Miranda, Eliana Cristina Martins; Aguiar, Simone dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) is the cell choice in autologous transplantation. The classic dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization is a single daily dose of 10 μg/kg of patient body weight. There is a theory that higher doses of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor applied twice daily could increase the number of CD34+ cells collected in fewer leukapheresis procedures. Objective The aim of this study was to compare a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg of body weight and the conventional dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in respect to the number of leukapheresis procedures required to achieve a minimum collection of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight. Methods Patients were divided into two groups: Group 10 – patients who received a single daily dose of 10 μg G-CSF/kg body weight and Group 15 – patients who received a fractioned dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight daily. The leukapheresis procedure was carried out in an automated cell separator. The autologous transplantation was carried out when a minimum number of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight was achieved. Results Group 10 comprised 39 patients and Group 15 comprised 26 patients. A total of 146 apheresis procedures were performed: 110 (75.3%) for Group 10 and 36 (24.7%) for Group 15. For Group 10, a median of three (range: 1–7) leukapheresis procedures and a mean of 8.89 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight (±9.59) were collected whereas for Group 15 the corresponding values were one (range: 1–3) and 5.29 × 106 cells/kg body weight (±4.95). A statistically significant difference was found in relation to the number of apheresis procedures (p-value <0.0001). Conclusions To collect a minimum target of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight, the administration of a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight significantly decreased the number of leukapheresis procedures performed. PMID:26041417

  2. [A path to spatial irradiation planning. I. The problem of dose homogeneity within the area of crossing ray beams with different planes of incidence; basic examinations leading to an optimization procedure].

    PubMed

    Sonntag, A

    1975-11-01

    Under certain circumstances, foci within distinct regions of the body are optimally included by irradiation from different directions of the space. In practice, such plannings mostly fail from the difficulty to produce a sufficiently homogenous dose distribution within the target volume. The present considerations disclose the possibility to determine certain parameters or irradiation in an explicit form, based on a vectorial view of the dose distribution, thus obtaining homogeneity of the radiation dose. Part I of this paper is presenting the foundations of a procedure which aims at dose homogeneity in cross-fire techniques with different planes of incidence, utilizing simple mathematical correlations among the vectorial dose quantities.

  3. Elevation correction factor for absolute pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, Joseph W.; Sorrells, Mark R.

    1996-01-01

    With the arrival of highly accurate multi-port pressure measurement systems, conditions that previously did not affect overall system accuracy must now be scrutinized closely. Errors caused by elevation differences between pressure sensing elements and model pressure taps can be quantified and corrected. With multi-port pressure measurement systems, the sensing elements are connected to pressure taps that may be many feet away. The measurement system may be at a different elevation than the pressure taps due to laboratory space or test article constraints. This difference produces a pressure gradient that is inversely proportional to height within the interface tube. The pressure at the bottom of the tube will be higher than the pressure at the top due to the weight of the tube's column of air. Tubes with higher pressures will exhibit larger absolute errors due to the higher air density. The above effect is well documented but has generally been taken into account with large elevations only. With error analysis techniques, the loss in accuracy from elevation can be easily quantified. Correction factors can be applied to maintain the high accuracies of new pressure measurement systems.

  4. Different routes and doses influence protection in pigs immunised with the naturally attenuated African swine fever virus isolate OURT88/3.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cordón, Pedro J; Chapman, Dave; Jabbar, Tamara; Reis, Ana L; Goatley, Lynnette; Netherton, Christopher L; Taylor, Geraldine; Montoya, Maria; Dixon, Linda

    2017-02-01

    This study compares different combinations of doses and routes of immunisation of pigs with low virulent African swine fever virus (ASFV) genotype I isolate OURT88/3, including the intramuscular and intranasal route, the latter not previously tested. Intranasal immunisations with low and moderate doses (10(3) and 10(4) TCID50) of OURT88/3 provided complete protection (100%) against challenge with virulent genotype I OURT88/1 isolate. Only mild and transient clinical reactions were observed in protected pigs. Transient moderate virus genome levels were detected in blood samples after challenge that decreased, but persisted until the end of the experiment in some animals. In contrast, pigs immunised intramuscularly with low and moderate doses (10(3) and 10(4) TCID50) displayed lower percentages of protection (50-66%), and low or undetectable levels of virus genome were detected in blood samples throughout the study. In addition, clinical courses observed in protected pigs were asymptomatic. In pigs that were not protected and developed acute ASF, an exacerbated increase of IL-10 sometimes accompanied by an increase of IFNγ was observed before euthanasia. These results showed that factors including delivery route and dose determine the outcome of immunisation with the naturally attenuated isolate OURT88/3.

  5. Comparison of Accuracy in Calculation of Absorbed Dose to Patients Following Bone Scan with 99mTc-Marked Diphosphonates by Two Different Background Correction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Damoori, Mehri; Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Moslehi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    To improve the accuracy of the activity quantification and the image quality in scintigraphy, scatter correction is a vital procedure. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy in calculation of absorbed dose to patients following bone scan with 99mTc-marked diphosphonates (99mTc-MDP) by two different methods of background correction in conjugate view method. This study involved 22 patients referring to the Nuclear Medicine Center of Shahid Chamran Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. After the injection of 99mTc-MDP, whole-body images from patients were acquired at 10, 60, 90, and 180 min. Organ activities were calculated using the conjugate view method by Buijs and conventional background correction. Finally, the absorbed dose was calculated using the Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) technique. The results of this study showed that the absorbed dose per unit of injected activity (rad/mCi) ± standard deviation for pelvis bone, bladder, and kidneys by Buijs method was 0.19 ± 0.05, 0.08 ± 0.01, and 0.03 ± 0.01 and by conventional method was 0.13 ± 0.04, 0.08 ± 0.01, and 0.024 ± 0.01, respectively. This showed that Buijs background correction method had a high accuracy compared to conventional method for the estimated absorbed dose of bone and kidneys whereas, for the bladder, its accuracy was low. PMID:27014610

  6. Cell-oriented alternatives to dose, quality factor, and dose equivalent for low-level radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sondhaus, C.A.; Bond, V.P.; Feinendegen, L.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Randomly occurring energy deposition events produced by low levels of ionizing radiation interacting with tissue deliver variable amounts of energy to sensitive target volumes within a small fraction of the tissue cell population. A model is described in which an experimentally derived function relating event size to cell response probability operates mathematically on the microdosimetric event size distribution characterizing a given irradiation and thus determines the total fractional number of responding cells; this fraction measures the effectiveness of the given radiation. Applying this cell response or hit size effectiveness function (HSEF) to different radiations and normalizing to equal numbers of responses produced by each radiation should define its radiation quality, or relative effectiveness, on a more nearly absolute basis than do the absorbed dose and dose equivalent, both of which are confounded when applied to low-level irradiations. Similar cell response probability functions calculated from different experimental data are presented.

  7. Cell-oriented alternatives to dose, quality factor, and dose equivalent for low-level radiation.

    PubMed

    Sondhaus, C A; Bond, V P; Feinendegen, L E

    1990-07-01

    Randomly occurring energy deposition events produced by low levels of ionizing radiation interacting with tissue deliver variable amounts of energy to sensitive target volumes within a small fraction of the tissue cell population. A model is described in which an experimentally derived function relating event size to cell response probability operates mathematically on the microdosimetric event size distribution characterizing a given irradiation and thus determines the total fractional number of responding cells; this fraction measures the effectiveness of the given radiation. Applying this cell response or hit size effectiveness function (HSEF) to different radiations and normalizing to equal numbers of responses produced by each radiation should define its radiation quality, or relative effectiveness, on a more nearly absolute basis than do the absorbed dose and dose equivalent, both of which are confounded when applied to low-level irradiations. Similar cell response probability functions calculated from different experimental data are presented.

