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Sample records for absolute fission cross

  1. 242Pu absolute neutron-capture cross section measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2017-09-01

    The absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. During target fabrication, a small amount of 239Pu was added to the active target so that the absolute scale of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section could be set according to the known 239Pu(n,f) resonance at En,R = 7.83 eV. The relative scale of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section covers four orders of magnitude for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈ 40 keV. The cross section reported in ENDF/B-VII.1 for the 242Pu(n,γ) En,R = 2.68 eV resonance was found to be 2.4% lower than the new absolute 242Pu(n,γ) cross section.

  2. Experimental programme on absolute fission fragment yields with the lohengrin spectrometer: New optical and statistical methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelaziz, Chebboubi; Grégoire, Kessedjian; Olivier, Serot; Sylvain, Julien-Laferriere; Christophe, Sage; Florence, Martin; Olivier, Méplan; David, Bernard; Olivier, Litaize; Aurélien, Blanc; Herbert, Faust; Paolo, Mutti; Ulli, Köster; Alain, Letourneau; Thomas, Materna; Michal, Rapala

    2017-09-01

    The study of fission yields has a major impact on the characterization and understanding of the fission process and is mandatory for reactor applications. In the past with the LOHENGRIN spectrometer of the ILL, priority has been given for the studies in the light fission fragment mass range. The LPSC in collaboration with ILL and CEA has developed a measurement program on symmetric and heavy mass fission fragment distributions. The combination of measurements with ionisation chamber and Ge detectors is necessary to describe precisely the heavy fission fragment region in mass and charge. Recently, new measurements of fission yields and kinetic energy distributions are has been made on the 233U(nth,f) reaction. The focus of this work has been on the new optical and statistical methodology and the self-normalization of the data to provide new absolute measurements, independently of any libraries, and the associated experimental covariance matrix.

  3. Absolute photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The absolute values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.

  4. Absolute photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.

    1985-01-01

    The absolute values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.

  5. Absolute partial photoionization cross sections of ethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, F. A.; Whitley, T. A.; Keller, P. R.; Taylor, J. W.

    1991-07-01

    Absolute partial photoionization cross sections for ionization out of the first four valence orbitals to the X 2B 3u, A 2B 3g, B 2A g and C 2B 2u states of the C 2H 4+ ion are presented as a function of photon energy over the energy range from 12 to 26 eV. The experimental results have been compared to previously published relative partial cross sections for the first two bands at 18, 21 and 24 eV. Comparison of the experimental data with continuum multiple scattering Xα calculations provides evidence for extensive autoionization to the X 2B 3u state and confirms the predicted shape resonances in ionization to the A 2B 3g and B 2A g states. Identification of possible transitions for the autoionizing resonances have been made using multiple scattering transition state calculations on Rydberg excited states.

  6. Cross section for the subthreshold fission of 236U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, A. A.; Bergman, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Koptelov, E. A.; Samylin, B. F.; Trufanov, A. M.; Fursov, B. I.; Shorin, V. S.

    2008-08-01

    The cross section for 236U fission in the neutron-energy range E n = 0.001 20 keV was measured by using the INR RAS (Institute of Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) LSDS-100 neutron spectrometer of the lead slowing-down spectrometer type. The resonance fission areas of the resonances at 5.45 eV and 1.28 keV were found, and the fission widths of these resonances were evaluated. The cross section for the 238U( n, f) fission process was measured, and the threshold sensitivity of the LSDS-100 to small values of fission cross sections was estimated. The well-known intermediate structure in the cross section for the neutron-induced subbarrier fission of 236U was confirmed.

  7. Lanl Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Section Measurement Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. B.; Tovesson, F.; Hill, T. S.

    2014-09-01

    A well established program of neutron-induced fission cross section measurement at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is supporting the Fuel Cycle Research program (FC R&D). Combining measurements at two LANSCE facilities, the Lujan Center and the Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR), cover neutron energies over 10 orders of magnitude: from sub-thermal up to 200 MeV. A parallel-plate fission ionization chamber was used as a fission fragment detector. The 235U(n,f) standard was used as the reference. Fission cross sections have been measured for multiple actinides. The new data presented here completes the suite of long-lived Uranium isotopes that were investigated with this experimental approach. The cross section data are presented in comparison with existing evaluations and previous measurements.

  8. A New Measurement of Neutron Induced Fission Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Joshua; Niffte Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Neutron induced fission cross sections of actinides are of great interest in nuclear energy and stockpile stewardship. Traditionally, measurements of these cross sections have been made with fission chambers, which provide limited information on the actual fragments, and ultimately result in uncertainties on the order of several percent. The Neutron Induced Fission ragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) collaboration designed and built a fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC), which provides additional information on these processes, through 3-dimensional tracking, improved particle identification, and in-situ profiles of target and beam non-uniformities. Ultimately, this should provide sub-percent measurements of (n,f) cross-sections. During the 2016 run cycle, measurements of the 238U(n,f)/235U(n,f) cross section shape was performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility. An overview of the fission TPC will be given, as well as these recently reported results. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Characterization of the Medley setup for measurements of neutron-induced fission cross sections at the GANIL-NFS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrío, Diego; Prokofiev, Alexander V.; Gustavsson, Cecilia; Jansson, Kaj; Andersson-Sundén, Erik; Al-Adili, Ali; Pomp, Stephan

    2017-09-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections of 235U and 238U are widely used as standards for monitoring of neutron beams and fields. An absolute measurement of these cross sections at an absolute scale, i.e., versus the H(n,p) scattering cross section, is planned with the white neutron beam under construction at the Neutrons For Science (NFS) facility in GANIL. The experimental setup, based on PPACs and ΔE-ΔE-E telescopes containing Silicon and CsI(Tl) detectors, is described. The expected uncertainties are discussed.

  10. Absolute measurement of the 242Pu neutron-capture cross section

    DOE PAGES

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; ...

    2016-04-21

    Here, the absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. The first direct measurement of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section was made over the incident neutron energy range from thermal to ≈ 6 keV, and the absolute scale of the (n,γ) cross section was set according to the known 239Pu(n,f) resonance at E n,R = 7.83 eV. This was accomplished by adding a small quantity of 239Pu to the 242Pu sample. The relative scale of themore » cross section, with a range of four orders of magnitude, was determined for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈ 40 keV. Our data, in general, are in agreement with previous measurements and those reported in ENDF/B-VII.1; the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section at the E n,R = 2.68 eV resonance is within 2.4% of the evaluated value. However, discrepancies exist at higher energies; our data are ≈30% lower than the evaluated data at E n ≈ 1 keV and are approximately 2σ away from the previous measurement at E n ≈ 20 keV.« less

  11. Fission cross section uncertainties with the NIFFTE TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangiorgio, Samuele; Niffte Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear data such as neutron-induced fission cross sections play a fundamental role in nuclear energy and defense applications. In recent years, understanding of these systems has become increasingly dependent upon advanced simulation and modeling, where uncertainties in nuclear data propagate in the expected performances of existing and future systems. It is important therefore that uncertainties in nuclear data are minimized and fully understood. For this reason, the Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) uses a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to measure energy-differential (n,f) cross sections with unprecedented precision. The presentation will discuss how the capabilities of the NIFFTE TPC allow to directly measures systematic uncertainties in fission cross sections, in particular for what concerns fission-fragment identification, and target and beam uniformity. Preliminary results from recent analysis of 238U/235U and 239Pu/235U data collected with the TPC will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Absolute photoionization cross-section of the methyl radical.

    PubMed

    Taatjes, Craig A; Osborn, David L; Selby, Talitha M; Meloni, Giovanni; Fan, Haiyan; Pratt, Stephen T

    2008-10-02

    The absolute photoionization cross-section of the methyl radical has been measured using two completely independent methods. The CH3 photoionization cross-section was determined relative to that of acetone and methyl vinyl ketone at photon energies of 10.2 and 11.0 eV by using a pulsed laser-photolysis/time-resolved synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry method. The time-resolved depletion of the acetone or methyl vinyl ketone precursor and the production of methyl radicals following 193 nm photolysis are monitored simultaneously by using time-resolved synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry. Comparison of the initial methyl signal with the decrease in precursor signal, in combination with previously measured absolute photoionization cross-sections of the precursors, yields the absolute photoionization cross-section of the methyl radical; sigma(CH3)(10.2 eV) = (5.7 +/- 0.9) x 10(-18) cm(2) and sigma(CH3)(11.0 eV) = (6.0 +/- 2.0) x 10(-18) cm(2). The photoionization cross-section for vinyl radical determined by photolysis of methyl vinyl ketone is in good agreement with previous measurements. The methyl radical photoionization cross-section was also independently measured relative to that of the iodine atom by comparison of ionization signals from CH3 and I fragments following 266 nm photolysis of methyl iodide in a molecular-beam ion-imaging apparatus. These measurements gave a cross-section of (5.4 +/- 2.0) x 10(-18) cm(2) at 10.460 eV, (5.5 +/- 2.0) x 10(-18) cm(2) at 10.466 eV, and (4.9 +/- 2.0) x 10(-18) cm(2) at 10.471 eV. The measurements allow relative photoionization efficiency spectra of methyl radical to be placed on an absolute scale and will facilitate quantitative measurements of methyl concentrations by photoionization mass spectrometry.

  13. Absolute cross-section measurements of inner-shell ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Hans; Tobehn, Ingo; Ebel, Frank; Hippler, Rainer

    1994-12-01

    Cross section ratios for K- and L-shell ionization of thin silver and gold targets by positron and electron impact have been determined at projectile energies of 30 70 keV. The experimental results are confirmed by calculations in plane wave Born approximation (PWBA) which include an electron exchange term and account for the deceleration or acceleration of the incident projectile in the nuclear field of the target atom. We report first absolute cross sections for K- and L-shell ionization of silver and gold targets by lepton impact in the threshold region. We have measured the corresponding cross sections for electron (e-) impact with an electron gun and the same experimental set-up.

  14. Uncertainty quantification in fission cross section measurements at LANSCE

    DOE PAGES

    Tovesson, F.

    2015-01-09

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections have been measured for several isotopes of uranium and plutonium at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) over a wide range of incident neutron energies. The total uncertainties in these measurements are in the range 3–5% above 100 keV of incident neutron energy, which results from uncertainties in the target, neutron source, and detector system. The individual sources of uncertainties are assumed to be uncorrelated, however correlation in the cross section across neutron energy bins are considered. The quantification of the uncertainty contributions will be described here.

  15. A time projection chamber for high accuracy and precision fission cross-section measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Heffner, M.; Asner, D. M.; Baker, R. G.; ...

    2014-05-22

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4π acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This study provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance ofmore » the fissionTPC.« less

  16. Experimental Cross Sections of Fission Fragments of Thorium-232 Irradiated with Medium-Energy Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libanova, O. N.; Golubeva, E. S.; Ermolaev, S. V.; Matushko, V. L.; Botvina, A. S.

    2018-05-01

    This paper is focused on fission of Th-232 nuclei induced by protons with energies ranging from 20 to 140 MeV. This energy range is the most informative for studying the competition between asymmetric and symmetric fission modes. Experimental cross sections of production of radionuclides in thorium targets have been determined a year after irradiation. The corresponding theoretical values are calculated using the cascade-evaporation-fission model. The theoretical and experimental cross sections (literature data included) are compared.

  17. Reducing Uncertainties in Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections Using a Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Brett; Niffte Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections for actinides have long been of great interest for nuclear energy and stockpile stewardship. Traditionally, measurements were performed using fission chambers which provided limited information about the detected fission events. For the case of 239Pu(n,f), sensitivity studies have shown a need for more precise measurements. Recently the Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) has developed the fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) to measure fission cross sections to better than 1% uncertainty by providing 3D tracking of fission fragments. The fissionTPC collected data to calculate the 239Pu(n,f) cross section at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center during the 2014 run cycle. Preliminary analysis has been focused on studying particle identification and target and beam non-uniformities to reduce the uncertainty on the cross section. Additionally, the collaboration is investigating other systematic errors that could not be well studied with a traditional fission chamber. LA-UR-15-24906.

  18. Fission cross-sections, prompt fission neutron and γ-ray emission in request for nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambsch, F.-J.; Salvador-Castiñeira, P.; Oberstedt, S.; Göök, A.; Billnert, R.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years JRC-IRMM has been investigating fission cross-sections of 240,242Pu in the fast-neutron energy range relevant for innovative reactor systems and requested in the High Priority Request List (HPRL) of the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). In addition to that, prompt neutron multiplicities are being investigated for the major isotopes 235U, 239Pu in the neutron-resonance region using a newly developed scintillation detector array (SCINTIA) and an innovative modification of the Frisch-grid ionisation chamber for fission-fragment detection. These data are highly relevant for improved neutron data evaluation and requested by the OECD/Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC). Thirdly, also prompt fission γ-ray emission is investigated using highly efficient lanthanide-halide detectors with superior timing resolution. Again, those data are requested in the HPRL for major actinides to solve open questions on an under-prediction of decay heat in nuclear reactors. The information on prompt fission neutron and γ-ray emission is crucial for benchmarking nuclear models to study the de-excitation process of neutron-rich fission fragments. Information on γ-ray emission probabilities is also useful in decommissioning exercises on damaged nuclear power plants like Fukushima Daiichi to which JRC-IRMM is contributing. The results on the 240,242Pu fission cross section, 235U prompt neutron multiplicity in the resonance region and correlations with fission fragments and prompt γ-ray emission for several isotopes will be presented and put into perspective.

  19. Beta decay of the fission product 125Sb and a new complete evaluation of absolute gamma ray transition intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajput, M. U.; Ali, N.; Hussain, S.; Mujahid, S. A.; MacMahon, D.

    2012-04-01

    The radionuclide 125Sb is a long-lived fission product, which decays to 125Te by negative beta emission with a half-life of 1008 day. The beta decay is followed by the emission of several gamma radiations, ranging from low to medium energy, that can suitably be used for high-resolution detector calibrations, decay heat calculations and in many other applications. In this work, the beta decay of 125Sb has been studied in detail. The complete published experimental data of relative gamma ray intensities in the beta decay of the radionuclide 125Sb has been compiled. The consistency analysis was performed and discrepancies found at several gamma ray energies. Evaluation of the discrepant data was carried out using Normalized Residual and RAJEVAL methods. The decay scheme balance was carried out using beta branching ratios, internal conversion coefficients, populating and depopulating gamma transitions to 125Te levels. The work has resulted in the consistent conversion factor equal to 29.59(13) %, and determined a new evaluated set of the absolute gamma ray emission probabilities. The work has also shown 22.99% of the delayed intensity fraction as outgoing from the 58 d isomeric 144 keV energy level and 77.01% of the prompt intensity fraction reaching to the ground state from the other excited states. The results are discussed and compared with previous evaluations. The present work includes additional experimental data sets which were not included in the previous evaluations. A new set of recommended relative and absolute gamma ray emission probabilities is presented.

  20. Absolute electron-impact total ionization cross sections of chlorofluoromethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Roberto; Sierra, Borja; Redondo, Carolina; Rayo, María N. Sánchez; Castaño, Fernando

    2004-12-01

    An experimental study is reported on the electron-impact total ionization cross sections (TICSs) of CCl4, CCl3F, CCl2F2, and CClF3 molecules. The kinetic energy of the colliding electrons was in the 10-85 eV range. TICSs were obtained as the sum of the partial ionization cross sections of all fragment ions, measured and identified in a linear double focusing time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The resulting TICS profiles—as a function of the electron-impact energy—have been compared both with those computed by ab initio and (semi)empirical methods and with the available experimental data. The computational methods used include the binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) modified to include atoms with principal quantum numbers n⩾3, the Deutsch and Märk (DM) formalism, and the modified additivity rule (MAR). It is concluded that both modified BEB and DM methods fit the experimental TICS for (CF4), CClF3, CCl2F2, CCl3F, and CCl4 to a high accuracy, in contrast with the poor accord of the MAR method. A discussion on the factors influencing the discrepancies of the fittings is presented.

  1. Reducing Uncertainties in Neutron Induced Fission Cross Sections via a Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Joshua; Niffte Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Neutron induced fission cross sections of actinides are of great interest in nuclear energy and stockpile stewardship. Traditionally, measurements of these cross sections have been made with fission chambers, which provide limited information on the actual fragments, and ultimately result in uncertainties on the order of several percent. The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment collaboration (NIFFTE) designed and built a fission Time Project Chamber (fission TPC), which provides additional information on these processes, through 3-dimensional tracking, improved particle identification, and in-situ profiles of target and beam non-uniformities. Ultimately, this should provide sub-percent measurements of (n,f) cross-sections. During the 2015 run cycle, measurements of several actinides were performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility. An overview of the fission TPC will be given, as well as the current progress towards a sub-percent measurement of the 239Pu/235U (n,f) cross-section ratio. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Section Measurements for Full Suite of Uranium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, Alexander; Tovesson, Fredrik; Hill, Tony

    2010-11-01

    A well established program of neutron-induced fission cross section measurement at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is supporting the Fuel Cycle Research program (FC R&D). The incident neutron energy range spans energies from sub-thermal energies up to 200 MeV by measuring both the Lujan Center and the Weapons Neutron Research center (WNR). Conventional parallel-plate fission ionization chambers with actinide deposited foils are used as a fission detector. The time-of-flight method is implemented to measure neutron energy. Counting rate ratio from investigated and standard U-235 foils is translated into fission cross section ratio. Different methods of normalization for measured ratio are employed, namely, using of actinide deposit thicknesses, normalization to evaluated data, etc. Finally, ratios are converted to cross sections based on the standard U-235 fission cross section data file. Preliminary data for newly investigated isotopes U-236 and U-234 will be reported. Those new data complete a full suite of Uranium isotopes, which were investigated with presented experimental approach. When analysis of the new measured data will is completed, data will be delivered to evaluators. Having data for full set of Uranium isotopes will increase theoretical modeling capabilities and make new data evaluations much more reliable.

  3. Fission cross sections of some thorium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium isotopes relative to /sup 235/U

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J W

    1983-10-01

    Earlier results from the measurements, at this Laboratory, of the fission cross sections of /sup 230/Th, /sup 232/Th, /sup 233/U, /sup 234/U, /sup 236/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 237/Np, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 242/Pu relative to /sup 235/U are reviewed with revisions to include changes in data processing procedures, alpha half lives and thermal fission cross sections. Some new data have also been included. The current experimental methods and procedures and the sample assay methods are described in detail and the sources of error are presented in a systematic manner. 38 references.

  4. Absolute total and partial dissociative cross sections of pyrimidine at electron and proton intermediate impact velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, Wania, E-mail: wania@if.ufrj.br; Luna, Hugo; Sigaud, Lucas

    Absolute total non-dissociative and partial dissociative cross sections of pyrimidine were measured for electron impact energies ranging from 70 to 400 eV and for proton impact energies from 125 up to 2500 keV. MOs ionization induced by coulomb interaction were studied by measuring both ionization and partial dissociative cross sections through time of flight mass spectrometry and by obtaining the branching ratios for fragment formation via a model calculation based on the Born approximation. The partial yields and the absolute cross sections measured as a function of the energy combined with the model calculation proved to be a useful toolmore » to determine the vacancy population of the valence MOs from which several sets of fragment ions are produced. It was also a key point to distinguish the dissociation regimes induced by both particles. A comparison with previous experimental results is also presented.« less

  5. Calculations of Nuclear Astrophysics and Californium Fission Neutron Spectrum Averaged Cross Section Uncertainties Using ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0 and Low-fidelity Covariances

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B., E-mail: pritychenko@bnl.gov

    Nuclear astrophysics and californium fission neutron spectrum averaged cross sections and their uncertainties for ENDF materials have been calculated. Absolute values were deduced with Maxwellian and Mannhart spectra, while uncertainties are based on ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0 and Low-Fidelity covariances. These quantities are compared with available data, independent benchmarks, EXFOR library, and analyzed for a wide range of cases. Recommendations for neutron cross section covariances are given and implications are discussed.

  6. Statistical Model Analysis of (n,p) Cross Sections and Average Energy For Fission Neutron Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Odsuren, M.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.

    2011-06-28

    Investigation of charged particle emission reaction cross sections for fast neutrons is important to both nuclear reactor technology and the understanding of nuclear reaction mechanisms. In particular, the study of (n,p) cross sections is necessary to estimate radiation damage due to hydrogen production, nuclear heating and transmutations in the structural materials of fission and fusion reactors. On the other hand, it is often necessary in practice to evaluate the neutron cross sections of the nuclides for which no experimental data are available.Because of this, we carried out the systematical analysis of known experimental (n,p) and (n,a) cross sections for fastmore » neutrons and observed a systematical regularity in the wide energy interval of 6-20 MeV and for broad mass range of target nuclei. To explain this effect using the compound, pre-equilibrium and direct reaction mechanisms some formulae were deduced. In this paper, in the framework of the statistical model known experimental (n,p) cross sections averaged over the thermal fission neutron spectrum of U-235 are analyzed. It was shown that the experimental data are satisfactorily described by the statistical model. Also, in the case of (n,p) cross sections the effective average neutron energy for fission spectrum of U-235 was found to be around 3 MeV.« less

  7. Measurements of absolute absorption cross sections of ozone in the 185- to 254-nm wavelength region and the temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Freeman, D. E.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of the relative absorption cross sections of ozone at temperatures 195, 228, and 295 K have been made throughout the 185 to 254 nm wavelength region. The absolute absorption cross sections at the same temperatures have been measured at several discrete wavelengths in the 185 to 250 nm region. The absolute cross sections of ozone have been used to put the relative cross sections on a firm absolute basis throughout the 185 to 255 nm region. These recalibrated cross sections are slightly lower than those of Molina and Molina (1986), but the differences are within a few percent and would not be significant in atmospheric applications.

  8. Improvement of Gaofen-3 Absolute Positioning Accuracy Based on Cross-Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Mingjun; Li, Jiansong

    2017-01-01

    The Chinese Gaofen-3 (GF-3) mission was launched in August 2016, equipped with a full polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensor in the C-band, with a resolution of up to 1 m. The absolute positioning accuracy of GF-3 is of great importance, and in-orbit geometric calibration is a key technology for improving absolute positioning accuracy. Conventional geometric calibration is used to accurately calibrate the geometric calibration parameters of the image (internal delay and azimuth shifts) using high-precision ground control data, which are highly dependent on the control data of the calibration field, but it remains costly and labor-intensive to monitor changes in GF-3’s geometric calibration parameters. Based on the positioning consistency constraint of the conjugate points, this study presents a geometric cross-calibration method for the rapid and accurate calibration of GF-3. The proposed method can accurately calibrate geometric calibration parameters without using corner reflectors and high-precision digital elevation models, thus improving absolute positioning accuracy of the GF-3 image. GF-3 images from multiple regions were collected to verify the absolute positioning accuracy after cross-calibration. The results show that this method can achieve a calibration accuracy as high as that achieved by the conventional field calibration method. PMID:29240675

  9. Measurement of the normalized 238U(n ,f )/235U(n ,f ) cross section ratio from threshold to 30 MeV with the NIFFTE fission Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casperson, R. J.; Asner, D. M.; Baker, J.; Baker, R. G.; Barrett, J. S.; Bowden, N. S.; Brune, C.; Bundgaard, J.; Burgett, E.; Cebra, D. A.; Classen, T.; Cunningham, M.; Deaven, J.; Duke, D. L.; Ferguson, I.; Gearhart, J.; Geppert-Kleinrath, V.; Greife, U.; Grimes, S.; Guardincerri, E.; Hager, U.; Hagmann, C.; Heffner, M.; Hensle, D.; Hertel, N.; Higgins, D.; Hill, T.; Isenhower, L. D.; King, J.; Klay, J. L.; Kornilov, N.; Kudo, R.; Laptev, A. B.; Loveland, W.; Lynch, M.; Lynn, W. S.; Magee, J. A.; Manning, B.; Massey, T. N.; McGrath, C.; Meharchand, R.; Mendenhall, M. P.; Montoya, L.; Pickle, N. T.; Qu, H.; Ruz, J.; Sangiorgio, S.; Schmitt, K. T.; Seilhan, B.; Sharma, S.; Snyder, L.; Stave, S.; Tate, A. C.; Tatishvili, G.; Thornton, R. T.; Tovesson, F.; Towell, D. E.; Towell, R. S.; Walsh, N.; Watson, S.; Wendt, B.; Wood, L.; Yao, L.; Younes, W.; Niffte Collaboration

    2018-03-01

    The normalized 238U(n ,f )/235U(n ,f ) cross section ratio has been measured using the NIFFTE fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) from the reaction threshold to 30 MeV . The fissionTPC is a two-volume MICROMEGAS time projection chamber that allows for full three-dimensional reconstruction of fission-fragment ionization profiles from neutron-induced fission. The measurement was performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, where the neutron energy is determined from neutron time of-flight. The 238U(n ,f )/235U(n ,f ) ratio reported here is the first cross section measurement made with the fissionTPC, and will provide new experimental data for evaluation of the 238U(n ,f ) cross section, an important standard used in neutron-flux measurements. Use of a development target in this work prevented the determination of an absolute normalization, to be addressed in future measurements. Instead, the measured cross section ratio has been normalized to ENDF/B-VIII.β 5 at 14.5 MeV.

  10. Neutron induced fission cross section measurements of 240Pu and 242Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, F.; Eykens, R.; Heyse, J.; Matei, C.; Moens, A.; Nolte, R.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Richter, S.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Wynants, R.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate neutron induced fission cross section of 240Pu and 242Pu are required in view of making nuclear technology safer and more efficient to meet the upcoming needs for the future generation of nuclear power plants (GEN-IV). The probability for a neutron to induce such reactions figures in the NEA Nuclear Data High Priority Request List [1]. A measurement campaign to determine neutron induced fission cross sections of 240Pu and 242Pu at 2.51 MeV and 14.83 MeV has been carried out at the 3.7 MV Van De Graaff linear accelerator at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig. Two identical Frisch Grid fission chambers, housing back to back a 238U and a APu target (A = 240 or A = 242), were employed to detect the total fission yield. The targets were molecular plated on 0.25 mm aluminium foils kept at ground potential and the employed gas was P10. The neutron fluence was measured with the proton recoil telescope (T1), which is the German primary standard for neutron fluence measurements. The two measurements were related using a De Pangher long counter and the charge as monitors. The experimental results have an average uncertainty of 3-4% at 2.51 MeV and for 6-8% at 14.81 MeV and have been compared to the data available in literature.

  11. Measurement of the normalized U 238 ( n , f ) / U 235 ( n , f ) cross section ratio from threshold to 30 MeV with the NIFFTE fission Time Projection Chamber

    DOE PAGES

    Casperson, R. J.; Asner, D. M.; Baker, J.; ...

    2018-03-23

    We present that the normalized 238U(n,f)/ 235U(n,f) cross section ratio has been measured using the NIFFTE fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) from the reaction threshold to 30 MeV . The fissionTPC is a two-volume MICROMEGAS time projection chamber that allows for full three-dimensional reconstruction of fission-fragment ionization profiles from neutron-induced fission. The measurement was performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, where the neutron energy is determined from neutron time of-flight. The 238U(n,f)/ 235U(n,f) ratio reported here is the first cross section measurement made with the fissionTPC, and will provide new experimental data for evaluation of the 238U(n,f) crossmore » section, an important standard used in neutron-flux measurements. Use of a development target in this work prevented the determination of an absolute normalization, to be addressed in future measurements. Instead, the measured cross section ratio has been normalized to ENDF/B-VIII.β5 at 14.5 MeV.« less

  12. Measurement of the normalized U 238 ( n , f ) / U 235 ( n , f ) cross section ratio from threshold to 30 MeV with the NIFFTE fission Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Casperson, R. J.; Asner, D. M.; Baker, J.

    We present that the normalized 238U(n,f)/ 235U(n,f) cross section ratio has been measured using the NIFFTE fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) from the reaction threshold to 30 MeV . The fissionTPC is a two-volume MICROMEGAS time projection chamber that allows for full three-dimensional reconstruction of fission-fragment ionization profiles from neutron-induced fission. The measurement was performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, where the neutron energy is determined from neutron time of-flight. The 238U(n,f)/ 235U(n,f) ratio reported here is the first cross section measurement made with the fissionTPC, and will provide new experimental data for evaluation of the 238U(n,f) crossmore » section, an important standard used in neutron-flux measurements. Use of a development target in this work prevented the determination of an absolute normalization, to be addressed in future measurements. Instead, the measured cross section ratio has been normalized to ENDF/B-VIII.β5 at 14.5 MeV.« less

  13. On the absolute photoionization cross section and dissociative photoionization of cyclopropenylidene.

    PubMed

    Holzmeier, Fabian; Fischer, Ingo; Kiendl, Benjamin; Krueger, Anke; Bodi, Andras; Hemberger, Patrick

    2016-04-07

    We report the determination of the absolute photoionization cross section of cyclopropenylidene, c-C3H2, and the heat of formation of the C3H radical and ion derived by the dissociative ionization of the carbene. Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation as provided by the Swiss Light Source and imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence (iPEPICO) were employed. Cyclopropenylidene was generated by pyrolysis of a quadricyclane precursor in a 1 : 1 ratio with benzene, which enabled us to derive the carbene's near threshold absolute photoionization cross section from the photoionization yield of the two pyrolysis products and the known cross section of benzene. The cross section at 9.5 eV, for example, was determined to be 4.5 ± 1.4 Mb. Upon dissociative ionization the carbene decomposes by hydrogen atom loss to the linear isomer of C3H(+). The appearance energy for this process was determined to be AE(0K)(c-C3H2; l-C3H(+)) = 13.67 ± 0.10 eV. The heat of formation of neutral and cationic C3H was derived from this value via a thermochemical cycle as Δ(f)H(0K)(C3H) = 725 ± 25 kJ mol(-1) and Δ(f)H(0K)(C3H(+)) = 1604 ± 19 kJ mol(-1), using a previously reported ionization energy of C3H.

  14. Absolute single-photoionization cross sections of Se 2 + : Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Macaluso, D. A.; Aguilar, A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.

    2015-12-28

    Absolute single-photoionization cross-section measurements for Se 2+ ions were performed at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using the merged-beams photo-ion technique. Measurements were made at a photon energy resolution of 24 ± 3 meV in the photon energy range 23.5-42.5 eV, spanning the ground state and low-lying metastable state ionization thresholds. Here, to clearly resolve the resonant structure near the ground-state threshold, high-resolution measurements were made from 30.0 to 31.9 eV at a photon energy resolution of 6.7 ± 0.7 meV. Numerous resonance features observed in the experimental spectra are assigned and their energies and quantummore » defects tabulated. The high-resolution cross-section measurements are compared with large-scale, state-of-the-art theoretical cross-section calculations obtained from the Dirac Coulomb R -matrix method. Suitable agreement is obtained over the entire photon energy range investigated. In conclusion, these results are an experimental determination of the absolute photoionization cross section of doubly ionized selenium and include a detailed analysis of the photoionization resonance spectrum of this ion.« less

  15. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  16. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  17. Absolute vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption cross section studies of atomic and molecular species: Techniques and observational data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, D. L.; Wu, C. Y. R.

    1990-01-01

    Absorption of a high energy photon (greater than 6 eV) by an isolated molecule results in the formation of highly excited quasi-discrete or continuum states which evolve through a wide range of direct and indirect photochemical processes. These are: photoionization and autoionization, photodissociation and predissociation, and fluorescence. The ultimate goal is to understand the dynamics of the excitation and decay processes and to quantitatively measure the absolute partial cross sections for all processes which occur in photoabsorption. Typical experimental techniques and the status of observational results of particular interest to solar system observations are presented.

  18. Determination of the fast-neutron-induced fission cross-section of 242Pu at nELBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kögler, Toni; Beyer, Roland; Junghans, Arnd R.; Schwengner, Ronald; Wagner, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    The fast-neutron-induced fission cross section of 242Pu was determined in the energy range of 0.5 MeV to 10MeV at the neutron time-of-flight facility nELBE. Using a parallel-plate fission ionization chamber this quantity was measured relative to 235U(n,f). The number of target nuclei was thereby calculated by means of measuring the spontaneous fission rate of 242Pu. An MCNP 6 neutron transport simulation was used to correct the relative cross section for neutron scattering. The determined results are in good agreement with current experimental and evaluated data sets.

  19. Absolute cross-sections for DNA strand breaks and crosslinks induced by low energy electrons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenzhuang; Chen, Shiliang; Dong, Yanfang; Cloutier, Pierre; Sanche, Léon

    2016-01-01

    Absolute cross sections (CSs) for the interaction of low energy electrons with condensed macromolecules are essential parameters to accurately model ionizing radiation induced reactions. To determine CSs for various conformational DNA damage induced by 2–20 eV electrons, we investigated the influence of the attenuation length (AL) and penetration factor (f) using a mathematical model. Solid films of super-coiled plasmid DNA with thicknesses of 10, 15 and 20 nm were irradiated with 4.6, 5.6, 9.6 and 14.6 eV electrons. DNA conformational changes were quantified by gel electrophoresis, and the respective yields were extrapolated from exposure–response curves. The absolute CS, AL and f values were generated by applying the model developed by Rezaee et al. The values of AL were found to lie between 11 and 16 nm with the maximum at 14.6 eV. The absolute CSs for the loss of the supercoiled (LS) configuration and production of crosslinks (CL), single strand breaks (SSB) and double strand breaks (DSB) induced by 4.6, 5.6, 9.6 and 14.6 eV electrons are obtained. The CSs for SSB are smaller, but similar to those for LS, indicating that SSB are the main conformational damage. The CSs for DSB and CL are about one order of magnitude smaller than those of LS and SSB. The value of f is found to be independent of electron energy, which allows extending the absolute CSs for these types of damage within the range 2–20 eV, from previous measurements of effective CSs. When comparison is possible, the absolute CSs are found to be in good agreement with those obtained from previous similar studies with double-stranded DNA. The high values of the absolute CSs of 4.6 and 9.6 eV provide quantitative evidence for the high efficiency of low energy electrons to induce DNA damage via the formation of transient anions. PMID:27878170

  20. Absolute cross-sections for DNA strand breaks and crosslinks induced by low energy electrons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenzhuang; Chen, Shiliang; Dong, Yanfang; Cloutier, Pierre; Zheng, Yi; Sanche, Léon

    2016-12-07

    Absolute cross sections (CSs) for the interaction of low energy electrons with condensed macromolecules are essential parameters to accurately model ionizing radiation induced reactions. To determine CSs for various conformational DNA damage induced by 2-20 eV electrons, we investigated the influence of the attenuation length (AL) and penetration factor (f) using a mathematical model. Solid films of supercoiled plasmid DNA with thicknesses of 10, 15 and 20 nm were irradiated with 4.6, 5.6, 9.6 and 14.6 eV electrons. DNA conformational changes were quantified by gel electrophoresis, and the respective yields were extrapolated from exposure-response curves. The absolute CS, AL and f values were generated by applying the model developed by Rezaee et al. The values of AL were found to lie between 11 and 16 nm with the maximum at 14.6 eV. The absolute CSs for the loss of the supercoiled (LS) configuration and production of crosslinks (CL), single strand breaks (SSB) and double strand breaks (DSB) induced by 4.6, 5.6, 9.6 and 14.6 eV electrons are obtained. The CSs for SSB are smaller, but similar to those for LS, indicating that SSB are the main conformational damage. The CSs for DSB and CL are about one order of magnitude smaller than those of LS and SSB. The value of f is found to be independent of electron energy, which allows extending the absolute CSs for these types of damage within the range 2-20 eV, from previous measurements of effective CSs. When comparison is possible, the absolute CSs are found to be in good agreement with those obtained from previous similar studies with double-stranded DNA. The high values of the absolute CSs of 4.6 and 9.6 eV provide quantitative evidence for the high efficiency of low energy electrons to induce DNA damage via the formation of transient anions.

  1. Neutron-induced fission-cross-section measurements and calculations of selected transplutonic isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.M.; Browne, J.C.

    1982-08-27

    The neutron-induced fission cross sections of /sup 242m/Am and /sup 245/Cm have been measured over an energy range of 10/sup -4/ eV to approx. 20 MeV in a series of experiments at three facilities during the past several years. The combined results of these measurements, in which only sub-milligram quantities of enriched isotopes were used, yield cross sections with uncertainties of approximately 5% below 10 MeV relative to the /sup 235/U standard cross section used to normalize the data. We summarize the resonance analysis of the /sup 242m/Am(n,f) cross section in the eV region. Hauser-Feshbach statistical calculations of the detailedmore » fission cross sections of /sup 235/U and /sup 245/Cm have been carried out over the energy region from 0.1 to 5 MeV and these results are compared with our experimental data.« less

  2. Investigation on the absolute and relative photoionization cross sections of 3 potential propargylic fuels.

    PubMed

    Winfough, Matthew; Meloni, Giovanni

    2017-12-01

    Absolute photoionization cross sections for 2 potential propargylic fuels (propargylamine and dipropargyl ether) along with the partial ionization cross sections for their dissociative fragments are measured and presented for the first time via synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry. The experimental setup consists of a multiplexed orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer and is located at the Advanced Light Source facility of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. Data for a third propargylic compound (propargyl alcohol) were taken; however, because of its low signal, due to its weakly bound cation, only the dissociative ionization fragment from the H-loss channel is observed and presented. Suggested pathways leading to formation of dissociative photoionization fragments along with CBS-QB3 calculated adiabatic ionization energies and appearance energies for the dissociative fragments are also presented. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Absolute photoionization cross sections of furanic fuels: 2-ethylfuran, 2-acetylfuran and furfural.

    PubMed

    Smith, Audrey R; Meloni, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Absolute photoionization cross sections of the molecules 2-ethylfuran, 2-acetylfuran and furfural, including partial ionization cross sections for the dissociative ionized fragments, are measured for the first time. These measurements are important because they allow fuel quantification via photoionization mass spectrometry and the development of quantitative kinetic modeling for the complex combustion of potential fuels. The experiments are carried out using synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry with an orthogonal time-of-flight spectrometer used for mass analysis at the Advanced Light Source of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The CBS-QB3 calculations of adiabatic ionization energies and appearance energies agree well with the experimental results. Several bond dissociation energies are also derived and presented. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Absolute photoionization cross sections of two cyclic ketones: cyclopentanone and cyclohexanone.

    PubMed

    Price, Chelsea; Fathi, Yasmin; Meloni, Giovanni

    2017-05-01

    Absolute photoionization cross sections for cyclopentanone and cyclohexanone, as well as partial ionization cross sections for the dissociative ionized fragments, are presented in this investigation. Experiments are performed via a multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometer utilizing vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation supplied by the Advanced Light Source of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. These results allow the quantification of these species that is relevant to investigate the kinetics and combustion reactions of potential biofuels. The CBS-QB3 calculated values for the adiabatic ionization energies agree well with the experimental values, and the identification of possible dissociative fragments is discussed for both systems. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Photodissociation of anisole and absolute photoionization cross-section of the phenoxy radical.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Pratt, S T

    2013-11-21

    We have studied the photodissociation dynamics of anisole (C6H5OCH3) at 193 nm and determined the absolute photoionization cross-section of the phenoxy radical at 118.2 nm (10.486 eV) relative to the known cross-section of the methyl radical. Even at this energy, there is extensive fragmentation of the phenoxy radical upon photoionization, which is attributed to ionizing transitions that populate low-lying excited electronic states of the cation. For phenoxy radicals with less than ∼1 eV of internal energy, we find a cross-section for the production of the phenoxy cation of 14.8 ± 3.8 Mb. For radicals with higher internal energy, dissociative ionization is the dominant process, and for internal energies of ∼2.7-3.7 eV, we find a total cross-section (photoionization plus dissociative ionization) of 22.3 ± 4.1 Mb. The results are discussed relative to the recently reported photoionization cross-section of phenol.

  6. Absolute Single Photoionization Cross Sections of Se^3+ For the Determination of Elemental Abundances in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteves, David; Sterling, Nicholas; Aguilar, Alex; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Phaneuf, Ronald; Bilodeau, Rene; Red, Eddie; McLaughlin, Brendan; Norrington, Patrick; Balance, Connor

    2009-05-01

    Numerical simulations show that derived elemental abundances in astrophysical nebulae can be uncertain by factors of two or more due to atomic data uncertainties alone, and of these uncertainties, absolute photoionization cross sections are the most important. Absolute single photoionization cross sections for Se^3+ ions have been measured from 42 eV to 56 eV at the ALS using the merged beams photo-ion technique. Theoretical photoionization cross section calculations were also performed for these ions using the state-of-the-art fully relativistic Dirac R-matrix code (DARC). The calculations show encouraging agreement with the experimental measurements.

  7. Systematic determination of absolute absorption cross-section of individual carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kaihui; Hong, Xiaoping; Choi, Sangkook; Jin, Chenhao; Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Kim, Jihoon; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong; Louie, Steven G.; Wang, Enge; Wang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Optical absorption is the most fundamental optical property characterizing light–matter interactions in materials and can be most readily compared with theoretical predictions. However, determination of optical absorption cross-section of individual nanostructures is experimentally challenging due to the small extinction signal using conventional transmission measurements. Recently, dramatic increase of optical contrast from individual carbon nanotubes has been successfully achieved with a polarization-based homodyne microscope, where the scattered light wave from the nanostructure interferes with the optimized reference signal (the reflected/transmitted light). Here we demonstrate high-sensitivity absorption spectroscopy for individual single-walled carbon nanotubes by combining the polarization-based homodyne technique with broadband supercontinuum excitation in transmission configuration. To our knowledge, this is the first time that high-throughput and quantitative determination of nanotube absorption cross-section over broad spectral range at the single-tube level was performed for more than 50 individual chirality-defined single-walled nanotubes. Our data reveal chirality-dependent behaviors of exciton resonances in carbon nanotubes, where the exciton oscillator strength exhibits a universal scaling law with the nanotube diameter and the transition order. The exciton linewidth (characterizing the exciton lifetime) varies strongly in different nanotubes, and on average it increases linearly with the transition energy. In addition, we establish an empirical formula by extrapolating our data to predict the absorption cross-section spectrum for any given nanotube. The quantitative information of absorption cross-section in a broad spectral range and all nanotube species not only provides new insight into the unique photophysics in one-dimensional carbon nanotubes, but also enables absolute determination of optical quantum efficiencies in important

  8. Systematic determination of absolute absorption cross-section of individual carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaihui; Hong, Xiaoping; Choi, Sangkook; Jin, Chenhao; Capaz, Rodrigo B; Kim, Jihoon; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong; Louie, Steven G; Wang, Enge; Wang, Feng

    2014-05-27

    Optical absorption is the most fundamental optical property characterizing light-matter interactions in materials and can be most readily compared with theoretical predictions. However, determination of optical absorption cross-section of individual nanostructures is experimentally challenging due to the small extinction signal using conventional transmission measurements. Recently, dramatic increase of optical contrast from individual carbon nanotubes has been successfully achieved with a polarization-based homodyne microscope, where the scattered light wave from the nanostructure interferes with the optimized reference signal (the reflected/transmitted light). Here we demonstrate high-sensitivity absorption spectroscopy for individual single-walled carbon nanotubes by combining the polarization-based homodyne technique with broadband supercontinuum excitation in transmission configuration. To our knowledge, this is the first time that high-throughput and quantitative determination of nanotube absorption cross-section over broad spectral range at the single-tube level was performed for more than 50 individual chirality-defined single-walled nanotubes. Our data reveal chirality-dependent behaviors of exciton resonances in carbon nanotubes, where the exciton oscillator strength exhibits a universal scaling law with the nanotube diameter and the transition order. The exciton linewidth (characterizing the exciton lifetime) varies strongly in different nanotubes, and on average it increases linearly with the transition energy. In addition, we establish an empirical formula by extrapolating our data to predict the absorption cross-section spectrum for any given nanotube. The quantitative information of absorption cross-section in a broad spectral range and all nanotube species not only provides new insight into the unique photophysics in one-dimensional carbon nanotubes, but also enables absolute determination of optical quantum efficiencies in important

  9. Absolute cross sections for the ionization-excitation of helium by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, S.; Lower, J.; Weigold, E.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D. V.; Bartschat, K.; Harris, A. L.; Madison, D. H.

    2008-09-01

    In a recent publication we presented detailed experimental and theoretical results for the electron-impact-induced ionization of ground-state helium atoms. The purpose of that work was to refine theoretical approaches and provide further insight into the Coulomb four-body problem. Cross section ratios were presented for transitions leading to excited states, relative to those leading to the ground state, of the helium ion. We now build on that study by presenting individual relative triple-differential ionization cross sections (TDCSs) for an additional body of experimental data measured at lower values of scattered-electron energies. This has been facilitated through the development of new electron-gun optics which enables us to accurately characterize the spectrometer transmission at low energies. The experimental results are compared to calculations resulting from a number of different approaches. For ionization leading to He+(1s2)1S , cross sections are calculated by the highly accurate convergent close-coupling (CCC) method. The CCC data are used to place the relative experimental data on to an absolute scale. TDCSs describing transitions to the excited states are calculated through three different approaches, namely, through a hybrid distorted- wave+R -matrix (close-coupling) model, through the recently developed four-body distorted-wave model, and by a first Born approximation calculation. Comparison of the first- and second-order theories with experiment allows for the accuracy of the different theoretical approaches to be assessed and gives insight into which physical aspects of the problem are most important to accurately model.

  10. Uptake of methanol on mixed HNO3/H2O clusters: An absolute pickup cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pysanenko, A.; Lengyel, J.; Fárník, M.

    2018-04-01

    The uptake of atmospheric oxidized organics on acid clusters is relevant for atmospheric new particle formation. We investigate the pickup of methanol (CH3OH) on mixed nitric acid-water clusters (HNO3)M(H2O)N by a combination of mass spectrometry and cluster velocity measurements in a molecular beam. The mass spectra of the mixed clusters exhibit (HNO3)m(H2O)nH+ series with m = 0-3 and n = 0-12. In addition, CH3OH.(HNO3)m(H2O)nH+ series with very similar patterns appear in the spectra after the methanol pickup. The velocity measurements prove that the undoped (HNO3)m(H2O)nH+ mass peaks in the pickup spectra originate from the neutral (HNO3)M(H2O)N clusters which have not picked up any CH3OH molecule, i.e., methanol has not evaporated upon the ionization. Thus the fraction of the doped clusters can be determined and the mean pickup cross section can be estimated, yielding σs ¯ ≈ 20 Å2. This is compared to the lower estimate of the mean geometrical cross section σg ¯ ≈ 60 Å2 obtained from the theoretical cluster geometries. Thus the "size" of the cluster corresponding to the methanol pickup is at least 3-times smaller than its geometrical size. We have introduced a method which can yield the absolute pickup cross sections relevant to the generation and growth of atmospheric aerosols, as illustrated in the example of methanol and nitric acid clusters.

  11. Fission cross section of 239Th and 232Th relative to 235U

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    The fission cross sections of /sup 230/Th and /sup 232/Th were measured relative to /sup 235/U from near threshold to near 10 MeV. The weights of the thorium samples were determined by isotopic dilution. The weight of the uranium deposit was based on specific activity measurements of a /sup 234/U-/sup 235/U mixture and low geometry alpha counting. Corrections were made for thermal background, loss of fragments in the deposits, neutron scattering in the detector assembly, sample geometry, sample composition and the spectrum of the neutron source. Generally the systematic errors were approx. 1%. The combined systematic and statistical errors weremore » typically 1.5%. 17 references.« less

  12. ScaRaB: first results of absolute and cross calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trémas, Thierry L.; Aznay, Ouahid; Chomette, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    ScaRaB (SCAnner for RAdiation Budget) is the name of three radiometers whose two first flight models have been launched in 1994 and 1997. The instruments were mounted on-board Russian satellites, METEOR and RESURS. On October 12th 2011, a last model has been launched from the Indian site of Sriharikota. ScaRaB is a passenger of MEGHA-TROPIQUES, an Indo-French joint Satellite Mission for studying the water cycle and energy exchanges in the tropics. ScaRaB is composed of four parallel and independent channels. Channel-2 and channel-3 are considered as the main ones. Channel-1 is dedicated to measure solar radiance (0.5 to 0.7 μm) while channel-4 (10 to 13 μm) is an infrared window. The absolute calibration of ScaRab is assured by internal calibration sources (black bodies and a lamp for channel-1). However, during the commissioning phase, the lamp used for the absolute calibration of channel-1 revealed to be inaccurate. We propose here an alternative calibration method based on terrestrial targets. Due to the spectral range of channel-1, only calibration over desert sites (temporal monitoring) and clouds (cross band) is suitable. Desert sites have been widely used for sensor calibration since they have a stable spectral response over time. Because of their high reflectances, the atmospheric effect on the upward radiance is relatively minimal. In addition, they are spatially uniform. Their temporal instability without atmospheric correction has been determined to be less than 1-2% over a year. Very-high-altitude (10 km) bright clouds are good validation targets in the visible and near-infrared spectra because of their high spectrally consistent reflectance. If the clouds are very high, there is no need to correct aerosol scattering and water vapor absorption as both aerosol and water vapor are distributed near the surface. Only Rayleigh scattering and ozone absorption need to be considered. This method has been found to give a 4% uncertainty. Radiometric cross

  13. Absolute Rayleigh scattering cross sections of gases and freons of stratospheric interest in the visible and ultraviolet regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SHARDANAND; Rao, A. D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The laboratory measurements of absolute Rayleigh scattering cross sections as a function wavelength are reported for gas molecules He, Ne, Ar, N2, H2, O2, CO2, CH4 and for vapors of most commonly used freons CCl2F2, CBrF3, CF4, and CHClf2. These cross sections are determined from the measurements of photon scattering at an angle of 54 deg 44 min which yield the absolute values independent of the value of normal depolarization ratios. The present results show that in the spectral range 6943-3638A deg, the values of the Rayleigh scattering cross section can be extrapolated from one wavelength to the other using 1/lambda (4) law without knowing the values of the polarizabilities. However, such an extrapolation can not be done in the region of shorter wavelengths.

  14. Towards the high-accuracy determination of the 238U fission cross section at the threshold region at CERN - n_TOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakaki, M.; Audouin, L.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviani, M.; Colonna, N.; Dupont, E.; Duran, I.; Gunsing, F.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Le Naour, C.; Leong, L. S.; Mastromarco, M.; Paradela, C.; Tarrio, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Aerts, G.; Altstadt, S.; Alvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Badurek, G.; Barbagallo, M.; Baumann, P.; Becares, V.; Becvar, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthier, B.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calvino, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Cennini, P.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Cortes, G.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cosentino, L.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dressler, R.; Dridi, W.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fraval, K.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Ganesan, S.; Garcia, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Goncalves, I. F.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gurusamy, P.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Heinitz, S.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Kaeppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Kivel, N.; Kokkoris, M.; Konovalov, V.; Krticka, M.; Kroll, J.; Lampoudis, C.; Langer, C.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lo Meo, S.; Losito, R.; Lozano, M.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martinez, T.; Marrone, S.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondelaers, W.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Musumarra, A.; O'Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perkowski, J.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, L.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Roman, F.; Rudolf, G.; Rubbia, C.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Wallner, A.; Walter, S.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiß, C.; Wiesher, M.; Wisshak, K.; Wright, T.; Zugec, P.

    2016-03-01

    The 238U fission cross section is an international standard beyond 2 MeV where the fission plateau starts. However, due to its importance in fission reactors, this cross-section should be very accurately known also in the threshold region below 2 MeV. The 238U fission cross section has been measured relative to the 235U fission cross section at CERN - n_TOF with different detection systems. These datasets have been collected and suitably combined to increase the counting statistics in the threshold region from about 300 keV up to 3 MeV. The results are compared with other experimental data, evaluated libraries, and the IAEA standards.

  15. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of condensed tetrahydrofuran (THF) by 11-16 eV electrons.

    PubMed

    Lemelin, V; Bass, A D; Cloutier, P; Sanche, L

    2016-11-07

    Absolute cross section (CS) data on the interaction of low energy electrons with DNA and its molecular constituents are required as input parameters in Monte-Carlo type simulations, for several radiobiological applications. Previously [V. Lemelin et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 074701 (2016)], we measured absolute vibrational CSs for low-energy electron scattering from condensed tetrahydrofuran, a convenient surrogate for the deoxyribose. Here we report absolute electronic CSs for energy losses of between 6 and 11.5 eV, by electrons with energies between 11 and 16 eV. The variation of these CSs with incident electron energy shows no evidence of transient anion states, consistent with theoretical and other experimental results, indicating that initial electron capture leading to DNA strand breaks occurs primarily on DNA bases or the phosphate group.

  16. Comparison of various hours living fission products for absolute power density determination in VVER-1000 mock up in LR-0 reactor.

    PubMed

    Košťál, Michal; Švadlenková, Marie; Koleška, Michal; Rypar, Vojtěch; Milčák, Ján

    2015-11-01

    Measuring power level of zero power reactor is a quite difficult task. Due to the absence of measurable cooling media heating, it is necessary to employ a different method. The gamma-ray spectroscopy of fission products induced within reactor operation is one of possible ways of power determination. The method is based on the proportionality between fission product buildup and released power. The (92)Sr fission product was previously preferred as nuclide for LR-0 power determination for short-time irradiation experiments. This work aims to find more appropriate candidates, because the (92)Sr, however suitable, has a short half-life, which limits the maximal measurable amount of fuel pins within a single irradiation batch. The comparison of various isotopes is realized for (92)Sr, (97)Zr, (135)I, (91)Sr, and (88)Kr. The comparison between calculated and experimentally determined (C/E-1 values) net peak areas is assessed for these fission products. Experimental results show that studied fission products, except (88)Kr, are in comparable agreement with (92)Sr results. Since (91)Sr has notably higher half-life than (92)Sr, (91)Sr seems to be more appropriate marker in experiments with a large number of measured fuel pins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neutron-induced fission cross section measurements for uranium isotopes 236U and 234U at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. B.; Tovesson, F.; Hill, T. S.