  8. Analysis of small field percent depth dose and profiles: Comparison of measurements with various detectors and effects of detector orientation with different jaw settings

    PubMed Central

    Godson, Henry Finlay; Ravikumar, M.; Sathiyan, S.; Ganesh, K. M.; Ponmalar, Y. Retna; Varatharaj, C.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of modern technologies in radiotherapy poses an increased challenge in the determination of dosimetric parameters of small fields that exhibit a high degree of uncertainty. Percent depth dose and beam profiles were acquired using different detectors in two different orientations. The parameters such as relative surface dose (DS), depth of dose maximum (Dmax), percentage dose at 10 cm (D10), penumbral width, flatness, and symmetry were evaluated with different detectors. The dosimetric data were acquired for fields defined by jaws alone, multileaf collimator (MLC) alone, and by MLC while the jaws were positioned at 0, 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 cm away from MLC leaf-end using a Varian linear accelerator with 6 MV photon beam. The accuracy in the measurement of dosimetric parameters with various detectors for three different field definitions was evaluated. The relative DS(38.1%) with photon field diode in parallel orientation was higher than electron field diode (EFD) (27.9%) values for 1 cm ×1 cm field. An overestimation of 5.7% and 8.6% in D10 depth were observed for 1 cm ×1 cm field with RK ion chamber in parallel and perpendicular orientation, respectively, for the fields defined by MLC while jaw positioned at the edge of the field when compared to EFD values in parallel orientation. For this field definition, the in-plane penumbral widths obtained with ion chamber in parallel and perpendicular orientation were 3.9 mm, 5.6 mm for 1 cm ×1 cm field, respectively. Among all detectors used in the study, the unshielded diodes were found to be an appropriate choice of detector for the measurement of beam parameters in small fields. PMID:27051165

  9. Comparison of different doses of magnesium sulphate and fentanyl as adjuvants to bupivacaine for infraumbilical surgeries under subarachnoid block

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Sarika; Dwivedi, Chhavi; Tipu, Saifullah; Jain, Rajnish K

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Spinal anaesthesia is used for many years for surgeries below the level of umbilicus. It has certain disadvantages such as limited duration of blockade and post-operative analgesia. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of additives fentanyl and magnesium sulphate along with bupivacaine during spinal anaesthesia for prolongation of analgesia and motor blockade. Methods: This randomised study was conducted in 120 patients of either sex of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II, posted for infraumbilical surgeries. Patients were randomly allocated to four groups and were given the following drugs intrathecally as per group distribution; group A - bupivacaine 15 mg (0.5% heavy) with fentanyl 25 μg, group B - bupivacaine 15 mg (0.5% heavy) with magnesium 100 mg, group C - bupivacaine 15 mg (0.5% heavy) with magnesium 50 mg and group D - bupivacaine 15 mg (0.5% heavy) with 0.5 ml normal saline. Parameters monitored were duration of analgesia along with haemodynamic parameters and side effects. Data were analysed using the Student's t-test for the continuous variables and two-tailed Fisher exact test or Chi-square test for categorical variables. Results: There was significant increase in duration of analgesia in group A (374.37 min) and B (328.13 min) as compared to group C (274.87 min) and D (246.03 min). In group A, all haemodynamic parameters decreased by more than 20%, compared to baseline parameters, which was clinically and statistically significant as compared to other groups. There was also increase in duration of motor blockade in groups A and B. Conclusion: Addition of magnesium sulphate at 100 mg dose or fentanyl 25 μg as adjuvants to intrathecal bupivacaine significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia, though in the given doses, magnesium provides better haemodynamic stability than fentanyl, with fewer side effects. PMID:26379289

  10. Low-intermediate dose testosterone replacement therapy by different pharmaceutical preparations improves frailty score in elderly hypogonadal hyperglycaemic patients.

    PubMed

    Strollo, Felice; Strollo, Giovanna; Morè, Massimo; Magni, Paolo; Macchi, Chiara; Masini, Maria Angela; Carucci, Iarba; Celotti, Fabio; Ruscica, Massimiliano; Gentile, Sandro

    2013-06-01

    An open-label follow-up study of low-to-intermediate dose testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) was conducted in 64 overweight patients (aged 65-75 years) with late onset hypogonadism (LOH) and increased fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Patients were subdivided into four treatment groups: oral testosterone (T) (T undecanoate, 80 mg/d), transmucosal T (60 mg/d), transdermal T (30 mg/d) or no treatment (control), and evaluated at 0 and 6 months. FPG, hemoglobin (Hb), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and total T were measured and the Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) index was calculated. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, fitness level (6-min walking test), Aging Males' Symptoms (AMS) scale, handgrip strength and energy expenditure with physical activity (Minnesota questionnaire for Leisure Time Physical Activity (LTPA)) were evaluated and a "frailty score" (based on: grip strength, gait speed and LTPA) was calculated. T levels increased in all treatment groups; the oral T group had values still in the hypogonadal range (5.9 ± 1.1 nmol/L). PSA and Hb concentrations did not change in any group. BMI, waist circumference, FPG and HOMA-IR improved in all T-treated groups after 6 months, with a greater effect seen with transmucosal and transdermal T compared with oral T. This study indicates that low-to-intermediate dose TRT may be safely utilized in LOH patients to ameliorate somatic and psychological frailty symptoms in association with improved anthropometric and glycometabolic parameters in aging, overweight men with LOH and impaired fasting glucose.

  11. A critical study of different Monte Carlo scoring methods of dose average linear-energy-transfer maps calculated in voxelized geometries irradiated with clinical proton beams.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Carabe, A

    2015-04-07

    We compare unrestricted dose average linear energy transfer (LET) maps calculated with three different Monte Carlo scoring methods in voxelized geometries irradiated with proton therapy beams with three different Monte Carlo scoring methods. Simulations were done with the Geant4 (Geometry ANd Tracking) toolkit. The first method corresponds to a step-by-step computation of LET which has been reported previously in the literature. We found that this scoring strategy is influenced by spurious high LET components, which relative contribution in the dose average LET calculations significantly increases as the voxel size becomes smaller. Dose average LET values calculated for primary protons in water with voxel size of 0.2 mm were a factor ~1.8 higher than those obtained with a size of 2.0 mm at the plateau region for a 160 MeV beam. Such high LET components are a consequence of proton steps in which the condensed-history algorithm determines an energy transfer to an electron of the material close to the maximum value, while the step length remains limited due to voxel boundary crossing. Two alternative methods were derived to overcome this problem. The second scores LET along the entire path described by each proton within the voxel. The third followed the same approach of the first method, but the LET was evaluated at each step from stopping power tables according to the proton kinetic energy value. We carried out microdosimetry calculations with the aim of deriving reference dose average LET values from microdosimetric quantities. Significant differences between the methods were reported either with pristine or spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs). The first method reported values systematically higher than the other two at depths proximal to SOBP by about 15% for a 5.9 cm wide SOBP and about 30% for a 11.0 cm one. At distal SOBP, the second method gave values about 15% lower than the others. Overall, we found that the third method gave the most consistent

  12. Role of shielding in modulating the effects of solar particle events: Monte Carlo calculation of absorbed dose and DNA complex lesions in different organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, F.; Biaggi, M.; De Biaggi, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ottolenghi, A.; Panzarasa, A.; Paretzke, H. G.; Pelliccioni, M.; Sala, P.; Scannicchio, D.; Zankl, M.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2004-01-01

    Distributions of absorbed dose and DNA clustered damage yields in various organs and tissues following the October 1989 solar particle event (SPE) were calculated by coupling the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code with two anthropomorphic phantoms (a mathematical model and a voxel model), with the main aim of quantifying the role of the shielding features in modulating organ doses. The phantoms, which were assumed to be in deep space, were inserted into a shielding box of variable thickness and material and were irradiated with the proton spectra of the October 1989 event. Average numbers of DNA lesions per cell in different organs were calculated by adopting a technique already tested in previous works, consisting of integrating into "condensed-history" Monte Carlo transport codes--such as FLUKA--yields of radiobiological damage, either calculated with "event-by-event" track structure simulations, or taken from experimental works available in the literature. More specifically, the yields of "Complex Lesions" (or "CL", defined and calculated as a clustered DNA damage in a previous work) per unit dose and DNA mass (CL Gy-1 Da-1) due to the various beam components, including those derived from nuclear interactions with the shielding and the human body, were integrated in FLUKA. This provided spatial distributions of CL/cell yields in different organs, as well as distributions of absorbed doses. The contributions of primary protons and secondary hadrons were calculated separately, and the simulations were repeated for values of Al shielding thickness ranging between 1 and 20 g/cm2. Slight differences were found between the two phantom types. Skin and eye lenses were found to receive larger doses with respect to internal organs; however, shielding was more effective for skin and lenses. Secondary particles arising from nuclear interactions were found to have a minor role, although their relative contribution was found to be larger for the Complex Lesions than for the

  13. Quantification of Contralateral Breast Dose and Risk Estimate of Radiation-Induced Contralateral Breast Cancer Among Young Women Using Tangential Fields and Different Modes of Breathing

    SciTech Connect

    Zurl, Brigitte; Stranzl, Heidi; Winkler, Peter; Kapp, Karin Sigrid

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Whole breast irradiation with deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique among left-sided breast cancer patients significantly reduces cardiac irradiation; however, a potential disadvantage is increased incidental irradiation of the contralateral breast. Methods and Materials: Contralateral breast dose (CBD) was calculated by comparing 400 treatment plans of 200 left-sided breast cancer patients whose tangential fields had been planned on gated and nongated CT data sets. Various anatomic and field parameters were analyzed for their impact on CBD. For a subgroup of patients (aged {<=}45 years) second cancer risk in the contralateral breast (CB) was modeled by applying the linear quadratic model, compound models, and compound models considering dose-volume information (DVH). Results: The mean CBD was significantly higher in DIBH with 0.69 Gy compared with 0.65 Gy in normal breathing (P=.01). The greatest impact on CBD was due to a shift of the inner field margin toward the CB in DIBH (mean 0.4 cm; range, 0-2), followed by field size in magnitude. Calculation with different risk models for CBC revealed values of excess relative risk/Gy ranging from 0.48-0.65 vs 0.46-0.61 for DIBH vs normal breathing, respectively. Conclusion: Contralateral breast dose, although within a low dose range, was mildly but significantly increased in 200 treatment plans generated under gated conditions, predominately due to a shift in the medial field margin. Risk modeling for CBC among women aged {<=}45 years also pointed to a higher risk when comparing DIBH with normal breathing. This risk, however, was substantially lower in the model considering DVH information. We think that clinical decisions should not be affected by this small increase in CBD with DIBH because DIBH is effective in reducing the dose to the heart in all patients.

  14. DOSE-RESPONSE Relationships Between Whole-Body Vibration and Lumbar Disk DISEASE—A Field Study on 388 Drivers of Different Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarze, S.; Notbohm, G.; Dupuis, H.; Hartung, E.

    1998-08-01

    In a longitudinal study, the dose-response relationships between long term occupational exposure to whole-body vibration and degenerative processes in the lumbar spine caused by the lumbar disks were examined. From 1990 to 1992, 388 vibration-exposed workers from different driving jobs were examined medically and by lumbar X-ray. For each individual, a history of all exposure conditions was recorded, and a cumulative vibration dose was calculated allowing comparisons between groups of low, middle, and high intensity of exposure. 310 subjects were selected for a follow-up four years later, of whom 90·6% (n=281) agreed to participate. In comparing the exposure groups, the results indicate that the limit value ofazw(8h)=0·8 m/s2should be reviewed. The best fit between the lifelong vibration dose and the occurrence of a lumbar syndrome was obtained by applying a daily reference ofazw(8h)=0·6 ms2as a limit value. The results became more distinct still when only those subjects were included in the statistical analysis who had had no lumbar symptoms up to the end of the first year of exposure. The prevalence of lumbar syndrome is 1·55 times higher in the highly exposed group when compared to the reference group with low exposure (CI95%=1·24/1·95). Calculating the cumulative incidence of new cases of lumbar syndrome in the follow-up period yields a relative risk ofRRMH=1·37 (CI95%=0·86/2·17) for the highly exposed group. It is concluded that the limit value for the calculation of an individual lifelong vibration dose should be based on a daily reference exposure ofazw(8h)=0·6 m/s2. With increasing dose it is more and more probable that cases of lumbar syndrome are caused by exposure to vibration.

  15. Dose and time dependent apoptotic response in a human melanoma cell line exposed to accelerated boron ions at four different LET.

    PubMed

    Meijer, A E; Jernberg, A R-M; Heiden, T; Stenerlöw, B; Persson, L M; Tilly, N; Lind, B K; Edgren, M R

    2005-04-01

    The aim was to investigate and compare the influence of linear energy transfer (LET), dose and time on the induction of apoptosis in a human melanoma cell line exposed to accelerated light boron ((10)B) ions and photons. Cells were exposed in vitro to doses up to 6 Gy accelerated boron ions (40, 80, 125 and 160 eV nm(-1)) and up to 12 Gy photons (0.2 eV nm(-1)). The induction of apoptosis was measured up to 9 days after irradiation using morphological characterization of apoptotic cells and bodies. In parallel, measurements of cell-cycle distribution, monitored by DNA flow cytometry, and cell survival based on the clonogenic cell survival assay, were performed. In addition, the induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were studied. Accelerated boron ions induced a significant increase in apoptosis as compared with photons at all time points studied. At 1-5 h the percentage of radiation-induced apoptotic cells increased with both dose and LET. At the later time points (24-216 h) the apoptotic response was more complex and did not increase in a strictly LET-dependent manner. The early premitotic apoptotic cells disappeared at 24 h following exposure to the highest LET (160 eV nm(-1)). A postmitotic apoptotic response was seen after release of the dose-, time- and LET-dependent G2/M accumulations. The loss of clonogenic ability was dose- and LET-dependent and the fraction of un-rejoined DSB increased with increasing LET. Despite the LET-dependent clonogenic cell killing, it was not possible to measure quantitatively a LET-dependent apoptotic response. This was due to the different time course of appearance and disappearance of apoptotic cells.

  16. Dose-response effects of Lepidium meyenii (Maca) aqueous extract on testicular function and weight of different organs in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Chung, Francisco; Rubio, Julio; Gonzales, Carla; Gasco, Manuel; Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2005-04-08

    Lepidium meyenii (Brassicaceae) known as Maca grows exclusively between 4000 and 4500 m over the sea level in the Peruvian central Andes. The dried hypocotyls of Maca are traditionally used as food and for its supposed fertility-enhancing properties. A dose-response study was performed to determine the effect of 7 days oral administration of an aqueous lyophilized extract of Maca at 0.01-5 g/kg (corresponding to 0.022-11 g dry hypocotyls of Maca/kg) on body and different organ weights, stages of the seminiferous tubules, epididymal sperm count and motility, and serum testosterone and estradiol levels in rats. In doses up to 5 g extract/kg, no toxicity was observed. Almost all organ weights were similar in controls and in the Maca extract-treated groups. Seminal vesicles weight was significantly reduced at 0.01 and 0.10 g extract/kg. Maca increased in length of stages VII-VIII of the seminiferous tubules in a dose-response fashion, with highest response at 1.0 g/kg, while caput/corpus epididymal sperm count increased at the 1.0 g dose. Cauda epididymal sperm count, sperm motility, and serum estradiol level were not affected at any of the doses studied. Serum testosterone was lower at 0.10 g extract/kg. Low-seminal vesicle weights correlated with low-serum testosterone levels (R2=0.33; P<0.0001) and low-testosterone/estradiol ratio (R2=0.35; P<0.0001). Increase in epididymal sperm count was related to lengths of stages VII-VIII. Highest effect on stages VII-VIII of the seminiferous tubules was observed at 1.0 g Maca aqueous extract/kg. The present study demonstrated that Maca extract in doses up to 5 g/kg (equivalent to the intake of 770 g hypocotyls in a man of 70 kg) was safe and that higher effect on reproductive parameters was elicited with a dose of 1 g extract/kg corresponding to 2.2 g dry Maca hypocotyls/kg.

  17. Quantification of absorption, retention and elimination of two different oral doses of vitamin A in Zambian boys using accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Aklamati, E K; Mulenga, M; Dueker, S R; Buchholz, B A; Peerson, J M; Kafwembe, E; Brown, K H; Haskell, M J

    2009-10-12

    A recent survey indicated that high-dose vitamin A supplements (HD-VAS) had no apparent effect on vitamin A (VA) status of Zambian children <5 y of age. To explore possible reasons for the lack of response to HD-VAS among Zambian children, we quantified the absorption, retention, and urinary elimination of either a single HDVAS (60 mg) or a smaller dose of stable isotope (SI)-labeled VA (5 mg), which was used to estimate VA pool size, in 3-4 y old Zambian boys (n = 4 for each VA dose). A 25 nCi tracer dose of [{sup 14}C{sub 2}]-labeled VA was co-administered with the HD-VAS or SI-labeled VA, and 24-hr stool and urine samples were collected for 3 and 7 consecutive days, respectively, and 24-hr urine samples at 4 later time points. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) was used to measure the cumulative excretion of {sup 14}C in stool and urine 3d after dosing to estimate, respectively, absorption and retention of the VAS and SI-labeled VA. The urinary elimination rate (UER) was estimated by plotting {sup 14}C in urine vs. time, and fitting an exponential equation to the data. Estimates of mean absorption, retention and the UER were 83.8 {+-} 7.1%, 76.3 {+-} 6.7%, and 1.9 {+-} 0.6%/d, respectively, for the HD-VAS and 76.5 {+-} 9.5%, 71.1 {+-} 9.4%, and 1.8 {+-} 1.2%/d, respectively for the smaller dose of SI-labeled VA. Estimates of absorption, retention and the UER did not differ by size of the VA dose administered (P=0.26, 0.40, 0.88, respectively). Estimated absorption and retention were negatively associated with reported fever (P=0.011) and malaria (P =0.010). HD-VAS and SI-labeled VA were adequately absorbed, retained and utilized in apparently healthy Zambian preschool-age boys, although absorption and retention may be affected by recent infections.