    2013-04-01

    A well established program of neutron-induced fission cross section measurement at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is supporting the Fuel Cycle Research program (FC R&D). The incident neutron energy range spans from sub-thermal up to 200 MeV by combining two LANSCE facilities, the Lujan Center and the Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR). The time-of-flight method is implemented to measure the incident neutron energy. A parallel-plate fission ionization chamber was used as a fission fragment detector. The event rate ratio between the investigated foil and a standard 235U foil is converted into a fission cross section ratio. In addition to previously measured data new measurements include 236U data which is being analyzed, and 234U data acquired in the 2011-2012 LANSCE run cycle. The new data complete the full suite of Uranium isotopes which were investigated with this experimental approach. Obtained data are presented in comparison with existing evaluations and previous data.

  18. A new time of flight mass spectrometer for absolute dissociative electron attachment cross-section measurements in gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Dipayan; Nag, Pamir; Nandi, Dhananjay

    2018-02-01

    A new time of flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) has been developed to study the absolute dissociative electron attachment (DEA) cross section using a relative flow technique of a wide variety of molecules in gas phase, ranging from simple diatomic to complex biomolecules. Unlike the Wiley-McLaren type TOFMS, here the total ion collection condition has been achieved without compromising the mass resolution by introducing a field free drift region after the lensing arrangement. The field free interaction region is provided for low energy electron molecule collision studies. The spectrometer can be used to study a wide range of masses (H- ion to few hundreds atomic mass unit). The mass resolution capability of the spectrometer has been checked experimentally by measuring the mass spectra of fragment anions arising from DEA to methanol. Overall performance of the spectrometer has been tested by measuring the absolute DEA cross section of the ground state SO2 molecule, and the results are satisfactory.

  19. Absolute ozone absorption cross section in the Huggins Chappuis minimum (350-470 nm) at 296 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axson, J. L.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Kahan, T. F.; Young, C. J.; Vaida, V.; Brown, S. S.

    2011-08-01

    We report the ozone absolute absorption cross section between 350-470 nm, the minimum between the Huggins and Chappuis bands, where the ozone cross section is less than 10-22 cm2. Ozone spectra were acquired using an incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer, with three channels centered at 365, 405, and 455 nm. The accuracy of the measured cross section is 2 %. Previous measurements vary by more than an order of magnitude in this spectral region. The measurements reported here provide much greater spectral coverage than the most recent measurements. We report a minimum absorption cross section of 3.4×10-24 cm2 at 381.8 nm, which is 22 % lower than the previously reported value. The effect of O3 concentration and water vapor partial pressure were investigated, however there were no observable changes in the absorption spectrum most likely due to the low optical density of the complex.

  20. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  1. Simultaneous measurement of (n,{gamma}) and (n,fission) cross sections with the DANCE 4{pi} BaF2 array

    SciTech Connect

    Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Bond, E. M.

    2006-03-13

    Neutron capture cross section measurements on many of the actinides are complicated by low-energy neutron-induced fission, which competes with neutron capture to varying degrees depending on the nuclide of interest. Measurements of neutron capture on 235U using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) have shown that we can partially resolve capture from fission events based on total photon calorimetry (i.e. total {gamma}-ray energy and {gamma}-ray multiplicity per event). The addition of a fission-tagging detector to the DANCE array will greatly improve our ability to separate these two competing processes so that improved neutron capture and (n,{gamma})/(n,fission) cross sectionmore » ratio measurements can be obtained. The addition of a fission-tagging detector to the DANCE array will also provide a means to study several important issues associated with neutron-induced fission, including (n,fission) cross sections as a function of incident neutron energy, and total energy and multiplicity of prompt fission photons. We have focused on two detector designs with complementary capabilities, a parallel-plate avalanche counter and an array of solar cells.« less

  2. Absolute Total Photoionization Cross Section of C60 in the Range of 25-120 eV: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafle, Bhim P.; Katayanagi, Hideki; Prodhan, Md. Serajul I.; Yagi, Hajime; Huang, Chaoqun; Mitsuke, Koichiro

    2008-01-01

    The absolute total photoionization cross section σabs,I of gaseous C60 is measured in the photon energy hν range from 25 to 120 eV by photoionization mass spectrometry with synchrotron radiation. The absolute detection efficiencies of photoions in different charge states are evaluated. The present σabs,I curve is combined with the photoabsorption cross section curves of C60 at hν=3.5--26 eV in the literature, after appropriate alterations of the vapor pressure are taken into account. The oscillator strengths are computed from the composite curve to be 178.5 and 230.5 for the hν ranges from 3.5 to 40.8 eV and from 3.5 to 119 eV, respectively. These oscillator strengths agree well with those expected from the Thomas-Kuhn-Reiche sum rule and 60 times the photoabsorption cross section of a carbon atom. Moreover, the present σabs,I curve behaves similarly to the relative photoionization cross section curve reported by Reinköster et al.

  3. One-group fission cross sections for plutonium and minor actinides inserted in calculated neutron spectra of fast reactor cooled with lead-208 or lead-bismuth eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Khorasanov, G. L.; Blokhin, A. I.

    The paper is dedicated to one-group fission cross sections of Pu and MA in LFRs spectra with the aim to increase these values by choosing a coolant which hardens neutron spectra. It is shown that replacement of coolant from Pb-Bi with Pb-208 in the fast reactor RBEC-M, designed in Russia, leads to increasing the core mean neutron energy. As concerns fuel Pu isotopes, their one-group fission cross sections become slightly changed, while more dramatically Am-241 one-group fission cross section is changed. Another situation occurs in the lateral blanket containing small quantities of minor actinides. It is shown that as amore » result of lateral blanket mean neutron energy hardening the one-group fission cross sections of Np-237, Am-241 and Am-243 increases up to 8-11%. This result allows reducing the time of minor actinides burning in FRs. (authors)« less

  4. Absolute vibrational excitation cross sections for 1-18 eV electron scattering from condensed dimethyl phosphate (DMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemelin, V.; Bass, A. D.; Wagner, J. R.; Sanche, L.

    2017-12-01

    Absolute cross sections (CSs) for vibrational excitation by 1-18 eV electrons incident on condensed dimethyl phosphate (DMP) were measured with a high-resolution electron energy loss (EEL) spectrometer. Absolute CSs were extracted from EEL spectra of DMP condensed on multilayer film of Ar held at about 20 K under ultra-high vacuum (˜1 × 10-11 Torr). Structures observed in the energy dependence of the CSs around 2, 4, 7, and 12 eV were compared with previous results of gas- and solid-phase experiments and with theoretical studies on dimethyl phosphate and related molecules. These structures were attributed to the formation of shape resonances.

  5. Absolute ozone absorption cross section in the Huggins Chappuis minimum (350-470 nm) at 296 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axson, J. L.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Kahan, T. F.; Young, C. J.; Vaida, V.; Brown, S. S.

    2011-11-01

    We report the ozone absolute absorption cross section between 350-470 nm, the minimum between the Huggins and Chappuis bands, where the ozone cross section is less than 10-22 cm2. Ozone spectra were acquired using an incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer, with three channels centered at 365, 405, and 455 nm. The accuracy of the measured cross section is 4-30%, with the greatest uncertainty near the minimum absorption at 375-390 nm. Previous measurements vary by more than an order of magnitude in this spectral region. The measurements reported here provide much greater spectral coverage than the most recent measurements. The effect of O3 concentration and water vapor partial pressure were investigated, however there were no observable changes in the absorption spectrum most likely due to the low optical density of the complex.

  6. Absolute cross sections of the 86Sr(α,n)89Zr reaction at energies of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprea, Andreea; Glodariu, Tudor; Filipescu, Dan; Gheorghe, Ioana; Mitu, Andreea; Boromiza, Marian; Bucurescu, Dorel; Costache, Cristian; Cata-Danil, Irina; Florea, Nicoleta; Ghita, Dan Gabriel; Ionescu, Alina; Marginean, Nicolae; Marginean, Raluca; Mihai, Constantin; Mihai, Radu; Negret, Alexandru; Nita, Cristina; Olacel, Adina; Pascu, Sorin; Sotty, Cristophe; Suvaila, Rares; Stan, Lucian; Stroe, Lucian; Serban, Andreea; Stiru, Irina; Toma, Sebastian; Turturica, Andrei; Ujeniuc, Sorin

    2017-09-01

    Absolute cross sections for the 86Sr(α,n)89Zr reaction at energies close to the Gamow window are reported. Three thin SrF2 targets were irradiated using the 9 MV Tandem facility in IFIN-HH Bucharest that delivered α beams for the activation process. Two high-purity Germanium detectors were used to measure the induced activity of 89Zr in a low background environment. The experimental results are in very good agreement with Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculations performed with the TALYS code.

  7. Absolute cross section for electron-impact ionization of He (1 s 2 s 3S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génévriez, Matthieu; Jureta, Jozo J.; Defrance, Pierre; Urbain, Xavier

    2017-07-01

    We present an experimental determination of the electron-impact ionization cross section of the 1 s 2 s 3S state of helium, for which there is a serious long-lasting discrepancy between theory and experiment. A technique for the production of a fast, intense beam of helium in the 1 s 2 s 3S state only has been developed for this purpose, based on photodetachment of the He- anion. The cross section is measured using the animated crossed beam technique. The present results are much lower than the experimental data of Dixon et al. [J. Phys. B 9, 2617 (1976), 10.1088/0022-3700/9/15/013] and are in excellent agreement with the calculation of Fursa and Bray [J. Phys. B 36, 1663 (2003), 10.1088/0953-4075/36/8/317].

  8. ENDF/B-VII.1 Nuclear Data for Science and Technology: Cross Sections, Covariances, Fission Product Yields and Decay Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, M. B.; Herman, M.; Obložinský, P.; Dunn, M. E.; Danon, Y.; Kahler, A. C.; Smith, D. L.; Pritychenko, B.; Arbanas, G.; Arcilla, R.; Brewer, R.; Brown, D. A.; Capote, R.; Carlson, A. D.; Cho, Y. S.; Derrien, H.; Guber, K.; Hale, G. M.; Hoblit, S.; Holloway, S.; Johnson, T. D.; Kawano, T.; Kiedrowski, B. C.; Kim, H.; Kunieda, S.; Larson, N. M.; Leal, L.; Lestone, J. P.; Little, R. C.; McCutchan, E. A.; MacFarlane, R. E.; MacInnes, M.; Mattoon, C. M.; McKnight, R. D.; Mughabghab, S. F.; Nobre, G. P. A.; Palmiotti, G.; Palumbo, A.; Pigni, M. T.; Pronyaev, V. G.; Sayer, R. O.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Summers, N. C.; Talou, P.; Thompson, I. J.; Trkov, A.; Vogt, R. L.; van der Marck, S. C.; Wallner, A.; White, M. C.; Wiarda, D.; Young, P. G.

    2011-12-01

    The ENDF/B-VII.1 library is our latest recommended evaluated nuclear data file for use in nuclear science and technology applications, and incorporates advances made in the five years since the release of ENDF/B-VII.0. These advances focus on neutron cross sections, covariances, fission product yields and decay data, and represent work by the US Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in nuclear data evaluation that utilizes developments in nuclear theory, modeling, simulation, and experiment. The principal advances in the new library are: (1) An increase in the breadth of neutron reaction cross section coverage, extending from 393 nuclides to 423 nuclides; (2) Covariance uncertainty data for 190 of the most important nuclides, as documented in companion papers in this edition; (3) R-matrix analyses of neutron reactions on light nuclei, including isotopes of He, Li, and Be; (4) Resonance parameter analyses at lower energies and statistical high energy reactions for isotopes of Cl, K, Ti, V, Mn, Cr, Ni, Zr and W; (5) Modifications to thermal neutron reactions on fission products (isotopes of Mo, Tc, Rh, Ag, Cs, Nd, Sm, Eu) and neutron absorber materials (Cd, Gd); (6) Improved minor actinide evaluations for isotopes of U, Np, Pu, and Am (we are not making changes to the major actinides 235,238U and 239Pu at this point, except for delayed neutron data and covariances, and instead we intend to update them after a further period of research in experiment and theory), and our adoption of JENDL-4.0 evaluations for isotopes of Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Fm, and some other minor actinides; (7) Fission energy release evaluations; (8) Fission product yield advances for fission-spectrum neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons incident on 239Pu; and (9) A new decay data sublibrary. Integral validation testing of the ENDF/B-VII.1 library is provided for a variety of quantities: For nuclear criticality, the VII.1 library maintains the generally-good performance seen for VII.0 for a wide range

  9. The Limits of Cross-Cultural Dialogue: Pedagogy, Desire, and Absolution in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Alison

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the limits of cross-cultural dialog in the classroom, asking what happens if this togetherness and dialog-across-difference fails to hold a compellingly positive meaning for subordinate ethnic groups. Presents a true story about a classroom in a New Zealand university and a controversial pedagogical strategy employed there. (SM)

  10. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  11. Neutron-induced fission cross section of 242Pu from 15 MeV to 20 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovančević, N.; Salvador-Castineira, P.; Daraban, L.; Vidali, M.; Heyse, J.; Oberstedt, S.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Bonaldi, C.; Geerts, W.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate nuclear-data needs in the fast-neutron-energy region have been recently addressed for the development of next generation nuclear power plants (GEN-IV) by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). This sensitivity study has shown that of particular interest is the 242Pu(n,f) cross section for fast reactor systems. Measurements have been performed with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons in the energy range from 15 MeV to 20 MeV produced by the Van de Graaff accelerator of the JRC-Geel. A twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber has been used in a back-to-back configuration as fission fragment detector. The 242Pu(n,f) cross section has been normalized to 238U(n,f) cross section data. The results were compared with existing literature data and show acceptable agreement within 5%.

  12. Measurement of the absolute differential cross section of proton–proton elastic scattering at small angles

    DOE PAGES

    Mchedlishvili, D.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; ...

    2016-02-03

    The differential cross section for proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured at a beam kinetic energy of 1.0 GeV and in 200 MeV steps from 1.6 to 2.8 GeV for centre-of-mass angles in the range from 12°-16° to 25°-30°, depending on the energy. A precision in the overall normalisation of typically 3% was achieved by studying the energy losses of the circulating beam of the COSY storage ring as it passed repeatedly through the windowless hydrogen target of the ANKE magnetic spectrometer. It is shown that the data have a significant impact upon the results of a partial wave analysis.more » Furthermore, after extrapolating the differential cross sections to the forward direction, the results are broadly compatible with the predictions of forward dispersion relations.« less

  13. Measurement of the absolute v μ-CCQE cross section at the SciBooNE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aunion, Jose Luis Alcaraz

    2010-07-01

    This thesis presents the measurement of the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) neutrino-nucleon cross section at neutrino energies around 1 GeV. This measurement has two main physical motivations. On one hand, the neutrino-nucleon interactions at few GeV is a region where existing old data are sparse and with low statistics. The current measurement populates low energy regions with higher statistics and precision than previous experiments. On the other hand, the CCQE interaction is the most useful interaction in neutrino oscillation experiments. The CCQE channel is used to measure the initial and final neutrino fluxes in order to determine the neutrino fractionmore » that disappeared. The neutrino oscillation experiments work at low neutrino energies, so precise measurement of CCQE interactions are essential for flux measurements. The main goal of this thesis is to measure the CCQE absolute neutrino cross section from the SciBooNE data. The SciBar Booster Neutrino Experiment (SciBooNE) is a neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering off experiment. The neutrino energy spectrum works at energies around 1 GeV. SciBooNE was running from June 8th 2007 to August 18th 2008. In that period, the experiment collected a total of 2.65 x 10 20 protons on target (POT). This thesis has used full data collection in neutrino mode 0.99 x 10 20 POT. A CCQE selection cut has been performed, achieving around 70% pure CCQE sample. A fit method has been exclusively developed to determine the absolute CCQE cross section, presenting results in a neutrino energy range from 0.2 to 2 GeV. The results are compatible with the NEUT predictions. The SciBooNE measurement has been compared with both Carbon (MiniBoonE) and deuterium (ANL and BNL) target experiments, showing a good agreement in both cases.« less

  14. Absolute Charge Exchange Cross Sections for ^3He^2+ Collisions with ^4He and H_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawhorter, R. J.; Greenwood, J.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2002-05-01

    The JPL charge exchange beam-line(J.B. Greenwood, et al., Phys. Rev A 63), 062707 (2001) was modified to increase the forward acceptance angle and enable the measurement of total charge-exchange cross sections for slow, light, highly-charged ion collisions with neutral targets(R. E. Olson and M. Kimura, J. Phys. B 15), 4231 (1982). Data are presented for single charge exchange cross sections for ^3He^2+ nuclei scattered by ^4He and H2 in the energy range 0.33-4.67 keV/amu. For both targets there is good agreement with Kusakabe, et al.(T. Kusakabe, et al., J. Phys. Soc. Japan 59), 1218 (1990). Angular collection is studied by a comparison with differential measurements(D. Bordenave-Montesquieu and R. Dagnac, J. Phys. B 27), 543 (1994), as well as with earlier JPL results(J.B. Greenwood, et al., Ap. J. 533), L175 (2000), ibid. 529, 605 (2000) using heavier projectiles and targets. This work was carried out at JPL/Caltech, and was supported through contract with NASA. RJM thanks the NRC for a Senior Associateship at JPL.

  15. Relativistic Coulomb Fission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear fission reactions induced by the electromagnetic field of relativistic nuclei are studied for energies relevant to present and future relativistic heavy ion accelerators. Cross sections are calculated for U-238 and Pu-239 fission induced by C-12, Si-28, Au-197, and U-238 projectiles. It is found that some of the cross sections can exceed 10 b.

  16. Absolute vibrational cross sections for 1-19 eV electron scattering from condensed tetrahydrofuran (THF).

    PubMed

    Lemelin, V; Bass, A D; Cloutier, P; Sanche, L

    2016-02-21

    Absolute cross sections (CSs) for vibrational excitation by 1-19 eV electrons impacting on condensed tetrahydrofuran (THF) were measured with a high-resolution electron energy loss spectrometer. Experiments were performed under ultra-high vacuum (3 × 10(-11) Torr) at a temperature of about 20 K. The magnitudes of the vibrational CSs lie within the 10(-17) cm(2) range. Features observed near 4.5, 9.5, and 12.5 eV in the incident energy dependence of the CSs were compared to the results of theoretical calculations and other experiments on gas and solid-phase THF. These three resonances are attributed to the formation of shape or core-excited shape resonances. Another maximum observed around 2.5 eV is not found in the calculations but has been observed in gas-phase studies; it is attributed to the formation of a shape resonance.

  17. Using DNA origami nanostructures to determine absolute cross sections for UV photon-induced DNA strand breakage.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Stefanie; Rackwitz, Jenny; Schürman, Robin; Prinz, Julia; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Giuliani, Alexandre; Bald, Ilko

    2015-11-19

    We have characterized ultraviolet (UV) photon-induced DNA strand break processes by determination of absolute cross sections for photoabsorption and for sequence-specific DNA single strand breakage induced by photons in an energy range from 6.50 to 8.94 eV. These represent the lowest-energy photons able to induce DNA strand breaks. Oligonucleotide targets are immobilized on a UV transparent substrate in controlled quantities through attachment to DNA origami templates. Photon-induced dissociation of single DNA strands is visualized and quantified using atomic force microscopy. The obtained quantum yields for strand breakage vary between 0.06 and 0.5, indicating highly efficient DNA strand breakage by UV photons, which is clearly dependent on the photon energy. Above the ionization threshold strand breakage becomes clearly the dominant form of DNA radiation damage, which is then also dependent on the nucleotide sequence.

  18. Designing an upgrade of the Medley setup for light-ion production and fission cross-section measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, K.; Gustavsson, C.; Al-Adili, A.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Andersson-Sundén, E.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Tarrío, D.; Pomp, S.

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of neutron-induced fission cross-sections and light-ion production are planned in the energy range 1-40 MeV at the upcoming Neutrons For Science (NFS) facility. In order to prepare our detector setup for the neutron beam with continuous energy spectrum, a simulation software was written using the Geant4 toolkit for both measurement situations. The neutron energy range around 20 MeV is troublesome when it comes to the cross-sections used by Geant4 since data-driven cross-sections are only available below 20 MeV but not above, where they are based on semi-empirical models. Several customisations were made to the standard classes in Geant4 in order to produce consistent results over the whole simulated energy range. Expected uncertainties are reported for both types of measurements. The simulations have shown that a simultaneous precision measurement of the three standard cross-sections H(n,n), 235U(n,f) and 238U(n,f) relative to each other is feasible using a triple layered target. As high resolution timing detectors for fission fragments we plan to use Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPACs). The simulation results have put some restrictions on the design of these detectors as well as on the target design. This study suggests a fissile target no thicker than 2 μm (1.7 mg/cm2) and a PPAC foil thickness preferably less than 1 μm. We also comment on the usability of Geant4 for simulation studies of neutron reactions in this energy range.

  19. Analysis of reaction cross-section production in neutron induced fission reactions on uranium isotope using computer code COMPLET.

    PubMed

    Asres, Yihunie Hibstie; Mathuthu, Manny; Birhane, Marelgn Derso

    2018-04-22

    This study provides current evidence about cross-section production processes in the theoretical and experimental results of neutron induced reaction of uranium isotope on projectile energy range of 1-100 MeV in order to improve the reliability of nuclear stimulation. In such fission reactions of 235 U within nuclear reactors, much amount of energy would be released as a product that able to satisfy the needs of energy to the world wide without polluting processes as compared to other sources. The main objective of this work is to transform a related knowledge in the neutron-induced fission reactions on 235 U through describing, analyzing and interpreting the theoretical results of the cross sections obtained from computer code COMPLET by comparing with the experimental data obtained from EXFOR. The cross section value of 235 U(n,2n) 234 U, 235 U(n,3n) 233 U, 235 U(n,γ) 236 U, 235 U(n,f) are obtained using computer code COMPLET and the corresponding experimental values were browsed by EXFOR, IAEA. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental data taken from EXFOR Data Bank. Computer code COMPLET has been used for the analysis with the same set of input parameters and the graphs were plotted by the help of spreadsheet & Origin-8 software. The quantification of uncertainties stemming from both experimental data and computer code calculation plays a significant role in the final evaluated results. The calculated results for total cross sections were compared with the experimental data taken from EXFOR in the literature, and good agreement was found between the experimental and theoretical data. This comparison of the calculated data was analyzed and interpreted with tabulation and graphical descriptions, and the results were briefly discussed within the text of this research work. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. A new measurement of the 6Li(n,α)t cross section at MeV energies using a 252Cf fission chamber and 6Li scintillators

    DOE PAGES

    Kirsch, Leo Edward; Devlin, Matthew James; Mosby, Shea Morgan; ...

    2017-09-01

    We present a new measurement of the 6Li(n,α)t cross section from 245 keV to 10 MeV using a 252Cf fission chamber with 6LiI(Eu) and Cs 2LiYCl 6:Ce (CLYC) scintillators which act as both target and detector. Neutron energies are determined from the time of flight (TOF) method using the signals from spontaneous fission and reaction product recoil. Simulations of neutron downscatter in the crystals and fission chamber bring 6Li(n,α)t cross section values measured with the 6LiI(Eu) into agreement with previous experiments and evaluations, except for two resonances at 4.2 and 6.5 MeV introduced by ENDF/B-VII.1. Suspected neutron transport modeling issuesmore » cause the cross section values obtained with CLYC to be discrepant above 2 MeV.« less

  1. A new measurement of the 6Li(n,α)t cross section at MeV energies using a 252Cf fission chamber and 6Li scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsch, Leo Edward; Devlin, Matthew James; Mosby, Shea Morgan

    We present a new measurement of the 6Li(n,α)t cross section from 245 keV to 10 MeV using a 252Cf fission chamber with 6LiI(Eu) and Cs 2LiYCl 6:Ce (CLYC) scintillators which act as both target and detector. Neutron energies are determined from the time of flight (TOF) method using the signals from spontaneous fission and reaction product recoil. Simulations of neutron downscatter in the crystals and fission chamber bring 6Li(n,α)t cross section values measured with the 6LiI(Eu) into agreement with previous experiments and evaluations, except for two resonances at 4.2 and 6.5 MeV introduced by ENDF/B-VII.1. Suspected neutron transport modeling issuesmore » cause the cross section values obtained with CLYC to be discrepant above 2 MeV.« less

  2. Absolute cross section measurements for the scattering of low- and intermediate-energy electrons from PF3. I. Elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hishiyama, N.; Hoshino, M.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Tanaka, H.

    2017-12-01

    We report absolute elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron collisions with phosphorus trifluoride, PF3, molecules (e- + PF3) in the impact energy range of 2.0-200 eV and over a scattering angle range of 10°-150°. Measured angular distributions of scattered electron intensities were normalized by reference to the elastic DCSs of He. Corresponding integral and momentum-transfer cross sections were derived by extrapolating the angular range from 0° to 180° with the help of a modified phase-shift analysis. In addition, due to the large dipole moment of the considered molecule, the dipole-Born correction for the forward scattering angles has also been applied. As a part of this study, independent atom model calculations in combination with screening corrected additivity rule were also performed for elastic and inelastic (electronic excitation plus ionization) scattering using a complex optical potential method. Rotational excitation cross sections have been estimated with a dipole-Born approximation procedure. Vibrational excitations are not considered in this calculation. Theoretical data, at the differential and integral levels, were found to reasonably agree with the present experimental results. Furthermore, we explore the systematics of the elastic DCSs for the four-atomic trifluoride molecules of XF3 (X = B, N, and P) and central P-atom in PF3, showing that, owing to the comparatively small effect of the F-atoms, the present angular distributions of elastic DCSs are essentially dominated by the characteristic of the central P-atom at lower impact energies. Finally, these quantitative results for e- - PF3 collisions were compiled together with the previous data available in the literature in order to obtain a cross section dataset for modeling purposes. To comprehensively describe such a considerable amount of data, we proceed by first discussing, in this paper, the vibrationally elastic scattering processes whereas vibrational and electronic

  3. Photoionization of Ne Atoms and Ne + Ions Near the K Edge: PrecisionSpectroscopy and Absolute Cross-sections

    DOE PAGES

    Müller, Alfred; Bernhardt, Dietrich; Borovik, Alexander; ...

    2017-02-17

    Single, double, and triple photoionization of Ne + ions by single photons have been investigated at the synchrotron radiation source PETRA III in Hamburg, Germany. Absolute cross-sections were measured by employing the photon-ion merged-beams technique. Photon energies were between about 840 and 930 eV, covering the range from the lowest-energy resonances associated with the excitation of one single K-shell electron up to double excitations involving one K- and one L-shell electron, well beyond the K-shell ionization threshold. Also, photoionization of neutral Ne was investigated just below the K edge. The chosen photon energy bandwidths were between 32 and 500 meV,more » facilitating the determination of natural line widths. The uncertainty of the energy scale is estimated to be 0.2 eV. For comparison with existing theoretical calculations, astrophysically relevant photoabsorption cross-sections were inferred by summing the measured partial ionization channels. Discussion of the observed resonances in the different final ionization channels reveals the presence of complex Auger-decay mechanisms. The ejection of three electrons from the lowest K-shell-excited Ne + (1s2s 2p 6 2S 1/2) level, for example, requires cooperative interaction of at least four electrons.« less

  4. Absolute cross section for low-energy-electron damage to condensed macromolecules: A case study of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Mohammad; Cloutier, Pierre; Bass, Andrew D.; Michaud, Marc; Hunting, Darel J.; Sanche, Léon

    2013-01-01

    Cross sections (CSs) for the interaction of low-energy electrons (LEE) with condensed macromolecules are essential parameters for accurate modeling of radiation-induced molecular decomposition and chemical synthesis. Electron irradiation of dry nanometer-scale macromolecular solid films has often been employed to measure CSs and other quantitative parameters for LEE interactions. Since such films have thicknesses comparable with electron thermalization distances, energy deposition varies throughout the film. Moreover, charge accumulation occurring inside the films shields a proportion of the macromolecules from electron irradiation. Such effects complicate the quantitative comparison of the CSs obtained in films of different thicknesses and limit the applicability of such measurements. Here, we develop a simple mathematical model, termed the molecular survival model, that employs a CS for a particular damage process together with an attenuation length related to the total CS, to investigate how a measured CS might be expected to vary with experimental conditions. As a case study, we measure the absolute CS for the formation of DNA strand breaks (SBs) by electron irradiation at 10 and 100 eV of lyophilized plasmid DNA films with thicknesses between 10 and 30 nm. The measurements are shown to depend strongly on the thickness and charging condition of the nanometer-scale films. Such behaviors are in accord with the model and support its validity. Via this analysis, the CS obtained for SB damage is nearly independent of film thickness and charging effects. In principle, this model can be adapted to provide absolute CSs for electron-induced damage or reactions occurring in other molecular solids across a wider range of experimental conditions. PMID:23030950

  5. Absolute absorption cross sections of ozone at 300 K, 228 K and 195 K in the wavelength region 185-240 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Parkinson, W. H.; Freeman, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of progress of work on absorption cross section measurements of ozone at 300 K, 228 K and 195 K in the wavelength region 185-240 nm. In this wavelength region, the penetration of solar radiation into the Earth's atmosphere is controlled by O2 and O3. The transmitted radiation is available to dissociate trace species such as halocarbons and nitrous oxide. We have recently measured absolute absorption cross sections of O3 in the wavelength region 240-350 nm (Freeman et al., 1985; Yoshino et al., 1988). We apply these proven techniques to the determination of the absorption cross section of O3 at 300 K, 228 K and 195 K throughout the wavelength region 185-240 nm. A paper titled 'Absolute Absorption Cross Section Measurements of Ozone in the Wavelength Region 185-254 nm and the Temperature Dependence' has been submitted for publication in the Journal of Geophysical Research.

  6. Effective and absolute cross sections for low-energy (1-30 eV) electron interactions with condensed biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Sanche, Léon

    2018-06-01

    Ionizing radiation is intensively used for therapeutic [e.g., radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT)], as well as for diagnostic medical imaging purposes. In these applications, the radiation dose given to the patient should be known and controlled. In conventional cancer treatments, absorbed dose calculations rely essentially on scattering cross sections (CSs) of the primary high-energy radiation. In more sophisticated treatments, such as combined radio- and chemo-therapy, a description of the details of energy deposits at the micro- and nano-scopic level is preferred to relate dose to radiobiological effectiveness or to evaluate doses at the biomolecular level, when radiopharmaceuticals emitting short-range radiation are delivered to critical molecular components of cancer cells (e.g., TRT). These highly radiotoxic compounds emit large densities of low-energy electrons (LEEs). More generally, LEE (0-30 eV) are emitted in large numbers by any type of high-energy radiation; i.e., about 30 000 per MeV of deposited primary energy. Thus, to optimize the effectiveness of several types of radiation treatments, the energy deposited by LEEs must be known at the level of the cell, nucleus, chromosome, or DNA. Such local doses can be evaluated by Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, which account event-by-event, for the slowing down of all generations of particles. In particular, these codes require as input parameters absolute LEE CSs for elastic scattering, energy losses, and direct damage to vital cellular molecules, particularly DNA, the main target of radiation therapy. In the last decade, such CSs have emerged in the literature. Furthermore, a method was developed to transform relative yields of damages into absolute CSs by measuring specific parameters in the experiments. In this review article, we first present a general description of dose calculations in biological media via MC simulation and give an overview of the CSs available from

  7. Calculation of the Coulomb Fission Cross Sections for Pb-Pb and Bi-Pb Interactions at 158 A GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poyser, William J.; Ahern, Sean C.; Norbury, John W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    The Weizsacker-Williams (WW) method of virtual quanta is used to make approximate cross section calculations for peripheral relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We calculated the Coulomb fission cross sections for projectile ions of Pb-208 and Bi-209 with energies of 158 A GeV interacting with a Pb-208 target. We also calculated the electromagnetic absorption cross section for Pb-208 ion interacting as described. For comparison we use both the full WW method and a standard approximate WW method. The approximate WW method in larger cross sections compared to the more accurate full WW method.

  8. Measurement of the 23Na(n,2n) cross section in 235U and 252Cf fission neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košťál, Michal; Schulc, Martin; Rypar, Vojtěch; Losa, Evžen; Švadlenková, Marie; Baroň, Petr; Jánský, Bohumil; Novák, Evžen; Mareček, Martin; Uhlíř, Jan

    2017-09-01

    The presented paper aims to compare the calculated and experimental reaction rates of 23Na(n,2n)22Na in a well-defined reactor spectra and in the spontaneous fission spectrum of 252Cf. The experimentally determined reaction rate, derived using gamma spectroscopy of irradiated NaF sample, is used for average cross section determination.Estimation of this cross-section is important as it is included in International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File and is also relevant to the correct estimation of long-term activity of Na coolant in Sodium Fast Reactors. The calculations were performed with the MCNP6 code using ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.2, JENDL-3.3, JENDL-4, ROSFOND-2010, CENDL-3.1 and IRDFF nuclear data libraries. In the case of reactor spectrum, reasonable agreement was not achieved with any library. However, in the case of 252Cf spectrum agreement was achieved with IRDFF, JEFF-3.1 and JENDL libraries.

  9. Absolute photoionization cross section of the ethyl radical in the range 8-11.5 eV: synchrotron and vacuum ultraviolet laser measurements.

    PubMed

    Gans, Bérenger; Garcia, Gustavo A; Boyé-Péronne, Séverine; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Douin, Stéphane; Gaie-Levrel, François; Gauyacq, Dolores

    2011-06-02

    The absolute photoionization cross section of C(2)H(5) has been measured at 10.54 eV using vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser photoionization. The C(2)H(5) radical was produced in situ using the rapid C(2)H(6) + F → C(2)H(5) + HF reaction. Its absolute photoionization cross section has been determined in two different ways: first using the C(2)H(5) + NO(2) → C(2)H(5)O + NO reaction in a fast flow reactor, and the known absolute photoionization cross section of NO. In a second experiment, it has been measured relative to the known absolute photoionization cross section of CH(3) as a reference by using the CH(4) + F → CH(3) + HF and C(2)H(6) + F → C(2)H(5) + HF reactions successively. Both methods gave similar results, the second one being more precise and yielding the value: σ(C(2)H(5))(ion) = (5.6 ± 1.4) Mb at 10.54 eV. This value is used to calibrate on an absolute scale the photoionization curve of C(2)H(5) produced in a pyrolytic source from the C(2)H(5)NO(2) precursor, and ionized by the VUV beam of the DESIRS beamline at SOLEIL synchrotron facility. In this latter experiment, a recently developed ion imaging technique is used to discriminate the direct photoionization process from dissociative ionization contributions to the C(2)H(5)(+) signal. The imaging technique applied on the photoelectron signal also allows a slow photoelectron spectrum with a 40 meV resolution to be extracted, indicating that photoionization around the adiabatic ionization threshold involves a complex vibrational overlap between the neutral and cationic ground states, as was previously observed in the literature. Comparison with earlier photoionization studies, in particular with the photoionization yield recorded by Ruscic et al. is also discussed. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  10. Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections for fission reactor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. F.; Chakraborty, A.; Combs, B.; Crider, B. P.; Downes, L.; Girgis, J.; Kersting, L. J.; Kumar, A.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P. J.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estevz, F. M.; Schniederjan, J.; Sidwell, L.; Sigillito, A. J.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Watts, D.; Yates, S. W.

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear data important for the design and development of the next generation of light-water reactors and future fast reactors include neutron elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections on important structural materials, such as Fe, and on coolant materials, such as Na. These reaction probabilities are needed since neutron reactions impact fuel performance during irradiations and the overall efficiency of reactors. While neutron scattering cross sections from these materials are available for certain incident neutron energies, the fast neutron region, particularly above 2 MeV, has large gaps for which no measurements exist, or the existing uncertainties are large. Measurements have been made at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory to measure neutron scattering cross sections on both Fe and Na in the region where these gaps occur and to reduce the uncertainties on scattering from the ground state and first excited state of these nuclei. Results from measurements on Fe at incident neutron energies between 2 and 4 MeV will be presented and comparisons will be made to model calculations available from data evaluators.

  11. Spallation reaction study for fission products in nuclear waste: Cross section measurements for 137Cs, 90Sr and 107Pd on proton and deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, He; Otsu, Hideaki; Sakurai, Hiroyoshi; Ahn, DeukSoon; Aikawa, Masayuki; Ando, Takashi; Araki, Shouhei; Chen, Sidong; Chiga, Nobuyuki; Doornenbal, Pieter; Fukuda, Naoki; Isobe, Tadaaki; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Kawase, Shoichiro; Kin, Tadahiro; Kondo, Yosuke; Koyama, Shupei; Kubono, Shigeru; Maeda, Yukie; Makinaga, Ayano; Matsushita, Masafumi; Matsuzaki, Teiichiro; Michimasa, Shinichiro; Momiyama, Satoru; Nagamine, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Takashi; Nakano, Keita; Niikura, Megumi; Ozaki, Tomoyuki; Saito, Atsumi; Saito, Takeshi; Shiga, Yoshiaki; Shikata, Mizuki; Shimizu, Yohei; Shimoura, Susumu; Sumikama, Toshiyuki; Söderström, Pär-Anders; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Taniuchi, Ryo; Togano, Yasuhiro; Tsubota, Junichi; Uesaka, Meiko; Watanabe, Yasushi; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Wimmer, Kathrin; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Koichi

    2017-09-01

    Spallation reactions for the long-lived fission products 137Cs, 90Sr and 107Pd have been studied for the purpose of nuclear waste transmutation. The cross sections on the proton- and deuteron-induced spallation were obtained in inverse kinematics at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory. Both the target and energy dependences of cross sections have been investigated systematically. and the cross-section differences between the proton and deuteron are found to be larger for lighter fragments. The experimental data are compared with the SPACS semi-empirical parameterization and the PHITS calculations including both the intra-nuclear cascade and evaporation processes.

  12. Spallation reaction study for fission products in nuclear waste: Cross section measurements for 137Cs and 90Sr on proton and deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Otsu, H.; Sakurai, H.; Ahn, D. S.; Aikawa, M.; Doornenbal, P.; Fukuda, N.; Isobe, T.; Kawakami, S.; Koyama, S.; Kubo, T.; Kubono, S.; Lorusso, G.; Maeda, Y.; Makinaga, A.; Momiyama, S.; Nakano, K.; Niikura, M.; Shiga, Y.; Söderström, P.-A.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Takeuchi, S.; Taniuchi, R.; Watanabe, Ya.; Watanabe, Yu.; Yamasaki, H.; Yoshida, K.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied spallation reactions for the fission products 137Cs and 90Sr for the purpose of nuclear waste transmutation. The spallation cross sections on the proton and deuteron were obtained in inverse kinematics for the first time using secondary beams of 137Cs and 90Sr at 185 MeV/nucleon at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory. The target dependence has been investigated systematically, and the cross-section differences between the proton and deuteron are found to be larger for lighter spallation products. The experimental data are compared with the PHITS calculation, which includes cascade and evaporation processes. Our results suggest that both proton- and deuteron-induced spallation reactions are promising mechanisms for the transmutation of radioactive fission products.

  13. Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections of 240Pu, 243Am, and natW in the Energy Range 1-200 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. B.; Donets, A. Yu.; Dushin, V. N.; Fomichev, A. V.; Fomichev, A. A.; Haight, R. C.; Shcherbakov, O. A.; Soloviev, S. M.; Tuboltsev, Yu. V.; Vorobyev, A. S.

    2005-05-01

    A long-range research program devoted to measurements of neutron-induced fission cross-sections of actinides and stable isotopes is under way at the GNEIS facility. By now the new series of experiments for measurements of fission cross-section ratios relative to 235U has been completed for 240Pu, 243Am, and natW in a wide energy range of incident neutrons from 1 MeV to 200 MeV in the frame of the ISTC Project ♯1971. The measurements were performed using the multiplate ionization chamber and time-of-flight techniques. The results obtained in this measurement are presented in comparison with the other data.

  14. Absolute emission cross sections for electron capture reactions of C2+, N3+, N4+ and O3+ ions in collisions with Li(2s) atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, G.; Pinnington, E. H.; Ciubotariu, C.

    2000-12-01

    Absolute photon emission cross sections following electron capture reactions have been measured for C2+, N3+, N4+ and O3+ ions colliding with Li(2s) atoms at keV energies. The results are compared with calculations using the extended classical over-the-barrier model by Niehaus. We explore the limits of our experimental method and present a detailed discussion of experimental errors.

  15. Absolute and relative cross section measurements of 237Np(n,f) and 238U(n,f) at the National Physical Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador-Castiñeira, Paula; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Göök, Alf; Vidali, Marzio; Hawkes, Nigel P.; Roberts, Neil J.; Taylor, Graeme C.; Thomas, David J.

    2017-09-01

    Cross section measurements in the fast energy region are being demanded as one of the key ingredients for modelling Generation-IV nuclear power plants. However, in facilities where there are no time-of-flight possibilities or it is not convenient to use them, using the 235U(n,f) cross section as a benchmark would require a careful knowledge of the room scatter in the experimental area. In this paper we present measurements of two threshold reactions, 238U(n,f) and 237Np(n,f), that could become a standard between their fission threshold and 2.5 MeV, if the discrepancies shown in the evaluations and in some experimental data can be solved. The preliminary results are in agreement with the present ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation.

  16. Absolute cascade-free cross-sections for the 2S to 2P transition in Zn(+) using electron-energy-loss and merged-beams methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Man, K.-F.; Chutjian, A.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Williams, I. D.

    1991-01-01

    Absolute cascade-free excitation cross-sections in an ion have been measured for the resonance 2S to 2P transition in Zn(+) using electron-energy-loss and merged electron-ion beams methods. Measurements were carried out at electron energies of below threshold to 6 times threshold. Comparisons are made with 2-, 5-, and 15-state close-coupling and distorted-wave theories. There is good agreement between experiment and the 15-state close-coupling cross-sections over the energy range of the calculations.

  17. Absolute second order nonlinear susceptibility of Pt nanowire arrays on MgO faceted substrates with various cross-sectional shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Yoichi; Mizutani, Goro

    2013-08-01

    We have measured optical second harmonic generation (SHG) intensity from three types of Pt nanowires with 7 nm widths of elliptical and boomerang cross-sectional shapes and with 2 nm width elliptical cross-sectional shapes on the MgO faceted templates. From the SHG intensities, we calculated the absolute value of the nonlinear susceptibility χ(2) integrated in the direction of the wire-layer thickness. The tentatively obtained bulk χ(2)B of the wire layer was very large, approaching the value of the well-known nonlinear optical material BaTiO3.

  18. Absolute Photoionization Cross Section for Fe6+ to Fe10+ Ions in the Photon Energy Region of the 2p–3d Resonance Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blancard, C.; Cubaynes, D.; Guilbaud, S.; Bizau, J.-M.

    2018-01-01

    Resonant single photoionization cross sections of Fen+ (n = 6 to 10) ions have been measured in absolute values using a merged-beams setup at the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation facility. Photon energies were between about 710 and 780 eV, covering the range of the 2p–3d transitions. The experimental cross sections are compared to calculations we performed using a multi-configuration Dirac–Fock code and the OPAS code dedicated to radiative opacity calculations. Comparisons are also done with the Chandra X-ray observatory NGC 3783 spectra and with the results of previously published calculations.

  19. Extended optical model for fission

    DOE PAGES

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; ...

    2016-03-07

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier ismore » used for 234,235U(n,f), while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n,f) reactions. The 239Pu(n,f) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for 235,238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. Lastly, the extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.« less

  20. Energy dependence of fission product yields from 235U, 238U, and 239Pu with monoenergetic neutrons between thermal and 14.8 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Gooden, Matthew; Arnold, Charles; Bhike, Megha

    Under a joint collaboration between TUNL-LANL-LLNL, a set of absolute fission product yield measurements has been performed. The energy dependence of a number of cumulative fission product yields (FPY) have been measured using quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams for three actinide targets, 235U, 238U and 239Pu, between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV. The FPYs were measured by a combination of fission counting using specially designed dual-fission chambers and γ-ray counting. Each dual-fission chamber is a back-to-back ionization chamber encasing an activation target in the center with thin deposits of the same target isotope in each chamber. This method allows for the direct measurementmore » of the total number of fissions in the activation target with no reference to the fission cross-section, thus reducing uncertainties. γ-ray counting of the activation target was performed on well-shielded HPGe detectors over a period of two months post irradiation to properly identify fission products. Reported are absolute cumulative fission product yields for incident neutron energies of 0.5, 1.37, 2.4, 3.6, 4.6, 5.5, 7.5, 8.9 and 14.8 MeV. Preliminary results from thermal irradiations at the MIT research reactor will also be presented and compared to present data and evaluations.« less

  1. Energy dependence of fission product yields from 235U, 238U, and 239Pu with monoenergetic neutrons between thermal and 14.8 MeV

    DOE PAGES

    Gooden, Matthew; Arnold, Charles; Bhike, Megha; ...

    2017-09-13

    Under a joint collaboration between TUNL-LANL-LLNL, a set of absolute fission product yield measurements has been performed. The energy dependence of a number of cumulative fission product yields (FPY) have been measured using quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams for three actinide targets, 235U, 238U and 239Pu, between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV. The FPYs were measured by a combination of fission counting using specially designed dual-fission chambers and γ-ray counting. Each dual-fission chamber is a back-to-back ionization chamber encasing an activation target in the center with thin deposits of the same target isotope in each chamber. This method allows for the direct measurementmore » of the total number of fissions in the activation target with no reference to the fission cross-section, thus reducing uncertainties. γ-ray counting of the activation target was performed on well-shielded HPGe detectors over a period of two months post irradiation to properly identify fission products. Reported are absolute cumulative fission product yields for incident neutron energies of 0.5, 1.37, 2.4, 3.6, 4.6, 5.5, 7.5, 8.9 and 14.8 MeV. Preliminary results from thermal irradiations at the MIT research reactor will also be presented and compared to present data and evaluations.« less

  2. Energy Dependence of Fission Product Yields from 235 U, 238U, and 239Pu for Incident Neutron Energies Between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooden, Matthew Edgell

    A joint collaboration between the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has performed a set of absolute Fission Product Yield (FPY) measurements. Using monoenergetic neutron at energies between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV, the excitation functions of a number of fission products from 235U, 238U and 239Pu have begun to be mapped out. This work has practical applications for the determination of weapon yields and the rate of burn-up in nuclear reactors, while also providing important insight into the fission process. Combining the use of a dual-fission ionization chamber and gamma-ray spectroscopy, absolute FPYs have been determined for approximately 15 different fission products. The dual-fission chamber is a back-to-back ionization chamber system with a 'thin' actinide foil in each chamber as a monitor or reference foil. The chamber holds a 'thick' target in the center of the system such that the target and reference foils are of the same actinide isotope. This allows for simple mass scaling between the recorded number of fissions in the individual chambers and the number of fissions in the center thick target, eliminating the need for the knowledge of the absolute fission cross section and its uncertainty. The 'thick' target was removed after activation and gamma-rays counted with well shielded High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors for a period of 1.5 - 2 months.

  3. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-06-05

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  4. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Mano K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  5. A novel double-focusing time-of-flight mass spectrometer for absolute recoil ion cross sections measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sigaud, L., E-mail: lsigaud@if.uff.br; Jesus, V. L. B. de; Ferreira, Natalia

    In this work, the inclusion of an Einzel-like lens inside the time-of-flight drift tube of a standard mass spectrometer coupled to a gas cell—to study ionization of atoms and molecules by electron impact—is described. Both this lens and a conical collimator are responsible for further focalization of the ions and charged molecular fragments inside the spectrometer, allowing a much better resolution at the time-of-flight spectra, leading to a separation of a single mass-to-charge unit up to 100 a.m.u. The procedure to obtain the overall absolute efficiency of the spectrometer and micro-channel plate detector is also discussed.

  6. A novel double-focusing time-of-flight mass spectrometer for absolute recoil ion cross sections measurements.

    PubMed

    Sigaud, L; de Jesus, V L B; Ferreira, Natalia; Montenegro, E C

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the inclusion of an Einzel-like lens inside the time-of-flight drift tube of a standard mass spectrometer coupled to a gas cell-to study ionization of atoms and molecules by electron impact-is described. Both this lens and a conical collimator are responsible for further focalization of the ions and charged molecular fragments inside the spectrometer, allowing a much better resolution at the time-of-flight spectra, leading to a separation of a single mass-to-charge unit up to 100 a.m.u. The procedure to obtain the overall absolute efficiency of the spectrometer and micro-channel plate detector is also discussed.

  7. Neutron Fission of 235,237,239U and 241,243Pu: Cross Sections, Integral Cross Sections and Cross Sections on Excited States

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Britt, H C

    In a recent paper submitted to Phys. Rev. C they have presented estimates for (n,f) cross sections on a series of Thorium, Uranium and Plutonium isotopes over the range E{sub n} = 0.1-2.5 MeV. The (n,f) cross sections for many of these isotopes are difficult or impossible to measure in the laboratory. The cross sections were obtained from previous (t,pf) reaction data invoking a model which takes into account the differences between (t,pf) and (n,f) reaction processes, and which includes improved estimates for the neutron compound formation process. The purpose of this note is: (1) to compare the estimated crossmore » sections to current data files in both ENDF and ENDL databases; (2) to estimate ratios of cross sections relatively to {sup 235}U integrated over the ''tamped flattop'' critical assembly spectrum that was used in the earlier {sup 237}U report; and (3) to show the effect on the integral cross sections when the neutron capturing state is an excited rotational state or an isomer. The isomer and excited state results are shown for {sup 235}U and {sup 237}U.« less

  8. Absolute fragmentation cross sections in atom-molecule collisions: Scaling laws for non-statistical fragmentation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Stockett, M. H.

    2014-06-14

    We present scaling laws for absolute cross sections for non-statistical fragmentation in collisions between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH/PAH{sup +}) and hydrogen or helium atoms with kinetic energies ranging from 50 eV to 10 keV. Further, we calculate the total fragmentation cross sections (including statistical fragmentation) for 110 eV PAH/PAH{sup +} + He collisions, and show that they compare well with experimental results. We demonstrate that non-statistical fragmentation becomes dominant for large PAHs and that it yields highly reactive fragments forming strong covalent bonds with atoms (H and N) and molecules (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}). Thus nonstatistical fragmentation may be an effectivemore » initial step in the formation of, e.g., Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles (PANHs). This relates to recent discussions on the evolution of PAHNs in space and the reactivities of defect graphene structures.« less

  9. Spontaneous Fission

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Segre, Emilio

    1950-11-22

    The first attempt to discover spontaneous fission in uranium was made by [Willard] Libby, who, however, failed to detect it on account of the smallness of effect. In 1940, [K. A.] Petrzhak and [G. N.] Flerov, using more sensitive methods, discovered spontaneous fission in uranium and gave some rough estimates of the spontaneous fission decay constant of this substance. Subsequently, extensive experimental work on the subject has been performed by several investigators and will be quoted in the various sections. [N.] Bohr and [A.] Wheeler have given a theory of the effect based on the usual ideas of penetration of potential barriers. On this project spontaneous fission has been studied for the past several years in an effort to obtain a complete picture of the phenomenon. For this purpose the spontaneous fission decay constants {lambda} have been measured for separated isotopes of the heavy elements wherever possible. Moreover, the number {nu} of neutrons emitted per fission has been measured wherever feasible, and other characteristics of the spontaneous fission process have been studied. This report summarizes the spontaneous fission work done at Los Alamos up to January 1, 1945. A chronological record of the work is contained in the Los Alamos monthly reports.

  10. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  11. Method for correcting for isotope burn-in effects in fission neutron dosimeters

    DOEpatents

    Gold, Raymond; McElroy, William N.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for correcting for effect of isotope burn-in in fission neutron dosimeters. Two quantities are measured in order to quantify the "burn-in" contribution, namely P.sub.Z',A', the amount of (Z', A') isotope that is burned-in, and F.sub.Z', A', the fissions per unit volume produced in the (Z', A') isotope. To measure P.sub.Z', A', two solid state track recorder fission deposits are prepared from the very same material that comprises the fission neutron dosimeter, and the mass and mass density are measured. One of these deposits is exposed along with the fission neutron dosimeter, whereas the second deposit is subsequently used for observation of background. P.sub.Z', A' is then determined by conducting a second irradiation, wherein both the irradiated and unirradiated fission deposits are used in solid state track recorder dosimeters for observation of the absolute number of fissions per unit volume. The difference between the latter determines P.sub.Z', A' since the thermal neutron cross section is known. F.sub.Z', A' is obtained by using a fission neutron dosimeter for this specific isotope, which is exposed along with the original threshold fission neutron dosimeter to experience the same neutron flux-time history at the same location. In order to determine the fissions per unit volume produced in the isotope (Z', A') as it ingrows during the irradiation, B.sub.Z', A', from these observations, the neutron field must generally be either time independent or a separable function of time t and neutron energy E.

  12. Neutron-induced fission cross section of 240Pu from 0.5 MeV to 3 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador-Castiñeira, P.; Bryś, T.; Eykens, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Göök, A.; Moens, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Vidali, M.; Pretel, C.