  18. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  19. Magnifying absolute instruments for optically homogeneous regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tyc, Tomas

    2011-09-15

    We propose a class of magnifying absolute optical instruments with a positive isotropic refractive index. They create magnified stigmatic images, either virtual or real, of optically homogeneous three-dimensional spatial regions within geometrical optics.

  20. The Simplicity Argument and Absolute Morality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the author has maintained that there is a similarity of thought to be found in the writings of Cudworth, Emerson, and Husserl in his investigation of an absolute system of morality. (Author/RK)

  1. Effectiveness and Tolerability of Different Recommended Doses of PPIs and H2RAs in GERD: Network Meta-Analysis and GRADE system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Kwong, Joey S. W.; Yuan, Rui-Xia; Chen, Hao; Xu, Chang; Wang, Yi-Pin; Yang, Gong-Li; Yan, Jin-Zhu; Peng, Le; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Weng, Hong; Luo, Jie; Niu, Yu-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine-2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs) are used for gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD); however, the clinical evidence for treatment is poor. We evaluated the effectiveness and tolerability of different doses of PPIs, H2RAs and placebo in adults with GERD. Six online databases were searched through September 1, 2016. All related articles were included and combined with a Bayesian network meta-analysis from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The GRADE systems were employed to assess the main outcome. Ninety-eight RCTs were identified, which included 45,964 participants. Our analysis indicated that the full/standard dose of esomeprazole at 40 mg per day was the most efficient in healing among nine different dosages of PPIs and H2RAs. The main efficacy outcome did not change after adjustments for the area, age, level of disease from endoscopy, year of publication, pharmaceutical industry sponsorship, Intention-to-treat (ITT)/per-protocol (PP), withdrawal rate, pre-set select design bias, single blinded and unblinded studies, study origination in China, study arms that included zero events, inconsistency node or discontinued drug were accounted for in the meta-regressions and sensitivity analyses. This research suggests that the full/standard doses (40 mg per day) of esomeprazole should be recommended as first-line treatments for GERD in adults for short-term therapy. PMID:28102361

  2. Absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, O. A.

    1993-11-01

    The program SEEF is a Fortran IV computer code for the extraction of absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions. When the evaporation residue is fed by its parents, only cumulative cross sections will be obtained from off-line gamma ray measurements. But, if one has the parent excitation function (experimental or calculated), this code will make it possible to determine absolute cross sections of any exit channel.

  3. Kelvin and the absolute temperature scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlichson, Herman

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the absolute temperature scale of Kelvin (William Thomson). Kelvin found that Carnot's axiom about heat being a conserved quantity had to be abandoned. Nevertheless, he found that Carnot's fundamental work on heat engines was correct. Using the concept of a Carnot engine Kelvin found that Q1/Q2 = T1/T2. Thermometers are not used to obtain absolute temperatures since they are calculated temperatures.

  4. Mathematical Model for Absolute Magnetic Measuring Systems in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fügenschuh, Armin; Fügenschuh, Marzena; Ludszuweit, Marina; Mojsic, Aleksandar; Sokół, Joanna

    2015-09-01

    Scales for measuring systems are either based on incremental or absolute measuring methods. Incremental scales need to initialize a measurement cycle at a reference point. From there, the position is computed by counting increments of a periodic graduation. Absolute methods do not need reference points, since the position can be read directly from the scale. The positions on the complete scales are encoded using two incremental tracks with different graduation. We present a new method for absolute measuring using only one track for position encoding up to micrometre range. Instead of the common perpendicular magnetic areas, we use a pattern of trapezoidal magnetic areas, to store more complex information. For positioning, we use the magnetic field where every position is characterized by a set of values measured by a hall sensor array. We implement a method for reconstruction of absolute positions from the set of unique measured values. We compare two patterns with respect to uniqueness, accuracy, stability and robustness of positioning. We discuss how stability and robustness are influenced by different errors during the measurement in real applications and how those errors can be compensated.

  5. Simulated Space Radiation: Impact of Four Different Types of High-Dose Ionizing Radiation on the Lichen Xanthoria elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Annette; Meeßen, Joachim; Jänicke, Reiner U.; Raguse, Marina; Ott, Sieglinde

    2017-02-01

    This study addresses the viability of the lichen Xanthoria elegans after high-dose ionizing irradiation in the frame of the STARLIFE campaign. The first set of experiments was intended to resemble several types of galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) as present beyond the magnetic shield of Earth. In the second set of experiments, γ radiation up to 113 kGy was applied to test the limit of lichen resistance to ionizing radiation. Entire thalli of Xanthoria elegans were irradiated in the anhydrobiotic state. After STARLIFE 1, the metabolic activity of both symbionts was quantified by live/dead staining with confocal laser scanning microscopy. The photosynthetic activity was measured after the respective irradiation to assess the ability of the symbiotic green algae to restore photosynthesis after irradiation. The STARLIFE campaign complements the results of the LIFE experiments at the EXPOSE-E facility on the International Space Station by testing the model organism Xanthoria elegans on its resistance to hazardous radiation that might be accumulated during long-term space exposure. In addition, the photosynthetic activity of metabolically active lichen was investigated after X-ray irradiation up to 100 Gy (3.3 Gy/min). Since previous astrobiological experiments were mostly performed with anhydrobiotic lichen, these experiments will broaden our knowledge on the correlation of physiological state and astrobiological stressors.

  6. Simulated Space Radiation: Impact of Four Different Types of High-Dose Ionizing Radiation on the Lichen Xanthoria elegans.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Annette; Meeßen, Joachim; Jänicke, Reiner U; Raguse, Marina; Ott, Sieglinde

    2017-02-01

    This study addresses the viability of the lichen Xanthoria elegans after high-dose ionizing irradiation in the frame of the STARLIFE campaign. The first set of experiments was intended to resemble several types of galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) as present beyond the magnetic shield of Earth. In the second set of experiments, γ radiation up to 113 kGy was applied to test the limit of lichen resistance to ionizing radiation. Entire thalli of Xanthoria elegans were irradiated in the anhydrobiotic state. After STARLIFE 1, the metabolic activity of both symbionts was quantified by live/dead staining with confocal laser scanning microscopy. The photosynthetic activity was measured after the respective irradiation to assess the ability of the symbiotic green algae to restore photosynthesis after irradiation. The STARLIFE campaign complements the results of the LIFE experiments at the EXPOSE-E facility on the International Space Station by testing the model organism Xanthoria elegans on its resistance to hazardous radiation that might be accumulated during long-term space exposure. In addition, the photosynthetic activity of metabolically active lichen was investigated after X-ray irradiation up to 100 Gy (3.3 Gy/min). Since previous astrobiological experiments were mostly performed with anhydrobiotic lichen, these experiments will broaden our knowledge on the correlation of physiological state and astrobiological stressors. Key Words: Astrobiology-Extremotolerance-Gamma rays-Ionizing radiation-Lichens-Viability. Astrobiology 17, 136-144.

  7. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities.

    PubMed

    Lechuga, Lawrence; Weidlich, Georg A

    2016-09-12

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities-fan beam and cone beam-was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient.

  8. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Weidlich, Georg A.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities—fan beam and cone beam—was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient. PMID:27752404

  9. SU-E-I-31: Differences Observed in Radiation Doses Across 2 Similar CT Scanners From Adult Brain-Neck CT Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K; McMillan, K; Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; McNitt-Gray, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the difference in radiation doses from adult Brain-Neck CT angiography (CTA) between two CT scanners. Methods: We collected CT dose index data (CTDIvol, DLP) from adult Brain-Neck CTA performed with two CT scanners (Sensation 64 (S64) and Definition AS (AS), Siemens Healthcare) performed at two of our facilities from Jan 1st to Dec 31th, 2014. X-ray dose management software (Radmetrics, Bayer Healthcare) was used to mine these data. All exams were performed with Tube Current Modulation (Care Dose 4D), tube voltage of 120 kVp, quality reference mAs of 300, beam collimation of 64*0.6 mm. The rotation time was set to 0.5 sec for S64 and 1.0 sec for AS. We also scanned an anthropomorphic skull and chest phantom under routine Brain-Neck CTA protocol with the two scanners and extracted the tube current values from the raw projection data. Results: The mean CTDIvol and DLP in Brain-Neck CTA was 72 mGy and 2554 mGy*cm for AS, which was substantially larger than the mean values of 46 mGy and 1699 mGy*cm for S64. The maximum tube current was 583 mA for most cases on the S64 while the maximum was 666 mA for AS even though the rotation time set for AS was 1.0 sec. Measurements obtained with the anthropomorphic phantom showed that the tube current reached 583 mA at the shoulder region for S64 while it reached to 666 mA for AS. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that substantially different CT doses can Result from Brain-Neck CTA protocols even when similar scanners and similar settings are used. Though both scanners have a similar maximum mA rating, differences in mA were observed through the shoulders, resulting in substantially different CTDIvol values.