    2015-07-01

    240Pu has recently been pointed out by a sensitivity study of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) to be one of the isotopes whose fission cross section lacks accuracy to meet the upcoming needs for the future generation of nuclear power plants (GEN-IV). In the High Priority Request List (HPRL) of the OECD, it is suggested that the knowledge of the 240Pu(n ,f ) cross section should be improved to an accuracy within 1-3 %, compared to the present 5%. A measurement of the 240Pu cross section has been performed at the Van de Graaff accelerator of the Joint Research Center (JRC) Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) using quasi-monoenergetic neutrons in the energy range from 0.5 MeV to 3 MeV. A twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber (TFGIC) has been used in a back-to-back configuration as fission fragment detector. The 240Pu(n ,f ) cross section has been normalized to three different isotopes: 237Np(n ,f ) , 235U (n ,f ) , and 238U (n ,f ) . Additionally, the secondary standard reactions were benchmarked through measurements against the primary standard reaction 235U (n ,f ) in the same geometry. A comprehensive study of the corrections applied to the data and the associated uncertainties is given. The results obtained are in agreement with previous experimental data at the threshold region. For neutron energies higher than 1 MeV, the results of this experiment are slightly lower than the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation, but in agreement with the experiments of Laptev et al. (2004) as well as Staples and Morley (1998).

  13. A new measurement of the 6Li(n, α)t cross section at MeV energies using a 252Cf fission chamber and 6Li scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsch, Leo E.; Devlin, M.; Mosby, S. M.; Gomez, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    A new measurement is presented of the 6Li(n, α)t cross section from 245 keV to 10 MeV using a 252Cf fission chamber with 6LiI(Eu) and Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC) scintillators which act as both target and detector. Neutron energies are determined from the time of flight (TOF) method using the signals from spontaneous fission and reaction product recoil. Simulations of neutron downscatter in the crystals and fission chamber bring 6Li(n, α)t cross section values measured with the 6LiI(Eu) into agreement with previous experiments and evaluations, except for two resonances at 4.2 and 6.5 MeV introduced by ENDF/B-VII.1. Suspected neutron transport modeling issues cause the cross section values obtained with CLYC to be discrepant above 2 MeV.

  14. Measurement of absolute hadronic branching fractions of D mesons and e+e- -->DD cross sections at Ec.m.=3773 MeV.

    PubMed

    He, Q; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Park, W; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Dambasuren, E; Dorjkhaidav, O; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nandakumar, R; Randrianarivony, K; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, K; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Chen, J; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Crede, V; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Phillips, E A; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shi, X; Shepherd, M R; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Urner, D; Weaver, K M; Wilksen, T; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Patel, R; Potlia, V; Stoeck, H; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G D; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Williams, J; Wiss, J; Edwards, K W; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Li, S Z; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Zweber, P; Ernst, J; Mahmood, A H; Severini, H; Asner, D M; Dytman, S A; Love, W; Mehrabyan, S; Mueller, J A; Savinov, V; Li, Z; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Adams, G S; Chasse, M; Cravey, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J

    2005-09-16

    Using 55.8 pb(-1) of e+e- collisions recorded at the psi(3770) resonance with the CLEO-c detector at CESR, we determine absolute hadronic branching fractions of charged and neutral D mesons using a double tag technique. Among measurements for three D0 and six D+ modes, we obtain reference branching fractions B(D0-->K-pi+)=(3.91+/-0.08+/-0.09)% and B(D+-->K-pi+pi+)=(9.5+/-0.2+/-0.3)%, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. Final state radiation is included in these branching fractions by allowing for additional, unobserved, photons in the final state. Using a determination of the integrated luminosity, we also extract the cross sections sigma(e+e- -->D0D0)=(3.60+/-0.07(+0.07)(-0.05)) nb and sigma(e+e- -->D+D-)=(2.79+/-0.07(+0.10)(-0.04)) nb.

  15. Absolute differential cross sections for electron impact excitation of the 10.8-11.5 eV energy-loss states of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. A.; Teubner, P. J. O.; Campbell, L.; Brunger, M. J.; Hoshino, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Kitajima, M.; Tanaka, H.; Itikawa, Y.; Kimura, M.; Buenker, R. J.

    2002-02-01

    Absolute differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron impact excitation of electronic states of CO2 in the 10.8-11.5 eV energy-loss range are reported. These data were obtained at the incident electron energies 20,30,60,100 and 200 eV and over the scattered electron angular range 3.5°-90°. The accuracy of our experimental methods has been established independently by using several different normalization techniques at both Sophia and Flinders Universities. Generalized oscillator strengths were derived from our measured DCSs and then extrapolated to zero momentum transfer, in order to determine the optical oscillator strengths. These optical oscillator strengths, where possible, are compared with the results from previous measurements and calculations.

  16. Energy Dependence of Fission Product Yields from 235U, 238U and 239Pu for Incident Neutron Energies Between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooden, M.; Arnold, C.; Bredeweg, T.; Vieira, D.; Wilhelmy, J.; Tonchev, A.; Stoyer, M.; Bhike, M.; Krishichayan, F.; Tornow, W.; Fowler, M.

    2015-10-01

    Under a joint collaboration between TUNL-LANL-LLNL, a set of absolute fission product yield measurements has been performed. The energy dependence of a number of cumulative fission product yields (FPY) have been measured using quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams for three actinide targets, 235U, 238U and 239Pu, between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV. The FPYs were measured by a combination of fission counting using specially designed dual-fission chambers and ?-ray counting. Each dual-fission chamber is a back-to-back ionization chamber encasing an activation target in the center with thin deposits of the same target isotope in each chamber. This method allows for the direct measurement of the total number of fissions in the activation target with no reference to the fission cross-section, thus reducing uncertainties. ?-ray counting of the activation target was performed on well-shielded HPGe detectors over a period of 2 months post irradiation to properly identify fission products. Reported are absolute cumulative fission product yields for incident neutron energies of 0.5, 1.37, 2.4, 3.6, 4.6, 5.5, 7.5, 8.9 and 14.8 MeV. These results are compared to previous measurements and theoretical estimates. This work was performed under the auspices of the USDoE by Los Alamos National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  17. Measuring Light-ion Production and Fission Cross Sections Normalised to H(n,p) Scattering at the Upcoming NFS Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, K.; Gustavsson, C.; Pomp, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Scian, G.; Tarrío, D.

    2014-05-01

    The Medley detector setup is planned to be moved to and used at the new neutron facility NFS where measurements of light-ion production and fission cross-sections are planned at 1-40 MeV. Medley has eight detector telescopes providing ΔE-ΔE-E data, each consisting of two silicon detectors and a CsI(Tl) detector at the back. The telescope setup can be rotated and arranged to cover any angle. Medley has previously been used in many measurements at The Svedberg Laboratory (TSL) in Uppsala mainly with a quasi-mono-energetic neutron beam at 96 and 175 MeV. To be able to do measurements at NFS, which will have a white neutron beam, Medley needs to detect the reaction products with a high timing resolution providing the ToF of the primary neutron. In this paper we discuss the design of the Medley upgrade along with simulations of the setup. We explore the use of Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPACs) which work very well for detecting fission fragments but require more consideration for detecting deeply penetrating particles.

  18. Fission Spectrum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bloch, F.; Staub, H.

    1943-08-18

    Measurements of the spectrum of the fission neutrons of 25 are described, in which the energy of the neutrons is determined from the ionization produced by individual hydrogen recoils. The slow neutrons producing fission are obtained by slowing down the fast neutrons from the Be-D reaction of the Stanford cyclotron. In order to distinguish between fission neutrons and the remaining fast cyclotron neutrons both the cyclotron current and the pusle amplifier are modulated. A hollow neutron container, in which slow neutrons have a lifetime of about 2 milliseconds, avoids the use of large distances. This method results in much higher intensities than the usual modulation arrangement. The results show a continuous distribution of neutrons with a rather wide maximum at about 0.8 MV falling off to half of its maximum value at 2.0 MV. The total number of netrons is determined by comparison with the number of fission fragments. The result seems to indicate that only about 30% of the neutrons have energies below .8 MV. Various tests are described which were performed in order to rule out modification of the spectrum by inelastic scattering. Decl. May 4, 1951

  19. High resolution absolute absorption cross sections of the B ̃(1)A'-X ̃(1)A' transition of the CH2OO biradical.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Elizabeth S; Kapnas, Kara M; Jou, YiTien; Kalinowski, Jarosław; Feng, David; Gerber, R Benny; Murray, Craig

    2015-12-28

    Carbonyl oxides, or Criegee intermediates, are formed from the gas phase ozonolysis of alkenes and play a pivotal role in night-time and urban area atmospheric chemistry. Significant discrepancies exist among measurements of the strong B ̃(1)A'-X ̃(1)A' electronic transition of the simplest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO in the visible/near-UV. We report room temperature spectra of the B ̃(1)A'-X ̃(1)A' electronic absorption band of CH2OO acquired at higher resolution using both single-pass broadband absorption and cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The new absorption spectra confirm the vibrational structure on the red edge of the band that is absent from ionization depletion measurements. The absolute absorption cross sections over the 362-470 nm range are in good agreement with those reported by Ting et al. Broadband absorption spectra recorded over the temperature range of 276-357 K were identical within their mutual uncertainties, confirming that the vibrational structure is not due to hot bands.

  20. Measurement of absolute hadronic branching fractions of D mesons and e+e-→DD¯ cross sections at the ψ(3770)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Ecklund, K. M.; Love, W.; Savinov, V.; Lopez, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez, J.; Huang, G. S.; Miller, D. H.; Pavlunin, V.; Sanghi, B.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B.; Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J.; He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Thorndike, E. H.; Yang, F.; Artuso, M.; Blusk, S.; Khalil, S.; Li, J.; Menaa, N.; Mountain, R.; Nisar, S.; Randrianarivony, K.; Sia, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Dubrovin, M.; Lincoln, A.; Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Naik, P.; Briere, R. A.; Ferguson, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Vogel, H.; Watkins, M. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Adam, N. E.; Alexander, J. P.; Berkelman, K.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.; Jones, C. D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Mahlke-Krüger, H.; Mohapatra, D.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Pivarski, J.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Sadoff, A. J.; Schwarthoff, H.; Shi, X.; Stroiney, S.; Sun, W. M.; Wilksen, T.; Athar, S. B.; Patel, R.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.; Cawlfield, C.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Karliner, I.; Kim, D.; Lowrey, N.; Selen, M.; White, E. J.; Wiss, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Shepherd, M. R.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Lang, B. W.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Smith, A.; Zweber, P.

    2007-12-01

    Using 281pb-1 of e+e- collisions recorded at the ψ(3770) resonance with the CLEO-c detector at CESR (Cornell Electron Storage Ring), we determine absolute hadronic branching fractions of charged and neutral D mesons using a double tag technique. Among measurements for three D0 and six D+ modes, we obtain reference branching fractions B(D0→K-π+)=(3.891±0.035±0.059±0.035)% and B(D+→K-π+π+)=(9.14±0.10±0.16±0.07)%, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is all systematic errors other than final-state radiation (FSR), and the third is the systematic uncertainty due to FSR. We include FSR in these branching fractions by allowing for additional unobserved photons in the final state. Using an independent determination of the integrated luminosity, we also extract the cross sections σ(e+e-→D0D¯0)=(3.66±0.03±0.06)nb and σ(e+e-→D+D-)=(2.91±0.03±0.05)nb at a center-of-mass energy, Ecm=3774±1MeV.

  1. The Fission of Thorium with Alpha Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Amos S.

    1948-04-15

    The fission distribution of fission of thorium with alpha particle of average energy 37.5 Mev has been measured by the chemical method. The distribution found shows that the characteristic dip in the fission yield mass spectrum has been raised to within a factor of two of the peaks compared to a factor of 600 in slow neutron fission of U{sup 235}. The raise in the deip has caused a corresponding lowering in fission yield of these elements at the peaks. The cross section for fission of thorium with 37.5 Mev alphas was found to be about 0.6 barn, and themore » threshold for fission was found to be 23 to 24 Mev.« less

  2. Fission meter

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA

    2012-04-10

    A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source.

  3. Energy Dependence of Fission Product Yields from 235U, 238U and 239Pu for Incident Neutron Energies Between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooden, Matthew; Bredeweg, Todd; Fowler, Malcolm; Vieira, David; Wilhelmy, Jerry; Tonchev, Anton; Stoyer, Mark; Bhike, Megha; Finch, Sean; Krishichayan, Fnu; Tornow, Werner

    2017-09-01

    The energy dependence of a number of cumulative fission product yields (FPY) have been measured using quasi- monoenergetic neutron beams for three actinide targets, 235U, 238U and 239Pu, between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV. The FPYs were measured by a combi- nation of fission counting using specially designed dual-fission chambers and -ray counting. Each dual-fission chamber is a back-to-back ioniza- tion chamber encasing an activation target in the center with thin de- posits of the same target isotope in each chamber. This method allows for the direct measurement of the total number of fissions in the activa- tion target with no reference to the fission cross-section, thus reducing uncertainties. γ-ray counting of the activation target was performed on well-shielded HPGe detectors over a period of 2 months post irradiation to properly identify fission products. Reported are absolute cumulative fission product yields for incident neutron energies of 0.5, 1.37, 2.4, 3.6, 4.6 and 14.8 MeV. New data in the second chance fission region of 5.5 - 9 MeV are included. Work performed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  4. Energy dependence of fission product yields from 235U, 238U, and 239Pu with monoenergetic neutrons between thermal and 14.8 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooden, Matthew; Arnold, Charles; Bhike, Megha; Bredeweg, Todd; Fowler, Malcolm; Krishichayan; Tonchev, Anton; Tornow, Werner; Stoyer, Mark; Vieira, David; Wilhelmy, Jerry

    2017-09-01

    Under a joint collaboration between TUNL-LANL-LLNL, a set of absolute fission product yield measurements has been performed. The energy dependence of a number of cumulative fission product yields (FPY) have been measured using quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams for three actinide targets, 235U, 238U and 239Pu, between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV. The FPYs were measured by a combination of fission counting using specially designed dual-fission chambers and γ-ray counting. Each dual-fission chamber is a back-to-back ionization chamber encasing an activation target in the center with thin deposits of the same target isotope in each chamber. This method allows for the direct measurement of the total number of fissions in the activation target with no reference to the fission cross-section, thus reducing uncertainties. γ-ray counting of the activation target was performed on well-shielded HPGe detectors over a period of two months post irradiation to properly identify fission products. Reported are absolute cumulative fission product yields for incident neutron energies of 0.5, 1.37, 2.4, 3.6, 4.6, 5.5, 7.5, 8.9 and 14.8 MeV. Preliminary results from thermal irradiations at the MIT research reactor will also be presented and compared to present data and evaluations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Security, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by Duke University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory through NNSA Stewardship Science Academic Alliance grant No. DE-FG52-09NA29465, DE-FG52-09NA29448 and Office of Nuclear Physics Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER41033.

  5. Neutron-induced fission cross section measurement of 233U, 241Am and 243Am in the energy range 0.5 MeV En 20 MeV at n TOF at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Belloni, F.; Milazzo, P. M.; Calviani, M.

    2012-01-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross section measurements of 233U, 243Am and 241Am relative to 235U have been carried out at the neutron time-of-flight facility n TOF at CERN. A fast ionization chamber has been employed. All samples were located in the same detector; therefore the studied elements and the reference 235U target are subject to the same neutron beam.

  6. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  7. Neutron-induced fission cross-section measurement of 234U with quasi-monoenergetic beams in the keV and MeV range using micromegas detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsinganis, A.; Kokkoris, M.; Vlastou, R.; Kalamara, A.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Kanellakopoulos, A.; Lagoyannis, A.; Axiotis, M.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate data on neutron-induced fission cross-sections of actinides are essential for the design of advanced nuclear reactors based either on fast neutron spectra or alternative fuel cycles, as well as for the reduction of safety margins of existing and future conventional facilities. The fission cross-section of 234U was measured at incident neutron energies of 560 and 660 keV and 7.5 MeV with a setup based on `microbulk' Micromegas detectors and the same samples previously used for the measurement performed at the CERN n_TOF facility (Karadimos et al., 2014). The 235U fission cross-section was used as reference. The (quasi-)monoenergetic neutron beams were produced via the 7Li(p,n) and the 2H(d,n) reactions at the neutron beam facility of the Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics at the `Demokritos' National Centre for Scientific Research. A detailed study of the neutron spectra produced in the targets and intercepted by the samples was performed coupling the NeuSDesc and MCNPX codes, taking into account the energy spread, energy loss and angular straggling of the beam ions in the target assemblies, as well as contributions from competing reactions and neutron scattering in the experimental setup. Auxiliary Monte-Carlo simulations were performed with the FLUKA code to study the behaviour of the detectors, focusing particularly on the reproduction of the pulse height spectra of α-particles and fission fragments (using distributions produced with the GEF code) for the evaluation of the detector efficiency. An overview of the developed methodology and preliminary results are presented.

  8. Assessment of experimental d-PIGE γ-ray production cross sections for 12C, 14N and 16O and comparison with absolute thick target yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csedreki, L.; Halász, Z.; Kiss, Á. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Measured differential cross sections for deuteron induced γ-ray emission from the reactions 12C(d,pγ)13C, (Eγ = 3089 keV), 14N(d,pγ)15N (Eγ = 8310 keV) and 16O(d,pγ)17O (Eγ = 871 keV) available in the literature were assessed. In order to cross check the assessed γ-ray production cross section data, thick target γ-yields calculated from the differential cross sections were compared with available measured thick target yields. Recommended differential cross section data for each reaction were deduced for particle induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) applications.

  9. Trends in absolute and relative educational inequalities in four modifiable ischaemic heart disease risk factors: repeated cross-sectional surveys from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT) 1984–2008

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There has been an overall decrease in incident ischaemic heart disease (IHD), but the reduction in IHD risk factors has been greater among those with higher social position. Increased social inequalities in IHD mortality in Scandinavian countries is often referred to as the Scandinavian “public health puzzle”. The objective of this study was to examine trends in absolute and relative educational inequalities in four modifiable ischaemic heart disease risk factors (smoking, diabetes, hypertension and high total cholesterol) over the last three decades among Norwegian middle-aged women and men. Methods Population-based, cross-sectional data from The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT): HUNT 1 (1984–1986), HUNT 2 (1995–1997) and HUNT 3 (2006–2008), women and men 40–59 years old. Educational inequalities were assessed using the Slope Index of Inequality (SII) and The Relative Index of Inequality (RII). Results Smoking prevalence increased for all education groups among women and decreased in men. Relative and absolute educational inequalities in smoking widened in both genders, with significantly higher absolute inequalities among women than men in the two last surveys. Diabetes prevalence increased in all groups. Relative inequalities in diabetes were stable, while absolute inequalities increased both among women (p = 0.05) and among men (p = 0.01). Hypertension prevalence decreased in all groups. Relative inequalities in hypertension widened over time in both genders. However, absolute inequalities in hypertension decreased among women (p = 0.05) and were stable among men (p = 0.33). For high total cholesterol relative and absolute inequalities remained stable in both genders. Conclusion Widening absolute educational inequalities in smoking and diabetes over the last three decades gives rise to concern. The mechanisms behind these results are less clear, and future studies are needed to assess if educational inequalities in

  10. The 235U Prompt Fission Neutron Spectrum in the BR1 Reactor at SCK•CEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemans, Jan; Malambu, Edouard; Borms, Luc; Fiorito, Luca

    2016-02-01

    The BR1 research reactor at SCK•CEN has a spherical cavity in the graphite above the reactor core. In this cavity an accurately characterised Maxwellian thermal neutron field is present. Different converters can be loaded in the cavity in order to obtain other types of neutron (and gamma) irradiation fields. Inside the so-called MARK III converter a fast 235U(n,f) prompt fission neutron field can be obtained. With the support of MCNP calculations, irradiations in MARK III can be directly related to the pure 235U(n,f) prompt fission neutron spectrum. For this purpose MARK III spectrum averaged cross sections for the most relevant fluence dosimetry reactions have been determined. A calibration factor for absolute measurements has been determined applying activation dosimetry following ISO/IEC 17025 standards.

  11. Deciphering Past and Present Tectonics of the Rio Grande Rift in New Mexico Utilizing Apatite Fission Track Thermochronology, Geochronology, Quaternary Faulting, and Cross-Section Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, J. W.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Kelley, S. A.; Priewisch, A.; Crossey, L. J.; Asmerom, Y.; Polyak, V.; Selmi, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Rio Grande rift provides an excellent laboratory for understanding styles and processes of extensional tectonics, and their driving forces. We apply apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronology, geochronology, fracture analysis, and cross-section restoration to decipher past and present tectonics of the Rio Grande rift. AFT data has been compiled from rift flank uplifts along the Rio Grande rift in an attempt to recognize long wavelength spatial and temporal patterns. AFT ages record time of cooling of rocks below ~110°C and, when cooling is due to exhumation, age elevation traverses can record upward advection of rocks through paleo 110°C isotherms. The relatively passive sides of half-grabens (e.g. Manzanos and Santa Fe Range) preserve Laramide AFT ages ranging from 45-70 Ma, indicating they were cooled during the Laramide Orogeny and have remained cooler than 110°C since then. Rift flanks on the tectonically active sides of half-grabens, (e.g. Sierra Ladrones, Sandias, Taos Range, and Sierra Blanca) have AFT ages that range from 35 Ma to <10 Ma, and record cooling that initiated with the Oligocene ignimbrite flare-up and continues through the Neogene. Our analysis tracks the approximate elevation of paleo 110°C isotherms in 10 Ma intervals from the Laramide to the present and shows that reconstructed paleoisotherms have been differentially uplifted, warped, and faulted since their time of formation, and hence serve as markers of uplift history and its mechanisms. AFT data at Ladron Peak, an active rift flank along the western margin of the Rio Grande rift in central New Mexico, indicates that it was rapidly unroofed between 20-10 Ma. Preliminary apatite helium data gives a similar age vs. elevation trend, but apatites have highly radiogenically damaged lattices and hence have corrected closure temperatures tens of degrees higher than AFT ages. The style of faulting at Ladron Peak is unusual because it is bounded by the anomalously low-angle (~15°) Jeter

  12. Absolute determination of the cross sections of ozone in the wavelength region 339-355 nm at temperatures 220-293 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciani, Marco; di Sarra, Alcide; Fiocco, Giorgio; Amoruso, Antonella

    1989-06-01

    Absolute measurements of the ozone absorption coefficient in the Huggins bands at different temperatures have been carried out. Ozone is produced by an electrical discharge and stored cryogenically; differential absorption measurements are subsequently obtained in a slowly evolving mixture of ozone and molecular oxygen. High resolution (to 0.012 nm) measurements cover a spectral range (339-355 nm) where the ozone absorption shows a strong dependence on temperature. Results at 293 and 220 K are reported; they are particularly interesting in view of the utilization of this spectral region as a low-absorption reference channel for the observation of atmospheric ozone profiles by active probing techniques. Coherent radiation at two wavelengths, around 355 and 353 nm, respectively, can be obtained as third harmonic of the fundamental output of an Nd:YAG laser and by H2 Raman shifting of an XeCl excimer laser output.

  13. A new photometric ozone reference in the Huggins bands: the absolute ozone absorption cross section at the 325 nm HeCd laser wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Christof; Elandaloussi, Hadj; Gröbner, Julian

    2018-03-01

    The room temperature (294.09 K) absorption cross section of ozone at the 325 nm HeCd wavelength has been determined under careful consideration of possible biases. At the vacuum wavelength of 325.126 nm, thus in a region used by a variety of ozone remote sensing techniques, an absorption cross-section value of σ = 16.470×10-21 cm2 was measured. The measurement provides the currently most accurate direct photometric absorption value of ozone in the UV with an expanded (coverage factor k = 2) standard uncertainty u(σ) = 31×10-24 cm2, corresponding to a relative level of 2 ‰. The measurements are most compatible with a relative temperature coefficient cT = σ-1 ∂ Tσ = 0.0031 K-1 at 294 K. The cross section and its uncertainty value were obtained using generalised linear regression with correlated uncertainties. It will serve as a reference for ozone absorption spectra required for the long-term remote sensing of atmospheric ozone in the Huggins bands. The comparison with commonly used absorption cross-section data sets for remote sensing reveals a possible bias of about 2 %. This could partly explain a 4 % discrepancy between UV and IR remote sensing data and indicates that further studies will be required to reach the accuracy goal of 1 % in atmospheric reference spectra.

  14. Measurement of the Am 242 m neutron-induced reaction cross sections

    DOE PAGES

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; ...

    2017-02-17

    The neutron-induced reaction cross sections of 242mAm were measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. A new neutron-capture cross section was determined, and the absolute scale was set according to a concurrent measurement of the well-known 242mAm(n,f) cross section. The (n,γ) cross section was measured from thermal energy to an incident energy of 1 eV at which point the data quality was limited by the reaction yield in the laboratory. Our new 242mAm fission cross section was normalized to ENDF/B-VII.1 tomore » set the absolute scale, and it agreed well with the (n,f) cross section from thermal energy to 1 keV. Lastly, the average absolute capture-to-fission ratio was determined from thermal energy to E n = 0.1 eV, and it was found to be 26(4)% as opposed to the ratio of 19% from the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation.« less

  15. Geant4 Modifications for Accurate Fission Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jiawei; Bendahan, Joseph

    Monte Carlo is one of the methods to simulate the generation and transport of radiation through matter. The most widely used radiation simulation codes are MCNP and Geant4. The simulation of fission production and transport by MCNP has been thoroughly benchmarked. There is an increasing number of users that prefer using Geant4 due to the flexibility of adding features. However, it has been found that Geant4 does not have the proper fission-production cross sections and does not produce the correct fission products. To achieve accurate results for studies in fissionable material applications, Geant4 was modified to correct these inaccuracies and to add new capabilities. The fission model developed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was integrated into the neutron-fission modeling package. The photofission simulation capability was enabled using the same neutron-fission library under the assumption that nuclei fission in the same way, independent of the excitation source. The modified fission code provides the correct multiplicity of prompt neutrons and gamma rays, and produces delayed gamma rays and neutrons with time and energy dependencies that are consistent with ENDF/B-VII. The delayed neutrons are now directly produced by a custom package that bypasses the fragment cascade model. The modifications were made for U-235, U-238 and Pu-239 isotopes; however, the new framework allows adding new isotopes easily. The SLAC nuclear data library is used for simulation of isotopes with an atomic number above 92 because it is not available in Geant4. Results of the modified Geant4.10.1 package of neutron-fission and photofission for prompt and delayed radiation are compared with ENDFB-VII and with results produced with the original package.

  16. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Fission foil detector calibrations with high energy protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Fission foil detectors (FFD's) are passive devices composed of heavy metal foils in contact with muscovite mica films. The heavy metal nuclei have significant cross sections for fission when irradiated with neutrons and protons. Each isotope is characterized by threshold energies for the fission reactions and particular energy-dependent cross sections. In the FFD's, fission fragments produced by the reactions are emitted from the foils and create latent particle tracks in the adjacent mica films. When the films are processed surface tracks are formed which can be optically counted. The track densities are indications of the fluences and spectra of neutrons and/or protons. In the past, detection efficiencies have been calculated using the low energy neutron calibrated dosimeters and published fission cross sections for neutrons and protons. The problem is that the addition of a large kinetic energy to the (n,nucleus) or (p,nucleus) reaction could increase the energies and ranges of emitted fission fragments and increase the detector sensitivity as compared with lower energy neutron calibrations. High energy calibrations are the only method of resolving the uncertainties in detector efficiencies. At high energies, either proton or neutron calibrations are sufficient since the cross section data show that the proton and neutron fission cross sections are approximately equal. High energy proton beams have been utilized (1.8 and 4.9 GeV, 80 and 140 MeV) for measuring the tracks of fission fragments emitted backward and forward.

  18. Pediatric obesity and depression: a cross-sectional analysis of absolute BMI as it relates to children's depression index scores in obese 7- to 17-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Benson, Levi P; Williams, Ronald J; Novick, Marsha B

    2013-01-01

    Depression and obesity are important in children because they affect health in childhood and later life. The exact relationship between obesity and depression, especially in children, remains undefined. Using a cross-sectional chart review design, our study looked at a weight management clinic-based sample of 117 obese children, 7 to 17 years old, to determine the relationship between absolute BMI and depression as measured by the Children's Depression Index (CDI) while accounting for confounders, such as the child's medical problems, physical activity, and family structure. There was no correlation between depression as measured by the CDI and increasing BMI in obese children seeking weight management. However, we did demonstrate a positive correlation between depression and paternal absence and daily television/computer/video game time. Clinicians should encourage decreasing screen time and might consider family therapy for obese children in families that lack paternal involvement.

  19. Absolute cross section for loss of supercoiled topology induced by 10 eV electrons in highly uniform /DNA/1,3-diaminopropane films deposited on highly ordered pyrolitic graphite

    PubMed Central

    Boulanouar, Omar; Fromm, Michel; Bass, Andrew D.; Cloutier, Pierre; Sanche, Léon

    2013-01-01

    It was recently shown that the affinity of doubly charged, 1–3 diaminopropane (Dap2+) for DNA permits the growth on highly ordered pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) substrates, of plasmid DNA films, of known uniform thickness [O. Boulanouar, A. Khatyr, G. Herlem, F. Palmino, L. Sanche, and M. Fromm, J. Phys. Chem. C 115, 21291–21298 (2011)]. Post-irradiation analysis by electrophoresis of such targets confirms that electron impact at 10 eV produces a maximum in the yield of single strand breaks that can be associated with the formation of a DNA− transient anion. Using a well-adapted deterministic survival model for the variation of electron damage with fluence and film thickness, we have determined an absolute cross section for strand-break damage by 10 eV electrons and inelastic scattering attenuation length in DNA-Dap complex films. PMID:23927289

  20. Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, Christian; Verbeke, Jerome; Vogt, Ramona

    FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) is a code that simulated the decay of a fissionable nucleus at specified excitation energy. In its present form, FREYA models spontaneous fission and neutron-induced fission up to 20 MeV. It includes the possibility of neutron emission from the nuclear prior to its fussion (nth chance fission).

  1. In-beam Fission Study at JAEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa

    2013-12-01

    Fission fragment mass distributions were measured in heavy-ion induced fissions using 238U target nucleus. The measured mass distributions changed drastically with incident energy. The results are explained by a change of the ratio between fusion and quasifission with nuclear orientation. A calculation based on a fluctuation dissipation model reproduced the mass distributions and their incident energy dependence. Fusion probability was determined in the analysis. Evaporation residue cross sections were calculated with a statistical model in the reactions of 30Si + 238U and 34S + 238U using the obtained fusion probability in the entrance channel. The results agree with the measured cross sections for seaborgium and hassium isotopes.

  2. Production and testing of the ENEA-Bologna VITJEFF32.BOLIB (JEFF-3.2) multi-group (199 n + 42 γ) cross section library in AMPX format for nuclear fission applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescarini, Massimo; Orsi, Roberto; Frisoni, Manuela

    2017-09-01

    The ENEA-Bologna Nuclear Data Group produced the VITJEFF32.BOLIB multi-group coupled neutron/photon (199 n + 42 γ) cross section library in AMPX format, based on the OECD-NEA Data Bank JEFF-3.2 evaluated nuclear data library. VITJEFF32.BOLIB was conceived for nuclear fission applications as European counterpart of the ORNL VITAMIN-B7 similar library (ENDF/B-VII.0 data). VITJEFF32.BOLIB has the same neutron and photon energy group structure as the former ORNL VITAMIN-B6 reference library (ENDF/B-VI.3 data) and was produced using similar data processing methodologies, based on the LANL NJOY-2012.53 nuclear data processing system for the generation of the nuclide cross section data files in GENDF format. Then the ENEA-Bologna 2007 Revision of the ORNL SCAMPI nuclear data processing system was used for the conversion into the AMPX format. VITJEFF32.BOLIB contains processed cross section data files for 190 nuclides, obtained through the Bondarenko (f-factor) method for the treatment of neutron resonance self-shielding and temperature effects. Collapsed working libraries of self-shielded cross sections in FIDO-ANISN format, used by the deterministic transport codes of the ORNL DOORS system, can be generated from VITJEFF32.BOLIB through the cited SCAMPI version. This paper describes the methodology and specifications of the data processing performed and presents some results of the VITJEFF32.BOLIB validation.

  3. Fission gas detection system

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A device for collecting fission gas released by a failed fuel rod which device uses a filter to pass coolant but which filter blocks fission gas bubbles which cannot pass through the filter due to the surface tension of the bubble.

  4. Fission Xenon on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathew, K. J.; Marti, K.; Marty, B.

    2002-01-01

    Fission Xe components due to Pu-244 decay in the early history of Mars have been identified in nakhlites; as in the case of ALH84001 and Chassigny the fission gas was assimilated into indigenous solar-type Xe. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Fission Activities of the Nuclear Reactions Group in Uppsala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Adili, A.; Alhassan, E.; Gustavsson, C.; Helgesson, P.; Jansson, K.; Koning, A.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Rakopoulos, V.; Sjöstrand, H.; Solders, A.; Tarrío, D.; Österlund, M.; Pomp, S.

    This paper highlights some of the main activities related to fission of the nuclear reactions group at Uppsala University. The group is involved for instance in fission yield experiments at the IGISOL facility, cross-section measurements at the NFS facility, as well as fission dynamics studies at the IRMM JRC-EC. Moreover, work is ongoing on the Total Monte Carlo (TMC) methodology and on including the GEF fission code into the TALYS nuclear reaction code. Selected results from these projects are discussed.

  6. Fission and Properties of Neutron-Rich Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Joseph H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Carter, H. K.

    2008-08-01

    . Fission-fragment spectroscopy with STEFF / A. G. Smith ... [et al.]. Gamma ray multiplicity of [symbol]Cf spontaneous fission using LiBerACE / D. L. Bleuel ... [et al.]. Excitation energy dependence of fragment mass and total kinetic energy distributions in proton-induced fission of light actinides / I. Nishinaka ... [et al.]. A dynamical calculation of multi-modal nuclear fission / T. Wada and T. Asano. Structure of fission potential energy surfaces in ten-dimensional spaces / V. V. Pashkevich, Y. K Pyatkov and A. V. Unzhakova. A possible enhancement of nuclear fission in scattering with low energy charged particles / V. Gudkov. Dynamical multi-break processes in the [symbol]Sn + [symbol]Ni system at 35 MeV/Nucleon / M. Papa and ISOSPIN-RE VERSE collaboration -- New experimental techniques. MTOF - a high resolution isobar separator for studies of exotic decays / A. Piechaczek ... [et al.]. Development of ORRUBA: a silicon array for the measurement of transfer reactions in inverse kinematics / S. D. Pain ... [et al.]. Indian national gamma array: present & future / R. K. Bhowmik. Absolute intensities of [symbol] rays emitted in the decay of [symbol]U / H. C. Griffin -- Superheavy elements theory and experiments / M. G. Itkis ... [et al.]. Study of superheavy elements at SHIP / S. Hofinann. Heaviest nuclei from [symbol]Ca-induced reactions / Yu. Ts. Oaanessian. Superheavy nuclei and giant nuclear systems / W. Greiner and V. Zagrebaev. Fission approach to alpha-decay of superheavy nuclei / D.N. Poenaru and W. Greiner. Superheavy elements in the Magic Islands / C. Samanta. Relativistic mean field studies of superheavy nuclei / A. V. Afanas jev. Understanding the synthesis of the heaviest nuclei / W. Loveland -- Mass measurements and g-factors. G factor measurements in neutron-rich [symbol]Cf fission fragments, measured using the gammasphere array / R. Orlandi ... [et al.]. Technique for measuring angular correlations and g-factors in neutron rich nuclei produced by the

  7. Absolute intensity of radiation emitted by uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.; Lee, J. H.; Mcfarland, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    The absolute intensity of radiation emitted by fissioning and nonfissioning uranium plasmas in the spectral range from 350 nm to 1000 nm was measured. The plasma was produced in a plasma-focus apparatus and the plasma properties are simular to those anticipated for plasma-core nuclear reactors. The results are expected to contribute to the establishment of design criteria for the development of plasma-core reactors.

  8. Re-interpretation of the ERMINE-V experiment validation of fission product integral cross section in the fast energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Paul; Leconte, Pierre; Blaise, Patrick; Naymeh, Laurent

    2017-09-01

    The current knowledge of nuclear data in the fast neutron energy range is not as good as in the thermal range, resulting in larger propagated uncertainties in integral quantities such as critical masses or reactivity effects. This situation makes it difficult to get the full benefit from recent advances in modeling and simulation. Zero power facilities such as the French ZPR MINERVE have already demonstrated that they can contribute to significantly reduce those uncertainties thanks to dedicated experiments. Historically, MINERVE has been mainly dedicated to thermal spectrum studies. However, experiments involving fast-thermal coupled cores were also performed in MINERVE as part of the ERMINE program, in order to improve nuclear data in fast spectra for the two French SFRs: PHENIX and SUPERPHENIX. Some of those experiments have been recently revisited. In particular, a full characterization of ZONA-1 and ZONA-3, two different cores loaded in the ERMINE V campaign, has been done, with much attention paid to possible sources of errors. It includes detailed geometric descriptions, energy profiles of the direct and adjoint fluxes and spectral indices obtained thanks to Monte Carlo calculations and compared to a reference fast core configuration. Sample oscillation experiments of separated fission products such as 103Rh or 99Tc, which were part of the ERMINE V program, have been simulated using recently-developed options in the TRIPOLI-4 code and compared to the experimental values. The present paper describes the corresponding results. The findings motivate in-depth studies for designing optimized coupled-core conditions in ZEPHYR, a new ZPR which will replace MINERVE and will provide integral data to meet the needs of Gen-III and Gen-IV reactors.

  9. Concurrent Application of ANC and THM to assess the 13C(α, n)16O Absolute Cross Section at Astrophysical Energies and Possible Consequences for Neutron Production in Low-mass AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippella, O.; La Cognata, M.

    2017-03-01

    The {}13{{C}}{(α ,n)}16{{O}} reaction is considered to be the main neutron source responsible for the production of heavy nuclides (from {Sr} to {Bi}) through slow n-capture nucleosynthesis (s-process) at low temperatures during the asymptotic giant branch phase of low-mass stars (≲ 3{--}4 {M}⊙ , or LMSs). In recent years, several direct and indirect measurements have been carried out to determine the cross section at the energies of astrophysical interest (around 190+/- 40 {keV}). However, they yield inconsistent results that cause a highly uncertain reaction rate and affect the neutron release in LMSs. In this work we have combined two indirect approaches, the asymptotic normalization coefficient and the Trojan horse method, to unambiguously determine the absolute value of the {}13{{C}}{(α ,n)}16{{O}} astrophysical factor. With these, we have determined a very accurate reaction rate to be introduced into astrophysical models of s-process nucleosynthesis in LMSs. Calculations using this recommended rate have shown limited variations in the production of those neutron-rich nuclei (with 86≤slant A≤slant 209) that receive contribution only by slow neutron captures.

  10. Fission Systems for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, T.; Dorney, D. J.; Swint, Marion Shayne

    2012-01-01

    Fission systems are used extensively on earth, and 34 such systems have flown in space. The energy density of fission is over 10 million times that of chemical reactions, giving fission the potential to eliminate energy density constraints for many space missions. Potential safety and operational concerns with fission systems are well understood, and strategies exist for affordably developing such systems. By enabling a power-rich environment and highly efficient propulsion, fission systems could enable affordable, sustainable exploration of Mars.

  11. Fission Product Yield Study of 235U, 238U and 239Pu Using Dual-Fission Ionization Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C.; Tornow, W.; Gooden, M.; Kelley, J.; Arnold, C.; Bond, E.; Bredeweg, T.; Fowler, M.; Moody, W.; Rundberg, R.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D.; Wilhelmy, J.; Becker, J.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M.; Tonchev, A.

    2014-05-01

    To resolve long-standing differences between LANL and LLNL regarding the correct fission basis for analysis of nuclear test data [M.B. Chadwick et al., Nucl. Data Sheets 111, 2891 (2010); H. Selby et al., Nucl. Data Sheets 111, 2891 (2010)], a collaboration between TUNL/LANL/LLNL has been established to perform high-precision measurements of neutron induced fission product yields. The main goal is to make a definitive statement about the energy dependence of the fission yields to an accuracy better than 2-3% between 1 and 15 MeV, where experimental data are very scarce. At TUNL, we have completed the design, fabrication and testing of three dual-fission chambers dedicated to 235U, 238U, and 239Pu. The dual-fission chambers were used to make measurements of the fission product activity relative to the total fission rate, as well as for high-precision absolute fission yield measurements. The activation method was employed, utilizing the mono-energetic neutron beams available at TUNL. Neutrons of 4.6, 9.0, and 14.5 MeV were produced via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction, and for neutrons at 14.8 MeV, the 3H(d,n)4He reaction was used. After activation, the induced γ-ray activity of the fission products was measured for two months using high-resolution HPGe detectors in a low-background environment. Results for the yield of seven fission fragments of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu and a comparison to available data at other energies are reported. For the first time results are available for neutron energies between 2 and 14 MeV.

  12. Singlet exciton fission photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiye; Jadhav, Priya; Reusswig, Philip D; Yost, Shane R; Thompson, Nicholas J; Congreve, Daniel N; Hontz, Eric; Van Voorhis, Troy; Baldo, Marc A

    2013-06-18

    Singlet exciton fission, a process that generates two excitons from a single photon, is perhaps the most efficient of the various multiexciton-generation processes studied to date, offering the potential to increase the efficiency of solar devices. But its unique characteristic, splitting a photogenerated singlet exciton into two dark triplet states, means that the empty absorption region between the singlet and triplet excitons must be filled by adding another material that captures low-energy photons. This has required the development of specialized device architectures. In this Account, we review work to develop devices that harness the theoretical benefits of singlet exciton fission. First, we discuss singlet fission in the archetypal material, pentacene. Pentacene-based photovoltaic devices typically show high external and internal quantum efficiencies. They have enabled researchers to characterize fission, including yield and the impact of competing loss processes, within functional devices. We review in situ probes of singlet fission that modulate the photocurrent using a magnetic field. We also summarize studies of the dissociation of triplet excitons into charge at the pentacene-buckyball (C60) donor-acceptor interface. Multiple independent measurements confirm that pentacene triplet excitons can dissociate at the C60 interface despite their relatively low energy. Because triplet excitons produced by singlet fission each have no more than half the energy of the original photoexcitation, they limit the potential open circuit voltage within a solar cell. Thus, if singlet fission is to increase the overall efficiency of a solar cell and not just double the photocurrent at the cost of halving the voltage, it is necessary to also harvest photons in the absorption gap between the singlet and triplet energies of the singlet fission material. We review two device architectures that attempt this using long-wavelength materials: a three-layer structure that uses

  13. Pairing-induced speedup of nuclear spontaneous fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Collective inertia is strongly influenced at the level crossing at which the quantum system changes its microscopic configuration diabatically. Pairing correlations tend to make the large-amplitude nuclear collective motion more adiabatic by reducing the effect of these configuration changes. Competition between pairing and level crossing is thus expected to have a profound impact on spontaneous fission lifetimes. Purpose: To elucidate the role of nucleonic pairing on spontaneous fission, we study the dynamic fission trajectories of 264Fm and 240Pu using the state-of-the-art self-consistent framework. Methods: We employ the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with the Skyrme energy density functional SkM* and a density-dependent pairing interaction. Along with shape variables, proton and neutron pairing correlations are taken as collective coordinates. The collective inertia tensor is calculated within the nonperturbative cranking approximation. The fission paths are obtained by using the least action principle in a four-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates. Results: Pairing correlations are enhanced along the minimum-action fission path. For the symmetric fission of 264Fm, where the effect of triaxiality on the fission barrier is large, the geometry of the fission pathway in the space of the shape degrees of freedom is weakly impacted by pairing. This is not the case for 240Pu, where pairing fluctuations restore the axial symmetry of the dynamic fission trajectory. Conclusions: The minimum-action fission path is strongly impacted by nucleonic pairing. In some cases, the dynamical coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom can lead to a dramatic departure from the static picture. Consequently, in the dynamical description of nuclear fission, particle-particle correlations should be considered on the same footing as those associated with shape degrees of freedom.

  14. Pairing-induced speedup of nuclear spontaneous fission

    DOE PAGES

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; ...

    2014-12-22

    Collective inertia is strongly influenced at the level crossing at which the quantum system changes its microscopic configuration diabatically. Pairing correlations tend to make the large-amplitude nuclear collective motion more adiabatic by reducing the effect of these configuration changes. Competition between pairing and level crossing is thus expected to have a profound impact on spontaneous fission lifetimes. To elucidate the role of nucleonic pairing on spontaneous fission, we study the dynamic fission trajectories of 264Fm and 240Pu using the state-of-the-art self-consistent framework. We employ the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with the Skyrme energy density functional SkM* and a density-dependentmore » pairing interaction. Along with shape variables, proton and neutron pairing correlations are taken as collective coordinates. The collective inertia tensor is calculated within the nonperturbative cranking approximation. The fission paths are obtained by using the least action principle in a four-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates. Pairing correlations are enhanced along the minimum-action fission path. For the symmetric fission of 264Fm, where the effect of triaxiality on the fission barrier is large, the geometry of the fission pathway in the space of the shape degrees of freedom is weakly impacted by pairing. This is not the case for 240Pu, where pairing fluctuations restore the axial symmetry of the dynamic fission trajectory. The minimum-action fission path is strongly impacted by nucleonic pairing. In some cases, the dynamical coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom can lead to a dramatic departure from the static picture. As a result, in the dynamical description of nuclear fission, particle-particle correlations should be considered on the same footing as those associated with shape degrees of freedom.« less

  15. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  16. A microtubule polymerase cooperates with the kinesin-6 motor and a microtubule cross-linker to promote bipolar spindle assembly in the absence of kinesin-5 and kinesin-14 in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Yukawa, Masashi; Kawakami, Tomoki; Okazaki, Masaki; Kume, Kazunori; Tang, Ngang Heok; Toda, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation relies on the bipolar mitotic spindle. In many eukaryotes, spindle formation is driven by the plus-end–directed motor kinesin-5 that generates outward force to establish spindle bipolarity. Its inhibition leads to the emergence of monopolar spindles with mitotic arrest. Intriguingly, simultaneous inactivation of the minus-end–directed motor kinesin-14 restores spindle bipolarity in many systems. Here we show that in fission yeast, three independent pathways contribute to spindle bipolarity in the absence of kinesin-5/Cut7 and kinesin-14/Pkl1. One is kinesin-6/Klp9 that engages with spindle elongation once short bipolar spindles assemble. Klp9 also ensures the medial positioning of anaphase spindles to prevent unequal chromosome segregation. Another is the Alp7/TACC-Alp14/TOG microtubule polymerase complex. Temperature-sensitive alp7cut7pkl1 mutants are arrested with either monopolar or very short spindles. Forced targeting of Alp14 to the spindle pole body is sufficient to render alp7cut7pkl1 triply deleted cells viable and promote spindle assembly, indicating that Alp14-mediated microtubule polymerization from the nuclear face of the spindle pole body could generate outward force in place of Cut7 during early mitosis. The third pathway involves the Ase1/PRC1 microtubule cross-linker that stabilizes antiparallel microtubules. Our study, therefore, unveils multifaceted interplay among kinesin-dependent and -independent pathways leading to mitotic bipolar spindle assembly. PMID:29021344

  17. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  18. Fission Chain Restart Theory

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, K. S.; Nakae, L. F.; Prasad, M. K.; ...

    2017-07-31

    We present that fast nanosecond timescale neutron and gamma-ray counting can be performed with a (liquid) scintillator array. Fission chains in metal evolve over a timescale of tens of nanoseconds. If the metal is surrounded by moderator, neutrons leaking from the metal can thermalize and diffuse in the moderator. With finite probability, the diffusing neutrons can return to the metal and restart the fast fission chain. The timescale for this restart process is microseconds. A theory describing time evolving fission chains for metal surrounded by moderator, including this restart process, is presented. Finally, this theory is sufficiently simple for itmore » to be implemented for real-time analysis.« less

  19. DEATH-STAR: Silicon and photovoltaic fission fragment detector arrays for light-ion induced fission correlation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Koglin, J. D.; Burke, J. T.; Fisher, S. E.

    Here, the Direct Excitation Angular Tracking pHotovoltaic-Silicon Telescope ARray (DEATH-STAR) combines a series of 12 silicon detectors in a ΔE–E configuration for charged particle identification with a large-area array of 56 photovoltaic (solar) cells for detection of fission fragments. The combination of many scattering angles and fission fragment detectors allows for an angular-resolved tool to study reaction cross sections using the surrogate method, anisotropic fission distributions, and angular momentum transfers through stripping, transfer, inelastic scattering, and other direct nuclear reactions. The unique photovoltaic detectors efficiently detect fission fragments while being insensitive to light ions and have a timing resolution ofmore » 15.63±0.37 ns. Alpha particles are detected with a resolution of 35.5 keV 1σ at 7.9 MeV. Measured fission fragment angular distributions are also presented.« less

  20. DEATH-STAR: Silicon and Photovoltaic Fission Fragment Detector Arrays for Light-Ion Induced Fission Correlation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, J. D.; Burke, J. T.; Fisher, S. E.; Jovanovic, I.

    2017-05-01

    The Direct Excitation Angular Tracking pHotovoltaic-Silicon Telescope ARray (DEATH-STAR) combines a series of 12 silicon detectors in a ΔE - E configuration for charged particle identification with a large-area array of 56 photovoltaic (solar) cells for detection of fission fragments. The combination of many scattering angles and fission fragment detectors allows for an angular-resolved tool to study reaction cross sections using the surrogate method, anisotropic fission distributions, and angular momentum transfers through stripping, transfer, inelastic scattering, and other direct nuclear reactions. The unique photovoltaic detectors efficiently detect fission fragments while being insensitive to light ions and have a timing resolution of 15.63±0.37 ns. Alpha particles are detected with a resolution of 35.5 keV 1σ at 7.9 MeV. Measured fission fragment angular distributions are also presented.

  1. DEATH-STAR: Silicon and photovoltaic fission fragment detector arrays for light-ion induced fission correlation studies

    DOE PAGES

    Koglin, J. D.; Burke, J. T.; Fisher, S. E.; ...

    2017-02-20

    Here, the Direct Excitation Angular Tracking pHotovoltaic-Silicon Telescope ARray (DEATH-STAR) combines a series of 12 silicon detectors in a ΔE–E configuration for charged particle identification with a large-area array of 56 photovoltaic (solar) cells for detection of fission fragments. The combination of many scattering angles and fission fragment detectors allows for an angular-resolved tool to study reaction cross sections using the surrogate method, anisotropic fission distributions, and angular momentum transfers through stripping, transfer, inelastic scattering, and other direct nuclear reactions. The unique photovoltaic detectors efficiently detect fission fragments while being insensitive to light ions and have a timing resolution ofmore » 15.63±0.37 ns. Alpha particles are detected with a resolution of 35.5 keV 1σ at 7.9 MeV. Measured fission fragment angular distributions are also presented.« less

  2. Fission Product Library and Resource

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J. T.; Padgett, S.

    Fission product yields can be extracted from an irradiated sample by performing gamma ray spectroscopy on the whole sample post irradiation. There are several pitfalls to avoid when trying to determine a specific isotope's fission product yield.

  3. Process for treating fission waste

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.; Wick, Oswald J.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for the treatment of fission waste. A glass forming agent, a metal oxide, and a reducing agent are mixed with the fission waste and the mixture is heated. After melting, the mixture separates into a glass phase and a metal phase. The glass phase may be used to safely store the fission waste, while the metal phase contains noble metals recovered from the fission waste.

  4. The fission cross sections of /sup 230/Th, /sup 232/Th, /sup 233/U, /sup 234/U, /sup 236/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 237/Np, /sup 239/Pu and /sup 242/Pu relative /sup 235/U at 14. 74 MeV neutron energy

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.W.

    1986-12-01

    The measurement of the fission cross section ratios of nine isotopes relative to /sup 235/U at an average neutron energy of 14.74 MeV is described with particular attention to the determination of corrections and to sources of error. The results are compared to ENDF/B-V and to other measurements of the past decade. The ratio of the neutron induced fission cross section for these isotopes to the fission cross section for /sup 235/U are: /sup 230/Th - 0.290 +- 1.9%; /sup 232/Th - 0.191 +- 1.9%; /sup 233/U - 1.132 +- 0.7%; /sup 234/U - 0.998 +- 1.0%; /sup 236/U -more » 0.791 +- 1.1%; /sup 238/U - 0.587 +- 1.1%; /sup 237/Np - 1.060 +- 1.4%; /sup 239/Pu - 1.152 +- 1.1%; /sup 242/Pu - 0.967 +- 1.0%. 40 refs., 11 tabs., 9 figs.« less

  5. Student Experiments in Spontaneous Fission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becchetti, F. D.; Ying, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Advanced undergraduate experiments utilizing a commercially available, thin spontaneous fission source are described, including studies of the energy and mass distribution of the fission fragments and their energy and angular correlation. The experiments provide a useful introduction to fission, nuclear mass equations, heavy-ion physics, and…

  6. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments inmore » Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.« less

  7. ABSOLUTE INTEGRAL CROSS SECTIONS AND PRODUCT BRANCHING RATIOS FOR THE VIBRATIONALLY SELECTED ION-MOLECULE REACTIONS: N{sub 2}{sup +}(X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}; v {sup +} = 0-2) + CH{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yuntao; Chang, Yih Chung; Lu Zhou

    Absolute vibrationally selected integral cross sections ({sigma}{sub v+}'s) for the ion-molecule reaction N{sub 2}{sup +}(X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}; v {sup +} = 0-2) + CH{sub 4} have been measured by using the newly developed vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser pulsed field ionization-photoion (PFI-PI) double-quadrupole-double-octopole ion guide apparatus. By employing a novel electric field pulsing scheme to the VUV laser PFI-PI source, we have been able to prepare reactant N{sub 2}{sup +} ions in single-vibrational quantum states with not only high intensity and high purity but also high kinetic energy resolution, allowing integral cross section measurements to be conducted in themore » center-of-mass kinetic energies (E{sub cm}'s) from 0.05 to 10.00 eV. Three primary product channels corresponding to the formations of CH{sub 3}{sup +}, CH{sub 2}{sup +}, and N{sub 2}H{sup +} were identified. After correcting for the secondary reactions involving CH{sub 3}{sup +} and CH{sub 2}{sup +}, we have determined the {sigma}{sub v+} values of the formation of these primary product ions, {sigma}{sub v+}(CH{sub 3}{sup +}), {sigma}{sub v+}(CH{sub 2}{sup +}), and {sigma}{sub v+}(N{sub 2}H{sup +}), and their branching ratios, [{sigma}{sub v+}(CH{sub 3}{sup +}): {sigma}{sub v+}(CH{sub 2}{sup +}): {sigma}{sub v+}(N{sub 2}H{sup +})]/{sigma}{sub v+}(CH{sub 3}{sup +} + CH{sub 2}{sup +} + N{sub 2}H{sup +}), v {sup +} = 0-2, in the E{sub cm} range of 0.05-10.00 eV, where {sigma}{sub v+}(CH{sub 3}{sup +} + CH{sub 2}{sup +} + N{sub 2}H{sup +}) = {sigma}{sub v+}(CH{sub 3}{sup +}) + {sigma}{sub v+}(CH{sub 2}{sup +}) + {sigma}{sub v+}(N{sub 2}H{sup +}). The branching ratios are found to be nearly independent of the v {sup +} state and E{sub cm}. Complex v {sup +}-state and E{sub cm} dependences for {sigma}{sub v+}(CH{sub 3}{sup +}), {sigma}{sub v+}(CH{sub 2}{sup +}), and {sigma}{sub v+}(N{sub 2}H{sup +}) along with vibrational inhibition for the formation of these product ions are

  8. Elastocapillary Instability in Mitochondrial Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Sart, Sébastien; Babataheri, Avin; Tareste, David; Barakat, Abdul I.; Clanet, Christophe; Husson, Julien

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic cell organelles that constantly undergo fission and fusion events. These dynamical processes, which tightly regulate mitochondrial morphology, are essential for cell physiology. Here we propose an elastocapillary mechanical instability as a mechanism for mitochondrial fission. We experimentally induce mitochondrial fission by rupturing the cell's plasma membrane. We present a stability analysis that successfully explains the observed fission wavelength and the role of mitochondrial morphology in the occurrence of fission events. Our results show that the laws of fluid mechanics can describe mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

  9. Search for ternary fission of chromium-48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dummer, Andrew K.

    1999-07-01

    Both alpha cluster model calculations and macroscopic energy calculations that allow for a double-neck shape of the compound nucleus suggest the possibility of a novel three 16O, chain-like configuration in 48 Cr. Such a configuration might lead to an enhanced cross section for three-16O breakup. To explore this possibility, the three-body exit channels for the 36Ar + 12C reaction at a beam energy of 210 MeV have been studied. The cross section for 16O + 16O + 16O breakup has been deduced and has been found to be in excess of what would be expected to result from a sequential binary fission process. However, the observation of a similarly enhanced 12C + 16O + 20Ne breakup cross section suggests that the observed 16O + 16O + 16O yields might still be associated with a statistical fission process. The results are discussed in the context of the fission of light nuclear systems and a simple cluster model calculation. This latter, ``Harvey model'' calculation suggests a possible inhibition of the formation of a three- 16O chain configuration from the 36Ar + 12C entrance channel. A further measurement using the 20Ne + 28Si-entrance channel is suggested.

  10. A microtubule polymerase cooperates with the kinesin-6 motor and a microtubule cross-linker to promote bipolar spindle assembly in the absence of kinesin-5 and kinesin-14 in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Masashi; Kawakami, Tomoki; Okazaki, Masaki; Kume, Kazunori; Tang, Ngang Heok; Toda, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation relies on the bipolar mitotic spindle. In many eukaryotes, spindle formation is driven by the plus-end-directed motor kinesin-5 that generates outward force to establish spindle bipolarity. Its inhibition leads to the emergence of monopolar spindles with mitotic arrest. Intriguingly, simultaneous inactivation of the minus-end-directed motor kinesin-14 restores spindle bipolarity in many systems. Here we show that in fission yeast, three independent pathways contribute to spindle bipolarity in the absence of kinesin-5/Cut7 and kinesin-14/Pkl1. One is kinesin-6/Klp9 that engages with spindle elongation once short bipolar spindles assemble. Klp9 also ensures the medial positioning of anaphase spindles to prevent unequal chromosome segregation. Another is the Alp7/TACC-Alp14/TOG microtubule polymerase complex. Temperature-sensitive alp7cut7pkl1 mutants are arrested with either monopolar or very short spindles. Forced targeting of Alp14 to the spindle pole body is sufficient to render alp7cut7pkl1 triply deleted cells viable and promote spindle assembly, indicating that Alp14-mediated microtubule polymerization from the nuclear face of the spindle pole body could generate outward force in place of Cut7 during early mitosis. The third pathway involves the Ase1/PRC1 microtubule cross-linker that stabilizes antiparallel microtubules. Our study, therefore, unveils multifaceted interplay among kinesin-dependent and -independent pathways leading to mitotic bipolar spindle assembly. © 2017 Yukawa et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. Presaddle and postsaddle dissipative effects in fission using complete kinematics measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Benlliure, J.; Taïeb, J.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Ayyad, Y.; Bélier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Casarejos, E.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Paradela, C.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Simon, H.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.

    2016-12-01

    A complete kinematics measurement of the two fission fragments was used for the first time to investigate fission dynamics at small and large deformations. Fissioning systems with high excitation energies, compact shapes, and low angular momenta were produced in inverse kinematics by using spallation reactions of lead projectiles. A new generation experimental setup allowed for the first full and unambiguous identification in mass and atomic number of both fission fragments. This measurement permitted us to accurately determine fission cross sections, the charge distribution, and the neutron excess of the fission fragments as a function of the atomic number of the fissioning system. These data are compared with different model calculations to extract information on the value of the dissipation parameter at small and large deformations. The present results do not show any sizable dependence of the nuclear dissipation parameter on temperature or deformation.

  12. Clusterization in Ternary Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamanin, D. V.; Pyatkov, Y. V.

    This lecture notes are devoted to the new kind of ternary decay of low excited heavy nuclei called by us "collinear cluster tri-partition" (CCT) due to the features of the effect observed, namely, decay partners fly away almost collinearly and at least one of them has magic nucleon composition. At the early stage of our work the process of "true ternary fission" (fission of the nucleus into three fragments of comparable masses) was considered to be undiscovered for low excited heavy nuclei. Another possible prototype—three body cluster radioactivity—was also unknown. The most close to the CCT phenomenon, at least cinematically, stands so called "polar emission", but only very light ions (up to isotopes of Be) were observed so far.

  13. SHAPED FISSIONABLE METAL BODIES

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Williamson, R.R.; Young, G.J.

    1958-10-14

    A technique is presented for grooving the surface of fissionable fuel elements so that expansion can take place without damage to the interior structure of the fuel element. The fissionable body tends to develop internal stressing when it is heated internally by the operation of the nuclear reactor and at the same time is subjected to surface cooling by the circulating coolant. By producing a grooved or waffle-like surface texture, the annular lines of tension stress are disrupted at equally spaced intervals by the grooves, thereby relieving the tension stresses in the outer portions of the body while also facilitating the removal of accumulated heat from the interior portion of the fuel element.

  14. High precision measurements on fission-fragment de-excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberstedt, Stephan; Gatera, Angélique; Geerts, Wouter; Göök, Alf; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Vidali, Marzio; Oberstedt, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    In recent years nuclear fission has gained renewed interest both from the nuclear energy community and in basic science. The first, represented by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, expressed the need for more accurate fission cross-section and fragment yield data for safety assessments of Generation IV reactor systems. In basic science modelling made much progress in describing the de-excitation mechanism of neutron-rich isotopes, e.g. produced in nuclear fission. Benchmarking the different models require a precise experimental data on prompt fission neutron and γ-ray emission, e.g. multiplicity, average energy per particle and total dissipated energy per fission, preferably as function of fission-fragment mass and total kinetic energy. A collaboration of scientists from JRC Geel (formerly known as JRC IRMM) and other institutes took the lead in establishing a dedicated measurement programme on prompt fission neutron and γ-ray characteristics, which has triggered even more measurement activities around the world. This contribution presents new advanced instrumentation and methodology we use to generate high-precision spectral data and will give a flavour of future data needs and opportunities.

  15. Simulating an Exploding Fission-Bomb Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Cameron

    2016-03-01

    A time-dependent desktop-computer simulation of the core of an exploding fission bomb (nuclear weapon) has been developed. The simulation models a core comprising a mixture of two isotopes: a fissile one (such as U-235) and an inert one (such as U-238) that captures neutrons and removes them from circulation. The user sets the enrichment percentage and scattering and fission cross-sections of the fissile isotope, the capture cross-section of the inert isotope, the number of neutrons liberated per fission, the number of ``initiator'' neutrons, the radius of the core, and the neutron-reflection efficiency of a surrounding tamper. The simulation, which is predicated on ordinary kinematics, follows the three-dimensional motions and fates of neutrons as they travel through the core. Limitations of time and computer memory render it impossible to model a real-life core, but results of numerous runs clearly demonstrate the existence of a critical mass for a given set of parameters and the dramatic effects of enrichment and tamper efficiency on the growth (or decay) of the neutron population. The logic of the simulation will be described and results of typical runs will be presented and discussed.

  16. Neutron-induced fission measurements at the time-of-flight facility nELBE

    DOE PAGES

    Kögler, T.; Beyer, R.; Junghans, A. R.; ...

    2015-05-18

    Neutron-induced fission of ²⁴²Pu is studied at the photoneutron source nELBE. The relative fast neutron fission cross section was determined using actinide fission chambers in a time-of-flight experiment. A good agreement of present nuclear data with evalua- tions has been achieved in the range of 100 keV to 10 MeV.

  17. Observation of shape isomers states in fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamanin, D. V.; Pyatkov, Yu V.; Alexandrov, A. A.; Alexandrova, I. A.; Mkaza, N.; Malaza, V.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Strekalovsky, A. O.; Strekalovsky, O. V.; Zhuchko, V. E.

    2017-06-01

    We discuss the manifestations of a new original effect appeared at crossing of the metal foils by fission fragments. We have observed significant mass deficit in the total mass Ms of the fission fragments detected in coincidence with ions knocked out from the foil. It was shown that at the large angles of scattering of the knocked-out ions from the foil predominantly conventional elastic Rutherford scattering takes place. As the result Ms corresponds to the mean mass of the mother system after emission of fission neutrons (no missing mass). In contrast, in near frontal impacts fission fragment misses essential part of its mass. Residual nuclei at least for the fragments from the heavy mass peak show magic nucleon composition.

  18. Fission barriers of light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Grotowski, K.; Pl-dash-baraneta, R.; Blann, M.

    1989-04-01

    Experimental fission excitation functions for compound nuclei /sup 52/Fe, /sup 49/Cr, /sup 46/V, and /sup 44/Ti formed in heavy-ion reactions are analyzed in the Hauser-Feshbach/Bohr-Wheeler formalism using fission barriers based on the rotating liquid drop model of Cohen et al. and on the rotating finite range model of Sierk. We conclude that the rotating finite range approach gives better reproduction of experimental fission yields, consistent with results found for heavier systems.

  19. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, M.; Al-Adili, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Mattera, A.; Moore, I.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Simutkin, V.; Solders, A.

    2016-06-01

    The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f) and Th(p,f) have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn) reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  20. Nuclear Forensics and Radiochemistry: Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Rundberg, Robert S.

    Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since it’ discovery. Radiochemical methods are used to determine cumulative mass yields. These measurements have led to the two-mode fission hypothesis to model the neutron energy dependence of fission product yields. Fission product yields can be used for the nuclear forensics of nuclear explosions. The mass yield curve depends on both the fuel and the neutron spectrum of a device. Recent studies have shown that the nuclear structure of the compound nucleus can affect the mass yield distribution.

  1. Determining the 13C(α, n)16O absolute cross section through the concurrent application of ANC and THM and astrophysical consequences for the s-process in AGB-LMSs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippella, Oscar; La Cognata, Marco

    2018-01-01

    The 13C(α, n)16O reaction is considered to be the most important neutron source for the s-process main component in low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars. No direct experimental data exist at very low energies and measurements performed through direct techniques show inconsistent results, mostly in their absolute values. In this context, we reversed the usual normalization procedure combining two indirect approaches, the asymptotic normalization coefficient and the Trojan Horse Method, to unambiguously determine the absolute value of the 13C(α, n)16O astrophysical S(E)-factor in the most relevant energy-region for astrophysics. Adopting the new reaction rate for the n-source in the NEWTON s-process nucleosynthesis code, astrophysical calculations show only limited variations, less than 1%, for those nuclei whose production is considered to be totally due to slow neutron captures.

  2. In-beam fission study for Heavy Element Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa

    2013-12-01

    Fission fragment mass distributions were measured in heavy-ion induced fissions using 238U target nucleus. The measured mass distributions changed drastically with incident energy. The results are explained by a change of the ratio between fusion and qasifission with nuclear orientation. A calculation based on a fluctuation dissipation model reproduced the mass distributions and their incident energy dependence. Fusion probability was determined in the analysis. Evaporation residue cross sections were calculated with a statistical model in the reactions of 30Si + 238U and 34S + 238U using the obtained fusion probability in the entrance channel. The results agree with the measured cross sections for seaborgium and hassium isotopes.

  3. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  4. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Shields, D.; ...

    2015-04-01

    We developed the SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products has been utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). Moreover, the SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, has been assembled and tested using 229Th and 252Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission productsmore » from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). Finally, these mass yield results measured from 252Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement.« less

  5. Measurement of Fission Product Yields from Fast-Neutron Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Henderson, R.; Kenneally, J.; Macri, R.; McNabb, D.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.; Bhatia, C.; Bhike, M.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.

    2014-09-01

    One of the aims of the Stockpile Stewardship Program is a reduction of the uncertainties on fission data used for analyzing nuclear test data [1,2]. Fission products such as 147Nd are convenient for determining fission yields because of their relatively high yield per fission (about 2%) and long half-life (10.98 days). A scientific program for measuring fission product yields from 235U,238U and 239Pu targets as a function of bombarding neutron energy (0.1 to 15 MeV) is currently underway using monoenergetic neutron beams produced at the 10 MV Tandem Accelerator at TUNL. Dual-fission chambers are used to determine the rate of fission in targets during activation. Activated targets are counted in highly shielded HPGe detectors over a period of several weeks to identify decaying fission products. To date, data have been collected at neutron bombarding energies 4.6, 9.0, 14.5 and 14.8 MeV. Experimental methods and data reduction techniques are discussed, and some preliminary results are presented.

  6. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  7. TREATMENT OF FISSION PRODUCT WASTE

    DOEpatents

    Huff, J.B.

    1959-07-28

    A pyrogenic method of separating nuclear reactor waste solutions containing aluminum and fission products as buring petroleum coke in an underground retort, collecting the easily volatile gases resulting as the first fraction, he uminum chloride as the second fraction, permitting the coke bed to cool and ll contain all the longest lived radioactive fission products in greatly reduced volume.

  8. Capture and fission with DANCE and NEUANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E.; Rusev, G.; Walker, C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chadwick, M. B.; Couture, A.; Fowler, M. M.; Hayes, A.; Kawano, T.; Mosby, S.; Stetcu, I.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Talou, P.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    A summary of the current and future experimental program at DANCE is presented. Measurements of neutron capture cross sections are planned for many actinide isotopes with the goal to reduce the present uncertainties in nuclear data libraries. Detailed studies of capture gamma rays in the neutron resonance region will be performed in order to derive correlated data on the de-excitation of the compound nucleus. New approaches on how to remove the DANCE detector response from experimental data and retain the correlations between the cascade gamma rays are presented. Studies on 235U are focused on quantifying the population of short-lived isomeric states in 236U after neutron capture. For this purpose, a new neutron detector array NEUANCE is under construction. It will be installed in the central cavity of the DANCE array and enable the highly efficient tagging of fission and capture events. In addition, developments of fission fragment detectors are also underway to expand DANCE capabilities to measurements of fully correlated data on fission observables.

  9. Capture and fission with DANCE and NEUANCE

    DOE PAGES

    Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E.; ...

    2015-12-23

    A summary of the current and future experimental program at DANCE is presented. Measurements of neutron capture cross sections are planned for many actinide isotopes with the goal to reduce the present uncertainties in nuclear data libraries. Detailed studies of capture gamma rays in the neutron resonance region will be performed in order to derive correlated data on the de-excitation of the compound nucleus. New approaches on how to remove the DANCE detector response from experimental data and retain the correlations between the cascade gamma rays are presented. Studies on 235U are focused on quantifying the population of short-lived isomericmore » states in 236U after neutron capture. For this purpose, a new neutron detector array NEUANCE is under construction. It will be installed in the central cavity of the DANCE array and enable the highly efficient tagging of fission and capture events. In addition, developments of fission fragment detectors are also underway to expand DANCE capabilities to measurements of fully correlated data on fission observables.« less

  10. Group Constants Generation of the Pseudo Fission Products for Fast Reactor Burnup Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, Choong-Sup; Kim, Do Heon; Chang, Jonghwa

    The pseudo fission products for the burnup calculations of the liquid metal fast reactor were generated. The cross-section data and fission product yield data of ENDF/B-VI were used for the pseudo fission product data of U-235, U-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. The pseudo fission product data can be used with the KAFAX-F22 or -E66, which are the MATXS-format libraries for analyses of the liquid metal fast reactor at KAERI and were distributed through the OECD/NEA. The 80-group MATXS-format libraries of the 172 fission products were generated and the burnup chains for generation of the pseudo fission products were prepared.

  11. Electromagnetic fission of238U at 600 and 1000 MeV per nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubehn, Th.; Müller, W. F. J.; Bassini, R.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Blaich, Th.; Ferrero, A.; Groß, C.; Imme, G.; Iori, I.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunze, W. D.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lynen, U.; Möhlenkamp, T.; Moretto, L. G.; Ocker, B.; Pochodzalla, J.; Raciti, G.; Reito, S.; Sann, H.; Schüttauf, A.; Seidel, W.; Serfling, V.; Trautmann, W.; Trzcinski, A.; Verde, G.; Wörner, A.; Zude, E.; Zwieglinski, B.

    1995-06-01

    Electromagnetic fission of238U projectiles at E/A =600 and 1000 MeV was studied with the ALADIN spectrometer at the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS. Seven different targets (Be, C, Al, Cu, In, Au and U) were used. By considering only those fission events where the two charges added up to 92, most of the nuclear interactions were excluded. The nuclear contributions to the measured fission cross sections were determined by extrapolating from beryllium to the heavier targets with the concept of factorization. The obtained cross sections for electromagnetic fission are well reproduced by extended Weizsäcker-Williams calculations which include E1 and E2 excitations. The asymmetry of the fission fragments' charge distribution gives evidence for the excitation of the double giant-dipole resonance in uranium.

  12. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  13. Absolute calibration of sniffer probes on Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseev, D.; Laqua, H. P.; Marsen, S.; Stange, T.; Braune, H.; Erckmann, V.; Gellert, F.; Oosterbeek, J. W.

    2016-08-01

    Here we report the first measurements of the power levels of stray radiation in the vacuum vessel of Wendelstein 7-X using absolutely calibrated sniffer probes. The absolute calibration is achieved by using calibrated sources of stray radiation and the implicit measurement of the quality factor of the Wendelstein 7-X empty vacuum vessel. Normalized absolute calibration coefficients agree with the cross-calibration coefficients that are obtained by the direct measurements, indicating that the measured absolute calibration coefficients and stray radiation levels in the vessel are valid. Close to the launcher, the stray radiation in the empty vessel reaches power levels up to 340 kW/m2 per MW injected beam power. Furthest away from the launcher, i.e., half a toroidal turn, still 90 kW/m2 per MW injected beam power is measured.

  14. Absolute calibration of sniffer probes on Wendelstein 7-X.

    PubMed

    Moseev, D; Laqua, H P; Marsen, S; Stange, T; Braune, H; Erckmann, V; Gellert, F; Oosterbeek, J W

    2016-08-01

    Here we report the first measurements of the power levels of stray radiation in the vacuum vessel of Wendelstein 7-X using absolutely calibrated sniffer probes. The absolute calibration is achieved by using calibrated sources of stray radiation and the implicit measurement of the quality factor of the Wendelstein 7-X empty vacuum vessel. Normalized absolute calibration coefficients agree with the cross-calibration coefficients that are obtained by the direct measurements, indicating that the measured absolute calibration coefficients and stray radiation levels in the vessel are valid. Close to the launcher, the stray radiation in the empty vessel reaches power levels up to 340 kW/m(2) per MW injected beam power. Furthest away from the launcher, i.e., half a toroidal turn, still 90 kW/m(2) per MW injected beam power is measured.

  15. Method of fission heat flux determination from experimental data

    DOEpatents

    Paxton, Frank A.

    1999-01-01

    A method is provided for determining the fission heat flux of a prime specimen inserted into a specimen of a test reactor. A pair of thermocouple test specimens are positioned at the same level in the holder and a determination is made of various experimental data including the temperature of the thermocouple test specimens, the temperature of bulk water channels located in the test holder, the gamma scan count ratios for the thermocouple test specimens and the prime specimen, and the thicknesses of the outer clads, the fuel fillers, and the backclad of the thermocouple test specimen. Using this experimental data, the absolute value of the fission heat flux for the thermocouple test specimens and prime specimen can be calculated.

  16. Advanced Space Fission Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2010-01-01

    Fission has been considered for in-space propulsion since the 1940s. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) systems underwent extensive development from 1955-1973, completing 20 full power ground tests and achieving specific impulses nearly twice that of the best chemical propulsion systems. Space fission power systems (which may eventually enable Nuclear Electric Propulsion) have been flown in space by both the United States and the Former Soviet Union. Fission is the most developed and understood of the nuclear propulsion options (e.g. fission, fusion, antimatter, etc.), and fission has enjoyed tremendous terrestrial success for nearly 7 decades. Current space nuclear research and technology efforts are focused on devising and developing first generation systems that are safe, reliable and affordable. For propulsion, the focus is on nuclear thermal rockets that build on technologies and systems developed and tested under the Rover/NERVA and related programs from the Apollo era. NTP Affordability is achieved through use of previously developed fuels and materials, modern analytical techniques and test strategies, and development of a small engine for ground and flight technology demonstration. Initial NTP systems will be capable of achieving an Isp of 900 s at a relatively high thrust-to-weight ratio. The development and use of first generation space fission power and propulsion systems will provide new, game changing capabilities for NASA. In addition, development and use of these systems will provide the foundation for developing extremely advanced power and propulsion systems capable of routinely and affordably accessing any point in the solar system. The energy density of fissile fuel (8 x 10(exp 13) Joules/kg) is more than adequate for enabling extensive exploration and utilization of the solar system. For space fission propulsion systems, the key is converting the virtually unlimited energy of fission into thrust at the desired specific impulse and thrust

  17. Ratios of dijet production cross sections as a function of the absolute difference in rapidity between jets in proton–proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 7\\ \\mathrm{TeV}$$

    DOE PAGES

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; ...

    2012-11-16

    A study of dijet production in proton-proton collisions was performed at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV for jets with pt > 35 GeV and abs(y) < 4.7 using data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC in 2010. Events with at least one pair of jets are denoted as 'inclusive'. Events with exactly one pair of jets are called 'exclusive'. The ratio of the cross section of all pairwise combinations of jets to the exclusive dijet cross section as a function of the rapidity difference between jets abs(Delta(y)) is measured for the first time up to abs(Delta(y)) = 9.2. Themore » ratio of the cross section for the pair consisting of the most forward and the most backward jet from the inclusive sample to the exclusive dijet cross section is also presented. The predictions of the Monte Carlo event generators PYTHIA6 and PYTHIA8 agree with the measurements. In both ratios the HERWIG++ generator exhibits a more pronounced rise versus abs(Delta(y)) than observed in the data. The BFKL-motivated generators CASCADE and HEJ+ARIADNE predict for these ratios a significantly stronger rise than observed.« less

  18. Ratios of dijet production cross sections as a function of the absolute difference in rapidity between jets in proton–proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 7\\ \\mathrm{TeV}$$

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.

    A study of dijet production in proton-proton collisions was performed at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV for jets with pt > 35 GeV and abs(y) < 4.7 using data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC in 2010. Events with at least one pair of jets are denoted as 'inclusive'. Events with exactly one pair of jets are called 'exclusive'. The ratio of the cross section of all pairwise combinations of jets to the exclusive dijet cross section as a function of the rapidity difference between jets abs(Delta(y)) is measured for the first time up to abs(Delta(y)) = 9.2. Themore » ratio of the cross section for the pair consisting of the most forward and the most backward jet from the inclusive sample to the exclusive dijet cross section is also presented. The predictions of the Monte Carlo event generators PYTHIA6 and PYTHIA8 agree with the measurements. In both ratios the HERWIG++ generator exhibits a more pronounced rise versus abs(Delta(y)) than observed in the data. The BFKL-motivated generators CASCADE and HEJ+ARIADNE predict for these ratios a significantly stronger rise than observed.« less

  19. Advanced model for the prediction of the neutron-rich fission product yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubchenya, V. A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Penttilä, H.; Äystö, J.

    2013-12-01

    The consistent models for the description of the independent fission product formation cross sections in the spontaneous fission and in the neutron and proton induced fission at the energies up to 100 MeV is developed. This model is a combination of new version of the two-component exciton model and a time-dependent statistical model for fusion-fission process with inclusion of dynamical effects for accurate calculations of nucleon composition and excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus at the scission point. For each member of the compound nucleus ensemble at the scission point, the primary fission fragment characteristics: kinetic and excitation energies and their yields are calculated using the scission-point fission model with inclusion of the nuclear shell and pairing effects, and multimodal approach. The charge distribution of the primary fragment isobaric chains was considered as a result of the frozen quantal fluctuations of the isovector nuclear matter density at the scission point with the finite neck radius. Model parameters were obtained from the comparison of the predicted independent product fission yields with the experimental results and with the neutron-rich fission product data measured with a Penning trap at the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä (JYFLTRAP).

  20. Neutron threshold activation detectors (TAD) for the detection of fissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi; Stevenson, John; King, Michael J.

    2011-10-01

    , called Threshold Activation Detection (TAD), is to utilize appropriate substances that can be selectively activated by the fission neutrons and not by the source radiation and then measure the radioactively decaying activation products (typically beta and gamma rays) well after the source pulse. The activation material should possess certain properties: a suitable half-life of the order of seconds; an energy threshold below which the numerous source neutrons will not activate it (e.g., 3 MeV); easily detectable activation products (typically >1 MeV beta and gamma rays) and have a usable cross-section for the selected reaction. Ideally the substance would be a part of the scintillator. There are several good material candidates for the TAD, including fluorine, which is a major constituent of available scintillators such as BaF 2, CaF 2 and hydrogen free liquid fluorocarbon. Thus the fluorine activation products, in particular the beta particles, can be measured with a very high efficiency in the detector. The principles, applications and experimental results obtained with the fluorine based TAD are discussed.

  1. Measurement of cross sections for the 147Sm(n, alpha)144Nd reaction at 5.0 and 6.0 MeV.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guohui; Zhang, Jiaguo; Guo, Li'an; Wu, Hao; Chen, Jinxiang; Tang, Guoyou; Gledenov, Yu M; Sedysheva, M V; Khuukhenkhuu, G; Szalanski, P J

    2009-01-01

    Cross sections of the (147)Sm(n, alpha)(144)Nd reaction were measured at En=5.0 and 6.0MeV. A twin gridded ionization chamber was used as a charged particle detector and two large area (147)Sm(2)O(3) samples placed back to back were employed. Experiments were performed at the 4.5MV Van de Graaff accelerator of Peking University. Neutrons were produced through the D(d, n)(3)He reaction with a deuterium gas target. Absolute neutron flux was determined by a small (238)U fission chamber. Present cross-section data are compared with existing results of evaluations and measurements.

  2. Physics of negative absolute temperatures.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  3. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  4. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  5. Moral absolutism and ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, C

    2001-02-01

    If one accepts a version of absolutism that excludes the intentional killing of any innocent human person from conception to natural death, ectopic pregnancy poses vexing difficulties. Given that the embryonic life almost certainly will die anyway, how can one retain one's moral principle and yet adequately respond to a situation that gravely threatens the life of the mother and her future fertility? The four options of treatment most often discussed in the literature are non-intervention, salpingectomy (removal of tube with embryo), salpingostomy (removal of embryo alone), and use of methotrexate (MXT). In this essay, I review these four options and introduce a fifth (the milking technique). In order to assess these options in terms of the absolutism mentioned, it will also be necessary to discuss various accounts of the intention/foresight distinction. I conclude that salpingectomy, salpingostomy, and the milking technique are compatible with absolutist presuppositions, but not the use of methotrexate.

  6. Absolute gravity measurements in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumberge, M. A.; Sasagawa, G.; Kappus, M.

    1986-08-01

    An absolute gravity meter that determines the local gravitational acceleration by timing a freely falling mass with a laser interferometer has been constructed. The instrument has made measurements at 11 sites in California, four in Nevada, and one in France. The uncertainty in the results is typically 10 microgal. Repeated measurements have been made at several of the sites; only one shows a substantial change in gravity.

  7. Fission gas in thoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuganathan, Navaratnarajah; Ghosh, Partha S.; Galvin, Conor O. T.; Arya, Ashok K.; Dutta, Bijon K.; Dey, Gautam K.; Grimes, Robin W.

    2017-03-01

    The fission gases Xe and Kr, formed during normal reactor operation, are known to degrade fuel performance, particularly at high burn-up. Using first-principles density functional theory together with a dispersion correction (DFT + D), in ThO2 we calculate the energetics of neutral and charged point defects, the di-vacancy (DV), different neutral tri-vacancies (NTV), the charged tetravacancy (CTV) defect cluster geometries and their interaction with Xe and Kr. The most favourable incorporation point defect site for Xe or Kr in defective ThO2 is the fully charged thorium vacancy. The lowest energy NTV in larger supercells of ThO2 is NTV3, however, a single Xe atom is most stable when accommodated within a NTV1. The di-vacancy (DV) is a significantly less favoured incorporation site than the NTV1 but the CTV offers about the same incorporation energy. Incorporation of a second gas atom in a NTV is a high energy process and more unfavourable than accommodation within an existing Th vacancy. The bi-NTV (BNTV) cluster geometry studied will accommodate one or two gas atoms with low incorporation energies but the addition of a third gas atom incurs a high energy penalty. The tri-NTV cluster (TNTV) forms a larger space which accommodates three gas atoms but again there is a penalty to accommodate a fourth gas atom. By considering the energy to form the defect sites, solution energies were generated showing that in ThO2-x the most favourable solution equilibrium site is the NTV1 while in ThO2 it is the DV.

  8. Compact fission counter for DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C Y; Chyzh, A; Kwan, E

    2010-11-06

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) consists of 160 BF{sub 2} crystals with equal solid-angle coverage. DANCE is a 4{pi} {gamma}-ray calorimeter and designed to study the neutron-capture reactions on small quantities of radioactive and rare stable nuclei. These reactions are important for the radiochemistry applications and modeling the element production in stars. The recognition of capture event is made by the summed {gamma}-ray energy which is equivalent of the reaction Q-value and unique for a given capture reaction. For a selective group of actinides, where the neutron-induced fission reaction competes favorably with the neutron capture reaction, additionalmore » signature is needed to distinguish between fission and capture {gamma} rays for the DANCE measurement. This can be accomplished by introducing a detector system to tag fission fragments and thus establish a unique signature for the fission event. Once this system is implemented, one has the opportunity to study not only the capture but also fission reactions. A parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) has many advantages for the detection of heavy charged particles such as fission fragments. These include fast timing, resistance to radiation damage, and tolerance of high counting rate. A PPAC also can be tuned to be insensitive to {alpha} particles, which is important for experiments with {alpha}-emitting actinides. Therefore, a PPAC is an ideal detector for experiments requiring a fast and clean trigger for fission. A PPAC with an ingenious design was fabricated in 2006 by integrating amplifiers into the target assembly. However, this counter was proved to be unsuitable for this application because of issues related to the stability of amplifiers and the ability to separate fission fragments from {alpha}'s. Therefore, a new design is needed. A LLNL proposal to develop a new PPAC for DANCE was funded by NA22 in FY09. The design goal is to minimize the mass for the proposed

  9. Energy production using fission fragment rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapline, G.; Matsuda, Y.

    1991-08-01

    Fission fragment rockets are nuclear reactors with a core consisting of thin fibers in a vacuum, and which use magnetic fields to extract the fission fragments from the reactor core. As an alternative to ordinary nuclear reactors, fission fragment rockets would have the following advantages: approximately twice the efficiency if the fission fragment energy can be directly converted into electricity; reduction of the buildup of a fission fragment inventory in the reactor could avoid a Chernobyl type disaster; and collection of the fission fragments outside the reactor could simplify the waste disposal problem.

  10. Absolute metrology for space interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadé, Yves; Courteville, Alain; Dändliker, René

    2017-11-01

    The crucial issue of space-based interferometers is the laser interferometric metrology systems to monitor with very high accuracy optical path differences. Although classical high-resolution laser interferometers using a single wavelength are well developed, this type of incremental interferometer has a severe drawback: any interruption of the interferometer signal results in the loss of the zero reference, which requires a new calibration, starting at zero optical path difference. We propose in this paper an absolute metrology system based on multiplewavelength interferometry.

  11. Recent advances in nuclear fission theory: pre- and post-scission physics

    SciTech Connect

    Talou, Patrick; Kawano, Toshihiko; Bouland, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the modeling of the nuclear fission process for data evaluation purposes are reviewed. In particular, it is stressed that a more comprehensive approach to fission data is needed if predictive capability is to be achieved. The link between pre- and post-scission data is clarified, and a path forward to evaluate those data in a consistent and comprehensive manner is presented. Two examples are given: (i) the modeling of fission cross-sections in the R-matrix formalism, for which results for Pu isotopes from 239 to 242 are presented; (ii) the modeling of prompt fission neutrons in the Monte Carlomore » Hauser-Feshbach framework. Results for neutron-induced fission on {sup 235}U are discussed.« less

  12. Evaporation channel as a tool to study fission dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Nitto, A.; Vardaci, E.; La Rana, G.; Nadtochy, P. N.; Prete, G.

    2018-03-01

    The dynamics of the fission process is expected to affect the evaporation residue cross section because of the fission hindrance due to the nuclear viscosity. Systems of intermediate fissility constitute a suitable environment for testing such hypothesis since they are characterized by evaporation residue cross sections comparable or larger than the fission ones. Observables related to emitted charged particles, due to their relatively high emission probability, can be used to put stringent constraints on models describing the excited nucleus decay and to recognize the effects of fission dynamics. In this work model simulations are compared with the experimental data collected via the 32S +100 Mo reaction at Elab = 200 MeV. Consequently we pointed out, exploring an extended set of evaporation channel observables, the limits of the statistical model and the large improvement obtained with a dynamical model. Moreover we stress the importance of using an apparatus covering a large fraction of 4π to extract observables. Finally, we discuss the opportunity to measure more sensitive observables by a new detection device in operation at LNL.

  13. Neutron induced fission of 237Np - status, challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruskov, Ivan; Goverdovski, Andrei; Furman, Walter; Kopatch, Yury; Shcherbakov, Oleg; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Oberstedt, Stephan; Oberstedt, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    Nowadays, there is an increased interest in a complete study of the neutron-induced fission of 237Np. This is due to the need of accurate and reliable nuclear data for nuclear science and technology. 237Np is generated (and accumulated) in the nuclear reactor core during reactor operation. As one of the most abundant long-lived isotopes in spent fuel ("waste"), the incineration of 237Np becomes an important issue. One scenario for burning of 237Np and other radio-toxic minor actinides suggests they are to be mixed into the fuel of future fast-neutron reactors, employing the so-called transmutation and partitioning technology. For testing present fission models, which are at the basis of new generation nuclear reactor developments, highly accurate and detailed neutron-induced nuclear reaction data is needed. However, the EXFOR nuclear database for 237Np on neutron-induced capture cross-section, σγ, and fission cross-section, σf, as well as on the characteristics of capture and fission resonance parameters (Γγ, Γf, σoΓf, fragments mass-energy yield distributions, multiplicities of neutrons vn and γ-rays vγ), has not been updated for decades.

  14. A MODEL FOR FISSION-GAS RELEASE FROM POROUS FUELS IN LOW-PERMEABILITY CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Prados, J.W.

    1961-08-25

    A simple mathematical model was developed to describe the steady-state release rate of gaseous fission products from porous ceramic fuels in low- permeability containers. The resulting equations are used to analyze experimental release rate results obtained from a UC/sub 2/-fueled graphite fuel body enclosed in a low-permeability impregnated graphite container. The relative release rates of the fission-product species Kr/sup 85m/, Kr/sup 88/, and Xe/sup 133/ were predicted with reasonable success. Absolute-rate predictions were not possible due to lack of information on true permeability and porosity profiles in the graphite container. (auth)

  15. Ballistic piston fissioning plasma experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. E.; Schneider, R. T.; Thom, K.; Lalos, G. T.

    1971-01-01

    The production of fissioning uranium plasma samples such that the fission fragment stopping distance is less than the dimensions of the plasma is approached by using a ballistic piston device for the compression of uranium hexafluoride. The experimental apparatus is described. At room temperature the gun can be loaded up to 100 torr UF6 partial pressure, but at compression a thousand fold increase of pressure can be obtained at a particle density on the order of 10 to the 19th power per cu cm. Limited spectral studies of UF6 were performed while obtaining the pressure-volume data. The results obtained and their implications are discussed.

  16. Fission Fragment Mass Distributions and Total Kinetic Energy Release of 235-Uranium and 238-Uranium in Neutron-Induced Fission at Intermediate and Fast Neutron Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, Dana Lynn

    2015-11-12

    This Ph.D. dissertation describes a measurement of the change in mass distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release with increasing incident neutron energy for fission of 235U and 238U. Although fission was discovered over seventy-five years ago, open questions remain about the physics of the fission process. The energy of the incident neutron, En, changes the division of energy release in the resulting fission fragments, however, the details of energy partitioning remain ambiguous because the nucleus is a many-body quantum system. Creating a full theoretical model is difficult and experimental data to validate existing models are lacking. Additional fissionmore » measurements will lead to higher-quality models of the fission process, therefore improving applications such as the development of next-generation nuclear reactors and defense. This work also paves the way for precision experiments such as the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for fission cross section measurements and the Spectrometer for Ion Determination in Fission (SPIDER) for precision mass yields.« less

  17. Absolute measurements of large mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Peng

    The ability to produce mirrors for large astronomical telescopes is limited by the accuracy of the systems used to test the surfaces of such mirrors. Typically the mirror surfaces are measured by comparing their actual shapes to a precision master, which may be created using combinations of mirrors, lenses, and holograms. The work presented here develops several optical testing techniques that do not rely on a large or expensive precision, master reference surface. In a sense these techniques provide absolute optical testing. The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) has been designed with a 350 m 2 collecting area provided by a 25 m diameter primary mirror made out from seven circular independent mirror segments. These segments create an equivalent f/0.7 paraboloidal primary mirror consisting of a central segment and six outer segments. Each of the outer segments is 8.4 m in diameter and has an off-axis aspheric shape departing 14.5 mm from the best-fitting sphere. Much of the work in this dissertation is motivated by the need to measure the surfaces or such large mirrors accurately, without relying on a large or expensive precision reference surface. One method for absolute testing describing in this dissertation uses multiple measurements relative to a reference surface that is located in different positions with respect to the test surface of interest. The test measurements are performed with an algorithm that is based on the maximum likelihood (ML) method. Some methodologies for measuring large flat surfaces in the 2 m diameter range and for measuring the GMT primary mirror segments were specifically developed. For example, the optical figure of a 1.6-m flat mirror was determined to 2 nm rms accuracy using multiple 1-meter sub-aperture measurements. The optical figure of the reference surface used in the 1-meter sub-aperture measurements was also determined to the 2 nm level. The optical test methodology for a 1.7-m off axis parabola was evaluated by moving several

  18. Computer program FPIP-REV calculates fission product inventory for U-235 fission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. S.; Call, D. W.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program calculates fission product inventories and source strengths associated with the operation of U-235 fueled nuclear power reactor. It utilizes a fission-product nuclide library of 254 nuclides, and calculates the time dependent behavior of the fission product nuclides formed by fissioning of U-235.

  19. Process for treating fission waste. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, C.A.; Wick, O.J.

    1981-11-17

    A method is described for the treatment of fission waste. A glass forming agent, a metal oxide, and a reducing agent are mixed with the fission waste and the mixture is heated. After melting, the mixture separates into a glass phase and a metal phase. The glass phase may be used to safely store the fission waste, while the metal phase contains noble metals recovered from the fission waste.

  20. Novel calibration for LA-ICP-MS-based fission-track thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, C. J.; Guedes, S.; Hadler, J. C.; Mertz-Kraus, R.; Zack, T.; Iunes, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel age-equation calibration for fission-track age determinations by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This new calibration incorporates the efficiency factor of an internal surface, [ ηq]is, which is obtained by measuring the projected fission-track length, allowing the determination of FT ages directly using the recommended spontaneous fission decay constant. Also, the uranium concentrations in apatite samples are determined using a Durango (Dur-2, 7.44 μg/g U) crystal and a Mud Tank (MT-7, 6.88 μg/g U) crystal as uranium reference materials. The use of matrix-matched reference materials allows a reduction in the uncertainty of the uranium measurements to those related to counting statistics, which are ca. 1 % taking into account that no extra source of uncertainty has to be considered. The equations as well as the matrix-matched reference materials are evaluated using well-dated samples from Durango, Fish Canyon Tuff, and Limberg as unknown samples. The results compare well with their respective published ages determined through other dating methods. Additionally, the results agree with traditional fission-track ages using both the zeta approach and the absolute approach, suggesting that the calibration presented in this work can be robustly applied in geological context. Furthermore, considering that fission-track ages can be determined without an age standard sample, the fission-track thermochronology approach presented here is assumed to be a valuable dating tool.

  1. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, J.P.P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony, E-mail: J.Pinto-Vieira@sussex.ac.uk, E-mail: ctb22@sussex.ac.uk, E-mail: antony@cosmologist.info

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion ( w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contractingmore » counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.« less

  2. Superabsorbing gel for actinide, lanthanide, and fission product decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Michael D.; Mertz, Carol J.

    The present invention provides an aqueous gel composition for removing actinide ions, lanthanide ions, fission product ions, or a combination thereof from a porous surface contaminated therewith. The composition comprises a polymer mixture comprising a gel forming cross-linked polymer and a linear polymer. The linear polymer is present at a concentration that is less than the concentration of the cross-linked polymer. The polymer mixture is at least about 95% hydrated with an aqueous solution comprising about 0.1 to about 3 percent by weight (wt %) of a multi-dentate organic acid chelating agent, and about 0.02 to about 0.6 molar (M)more » carbonate salt, to form a gel. When applied to a porous surface contaminated with actinide ions, lanthanide ions, and/or other fission product ions, the aqueous gel absorbs contaminating ions from the surface.« less

  3. Etching fission tracks in zircons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.

    1969-01-01

    A new technique has been developed whereby fission tracks can be etched in zircon with a solution of sodium hydroxide at 220??C. Etching time varied between 15 minutes and 5 hours. Colored zircon required less etching time than the colorless varieties.

  4. Relative fission product yield determination in the USGS TRIGA Mark I reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, Michael A.

    Fission product yield data sets are one of the most important and fundamental compilations of basic information in the nuclear industry. This data has a wide range of applications which include nuclear fuel burnup and nonproliferation safeguards. Relative fission yields constitute a major fraction of the reported yield data and reduce the number of required absolute measurements. Radiochemical separations of fission products reduce interferences, facilitate the measurement of low level radionuclides, and are instrumental in the analysis of low-yielding symmetrical fission products. It is especially useful in the measurement of the valley nuclides and those on the extreme wings of the mass yield curve, including lanthanides, where absolute yields have high errors. This overall project was conducted in three stages: characterization of the neutron flux in irradiation positions within the U.S. Geological Survey TRIGA Mark I Reactor (GSTR), determining the mass attenuation coefficients of precipitates used in radiochemical separations, and measuring the relative fission products in the GSTR. Using the Westcott convention, the Westcott flux, modified spectral index, neutron temperature, and gold-based cadmium ratios were determined for various sampling positions in the USGS TRIGA Mark I reactor. The differential neutron energy spectrum measurement was obtained using the computer iterative code SAND-II-SNL. The mass attenuation coefficients for molecular precipitates were determined through experiment and compared to results using the EGS5 Monte Carlo computer code. Difficulties associated with sufficient production of fission product isotopes in research reactors limits the ability to complete a direct, experimental assessment of mass attenuation coefficients for these isotopes. Experimental attenuation coefficients of radioisotopes produced through neutron activation agree well with the EGS5 calculated results. This suggests mass attenuation coefficients of molecular

  5. The role of off-line mass spectrometry in nuclear fission.

    PubMed

    De Laeter, J R

    1996-01-01

    The role of mass spectrometry in nuclear fission has been invaluable since 1940, when A. O. C. Nier separated microgram quantities of (235) U from (238) U, using a gas source mass spectrometer. This experiment enabled the fissionable nature of (235) U to be established. During the Manhattan Project, the mass spectrometer was used to measure the isotope abundances of uranium after processing in various separation systems, in monitoring the composition of the gaseous products in the Oak Ridge Diffusion Plant, and as a helium leak detector. Following the construction of the first reactor at the University of Chicago, it was necessary to unravel the nuclear systematics of the various fission products produced in the fission process. Off-line mass spectrometry was able to identify stable and long-lived isotopes produced in fission, but more importantly, was used in numerous studies of the distribution of mass of the cumulative fission yields. Improvements in sensitivity enabled off-line mass spectrometric studies to identify fine structure in the mass-yield curve and, hence, demonstrate the importance of shell structure in nuclear fission. Solid-source mass spectrometry was also able to measure the cumulative fission yields in the valley of symmetry in the mass-yield curve, and enabled spontaneous fission yields to be quantified. Apart from the accurate measurement of abundances, the stable isotope mass spectrometric technique has been invaluable in establishing absolute cumulative fission yields for many isotopes making up the mass-yield distribution curve for a variety of fissile nuclides. Extensive mass spectrometric studies of noble gases in primitive meteorites revealed the presence of fission products from the now extinct nuclide (244) Pu, and have eliminated the possibility of fission products from a super-heavy nuclide contributing to isotopic anomalies in meteoritic material. Numerous mass spectrometric studies of the isotopic and elemental abundances of

  6. Study of heavy-ion induced fission for heavy-element synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, K.; Ikezoe, H.; Hofmann, S.; Heßberger, F. P.; Ackermann, D.; Antalic, S.; Aritomo, Y.; Comas, V. F.; Düllman, Ch. E.; Gorshkov, A.; Graeger, R.; Heinz, S.; Heredia, J. A.; Hirose, K.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Kojouharov, I.; Lommel, B.; Makii, H.; Mann, R.; Mitsuoka, S.; Nagame, Y.; Nishinaka, I.; Ohtsuki, T.; Popeko, A. G.; Saro, S.; Schädel, M.; Türler, A.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Yakushev, A.; Yeremin, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    Fission fragment mass distributions were measured in heavy-ion induced fissions using 238U target nucleus. The measured mass distributions changed drastically with incident energy. The results are explained by a change of the ratio between fusion and qasifission with nuclear orientation. A calculation based on a fluctuation dissipation model reproduced the mass distributions and their incident energy dependence. Fusion probability was determined in the analysis, and the values were consistent with those determined from the evaporation residue cross sections.

  7. Radiochemistry and the Study of Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Rundberg, Robert S.

    These are slides from a lecture given at UC Berkeley. Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since its discovery. Radiochemical methods are used to determine cumulative mass yields. These measurements have led to the two-mode fission hypothesis to model the neutron energy dependence of fission product yields. Fission product yields can be used for the nuclear forensics of nuclear explosions. The mass yield curve depends on both the fuel and the neutron spectrum of a device. Recent studies have shown that the nuclear structure of the compound nucleus can affect the mass yield distribution. The following topics are covered:more » In the beginning: the discovery of fission; forensics using fission products: what can be learned from fission products, definitions of R-values and Q-values, fission bases, K-factors and fission chambers, limitations; the neutron energy dependence of the mass yield distribution (the two mode fission hypothesis); the influence of nuclear structure on the mass yield distribution. In summary: Radiochemistry has been used to study fission since its discovery. Radiochemical measurement of fission product yields have provided the highest precision data for developing fission models and for nuclear forensics. The two-mode fission hypothesis provides a description of the neutron energy dependence of the mass yield curve. However, data is still rather sparse and more work is needed near second and third chance fission. Radiochemical measurements have provided evidence for the importance of nuclear states in the compound nucleus in predicting the mass yield curve in the resonance region.« less

  8. On the dynamics of fission of hot nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröbrich, P.

    2007-05-01

    ) probabilities prescission neutron multiplicities and spectra prescission charged particle multiplicities and spectra prescission γ-multiplicities and spectra evaporation residue cross sections fission time distributions temperatures at scission fission fragment angular distributions The results above are obtained with the Ito-discretization of the Langevin equation and might lead to some modifications when using the Klimontovich [Yu.L. Klimontovich, Usp. Fiz. Nauk. 37, 737 (1994)] discretization, which is claimed to be more physical [A.E. Gettinger, I.I. Gontchar, J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys. 26, 347 (2000)]. A satisfactory description of the measured correlation between the kinetic energy distribution and prescission neutron multiplicities could only be obtained when the mass asymmetry degree of freedom is included in the Langevin theory [P.N. Nadtochy, G.D. Adeev, A.V. Karpov, Phys. Rev. C 65, 064615 (2002)], thus generalizing the two-dimensional not overdamped Langevin models of Refs. [G.R. Tillack, R. Reif, A. Schülcke, P. Fröbrich, H.J. Krappe, H.G. Reusch, Phys. Lett. B 296, 296 (1992)] and [T. Wada, Y. Abe, N. Carjan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 3528 (1993)]. A recent article analysing the mass distribution of fission fragments is [E.G. Ryabov, A.V. Karpov, G.D. Adeev, Nucl. Phys. A 765, 39 (2006)]. The first important point I want to stress is that the driving force of a hot system is not simply the negative gradient of the conservative potential but should contain a thermodynamical correction which is not taken into account in a number of publications.

  9. Proton induced fission of {sup 232}Th at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Gikal, K. B., E-mail: kgikal@mail.ru; Kozulin, E. M.; Bogachev, A. A.

    2016-12-15

    The mass-energy distributions and cross sections of proton-induced fission of {sup 232}Th have been measured at the proton energies of 7, 10, 13, 20, 40, and 55 MeV. Experiments were carried out at the proton beam of the K-130 cyclotron of the JYFL Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä and U-150m cyclotron of the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Ministry of Energy of the Republic of Kazakhstan. The yields of fission fragments in the mass range A = 60–170 a.m.u. have been measured up to the level of 10−4%. The three humped shape of the mass distribution up has beenmore » observed at higher proton energies. The contribution of the symmetric component grows up with increasing proton incident energy; although even at 55 MeV of proton energy the shoulders in the mass energy distribution clearly indicate the asymmetric fission peaks. Evolution of shell structure was observed in the fission fragment mass distributions even at high excitation energy.« less

  10. Space Fission Propulsion System Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Mike; VanDyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Pedersen, Kevin; Martin, James; Dickens, Ricky; Williams, Eric; Harper, Roger; Salvail, Pat; Hrbud, Ivana; hide

    2001-01-01

    The world's first man-made self-sustaining fission reaction was achieved in 1942. Since then fission has been used to propel submarines, generate tremendous amounts of electricity, produce medical isotopes, and provide numerous other benefits to society. Fission systems operate independently of solar proximity or orientation, and are thus well suited for deep spare or planetary surface missions. In addition, the fuel for fission systems (enriched uranium) is virtually non-radioactive. The primary safety issue with fission systems is avoiding inadvertent system start - addressing this issue through proper system design is straightforward. Despite the relative simplicity and tremendous potential of space fission systems, the development and utilization of these systems has proven elusive. The first use of fission technology in space occurred 3 April 1965 with the US launch of the SNAP-10A reactor. There have been no additional US uses of space fission system. While space fission system were used extensively by the former Soviet Union, their application was limited to earth-orbital missions. Early space fission systems must be safely and affordably utilized if Ae are to reap the benefits of advanced space fission systems.

  11. Two neutron correlations in photo-fission

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, D. S.; Kosinov, O.; Forest, T.