  10. Body fat loss and compensatory mechanisms in response to different doses of aerobic exercise--a randomized controlled trial in overweight sedentary males.

    PubMed

    Rosenkilde, Mads; Auerbach, Pernille; Reichkendler, Michala Holm; Ploug, Thorkil; Stallknecht, Bente Merete; Sjödin, Anders

    2012-09-15

    The amount of weight loss induced by exercise is often disappointing. A diet-induced negative energy balance triggers compensatory mechanisms, e.g., lower metabolic rate and increased appetite. However, knowledge about potential compensatory mechanisms triggered by increased aerobic exercise is limited. A randomized controlled trial was performed in healthy, sedentary, moderately overweight young men to examine the effects of increasing doses of aerobic exercise on body composition, accumulated energy balance, and the degree of compensation. Eighteen participants were randomized to a continuous sedentary control group, 21 to a moderate-exercise (MOD; 300 kcal/day), and 22 to a high-exercise (HIGH; 600 kcal/day) group for 13 wk, corresponding to ∼30 and 60 min of daily aerobic exercise, respectively. Body weight (MOD: -3.6 kg, P < 0.001; HIGH: -2.7 kg, P = 0.01) and fat mass (MOD: -4.0 kg, P < 0.001 and HIGH: -3.8 kg, P < 0.001) decreased similarly in both exercise groups. Although the exercise-induced energy expenditure in HIGH was twice that of MOD, the resulting accumulated energy balance, calculated from changes in body composition, was not different (MOD: -39.6 Mcal, HIGH: -34.3 Mcal, not significant). Energy balance was 83% more negative than expected in MOD, while it was 20% less negative than expected in HIGH. No statistically significant changes were found in energy intake or nonexercise physical activity that could explain the different compensatory responses associated with 30 vs. 60 min of daily aerobic exercise. In conclusion, a similar body fat loss was obtained regardless of exercise dose. A moderate dose of exercise induced a markedly greater than expected negative energy balance, while a higher dose induced a small but quantifiable degree of compensation.

  11. Immunogenicity and safety of a live attenuated shingles (herpes zoster) vaccine (Zostavax®) in individuals aged ≥ 70 years: a randomized study of a single dose vs. two different two-dose schedules.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, Timo; Hardt, Roland; Rümke, Hans C; Icardi, Giancarlo; Montero, Jordi; Thomas, Stéphane; Sadorge, Christine; Fiquet, Anne

    2013-04-01

    Disease protection provided by herpes zoster (HZ) vaccination tends to reduce as age increases. This study was designed to ascertain whether a second dose of the HZ vaccine, Zostavax(®), would increase varicella zoster virus (VZV)-specific immune response among individuals aged ≥ 70 y. Individuals aged ≥ 70 y were randomized to receive HZ vaccine in one of three schedules: a single dose (0.65 mL), two doses at 0 and 1 mo, or two doses at 0 and 3 mo. VZV antibody titers were measured at baseline, 4 weeks after each vaccine dose, and 12 mo after the last dose. In total, 759 participants (mean age 76.1 y) were randomized to receive vaccination. Antibody responses were similar after a single dose or two doses of HZ vaccine [post-dose 2/post-dose 1 geometric mean titer (GMT) ratios for the 1-mo or 3-mo schedules were 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.22 and 0.78, 95% CI 0.73-0.85], respectively). The 12-mo post-dose 2/12-mo post-dose 1 GMT ratio was similar for the 1-mo schedule and for the 3-mo schedule (1.06, 95% CI 0.96-1.17 and 1.08, 95% CI 0.98-1.19, respectively). Similar immune responses were observed in participants aged 70-79 y and those aged ≥ 80 y. HZ vaccine was generally well tolerated, with no evidence of increased adverse event incidence after the second dose with either schedule. Compared with a single-dose regimen, two-dose vaccination did not increase VZV antibody responses among individuals aged ≥ 70 y. Antibody persistence after 12 mo was similar with all three schedules.

  12. Absolute calibration of forces in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, R. S.; Viana, N. B.; Maia Neto, P. A.; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2014-07-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past 15 years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spot, adapting frequently employed video microscopy techniques. Combined with interface spherical aberration, it reveals a previously unknown window of instability for trapping. Comparison with experimental data leads to an overall agreement within error bars, with no fitting, for a broad range of microsphere radii, from the Rayleigh regime to the ray optics one, for different polarizations and trapping heights, including all commonly employed parameter domains. Besides signaling full first-principles theoretical understanding of optical tweezers operation, the results may lead to improved instrument design and control over experiments, as well as to an extended domain of applicability, allowing reliable force measurements, in principle, from femtonewtons to nanonewtons.

  13. Treatment planning study of the 3D dosimetric differences between Co-60 and Ir-192 sources in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervix cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayman, Orla; Muscat, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether Co-60 is equivalent to Ir-192 for HDR cervical brachytherapy, through 3D-DVH dose comparisons in standard and optimised plans. Previous studies have only considered 2D dosimetry, point dose comparisons or identical loading. Typical treatment times and economics are considered. Material and methods Plans were produced for eight cervix patients using Co-60 and Ir-192 sources, CT imaging and IU/two-channel-ring applicator (Eckert Ziegler BEBIG). The comparison was made under two conditions: (A) identical dwell positions and loading, prescribed to Point A and (B) optimised source dwells, prescribed to HR-CTV. This provided a direct comparison of inherent differences and residual differences under typical clinical plan optimisation. The DVH (target and OAR), ICRU reference points and isodose distributions were compared. Typical treatment times and source replacement costs were compared. Results Small differences (p < 0.01) in 3D dosimetry exist when using Co-60 compared to Ir-192, prescribed to Point A with identical loading patterns, particularly 3.3% increase in rectum D2cc. No significant difference was observed in this parameter when prescribing to the HR-CTV using dwell-time optimisation. There was no statistically significant difference in D90 between the two isotopes. Co-60 plans delivered consistently higher V150% (mean +4.4%, p = 0.03) and V400% (mean +11.6%, p < 0.01) compared to Ir-192 in optimised plans. Differences in physical source properties were overwhelmed by geometric effects. Conclusions Co-60 may be used as an effective alternative to Ir-192 for HDR cervix brachytherapy, producing similar plans of equivalent D90, but with logistical benefits. There is a small dose increase along the extension of the source axis when using Co-60 compared to Ir-192, leading to small rectal dose increases for identical loading patterns. This can be eliminated by planning optimisation techniques. Such optimisation may also be associated with

  14. WE-E-BRE-06: High-Dose Microbeam Radiation Induces Different Responses in Tumor Microenvironment Compared to Conventional Seamless Radiation in Window Chamber Tumor Models

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S; Zhang, J; Hadsell, M; Fontanella, A; Schroeder, T; Palmer, G; Dewhirst, M; Boss, M; Berman, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy and GRID therapy are different forms of Spatially-Fractioned Radiation Therapy (SFRT) that is fundamentally different from the conventional seamless and temporally fractionated radiation therapy. SFRT is characterized by a ultra-high dose (10s –100s Gy) dose single treatment with drastic inhomogeneity pattern of given spatial frequencies. Preclinical and limited clinical studies have shown that the SFRT treatments may offer significant improvements in reducing treatment toxicity, especially for those patients who have not benefited from the state-of-the-art radiation therapy approaches. This preliminary study aims to elucidate the underlying working mechanisms of SFRT, which currently remains poorly understood. Methods: A genetically engineered 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma cell line and nude mice skin fold window chamber were used. A nanotechnology-based 160kV x-ray irradiator delivered 50Gy (entrance dose) single treatments of microbeam or seamless radiation. Animals were in 3 groups: mock, seamless radiation, and 300μm microbeam radiation. The windows were imaged using a hyperspectral system to capture total hemoglobin/saturation, GFP fluorescence emission, RFP fluorescence emission, and vessel density at 9 time points up to 7 days post radiation. Results: We found unique physiologic changes in different tumor/normal tissue regions and differential effects between seamless and microbeam treatments. They include 1) compared to microbeam and mock radiation seamless radiation damaged more microvasculature in tumor-surrounding normal tissue, 2) a pronounced angiogenic effect was observed with vascular proliferation in the microbeam irradiated portion of the tumor days post treatment (no such effect observed in seamless and mock groups), and 3) a notable change in tumor vascular orientation was observed where vessels initially oriented parallel to the beam length were replaced by vessels running perpendicular to the irradiation

  15. Alternatives to dose, quality factor and dose equivalent for low level irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sondhaus, C.A.; Bond, V.P.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    Randomly occurring energy deposition events produced by low levels of ionizing radiation interacting with tissue deliver variable amounts of energy to the sensitive target volumes within a small fraction of the cell population. A model is described in which an experimentally derived function relating event size to cell response probability operates mathematically on the microdosimetric event size distribution characterizing a given irradiation and thus determines the total fractional number of responding cells; this fraction measures the effectiveness of the given radiation. Normalizing to equal numbers of events produced by different radiations and applying this cell response or hit size effectiveness function (HSEF) should define radiation quality, or relative effectiveness, on a more nearly absolute basis than do the absorbed dose and dose evaluation, which are confounded when applied to low level irradiations. Examples using both calculation and experimental data are presented. 15 refs., 18 figs.