    2016-01-01

    A large body of experimental work has established the strong kinematical correlation between fission fragments and fission neutrons. Here, we report on the progress of investigations of the potential for strong two neutron correlations arising from the nearly back-to-back nature of the two fission fragments that emit these neutrons in the photo-fission process. In initial measurements, a pulsed electron linear accelerator was used to generate bremsstrahlung photons that impinged upon an actinide target, and the energy and opening angle distributions of coincident neutrons were measured using a large acceptance neutron detector array. A planned comprehensive set of measurements of twomore » neutron correlations in the photo-fission of actinides is expected to shed light on several fundamental aspects of the fission process including the multiplicity distributions associated with the light and heavy fission fragments, the nuclear temperatures of the fission fragments, and the mass distribution of the fission fragments as a function of energy released. In addition to these measurements providing important nuclear data, the unique kinematics of fission and the resulting two neutron correlations have the potential to be the basis for a new tool to detect fissionable materials. A key technical challenge of this program arises from the need to perform coincidence measurements with a low duty factor, pulsed electron accelerator. This has motivated the construction of a large acceptance neutron detector array, and the development of data analysis techniques to directly measure uncorrelated two neutron backgrounds.« less

  12. Space Fission Propulsion System Development Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houts, M.; Van Dyke, M. K.; Godfroy, T. J.; Pedersen, K. W.; Martin, J. J.; Dickens, R.; Williams, E.; Harper, R.; Salvail, P.; Hrbud, I.

    2001-01-01

    The world's first man-made self-sustaining fission reaction was achieved in 1942. Since then fission has been used to propel submarines, generate tremendous amounts of electricity, produce medical isotopes, and provide numerous other benefits to society. Fission systems operate independently of solar proximity or orientation, and are thus well suited for deep space or planetary surface missions. In addition, the fuel for fission systems (enriched uranium) is virtually non-radioactive. The primary safety issue with fission systems is avoiding inadvertent system start. Addressing this issue through proper system design is straight-forward. Despite the relative simplicity and tremendous potential of space fission systems, the development and utilization of these systems has proven elusive. The first use of fission technology in space occurred 3 April 1965 with the US launch of the SNAP-10A reactor. There have been no additional US uses of space fission systems. While space fission systems were used extensively by the former Soviet Union, their application was limited to earth-orbital missions. Early space fission systems must be safely and affordably utilized if we are to reap the benefits of advanced space fission systems. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, working with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories, and others, has conducted preliminary research related to a Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE). An unfueled core has been fabricated by LANL, and resistance heaters used to verify predicted core thermal performance by closely mimicking heat from fission. The core is designed to use only established nuclear technology and be highly testable. In FY01 an energy conversion system and thruster will be coupled to the core, resulting in an 'end-to-end' nuclear electric propulsion demonstrator being tested using resistance heaters to closely mimic heat from fission. Results of the SAFE test program will be presented. The applicability

  13. Prompt fission γ-ray data from spontaneous fission and the mechanism of fission-fragment de-excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberstedt, Stephan; Dragic, Aleksandar; Gatera, Angelique; Göök, Alf; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Oberstedt, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    The investigation of prompt γ-ray emission in nuclear fission has a great relevance for the assessment of prompt heat generation in a reactor core and for the better understanding of the de-excitation mechanism of fission fragments. Some years ago experimental data was scarce and available only from a few fission reactions, 233,235U(nth, f), 239Pu(nth, f), and 252Cf(sf). Initiated by a high priority data request published by the OECD/NEA a dedicated prompt fission γ-ray measurement program is being conducted at the Joint Research Centre Geel. In recent years we obtained new and accurate prompt fission γ-ray spectrum (PFGS) characteristics (average number of photons per fission, average total energy per fission and mean photon energy) from 252Cf(sf), 235U(nth, f) and 239,241Pu(nth, f) within 2% of uncertainty. In order to understand the dependence of prompt fission γ-ray emission on the compound nuclear mass and excitation energy, we started a first measurement campaign on spontaneously fissioning plutonium and curium isotopes. Results on PFGS characteristics from 240,242Pu(sf) show a dependence on the fragment mass distribution rather than on the average prompt neutron multiplicity, pointing to a more complex competition between prompt fission γ-ray and neutron emission.

  14. Neutron activation analysis of certified samples by the absolute method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadem, F.; Belouadah, N.; Idiri, Z.

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear reactions analysis technique is mainly based on the relative method or the use of activation cross sections. In order to validate nuclear data for the calculated cross section evaluated from systematic studies, we used the neutron activation analysis technique (NAA) to determine the various constituent concentrations of certified samples for animal blood, milk and hay. In this analysis, the absolute method is used. The neutron activation technique involves irradiating the sample and subsequently performing a measurement of the activity of the sample. The fundamental equation of the activation connects several physical parameters including the cross section that is essential for the quantitative determination of the different elements composing the sample without resorting to the use of standard sample. Called the absolute method, it allows a measurement as accurate as the relative method. The results obtained by the absolute method showed that the values are as precise as the relative method requiring the use of standard sample for each element to be quantified.

  15. Absolute Integral Cross Sections for the State-selected Ion-Molecule Reaction N2+(X2Σg+ v+ = 0-2) + C2H2 in the Collision Energy Range of 0.03-10.00 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuntao; Xiong, Bo; Chung Chang, Yih; Ng, C. Y.

    2016-08-01

    Using the vacuum ultraviolet laser pulsed field ionization-photoion source, together with the double-quadrupole-double-octopole mass spectrometer developed in our laboratory, we have investigated the state-selected ion-molecule reaction {{{{N}}}2}+({X}2{{{{Σ }}}{{g}}}+; v + = 0-2, N+ = 0-9) + C2H2, achieving high internal-state selectivity and high kinetic energy resolution for reactant {{{{N}}}2}+ ions. The charge transfer (CT) and hydrogen-atom transfer (HT) channels, which lead to the respective formation of product {{{C}}}2{{{{H}}}2}+ and N2H+ ions, are observed. The vibrationally selected absolute integral cross sections for the CT [σ CT(v +)] and HT [[σ HT(v +)] channels obtained in the center-of-mass collision energy (E cm) range of 0.03-10.00 eV reveal opposite E cm dependences. The σ CT(v +) is found to increase as E cm is decreased, and is consistent with the long-range exothermic CT mechanism, whereas the E cm enhancement observed for the σ HT(v +) suggests effective coupling of kinetic energy to internal energy, enhancing the formation of N2H+. The σ HT(v +) curve exhibits a step at E cm = 0.70-1.00 eV, suggesting the involvement of the excited {{{C}}}2{{{{H}}}2}+({A}2{{{{Σ }}}{{g}}}+) state in the HT reaction. Contrary to the strong E cm dependences for σ CT(v +) and σ HT(v +), the effect of vibrational excitation of {{{{N}}}2}+ on both the CT and HT channels is marginal. The branching ratios and cross sections for the CT and HT channels determined in the present study are useful for modeling the atmospheric compositions of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. These cross sections and branching ratios are also valuable for benchmarking theoretical calculations on chemical dynamics of the titled reaction.

  16. Fission of Rapidly Rotating Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozier, Jennifer L.; Michael, S.; Durisen, R. H.; Imamura, J. N.

    2006-12-01

    It has long been conjectured that close binary star systems might form through the fission of a rapidly rotating and contracting protostar (for a review see Durisen & Tohline 1985). Protostars that are axisymmetric beyond the point of dynamic bar-like mode instability do not fission (Imamura et al. 2000), but contracting non-axisymmetric protostars might encounter bifurcations of surface shape leading to fission. In addition, they may be susceptible to hydrodynamic instabilities, first described by Lebovitz & Lifschitz (1996), whose nonlinear effects are still unknown. We will present a series of hydrodynamic simulations of rapidly rotating polytropic protostars to investigate fission in contracting protostars. The initial model is an equilibrium configuration with T/|W| ≈ 0.14, where T is the rotational kinetic energy and W is the total gravitational energy. It is given a bar-like cos(2φ) density perturbation with an amplitude of .02, .10 or .25. These perturbed polytropes are then cooled by reducing the polytropic constant K where P = Kρ1+1/n. Here P is the pressure, ρ is the density and n is the polytropic index, here chosen to be 3/2. As the polytrope contracts, we find no strong signal of a growing instability. All simulations evolve through to the dynamic bar-like mode instability point at T/|W|≈ 0.27 and produce a ring around a bar, not a binary. However, there is some indication of amplitude growth at a T/|W|≈0.22. We are investigating this growth further with follow-up simulations that start at an equilibrium model with a T/|W| ≈ 0.22. This enables us to study growth in this regime with higher resolution and slower contraction rates. This work has been supported by the National Science Foundation through grant AST-0452975 (astronomy REU program to Indiana University).

  17. Absolute and Relative Socioeconomic Health Inequalities across Age Groups

    PubMed Central

    van Zon, Sander K. R.; Bültmann, Ute; Mendes de Leon, Carlos F.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The magnitude of socioeconomic health inequalities differs across age groups. It is less clear whether socioeconomic health inequalities differ across age groups by other factors that are known to affect the relation between socioeconomic position and health, like the indicator of socioeconomic position, the health outcome, gender, and as to whether socioeconomic health inequalities are measured in absolute or in relative terms. The aim is to investigate whether absolute and relative socioeconomic health inequalities differ across age groups by indicator of socioeconomic position, health outcome and gender. Methods The study sample was derived from the baseline measurement of the LifeLines Cohort Study and consisted of 95,432 participants. Socioeconomic position was measured as educational level and household income. Physical and mental health were measured with the RAND-36. Age concerned eleven 5-years age groups. Absolute inequalities were examined by comparing means. Relative inequalities were examined by comparing Gini-coefficients. Analyses were performed for both health outcomes by both educational level and household income. Analyses were performed for all age groups, and stratified by gender. Results Absolute and relative socioeconomic health inequalities differed across age groups by indicator of socioeconomic position, health outcome, and gender. Absolute inequalities were most pronounced for mental health by household income. They were larger in younger than older age groups. Relative inequalities were most pronounced for physical health by educational level. Gini-coefficients were largest in young age groups and smallest in older age groups. Conclusions Absolute and relative socioeconomic health inequalities differed cross-sectionally across age groups by indicator of socioeconomic position, health outcome and gender. Researchers should critically consider the implications of choosing a specific age group, in addition to the indicator of

  18. Technical Application of Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denschlag, J. O.

    The chapter is devoted to the practical application of the fission process, mainly in nuclear reactors. After a historical discussion covering the natural reactors at Oklo and the first attempts to build artificial reactors, the fundamental principles of chain reactions are discussed. In this context chain reactions with fast and thermal neutrons are covered as well as the process of neutron moderation. Criticality concepts (fission factor η, criticality factor k) are discussed as well as reactor kinetics and the role of delayed neutrons. Examples of specific nuclear reactor types are presented briefly: research reactors (TRIGA and ILL High Flux Reactor), and some reactor types used to drive nuclear power stations (pressurized water reactor [PWR], boiling water reactor [BWR], Reaktor Bolshoi Moshchnosti Kanalny [RBMK], fast breeder reactor [FBR]). The new concept of the accelerator-driven systems (ADS) is presented. The principle of fission weapons is outlined. Finally, the nuclear fuel cycle is briefly covered from mining, chemical isolation of the fuel and preparation of the fuel elements to reprocessing the spent fuel and conditioning for deposit in a final repository.

  19. Measurement of the 242Pu neutron capture cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Chyzh, A.; Dance Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Precision (n,f) and (n, γ) cross sections are important for the network calculations of the radiochemical diagnostic chain for the U.S. DOE's Stockpile Stewardship Program. 242Pu(n, γ) cross section is relevant to the network calculations of Pu and Am. Additionally, new reactor concepts have catalyzed considerable interest in the measurement of improved cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on key actinides. To date, little or no experimental data has been reported on 242Pu(n, γ) for incident neutron energy below 50 keV. A new measurement of the 242Pu(n, γ) reaction was performed with the DANCE together with an improved PPAC for fission-fragment detection at LANSCE during FY14. The relative scale of the 242Pu(n, γ) cross section spans four orders of magnitude for incident neutron energies from thermal to ~ 30 keV. The absolute scale of the 242Pu(n, γ) cross section is set according to the measured 239Pu(n,f) resonance at 7.8 eV; the target was spiked with 239Pu for this measurement. The absolute 242Pu(n, γ) neutron capture cross section is ~ 30% higher than the cross section reported in ENDF for the 2.7 eV resonance. Latest results to be reported. Funded by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL) and DE-AC52-06NA25396 (LANL). U.S. DOE/NNSA Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development. Isotopes (ORNL).

  20. Curved Waveguide Based Nuclear Fission for Small, Lightweight Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert; Putnam, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    The focus of the presented work is on the creation of a system of grazing incidence, supermirror waveguides for the capture and reuse of fission sourced neutrons. Within research reactors, neutron guides are a well known tool for directing neutrons from the confined and hazardous central core to a more accessible testing or measurement location. Typical neutron guides have rectangular, hollow cross sections, which are crafted as thin, mirrored waveguides plated with metal (commonly nickel). Under glancing angles with incoming neutrons, these waveguides can achieve nearly lossless transport of neutrons to distant instruments. Furthermore, recent developments have created supermirror surfaces which can accommodate neutron grazing angles up to four times as steep as nickel. A completed system will form an enclosing ring or spherical resonator system to a coupled neutron source for the purpose of capturing and reusing free neutrons to sustain and/or accelerate fission. While grazing incidence mirrors are a known method of directing and safely using neutrons, no method has been disclosed for capture and reuse of neutrons or sustainment of fission using a circular waveguide structure. The presented work is in the process of fabricating a functional, highly curved, neutron supermirror using known methods of Ni-Ti layering capable of achieving incident reflection angles up to four times steeper than nickel alone. Parallel work is analytically investigating future geometries, mirror compositions, and sources for enabling sustained fission with applicability to the propulsion and energy goals of NASA and other agencies. Should research into this concept prove feasible, it would lead to development of a high energy density, low mass power source potentially capable of sustaining fission with a fraction of the standard critical mass for a given material and a broadening of feasible materials due to reduced rates of release, absorption, and non-fission for neutrons. This

  1. Fission-like events in the 12C+169Tm system at low excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Arshiya; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Sahoo, Rudra N.; Kumar, Pawan; Yadav, Abhishek; Sharma, Vijay R.; Shuaib, Mohd.; Sharma, Manoj K.; Singh, Devendra P.; Gupta, Unnati; Kumar, R.; Aydin, S.; Singh, B. P.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Prasad, R.

    2017-07-01

    Background: Fission has been found to be a dominating mode of deexcitation in heavy-ion induced reactions at high excitation energies. The phenomenon of heavy-ion induced fission has been extensively investigated with highly fissile actinide nuclei, yet there is a dearth of comprehensive understanding of underlying dynamics, particularly in the below actinide region and at low excitation energies. Purpose: Prime objective of this work is to study different aspects of heavy-ion induced fission ensuing from the evolution of composite system formed via complete and/or incomplete fusion in the 12C+169Tm system at low incident energies, i.e., Elab≈6.4 , 6.9, and 7.4 A MeV, as well as to understand charge and mass distributions of fission fragments. Method: The recoil-catcher activation technique followed by offline γ spectroscopy was used to measure production cross sections of fission-like events. The evaporation residues were identified by their characteristic γ rays and vetted by the decay-curve analysis. Charge and mass distributions of fission-like events were studied to obtain dispersion parameters of fission fragments. Results: In the present work, 26 fission-like events (32 ≤Z ≤49 ) were identified at different excitation energies. The mass distribution of fission fragments is found to be broad and symmetric, manifesting their production via compound nuclear processes. The dispersion parameters of fission fragments obtained from the analysis of mass and isotopic yield distributions are found to be in good accord with the reported values obtained for different fissioning systems. A self-consistent approach was employed to determine the isobaric yield distribution. Conclusions: The present work suggests that fission is one of the competing modes of deexcitation of complete and/or incomplete fusion composites at low excitation energies, i.e., E*≈57 , 63, and 69 MeV, where evaporation of light nuclear particle(s) and/or γ rays are assumed to be the sole

  2. Precise Nuclear Data Measurements Possible with the NIFFTE fissionTPC for Advanced Reactor Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towell, Rusty; Niffte Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) Collaboration has applied the proven technology of Time Projection Chambers (TPC) to the task of precisely measuring fission cross sections. With the NIFFTE fission TPC, precise measurements have been made during the last year at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center from both U-235 and Pu-239 targets. The exquisite tracking capabilities of this device allow the full reconstruction of charged particles produced by neutron beam induced fissions from a thin central target. The wealth of information gained from this approach will allow systematics to be controlled at the level of 1%. The fissionTPC performance will be presented. These results are critical to the development of advanced uranium-fueled reactors. However, there are clear advantages to developing thorium-fueled reactors such as Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactors over uranium-fueled reactors. These advantages include improved reactor safety, minimizing radioactive waste, improved reactor efficiency, and enhanced proliferation resistance. The potential for using the fissionTPC to measure needed cross sections important to the development of thorium-fueled reactors will also be discussed.

  3. Absolute and relative educational inequalities in depression in Europe.

    PubMed

    Dudal, Pieter; Bracke, Piet

    2016-09-01

    To investigate (1) the size of absolute and relative educational inequalities in depression, (2) their variation between European countries, and (3) their relationship with underlying prevalence rates. Analyses are based on the European Social Survey, rounds three and six (N = 57,419). Depression is measured using the shortened Centre of Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Education is coded by use of the International Standard Classification of Education. Country-specific logistic regressions are applied. Results point to an elevated risk of depressive symptoms among the lower educated. The cross-national patterns differ between absolute and relative measurements. For men, large relative inequalities are found for countries including Denmark and Sweden, but are accompanied by small absolute inequalities. For women, large relative and absolute inequalities are found in Belgium, Bulgaria, and Hungary. Results point to an empirical association between inequalities and the underlying prevalence rates. However, the strength of the association is only moderate. This research stresses the importance of including both measurements for comparative research and suggests the inclusion of the level of population health in research into inequalities in health.

  4. Refinements in the Los Alamos model of the prompt fission neutron spectrum

    DOE PAGES

    Madland, D. G.; Kahler, A. C.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a number of refinements to the original Los Alamos model of the prompt fission neutron spectrum and average prompt neutron multiplicity as derived in 1982. The four refinements are due to new measurements of the spectrum and related fission observables many of which were not available in 1982. Here, they are also due to a number of detailed studies and comparisons of the model with previous and present experimental results including not only the differential spectrum, but also integal cross sections measured in the field of the differential spectrum. The four refinements are (a) separate neutron contributionsmore » in binary fission, (b) departure from statistical equilibrium at scission, (c) fission-fragment nuclear level-density models, and (d) center-of-mass anisotropy. With these refinements, for the first time, good agreement has been obtained for both differential and integral measurements using the same Los Alamos model spectrum.« less

  5. Estimating the absolute wealth of households

    PubMed Central

    Gerkey, Drew; Hadley, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the absolute wealth of households using data from demographic and health surveys. Methods We developed a new metric, the absolute wealth estimate, based on the rank of each surveyed household according to its material assets and the assumed shape of the distribution of wealth among surveyed households. Using data from 156 demographic and health surveys in 66 countries, we calculated absolute wealth estimates for households. We validated the method by comparing the proportion of households defined as poor using our estimates with published World Bank poverty headcounts. We also compared the accuracy of absolute versus relative wealth estimates for the prediction of anthropometric measures. Findings The median absolute wealth estimates of 1 403 186 households were 2056 international dollars per capita (interquartile range: 723–6103). The proportion of poor households based on absolute wealth estimates were strongly correlated with World Bank estimates of populations living on less than 2.00 United States dollars per capita per day (R2 = 0.84). Absolute wealth estimates were better predictors of anthropometric measures than relative wealth indexes. Conclusion Absolute wealth estimates provide new opportunities for comparative research to assess the effects of economic resources on health and human capital, as well as the long-term health consequences of economic change and inequality. PMID:26170506

  6. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  7. 49 CFR 236.709 - Block, absolute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Block, absolute. 236.709 Section 236.709 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Block, absolute. A block in which no train is permitted to enter while it is occupied by another train. ...

  8. Estimating the absolute wealth of households.

    PubMed

    Hruschka, Daniel J; Gerkey, Drew; Hadley, Craig

    2015-07-01

    To estimate the absolute wealth of households using data from demographic and health surveys. We developed a new metric, the absolute wealth estimate, based on the rank of each surveyed household according to its material assets and the assumed shape of the distribution of wealth among surveyed households. Using data from 156 demographic and health surveys in 66 countries, we calculated absolute wealth estimates for households. We validated the method by comparing the proportion of households defined as poor using our estimates with published World Bank poverty headcounts. We also compared the accuracy of absolute versus relative wealth estimates for the prediction of anthropometric measures. The median absolute wealth estimates of 1,403,186 households were 2056 international dollars per capita (interquartile range: 723-6103). The proportion of poor households based on absolute wealth estimates were strongly correlated with World Bank estimates of populations living on less than 2.00 United States dollars per capita per day (R(2)  = 0.84). Absolute wealth estimates were better predictors of anthropometric measures than relative wealth indexes. Absolute wealth estimates provide new opportunities for comparative research to assess the effects of economic resources on health and human capital, as well as the long-term health consequences of economic change and inequality.

  9. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  10. Investigating Absolute Value: A Real World Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret; Pagni, David

    2009-01-01

    Making connections between various representations is important in mathematics. In this article, the authors discuss the numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of sums of absolute values of linear functions. The initial explanations are accessible to all students who have experience graphing and who understand that absolute value simply…

  11. 49 CFR 236.709 - Block, absolute.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Block, absolute. 236.709 Section 236.709 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Block, absolute. A block in which no train is permitted to enter while it is occupied by another train. ...

  12. Absolute Income, Relative Income, and Happiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Richard; Chernova, Kateryna

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses data from the World Values Survey to investigate how an individual's self-reported happiness is related to (i) the level of her income in absolute terms, and (ii) the level of her income relative to other people in her country. The main findings are that (i) both absolute and relative income are positively and significantly…

  13. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  14. Comparative evaluation of solar, fission, fusion, and fossil energy resources. Part 2: Power from nuclear fission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Different types of nuclear fission reactors and fissionable materials are compared. Special emphasis is placed upon the environmental impact of such reactors. Graphs and charts comparing reactor facilities in the U. S. are presented.

  15. RECOVERY OF ALUMINUM FROM FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Blanco, R.E.; Higgins, I.R.

    1962-11-20

    A method is given for recovertng aluminum values from aqueous solutions containing said values together with fission products. A mixture of Fe/sub 2/O/ sub 3/ and MnO/sub 2/ is added to a solution containing aluminum and fission products. The resulting aluminum-containing supernatant is then separated from the fission product-bearing metal oxide precipitate and is contacted with a cation exchange resin. The aluminum sorbed on the resin is then eluted and recovered. (AEC)

  16. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  17. A spin exchange model for singlet fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yago, Tomoaki; Wakasa, Masanobu

    2018-03-01

    Singlet fission has been analyzed with the Dexter model in which electron exchange occurs between chromophores, conserving the spin for each electron. In the present study, we propose a spin exchange model for singlet fission. In the spin exchange model, spins are exchanged by the exchange interaction between two electrons. Our analysis with simple spin functions demonstrates that singlet fission is possible by spin exchange. A necessary condition for spin exchange is a variation in exchange interactions. We also adapt the spin exchange model to triplet fusion and triplet energy transfer, which often occur after singlet fission in organic solids.

  18. FISSION PRODUCT REMOVAL FROM ORGANIC SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1960-05-10

    The decontamination of organic solvents from fission products and in particular the treatment of solvents that were used for the extraction of uranium and/or plutonium from aqueous acid solutions of neutron-irradiated uranium are treated. The process broadly comprises heating manganese carbonate in air to a temperature of between 300 and 500 deg C whereby manganese dioxide is formed; mixing the manganese dioxide with the fission product-containing organic solvent to be treated whereby the fission products are precipitated on the manganese dioxide; and separating the fission product-containing manganese dioxide from the solvent.

  19. Fission fragment excited laser system

    DOEpatents

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  20. Prompt fission neutron multiplicity and spectrum model for 30-80 MeV neutrons incident on 238U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudora, Anabella; Vladuca, G.; Morillon, B.

    2004-08-01

    The improved Los Alamos model is developed for the first time in order to provide prompt fission neutron multiplicity, prompt fission neutron spectra and other quantities at high incident neutron energies where the fission of secondary compound nuclei formed by charged particle emission occurs. In this model (exemplified by the n+ 238U reaction up to 80 MeV incident energy) the fission of the secondary nuclei formed by proton emission, neutron evaporation from the nuclei formed by proton emission, deuteron emission, alpha emission and neutron evaporation from the nuclei formed by alpha emission is taken into account. Input model parameters and related excitation energy dependences are determined using available experimental information and systematics as well as total and partial neutron induced fission cross-sections and their ratios obtained separately from a recent evaluation performed up to medium energies. Our present model predictions are in good agreement with the measured prompt neutron spectra and multiplicities.

  1. A global algorithm for estimating Absolute Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDougall, T. J.; Jackett, D. R.; Millero, F. J.; Pawlowicz, R.; Barker, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    The International Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater - 2010 has defined the thermodynamic properties of seawater in terms of a new salinity variable, Absolute Salinity, which takes into account the spatial variation of the composition of seawater. Absolute Salinity more accurately reflects the effects of the dissolved material in seawater on the thermodynamic properties (particularly density) than does Practical Salinity. When a seawater sample has standard composition (i.e. the ratios of the constituents of sea salt are the same as those of surface water of the North Atlantic), Practical Salinity can be used to accurately evaluate the thermodynamic properties of seawater. When seawater is not of standard composition, Practical Salinity alone is not sufficient and the Absolute Salinity Anomaly needs to be estimated; this anomaly is as large as 0.025 g kg-1 in the northernmost North Pacific. Here we provide an algorithm for estimating Absolute Salinity Anomaly for any location (x, y, p) in the world ocean. To develop this algorithm, we used the Absolute Salinity Anomaly that is found by comparing the density calculated from Practical Salinity to the density measured in the laboratory. These estimates of Absolute Salinity Anomaly however are limited to the number of available observations (namely 811). In order to provide a practical method that can be used at any location in the world ocean, we take advantage of approximate relationships between Absolute Salinity Anomaly and silicate concentrations (which are available globally).

  2. SPIDER: A new tool for measuring fission yields

    SciTech Connect

    Meierbachtol, Krista C.

    2014-03-27

    The goals of this project are to measure fission-fragment yields as a function of (En, Z,A, TKE); develop theory in order to evaluate fission yield data; and provide an evaluation of the Pu-239 fission yields.

  3. Nuclear Power from Fission Reactors. An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Technical Information Center.

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide a basic understanding of nuclear fission energy and different fission reaction concepts. Topics discussed are: energy use and production, current uses of fuels, oil and gas consumption, alternative energy sources, fossil fuel plants, nuclear plants, boiling water and pressurized water reactors, the light…

  4. Prompt fission neutron spectra of actinides

    DOE PAGES

    Capote, R.; Chen, Y. -J.; Hambsch, F. -J.; ...

    2016-01-06

    Here, the energy spectrum of prompt neutrons emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) "Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides" was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei.

  5. Options for Affordable Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Mike; Gaddis, Steve; Porter, Ron; VanDyke, Melissa; Martin Jim; Godfroy, Tom; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Garber, Anne; Pearson, Boise

    2006-01-01

    Fission surface power systems could provide abundant power anywhere on free surface of the moon or Mars. Locations could include permanently shaded regions on the moon and high latitudes on Mars. To be fully utilized; however, fission surface power systems must be safe, have adequate performance, and be affordable. This paper discusses options for the design and development of such systems.

  6. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Butler, T.A.; Johns, I.B.

    1959-03-10

    The removal of fission products such as strontium, barium, cesium, rubidium, or iodine from neutronirradiated uranium is described. Uranium halide or elemental halogen is added to melted irradiated uranium to convert the fission products to either more volatile compositions which vaporize from the melt or to higher melting point compositions which separate as solids.

  7. SOURCE OF PRODUCTS OF NUCLEAR FISSION

    DOEpatents

    Harteck, P.; Dondes, S.

    1960-03-15

    A source of fission product recoil energy suitable for use in radiation chemistry is reported. The source consists of thermal neutron irradiated glass wool having a diameter of 1 to 5 microns and containing an isotope fissionable by thermal neutrons, such as U/sup 235/.

  8. Single-level resonance parameters fit nuclear cross-sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drawbaugh, D. W.; Gibson, G.; Miller, M.; Page, S. L.

    1970-01-01

    Least squares analyses of experimental differential cross-section data for the U-235 nucleus have yielded single level Breit-Wigner resonance parameters that fit, simultaneously, three nuclear cross sections of capture, fission, and total.

  9. Bruyères-le-Châtel Neutron Evaluations of Actinides with the TALYS Code: The Fission Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Romain, P., E-mail: pascal.romain@cea.fr; Morillon, B.; Duarte, H.

    For several years, various neutron evaluations of plutonium and uranium isotopes have been performed at Bruyères-le-Châtel (BRC), from 1 keV up to 30 MeV. Since only nuclear reaction models have been used to produce these evaluations, our approach was named the “Full Model” approach. Total, shape elastic and direct inelastic cross sections were obtained from the coupled channels model using a dispersive optical potential developed for actinides, with a large enough coupling scheme including the lowest octupolar band. All other cross sections were calculated using the Hauser-Feshbach theory (TALYS code) with a pre-equilibrium component above 8–10 MeV. In this paper,more » we focus our attention on the fission channel. More precisely, we will present the BRC contribution to fission modeling and the philosophy adopted in our “Full Model” approach. Performing evaluations with the “Full Model” approach implies the optimization of a large number of model parameters. With increasing neutron incident energy, many residual nuclei produced by nucleon emission also lead to fission. All available experimental data assigned to various fission mechanisms of the same nucleus were used to determine fission barrier parameters. For uranium isotopes, triple-humped fission barriers were required in order to reproduce accurately variations of the experimental fission cross sections. Our BRC fission modeling has shown that the effects of the class II or class III states located in the wells of the fission barrier sometimes provide an anti-resonant transmission rather than a resonant one. Consistent evaluations were produced for a large series of U and Pu isotopes. Resulting files were tested against integral data.« less

  10. Absolute quantification of microbial taxon abundances.

    PubMed

    Props, Ruben; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Rubbens, Peter; De Vrieze, Jo; Hernandez Sanabria, Emma; Waegeman, Willem; Monsieurs, Pieter; Hammes, Frederik; Boon, Nico

    2017-02-01

    High-throughput amplicon sequencing has become a well-established approach for microbial community profiling. Correlating shifts in the relative abundances of bacterial taxa with environmental gradients is the goal of many microbiome surveys. As the abundances generated by this technology are semi-quantitative by definition, the observed dynamics may not accurately reflect those of the actual taxon densities. We combined the sequencing approach (16S rRNA gene) with robust single-cell enumeration technologies (flow cytometry) to quantify the absolute taxon abundances. A detailed longitudinal analysis of the absolute abundances resulted in distinct abundance profiles that were less ambiguous and expressed in units that can be directly compared across studies. We further provide evidence that the enrichment of taxa (increase in relative abundance) does not necessarily relate to the outgrowth of taxa (increase in absolute abundance). Our results highlight that both relative and absolute abundances should be considered for a comprehensive biological interpretation of microbiome surveys.

  11. Low absolute neutrophil counts in African infants.

    PubMed

    Kourtis, Athena P; Bramson, Brian; van der Horst, Charles; Kazembe, Peter; Ahmed, Yusuf; Chasela, Charles; Hosseinipour, Mina; Knight, Rodney; Lugalia, Lebah; Tegha, Gerald; Joaki, George; Jafali, Robert; Jamieson, Denise J

    2005-07-01

    Infants of African origin have a lower normal range of absolute neutrophil counts than white infants; this fact, however, remains under appreciated by clinical researchers in the United States. During the initial stages of a clinical trial in Malawi, the authors noted an unexpectedly high number of infants with absolute neutrophil counts that would be classifiable as neutropenic using the National Institutes of Health's Division of AIDS toxicity tables. The authors argue that the relevant Division of AIDS table does not take into account the available evidence of low absolute neutrophil counts in African infants and that a systematic collection of data from many African settings might help establish the absolute neutrophil count cutpoints to be used for defining neutropenia in African populations.

  12. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  13. Absolute colorimetric characterization of a DSLR camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnera, Giuseppe Claudio; Bianco, Simone; Schettini, Raimondo

    2014-03-01

    A simple but effective technique for absolute colorimetric camera characterization is proposed. It offers a large dynamic range requiring just a single, off-the-shelf target and a commonly available controllable light source for the characterization. The characterization task is broken down in two modules, respectively devoted to absolute luminance estimation and to colorimetric characterization matrix estimation. The characterized camera can be effectively used as a tele-colorimeter, giving an absolute estimation of the XYZ data in cd=m2. The user is only required to vary the f - number of the camera lens or the exposure time t, to better exploit the sensor dynamic range. The estimated absolute tristimulus values closely match the values measured by a professional spectro-radiometer.

  14. Absolute instabilities of travelling wave solutions in a Keller-Segel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, P. N.; van Heijster, P.; Marangell, R.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the spectral stability of travelling wave solutions in a Keller-Segel model of bacterial chemotaxis with a logarithmic chemosensitivity function and a constant, sublinear, and linear consumption rate. Linearising around the travelling wave solutions, we locate the essential and absolute spectrum of the associated linear operators and find that all travelling wave solutions have parts of the essential spectrum in the right half plane. However, we show that in the case of constant or sublinear consumption there exists a range of parameters such that the absolute spectrum is contained in the open left half plane and the essential spectrum can thus be weighted into the open left half plane. For the constant and sublinear consumption rate models we also determine critical parameter values for which the absolute spectrum crosses into the right half plane, indicating the onset of an absolute instability of the travelling wave solution. We observe that this crossing always occurs off of the real axis.

  15. Fission Surface Power Technology Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Donald T.; Mason, Lee S.; Houts, Michael G.; Harlow, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Power is a critical consideration in planning exploration of the surfaces of the Moon, Mars, and beyond. Nuclear power is an important option, especially for locations in the solar system where sunlight is limited in availability or intensity. NASA is maintaining the option for fission surface power for the Moon and Mars by developing and demonstrating technology for an affordable fission surface power system. Because affordability drove the determination of the system concept that this technology will make possible, low development and recurring costs result, while required safety standards are maintained. However, an affordable approach to fission surface power also provides the benefits of simplicity, robustness, and conservatism in design. This paper will illuminate the multiplicity of benefits to an affordable approach to fission surface power, and will describe how the foundation for these benefits is being developed and demonstrated in the Exploration Technology Development Program s Fission Surface Power Project.

  16. Measurement of 240Pu Angular Momentum Dependent Fission Probabilities Using the (α ,α') Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, Johnathon; Burke, Jason; Fisher, Scott; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-09-01

    The surrogate reaction method often lacks the theoretical framework and necessary experimental data to constrain models especially when rectifying differences between angular momentum state differences between the desired and surrogate reaction. In this work, dual arrays of silicon telescope particle identification detectors and photovoltaic (solar) cell fission fragment detectors have been used to measure the fission probability of the 240Pu(α ,α' f) reaction - a surrogate for the 239Pu(n , f) - and fission fragment angular distributions. Fission probability measurements were performed at a beam energy of 35.9(2) MeV at eleven scattering angles from 40° to 140°e in 10° intervals and at nuclear excitation energies up to 16 MeV. Fission fragment angular distributions were measured in six bins from 4.5 MeV to 8.0 MeV and fit to expected distributions dependent on the vibrational and rotational excitations at the saddle point. In this way, the contributions to the total fission probability from specific states of K angular momentum projection on the symmetry axis are extracted. A sizable data collection is presented to be considered when constraining microscopic cross section calculations.

  17. Radiation Effects in Fission and Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odette, G. Robert; Wirth, Brian D.

    Since the prediction of "Wigner disease" [1] and the subsequent observation of anisotropic growth of the graphite used in the Chicago Pile, the effects of radiation on materials has been an important technological concern. The broad field of radiation effects impacts many critical advanced technologies, ranging from semiconductor processing to severe materials degradation in nuclear reactor environments. Radiation effects also occur in many natural environments, ranging from deep space to inside the Earth's crust. As selected examples that involve many basic phenomena that cross-cut and illustrate the broader impacts of radiation exposure on materials, this article focuses on modeling microstructural changes in iron-based ferritic alloys under high-energy neutron irradiation relevant to light water fission reactor pressure vessels. We also touch briefly on radiation effects in structural alloys for fusion reactor first wall and blanket structures; in this case the focus is on modeling the evolution of self-interstitial atom clusters and dislocation loops. Note, since even the narrower topic of structural materials for nuclear energy applications encompass a vast literature dating from 1942, the references included in this article are primarily limited to these two narrower subjects. Thus, the references cited here are presented as examples, rather than comprehensive bibliographies. However, the interested reader is referred to proceedings of continuing symposia series that have been sponsored by several organizations, several monographs [2-4] and key journals (e.g., Journal of Nuclear Materials, Radiation Effects and Defects in Solids).

  18. Strategy for the absolute neutron emission measurement on ITER.

    PubMed

    Sasao, M; Bertalot, L; Ishikawa, M; Popovichev, S

    2010-10-01

    Accuracy of 10% is demanded to the absolute fusion measurement on ITER. To achieve this accuracy, a functional combination of several types of neutron measurement subsystem, cross calibration among them, and in situ calibration are needed. Neutron transport calculation shows the suitable calibration source is a DT/DD neutron generator of source strength higher than 10(10) n/s (neutron/second) for DT and 10(8) n/s for DD. It will take eight weeks at the minimum with this source to calibrate flux monitors, profile monitors, and the activation system.

  19. Singlet fission in pentacene dimers

    PubMed Central

    Zirzlmeier, Johannes; Lehnherr, Dan; Coto, Pedro B.; Chernick, Erin T.; Casillas, Rubén; Basel, Bettina S.; Thoss, Michael; Tykwinski, Rik R.; Guldi, Dirk M.

    2015-01-01

    Singlet fission (SF) has the potential to supersede the traditional solar energy conversion scheme by means of boosting the photon-to-current conversion efficiencies beyond the 30% Shockley–Queisser limit. Here, we show unambiguous and compelling evidence for unprecedented intramolecular SF within regioisomeric pentacene dimers in room-temperature solutions, with observed triplet quantum yields reaching as high as 156 ± 5%. Whereas previous studies have shown that the collision of a photoexcited chromophore with a ground-state chromophore can give rise to SF, here we demonstrate that the proximity and sufficient coupling through bond or space in pentacene dimers is enough to induce intramolecular SF where two triplets are generated on one molecule. PMID:25858954

  20. Membrane Fission: Model for Intermediate Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kozlovsky, Yonathan; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    Membrane budding-fission is a fundamental process generating intracellular carriers of proteins. Earlier works were focused only on formation of coated buds connected to the initial membrane by narrow membrane necks. We present the theoretical analysis of the whole pathway of budding-fission, including the crucial stage where the membrane neck undergoes fission and the carrier separates from the donor membrane. We consider two successive intermediates of the reaction: 1), a constricted membrane neck coming out of aperture of the assembling protein coat, and 2), hemifission intermediate resulting from self-fusion of the inner monolayer of the neck, while its outer monolayer remains continuous. Transformation of the constricted neck into the hemifission intermediate is driven by the membrane stress produced in the neck by the protein coat. Although apparently similar to hemifusion, the fission is predicted to have an opposite dependence on the monolayer spontaneous curvature. Analysis of the further stages of the process demonstrates that in all practically important cases the hemifission intermediate decays spontaneously into two separate membranes, thereby completing the fission process. We formulate the “job description” for fission proteins by calculating the energy they have to deliver and the radii of the protein coat aperture which have to be reached to drive the fission process. PMID:12829467

  1. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed.

  2. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  3. Experimental Constraints on Neutrino Spectra Following Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, Jim; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We discuss new initiatives to constrain predictions of fission neutrino spectra from nuclear reactors. These predictions are germane to the understanding of reactor flux anomalies; are needed to reduce systematic uncertainty in neutrino oscillation spectra; and inform searches for the diffuse supernova neutrino background. The initiatives include a search for very high- Q beta decay components to the neutrino spectrum from the Daya Bay power plant; plans for a measurement of the β- spectrum from 252Cf fission products; and precision measurements of the 235U fission neutrino spectrum from PROSPECT and other very short baseline reactor experiments.

  4. Stimulus probability effects in absolute identification.

    PubMed

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of presentation probability on both proportion correct and response times. The effects were moderated by the ubiquitous stimulus position effect. The accuracy and response time data were predicted by an exemplar-based model of perceptual cognition (Kent & Lamberts, 2005). The bow in discriminability was also attenuated when presentation probability for middle items was relatively high, an effect that will constrain future model development. The study provides evidence for item-specific learning in absolute identification. Implications for other theories of absolute identification are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Absolute gravimetry for monitoring geodynamics in Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, E.; Strykowski, G.; Forsberg, R.

    2015-12-01

    Here are presented the preliminary results of the absolute gravity measurements done in Greenland by DTU Space with their A10 absolute gravimeter (the A10-019). The purpose, besides establishing and maintaining a national gravity network, is to study geodynamics.The absolute gravity measurements are juxtaposed with the permanent GNET GNSS stations. The first measurements were conducted in 2009 and a few sites have been re-visited. As of present is there a gravity value at 18 GNET sites.There are challenges in interpreting the measurements from Greenland and several signals has to be taken into account, besides the geodynamical signals originating from the changing load of the ice, there is also a clear signal of direct attraction from different masses. Here are presented the preliminary results of our measurements in Greenland and attempts explain them through modelling of the geodynamical signals and the direct attraction from the ocean and ice.

  6. Absolute Distance Measurement with the MSTAR Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Peters, Robert; Burger, Johan; Ahn, Seh-Won; Steier, William H.; Fetterman, Harrold R.; Chang, Yian

    2003-01-01

    The MSTAR sensor (Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging) is a new system for measuring absolute distance, capable of resolving the integer cycle ambiguity of standard interferometers, and making it possible to measure distance with sub-nanometer accuracy. The sensor uses a single laser in conjunction with fast phase modulators and low frequency detectors. We describe the design of the system - the principle of operation, the metrology source, beamlaunching optics, and signal processing - and show results for target distances up to 1 meter. We then demonstrate how the system can be scaled to kilometer-scale distances.

  7. Aqueous cutting fluid for machining fissionable materials

    DOEpatents

    Duerksen, Walter K.; Googin, John M.; Napier, Jr., Bradley

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a cutting fluid for machining fissionable material. The cutting fluid is formed of glycol, water and boron compound in an adequate concentration for effective neutron attenuation so as to inhibit criticality incidents during machining.

  8. Charge Transfer-Mediated Singlet Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, N.; Zhu, X.-Y.

    2015-04-01

    Singlet fission, the splitting of a singlet exciton into two triplet excitons in molecular materials, is interesting not only as a model many-electron problem, but also as a process with potential applications in solar energy conversion. Here we discuss limitations of the conventional four-electron and molecular dimer model in describing singlet fission in crystalline organic semiconductors, such as pentacene and tetracene. We emphasize the need to consider electronic delocalization, which is responsible for the decisive role played by the Mott-Wannier exciton, also called the charge transfer (CT) exciton, in mediating singlet fission. At the strong electronic coupling limit, the initial excitation creates a quantum superposition of singlet, CT, and triplet-pair states, and we present experimental evidence for this interpretation. We also discuss the most recent attempts at translating this mechanistic understanding into design principles for CT state-mediated intramolecular singlet fission in oligomers and polymers.

  9. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed.

  10. MCNP6 Fission Multiplicity with FMULT Card

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Trevor; Fensin, Michael Lorne; Hendricks, John S.

    With the merger of MCNPX and MCNP5 into MCNP6, MCNP6 now provides all the capabilities of both codes allowing the user to access all the fission multiplicity data sets. Detailed in this paper is: (1) the new FMULT card capabilities for accessing these different data sets; (2) benchmark calculations, as compared to experiment, detailing the results of selecting these separate data sets for thermal neutron induced fission on U-235.

  11. Fission Surface Power Technology Demonstration Unit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-09

    NASA Glenn Technician Mark Springowski works on a 10-kilowatt Stirling Power Conversion Unit, which is part of the Fission Surface Power Technology Demonstration Unit. This is a system level demonstration of a surface power system, which could potentially be used to support manned missions to the moon or Mars. A flight system would use 180 kilowatt nuclear fission reactor and four Stirling PCU’s to produce 40 kW of electricity for manned surface missions.

  12. Cluster fusion-fission dynamics in the Singapore stock exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Boon Kin; Cheong, Siew Ann

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate how the cross-correlations between stocks in the Singapore stock exchange (SGX) evolve over 2008 and 2009 within overlapping one-month time windows. In particular, we examine how these cross-correlations change before, during, and after the Sep-Oct 2008 Lehman Brothers Crisis. To do this, we extend the complete-linkage hierarchical clustering algorithm, to obtain robust clusters of stocks with stronger intracluster correlations, and weaker intercluster correlations. After we identify the robust clusters in all time windows, we visualize how these change in the form of a fusion-fission diagram. Such a diagram depicts graphically how the cluster sizes evolve, the exchange of stocks between clusters, as well as how strongly the clusters mix. From the fusion-fission diagram, we see a giant cluster growing and disintegrating in the SGX, up till the Lehman Brothers Crisis in September 2008 and the market crashes of October 2008. After the Lehman Brothers Crisis, clusters in the SGX remain small for few months before giant clusters emerge once again. In the aftermath of the crisis, we also find strong mixing of component stocks between clusters. As a result, the correlation between initially strongly-correlated pairs of stocks decay exponentially with average life time of about a month. These observations impact strongly how portfolios and trading strategies should be formulated.

  13. Atypical mitochondrial fission upon bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Stavru, Fabrizia; Palmer, Amy E.; Wang, Chunxin; Youle, Richard J.; Cossart, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    We recently showed that infection by Listeria monocytogenes causes mitochondrial network fragmentation through the secreted pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O (LLO). Here, we examine factors involved in canonical fusion and fission. Strikingly, LLO-induced mitochondrial fragmentation does not require the traditional fission machinery, as Drp1 oligomers are absent from fragmented mitochondria following Listeria infection or LLO treatment, as the dynamin-like protein 1 (Drp1) receptor Mff is rapidly degraded, and as fragmentation proceeds efficiently in cells with impaired Drp1 function. LLO does not cause processing of the fusion protein optic atrophy protein 1 (Opa1), despite inducing a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting a unique Drp1- and Opa1-independent fission mechanism distinct from that triggered by uncouplers or the apoptosis inducer staurosporine. We show that the ER marks LLO-induced mitochondrial fragmentation sites even in the absence of functional Drp1, demonstrating that the ER activity in regulating mitochondrial fission can be induced by exogenous agents and that the ER appears to regulate fission by a mechanism independent of the canonical mitochondrial fission machinery. PMID:24043775

  14. Complete event simulations of nuclear fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Ramona

    2015-10-01

    For many years, the state of the art for treating fission in radiation transport codes has involved sampling from average distributions. In these average fission models energy is not explicitly conserved and everything is uncorrelated because all particles are emitted independently. However, in a true fission event, the energies, momenta and multiplicities of the emitted particles are correlated. Such correlations are interesting for many modern applications. Event-by-event generation of complete fission events makes it possible to retain the kinematic information for all particles emitted: the fission products as well as prompt neutrons and photons. It is therefore possible to extract any desired correlation observables. Complete event simulations can be included in general Monte Carlo transport codes. We describe the general functionality of currently available fission event generators and compare results for several important observables. This work was performed under the auspices of the US DOE by LLNL, Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. We acknowledge support of the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development in DOE/NNSA.

  15. Novel roles for actin in mitochondrial fission

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Anna L.; Gurel, Pinar S.; Higgs, Henry N.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial dynamics, including fusion, fission and translocation, are crucial to cellular homeostasis, with roles in cellular polarity, stress response and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission has received particular attention, owing to links with several neurodegenerative diseases. A central player in fission is the cytoplasmic dynamin-related GTPase Drp1, which oligomerizes at the fission site and hydrolyzes GTP to drive membrane ingression. Drp1 recruitment to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) is a key regulatory event, which appears to require a pre-constriction step in which the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrion interact extensively, a process termed ERMD (ER-associated mitochondrial division). It is unclear how ER–mitochondrial contact generates the force required for pre-constriction or why pre-constriction leads to Drp1 recruitment. Recent results, however, show that ERMD might be an actin-based process in mammals that requires the ER-associated formin INF2 upstream of Drp1, and that myosin II and other actin-binding proteins might be involved. In this Commentary, we present a mechanistic model for mitochondrial fission in which actin and myosin contribute in two ways; firstly, by supplying the force for pre-constriction and secondly, by serving as a coincidence detector for Drp1 binding. In addition, we discuss the possibility that multiple fission mechanisms exist in mammals. PMID:25217628

  16. Fission neutron source in Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Mario; Di Majo, V.; Ingrao, G.; Rebessi, S.; Testa, A.

    1997-02-01

    A fission neutron source is operating in Rome at the ENEA Casaccia Research Center since 1971, consisting of a low power fast reactor named RSV-Tapiro. it is employed for a variety of experiments, including dosimetry, material testing, radiation protection and biology. In particular, application to experimental radiobiology includes studies of the biological action of neutrons in the whole-body irradiated animal, or in specialized systems in vivo or in vitro. For his purpose a vertical irradiation facility was originally constructed. Recently, a new horizontal irradiation facility has been designed to allow the exposure of larger samples or larger sample batches at one time. Dosimetry at the sample irradiation positions is routinely carried out by the conventional method of using two ion chambers. This physical dosimetry has recently been compared with the results of biological dosimetry based on the detection of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood human lymphocytes irradiated in vitro. A characterization of the radiation quality in the two configurations has been carried out by tissue equivalent proportional counter microdosimetry measurements. Information about the main characteristics of the reactor and the two irradiation facilities is provided and relevant results of the various measurements are summarized. Radiobiological results obtained using this neutron source are also briefly outlined.

  17. Fission of Polyanionic Metal Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, S.; Jankowski, A.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Wolfram, M.

    2018-04-01

    Size-selected dianionic lead clusters Pbn2 -, n =34 - 56 , are stored in a Penning trap and studied with respect to their decay products upon photoexcitation. Contrary to the decay of other dianionic metal clusters, these lead clusters show a variety of decay channels. The mass spectra of the fragments are compared to the corresponding spectra of the monoanionic precursors. This comparison leads to the conclusion that, in the cluster size region below about n =48 , the fission reaction Pbn2 -→Pbn-10 -+Pb10- is the major decay process. Its disappearance at larger cluster sizes may be an indication of a nonmetal to metal transition. Recently, the pair of Pb10- and Pbn-10 - were observed as pronounced fragments in electron-attachment studies [S. König et al., Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 421, 129 (2017), 10.1016/j.ijms.2017.06.009]. The present findings suggest that this combination is the fingerprint of the decay of doubly charged lead clusters. With this assumption, the dianion clusters have been traced down to Pb212 -, whereas the smallest size for the direct observation was as high as n =28 .

  18. Solving Absolute Value Equations Algebraically and Geometrically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiyuan, Wei

    2005-01-01

    The way in which students can improve their comprehension by understanding the geometrical meaning of algebraic equations or solving algebraic equation geometrically is described. Students can experiment with the conditions of the absolute value equation presented, for an interesting way to form an overall understanding of the concept.

  19. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  20. Increasing Capacity: Practice Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Pennie; Donkin, Christopher; Brown, Scott D.; Heathcote, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In most of the long history of the study of absolute identification--since Miller's (1956) seminal article--a severe limit on performance has been observed, and this limit has resisted improvement even by extensive practice. In a startling result, Rouder, Morey, Cowan, and Pfaltz (2004) found substantially improved performance with practice in the…

  1. On Relative and Absolute Conviction in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Keith; Mejia-Ramos, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Conviction is a central construct in mathematics education research on justification and proof. In this paper, we claim that it is important to distinguish between absolute conviction and relative conviction. We argue that researchers in mathematics education frequently have not done so and this has lead to researchers making unwarranted claims…

  2. Absolute Points for Multiple Assignment Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adlakha, V.; Kowalski, K.

    2006-01-01

    An algorithm is presented to solve multiple assignment problems in which a cost is incurred only when an assignment is made at a given cell. The proposed method recursively searches for single/group absolute points to identify cells that must be loaded in any optimal solution. Unlike other methods, the first solution is the optimal solution. The…

  3. Assessing epistemic sophistication by considering domain-specific absolute and multiplicistic beliefs separately.

    PubMed

    Peter, Johannes; Rosman, Tom; Mayer, Anne-Kathrin; Leichner, Nikolas; Krampen, Günter

    2016-06-01

    Particularly in higher education, not only a view of science as a means of finding absolute truths (absolutism), but also a view of science as generally tentative (multiplicism) can be unsophisticated and obstructive for learning. Most quantitative epistemic belief inventories neglect this and understand epistemic sophistication as disagreement with absolute statements. This article suggests considering absolutism and multiplicism as separate dimensions. Following our understanding of epistemic sophistication as a cautious and reluctant endorsement of both positions, we assume evaluativism (a contextually adaptive view of knowledge as personally constructed and evidence-based) to be reflected by low agreement with both generalized absolute and generalized multiplicistic statements. Three studies with a total sample size of N = 416 psychology students were conducted. A domain-specific inventory containing both absolute and multiplicistic statements was developed. Expectations were tested by exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and correlational analyses. Results revealed a two-factor solution with an absolute and a multiplicistic factor. Criterion validity of both factors was confirmed. Cross-sectional analyses revealed that agreement to generalized multiplicistic statements decreases with study progress. Moreover, consistent with our understanding of epistemic sophistication as a reluctant attitude towards generalized epistemic statements, evidence for a negative relationship between epistemic sophistication and need for cognitive closure was found. We recommend including multiplicistic statements into epistemic belief questionnaires and considering them as a separate dimension, especially when investigating individuals in later stages of epistemic development (i.e., in higher education). © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  4. The fading American dream: Trends in absolute income mobility since 1940.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Raj; Grusky, David; Hell, Maximilian; Hendren, Nathaniel; Manduca, Robert; Narang, Jimmy

    2017-04-28

    We estimated rates of "absolute income mobility"-the fraction of children who earn more than their parents-by combining data from U.S. Census and Current Population Survey cross sections with panel data from de-identified tax records. We found that rates of absolute mobility have fallen from approximately 90% for children born in 1940 to 50% for children born in the 1980s. Increasing Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth rates alone cannot restore absolute mobility to the rates experienced by children born in the 1940s. However, distributing current GDP growth more equally across income groups as in the 1940 birth cohort would reverse more than 70% of the decline in mobility. These results imply that reviving the "American dream" of high rates of absolute mobility would require economic growth that is shared more broadly across the income distribution. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Neutron-Induced Fission Measurements at the Dance and Lsds Facilities at Lanl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Bond, E. M.; Chadwick, M. B.; Couture, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Fowler, M. M.; Haight, R. C.; Hayes-Sterbenz, A. C.; Rundberg, R. S.; Rusev, G. Y.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Alexander, C. W.; Belier, G.

    2014-09-01

    New results from neutron-induced fission measurements performed at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) and Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer (LSDS) are presented. New correlated data on promptfission γ-ray (PFG) distributions were measured using the DANCE array for resonant neutron-induced fission of 233U, 235U and 239Pu. The deduced properties of PFG emission are presented using a simple parametrization. An accurate knowledge of fission γ-ray spectra enables us to analyze the isomeric states of 236U created after neutron capture on 235U. We briefly discuss these new results. Finally, we review details and preliminary results of the challenging 237U(n,f) cross section measurement at the LSDS facility.

  6. Correlated prompt fission data in transport simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Talou, P.; Vogt, R.; Randrup, J.; ...

    2018-01-24

    Detailed information on the fission process can be inferred from the observation, modeling and theoretical understanding of prompt fission neutron and γ-ray observables. Beyond simple average quantities, the study of distributions and correlations in prompt data, e.g., multiplicity-dependent neutron and γ-ray spectra, angular distributions of the emitted particles, n -n, n - γ, and γ - γ correlations, can place stringent constraints on fission models and parameters that would otherwise be free to be tuned separately to represent individual fission observables. The FREYA and CGMF codes have been developed to follow the sequential emissions of prompt neutrons and γ raysmore » from the initial excited fission fragments produced right after scission. Both codes implement Monte Carlo techniques to sample initial fission fragment configurations in mass, charge and kinetic energy and sample probabilities of neutron and γ emission at each stage of the decay. This approach naturally leads to using simple but powerful statistical techniques to infer distributions and correlations among many observables and model parameters. The comparison of model calculations with experimental data provides a rich arena for testing various nuclear physics models such as those related to the nuclear structure and level densities of neutron-rich nuclei, the γ-ray strength functions of dipole and quadrupole transitions, the mechanism for dividing the excitation energy between the two nascent fragments near scission, and the mechanisms behind the production of angular momentum in the fragments, etc. Beyond the obvious interest from a fundamental physics point of view, such studies are also important for addressing data needs in various nuclear applications. The inclusion of the FREYA and CGMF codes into the MCNP6.2 and MCNPX - PoliMi transport codes, for instance, provides a new and powerful tool to simulate correlated fission events in neutron transport calculations important in

  7. Correlated prompt fission data in transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talou, P.; Vogt, R.; Randrup, J.; Rising, M. E.; Pozzi, S. A.; Verbeke, J.; Andrews, M. T.; Clarke, S. D.; Jaffke, P.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; Marcath, M. J.; Meierbachtol, K.; Nakae, L.; Rusev, G.; Sood, A.; Stetcu, I.; Walker, C.

    2018-01-01

    Detailed information on the fission process can be inferred from the observation, modeling and theoretical understanding of prompt fission neutron and γ-ray observables. Beyond simple average quantities, the study of distributions and correlations in prompt data, e.g., multiplicity-dependent neutron and γ-ray spectra, angular distributions of the emitted particles, n - n, n - γ, and γ - γ correlations, can place stringent constraints on fission models and parameters that would otherwise be free to be tuned separately to represent individual fission observables. The FREYA and CGMF codes have been developed to follow the sequential emissions of prompt neutrons and γ rays from the initial excited fission fragments produced right after scission. Both codes implement Monte Carlo techniques to sample initial fission fragment configurations in mass, charge and kinetic energy and sample probabilities of neutron and γ emission at each stage of the decay. This approach naturally leads to using simple but powerful statistical techniques to infer distributions and correlations among many observables and model parameters. The comparison of model calculations with experimental data provides a rich arena for testing various nuclear physics models such as those related to the nuclear structure and level densities of neutron-rich nuclei, the γ-ray strength functions of dipole and quadrupole transitions, the mechanism for dividing the excitation energy between the two nascent fragments near scission, and the mechanisms behind the production of angular momentum in the fragments, etc. Beyond the obvious interest from a fundamental physics point of view, such studies are also important for addressing data needs in various nuclear applications. The inclusion of the FREYA and CGMF codes into the MCNP6.2 and MCNPX - PoliMi transport codes, for instance, provides a new and powerful tool to simulate correlated fission events in neutron transport calculations important in

  8. Correlated prompt fission data in transport simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Talou, P.; Vogt, R.; Randrup, J.

    Detailed information on the fission process can be inferred from the observation, modeling and theoretical understanding of prompt fission neutron and γ-ray observables. Beyond simple average quantities, the study of distributions and correlations in prompt data, e.g., multiplicity-dependent neutron and γ-ray spectra, angular distributions of the emitted particles, n -n, n - γ, and γ - γ correlations, can place stringent constraints on fission models and parameters that would otherwise be free to be tuned separately to represent individual fission observables. The FREYA and CGMF codes have been developed to follow the sequential emissions of prompt neutrons and γ raysmore » from the initial excited fission fragments produced right after scission. Both codes implement Monte Carlo techniques to sample initial fission fragment configurations in mass, charge and kinetic energy and sample probabilities of neutron and γ emission at each stage of the decay. This approach naturally leads to using simple but powerful statistical techniques to infer distributions and correlations among many observables and model parameters. The comparison of model calculations with experimental data provides a rich arena for testing various nuclear physics models such as those related to the nuclear structure and level densities of neutron-rich nuclei, the γ-ray strength functions of dipole and quadrupole transitions, the mechanism for dividing the excitation energy between the two nascent fragments near scission, and the mechanisms behind the production of angular momentum in the fragments, etc. Beyond the obvious interest from a fundamental physics point of view, such studies are also important for addressing data needs in various nuclear applications. The inclusion of the FREYA and CGMF codes into the MCNP6.2 and MCNPX - PoliMi transport codes, for instance, provides a new and powerful tool to simulate correlated fission events in neutron transport calculations important in

  9. Dual-fission chamber and neutron beam characterization for fission product yield measurements using monoenergetic neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.; Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rundberg, R. S.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.

    2014-09-01

    A program has been initiated to measure the energy dependence of selected high-yield fission products used in the analysis of nuclear test data. We present out initial work of neutron activation using a dual-fission chamber with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and gamma-counting method. Quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of energies from 0.5 to 15 MeV using the TUNL 10 MV FM tandem to provide high-precision and self-consistent measurements of fission product yields (FPY). The final FPY results will be coupled with theoretical analysis to provide a more fundamental understanding of the fission process. To accomplish this goal, we have developed and tested a set of dual-fission ionization chambers to provide an accurate determination of the number of fissions occurring in a thick target located in the middle plane of the chamber assembly. Details of the fission chamber and its performance are presented along with neutron beam production and characterization. Also presented are studies on the background issues associated with room-return and off-energy neutron production. We show that the off-energy neutron contribution can be significant, but correctable, while room-return neutron background levels contribute less than <1% to the fission signal.

  10. Measurement of prompt fission neutron spectrum for spontaneous fission of 252Cf using γ multiplicity tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, E.; Daskalakis, A.; Block, R. C.; Danon, Y.

    2017-06-01

    The prompt fission neutron spectrum from spontaneous fission of 252Cf is an integral part of several aspects of nuclear data. Not only is the spectrum itself of interest, but neutron detectors often use the spectrum for calibration, and other prompt fission neutron spectra are measured as a ratio to 252Cf. Therefore, reducing the uncertainties in this spectrum will allow for more accurate nuclear data to be available across a wide range of fields. The prompt fission neutron spectrum for the spontaneous fission of 252Cf was measured at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute using the multiple γ tagging method with a 18.4-ng fission sample. An EJ-301 liquid scintillator fast neutron detector was used to measure the high energy portion of the spectrum, 0.5-7 MeV, and a thin EJ-204 plastic scintillator was used to measure the low energy portion of the spectrum, from 50 keV to 2 MeV. These spectra both show good agreement with the current evaluation of 252Cf and have low associated uncertainties providing a new high precision measurement that helps reduce the uncertainties in the prompt fission neutron spectrum for the spontaneous fission of 252Cf.

  11. Induction of a G1-S checkpoint in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Bøe, Cathrine A; Krohn, Marit; Rødland, Gro Elise; Capiaghi, Christoph; Maillard, Olivier; Thoma, Fritz; Boye, Erik; Grallert, Beáta

    2012-06-19

    Entry into S phase is carefully regulated and, in most organisms, under the control of a G(1)-S checkpoint. We have previously described a G(1)-S checkpoint in fission yeast that delays formation of the prereplicative complex at chromosomal replication origins after exposure to UV light (UVC). This checkpoint absolutely depends on the Gcn2 kinase. Here, we explore the signal for activation of the Gcn2-dependent G(1)-S checkpoint in fission yeast. If some form of DNA damage can activate the checkpoint, deficient DNA repair should affect the length of the checkpoint-induced delay. We find that the cell-cycle delay differs in repair-deficient mutants from that in wild-type cells. However, the duration of the delay depends not only on the repair capacity of the cells, but also on the nature of the repair deficiency. First, the delay is abolished in cells that are deficient in the early steps of repair. Second, the delay is prolonged in repair mutants that fail to complete repair after the incision stage. We conclude that the G(1)-S delay depends on damage to the DNA and that the activating signal derives not from the initial DNA damage, but from a repair intermediate(s). Surprisingly, we find that activation of Gcn2 does not depend on the processing of DNA damage and that activated Gcn2 alone is not sufficient to delay entry into S phase in UVC-irradiated cells. Thus, the G(1)-S delay depends on at least two different inputs.

  12. 20 CFR 404.1205 - Absolute coverage groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Absolute coverage groups. 404.1205 Section... Covered § 404.1205 Absolute coverage groups. (a) General. An absolute coverage group is a permanent... are not under a retirement system. An absolute coverage group may include positions which were...

  13. Globular Clusters: Absolute Proper Motions and Galactic Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemel, A. A.; Glushkova, E. V.; Dambis, A. K.; Rastorguev, A. S.; Yalyalieva, L. N.; Klinichev, A. D.

    2018-04-01

    We cross-match objects from several different astronomical catalogs to determine the absolute proper motions of stars within the 30-arcmin radius fields of 115 Milky-Way globular clusters with the accuracy of 1-2 mas yr-1. The proper motions are based on positional data recovered from the USNO-B1, 2MASS, URAT1, ALLWISE, UCAC5, and Gaia DR1 surveys with up to ten positions spanning an epoch difference of up to about 65 years, and reduced to Gaia DR1 TGAS frame using UCAC5 as the reference catalog. Cluster members are photometrically identified by selecting horizontal- and red-giant branch stars on color-magnitude diagrams, and the mean absolute proper motions of the clusters with a typical formal error of about 0.4 mas yr-1 are computed by averaging the proper motions of selected members. The inferred absolute proper motions of clusters are combined with available radial-velocity data and heliocentric distance estimates to compute the cluster orbits in terms of the Galactic potential models based on Miyamoto and Nagai disk, Hernquist spheroid, and modified isothermal dark-matter halo (axisymmetric model without a bar) and the same model + rotating Ferre's bar (non-axisymmetric). Five distant clusters have higher-than-escape velocities, most likely due to large errors of computed transversal velocities, whereas the computed orbits of all other clusters remain bound to the Galaxy. Unlike previously published results, we find the bar to affect substantially the orbits of most of the clusters, even those at large Galactocentric distances, bringing appreciable chaotization, especially in the portions of the orbits close to the Galactic center, and stretching out the orbits of some of the thick-disk clusters.

  14. 237Np absolute delayed neutron yield measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doré, D.; Ledoux, X.; Nolte, R.; Gagnon-Moisan, F.; Thulliez, L.; Litaize, O.; Roettger, S.; Serot, O.

    2017-09-01

    237Np absolute delayed neutron yields have been measured at different incident neutron energies from 1.5 to 16 MeV. The experiment was performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) facility where the Van de Graaff accelerator and the cyclotron CV28 delivered 9 different neutron energy beams using p+T, d+D and d+T reactions. The detection system is made up of twelve 3He tubes inserted into a polyethylene cylinder. In this paper, the experimental setup and the data analysis method are described. The evolution of the absolute DN yields as a function of the neutron incident beam energies are presented and compared to experimental data found in the literature and data from the libraries.

  15. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  16. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  17. Fission Surface Power Technology Development Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Donald T.; Mason, Lee S.; Houts, Michael G.; Harlow, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Power is a critical consideration in planning exploration of the surfaces of the Moon, Mars, and places beyond. Nuclear power is an important option, especially for locations in the solar system where sunlight is limited or environmental conditions are challenging (e.g., extreme cold, dust storms). NASA and the Department of Energy are maintaining the option for fission surface power for the Moon and Mars by developing and demonstrating technology for a fission surface power system. The Fission Surface Power Systems project has focused on subscale component and subsystem demonstrations to address the feasibility of a low-risk, low-cost approach to space nuclear power for surface missions. Laboratory demonstrations of the liquid metal pump, reactor control drum drive, power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution technologies have validated that the fundamental characteristics and performance of these components and subsystems are consistent with a Fission Surface Power preliminary reference concept. In addition, subscale versions of a non-nuclear reactor simulator, using electric resistance heating in place of the reactor fuel, have been built and operated with liquid metal sodium-potassium and helium/xenon gas heat transfer loops, demonstrating the viability of establishing system-level performance and characteristics of fission surface power technologies without requiring a nuclear reactor. While some component and subsystem testing will continue through 2011 and beyond, the results to date provide sufficient confidence to proceed with system level technology readiness demonstration. To demonstrate the system level readiness of fission surface power in an operationally relevant environment (the primary goal of the Fission Surface Power Systems project), a full scale, 1/4 power Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) is under development. The TDU will consist of a non-nuclear reactor simulator, a sodium-potassium heat transfer loop, a power

  18. Absolute detector calibration using twin beams.

    PubMed

    Peřina, Jan; Haderka, Ondřej; Michálek, Václav; Hamar, Martin

    2012-07-01

    A method for the determination of absolute quantum detection efficiency is suggested based on the measurement of photocount statistics of twin beams. The measured histograms of joint signal-idler photocount statistics allow us to eliminate an additional noise superimposed on an ideal calibration field composed of only photon pairs. This makes the method superior above other approaches presently used. Twin beams are described using a paired variant of quantum superposition of signal and noise.

  19. Singlet fission in linear chains of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosio, Francesco, E-mail: F.Ambrosio@warwick.ac.uk, E-mail: A.Troisi@warwick.ac.uk; Troisi, Alessandro, E-mail: F.Ambrosio@warwick.ac.uk, E-mail: A.Troisi@warwick.ac.uk

    2014-11-28

    We develop a model configuration interaction Hamiltonian to study the electronic structure of a chain of molecules undergoing singlet fission. We first consider models for dimer and trimer and then we use a matrix partitioning technique to build models of arbitrary size able to describe the relevant electronic structure for singlet fission in linear aggregates. We find that the multi-excitonic state (ME) is stabilized at short inter-monomer distance and the extent of this stabilization depends upon the size of orbital coupling between neighboring monomers. We also find that the coupling between ME states located on different molecules is extremely smallmore » leading to bandwidths in the order of ∼10 meV. This observation suggests that multi-exciton states are extremely localized by electron-phonon coupling and that singlet fission involves the transition between a relatively delocalized Frenkel exciton and a strongly localized multi-exciton state. We adopt the methodology commonly used to study non-radiative transitions to describe the singlet fission dynamics in these aggregates and we discuss the limit of validity of the approach. The results indicate that the phenomenology of singlet fission in molecular crystals is different in many important ways from what is observed in isolated dimers.« less

  20. Correlation of recent fission product release data

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, T.S.; Lorenz, R.A.; Nakamura, T.

    For the calculation of source terms associated with severe accidents, it is necessary to model the release of fission products from fuel as it heats and melts. Perhaps the most definitive model for fission product release is that of the FASTGRASS computer code developed at Argonne National Laboratory. There is persuasive evidence that these processes, as well as additional chemical and gas phase mass transport processes, are important in the release of fission products from fuel. Nevertheless, it has been found convenient to have simplified fission product release correlations that may not be as definitive as models like FASTGRASS butmore » which attempt in some simple way to capture the essence of the mechanisms. One of the most widely used such correlation is called CORSOR-M which is the present fission product/aerosol release model used in the NRC Source Term Code Package. CORSOR has been criticized as having too much uncertainty in the calculated releases and as not accurately reproducing some experimental data. It is currently believed that these discrepancies between CORSOR and the more recent data have resulted because of the better time resolution of the more recent data compared to the data base that went into the CORSOR correlation. This document discusses a simple correlational model for use in connection with NUREG risk uncertainty exercises. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.« less

  1. Chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil.

    PubMed

    Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-10

    Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) absolute oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the absolute oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound.

  2. The absolute dynamic ocean topography (ADOT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Wolfgang; Savcenko, Roman

    The sea surface slopes relative to the geoid (an equipotential surface) basically carry the in-formation on the absolute velocity field of the surface circulation. Pure oceanographic models may remain unspecific with respect to the absolute level of the ocean topography. In contrast, the geodetic approach to estimate the ocean topography as difference between sea level and the geoid gives by definition an absolute dynamic ocean topography (ADOT). This approach requires, however, a consistent treatment of geoid and sea surface heights, the first being usually derived from a band limited spherical harmonic series of the Earth gravity field and the second observed with much higher spectral resolution by satellite altimetry. The present contribution shows a procedure for estimating the ADOT along the altimeter profiles, preserving as much sea surface height details as the consistency w.r.t. the geoid heights will allow. The consistent treatment at data gaps and the coast is particular demanding and solved by a filter correction. The ADOT profiles are inspected for their innocent properties towards the coast and compared to external estimates of the ocean topography or the velocity field of the surface circulation as derived, for example, by ARGO floats.

  3. Measurement of absolute gravity acceleration in Firenze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, M.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the University of Firenze (Italy). In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the Newtonian law at short distances are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. The only available datum, pertaining to the italian zero-order gravity network, was taken more than 20 years ago at a distance of more than 60 km from the study site. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 absolute gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The absolute accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are (980 492 160.6 ± 4.0) μGal and (980 492 048.3 ± 3.0) μGal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the absolute value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.

  4. On the Perceptual Subprocess of Absolute Pitch.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Goo; Knösche, Thomas R

    2017-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the rare ability of musicians to identify the pitch of tonal sound without external reference. While there have been behavioral and neuroimaging studies on the characteristics of AP, how the AP is implemented in human brains remains largely unknown. AP can be viewed as comprising of two subprocesses: perceptual (processing auditory input to extract a pitch chroma) and associative (linking an auditory representation of pitch chroma with a verbal/non-verbal label). In this review, we focus on the nature of the perceptual subprocess of AP. Two different models on how the perceptual subprocess works have been proposed: either via absolute pitch categorization (APC) or based on absolute pitch memory (APM). A major distinction between the two views is that whether the AP uses unique auditory processing (i.e., APC) that exists only in musicians with AP or it is rooted in a common phenomenon (i.e., APM), only with heightened efficiency. We review relevant behavioral and neuroimaging evidence that supports each notion. Lastly, we list open questions and potential ideas to address them.

  5. On the Perceptual Subprocess of Absolute Pitch

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Goo; Knösche, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the rare ability of musicians to identify the pitch of tonal sound without external reference. While there have been behavioral and neuroimaging studies on the characteristics of AP, how the AP is implemented in human brains remains largely unknown. AP can be viewed as comprising of two subprocesses: perceptual (processing auditory input to extract a pitch chroma) and associative (linking an auditory representation of pitch chroma with a verbal/non-verbal label). In this review, we focus on the nature of the perceptual subprocess of AP. Two different models on how the perceptual subprocess works have been proposed: either via absolute pitch categorization (APC) or based on absolute pitch memory (APM). A major distinction between the two views is that whether the AP uses unique auditory processing (i.e., APC) that exists only in musicians with AP or it is rooted in a common phenomenon (i.e., APM), only with heightened efficiency. We review relevant behavioral and neuroimaging evidence that supports each notion. Lastly, we list open questions and potential ideas to address them. PMID:29085275

  6. Absolute angular encoder based on optical diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Zhou, Tingting; Yuan, Bo; Wang, Liqiang

    2015-08-01

    A new encoding method for absolute angular encoder based on optical diffraction was proposed in the present study. In this method, an encoder disc is specially designed that a series of elements are uniformly spaced in one circle and each element is consisted of four diffraction gratings, which are tilted in the directions of 30°, 60°, -60° and -30°, respectively. The disc is illuminated by a coherent light and the diffractive signals are received. The positions of diffractive spots are used for absolute encoding and their intensities are for subdivision, which is different from the traditional optical encoder based on transparent/opaque binary principle. Since the track's width in the disc is not limited in the diffraction pattern, it provides a new way to solve the contradiction between the size and resolution, which is good for minimization of encoder. According to the proposed principle, the diffraction pattern disc with a diameter of 40 mm was made by lithography in the glass substrate. A prototype of absolute angular encoder with a resolution of 20" was built up. Its maximum error was tested as 78" by comparing with a small angle measuring system based on laser beam deflection.

  7. Options For Development of Space Fission Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houta, Mike; VanDyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Pedersen, Kevin; Martin, James; Dickens, Ricky; Salvail, Pat; Hrbud, Ivana; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fission technology can enable rapid, affordable access to any point in the solar system. Potential fission-based transportation options include high specific power continuous impulse propulsion systems and bimodal nuclear thermal rockets. Despite their tremendous potential for enhancing or enabling deep space and planetary missions, to date space fission system have only been used in Earth orbit. The first step towards utilizing advanced fission propulsion systems is development of a safe, near-term, affordable fission system that can enhance or enable near-term missions of interest. An evolutionary approach for developing space fission propulsion systems is proposed.

  8. Final excitation energy of fission fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Jurado, Beatriz

    We study how the excitation energy of the fully accelerated fission fragments is built up. It is stressed that only the intrinsic excitation energy available before scission can be exchanged between the fission fragments to achieve thermal equilibrium. This is in contradiction with most models used to calculate prompt neutron emission, where it is assumed that the total excitation energy of the final fragments is shared between the fragments by the condition of equal temperatures. We also study the intrinsic excitation-energy partition in statistical equilibrium for different level-density descriptions as a function of the total intrinsic excitation energy of themore » fissioning system. Excitation energies are found to be strongly enhanced in the heavy fragment, if the level density follows a constant-temperature behavior at low energies, e.g., in the composed Gilbert-Cameron description.« less

  9. Measurements of Short-Lived Fission Isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, Sean; Bhike, Megha; Howell, Calvin; Krishichayan, Fnu; Tornow, Werner

    2016-09-01

    Fission yields of the short lived isomers 134mTe (T1 / 2 = 162 ns) and 136mXe (T1 / 2 = 2 . 95 μs) were measured for 235U and 238U. The isomers were detected by the γ rays associated with the decay of the isomeric states using high-purity germanium detectors. Fission was induced using both monoenergetic γ rays and neutrons. At TUNL's High-Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HI γS), γ rays of 9 and 11 MeV were produced . Monoenergetic 8 MeV neutrons were produced at TUNL's tandem accelerator laboratory. Both beams were pulsed to allow for precise time-gated spectroscopy of both prompt and delayed γ rays following fission. This technique offers a non-destructive probe of special nuclear materials that is sensitive to the isotopic identity of the fissile material.

  10. Solar vs. Fission Surface Power for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Oleson, Steve; George, Pat; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James; Bogner, Amee; Jones, Robert E.; Turnbull, Elizabeth; Martini, Michael C.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; hide

    2016-01-01

    A multi-discipline team of experts from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed Mars surface power system point design solutions for two conceptual missions. The primary goal of this study was to compare the relative merits of solar- versus fission-powered versions of each surface mission. First, the team compared three different solar power options against a fission power system concept for a sub-scale, uncrewed demonstration mission. The 4.5 meter (m) diameter pathfinder lander's primary mission would be to demonstrate Mars entry, descent, and landing techniques. Once on the Martian surface, the lander's In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) payload would demonstrate liquid oxygen propellant production using atmospheric resources. For the purpose of this exercise, location was assumed to be at the Martian equator. The three solar concepts considered included a system that only operated during daylight hours (at roughly half the daily propellant production rate of a round-the-clock fission design), a battery-augmented system that operated through the night (matching the fission concept's propellant production rate), and a system that operated only during daylight, but at a higher rate (again, matching the fission concept's propellant production rate). Including 30% mass growth allowance, total payload masses for the three solar concepts ranged from 1,116 to 2,396 kg, versus the 2,686 kg fission power scheme. However, solar power masses are expected to approach or exceed the fission payload mass at landing sites further from the equator, making landing site selection a key driver in the final power system decision. The team also noted that detailed reliability analysis should be performed on daytime-only solar power schemes to assess potential issues with frequent ISRU system on/off cycling. Next, the team developed a solar-powered point design solution for a conceptual four-crew, 500-day surface mission consisting of up to four landers per

  11. Staggering of angular momentum distribution in fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamagno, Pierre; Litaize, Olivier

    2018-03-01

    We review here the role of angular momentum distributions in the fission process. To do so the algorithm implemented in the FIFRELIN code [?] is detailed with special emphasis on the place of fission fragment angular momenta. The usual Rayleigh distribution used for angular momentum distribution is presented and the related model derivation is recalled. Arguments are given to justify why this distribution should not hold for low excitation energy of the fission fragments. An alternative ad hoc expression taking into account low-lying collectiveness is presented as has been implemented in the FIFRELIN code. Yet on observables currently provided by the code, no dramatic impact has been found. To quantify the magnitude of the impact of the low-lying staggering in the angular momentum distribution, a textbook case is considered for the decay of the 144Ba nucleus with low excitation energy.

  12. Accurate isotopic fission yields of electromagnetically induced fission of 238U measured in inverse kinematics at relativistic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellereau, E.; Taïeb, J.; Chatillon, A.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Ayyad, Y.; Bélier, G.; Benlliure, J.; Boutoux, G.; Caamaño, M.; Casarejos, E.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Ebran, A.; Farget, F.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Gorbinet, T.; Grente, L.; Heinz, A.; Johansson, H.; Jurado, B.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Kurz, N.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Nociforo, C.; Paradela, C.; Pietri, S.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Simon, H.; Tassan-Got, L.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.; Weick, H.

    2017-05-01

    SOFIA (Studies On Fission with Aladin) is a novel experimental program, dedicated to accurate measurements of fission-fragment isotopic yields. The setup allows us to fully identify, in nuclear charge and mass, both fission fragments in coincidence for the whole fission-fragment range. It was installed at the GSI facility (Darmstadt), to benefit from the relativistic heavy-ion beams available there, and thus to use inverse kinematics. This paper reports on fission yields obtained in electromagnetically induced fission of 238U.

  13. Landsat-5 TM reflective-band absolute radiometric calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Helder, D.L.; Markham, B.L.; Dewald, J.D.; Kaita, E.; Thome, K.J.; Micijevic, E.; Ruggles, T.A.

    2004-01-01

    The Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor provides the longest running continuous dataset of moderate spatial resolution remote sensing imagery, dating back to its launch in March 1984. Historically, the radiometric calibration procedure for this imagery used the instrument's response to the Internal Calibrator (IC) on a scene-by-scene basis to determine the gain and offset of each detector. Due to observed degradations in the IC, a new procedure was implemented for U.S.-processed data in May 2003. This new calibration procedure is based on a lifetime radiometric calibration model for the instrument's reflective bands (1-5 and 7) and is derived, in part, from the IC response without the related degradation effects and is tied to the cross calibration with the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus. Reflective-band absolute radiometric accuracy of the instrument tends to be on the order of 7% to 10%, based on a variety of calibration methods.

  14. Upgrade of absolute extreme ultraviolet diagnostic on J-TEXT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. L.; Cheng, Z. F., E-mail: chengfe@hust.edu.cn; Hou, S. Y.

    The absolute extreme ultraviolet (AXUV) diagnostic system is used for radiation observation on J-TEXT tokamak [J. Zhang, G. Zhuang, Z. J. Wang, Y. H. Ding, X. Q. Zhang, and Y. J. Tang, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 073509 (2010)]. The upgrade of the AXUV system is aimed to improve the spatial resolution and provide a three-dimensional image on J-TEXT. The new system consists of 12 AXUV arrays (4 AXUV16ELG arrays, 8 AXUV20ELG arrays). The spatial resolution in the cross-section is 21 mm for the AXUV16ELG arrays and 17 mm for the AXUV20ELG arrays. The pre-amplifier is also upgraded for a highermore » signal to noise ratio. By upgrading the AXUV imaging system, a more accurate observation on the radiation information is obtained.« less

  15. Coincident measurements of prompt fission γ rays and fission fragments at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, C. L.; Baramsai, B.; Jandel, M.; Rusev, G.; Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J.; Kawano, T.; Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.

    2015-10-01

    Modern statistical approaches to modeling fission involve the calculation of not only average quantities but also fully correlated distributions of all fission products. Applications such as those involving the detection of special nuclear materials also rely on fully correlated data of fission products. Experimental measurements of correlated data are thus critical to the validation of theory and the development of important applications. The goal of this experiment was to measure properties of prompt fission gamma-ray emission as a function of fission fragments' total kinetic energy in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. The measurement was carried out at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE), a 4 π γ-ray calorimeter. A prototype design consisting of two silicon detectors was installed in the center of DANCE, allowing simultaneous measurement of fission fragments and γ rays. Effort has been taken to simulate fragment kinetic energy losses as well as γ-ray attenuation in DANCE using such tools as GEANT4 and SRIM. Theoretical predictions generated by the code CGMF were also incorporated as input for these simulations. Results from the experiment and simulations will be presented, along with plans for future measurements.

  16. Solar Versus Fission Surface Power for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Oleson, Steve; George, Pat; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James; Bogner, Amee; Jones, Robert E.; Turnbull, Elizabeth; McNatt, Jeremiah; Martini, Michael C.; hide

    2016-01-01

    A multi-discipline team of experts from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed Mars surface power system point design solutions for two conceptual missions to Mars using In-situ resource utilization (ISRU). The primary goal of this study was to compare the relative merits of solar- versus fission-powered versions of each surface mission. First, the team compared three different solar-power options against a fission power system concept for a sub-scale, uncrewed demonstration mission. This “pathfinder” design utilized a 4.5 meter diameter lander. Its primary mission would be to demonstrate Mars entry, descent, and landing techniques. Once on the Martian surface, the lander’s ISRU payload would demonstrate liquid oxygen propellant production from atmospheric resources. For the purpose of this exercise, location was assumed to be at the Martian equator. The three solar concepts considered included a system that only operated during daylight hours (at roughly half the daily propellant production rate of a round-the-clock fission design), a battery-augmented system that operated through the night (matching the fission concept’s propellant production rate), and a system that operated only during daylight, but at a higher rate (again, matching the fission concept’s propellant production rate). Including 30% mass growth allowance, total payload masses for the three solar concepts ranged from 1,128 to 2,425 kg, versus the 2,751 kg fission power scheme. However, solar power masses increase as landing sites are selected further from the equator, making landing site selection a key driver in the final power system decision. The team also noted that detailed reliability analysis should be performed on daytime-only solar power schemes to assess potential issues with frequent ISRU system on/off cycling.

  17. The Rate of Decay of Fission Products

    DOE PAGES

    May, K.; Wigner, Eugene P.

    1948-06-01

    By considering the fission products as a sort of statistical assembly, calculations have been made of the β -disintegrations per second and of the total energy emitted per second at any time after fission has taken place (cf. Fig. 6). The results are in good agreement with experiment. The theoretical work is based on the assumption that the mass of a nucleus of mass number A and charge Z is given by a ( Z 0 ( A ) - Z ) 2 + b . Empirical values for a and b are used. Use is also made of anmore » approximate empirical relationship between half-life and disintegration energy. A further basic hypothesis which is important for the results at very short times after fission has taken place is that, in the most probable way of splitting, the chain lengths of the light and heavy fragments are equal and that there is not much deviation from this most probable mode of fission. (See L. E. Glendenin, C. D. Coryell, R. R. Edwards, and M. H. Feldman, CL-LEG-1. A tentative explanation has been given recently by R. D. Present, Phys. Rev. 72, 7 (1947).) The average number of β -disintegrations per fission is found to be 6; the average energy of all radiations ( β, γ, and neutrino) of the fission products is 21.5 ± 3 Mev. Apparently, about half of this energy escapes in the form of neutrinos and a quarter is emitted in the form of β and in the form of γ rays.« less

  18. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd

    2013-04-08

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributionsmore » of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission

  19. Fission-gas release from uranium nitride at high fission rate density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. B.; Kirchgessner, T. A.; Tambling, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    A sweep gas facility has been used to measure the release rates of radioactive fission gases from small UN specimens irradiated to 8-percent burnup at high fission-rate densities. The measured release rates have been correlated with an equation whose terms correspond to direct recoil release, fission-enhanced diffusion, and atomic diffusion (a function of temperature). Release rates were found to increase linearly with burnups between 1.5 and 8 percent. Pore migration was observed after operation at 1550 K to over 6 percent burnup.

  20. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  1. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  2. Fission Product Sorptivity in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Tompson, Jr., Robert V.; Loyalka, Sudarshan; Ghosh, Tushar

    Both adsorption and absorption (sorption) of fission product (FP) gases on/into graphite are issues of interest in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). In the original proposal, we proposed to use packed beds of graphite particles to measure sorption at a variety of temperatures and to use an electrodynamic balance (EDB) to measure sorption onto single graphite particles (a few μm in diameter) at room temperature. The use of packed beds at elevated temperature is not an issue. However, the TPOC requested revision of this initial proposal to included single particle measurements at elevated temperatures up to 1100 °C. To accommodatemore » the desire of NEUP to extend the single particle EDB measurements to elevated temperatures it was necessary to significantly revise the plan and the budget. These revisions were approved. In the EDB method, we levitate a single graphite particle (the size, surface characteristics, morphology, purity, and composition of the particle can be varied) or agglomerate in the balance and measure the sorption of species by observing the changes in mass. This process involves the use of an electron stepping technique to measure the total charge on a particle which, in conjunction with the measured suspension voltages for the particle, allows for determinations of mass and, hence, of mass changes which then correspond to measurements of sorption. Accommodating elevated temperatures with this type of system required a significant system redesign and required additional time that ultimately was not available. These constraints also meant that the grant had to focus on fewer species as a result. Overall, the extension of the original proposed single particle work to elevated temperatures added greatly to the complexity of the proposed project and added greatly to the time that would eventually be required as well. This means that the bulk of the experimental progress was made using the packed bed sorption systems. Only being able to

  3. Continuum limit of electrostatic gyrokinetic absolute equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian-Zhou

    2012-06-01

    Electrostatic gyrokinetic absolute equilibria with continuum velocity field are obtained through the partition function and through the Green function of the functional integral. The new results justify and explain the prescription for quantization/discretization or taking the continuum limit of velocity. The mistakes in the Appendix D of our earlier work [J.-Z. Zhu and G. W. Hammett, Phys. Plasmas 17, 122307 (2010)] are explained and corrected. If the lattice spacing for discretizing velocity is big enough, all the invariants could concentrate at the lowest Fourier modes in a negative-temperature state, which might indicate a possible variation of the dual cascade picture in 2D plasma turbulence.

  4. Fractional order absolute vibration suppression (AVS) controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevi, Yoram

    2017-04-01

    Absolute vibration suppression (AVS) is a control method for flexible structures. The first step is an accurate, infinite dimension, transfer function (TF), from actuation to measurement. This leads to the collocated, rate feedback AVS controller that in some cases completely eliminates the vibration. In case of the 1D wave equation, the TF consists of pure time delays and low order rational terms, and the AVS controller is rational. In all other cases, the TF and consequently the controller are fractional order in both the delays and the "rational parts". The paper considers stability, performance and actual implementation in such cases.

  5. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  6. Optimally moderated nuclear fission reactor and fuel source therefor

    DOEpatents

    Ougouag, Abderrafi M [Idaho Falls, ID; Terry, William K [Shelley, ID; Gougar, Hans D [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-07-22

    An improved nuclear fission reactor of the continuous fueling type involves determining an asymptotic equilibrium state for the nuclear fission reactor and providing the reactor with a moderator-to-fuel ratio that is optimally moderated for the asymptotic equilibrium state of the nuclear fission reactor; the fuel-to-moderator ratio allowing the nuclear fission reactor to be substantially continuously operated in an optimally moderated state.

  7. Fourier Method for Calculating Fission Chain Neutron Multiplicity Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, David H.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Walston, Sean E.

    Here, a new way of utilizing the fast Fourier transform is developed to compute the probability distribution for a fission chain to create n neutrons. We then extend this technique to compute the probability distributions for detecting n neutrons. Lastly, our technique can be used for fission chains initiated by either a single neutron inducing a fission or by the spontaneous fission of another isotope.

  8. Fourier Method for Calculating Fission Chain Neutron Multiplicity Distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Chambers, David H.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Walston, Sean E.

    2017-03-27

    Here, a new way of utilizing the fast Fourier transform is developed to compute the probability distribution for a fission chain to create n neutrons. We then extend this technique to compute the probability distributions for detecting n neutrons. Lastly, our technique can be used for fission chains initiated by either a single neutron inducing a fission or by the spontaneous fission of another isotope.

  9. Development and Utilization of Space Fission Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Mason, Lee S.; Palac, Donald T.; Harlow, Scott E.

    2009-01-01

    Space fission power systems could enable advanced civilian space missions. Terrestrially, thousands of fission systems have been operated since 1942. In addition, the US flew a space fission system in 1965, and the former Soviet Union flew 33 such systems prior to the end of the Cold War. Modern design and development practices, coupled with 65 years of experience with terrestrial reactors, could enable the affordable development of space fission power systems for near-term planetary surface applications.

  10. Development and Utilization of Space Fission Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael; Mason, Lee S.; Palac, Donald T.; Harlow, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    Space fission power systems could enable advanced civilian space missions. Terrestrially, thousands of fission systems have been operated since 1942. In addition, the US flew a space fission system in 1965, and the former Soviet Union flew 33 such systems prior to the end of the Cold War. Modern design and development practices, coupled with 65 years of experience with terrestrial reactors, could enable the affordable development of space fission power systems for near-term planetary surface applications.

  11. Fission fragment angular distributions in the reactions {sup 16}O+{sup 188}Os and {sup 28}Si+{sup 176}Yb

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, R.; Sudarshan, K.; Sharma, S. K.

    2009-06-15

    Fission fragment angular distributions have been measured in the reactions {sup 16}O+{sup 188}Os and {sup 28}Si+{sup 176}Yb to investigate the contribution from noncompound nucleus fission. Parameters for statistical model calculations were fixed using fission cross section data in the {sup 16}O+{sup 188}Os reaction. Experimental anisotropies were in reasonable agreement with those calculated using the statistical saddle point model for both reactions. The present results are also consistent with those of mass distribution studies in the fission of {sup 202}Po, formed in the reactions with varying entrance channel mass asymmetry. However, the present studies do not show a large fusion hindrancemore » as reported in the pre-actinide region based on the measurement of evaporation residue cross section.« less

  12. Fusion-fission Study at JAEA for Heavy-element Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, K.

    Fission fragment mass distributions were measured in the heavy-ion induced fission using 238U target nucleus. The mass distribu- tions changed drastically with incident energy. The results are explained by a change of the ratio between fusion and qasifission with nuclear orientation. A calculation based on a fluctuation dissipation model reproduced the mass distributions and their inci- dent energy dependence. Fusion probability was determined in the analysis. Evaporation residue cross sections were calculated with a statistical model in the reactions of 30Si+238U and 34S+238U using the obtained fusion probability in the entrance channel. The results agree with the measured cross sections of 263,264Sg and 267,268Hs, produced by 30Si+238U and 34S+238U, respectively. It is also suggested that the sub-barrier energies can be used for heavy element synthesis.

  13. Study of Heavy-ion Induced Fission for Heavy Element Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, K.; Ikezoe, H.; Hofmann, S.; Ackermann, D.; Aritomo, Y.; Comas, V. F.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Heinz, S.; Heredia, J. A.; Heßberger, F. P.; Hirose, K.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Kojouharov, I.; Lommel, B.; Makii, M.; Mann, R.; Mitsuoka, S.; Nishinaka, I.; Ohtsuki, T.; Saro, S.; Schädel, M.; Popeko, A. G.; Türler, A.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Yakushev, A.; Yeremin, A.

    2014-05-01

    Fission fragment mass distributions were measured in heavy-ion induced fission of 238U. The mass distributions changed drastically with incident energy. The results are explained by a change of the ratio between fusion and quasifission with nuclear orientation. A calculation based on a fluctuation dissipation model reproduced the mass distributions and their incident energy dependence. Fusion probability was determined in the analysis. Evaporation residue cross sections were calculated with a statistical model for the reactions of 30Si+238U and 34S+238U using the obtained fusion probability in the entrance channel. The results agree with the measured cross sections of 263,264Sg and 267,268Hs, produced by 30Si+238U and 34S+238U, respectively. It is also suggested that sub-barrier energies can be used for heavy element synthesis.

  14. A CHEMICAL METHOD OF TREATING FISSIONABLE MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Olson, C.M.

    1959-09-01

    One step of a process for separating plutonium from uranium and fission products is presented. A nitric acid solution containing these constituents is treated with formic acid to reduce simultaneously the plutonium to a valence state of not greater than +4 and destroy and eliminate the excess nitric acid.

  15. After Apollo: Fission Origin of the Moon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, John A.

    1973-01-01

    Presents current ideas about the fission process of the Moon, including loss of mass. Saturnian rings, center of the Moon, binary stars, and uniformitarianism. Indicates that planetary formation may be best explained as a destructive, rather than a constructive process. (CC)

  16. Fission Energy and Other Sources of Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfven, Hannes

    1974-01-01

    Discusses different forms of energy sources and basic reasons for the opposition to the use of atomic energy. Suggests that research efforts should also be aimed toward the fission technology to make it acceptable besides major research studies conducted in the development of alternative energy sources. (CC)

  17. Liquid uranium alloy-helium fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Minkov, V.

    1984-06-13

    This invention describes a nuclear fission reactor which has a core vessel and at least one tandem heat exchanger vessel coupled therewith across upper and lower passages to define a closed flow loop. Nuclear fuel such as a uranium alloy in its liquid phase fills these vessels and flow passages. Solid control elements in the reactor core vessel are adapted to be adjusted relative to one another to control fission reaction of the liquid fuel therein. Moderator elements in the other vessel and flow passages preclude fission reaction therein. An inert gas such as helium is bubbled upwardly through the heat exchanger vessel operable to move the liquid fuel upwardly therein and unidirectionally around the closed loop and downwardly through the core vessel. This helium gas is further directed to heat conversion means outside of the reactor vessels to utilize the heat from the fission reaction to generate useful output. The nuclear fuel operates in the 1200 to 1800/sup 0/C range, and even higher to 2500/sup 0/C.

  18. Prompt γ rays and neutrons from fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, E.; Wu, C. Y.; Chyzh, A.; Gostic, J.; Henderson, R.; Haight, R. C.; Lee, H. Y.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Perdue, B. A.; Taddeucci, T. N.

    2011-10-01

    Nuclear data are needed to test the accuracy of calculations from nuclear reaction codes. Information on the prompt γ-ray distributions from fission is sparse and only a handful of published experiments data that measured the prompt γ-ray distribution above incident neutron energies of 1 MeV can be found. In addition, improvement on the accuracy and shape of neutron spectrum from the fission of actinides been requested by the nuclear data community. An investigation on the shapes of the neutron and γ-ray distributions from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and the neutron-induced fission of 235U was undertaken using the Chi-Nu detector array at the Weapons Neutron Research Facility of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Preliminary results will be presented. This work is performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  19. Fission Dynamics with Microscopic Level Densities

    DOE PAGES

    Ward, D.; Carlsson, B. G.; Dossing, Th.; ...

    2017-01-01

    We present a consistent framework for treating the energy and angularmomentum dependence of the shape evolution in the nuclear fission. It combines microscopically calculated level densities with the Metropolis-walk method, has no new parameters, and can elucidate the energy-dependent influence of pairing and shell effects on the dynamics of warm nuclei.

  20. Liquid uranium alloy-helium fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Minkov, Vladimir

    1986-01-01

    This invention teaches a nuclear fission reactor having a core vessel and at least one tandem heat exchanger vessel coupled therewith across upper and lower passages to define a closed flow loop. Nuclear fuel such as a uranium alloy in its liquid phase fills these vessels and flow passages. Solid control elements in the reactor core vessel are adapted to be adjusted relative to one another to control fission reaction of the liquid fuel therein. Moderator elements in the other vessel and flow passages preclude fission reaction therein. An inert gas such as helium is bubbled upwardly through the heat exchanger vessel operable to move the liquid fuel upwardly therein and unidirectionally around the closed loop and downwardly through the core vessel. This helium gas is further directed to heat conversion means outside of the reactor vessels to utilize the heat from the fission reaction to generate useful output. The nuclear fuel operates in the 1200.degree.-1800.degree. C. range, and even higher to 2500.degree. C., limited only by the thermal effectiveness of the structural materials, increasing the efficiency of power generation from the normal 30-35% with 300.degree.-500.degree. C. upper limit temperature to 50-65%. Irradiation of the circulating liquid fuel, as contrasted to only localized irradiation of a solid fuel, provides improved fuel utilization.

  1. Quintet multiexciton dynamics in singlet fission

    DOE PAGES

    Tayebjee, Murad J. Y.; Sanders, Samuel N.; Kumarasamy, Elango; ...

    2016-10-17

    Singlet fission, in which two triplet excitons are generated from a single absorbed photon, is a key third-generation solar cell concept. Conservation of angular momentum requires that singlet fission populates correlated multiexciton states, which can subsequently dissociate to generate free triplets. However, little is known about electronic and spin correlations in these systems since, due to its typically short lifetime, the multiexciton state is challenging to isolate and study. Here, we use bridged pentacene dimers, which undergo intramolecular singlet fission while isolated in solution and in solid matrices, as a unimolecular model system that can trap long-lived multiexciton states. Wemore » also combine transient absorption and time-resolved electron spin resonance spectroscopies to show that spin correlations in the multiexciton state persist for hundreds of nanoseconds. Furthermore, we confirm long-standing predictions that singlet fission produces triplet pair states of quintet character. Finally, we compare two different pentacene–bridge–pentacene chromophores, systematically tuning the coupling between the pentacenes to understand how differences in molecular structure affect the population and dissociation of multiexciton quintet states.« less

  2. The absolute threshold of cone vision

    PubMed Central

    Koeing, Darran; Hofer, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of the absolute threshold of cone vision, which has been previously underestimated due to sub-optimal conditions or overly strict subjective response criteria. We avoided these limitations by using optimized stimuli and experimental conditions while having subjects respond within a rating scale framework. Small (1′ fwhm), brief (34 msec), monochromatic (550 nm) stimuli were foveally presented at multiple intensities in dark-adapted retina for 5 subjects. For comparison, 4 subjects underwent similar testing with rod-optimized stimuli. Cone absolute threshold, that is, the minimum light energy for which subjects were just able to detect a visual stimulus with any response criterion, was 203 ± 38 photons at the cornea, ∼0.47 log units lower than previously reported. Two-alternative forced-choice measurements in a subset of subjects yielded consistent results. Cone thresholds were less responsive to criterion changes than rod thresholds, suggesting a limit to the stimulus information recoverable from the cone mosaic in addition to the limit imposed by Poisson noise. Results were consistent with expectations for detection in the face of stimulus uncertainty. We discuss implications of these findings for modeling the first stages of human cone vision and interpreting psychophysical data acquired with adaptive optics at the spatial scale of the receptor mosaic. PMID:21270115

  3. Why to compare absolute numbers of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the absolute number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to absolute mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Relational versus absolute representation in categorization.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Darren J; Pothos, Emmanuel M; Perlman, Amotz

    2012-01-01

    This study explores relational-like and absolute-like representations in categorization. Although there is much evidence that categorization processes can involve information about both the particular physical properties of studied instances and abstract (relational) properties, there has been little work on the factors that lead to one kind of representation as opposed to the other. We tested 370 participants in 6 experiments, in which participants had to classify new items into predefined artificial categories. In 4 experiments, we observed a predominantly relational-like mode of classification, and in 2 experiments we observed a shift toward an absolute-like mode of classification. These results suggest 3 factors that promote a relational-like mode of classification: fewer items per group, more training groups, and the presence of a time delay. Overall, we propose that less information about the distributional properties of a category or weaker memory traces for the category exemplars (induced, e.g., by having smaller categories or a time delay) can encourage relational-like categorization.

  5. Linear ultrasonic motor for absolute gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yue; Yao, Zhiyuan; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2017-05-01

    Thanks to their compactness and suitability for vacuum applications, linear ultrasonic motors are considered as substitutes for classical electromagnetic motors as driving elements in absolute gravimeters. Still, their application is prevented by relatively low power output. To overcome this limitation and provide better stability, a V-type linear ultrasonic motor with a new clamping method is proposed for a gravimeter. In this paper, a mechanical model of stators with flexible clamping components is suggested, according to a design criterion for clamps of linear ultrasonic motors. After that, an effect of tangential and normal rigidity of the clamping components on mechanical output is studied. It is followed by discussion of a new clamping method with sufficient tangential rigidity and a capability to facilitate pre-load. Additionally, a prototype of the motor with the proposed clamping method was fabricated and the performance tests in vertical direction were implemented. Experimental results show that the suggested motor has structural stability and high dynamic performance, such as no-load speed of 1.4m/s and maximal thrust of 43N, meeting the requirements for absolute gravimeters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Nuclear fission: a review of experimental advances and phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreyev, A. N.; Nishio, K.; Schmidt, K.-H.