  16. Systematic review using meta-analyses to estimate dose-response relationships between iodine intake and biomarkers of iodine status in different population groups.

    PubMed

    Ristić-Medić, Danijela; Dullemeijer, Carla; Tepsić, Jasna; Petrović-Oggiano, Gordana; Popović, Tamara; Arsić, Aleksandra; Glibetić, Marija; Souverein, Olga W; Collings, Rachel; Cavelaars, Adriënne; de Groot, Lisette; van't Veer, Pieter; Gurinović, Mirjana

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to identify studies investigating iodine intake and biomarkers of iodine status, to assess the data of the selected studies, and to estimate dose-response relationships using meta-analysis. All randomized controlled trials, prospective cohort studies, nested case-control studies, and cross-sectional studies that supplied or measured dietary iodine and measured iodine biomarkers were included. The overall pooled regression coefficient (β) and the standard error of β were calculated by random-effects meta-analysis on a double-log scale, using the calculated intake-status regression coefficient (β) for each individual study. The results of pooled randomized controlled trials indicated that the doubling of dietary iodine intake increased urinary iodine concentrations by 14% in children and adolescents, by 57% in adults and the elderly, and by 81% in pregnant women. The dose-response relationship between iodine intake and biomarkers of iodine status indicated a 12% decrease in thyroid-stimulating hormone and a 31% decrease in thyroglobulin in pregnant women. The model of dose-response quantification used to describe the relationship between iodine intake and biomarkers of iodine status may be useful for providing complementary evidence to support recommendations for iodine intake in different population groups.

  17. Behavioral and physiological changes produced by a supralethal dose of ionizing radiation: evidence for hormone-influenced sex differences in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    A sufficiently large and rapid dose of ionizing radiation produces an immediate but transient behavioral incapacitation. Acute hypotension often accompanies the disorder. Although the etiology of this syndrome is unclear, it has been suggested that an increase in histamine excretion contributes to it. Since histamine is known to interact with the endocrine system and since estrogens have been shown to prolong the life of animals exposed to potentially lethal doses of radiation, it was also hypothesized that females might be relatively less affected by an acute, large dose of ionizing radiation. Male and female rats were trained on an avoidance task, irradiated, and then retested. Females showed a less severe decrement after radiation exposure than males. Likewise, females did not suffer the severe hypotension normally associated with male radiogenic early transient incapacitation (ETI); rather, an acute hypertension was produced in females. A second series of experiments revealed that differences in male and female radiation response were eliminated by gonadectomy. Systemic estradiol injection produced strikingly feminine (i.e., superior) postirradiation avoidance responses as well as hypertension in neutered rats. Testosterone injections had no effect on either measure. Central nervous system alterations have been correlated with the ETI. Therefore, final experiments sought a possible central locus of the action of estradiol. It was found that exposure of the nucleus peopticus medialis to estrogens produces postirradiation benefits in avoidance performance and blood pressure similar to those seen after systemic estradiol treatments. Nucleus amygdaloideus medialis implants produced no such benefits.

  18. Dose reduction technique using a combination of a region of interest (ROI) material x-ray attenuator and spatially different temporal filtering for fluoroscopic interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Panse, A.; Jain, A.; Sharma, P.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A. H.; Cartwright, A. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach for achieving patient dose savings during image-guided neurovascular interventions, involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and a spatially different ROI temporal filtering technique. The part of the image under the attenuator is reduced in dose but noisy and less bright due to fewer x-ray quanta reaching the detector, as compared to the non-attenuating (or less attenuating) region. First the brightness is equalized throughout the image by post processing and then a temporal filter with higher weights is applied to the high attenuating region to reduce the noise, at the cost of increased lag; however, in the regions where less attenuation is present, a lower temporal weight is needed and is applied to preserve temporal resolution. A simulation of the technique is first presented on an actual image sequence obtained from an endovascular image guided interventional (EIGI) procedure. Then the actual implementation of the technique with a physical ROI attenuator is presented. Quantitative analysis including noise analysis and integral dose calculations are presented to validate the proposed technique.

  19. Ecological half-time and effective dose from chernobyl debris and from nuclear weapons fallout of 137Cs as measured in different Swedish populations.

    PubMed

    Rääf, C L; Hubbard, L; Falk, R; Agren, G; Vesanen, R

    2006-05-01

    The fallout in Sweden of radiocesium from nuclear weapons tests during the 1960's (137Cs) and from the Chernobyl accident in 1986 (134Cs and 137Cs) has transferred to humans through different ecological pathways. Data from whole-body burden measurements of 134Cs, 137Cs, and 40K in various Swedish populations between 1964 and 2002 have been compiled. This database enables an evaluation of the temporal and geographical dependence of the transfer of radiocesium from ground deposition to humans and the associated absorbed dose. The body burdens of 137Cs gradually decrease after the peak values reached in 1965 from nuclear weapons fallout and in 1987 from the Chernobyl fallout, but at a varying rate depending on the population. Assuming a dual exponential decrease, a short-term component of typically 1-2 y and a long-term component of 5-10 y are found in urban populations in Sweden. Among reindeer herders and hunters the effective ecological half-time is mono-exponential with a half-time of 5-7 y. The estimated time-integrated effective dose to an individual during a period of 50 y from the Chernobyl fallout is, on average, approximately 10 mSv for reindeer herders, which is 10-100 times higher than the estimated dose received by urban populations in the three major Swedish urban areas (Malmö, Göteborg, and Stockholm).

  20. Development of TV003/TV005, a single dose, highly immunogenic live attenuated dengue vaccine; what makes this vaccine different from the Sanofi-Pasteur CYD™ vaccine?

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Stephen S

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is caused by four serotype-distinct dengue viruses (DENVs), and developing a multivalent vaccine against dengue has not been straightforward since partial immunity to DENV may predispose to more severe disease upon subsequent DENV infection. The vaccine that is furthest along in development is CYD™, a live attenuated tetravalent vaccine (LATV) produced by Sanofi Pasteur. Although the multi-dose vaccine demonstrated protection against severe dengue, its overall efficacy was limited by DENV serotype, serostatus at vaccination, region and age. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has developed the LATV dengue vaccines TV003/TV005. A single dose of either TV003 or TV005 induced seroconversion to four DENV serotypes in 74-92% (TV003) and 90% (TV005) of flavivirus seronegative adults and elicited near-sterilizing immunity to a second dose of vaccine administered 6-12 months later. The important differences in the structure, infectivity and immune responses to TV003/TV005 are compared with CYD™.

  1. A mathematical biologist's guide to absolute and convective instability.

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Jonathan A; Dagbovie, Ayawoa S; Hilker, Frank M

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models have been highly successful at reproducing the complex spatiotemporal phenomena seen in many biological systems. However, the ability to numerically simulate such phenomena currently far outstrips detailed mathematical understanding. This paper reviews the theory of absolute and convective instability, which has the potential to redress this inbalance in some cases. In spatiotemporal systems, unstable steady states subdivide into two categories. Those that are absolutely unstable are not relevant in applications except as generators of spatial or spatiotemporal patterns, but convectively unstable steady states can occur as persistent features of solutions. The authors explain the concepts of absolute and convective instability, and also the related concepts of remnant and transient instability. They give examples of their use in explaining qualitative transitions in solution behaviour. They then describe how to distinguish different types of instability, focussing on the relatively new approach of the absolute spectrum. They also discuss the use of the theory for making quantitative predictions on how spatiotemporal solutions change with model parameters. The discussion is illustrated throughout by numerical simulations of a model for river-based predator-prey systems.