    2018-01-01

    In the last two decades, through technological, experimental and theoretical advances, the situation in experimental fission studies has changed dramatically. With the use of advanced production and detection techniques both much more detailed and precise information can now be obtained for the traditional regions of fission research and, crucially, new regions of nuclei have become routinely accessible for fission studies. This work first of all reviews the recent developments in experimental fission techniques, in particular the resurgence of transfer-induced fission reactions with light and heavy ions, the emerging use of inverse-kinematic approaches, both at Coulomb and relativistic energies, and of fission studies with radioactive beams. The emphasis on the fission-fragment mass and charge distributions will be made in this work, though some of the other fission observables, such as prompt neutron and γ-ray emission will also be reviewed. A particular attention will be given to the low-energy fission in the so far scarcely explored nuclei in the very neutron-deficient lead region. They recently became the focus for several complementary experimental studies, such as β-delayed fission with radioactive beams at ISOLDE(CERN), Coulex-induced fission of relativistic secondary beams at FRS(GSI), and several prompt fusion–fission studies. The synergy of these approaches allows a unique insight in the new region of asymmetric fission around {\\hspace{0pt}}180 Hg, recently discovered at ISOLDE. Recent extensive theoretical efforts in this region will also be outlined. The unprecedented high-quality data for fission fragments, completely identified in Z and A, by means of reactions in inverse kinematics at FRS(GSI) and VAMOS(GANIL) will be also reviewed. These experiments explored an extended range of mercury-to-californium elements, spanning from the neutron-deficient to neutron-rich nuclides, and covering both asymmetric, symmetric and transitional fission regions

  7. The partial fission of fast spinning asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardivel, Simon; Sanchez, Paul; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2016-10-01

    The spin rates of asteroids systematically change over time due the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect. Above a certain spin rate that depends on the body's density, regions of an asteroid can enter in tension, with components held to the body by cohesive forces. When the body fails, deformation or fission can occur. Catastrophic fission leading to complete disruption has been directly observed in active asteroid P/2013 R3. Partial fission, the loss of only part of the body, has been proposed as a mechanism for the formation of binaries and is explored here.The equatorial cavities of (341843) 2008 EV5 and of (185851) 2000 DP107 (a binary system) are consistent with a localized partial fission of the body (LPSC 2016 #1036). The examination of the gravity field of these bodies reveals that a mass placed within these cavities could be shed. In this mechanism, the outward pull of inertial forces creates an average stress at the cavity interface of ≈1 Pa for 2008 EV5 and ≈3 Pa for 2000 DP107 at spin periods of ≈3.15 h for the assumed densities of 1.3 g/cm3.This work continues the study of this partial, localized fission. Specifically, it addresses the issue of the low cohesion necessary to the mechanism. These cohesion values are typically lower than global strength values inferred on other asteroids (10 - 200 Pa), meaning that partial fission may occur prior to larger-scale deformations. Yet, several processes can explain the discrepancy, as they can naturally segregate particles by size. For instance, landslides or granular convection (Brazil nut effect) could bring larger boulders to the equator of the body, while finer particles are left at higher latitudes or sink to the center. Conversely, failure of the interior could bring boulders to the surface. The peculiar profile shape of these asteroids, shared by many binaries (e.g. 1999 KW4, 1996 FG3) may also be a clue of this heterogeneity, as this "spin top" shape is obtained in simulations with

  8. Langevin model of low-energy fission

    SciTech Connect

    Sierk, Arnold John

    Since the earliest days of fission, stochastic models have been used to describe and model the process. For a quarter century, numerical solutions of Langevin equations have been used to model fission of highly excited nuclei, where microscopic potential-energy effects have been neglected. In this paper I present a Langevin model for the fission of nuclei with low to medium excitation energies, for which microscopic effects in the potential energy cannot be ignored. I solve Langevin equations in a five-dimensional space of nuclear deformations. The macroscopic-microscopic potential energy from a global nuclear structure model well benchmarked to nuclear masses ismore » tabulated on a mesh of approximately 10 7 points in this deformation space. The potential is defined continuously inside the mesh boundaries by use of a moving five-dimensional cubic spline approximation. Because of reflection symmetry, the effective mesh is nearly twice this size. For the inertia, I use a (possibly scaled) approximation to the inertia tensor defined by irrotational flow. A phenomenological dissipation tensor related to one-body dissipation is used. A normal-mode analysis of the dynamical system at the saddle point and the assumption of quasiequilibrium provide distributions of initial conditions appropriate to low excitation energies, and are extended to model spontaneous fission. A dynamical model of postscission fragment motion including dynamical deformations and separation allows the calculation of final mass and kinetic-energy distributions, along with other interesting quantities. The model makes quantitative predictions for fragment mass and kinetic-energy yields, some of which are very close to measured ones. Varying the energy of the incident neutron for induced fission allows the prediction of energy dependencies of fragment yields and average kinetic energies. With a simple approximation for spontaneous fission starting conditions, quantitative predictions are made for

  9. Langevin model of low-energy fission

    DOE PAGES

    Sierk, Arnold John

    2017-09-05

    Since the earliest days of fission, stochastic models have been used to describe and model the process. For a quarter century, numerical solutions of Langevin equations have been used to model fission of highly excited nuclei, where microscopic potential-energy effects have been neglected. In this paper I present a Langevin model for the fission of nuclei with low to medium excitation energies, for which microscopic effects in the potential energy cannot be ignored. I solve Langevin equations in a five-dimensional space of nuclear deformations. The macroscopic-microscopic potential energy from a global nuclear structure model well benchmarked to nuclear masses ismore » tabulated on a mesh of approximately 10 7 points in this deformation space. The potential is defined continuously inside the mesh boundaries by use of a moving five-dimensional cubic spline approximation. Because of reflection symmetry, the effective mesh is nearly twice this size. For the inertia, I use a (possibly scaled) approximation to the inertia tensor defined by irrotational flow. A phenomenological dissipation tensor related to one-body dissipation is used. A normal-mode analysis of the dynamical system at the saddle point and the assumption of quasiequilibrium provide distributions of initial conditions appropriate to low excitation energies, and are extended to model spontaneous fission. A dynamical model of postscission fragment motion including dynamical deformations and separation allows the calculation of final mass and kinetic-energy distributions, along with other interesting quantities. The model makes quantitative predictions for fragment mass and kinetic-energy yields, some of which are very close to measured ones. Varying the energy of the incident neutron for induced fission allows the prediction of energy dependencies of fragment yields and average kinetic energies. With a simple approximation for spontaneous fission starting conditions, quantitative predictions are made for

  10. Microscopic theory of nuclear fission: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; Robledo, L. M.

    2016-11-01

    This article reviews how nuclear fission is described within nuclear density functional theory. A distinction should be made between spontaneous fission, where half-lives are the main observables and quantum tunnelling the essential concept, and induced fission, where the focus is on fragment properties and explicitly time-dependent approaches are often invoked. Overall, the cornerstone of the density functional theory approach to fission is the energy density functional formalism. The basic tenets of this method, including some well-known tools such as the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) theory, effective two-body nuclear potentials such as the Skyrme and Gogny force, finite-temperature extensions and beyond mean-field corrections, are presented succinctly. The energy density functional approach is often combined with the hypothesis that the time-scale of the large amplitude collective motion driving the system to fission is slow compared to typical time-scales of nucleons inside the nucleus. In practice, this hypothesis of adiabaticity is implemented by introducing (a few) collective variables and mapping out the many-body Schrödinger equation into a collective Schrödinger-like equation for the nuclear wave-packet. The region of the collective space where the system transitions from one nucleus to two (or more) fragments defines what are called the scission configurations. The inertia tensor that enters the kinetic energy term of the collective Schrödinger-like equation is one of the most essential ingredients of the theory, since it includes the response of the system to small changes in the collective variables. For this reason, the two main approximations used to compute this inertia tensor, the adiabatic time-dependent HFB and the generator coordinate method, are presented in detail, both in their general formulation and in their most common approximations. The collective inertia tensor enters also the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) formula used to extract

  11. Microscopic Theory of Nuclear Fission: A Review

    DOE PAGES

    Schunck, N.; Robledo, L. M.

    2016-10-11

    This paper reviews how nuclear fission is described within nuclear density functional theory. A distinction should be made between spontaneous fission, where half-lives are the main observables and quantum tunnelling the essential concept, and induced fission, where the focus is on fragment properties and explicitly time-dependent approaches are often invoked. Overall, the cornerstone of the density functional theory approach to fission is the energy density functional formalism. The basic tenets of this method, including some well-known tools such as the Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov (HFB) theory, effective two-body nuclear potentials such as the Skyrme and Gogny force, finite-temperature extensions and beyond mean-field corrections,more » are presented succinctly. The energy density functional approach is often combined with the hypothesis that the time-scale of the large amplitude collective motion driving the system to fission is slow compared to typical time-scales of nucleons inside the nucleus. In practice, this hypothesis of adiabaticity is implemented by introducing (a few) collective variables and mapping out the many-body Schrödinger equation into a collective Schrödinger-like equation for the nuclear wave-packet. The region of the collective space where the system transitions from one nucleus to two (or more) fragments defines what are called the scission configurations. The inertia tensor that enters the kinetic energy term of the collective Schrödinger-like equation is one of the most essential ingredients of the theory, since it includes the response of the system to small changes in the collective variables. For this reason, the two main approximations used to compute this inertia tensor, the adiabatic time-dependent HFB and the generator coordinate method, are presented in detail, both in their general formulation and in their most common approximations. The collective inertia tensor enters also the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB) formula

  12. Microscopic theory of nuclear fission: a review.

    PubMed

    Schunck, N; Robledo, L M

    2016-11-01

    This article reviews how nuclear fission is described within nuclear density functional theory. A distinction should be made between spontaneous fission, where half-lives are the main observables and quantum tunnelling the essential concept, and induced fission, where the focus is on fragment properties and explicitly time-dependent approaches are often invoked. Overall, the cornerstone of the density functional theory approach to fission is the energy density functional formalism. The basic tenets of this method, including some well-known tools such as the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) theory, effective two-body nuclear potentials such as the Skyrme and Gogny force, finite-temperature extensions and beyond mean-field corrections, are presented succinctly. The energy density functional approach is often combined with the hypothesis that the time-scale of the large amplitude collective motion driving the system to fission is slow compared to typical time-scales of nucleons inside the nucleus. In practice, this hypothesis of adiabaticity is implemented by introducing (a few) collective variables and mapping out the many-body Schrödinger equation into a collective Schrödinger-like equation for the nuclear wave-packet. The region of the collective space where the system transitions from one nucleus to two (or more) fragments defines what are called the scission configurations. The inertia tensor that enters the kinetic energy term of the collective Schrödinger-like equation is one of the most essential ingredients of the theory, since it includes the response of the system to small changes in the collective variables. For this reason, the two main approximations used to compute this inertia tensor, the adiabatic time-dependent HFB and the generator coordinate method, are presented in detail, both in their general formulation and in their most common approximations. The collective inertia tensor enters also the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) formula used to extract

  13. Microscopic Theory of Nuclear Fission: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Schunck, N.; Robledo, L. M.

    This paper reviews how nuclear fission is described within nuclear density functional theory. A distinction should be made between spontaneous fission, where half-lives are the main observables and quantum tunnelling the essential concept, and induced fission, where the focus is on fragment properties and explicitly time-dependent approaches are often invoked. Overall, the cornerstone of the density functional theory approach to fission is the energy density functional formalism. The basic tenets of this method, including some well-known tools such as the Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov (HFB) theory, effective two-body nuclear potentials such as the Skyrme and Gogny force, finite-temperature extensions and beyond mean-field corrections,more » are presented succinctly. The energy density functional approach is often combined with the hypothesis that the time-scale of the large amplitude collective motion driving the system to fission is slow compared to typical time-scales of nucleons inside the nucleus. In practice, this hypothesis of adiabaticity is implemented by introducing (a few) collective variables and mapping out the many-body Schrödinger equation into a collective Schrödinger-like equation for the nuclear wave-packet. The region of the collective space where the system transitions from one nucleus to two (or more) fragments defines what are called the scission configurations. The inertia tensor that enters the kinetic energy term of the collective Schrödinger-like equation is one of the most essential ingredients of the theory, since it includes the response of the system to small changes in the collective variables. For this reason, the two main approximations used to compute this inertia tensor, the adiabatic time-dependent HFB and the generator coordinate method, are presented in detail, both in their general formulation and in their most common approximations. The collective inertia tensor enters also the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB) formula

  14. Statistical and dynamical modeling of heavy-ion fusion-fission reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslamizadeh, H.; Razazzadeh, H.

    2018-02-01

    A modified statistical model and a four dimensional dynamical model based on Langevin equations have been used to simulate the fission process of the excited compound nuclei 207At and 216Ra produced in the fusion 19F + 188Os and 19F + 197Au reactions. The evaporation residue cross section, the fission cross section, the pre-scission neutron, proton and alpha multiplicities and the anisotropy of fission fragments angular distribution have been calculated for the excited compound nuclei 207At and 216Ra. In the modified statistical model the effects of spin K about the symmetry axis and temperature have been considered in calculations of the fission widths and the potential energy surfaces. It was shown that the modified statistical model can reproduce the above mentioned experimental data by using appropriate values of the temperature coefficient of the effective potential equal to λ = 0.0180 ± 0.0055, 0.0080 ± 0.0030 MeV-2 and the scaling factor of the fission barrier height equal to rs = 1.0015 ± 0.0025, 1.0040 ± 0.0020 for the compound nuclei 207At and 216Ra, respectively. Three collective shape coordinates plus the projection of total spin of the compound nucleus on the symmetry axis, K, were considered in the four dimensional dynamical model. In the dynamical calculations, dissipation was generated through the chaos weighted wall and window friction formula. Comparison of the theoretical results with the experimental data showed that two models make it possible to reproduce satisfactorily the above mentioned experimental data for the excited compound nuclei 207At and 216Ra.

  15. Forecasting Error Calculation with Mean Absolute Deviation and Mean Absolute Percentage Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khair, Ummul; Fahmi, Hasanul; Hakim, Sarudin Al; Rahim, Robbi

    2017-12-01

    Prediction using a forecasting method is one of the most important things for an organization, the selection of appropriate forecasting methods is also important but the percentage error of a method is more important in order for decision makers to adopt the right culture, the use of the Mean Absolute Deviation and Mean Absolute Percentage Error to calculate the percentage of mistakes in the least square method resulted in a percentage of 9.77% and it was decided that the least square method be worked for time series and trend data.

  16. Fission track dating of kimberlitic zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggerty, Stephen E.; Raber, Ellen; Naeser, Charles W.

    1983-04-01

    The only reliable method for dating kimberlites at present is the lengthy and specialized hydrothermal procedure that extracts 206Pb and 238U from low-uranium zircons. This paper describes a second successful method by fission track dating of large single-crystal zircons, 1.0-1.5 cm in dimension. The use of large crystals overcomes the limitations imposed in conventional fission track analysis which utilizes crushed fragments. Low track densities, optical track dispersion, and the random orientation of polished surfaces in the etch and irradiation cycle are effectively overcome. Fission track ages of zircons from five African kimberlites are reported, from the Kimberley Pool (90.3 ± 6.5 m.y.), Orapa (87.4 ± 5.7 and 92.4 ± 6.1 m.y.), Nzega (51.1 ± 3.8 m.y.), Koffiefontein (90.0 ± 8.2 m.y.), and Val do Queve (133.4 ± 11.5 m.y.). In addition we report the first radiometric ages (707.9 ± 59.6 and 705.5 ± 61.0 m.y.) of crustal zircons from kimberlites in northwest Liberia. The fission track ages agree well with earlier age estimates. Most of the zircons examined in this study are zoned with respect to uranium but linear correlations are established (by regression analysis) between zones of variable uranium content, and within zones of constant uranium content (by analysis of variance). Concordance between the fission track method and the U/Pb technique is established and we concluded that track fading from thermal annealing has not taken place. Kimberlitic zircons dated in this study, therefore, record the time of eruption.

  17. Fission track dating of kimberlitic zircons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haggerty, S.E.; Raber, E.; Naeser, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The only reliable method for dating kimberlites at present is the lengthy and specialized hydrothermal procedure that extracts 206Pb and 238U from low-uranium zircons. This paper describes a second successful method by fission track dating of large single-crystal zircons, 1.0-1.5 cm in dimension. The use of large crystals overcomes the limitations imposed in conventional fission track analysis which utilizes crushed fragments. Low track densities, optical track dispersion, and the random orientation of polished surfaces in the etch and irradiation cycle are effectively overcome. Fission track ages of zircons from five African kimberlites are reported, from the Kimberley Pool (90.3 ?? 6.5 m.y.), Orapa (87.4 ?? 5.7 and 92.4 ?? 6.1 m.y.), Nzega (51.1 ?? 3.8 m.y.), Koffiefontein (90.0 ?? 8.2 m.y.), and Val do Queve (133.4 ?? 11.5 m.y.). In addition we report the first radiometric ages (707.9 ?? 59.6 and 705.5 ?? 61.0 m.y.) of crustal zircons from kimberlites in northwest Liberia. The fission track ages agree well with earlier age estimates. Most of the zircons examined in this study are zoned with respect to uranium but linear correlations are established (by regression analysis) between zones of variable uranium content, and within zones of constant uranium content (by analysis of variance). Concordance between the fission track method and the U/Pb technique is established and we concluded that track fading from thermal annealing has not taken place. Kimberlitic zircons dated in this study, therefore, record the time of eruption. ?? 1983.

  18. A Conceptual Approach to Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. When absolute value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…

  19. Using, Seeing, Feeling, and Doing Absolute Value for Deeper Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponce, Gregorio A.

    2008-01-01

    Using sticky notes and number lines, a hands-on activity is shared that anchors initial student thinking about absolute value. The initial point of reference should help students successfully evaluate numeric problems involving absolute value. They should also be able to solve absolute value equations and inequalities that are typically found in…

  20. 20 CFR 404.1205 - Absolute coverage groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Absolute coverage groups. 404.1205 Section... INSURANCE (1950- ) Coverage of Employees of State and Local Governments What Groups of Employees May Be Covered § 404.1205 Absolute coverage groups. (a) General. An absolute coverage group is a permanent...

  1. 20 CFR 404.1205 - Absolute coverage groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Absolute coverage groups. 404.1205 Section... INSURANCE (1950- ) Coverage of Employees of State and Local Governments What Groups of Employees May Be Covered § 404.1205 Absolute coverage groups. (a) General. An absolute coverage group is a permanent...

  2. 20 CFR 404.1205 - Absolute coverage groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Absolute coverage groups. 404.1205 Section... INSURANCE (1950- ) Coverage of Employees of State and Local Governments What Groups of Employees May Be Covered § 404.1205 Absolute coverage groups. (a) General. An absolute coverage group is a permanent...

  3. Modeling absolute plate and plume motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodinier, G. P.; Wessel, P.; Conrad, C. P.

    2016-12-01

    Paleomagnetic evidence for plume drift has made modeling of absolute plate motions challenging, especially since direct observations of plume drift are lacking. Predictions of plume drift arising from mantle convection models and broadly satisfying observed paleolatitudes have so far provided the only framework for deriving absolute plate motions over moving hotspots. However, uncertainties in mantle rheology, temperature, and initial conditions make such models nonunique. Using simulated and real data, we will show that age progressions along Pacific hotspot trails provide strong constraints on plume motions for all major trails, and furthermore that it is possible to derive models for relative plume drift from these data alone. Relative plume drift depends on the inter-hotspot distances derived from age progressions but lacks a fixed reference point and orientation. By incorporating paleolatitude histories for the Hawaii and Louisville chains we add further constraints on allowable plume motions, yet one unknown parameter remains: a longitude shift that applies equally to all plumes. To obtain a solution we could restrict either the Hawaii or Louisville plume to have latitudinal motion only, thus satisfying paleolatitude constraints. Yet, restricting one plume to latitudinal motion while all others move freely is not realistic. Consequently, it is only possible to resolve the motion of hotspots relative to an overall and unknown longitudinal shift as a function of time. Our plate motions are therefore dependent on the same shift via an unknown rotation about the north pole. Yet, as plume drifts are consequences of mantle convection, our results place strong constraints on the pattern of convection. Other considerations, such as imposed limits on plate speed, plume speed, proximity to LLSVP edges, model smoothness, or relative plate motions via ridge-spotting may add further constraints that allow a unique model of Pacific absolute plate and plume motions to be

  4. Fission Technology for Exploring and Utilizing the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Mike; VanDyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Pedersen, Kevin; Martin, James; Dickens, Ricky; Salvail, Pat; Hrbub, Ivana; Schmidt, George R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Fission technology can enable rapid, affordable access to any point in the solar system. Potential fission-based transportation options include bimodal nuclear thermal rockets, high specific energy propulsion systems, and pulsed fission propulsion systems. In-space propellant re-supply enhances the effective performance of all systems, but requires significant infrastructure development. Safe, timely, affordable utilization of first-generation space fission propulsion systems will enable the development of more advanced systems. First generation space systems will build on over 45 years of US and international space fission system technology development to minimize cost,

  5. Wide-field absolute transverse blood flow velocity mapping in vessel centerline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nanshou; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Bifeng; Guan, Caizhong; Wang, Mingyi; Han, Dingan; Tan, Haishu; Zeng, Yaguang

    2018-02-01

    We propose a wide-field absolute transverse blood flow velocity measurement method in vessel centerline based on absorption intensity fluctuation modulation effect. The difference between the light absorption capacities of red blood cells and background tissue under low-coherence illumination is utilized to realize the instantaneous and average wide-field optical angiography images. The absolute fuzzy connection algorithm is used for vessel centerline extraction from the average wide-field optical angiography. The absolute transverse velocity in the vessel centerline is then measured by a cross-correlation analysis according to instantaneous modulation depth signal. The proposed method promises to contribute to the treatment of diseases, such as those related to anemia or thrombosis.

  6. Use of Absolute and Comparative Performance Feedback in Absolute and Comparative Judgments and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Don A.; Klein, William M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Which matters more--beliefs about absolute ability or ability relative to others? This study set out to compare the effects of such beliefs on satisfaction with performance, self-evaluations, and bets on future performance. In Experiment 1, undergraduate participants were told they had answered 20% correct, 80% correct, or were not given their…

  7. Measurement of Plutonium-240 Angular Momentum Dependent Fission Probabilities Using the Alpha-Alpha' Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, Johnathon

    Accurate nuclear reaction data from a few keV to tens of MeV and across the table of nuclides is essential to a number of applications of nuclear physics, including national security, nuclear forensics, nuclear astrophysics, and nuclear energy. Precise determination of (n, f) and neutron capture cross sections for reactions in high- ux environments are particularly important for a proper understanding of nuclear reactor performance and stellar nucleosynthesis. In these extreme environments reactions on short-lived and otherwise difficult-to-produce isotopes play a significant role in system evolution and provide insights into the types of nuclear processes taking place; a detailed understanding of these processes is necessary to properly determine cross sections far from stability. Indirect methods are often attempted to measure cross sections on isotopes that are difficult to separate in a laboratory setting. Using the surrogate approach, the same compound nucleus from the reaction of interest is created through a "surrogate" reaction on a different isotope and the resulting decay is measured. This result is combined with appropriate reaction theory for compound nucleus population, from which the desired cross sections can be inferred. This method has shown promise, but the theoretical framework often lacks necessary experimental data to constrain models. In this work, dual arrays of silicon telescope particle identification detectors and photovoltaic (solar) cell fission fragment detectors have been used to measure the fission probability of the 240Pu(alpha, alpha'f) reaction - a surrogate for the 239Pu(n, f) - and fission of 35.9(2)MeV at eleven scattering angles from 40° to 140° in 10° intervals and at nuclear excitation energies up to 16MeV. Within experimental uncertainty, the maximum fission probability was observed at the neutron separation energy for each alpha scattering angle. Fission probabilities were separated into five 500 keV bins from 5:5MeV to

  8. A Proteome-wide Fission Yeast Interactome Reveals Network Evolution Principles from Yeasts to Human.

    PubMed

    Vo, Tommy V; Das, Jishnu; Meyer, Michael J; Cordero, Nicolas A; Akturk, Nurten; Wei, Xiaomu; Fair, Benjamin J; Degatano, Andrew G; Fragoza, Robert; Liu, Lisa G; Matsuyama, Akihisa; Trickey, Michelle; Horibata, Sachi; Grimson, Andrew; Yamano, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Minoru; Roth, Frederick P; Pleiss, Jeffrey A; Xia, Yu; Yu, Haiyuan

    2016-01-14

    Here, we present FissionNet, a proteome-wide binary protein interactome for S. pombe, comprising 2,278 high-quality interactions, of which ∼ 50% were previously not reported in any species. FissionNet unravels previously unreported interactions implicated in processes such as gene silencing and pre-mRNA splicing. We developed a rigorous network comparison framework that accounts for assay sensitivity and specificity, revealing extensive species-specific network rewiring between fission yeast, budding yeast, and human. Surprisingly, although genes are better conserved between the yeasts, S. pombe interactions are significantly better conserved in human than in S. cerevisiae. Our framework also reveals that different modes of gene duplication influence the extent to which paralogous proteins are functionally repurposed. Finally, cross-species interactome mapping demonstrates that coevolution of interacting proteins is remarkably prevalent, a result with important implications for studying human disease in model organisms. Overall, FissionNet is a valuable resource for understanding protein functions and their evolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Driven tracer with absolute negative mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cividini, J.; Mukamel, D.; Posch, H. A.

    2018-02-01

    Instances of negative mobility, where a system responds to a perturbation in a way opposite to naive expectation, have been studied theoretically and experimentally in numerous nonequilibrium systems. In this work we show that absolute negative mobility (ANM), whereby current is produced in a direction opposite to the drive, can occur around equilibrium states. This is demonstrated with a simple one-dimensional lattice model with a driven tracer. We derive analytical predictions in the linear response regime and elucidate the mechanism leading to ANM by studying the high-density limit. We also study numerically a model of hard Brownian disks in a narrow planar channel, for which the lattice model can be viewed as a toy model. We find that the model exhibits negative differential mobility (NDM), but no ANM.

  10. Measurement of absolute gamma emission probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumithrarachchi, Chandana S.; Rengan, Krish; Griffin, Henry C.

    2003-06-01

    The energies and emission probabilities (intensities) of gamma-rays emitted in radioactive decays of particular nuclides are the most important characteristics by which to quantify mixtures of radionuclides. Often, quantification is limited by uncertainties in measured intensities. A technique was developed to reduce these uncertainties. The method involves obtaining a pure sample of a nuclide using radiochemical techniques, and using appropriate fractions for beta and gamma measurements. The beta emission rates were measured using a liquid scintillation counter, and the gamma emission rates were measured with a high-purity germanium detector. Results were combined to obtain absolute gamma emission probabilities. All sources of uncertainties greater than 0.1% were examined. The method was tested with 38Cl and 88Rb.

  11. Absolute calibration of ultraviolet filter photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, R. C.; Fairchild, T.; Code, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The essential features of the calibration procedure can be divided into three parts. First, the shape of the bandpass of each photometer was determined by measuring the transmissions of the individual optical components and also by measuring the response of the photometer as a whole. Secondly, each photometer was placed in the essentially-collimated synchrotron radiation bundle maintained at a constant intensity level, and the output signal was determined from about 100 points on the objective. Finally, two or three points on the objective were illuminated by synchrotron radiation at several different intensity levels covering the dynamic range of the photometers. The output signals were placed on an absolute basis by the electron counting technique described earlier.

  12. Absolute negative mobility in the anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruyin; Chen, Chongyang; Nie, Linru

    2017-12-01

    Transport of an inertial Brownian particle driven by the multiplicative Lévy noise was investigated here. Numerical results indicate that: (i) The Lévy noise is able to induce absolute negative mobility (ANM) in the system, while disappearing in the deterministic case; (ii) the ANM can occur in the region of superdiffusion while disappearing in the region of normal diffusion, and the appropriate stable index of the Lévy noise makes the particle move along the opposite direction of the bias force to the maximum degree; (iii) symmetry breaking of the Lévy noise also causes the ANM effect. In addition, the intrinsic physical mechanism and conditions for the ANM to occur are discussed in detail. Our results have the implication that the Lévy noise plays an important role in the occurrence of the ANM phenomenon.

  13. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium.

    PubMed

    Roshan, M V; Springham, S V; Rawat, R S; Lee, P; Krishnan, M

    2010-08-01

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f(n) approximately 4.1x10(-4) with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10(8) neutrons per discharge.

  14. Measured and modelled absolute gravity in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, E.; Forsberg, R.; Strykowski, G.

    2012-12-01

    Present day changes in the ice volume in glaciated areas like Greenland will change the load on the Earth and to this change the lithosphere will respond elastically. The Earth also responds to changes in the ice volume over a millennial time scale. This response is due to the viscous properties of the mantle and is known as Glaical Isostatic Adjustment (GIA). Both signals are present in GPS and absolute gravity (AG) measurements and they will give an uncertainty in mass balance estimates calculated from these data types. It is possible to separate the two signals if both gravity and Global Positioning System (GPS) time series are available. DTU Space acquired an A10 absolute gravimeter in 2008. One purpose of this instrument is to establish AG time series in Greenland and the first measurements were conducted in 2009. Since then are 18 different Greenland GPS Network (GNET) stations visited and six of these are visited more then once. The gravity signal consists of three signals; the elastic signal, the viscous signal and the direct attraction from the ice masses. All of these signals can be modelled using various techniques. The viscous signal is modelled by solving the Sea Level Equation with an appropriate ice history and Earth model. The free code SELEN is used for this. The elastic signal is modelled as a convolution of the elastic Greens function for gravity and a model of present day ice mass changes. The direct attraction is the same as the Newtonian attraction and is calculated as this. Here we will present the preliminary results of the AG measurements in Greenland. We will also present modelled estimates of the direct attraction, the elastic and the viscous signals.

  15. Absolute GPS Positioning Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, G.

    A new inverse approach for restoring the absolute coordinates of a ground -based station from three or four observed GPS pseudo-ranges is proposed. This stochastic method is based on simulations of natural evolution named genetic algorithms (GA). These iterative procedures provide fairly good and robust estimates of the absolute positions in the Earth's geocentric reference system. For comparison/validation, GA results are compared to the ones obtained using the classical linearized least-square scheme for the determination of the XYZ location proposed by Bancroft (1985) which is strongly limited by the number of available observations (i.e. here, the number of input pseudo-ranges must be four). The r.m.s. accuracy of the non -linear cost function reached by this latter method is typically ~10-4 m2 corresponding to ~300-500-m accuracies for each geocentric coordinate. However, GA can provide more acceptable solutions (r.m.s. errors < 10-5 m2), even when only three instantaneous pseudo-ranges are used, such as a lost of lock during a GPS survey. Tuned GA parameters used in different simulations are N=1000 starting individuals, as well as Pc=60-70% and Pm=30-40% for the crossover probability and mutation rate, respectively. Statistical tests on the ability of GA to recover acceptable coordinates in presence of important levels of noise are made simulating nearly 3000 random samples of erroneous pseudo-ranges. Here, two main sources of measurement errors are considered in the inversion: (1) typical satellite-clock errors and/or 300-metre variance atmospheric delays, and (2) Geometrical Dilution of Precision (GDOP) due to the particular GPS satellite configuration at the time of acquisition. Extracting valuable information and even from low-quality starting range observations, GA offer an interesting alternative for high -precision GPS positioning.

  16. Absolute Bioavailability of Osimertinib in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Vishwanathan, Karthick; So, Karen; Thomas, Karen; Bramley, Alex; English, Stephen; Collier, Jo

    2018-04-23

    Osimertinib is a third-generation, central nervous system-active, epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) selective for EGFR-TKI sensitizing and T790M resistance mutations. This phase 1, open-label study (NCT02491944) investigated absolute bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) of oral and intravenous (IV) osimertinib. Ten healthy subjects (21-61 years) received a single oral 80-mg dose concomitantly with a 100 μg (containing 1 μCi) IV microtracer dose of [ 14 C]osimertinib. Oral and IV PK were determined simultaneously for osimertinib and its active metabolites, AZ5104 and AZ7550. High-performance liquid chromatography and accelerator mass spectrometry were used to characterize IV dose PK. Geometric mean absolute oral bioavailability of osimertinib was 69.8% (90% confidence interval, 66.7, 72.9). Oral osimertinib was slowly absorbed (median time to maximum plasma concentration [t max ] 7.0 hours). Following t max , plasma concentrations fell in an apparent monophasic manner. IV clearance and volume of distribution were 16.8 L/h and 1285 L, respectively. Arithmetic mean elimination half-life estimates were 59.7, 52.6, and 72.6 hours for osimertinib, AZ5104, and AZ7550, respectively (oral dosing), and 54.9, 68.4, and 99.7 hours for [ 14 C]osimertinib, [ 14 C]AZ5104, and [ 14 C]AZ7550, respectively (IV dosing). Oral osimertinib was well absorbed. Simultaneous IV and oral PK analysis proved useful for complete understanding of osimertinib PK and showed that the first-pass effect was minimal for osimertinib. © 2018, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  17. Structural inhibition of dynamin-mediated membrane fission by endophilin

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Valentina; Shen, Peter S; Humbert, Frédéric; De Camilli, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Dynamin, which mediates membrane fission during endocytosis, binds endophilin and other members of the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) protein family. How endophilin influences endocytic membrane fission is still unclear. Here, we show that dynamin-mediated membrane fission is potently inhibited in vitro when an excess of endophilin co-assembles with dynamin around membrane tubules. We further show by electron microscopy that endophilin intercalates between turns of the dynamin helix and impairs fission by preventing trans interactions between dynamin rungs that are thought to play critical roles in membrane constriction. In living cells, overexpression of endophilin delayed both fission and transferrin uptake. Together, our observations suggest that while endophilin helps shape endocytic tubules and recruit dynamin to endocytic sites, it can also block membrane fission when present in excess by inhibiting inter-dynamin interactions. The sequence of recruitment and the relative stoichiometry of the two proteins may be critical to regulated endocytic fission. PMID:28933693

  18. Study of fission using multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa; Hirose, Kentaro; Mark, Vermeulen; Makii, Hiroyuki; Orlandi, Riccardo; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Asai, Masato; Toyoshima, Atsushi; Sato, Tetsuya K.; Nagame, Yuichiro; Chiba, Satoshi; Aritomo, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Shouya; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Tsekhanovich, Igor; Petrache, Costel M.; Andreyev, Andrei

    2017-11-01

    It is shown that multi-nucleon transfer reaction is a powerful tool to study fission of exotic neutronrich actinide nuclei, which cannot be accessed by particle-capture or heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, multi-nucleon transfer channels of the reactions of 18O+232Th, 18O+238U, 18O+248Cm, and 18O+237Np were used to measure fission-fragment mass distribution for each transfer channel. Predominantly asymmetric fission is observed at low excitation energies for all the studied cases, with an increase of the symmetric fission towards high excitation energies. Experimental data are compared with predictions of the fluctuation-dissipation model, where effects of multi-chance fission (neutron evaporation prior to fission) was introduced. It is shown that mass-asymmetric structure remaining at high excitation energies originates from low-excited and less neutronrich excited nuclei due to higher-order chance fissions.

  19. A transferable model for singlet-fission kinetics.

    PubMed

    Yost, Shane R; Lee, Jiye; Wilson, Mark W B; Wu, Tony; McMahon, David P; Parkhurst, Rebecca R; Thompson, Nicholas J; Congreve, Daniel N; Rao, Akshay; Johnson, Kerr; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Bawendi, Moungi G; Swager, Timothy M; Friend, Richard H; Baldo, Marc A; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2014-06-01

    Exciton fission is a process that occurs in certain organic materials whereby one singlet exciton splits into two independent triplets. In photovoltaic devices these two triplet excitons can each generate an electron, producing quantum yields per photon of >100% and potentially enabling single-junction power efficiencies above 40%. Here, we measure fission dynamics using ultrafast photoinduced absorption and present a first-principles expression that successfully reproduces the fission rate in materials with vastly different structures. Fission is non-adiabatic and Marcus-like in weakly interacting systems, becoming adiabatic and coupling-independent at larger interaction strengths. In neat films, we demonstrate fission yields near unity even when monomers are separated by >5 Å. For efficient solar cells, however, we show that fission must outcompete charge generation from the singlet exciton. This work lays the foundation for tailoring molecular properties like solubility and energy level alignment while maintaining the high fission yield required for photovoltaic applications.

  20. Landsat-7 ETM+ radiometric stability and absolute calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markham, B.L.; Barker, J.L.; Barsi, J.A.; Kaita, E.; Thome, K.J.; Helder, D.L.; Palluconi, Frank Don; Schott, J.R.; Scaramuzza, Pat; ,

    2002-01-01

    Launched in April 1999, the Landsat-7 ETM+ instrument is in its fourth year of operation. The quality of the acquired calibrated imagery continues to be high, especially with respect to its three most important radiometric performance parameters: reflective band instrument stability to better than ??1%, reflective band absolute calibration to better than ??5%, and thermal band absolute calibration to better than ??0.6 K. The ETM+ instrument has been the most stable of any of the Landsat instruments, in both the reflective and thermal channels. To date, the best on-board calibration source for the reflective bands has been the Full Aperture Solar Calibrator, which has indicated changes of at most -1.8% to -2.0% (95% C.I.) change per year in the ETM+ gain (band 4). However, this change is believed to be caused by changes in the solar diffuser panel, as opposed to a change in the instrument's gain. This belief is based partially on ground observations, which bound the changes in gain in band 4 at -0.7% to +1.5%. Also, ETM+ stability is indicated by the monitoring of desert targets. These image-based results for four Saharan and Arabian sites, for a collection of 35 scenes over the three years since launch, bound the gain change at -0.7% to +0.5% in band 4. Thermal calibration from ground observations revealed an offset error of +0.31 W/m 2 sr um soon after launch. This offset was corrected within the U. S. ground processing system at EROS Data Center on 21-Dec-00, and since then, the band 6 on-board calibration has indicated changes of at most +0.02% to +0.04% (95% C.I.) per year. The latest ground observations have detected no remaining offset error with an RMS error of ??0.6 K. The stability and absolute calibration of the Landsat-7 ETM+ sensor make it an ideal candidate to be used as a reference source for radiometric cross-calibrating to other land remote sensing satellite systems.

  1. Variance computations for functional of absolute risk estimates.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, R M; Petracci, E

    2011-07-01

    We present a simple influence function based approach to compute the variances of estimates of absolute risk and functions of absolute risk. We apply this approach to criteria that assess the impact of changes in the risk factor distribution on absolute risk for an individual and at the population level. As an illustration we use an absolute risk prediction model for breast cancer that includes modifiable risk factors in addition to standard breast cancer risk factors. Influence function based variance estimates for absolute risk and the criteria are compared to bootstrap variance estimates.

  2. Variance computations for functional of absolute risk estimates

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, R.M.; Petracci, E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple influence function based approach to compute the variances of estimates of absolute risk and functions of absolute risk. We apply this approach to criteria that assess the impact of changes in the risk factor distribution on absolute risk for an individual and at the population level. As an illustration we use an absolute risk prediction model for breast cancer that includes modifiable risk factors in addition to standard breast cancer risk factors. Influence function based variance estimates for absolute risk and the criteria are compared to bootstrap variance estimates. PMID:21643476

  3. Investigation of the heavy nuclei fission with anomalously high values of the fission fragments total kinetic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khryachkov, Vitaly; Goverdovskii, Andrei; Ketlerov, Vladimir; Mitrofanov, Vecheslav; Sergachev, Alexei

    2018-03-01

    Binary fission of 232Th and 238U induced by fast neutrons were under intent investigation in the IPPE during recent years. These measurements were performed with a twin ionization chamber with Frisch grids. Signals from the detector were digitized for further processing with a specially developed software. It results in information of kinetic energies, masses, directions and Bragg curves of registered fission fragments. Total statistics of a few million fission events were collected during each experiment. It was discovered that for several combinations of fission fragment masses their total kinetic energy was very close to total free energy of the fissioning system. The probability of such fission events for the fast neutron induced fission was found to be much higher than for spontaneous fission of 252Cf and thermal neutron induced fission of 235U. For experiments with 238U target the energy of incident neutrons were 5 MeV and 6.5 MeV. Close analysis of dependence of fission fragment distribution on compound nucleus excitation energy gave us some explanation of the phenomenon. It could be a process in highly excited compound nucleus which leads the fissioning system from the scission point into the fusion valley with high probability.

  4. A single cyclin–CDK complex is sufficient for both mitotic and meiotic progression in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Escribano, Pilar; Nurse, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The dominant model for eukaryotic cell cycle control proposes that cell cycle progression is driven by a succession of CDK complexes with different substrate specificities. However, in fission yeast it has been shown that a single CDK complex generated by the fusion of the Cdc13 cyclin with the CDK protein Cdc2 can drive the mitotic cell cycle. Meiosis is a modified cell cycle programme in which a single S-phase is followed by two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation. Here we systematically analyse the requirements of the different fission yeast cyclins for meiotic cell cycle progression. We also show that a single Cdc13–Cdc2 complex, in the absence of the other cyclins, can drive the meiotic cell cycle. We propose that qualitatively different CDK complexes are not absolutely required for cell cycle progression either during mitosis or meiosis, and that a single CDK complex can drive both cell cycle programmes. PMID:25891897

  5. System Concepts for Affordable Fission Surface Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee; Poston, David; Qualls, Louis

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of an affordable Fission Surface Power (FSP) system that could be used for NASA applications on the Moon and Mars. The proposed FSP system uses a low temperature, uranium dioxide-fueled, liquid metal-cooled fission reactor coupled to free-piston Stirling converters. The concept was determined by a 12 month NASA/DOE study that examined design options and development strategies based on affordability and risk. The system is considered a low development risk based on the use of terrestrial-derived reactor technology, high efficiency power conversion, and conventional materials. The low-risk approach was selected over other options that could offer higher performance and/or lower mass.

  6. Fission Surface Power Technology Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Donald T.; Mason, Lee S.; Harlow, Scott

    2009-01-01

    With the potential future deployment of a lunar outpost there is expected to be a clear need for a high-power, lunar surface power source to support lunar surface operations independent of the day-night cycle, and Fission Surface Power (FSP) is a very effective solution for power levels above a couple 10 s of kWe. FSP is similarly enabling for the poorly illuminated surface of Mars. The power levels/requirements for a lunar outpost option are currently being studied, but it is known that cost is clearly a predominant concern to decision makers. This paper describes the plans of NASA and the DOE to execute an affordable fission surface power system technology development project to demonstrate sufficient technology readiness of an affordable FSP system so viable and cost-effective FSP system options will be available when high power lunar surface system choices are expected to be made in the early 2010s.

  7. Fission Fragment characterization with FALSTAFF at NFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doré, D.; Farget, F.; Lecolley, F.-R.; Ledoux, X.; Lehaut, G.; Materna, T.; Pancin, J.; Panebianco, S.

    2013-03-01

    The Neutrons for Science (NFS) facility will be one of the first installations of the SPIRAL2 facility. NFS will be composed of a time-of-flight baseline and irradiation stations and will allow studying neutron-induced reactions for energies going from some hundreds of keV up to 40 MeV. Continuous and quasi-monoenergetic energy neutron beams will be available. Taking advantage of this new installation, the development of an experimental setup for a full characterization of actinide fission fragments in this energy domain has been undertaken. To achieve this goal a new detection system called FALSTAFF (Four Arm cLover for the STudy of Actinide Fission Fragments) in under development. In this paper, the characteristics of the NFS facility will be exposed and the motivations for the FALSTAFF experiment will be presented. The experimental setup will be described and the expected resolutions based on realistic GEANT4 simulations will be discussed.

  8. FALSTAFF: A new tool for fission studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, D.; Farget, F.; Lecolley, F.-R.; Lehaut, G.; Materna, T.; Pancin, J.; Panebianco, S.; Papaevangelou, Th.

    2013-12-01

    The future NFS installation will produce high intensity neutron beams from hundreds of keV up to 40 MeV. Taking advantage of this facility, data of particular interest for the nuclear community in view of the development of the fast reactor technology will be measured. The development of an experimental setup called FALSTAFF for a full characterization of actinide fission fragments has been undertaken. Fission fragment isotopic yields and associated neutron multiplicities will be measured as a function of the neutron energy. Based on time-of-flight and residual energy technique, the setup will allow the simultaneous measurement of the complementary fragments velocity and energy. The performances of TOF detectors of FALSTAFF will be presented and expected resolutions for fragment masses and neutron multiplicities, based on realistic simulations, will be shown.

  9. Nuclear Fission Investigation with Twin Ionization Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Zeynalova, O.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Nazarenko, M.

    2011-11-29

    The purpose of the present paper was to report the recent results, obtained in development of digital pulse processing mathematics for prompt fission neutron (PFN) investigation using twin ionization chamber (TIC) along with fast neutron time-of-flight detector (ND). Due to well known ambiguities in literature (see refs. [4, 6, 9 and 11]), concerning a pulse induction on TIC electrodes by FF ionization, we first presented detailed mathematical analysis of fission fragment (FF) signal formation on TIC anode. The analysis was done using Ramo-Shockley theorem, which gives relation between charged particle motion between TIC electrodes and so called weighting potential. Weightingmore » potential was calculated by direct numerical solution of Laplace equation (neglecting space charge) for the TIC geometry and ionization, caused by FF. Formulae for grid inefficiency (GI) correction and digital pulse processing algorithms for PFN time-of-flight measurements and pulse shape analysis are presented and discussed.« less

  10. REMOVAL OF FISSION PRODUCTS FROM WATER

    DOEpatents

    Rosinski, J.

    1961-12-19

    A process is given for precipitating fission products from a body of water having a pH of above 6.5. Calcium permanganate and ferrous sulfate are added in a molar ratio of l: 3, whereby a mixed precipitate of manganese dioxide, ferric hydroxide and calcium sulfate is formed; the precipitate carries the fisston products and settles to the bottom of the body of water. (AEC)

  11. Temperature dependence of nuclear fission time in heavy-ion fusion-fission reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eccles, Chris; Roy, Sanil; Gray, Thomas H.; Zaccone, Alessio

    2017-11-01

    Accounting for viscous damping within Fokker-Planck equations led to various improvements in the understanding and analysis of nuclear fission of heavy nuclei. Analytical expressions for the fission time are typically provided by Kramers' theory, which improves on the Bohr-Wheeler estimate by including the time scale related to many-particle dissipative processes along the deformation coordinate. However, Kramers' formula breaks down for sufficiently high excitation energies where Kramers' assumption of a large barrier no longer holds. Focusing on the overdamped regime for energies T >1 MeV, Kramers' theory should be replaced by a new analytical theory derived from the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck first-passage time method that is proposed here. The theory is applied to fission time data from fusion-fission experiments on 16O+208Pb→224Th . The proposed model provides an internally consistent one-parameter fitting of fission data with a constant nuclear friction as the fitting parameter, whereas Kramers' fitting requires a value of friction which falls out of the allowed range. The theory provides also an analytical formula that in future work can be easily implemented in numerical codes such as cascade or joanne4.

  12. Fission yield and criticality excursion code

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.

    2000-06-30

    The ANSI/ANS 8.3 standard allows a maximum yield not to exceed 2 x 10 fissions to calculate requiring the alarm system to be effective. It is common practice to use this allowance or to develop some other yield based on past criticality accident history or excursion experiments. The literature on the subject of yields discusses maximum yields larger and somewhat smaller than the ANS 8.3 permissive value. The ability to model criticality excursions and vary the various parameters to determine a credible maximum yield for operational specific cases has been available for some time but is not in common usemore » by criticality safety specialists. The topic of yields for various solution, metal, oxide powders, etc. in various geometry's and containers has been published by laboratory specialists or university staff and students for many decades but have not been available to practitioners. The need for best-estimate calculations of fission yields with a well-validated criticality excursion code has long been recognized. But no coordinated effort has been made so far to develop a generalized and well-validated excursion code for different types of systems. In this paper, the current practices to estimate fission yields are summarized along with its shortcomings for the 12-Rad zone (at SRS) and Criticality Alarm System (CAS) calculations. Finally the need for a user-friendly excursion code is reemphasized.« less

  13. Decay of Plutonium isotopes via spontaneous and heavy-ion induced fission paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Kanishka; Sawhney, Gudveen; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2018-04-01

    Based on the collective clusterization approach, we have extended our earlier study on α-decay, exotic cluster-decay, and heavy particle radioactivity, to the phenomenon of spontaneous fission (SF) in the ground-state (g.s.) decays of even mass 234-246Pu parents. The calculations for the SF half-lives of these Pu-isotopes have been made within the framework of preformed cluster model (PCM), both for spherical as well as β2-deformed choices of shapes, and a comparison is made with the relevant available experimental data, which prefer spherical shapes. The importance of the orientation degree of freedom (hot compact or cold elongated configurations) is also explored. Next, in order to look for the exclusive role of heavy-ion induced fission, the dynamics of 6He + 238U reaction forming 244Pu* is studied over the center of mass energy range of E c . m . = 15.0- 28.8MeV, using the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM), an extension of the PCM with temperature T- and angular momentum ℓ-effects included. The β2-deformed fragments of 244Pu* in the mass range A2 = 106- 113 (plus their complementary heavy fragments), corresponding to asymmetric fission peaks, are found contributing towards the fission cross-section. Finally, the potential energy surfaces and barrier modification effects are presented for the relative comparison of spontaneous and the heavy-ion induced fission processes. Both are found to behave similar with respect to the probable emission of fragments and hence point out to the shell closure property of the decay fragments.

  14. Interference of fission amplitudes of neutron resonances and T-odd asymmetry for various prescission third particles in the ternary fission of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@phys.vsu.ru; Bunakov, V. E.; Kadmensky, S. S.

    Differential cross sections for reactions of the true ternary fission of nuclei that was induced by cold polarized neutrons were constructed with allowance of the effect that Coriolis interaction and the interference between fission amplitudes of neutron resonances excited in fissile nuclei upon incidentneutron capture by target nuclei exerted on angular distributions of prescission third particles (alpha particles, neutrons, or photons). It is shown that T -odd TRI- and ROT-type asymmetries for prescission alpha particles are associated with, respectively, the odd and even components of the Coriolis interaction-perturbed amplitude of angular distributions of particles belonging to the types indicated above.more » These asymmetries have angular distributions differing from each other and stemming from a nontrivial dependence of these components on the neutron-resonance spins J{sub s} and their projections K{sub s} onto the symmetry axis of the nucleus involved. It is shown that angular distributions of prescission photons and neutrons from reactions of the ternary fission of nuclei that is induced by cold polarized neutrons are determined by the effect of Coriolis forces exclusively. Therefore, the emerging T-odd asymmetries have a character of a ROT-type asymmetry and are universal for all target nuclei.« less

  15. Gyrokinetic statistical absolute equilibrium and turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jianzhou; Hammett, Gregory W.

    2010-12-15

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: a finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N+1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperaturemore » states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.« less

  16. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, correspondingmore » to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.« less

  17. Elevation correction factor for absolute pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, Joseph W.; Sorrells, Mark R.

    1996-01-01

    With the arrival of highly accurate multi-port pressure measurement systems, conditions that previously did not affect overall system accuracy must now be scrutinized closely. Errors caused by elevation differences between pressure sensing elements and model pressure taps can be quantified and corrected. With multi-port pressure measurement systems, the sensing elements are connected to pressure taps that may be many feet away. The measurement system may be at a different elevation than the pressure taps due to laboratory space or test article constraints. This difference produces a pressure gradient that is inversely proportional to height within the interface tube. The pressure at the bottom of the tube will be higher than the pressure at the top due to the weight of the tube's column of air. Tubes with higher pressures will exhibit larger absolute errors due to the higher air density. The above effect is well documented but has generally been taken into account with large elevations only. With error analysis techniques, the loss in accuracy from elevation can be easily quantified. Correction factors can be applied to maintain the high accuracies of new pressure measurement systems.

  18. Absolute flux measurements for swift atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M.; Kohl, D. A.; Keto, J. W.; Antoniewicz, P.

    1987-01-01

    While a torsion balance in vacuum can easily measure the momentum transfer from a gas beam impinging on a surface attached to the balance, this measurement depends on the accommodation coefficients of the atoms with the surface and the distribution of the recoil. A torsion balance is described for making absolute flux measurements independent of recoil effects. The torsion balance is a conventional taut suspension wire design and the Young modulus of the wire determines the relationship between the displacement and the applied torque. A compensating magnetic field is applied to maintain zero displacement and provide critical damping. The unique feature is to couple the impinging gas beam to the torsion balance via a Wood's horn, i.e., a thin wall tube with a gradual 90 deg bend. Just as light is trapped in a Wood's horn by specular reflection from the curved surfaces, the gas beam diffuses through the tube. Instead of trapping the beam, the end of the tube is open so that the atoms exit the tube at 90 deg to their original direction. Therefore, all of the forward momentum of the gas beam is transferred to the torsion balance independent of the angle of reflection from the surfaces inside the tube.

  19. [Tobacco and plastic surgery: An absolute contraindication?

    PubMed

    Matusiak, C; De Runz, A; Maschino, H; Brix, M; Simon, E; Claudot, F

    2017-08-01

    Smoking increases perioperative risk regarding wound healing, infection rate and failure of microsurgical procedures. There is no present consensus about plastic and aesthetic surgical indications concerning smoking patients. The aim of our study is to analyze French plastic surgeons practices concerning smokers. A questionnaire was send by e-mail to French plastic surgeons in order to evaluate their own operative indications: patient information about smoking dangers, pre- and postoperative delay of smoking cessation, type of intervention carried out, smoking cessation supports, use of screening test and smoking limit associated to surgery refusing were studied. Statistical tests were used to compare results according to practitioner activity (liberal or public), own smoking habits and time of installation. In 148 questionnaires, only one surgeon did not explain smoking risk. Of the surgeons, 49.3% proposed smoking-cessation supports, more frequently with public practice (P=0.019). In total, 85.4% of surgeons did not use screening tests. Years of installation affected operative indication with smoking patients (P=0.02). Pre- and postoperative smoking cessation delay were on average respectively 4 and 3 weeks in accordance with literature. Potential improvements could be proposed to smoking patients' care: smoking cessation assistance, screening tests, absolute contraindication of some procedures or level of consumption to determine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Absolute Lower Bound on the Bounce Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ryosuke; Takimoto, Masahiro

    2018-03-01

    The decay rate of a false vacuum is determined by the minimal action solution of the tunneling field: bounce. In this Letter, we focus on models with scalar fields which have a canonical kinetic term in N (>2 ) dimensional Euclidean space, and derive an absolute lower bound on the bounce action. In the case of four-dimensional space, we show the bounce action is generically larger than 24 /λcr, where λcr≡max [-4 V (ϕ )/|ϕ |4] with the false vacuum being at ϕ =0 and V (0 )=0 . We derive this bound on the bounce action without solving the equation of motion explicitly. Our bound is derived by a quite simple discussion, and it provides useful information even if it is difficult to obtain the explicit form of the bounce solution. Our bound offers a sufficient condition for the stability of a false vacuum, and it is useful as a quick check on the vacuum stability for given models. Our bound can be applied to a broad class of scalar potential with any number of scalar fields. We also discuss a necessary condition for the bounce action taking a value close to this lower bound.

  1. Auditory processing in absolute pitch possessors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKetton, Larissa; Schneider, Keith A.

    2018-05-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is a rare ability in classifying a musical pitch without a reference standard. It has been of great interest to researchers studying auditory processing and music cognition since it is seldom expressed and sheds light on influences pertaining to neurodevelopmental biological predispositions and the onset of musical training. We investigated the smallest frequency that could be detected or just noticeable difference (JND) between two pitches. Here, we report significant differences in JND thresholds in AP musicians and non-AP musicians compared to non-musician control groups at both 1000 Hz and 987.76 Hz testing frequencies. Although the AP-musicians did better than non-AP musicians, the difference was not significant. In addition, we looked at neuro-anatomical correlates of musicianship and AP using structural MRI. We report increased cortical thickness of the left Heschl's Gyrus (HG) and decreased cortical thickness of the inferior frontal opercular gyrus (IFO) and circular insular sulcus volume (CIS) in AP compared to non-AP musicians and controls. These structures may therefore be optimally enhanced and reduced to form the most efficient network for AP to emerge.