  2. Absolute calibration in the 1750 - 3350 A region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strongylis, G. J.; Bohlin, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The absolute flux measurements in the rocket ultraviolet made by Bohlin, Frimout, and Lillie (BFL) are revised using a more correct treatment of the air extinction that enters the air calibration of their instrument. The absorption by molecular oxygen and ozone, Rayleigh scattering, and extinction by aerosols is tabulated for general use in ultraviolet calibrations performed in air. The revised absolute flux of eta UMa and final fluxes for alpha Lyr and zeta Oph are presented in the 1750-3350 A region. The absolute flux of the star eta UMa is compared to four other independent determinations in the 1200-3400 A region and a maximum difference of 35% is found near 1500 A between the OAO-2 and Apollo 17 fluxes. The rocket measurements of BFL, the ANS and TD-1 satellite data, and the Apollo 17 data are compared to the ultraviolet fluxes from the OAO-2, demonstrating a photometric reproducibility of about + or - 3 percent. Therefore, all four sets of spectrophotometry can be reduced to a common absolute scale.

  3. Automated absolute phase retrieval in across-track interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, Soren N.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1992-01-01

    Discussed is a key element in the processing of topographic radar maps acquired by the NASA/JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar configured as an across-track interferometer (TOPSAR). TOPSAR utilizes a single transmit and two receive antennas; the three-dimensional target location is determined by triangulation based on a known baseline and two measured slant ranges. The slant range difference is determined very accurately from the phase difference between the signals received by the two antennas. This phase is measured modulo 2pi, whereas it is the absolute phase which relates directly to the difference in slant range. It is shown that splitting the range bandwidth into two subbands in the processor and processing each individually allows for the absolute phase. The underlying principles and system errors which must be considered are discussed, together with the implementation and results from processing data acquired during the summer of 1991.

  4. Utilising pseudo-CT data for dose calculation and plan optimization in adaptive radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Brendan; Kumar, Shivani; Dowling, Jason; Begg, Jarrad; Lambert, Jonathan; Lim, Karen; Vinod, Shalini K; Greer, Peter B; Holloway, Lois

    2015-12-01

    To quantify the dose calculation error and resulting optimization uncertainty caused by performing inverse treatment planning on inaccurate electron density data (pseudo-CT) as needed for adaptive radiotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) based treatment planning. Planning Computer Tomography (CT) data from 10 cervix cancer patients was used to generate 4 pseudo-CT data sets. Each pseudo-CT was created based on an available method of assigning electron density to an anatomic image. An inversely modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan was developed on each planning CT. The dose calculation error caused by each pseudo-CT data set was quantified by comparing the dose calculated each pseudo-CT data set with that calculated on the original planning CT for the same IMRT plan. The optimization uncertainty introduced by the dose calculation error was quantified by re-optimizing the same optimization parameters on each pseudo-CT data set and comparing against the original planning CT. Dose differences were quantified by assessing the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD) for targets and relevant organs at risk. Across all pseudo-CT data sets and all organs, the absolute mean dose calculation error was 0.2 Gy, and was within 2 % of the prescription dose in 98.5 % of cases. Then absolute mean optimisation error was 0.3 Gy EUD, indicating that that inverse optimisation is impacted by the dose calculation error. However, the additional uncertainty introduced to plan optimisation is small compared the sources of variation which already exist. Use of inaccurate electron density data for inverse treatment planning results in a dose calculation error, which in turn introduces additional uncertainty into the plan optimization process. In this study, we showed that both of these effects are clinically acceptable for cervix cancer patients using four different pseudo-CT data sets. Dose calculation and inverse optimization on pseudo-CT is feasible for this patient cohort.

  5. To evaluate efficacy and safety of amphotericin B in two different doses in the treatment of post kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL)

    PubMed Central

    Rabi Das, Vidya Nand; Siddiqui, Niyamat Ali; Pal, Biplab; Lal, Chandra Shekhar; Verma, Neena; Kumar, Ashish; Verma, Rakesh Bihari; Kumar, Dhirendra; Das, Pradeep; Pandey, Krishna

    2017-01-01

    Background Post kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) is a skin disorder that usually occurs among patients with a past history of visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Cases are also reported without a history of VL. There is no satisfactory treatment regimen available at present. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of amphotericin B in two different doses (0.5mg/kg vs 1mg/kg) in a prospective randomized trial in 50 PKDL patients. Methods In this open label study 50 patients with PKDL, aged between 5–60 years were randomized in two groups. Group A received amphotericin B in the dose of 0.5 mg/kg in 5% dextrose, daily for 20 infusions for 3 courses at an interval of 15 days between each course and Group B received amphotericin B in the dose of 1mg/kg in 5% dextrose on alternate days, 20 infusions for 3 courses an interval of 15 days between each course and followed up for one year. Results A total of 50 patients were enrolled, 25 in each of group A and group B. Two patients lost to follow up and three patients withdrew consent due to adverse events. The initial cure rate was 92% in group A and 88% in group B by intention to treat analysis and final cure rate by per protocol analysis was 95.65% and 95.45% in group A and group B respectively. Two patients each from either group relapsed. Nephrotoxicity was the most common adverse event occurring in both the groups. Conclusion The lower dose appears to have fewer adverse events however, nephrotoxicity remains a problem in both regimens. The 0.5mg/kg regimen may be considered instead of the higher dosage however safer treatments remain critical for PKDL treatment. PMID:28355259

  6. The effects of two different doses of calcium lactate on blood pH, bicarbonate, and repeated high-intensity exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Painelli, Vitor de Salles; da Silva, Rafael Pires; de Oliveira, Odilon Marques; de Oliveira, Luana Farias; Benatti, Fabiana Braga; Rabelo, Tobias; Guilherme, João Paulo Limongi França; Lancha, Antonio Herbert; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the effects of low- and high-dose calcium lactate supplementation on blood pH and bicarbonate (Study A) and on repeated high-intensity performance (Study B). In Study A, 10 young, physically active men (age: 24 ± 2.5 years; weight: 79.2 ± 9.45 kg; height: 1.79 ± 0.06 m) were assigned to acutely receive three different treatments, in a crossover fashion: high-dose calcium lactate (HD: 300 mg · kg(-1) body mass), low-dose calcium lactate (LD: 150 mg · kg(-1) body mass) and placebo (PL). During each visit, participants received one of these treatments and were assessed for blood pH and bicarbonate 0, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, and 240 min following ingestion. In Study B, 12 young male participants (age: 26 ± 4.5 years; weight: 82.0 ± 11.0 kg; height: 1.81 ± 0.07 m) received the same treatments of Study A. Ninety minutes after ingestion, participants underwent 3 bouts of the upper-body Wingate test and were assessed for blood pH and bicarbonate 0 and 90 min following ingestion and immediately after exercise. In Study A, both HD and LD promoted slight but significant increases in blood bicarbonate (31.47 ± 1.57 and 31.69 ± 1.04 mmol · L(-1, respectively) and pH levels (7.36 ± 0.02 and 7.36 ± 0.01, respectively), with no effect of PL. In Study B, total work done, peak power, mean power output were not affected by treatments. In conclusion, low- and high-dose calcium lactate supplementation induced similar, yet very discrete, increases in blood pH and bicarbonate, which were not sufficiently large to improve repeated high-intensity performance.

  7. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed.

  8. An Integrated Model of Choices and Response Times in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott D.; Marley, A. A. J.; Donkin, Christopher; Heathcote, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Recent theoretical developments in the field of absolute identification have stressed differences between relative and absolute processes, that is, whether stimulus magnitudes are judged relative to a shorter term context provided by recently presented stimuli or a longer term context provided by the entire set of stimuli. The authors developed a…

  9. The Relation between the Absolute Level of Parenting and Differential Parental Treatment with Adolescent Siblings' Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamrouti-Makkink, Ilse D.; Dubas, Judith Semon; Gerris, Jan R. M.; van Aken, Marcel A. G.

    2004-01-01

    Background: The present study extends existing studies on the role of differential parental treatment in explaining individual differences in adolescent problem behaviors above the absolute level of parenting and clarifies the function of gender of the child, birth rank and gender constellation of the sibling dyads. Method: The absolute level of…

  10. [Correction of polyhypovitaminosis in rats, having standard and enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids family omega-3 diets with different doses of vitamins].

    PubMed

    Beketova, N A; Vrzhesinskaia, O A; Kodentsova, V M; Kosheleva, O V; Preverzeva, O G; Sokol'nikov, A A

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of the correction of combined alimentary vitamin deficit in male Wistar rats (body weight 90-121 g) fed standard diet or enriched with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids diet (by replacing sunflower oil (4.5% of the diet) with linseed oil) with different doses (physiological and enhanced) of vitamins has been investigated. The control group of animals (n = 12) received a complete semisynthetic diet during all experimental period (42 d). The animals of the test groups (each of 20 rats) received vitamin-deficient diet containing sunflower or linseed oil and 20% per cent of vitamin mixture amount in control diet from which vitamin E had been excluded. After 28 days of such feeding each of test groups was divided into two subgroups (6-8 rats in each), and the next 14 days the animals of subgroups received the diet with different degree of vitamin compensation (50 or 180% percent of vitamin content in the diet of the control group). The addition of both low and high vitamin dose in deficient diet based on standard fat component did not compensate the reduced liver vitamin A content, which amounted to 47.4% of the level in the liver of the control group. The lack of vitamin E in animals was eliminated only after adding of the enhanced dose of vitamin E to the ration. Recovering of decreased plasma and liver B2 level, plasma 25(OH)D and liver vitamin B1 content have been occurred after addition of the low dose of these vitamins to rat diet. Increasing of omega-3 PUFA diet level improved vitamins A and D sufficiency to some extent, but was accompanied by the significant reduction of rat liver alfa-tocopherol content both under combined vitamin deficiency (by 14%) and increased vitamins consumption (by 43%). PUFA enrichment of the diet of rats with vitamin deficiency had no impact on vitamin B1 and B2 liver level. The use of high doses of vitamins for a long time to eliminate a combined deficiency of vitamins has been proved.

  11. Efficacy of single-dose hyaluronic acid products with two different structures in patients with early-stage knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Dernek, Bahar; Duymus, Tahir Mutlu; Koseoglu, Pinar Kursuz; Aydin, Tugba; Kesiktas, Fatma Nur; Aksoy, Cihan; Mutlu, Serhat

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] There are many types of hyaluronic acid preparations, but no clear data are available about which preparations is more effective. The aim of this trial was to investigate the effectiveness of different types of hyaluronic acid preparations on pain and function of inpatients with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] All patients were diagnosed by clinical examination and x-ray. Ostenil PLUS® was injected into 28 patients (group 1, 1.6 million daltons), and MONOVISC® (group 2, 2.5 million daltons) was injected into 46 patients. Demographic data and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index and Visual Analog Scale scores were used for clinical evaluation at 1, 3, and 6 months post injection. [Results] In both groups, baseline Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index and Visual Analog Scale scores were higher compared with those in subsequent evaluations. Based on the pre- and post-injection data, a significant reduction in all scores was observed after the injections for in both groups. According to intergroup comparisons, there was no significant difference in any of the scores between the two groups. [Conclusion] There were no difference in Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index and Visual Analog Scale scores in patients with knee osteoarthritis injected with two different hyaluronic acid structures in short-term preparations. PMID:27942115

  12. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  13. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  14. Sensitivity to change in cognitive performance and mood measures of energy and fatigue in response to differing doses of caffeine or breakfast.

    PubMed

    Maridakis, Victor; Herring, Matthew P; O'Connor, Patrick J

    2009-01-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects (N = 18) experiment compared the sensitivity to change of cognitive performance and mood measures of mental energy following consumption of either 100 or 200-mg caffeine or a 440-calorie breakfast. Breakfast and 200-mg caffeine improved mood and cognitive performance. The sensitivity to change of the measures did not differ in response to any treatment (all p values > .05). The mood and cognitive measures of mental energy used here have similar sensitivity to detecting change in response to a moderate dose of caffeine and breakfast consumption.

  15. Observational clinical study on the effects of different dosing regimens on vancomycin target levels in critically ill patients: Continuous versus intermittent application.

    PubMed

    Tafelski, S; Nachtigall, I; Troeger, Uwe; Deja, Maria; Krannich, Alexander; Günzel, Karsten; Spies, C

    2015-01-01

    Different dosing regimens for vancomycin are in clinical use: intermittent infusion and continuous administration. The intention of using these different dosing regimens is to reduce toxicity, to achieve target levels faster and to avoid treatment failure. The aim of this phase IV study was to compare safety and effectiveness in both administration regimens. The study was conducted in 2010 and 2011 in three postoperative intensive care units (ICUs) in a tertiary care university hospital in Berlin, Germany. Adult patients with vancomycin therapy and therapeutic drug monitoring were included. Out of 675 patients screened, 125 received vancomycin therapy, 39% with intermittent and 61% with continuous administration. Patients with continuous administration achieved target serum levels significantly earlier (median day 3 versus 4, p=0.022) and showed fewer sub-therapeutic serum levels (41% versus 11%, p<0.001). ICU mortality rate, duration of ICU stay and duration of ventilation did not differ between groups. Acute renal failure during the ICU stay occurred in 35% of patients with intermittent infusion versus 26% of patients with continuous application (p=0.324). In conclusion, continuous administration of vancomycin allowed more rapid achievement of targeted drug levels with fewer sub-therapeutic vancomycin levels observed. This might indicate that patients with more severe infections or higher variability in renal function could benefit from this form of administration.

  16. [Dose effect of alcohol on sex differences in blood alcohol metabolism--cases where healthy subjects with ALDH2*1/1 genotype drunk beer with meal].

    PubMed

    Oshima, Shunji; Haseba, Takeshi; Masuda, Chiaki; Kakimi, Ema; Kitagawa, Yasushi; Ohno, Youkichi

    2013-06-01

    It is said that blood alcohol concentrations (BAG) are higher in female than in male due to the smaller distribution volume of alcohol in female, whereas the rate of alcohol metabolism is faster in female than in males due to a higher activity of liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) in female. However, it is also known that alcohol metabolism varies depending on drinking conditions. In this study, we evaluated the dose effect of alcohol on sex differences in alcohol metabolism in daily drinking conditions, where young adults (16 males, 15 females) with ALDH2*1/1 genotype drunk beer at a dose of 0.32g or 1.0g ethanol/kg body weight with a test meal (460kcal). This study was conducted using a randomized cross-over design. In the considerable drinking condition (1.0g/kg), BAG was significantly higher in females than in males, whereas the rate of alcohol metabolism (beta) was higher in female than in male. In the moderate drinking condition (0.32g/kg), however, no sex differences in alcohol metabolism including BAG were seen. These results suggest that an increased first pass metabolism through liver ADH in female, which may be caused by the reduction of gastric emptying rate due to the meal intake, contribute to the vanishing of sex difference in BAC in the moderate drinking condition.

  17. Is there a difference between levodopa/ dopa-decarboxylase inhibitor and entacapone and levodopa/dopa-decarboxylase inhibitor dose fractionation strategies in Parkinson's disease patients experiencing symptom re-emergence due to wearing-off? The Honeymoon Study.

    PubMed

    Destée, Alain; Rérat, Karin; Bourdeix, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    Two strategies to manage symptom re-emergence due to wearing-off with conventional levodopa/dopa-decarboxylase inhibitor (DDCI) therapy were compared in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) in this randomized, open-label trial. PD patients receiving 3 daily doses of levodopa/DDCI were randomized to either levodopa/DDCI and entacapone or an increased dose frequency of levodopa/DDCI with or without an increased total daily dose (dose fractionation). After 1 month of treatment, patients were followed up for 1 year. A greater proportion of levodopa/DDCI and entacapone-treated patients had treatment success compared with dose-fractionated patients, according to investigator Clinical Global Impression of Change scores at 1 month (68 vs. 59%, respectively) and 1 year (60 vs. 51%, respectively). Mean 'off' time (time with symptoms) was improved in both groups at 1 month and 1 year, despite a reduction in the mean daily levodopa dose in the levodopa/DDCI and entacapone group at 1 month. The mean daily levodopa dose was increased in the dose fractionation group. At 1 month, there was a 4% reduction in patients experiencing dyskinesia with levodopa/DDCI and entacapone and a 3% increase with dose fractionation. These data suggest that levodopa/DDCI and entacapone reduces time with symptoms, the rate of motor complications and the daily levodopa dose compared with dose fractionation. However, as the observed differences were not statistically significant, further studies are required to confirm these results.

  18. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath plate interiors may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the sub-asthenospheric mantle. Here we analyze two global sets of shear-wave splitting data, that of Kreemer [2009] and an updated and expanded data set, to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. We also explore the effect of using geologically current plate velocities (i.e., the MORVEL set of angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]) compared with geodetically current plate velocities (i.e., the GSRM v1.2 angular velocities [Kreemer et al. 2014]). We demonstrate that the errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. The SKS-MORVEL absolute plate angular velocities (based on the Kreemer [2009] data set) are determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2° ) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6° ). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4° ) than for continental

  19. Absolute Gravity Datum in the Age of