  2. Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a mission, led and developed by NASA, that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to quantify and attribute climate change. CLARREO consists of three separate instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer, a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer, and a radio occultation (RO) instrument. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy, including on orbit verification, to calibrate other space-based instrumentation, increasing their respective accuracy by as much as an order of magnitude. The IR spectrometer is a Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) working in the 5 to 50 microns wavelength region with a goal of 0.1 K (k = 3) accuracy. The FTS will achieve this accuracy using phase change cells to verify thermistor accuracy and heated halos to verify blackbody emissivity, both on orbit. The RS spectrometer will measure the reflectance of the atmosphere in the 0.32 to 2.3 microns wavelength region with an accuracy of 0.3% (k = 2). The status of the instrumentation packages and potential mission options will be presented.

  3. Revisiting Absolute Radio Backgrounds in Light of Juno Cruise Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tzu-Ching

    extragalactic. Six years after the report of this excess, this situation remains unsettled and has not evolved due to the lack of new observations at these frequencies. For this reason, and for the intrinsic value of the unprecedented full-sky maps, the astrophysics impact of MWR Juno cruise observations will be very important. Our program will be articulated along five projects (labeled P1 to P5), loosely corresponding to research papers: (P1) We will generate well characterized full-sky maps at the Juno MWR six frequencies starting from the timestream data, released in September 2016 on the Planetary Data System (PDS) archive. We will validate these maps using cross-correlations with WMAP and Planck public maps at low frequencies. We will release our maps to the community via the NASA LAMBDA archive. This analysis will set the basis for the following projects. (P2) We will investigate the implication of these new maps for foreground modeling with a focus on CMB foreground separation. This analysis will be performed jointly with now standard WMAP and Planck component separation tools and products. (P3) We will investigate the implication of these new maps for foreground modeling with a focus on radio 21 cm intensity mapping signals, extending in the process current community foreground models. This analysis will be improve our understanding and characterization of radio foregrounds, and guide current and future redshifted 21 cm line mapping experiments. (P4) Using the above maps, we will revisit the ARCADE excess and perform absolute temperature measurement of the extragalactic radio backgrounds at multiple frequencies and angular positions over the sky. (P5) Using the above maps, we will revisit the ARCADE excess and perform absolute temperature measurement of the Galactic radio backgrounds at multiple frequencies and angular positions in the Galactic plane, using multiple other line surveys to guide our interpretation.

  4. Fission fragment mass and total kinetic energy distributions of spontaneously fissioning plutonium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomorski, K.; Nerlo-Pomorska, B.; Bartel, J.; Schmitt, C.

    2018-03-01

    The fission-fragment mass and total kinetic energy (TKE) distributions are evaluated in a quantum mechanical framework using elongation, mass asymmetry, neck degree of freedom as the relevant collective parameters in the Fourier shape parametrization recently developed by us. The potential energy surfaces (PES) are calculated within the macroscopic-microscopic model based on the Lublin-Strasbourg Drop (LSD), the Yukawa-folded (YF) single-particle potential and a monopole pairing force. The PES are presented and analysed in detail for even-even Plutonium isotopes with A = 236-246. They reveal deep asymmetric valleys. The fission-fragment mass and TKE distributions are obtained from the ground state of a collective Hamiltonian computed within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, in the WKB approach by introducing a neck-dependent fission probability. The calculated mass and total kinetic energy distributions are found in good agreement with the data.

  5. Anomalous anisotropies of fission fragments in near- and sub-barrier fusion-fussion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huanqiao, Zhang; Zuhua, Liu; Jincheng, Xu; Jun, Lu; Ming, Ruan; Kan, Xu

    1992-03-01

    Fission cross sections and angular distributions have been measured for the reactions of 16O + 232Th and238U, and19F + 208Pb and232Th at near- and sub-barrier energies. The fission excitation functions are rather well reproduced on the basis of Wong model or coupled channels theory. However, the models which reproduce the sub-barrier fusion cross sections fail to account for the experimental anisotropies of fission fragments. It is found that the observed anisotropies are much larger than expected. For the first time it has been observed that the anisotropies as a function of the center-of-mass energy show a peak centered near 4.5 MeV below the fusion barrier for several reaction systems. The present approaches fail to explain these anomalies. For 19F + 208Pb systems, our results confirm the prediction of an approximately constant value for the mean square spin of the compound nucleus produced in far sub-barrier fusion reaction.

  6. Neutron capture and neutron-induced fission experiments on americium isotopes with DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.

    2009-01-28

    Neutron capture cross section data on Am isotopes were measured using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron capture cross section was determined for {sup 241}Am for neutron energies between thermal and 320 keV. Preliminary results were also obtained for {sup 243}Am for neutron energies between 10 eV and 250 keV. The results on concurrent neutron-induced fission and neutron-capture measurements on {sup 242m}Am will be presented where the fission events were actively triggered during the experiments. In these experiments, a Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) detector that surrounds the target located in themore » center of the DANCE array was used as a fission-tagging detector to separate (n,{gamma}) events from (n,f) events. The first direct observation of neutron capture on {sup 242m}Am in the resonance region in between 2 and 9 eV of the neutron energy was obtained.« less

  7. Neutron capture and neutron-induced fission experiments on americium isotopes with DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jandel, Marian

    2008-01-01

    Neutron capture cross section data on Am isotopes were measured using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron capture cross section was determined for {sup 241}Am for neutron energies between thermal and 320 keV. Preliminary results were also obtained for {sup 243}Am for neutron energies between 35 eV and 200 keV. The results on concurrent neutron-induced fission and neutron-capture measurements on {sup 242m}Am will be presented, where the fission events were actively triggered during the experiments. In these experiments, the Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) detector that surrounds the target located in themore » center of the DANCE array was used as a fission-tagging detector to separate (n,{gamma}) from (n,f) events. The first evidence of neutron capture on {sup 242m}Am in the resonance region in between 2 and 9 eV of the neutron energy was obtained.« less

  8. Near-barrier Fusion Evaporation and Fission of 28Si+174Yb and 32S+170Er

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongxi; Lin, Chengjian; Jia, Huiming; Ma, Nanru; Sun, Lijie; Xu, Xinxing; Yang, Lei; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Huanqiao; Bao, Pengfei

    2017-11-01

    Fusion evaporation residues and fission fragments have been measured, respectively, at energies around the Coulomb barrier for the 28Si+174Yb and 32S+170Er systems forming the same compound nucleus 202Po. The excitation function of fusion evaporation, fission as well as capture reactions were deduced. Coupled-channels analyses reveal that couplings to the deformations of targets and the two-phonon states of projectiles contribute much to the enhancement of capture cross sections at sub-barrier energies. The mass and total kinetic energy of fission fragments were deduced by the time-difference method assuming full momentum transfer in a two-body kinematics. The mass-energy and mass-angle distributions were obtained and no obvious quasi-fission components were observed in this bombarding energy range. Further, mass distributions of fission fragments were fitted to extract their widths. Results show that the mass widths decrease monotonically with decreasing energy, but might start to increase when Ec.m./VB < 0.95 for both systems.

  9. Reassessment of fission fragment angular distributions from continuum states in the context of transition-state theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Louis C.; Alexander, John M.

    1983-07-01

    Fission angular distributions have been studied for years and have been treated as classic examples of trasitions-state theory. Early work involving composite nuclei of relatively low excitation energy E ∗ (⪅35 MeV) and spin I (⪅25ħ) gave support to theory and delimited interesting properties of the transitions-state nuclei. More recent research on fusion fission and sequential fission after deeply inelastic reactions involves composite nuclei of much higher energies (⪅200 MeV) and spins (⪅100ħ). Extension of the basic ideas developed for low-spin nuclei requires detailed consideration of the role of these high spins and, in particular, the “spin window” for fussion. We have made empirical correlations of cross sections for evaporation residues and fission in order to get a description of this spin window. A systematic reanalysis has been made for fusion fission induced by H, He and heavier ions. Empirical correlations of K 20 (K 20 = {IeffT }/{h̷2}) are presented along with comparisons of Ieff to moments of inertia for saddle-point nuclei from the rotating liquid drop model. This model gives an excellent guide for the intermidiate spin zone (30⪅ I ⪅65), while strong shell and/or pairing effects are evident for excitations less than ⪅35 MeV. Observations of strong anisotropies for very high-spin systems signal the demise of certain approximation commonly made in the theory, and suggestions are made toward this end.

  10. Fractal Model of Fission Product Release in Nuclear Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankunas, Gediminas

    2012-09-01

    A model of fission gas migration in nuclear fuel pellet is proposed. Diffusion process of fission gas in granular structure of nuclear fuel with presence of inter-granular bubbles in the fuel matrix is simulated by fractional diffusion model. The Grunwald-Letnikov derivative parameter characterizes the influence of porous fuel matrix on the diffusion process of fission gas. A finite-difference method for solving fractional diffusion equations is considered. Numerical solution of diffusion equation shows correlation of fission gas release and Grunwald-Letnikov derivative parameter. Calculated profile of fission gas concentration distribution is similar to that obtained in the experimental studies. Diffusion of fission gas is modeled for real RBMK-1500 fuel operation conditions. A functional dependence of Grunwald-Letnikov derivative parameter with fuel burn-up is established.

  11. Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm FREYA 2.0.2

    DOE PAGES

    Verbeke, J. M.; Randrup, J.; Vogt, R.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the main differences between FREYA versions 1.0 and 2.0.2. FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) is a fission event generator which models complete fission events. As such, it automatically includes fluctuations as well as correlations between observables, resulting from conservation of energy and momentum. The main differences between the two versions are: additional fissionable isotopes, angular momentum conservation, Giant Dipole Resonance form factor for the statistical emission of photons, improved treatment of fission photon emission using RIPL database, and dependence on the incident neutron direction. FREYA 2.0.2 has been integrated into themore » LLNL Fission Library 2.0.2, which has itself been integrated into MCNP6.2, TRIPOLI-4.10, and can be called from Geant4.10.« less

  12. Thorium-232 fission induced by light charged particles up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métivier, Vincent; Duchemin, Charlotte; Guertin, Arnaud; Michel, Nathalie; Haddad, Férid

    2017-09-01

    Studies have been devoted to the production of alpha emitters for medical application in collaboration with the GIP ARRONAX that possesses a high energy and high intensity multi-particle cyclotron. The productions of Ra-223, Ac-225 and U-230 have been investigated from the Th-232(p,x) and Th-232(d,x) reactions using the stacked-foils method and gamma spectrometry measurements. These reactions have led to the production of several fission products, including some with a medical interest like Mo-99, Cd-115g and I-131. This article presents cross section data of fission products obtained from these undedicated experiments. These data have been also compared with the TALYS code results.

  13. fissioncore: A desktop-computer simulation of a fission-bomb core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron Reed, B.; Rohe, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    A computer program, fissioncore, has been developed to deterministically simulate the growth of the number of neutrons within an exploding fission-bomb core. The program allows users to explore the dependence of criticality conditions on parameters such as nuclear cross-sections, core radius, number of secondary neutrons liberated per fission, and the distance between nuclei. Simulations clearly illustrate the existence of a critical radius given a particular set of parameter values, as well as how the exponential growth of the neutron population (the condition that characterizes criticality) depends on these parameters. No understanding of neutron diffusion theory is necessary to appreciate the logic of the program or the results. The code is freely available in FORTRAN, C, and Java and is configured so that modifications to accommodate more refined physical conditions are possible.

  14. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath plate interiors may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the sub-asthenospheric mantle. Here we analyze two global sets of shear-wave splitting data, that of Kreemer [2009] and an updated and expanded data set, to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. We also explore the effect of using geologically current plate velocities (i.e., the MORVEL set of angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]) compared with geodetically current plate velocities (i.e., the GSRM v1.2 angular velocities [Kreemer et al. 2014]). We demonstrate that the errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. The SKS-MORVEL absolute plate angular velocities (based on the Kreemer [2009] data set) are determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2° ) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6° ). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4° ) than for continental

  15. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  16. Orion Absolute Navigation System Progress and Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The absolute navigation design of NASA's Orion vehicle is described. It has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to benchmark the current state of the design and some of the rationale and analysis behind it. There are specific challenges to address when preparing a timely and effective design for the Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1), while still looking ahead and providing software extensibility for future exploration missions. The primary onboard measurements in a Near-Earth or Mid-Earth environment consist of GPS pseudo-range and delta-range, but for future explorations missions the use of star-tracker and optical navigation sources need to be considered. Discussions are presented for state size and composition, processing techniques, and consider states. A presentation is given for the processing technique using the computationally stable and robust UDU formulation with an Agee-Turner Rank-One update. This allows for computational savings when dealing with many parameters which are modeled as slowly varying Gauss-Markov processes. Preliminary analysis shows up to a 50% reduction in computation versus a more traditional formulation. Several state elements are discussed and evaluated, including position, velocity, attitude, clock bias/drift, and GPS measurement biases in addition to bias, scale factor, misalignment, and non-orthogonalities of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Another consideration is the initialization of the EKF in various scenarios. Scenarios such as single-event upset, ground command, and cold start are discussed as are strategies for whole and partial state updates as well as covariance considerations. Strategies are given for dealing with latent measurements and high-rate propagation using multi-rate architecture. The details of the rate groups and the data ow between the elements is discussed and evaluated.

  17. Absolute parameters of young stars: QZ Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, W. S. G.; Blackford, M.; Butland, R.; Budding, E.

    2017-09-01

    New high-resolution spectroscopy and BVR photometry together with literature data on the complex massive quaternary star QZ Car are collected and analysed. Absolute parameters are found as follows. System A: M1 = 43 (±3), M2 = 19 (+3 -7), R1 = 28 (±2), R2 = 6 (±2), (⊙); T1 ˜ 28 000, T2 ˜ 33 000 K; System B: M1 = 30 (±3), M2 = 20 (±3), R1 = 10 (±0.5), R2 = 20 (±1), (⊙); T1 ˜ 36 000, T2 ˜ 30 000 K (model dependent temperatures). The wide system AB: Period = 49.5 (±1) yr, Epochs, conjunction = 1984.8 (±1), periastron = 2005.3 (±3) yr, mean separation = 65 (±3), (au); orbital inclination = 85 (+5 -15) deg, photometric distance ˜2700 (±300) pc, age = 4 (±1) Myr. Other new contributions concern: (a) analysis of the timing of minima differences (O - C)s for the eclipsing binary (System B); (b) the width of the eclipses, pointing to relatively large effects of radiation pressure; (c) inferences from the rotational widths of lines for both Systems A and B; and (d) implications for theoretical models of early-type stars. While feeling greater confidence on the quaternary's general parametrization, observational complications arising from strong wind interactions or other, unclear, causes still inhibit precision and call for continued multiwavelength observations. Our high-inclination value for the AB system helps to explain failures to resolve the wide binary in the previous years. The derived young age independently confirms membership of QZ Car to the open cluster Collinder 228.

  18. Evaluation of the Absolute Regional Temperature Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Absolute Regional Temperature Potential (ARTP) is one of the few climate metrics that provides estimates of impacts at a sub-global scale. The ARTP presented here gives the time-dependent temperature response in four latitude bands (90-28degS, 28degS-28degN, 28-60degN and 60-90degN) as a function of emissions based on the forcing in those bands caused by the emissions. It is based on a large set of simulations performed with a single atmosphere-ocean climate model to derive regional forcing/response relationships. Here I evaluate the robustness of those relationships using the forcing/response portion of the ARTP to estimate regional temperature responses to the historic aerosol forcing in three independent climate models. These ARTP results are in good accord with the actual responses in those models. Nearly all ARTP estimates fall within +/-20%of the actual responses, though there are some exceptions for 90-28degS and the Arctic, and in the latter the ARTP may vary with forcing agent. However, for the tropics and the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in particular, the +/-20% range appears to be roughly consistent with the 95% confidence interval. Land areas within these two bands respond 39-45% and 9-39% more than the latitude band as a whole. The ARTP, presented here in a slightly revised form, thus appears to provide a relatively robust estimate for the responses of large-scale latitude bands and land areas within those bands to inhomogeneous radiative forcing and thus potentially to emissions as well. Hence this metric could allow rapid evaluation of the effects of emissions policies at a finer scale than global metrics without requiring use of a full climate model.

  19. Absolute determination of local tropospheric OH concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armerding, Wolfgang; Comes, Franz-Josef

    1994-01-01

    Long path absorption (LPA) according to Lambert Beer's law is a method to determine absolute concentrations of trace gases such as tropospheric OH. We have developed a LPA instrument which is based on a rapid tuning of the light source which is a frequency doubled dye laser. The laser is tuned across two or three OH absorption features around 308 nm with a scanning speed of 0.07 cm(exp -1)/microsecond and a repetition rate of 1.3 kHz. This high scanning speed greatly reduces the fluctuation of the light intensity caused by the atmosphere. To obtain the required high sensitivity the laser output power is additionally made constant and stabilized by an electro-optical modulator. The present sensitivity is of the order of a few times 10(exp 5) OH per cm(exp 3) for an acquisition time of a minute and an absorption path length of only 1200 meters so that a folding of the optical path in a multireflection cell was possible leading to a lateral dimension of the cell of a few meters. This allows local measurements to be made. Tropospheric measurements have been carried out in 1991 resulting in the determination of OH diurnal variation at specific days in late summer. Comparison with model calculations have been made. Interferences are mainly due to SO2 absorption. The problem of OH self generation in the multireflection cell is of minor extent. This could be shown by using different experimental methods. The minimum-maximum signal to noise ratio is about 8 x 10(exp -4) for a single scan. Due to the small size of the absorption cell the realization of an open air laboratory is possible in which by use of an additional UV light source or by additional fluxes of trace gases the chemistry can be changed under controlled conditions allowing kinetic studies of tropospheric photochemistry to be made in open air.

  20. Planck absolute entropy of a rotating BTZ black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaz, S. M. Jawwad

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the Planck absolute entropy and the Bekenstein-Smarr formula of the rotating Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole are presented via a complex thermodynamical system contributed by its inner and outer horizons. The redefined entropy approaches zero as the temperature of the rotating BTZ black hole tends to absolute zero, satisfying the Nernst formulation of a black hole. Hence, it can be regarded as the Planck absolute entropy of the rotating BTZ black hole.

  1. Daniel Gogny's vision for a microscopic theory of fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younes, W.

    2017-05-01

    Daniel Gogny made many contributions to our understanding of nuclear fission over a span of 35 years. This paper reviews some of those contributions, focusing in particular on fission dynamics, the challenges of describing scission in a quantum-mechanical context, and the calculation of fragment properties such as their mass, kinetic, and excitation energy distributions. The generator coordinate method provides the common theoretical framework within which these various aspects of fission are formulated.

  2. Fission of actinide nuclei using multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léguillon, Romain; Nishio, Katsuhisa; Hirose, Kentaro; Orlandi, Riccardo; Makii, Hiroyuki; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Ishii, Tetsuro; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Asai, Masato; Chiba, Satoshi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Araki, Shohei; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Tatsuzawa, Ryotaro; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2014-09-01

    We are promoting a campaign to measure fission-fragment mass distributions for neutron-rich actinide nuclei populated by transfer reactions from their ground state up to an excitation energy of several tens MeV. We thus obtain the excitation energy dependence of the mass distribution. The experiment was carried out at the 20 MV JAEA tandem facility at Tokai. We report on the data obtained in the direct reaction 18 O + 232 Th . Transfer-channels and excitation energies of the fissioning nuclei were identified using silicon dE-E detectors located at forward angle. Two fission fragments were detected in coincidence using multi-wire proportional counters. Fission fragment masses were determined by kinematic consideration. We obtained the fission fragment mass distributions for 13 nuclei from actinium to uranium and some fission barrier heights. We are promoting a campaign to measure fission-fragment mass distributions for neutron-rich actinide nuclei populated by transfer reactions from their ground state up to an excitation energy of several tens MeV. We thus obtain the excitation energy dependence of the mass distribution. The experiment was carried out at the 20 MV JAEA tandem facility at Tokai. We report on the data obtained in the direct reaction 18 O + 232 Th . Transfer-channels and excitation energies of the fissioning nuclei were identified using silicon dE-E detectors located at forward angle. Two fission fragments were detected in coincidence using multi-wire proportional counters. Fission fragment masses were determined by kinematic consideration. We obtained the fission fragment mass distributions for 13 nuclei from actinium to uranium and some fission barrier heights. Present study is supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  3. Neutron flux profile monitor for use in a fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, Manfred K.; Valentine, Kenneth H.

    1983-01-01

    A neutron flux monitor is provided which consists of a plurality of fission counters arranged as spaced-apart point detectors along a delay line. As a fission event occurs in any one of the counters, two delayed current pulses are generated at the output of the delay line. The time separation of the pulses identifies the counter in which the particular fission event occured. Neutron flux profiles of reactor cores can be more accurately measured as a result.

  4. The absolute disparity anomaly and the mechanism of relative disparities

    PubMed Central

    Chopin, Adrien; Levi, Dennis; Knill, David; Bavelier, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    There has been a long-standing debate about the mechanisms underlying the perception of stereoscopic depth and the computation of the relative disparities that it relies on. Relative disparities between visual objects could be computed in two ways: (a) using the difference in the object's absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1) or (b) using relative disparities based on the differences in the monocular separations between objects (Hypothesis 2). To differentiate between these hypotheses, we measured stereoscopic discrimination thresholds for lines with different absolute and relative disparities. Participants were asked to judge the depth of two lines presented at the same distance from the fixation plane (absolute disparity) or the depth between two lines presented at different distances (relative disparity). We used a single stimulus method involving a unique memory component for both conditions, and no extraneous references were available. We also measured vergence noise using Nonius lines. Stereo thresholds were substantially worse for absolute disparities than for relative disparities, and the difference could not be explained by vergence noise. We attribute this difference to an absence of conscious readout of absolute disparities, termed the absolute disparity anomaly. We further show that the pattern of correlations between vergence noise and absolute and relative disparity acuities can be explained jointly by the existence of the absolute disparity anomaly and by the assumption that relative disparity information is computed from absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1). PMID:27248566

  5. The absolute disparity anomaly and the mechanism of relative disparities.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Adrien; Levi, Dennis; Knill, David; Bavelier, Daphne

    2016-06-01

    There has been a long-standing debate about the mechanisms underlying the perception of stereoscopic depth and the computation of the relative disparities that it relies on. Relative disparities between visual objects could be computed in two ways: (a) using the difference in the object's absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1) or (b) using relative disparities based on the differences in the monocular separations between objects (Hypothesis 2). To differentiate between these hypotheses, we measured stereoscopic discrimination thresholds for lines with different absolute and relative disparities. Participants were asked to judge the depth of two lines presented at the same distance from the fixation plane (absolute disparity) or the depth between two lines presented at different distances (relative disparity). We used a single stimulus method involving a unique memory component for both conditions, and no extraneous references were available. We also measured vergence noise using Nonius lines. Stereo thresholds were substantially worse for absolute disparities than for relative disparities, and the difference could not be explained by vergence noise. We attribute this difference to an absence of conscious readout of absolute disparities, termed the absolute disparity anomaly. We further show that the pattern of correlations between vergence noise and absolute and relative disparity acuities can be explained jointly by the existence of the absolute disparity anomaly and by the assumption that relative disparity information is computed from absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1).

  6. New fission-fragment detector for experiments at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Roman, A. R.; Daum, J. K.; Springs, R. K.; Bond, E. M.; Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Favalli, A.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-10-01

    A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films has been built to serve as a veto/trigger detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing a 4 π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillation events caused by the fission fragment interactions in the films are registered with silicon photomultipliers. Design of the detector and test measurements are described. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Nuclear Physics under the Early Career Award No. LANL20135009.

  7. Late-time emission of prompt fission γ rays

    DOE PAGES

    Talou, Patrick; Kawano, Toshihiko; Stetcu, Ionel; ...

    2016-12-22

    The emission of prompt fission γ rays within a few nanoseconds to a few microseconds following the scission point is studied in the Hauser-Feshbach formalism applied to the deexcitation of primary excited fission fragments. Neutron and γ-ray evaporations from fully accelerated fission fragments are calculated in competition at each stage of the decay, and the role of isomers in the fission products, before β decay, is analyzed. The time evolution of the average total γ-ray energy, the average total γ-ray multiplicity, and the fragment-specific γ-ray spectra is presented in the case of neutron-induced fission reactions of 235U and 239Pu, asmore » well as spontaneous fission of 252Cf. The production of specific isomeric states is calculated and compared to available experimental data. About 7% of all prompt fission γ rays are predicted to be emitted between 10 ns and 5 μs following fission, in the case of 235U and 239Pu( nth,f) reactions, and up to 3% in the case of 252Cf spontaneous fission. The cumulative average total γ-ray energy increases by 2% to 5% in the same time interval. Lastly, those results are shown to be robust against significant changes in the model input parameters.« less

  8. Magnetic Materials Suitable for Fission Power Conversion in Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial fission reactors use combinations of shielding and distance to protect power conversion components from elevated temperature and radiation. Space mission systems are necessarily compact and must minimize shielding and distance to enhance system level efficiencies. Technology development efforts to support fission power generation scenarios for future space missions include studying the radiation tolerance of component materials. The fundamental principles of material magnetism are reviewed and used to interpret existing material radiation effects data for expected fission power conversion components for target space missions. Suitable materials for the Fission Power System (FPS) Project are available and guidelines are presented for bounding the elevated temperature/radiation tolerance envelope for candidate magnetic materials.

  9. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM FROM URANIUM AND FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.E.; Adamson, A.W.; Schubert, J.; Russell, E.R.

    1958-10-01

    A chromatographic adsorption process is presented for the separation of plutonium from other fission products formed by the irradiation of uranium. The plutonium and the lighter element fission products are adsorbed on a sulfonated phenol-formaldehyde resin bed from a nitric acid solution containing the dissolved uranium. Successive washes of sulfuric, phosphoric, and nitric acids remove the bulk of the fission products, then an eluate of dilute phosphoric and nitric acids removes the remaining plutonium and fission products. The plutonium is selectively removed by passing this solution through zirconium phosphate, from which the plutonium is dissolved with nitric acid. This process provides a convenient and efficient means for isolating plutonium.

  10. Python Waveform Cross-Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Templeton, Dennise

    PyWCC is a tool to compute seismic waveform cross-correlation coefficients on single-component or multiple-component seismic data across a network of seismic sensors. PyWCC compares waveform data templates with continuous seismic data, associates the resulting detections, identifies the template with the highest cross-correlation coefficient, and outputs a catalog of detections above a user-defined absolute cross-correlation threshold value.

  11. Fission Signatures for Nuclear Material Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi

    2009-06-01

    Detection and interdiction of nuclear materials in all forms of transport is one of the most critical security issues facing the United States and the rest of the civilized world. Naturally emitted gamma rays by these materials, while abundant and detectable when unshielded, are low in energy and readily shielded. X-ray radiography is useful in detecting the possible presence of shielding material. Positive detection of concealed nuclear materials requires methods which unequivocally detect specific attributes of the materials. These methods typically involve active interrogation by penetrating radiation of neutrons, photons or other particles. Fortunately, nuclear materials, probed by various types of radiation, yield very unique and often strong signatures. Paramount among them are the detectable fission signatures, namely prompt neutrons and gamma rays, and delayed neutrons gamma rays. Other useful signatures are the nuclear states excited by neutrons, via inelastic scattering, or photons, via nuclear resonance fluorescence and absorption. The signatures are very different in magnitude, level of specificity, ease of excitation and detection, signal to background ratios, etc. For example, delayed neutrons are very unique to the fission process, but are scarce, have low energy, and hence are easily absorbed. Delayed gamma rays are more abundant but "featureless", and have a higher background from natural sources and more importantly, from activation due to the interrogation sources. The prompt fission signatures need to be measured in the presence of the much higher levels of probing radiation. This requires taking special measures to look for the signatures, sometimes leading to a significant sensitivity loss or a complete inability to detect them. Characteristic gamma rays induced in nuclear materials reflecting their nuclear structure, while rather unique, require very high intensity of interrogation radiation and very high resolution in energy and/or time. The

  12. Rail-highway crossing hazard prediction : research results

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1979-12-01

    This document presents techniques for constructing and evaluating railroad grade : crossing hazard indexes. Hazard indexes are objective formulas for comparing or ranking : crossings according to relative hazard or for calculating absolute hazard (co...

  13. Weld Development for Aluminum Fission Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, Carl Edward; Martinez, Jesse Norris

    2017-05-16

    The Sigma welding team was approached to help fabricate a small fission chamber (roughly ½ inch dia. x ½ inch tall cylinder). These chambers are used as radiation sensors that contain small traces of radionuclides (Cf 252, U 235, and U 238) that serve to ionize gas atoms in addition to external radiation. When a voltage is applied within the chamber, the resulting ion flow can be calibrated and monitored. Aluminum has the advantage of not forming radioactive compounds when exposed to high external radiation (except from minor Na alloy content). Since aluminum has not been used before in thismore » application, this presented an unexplored challenge.« less

  14. SEPARATION OF URANIUM, PLUTONIUM AND FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Nicholls, C.M.; Wells, I.; Spence, R.

    1959-10-13

    The separation of uranium and plutonium from neutronirradiated uranium is described. The neutron-irradiated uranium is dissolved in nitric acid to provide an aqueous solution 3N in nitric acid. The fission products of the solution are extruded by treating the solution with dibutyl carbitol substantially 1.8N in nitric acid. The organic solvent phase is separated and neutralized with ammonium hydroxide and the plutonium reduced with hydroxylamine base to the trivalent state. Treatment of the mixture with saturated ammonium nitrate extracts the reduced plutonium and leaves the uranium in the organic solvent.

  15. Precision determination of absolute neutron flux

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, A. T.; Anderson, E. S.; Dewey, M. S.; ...

    2018-06-08

    A technique for establishing the total neutron rate of a highly-collimated monochromatic cold neutron beam was demonstrated using an alpha–gamma counter. The method involves only the counting of measured rates and is independent of neutron cross sections, decay chain branching ratios, and neutron beam energy. For the measurement, a target of 10B-enriched boron carbide totally absorbed the neutrons in a monochromatic beam, and the rate of absorbed neutrons was determined by counting 478 keV gamma rays from neutron capture on 10B with calibrated high-purity germanium detectors. A second measurement based on Bragg diffraction from a perfect silicon crystal was performedmore » to determine the mean de Broglie wavelength of the beam to a precision of 0.024%. With these measurements, the detection efficiency of a neutron monitor based on neutron absorption on 6Li was determined to an overall uncertainty of 0.058%. We discuss the principle of the alpha–gamma method and present details of how the measurement was performed including the systematic effects. We further describe how this method may be used for applications in neutron dosimetry and metrology, fundamental neutron physics, and neutron cross section measurements.« less

  16. Precision determination of absolute neutron flux

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, A. T.; Anderson, E. S.; Dewey, M. S.

    A technique for establishing the total neutron rate of a highly-collimated monochromatic cold neutron beam was demonstrated using an alpha–gamma counter. The method involves only the counting of measured rates and is independent of neutron cross sections, decay chain branching ratios, and neutron beam energy. For the measurement, a target of 10B-enriched boron carbide totally absorbed the neutrons in a monochromatic beam, and the rate of absorbed neutrons was determined by counting 478 keV gamma rays from neutron capture on 10B with calibrated high-purity germanium detectors. A second measurement based on Bragg diffraction from a perfect silicon crystal was performedmore » to determine the mean de Broglie wavelength of the beam to a precision of 0.024%. With these measurements, the detection efficiency of a neutron monitor based on neutron absorption on 6Li was determined to an overall uncertainty of 0.058%. We discuss the principle of the alpha–gamma method and present details of how the measurement was performed including the systematic effects. We further describe how this method may be used for applications in neutron dosimetry and metrology, fundamental neutron physics, and neutron cross section measurements.« less

  17. Rupturing the hemi-fission intermediate in membrane fission under tension: Reaction coordinates, kinetic pathways, and free-energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guojie; Müller, Marcus

    2017-08-14

    Membrane fission is a fundamental process in cells, involved inter alia in endocytosis, intracellular trafficking, and virus infection. Its underlying molecular mechanism, however, is only incompletely understood. Recently, experiments and computer simulation studies have revealed that dynamin-mediated membrane fission is a two-step process that proceeds via a metastable hemi-fission intermediate (or wormlike micelle) formed by dynamin's constriction. Importantly, this hemi-fission intermediate is remarkably metastable, i.e., its subsequent rupture that completes the fission process does not occur spontaneously but requires additional, external effects, e.g., dynamin's (unknown) conformational changes or membrane tension. Using simulations of a coarse-grained, implicit-solvent model of lipid membranes, we investigate the molecular mechanism of rupturing the hemi-fission intermediate, such as its pathway, the concomitant transition states, and barriers, as well as the role of membrane tension. The membrane tension is controlled by the chemical potential of the lipids, and the free-energy landscape as a function of two reaction coordinates is obtained by grand canonical Wang-Landau sampling. Our results show that, in the course of rupturing, the hemi-fission intermediate undergoes a "thinning → local pinching → rupture/fission" pathway, with a bottle-neck-shaped cylindrical micelle as a transition state. Although an increase of membrane tension facilitates the fission process by reducing the corresponding free-energy barrier, for biologically relevant tensions, the free-energy barriers still significantly exceed the thermal energy scale k B T.

  18. Rupturing the hemi-fission intermediate in membrane fission under tension: Reaction coordinates, kinetic pathways, and free-energy barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guojie; Müller, Marcus

    2017-08-01

    Membrane fission is a fundamental process in cells, involved inter alia in endocytosis, intracellular trafficking, and virus infection. Its underlying molecular mechanism, however, is only incompletely understood. Recently, experiments and computer simulation studies have revealed that dynamin-mediated membrane fission is a two-step process that proceeds via a metastable hemi-fission intermediate (or wormlike micelle) formed by dynamin's constriction. Importantly, this hemi-fission intermediate is remarkably metastable, i.e., its subsequent rupture that completes the fission process does not occur spontaneously but requires additional, external effects, e.g., dynamin's (unknown) conformational changes or membrane tension. Using simulations of a coarse-grained, implicit-solvent model of lipid membranes, we investigate the molecular mechanism of rupturing the hemi-fission intermediate, such as its pathway, the concomitant transition states, and barriers, as well as the role of membrane tension. The membrane tension is controlled by the chemical potential of the lipids, and the free-energy landscape as a function of two reaction coordinates is obtained by grand canonical Wang-Landau sampling. Our results show that, in the course of rupturing, the hemi-fission intermediate undergoes a "thinning → local pinching → rupture/fission" pathway, with a bottle-neck-shaped cylindrical micelle as a transition state. Although an increase of membrane tension facilitates the fission process by reducing the corresponding free-energy barrier, for biologically relevant tensions, the free-energy barriers still significantly exceed the thermal energy scale kBT.

  19. Influence of nuclear data uncertainties on thorium fusion-fission hybrid blanket nucleonic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, E.T.; Mathews, D.R.

    1979-09-01

    The fusion-fission hybrid blanket proposed for the Tandem Mirror Hybrid Reactor employs thorium metal as the fertile material. Based on the ENDF/B-IV nuclear data, the /sup 233/U and tritium production rate and blanket energy multiplication averaged over the blanket lifetime of about 9 MW-yr/m/sup 2/ are 0.76 and 1.12 per D-T neutron and 4.8, respectively. At the time of the blanket discharge, the /sup 233/U enrichment in the thorium metal is about 3%. The thorium cross sections given by the ENDF/B-IV and V were reviewed, and the important partial cross sections such as (n,2n), (n,3n), and (n,..gamma..) were found tomore » be known to +-10 to 20% in the respective energy range of interest. A sensitivity study showed that the /sup 233/U and tritium production rate and blanket energy multiplication are relatively sensitive to the thorium capture and fission cross section uncertainties. In order to predict the above parameters within +-1%, the Th(n,..gamma..) and Th(n,..nu..f) cross sections must be measured within about +-2% in the energy range 3 to 3000 keV and 13.5 to 15 MeV, respectively.« less

  20. New statistical scission-point model to predict fission fragment observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaître, Jean-François; Panebianco, Stefano; Sida, Jean-Luc; Hilaire, Stéphane; Heinrich, Sophie

    2015-09-01

    The development of high performance computing facilities makes possible a massive production of nuclear data in a full microscopic framework. Taking advantage of the individual potential calculations of more than 7000 nuclei, a new statistical scission-point model, called SPY, has been developed. It gives access to the absolute available energy at the scission point, which allows the use of a parameter-free microcanonical statistical description to calculate the distributions and the mean values of all fission observables. SPY uses the richness of microscopy in a rather simple theoretical framework, without any parameter except the scission-point definition, to draw clear answers based on perfect knowledge of the ingredients involved in the model, with very limited computing cost.

  1. Cross section of resonant Raman scattering of light by polyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdyugin, V. V.; Burshteyn, K. Ya.; Shorygin, P. P.

    1987-03-01

    An experimental study is presented of the resonant Raman spectra of beta carotene. Absolute differential cross sections are obtained for the most intensive Raman spectral lines with excitation at the absorption maximum. A theoretical analysis is presented of the variation in absolute differential cross section as a function of a number of conjunct double bonds in the polyenes.

  2. Determination of Absolute Zero Using a Computer-Based Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple computer-based laboratory experiment for evaluating absolute zero in degrees Celsius, which can be performed in college and undergraduate physical sciences laboratory courses. With a computer, absolute zero apparatus can help demonstrators or students to observe the relationship between temperature and pressure and use…

  3. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonality of Influenza (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaman, J. L.; Pitzer, V.; Viboud, C.; Grenfell, B.; Goldstein, E.; Lipsitch, M.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent re-analysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here we show that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. In addition, we show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility and changes in population mixing and contact rates.

  4. Novalis' Poetic Uncertainty: A "Bildung" with the Absolute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mika, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Novalis, the Early German Romantic poet and philosopher, had at the core of his work a mysterious depiction of the "absolute." The absolute is Novalis' name for a substance that defies precise knowledge yet calls for a tentative and sensitive speculation. How one asserts a truth, represents an object, and sets about encountering things…

  5. Absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The distinction between the uses of relative and absolute spectroradiometric calibration of remote sensing systems is discussed. The advantages of detector-based absolute calibration are described, and the categories of relative and absolute system calibrations are listed. The limitations and problems associated with three common methods used for the absolute calibration of remote sensing systems are addressed. Two methods are proposed for the in-flight absolute calibration of advanced multispectral linear array systems. One makes use of a sun-illuminated panel in front of the sensor, the radiance of which is monitored by a spectrally flat pyroelectric radiometer. The other uses a large, uniform, high-radiance reference ground surface. The ground and atmospheric measurements required as input to a radiative transfer program to predict the radiance level at the entrance pupil of the orbital sensor are discussed, and the ground instrumentation is described.

  6. Advancing Absolute Calibration for JWST and Other Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George; Bohlin, Ralph; Boyajian, Tabetha; Carey, Sean; Casagrande, Luca; Deustua, Susana; Gordon, Karl; Kraemer, Kathleen; Marengo, Massimo; Schlawin, Everett; Su, Kate; Sloan, Greg; Volk, Kevin

    2017-10-01

    We propose to exploit the unique optical stability of the Spitzer telescope, along with that of IRAC, to (1) transfer the accurate absolute calibration obtained with MSX on very bright stars directly to two reference stars within the dynamic range of the JWST imagers (and of other modern instrumentation); (2) establish a second accurate absolute calibration based on the absolutely calibrated spectrum of the sun, transferred onto the astronomical system via alpha Cen A; and (3) provide accurate infrared measurements for the 11 (of 15) highest priority stars with no such data but with accurate interferometrically measured diameters, allowing us to optimize determinations of effective temperatures using the infrared flux method and thus to extend the accurate absolute calibration spectrally. This program is integral to plans for an accurate absolute calibration of JWST and will also provide a valuable Spitzer legacy.

  7. Exciton Correlations in Intramolecular Singlet Fission

    DOE PAGES

    Sanders, Samuel N.; Kumarasamy, Elango; Pun, Andrew B.; ...

    2016-05-16

    We have synthesized a series of asymmetric pentacene-tetracene heterodimers with a variable-length conjugated bridge that undergo fast and efficient intramolecular singlet fission (iSF). These compounds have distinct singlet and triplet energies, which allow us to study the spatial dynamics of excitons during the iSF process, including the significant role of exciton correlations in promoting triplet pair generation and recombination. We demonstrate that the primary photoexcitations in conjugated dimers are delocalized singlets that enable fast and efficient iSF. However, in these asymmetric dimers, the singlet becomes more localized on the lower energy unit as the length of the bridge is increased,more » slowing down iSF relative to analogous symmetric dimers. We resolve the recombination kinetics of the inequivalent triplets produced via iSF, and find that they primarily decay via concerted processes. By identifying different decay channels, including delayed fluorescence via triplet-triplet annihilation, we can separate transient species corresponding to both correlated triplet pairs and uncorrelated triplets. Recombination of the triplet pair proceeds rapidly despite our experimental and theoretical demonstration that individual triplets are highly localized and unable to be transported across the conjugated linker. In this class of compounds, the rate of formation and yield of uncorrelated triplets increases with bridge length. Overall, these constrained, asymmetric systems provide a unique platform to isolate and study transient species essential for singlet fission, which are otherwise difficult to observe in symmetric dimers or condensed phases.« less

  8. The Munich accelerator for fission fragments MAFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Groß, M.; Assmann, W.; Ames, F.; Bongers, H.; Emhofer, S.; Heinz, S.; Henry, S.; Kester, O.; Neumayr, J.; Ospald, F.; Reiter, P.; Sieber, T.; Szerypo, J.; Thirolf, P. G.; Varentsov, V.; Wilfart, T.; Faestermann, T.; Krücken, R.; Maier-Komor, P.

    2003-05-01

    The Munich Accelerator for Fission Fragments MAFF has been designed for the new Munich research reactor FRM-II. It will deliver several intense beams (˜3×10 11 s -1) of very neutron-rich fission fragments with a final energy of 30 keV (low-energy beam) or energies between 3.7 and 5.9 MeV· A (high-energy beam). Such beams are of interest for the creation of super-heavy elements by fusion reactions, nuclear spectroscopy of exotic nuclei, but they also have a potential for applications, e.g. in medicine. Presently the Munich research reactor FRM-II is ready for operation, but authorities delay the final permission to turn the reactor critical probably till the end of 2002. Only after this final permission the financing of the major parts of MAFF can start. On the other hand all major components have been designed and special components have been tested in separate setups.

  9. Electroplating method for producing ultralow-mass fissionable deposits

    DOEpatents

    Ruddy, Francis H.

    1989-01-01

    A method for producing ultralow-mass fissionable deposits for nuclear reactor dosimetry is described, including the steps of holding a radioactive parent until the radioactive parent reaches secular equilibrium with a daughter isotope, chemically separating the daughter from the parent, electroplating the daughter on a suitable substrate, and holding the electroplated daughter until the daughter decays to the fissionable deposit.

  10. Correlated fission data measurements with DANCE and NEUANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Favalli, A.; Hayes, A. C.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Kawano, T.; Mosby, S.; Rusev, G.; Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Walker, C. L.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2018-02-01

    To enhance the capabilities of the DANCE array, a new detector array NEUANCE was developed to enable simultaneous measurements of prompt fission neutrons and γ rays. NEUANCE was designed and constructed using 21 stilbene organic scintillator crystals. It was installed in the central cavity of the DANCE array. Signals from the 160 BaF2 detectors of DANCE and the 21 detectors of NEUANCE were merged into a newly designed high-density high-throughput data acquisition system. The excellent pulse shape discrimination properties of stilbene enabled detection of neutrons with energy thresholds as low as 30-40 keVee. A fission reaction tagging method was developed using a NEUANCE γ-ray or neutron signal. The probability of detecting a neutron from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf using NEUANCE is ∼47%. New correlated data for prompt fission neutrons and prompt fission γ rays were obtained for 252Cf using this high detection efficiency experimental setup. Average properties of prompt fission neutron emission as a function of prompt fission γ-ray quantities were also obtained, suggesting that neutron and γ-ray emission in fission are correlated.

  11. Whole-rock uranium analysis by fission track activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, J. R.; Haines, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    We report a whole-rock uranium method in which the polished sample and track detector are separated in a vacuum chamber. Irradiation with thermal neutrons induces uranium fission in the sample, and the detector records the integrated fission track density. Detection efficiency and geometric factors are calculated and compared with calibration experiments.

  12. Experimental fission study using multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa; Hirose, Kentaro; Léguillon, Romain; Makii, Hiroyuki; Orlandi, Riccardo; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Smallcombe, James; Chiba, Satoshi; Aritomo, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Shouya; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Tsekhanovich, Igor; Petrache, Costel M.; Andreyev, Andrei

    2017-09-01

    It is shown that the multi-nucleon transfer reactions is a powerful tool to study fission of exotic neutron-rich actinide nuclei, which cannot be accessed by particle-capture or heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, multi-nucleon transfer channels of the reactions of 18O+232Th, 18O+238U and 18O+248Cm are used to study fission for various nuclei from many excited states. Identification of fissioning nuclei and of their excitation energy is performed on an event-by-event basis, through the measurement of outgoing ejectile particle in coincidence with fission fragments. Fission fragment mass distributions are measured for each transfer channel. Predominantly asymmetric fission is observed at low excitation energies for all studied cases, with a gradual increase of the symmetric mode towards higher excitation energy. The experimental distributions are found to be in general agreement with predictions of the fluctuation-dissipation model. Role of multi-chance fission in fission fragment mass distributions is discussed, where it is shown that mass-asymmetric structure remaining at high excitation energies originates from low-excited nuclei by evaporation of neutrons.

  13. Fission product yield measurements using monoenergetic photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishichayan; Bhike, M.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.

    2017-09-01

    Measurements of fission products yields (FPYs) are an important source of information on the fission process. During the past couple of years, a TUNL-LANL-LLNL collaboration has provided data on the FPYs from quasi monoenergetic neutron-induced fission on 235U, 238U, and 239Pu and has revealed an unexpected energy dependence of both asymmetric fission fragments at energies below 4 MeV. This peculiar FPY energy dependence was more pronounced in neutron-induced fission of 239Pu. In an effort to understand and compare the effect of the incoming probe on the FPY distribution, we have carried out monoenergetic photon-induced fission experiments on the same 235U, 238U, and 239Pu targets. Monoenergetic photon beams of Eγ = 13.0 MeV were provided by the HIγS facility, the world's most intense γ-ray source. In order to determine the total number of fission events, a dual-fission chamber was used during the irradiation. These irradiated samples were counted at the TUNL's low-background γ-ray counting facility using high efficient HPGe detectors over a period of 10 weeks. Here we report on our first ever photofission product yield measurements obtained with monoenegetic photon beams. These results are compared with neutron-induced FPY data.

  14. Correlated fission data measurements with DANCE and NEUANCE

    DOE PAGES

    Jandel, Marian; Baramsai, Baramsai; Bredeweg, Todd Allen; ...

    2017-11-16

    To enhance the capabilities of the DANCE array, a new detector array NEUANCE was developed to enable simultaneous measurements of prompt fission neutrons and γ rays. NEUANCE was designed and constructed using 21 stilbene organic scintillator crystals. It was installed in the central cavity of the DANCE array. Signals from the 160 BaF 2 detectors of DANCE and the 21 detectors of NEUANCE were merged into a newly designed high-density high-throughput data acquisition system. The excellent pulse shape discrimination properties of stilbene enabled detection of neutrons with energy thresholds as low as 30–40 keVee. A fission reaction tagging method wasmore » developed using a NEUANCE γ-ray or neutron signal. The probability of detecting a neutron from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf using NEUANCE is 47%. New correlated data for prompt fission neutrons and prompt fission rays were obtained for 252Cf using this high detection efficiency experimental setup. In conclusion, average properties of prompt fission neutron emission as a function of prompt fission γ-ray quantities were also obtained, suggesting that neutron and γ-ray emission in fission are correlated.« less

  15. REGENERATION OF FISSION-PRODUCT-CONTAINING MAGNESIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Chiotti, P.

    1964-02-01

    A process of regenerating a magnesium-thorium alloy contaminated with fission products, protactinium, and uranium is presented. A molten mixture of KCl--LiCl-MgCl/sub 2/ is added to the molten alloy whereby the alkali, alkaline parth, and rare earth fission products (including yttrium) and some of the thorium and uranium are chlorinated and

  16. SEPARATION OF FISSION PRODUCTS FROM PLUTONIUM BY PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Thompson, S.G.; Davidson, N.R.

    1959-09-01

    Fission product separation from hexavalent plutonium by bismuth phosphate precipitation of the fission products is described. The precipitation, according to this invention, is improved by coprecipitating ceric and zirconium phosphates (0.05 to 2.5 grams/liter) with the bismuth phosphate.

  17. Emilio Segrè and Spontaneous Fission

    Science.gov Websites

    fissioned instead. The discovery of fission led in turn to the discovery of the chain reaction that, if material apart before it had a chance to undergo an efficient chain reaction. The possibility of chain reaction. If a similar rate was found in plutonium, it might rule out the use of that element as

  18. A generalized method for characterization of 235U and 239Pu content using short-lived fission product gamma spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Knowles, Justin R.; Skutnik, Steven E.; Glasgow, David C.; ...

    2016-06-23

    Rapid non-destructive assay methods for trace fissile material analysis are needed in both nuclear forensics and safeguards communities. To address these needs, research at the High Flux Isotope Reactor Neutron Activation Analysis laboratory has developed a generalized non-destructive assay method to characterize materials containing fissile isotopes. This method relies on gamma-ray emissions from short-lived fission products and capitalizes off of differences in fission product yields to identify fissile compositions of trace material samples. Although prior work has explored the use of short-lived fission product gamma-ray measurements, the proposed method is the first to provide a holistic characterization of isotopic identification,more » mass ratios, and absolute mass determination. Successful single fissile isotope mass recoveries of less than 6% error have been conducted on standards of 235U and 239Pu as low as 12 nanograms in less than 10 minutes. Additionally, mixtures of fissile isotope standards containing 235U and 239Pu have been characterized as low as 229 nanograms of fissile mass with less than 12% error. The generalizability of this method is illustrated by evaluating different fissile isotopes, mixtures of fissile isotopes, and two different irradiation positions in the reactor. Furthermore, it is anticipated that this method will be expanded to characterize additional fissile nuclides, utilize various irradiation sources, and account for increasingly complex sample matrices.« less

  19. A generalized method for characterization of 235U and 239Pu content using short-lived fission product gamma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Justin; Skutnik, Steven; Glasgow, David; Kapsimalis, Roger

    2016-10-01

    Rapid nondestructive assay methods for trace fissile material analysis are needed in both nuclear forensics and safeguards communities. To address these needs, research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Neutron Activation Analysis facility has developed a generalized nondestructive assay method to characterize materials containing fissile isotopes. This method relies on gamma-ray emissions from short-lived fission products and makes use of differences in fission product yields to identify fissile compositions of trace material samples. Although prior work has explored the use of short-lived fission product gamma-ray measurements, the proposed method is the first to provide a complete characterization of isotopic identification, mass ratios, and absolute mass determination. Successful single fissile isotope mass recoveries of less than 6% recovery bias have been conducted on standards of 235U and 239Pu as low as 12 ng in less than 10 minutes. Additionally, mixtures of fissile isotope standards containing 235U and 239Pu have been characterized as low as 198 ng of fissile mass with less than 7% recovery bias. The generalizability of this method is illustrated by evaluating different fissile isotopes, mixtures of fissile isotopes, and two different irradiation positions in the reactor. It is anticipated that this method will be expanded to characterize additional fissile nuclides, utilize various irradiation facilities, and account for increasingly complex sample matrices.

  20. A generalized method for characterization of 235U and 239Pu content using short-lived fission product gamma spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, Justin R.; Skutnik, Steven E.; Glasgow, David C.

    Rapid non-destructive assay methods for trace fissile material analysis are needed in both nuclear forensics and safeguards communities. To address these needs, research at the High Flux Isotope Reactor Neutron Activation Analysis laboratory has developed a generalized non-destructive assay method to characterize materials containing fissile isotopes. This method relies on gamma-ray emissions from short-lived fission products and capitalizes off of differences in fission product yields to identify fissile compositions of trace material samples. Although prior work has explored the use of short-lived fission product gamma-ray measurements, the proposed method is the first to provide a holistic characterization of isotopic identification,more » mass ratios, and absolute mass determination. Successful single fissile isotope mass recoveries of less than 6% error have been conducted on standards of 235U and 239Pu as low as 12 nanograms in less than 10 minutes. Additionally, mixtures of fissile isotope standards containing 235U and 239Pu have been characterized as low as 229 nanograms of fissile mass with less than 12% error. The generalizability of this method is illustrated by evaluating different fissile isotopes, mixtures of fissile isotopes, and two different irradiation positions in the reactor. Furthermore, it is anticipated that this method will be expanded to characterize additional fissile nuclides, utilize various irradiation sources, and account for increasingly complex sample matrices.« less

  1. Fission fragment mass distributions from 210Po and 213At

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, A.; Ghosh, T. K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Banerjee, K.; Bhattacharya, C.; Kundu, S.; Mukherjee, G.; Asgar, A.; Dey, A.; Dhal, A.; Shaikh, Md. Moin; Meena, J. K.; Manna, S.; Pandey, R.; Rana, T. K.; Roy, Pratap; Roy, T.; Srivastava, V.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2017-12-01

    Background: The influence of shell effect on the dynamics of the fusion fission process and its evolution with excitation energy in the preactinide Hg-Pb region in general is a matter of intense research in recent years. In particular, a strong ambiguity remains for the neutron shell closed 210Po nucleus regarding the role of shell effect in fission around ≈30 -40 MeV of excitation energy. Purpose: We have measured the fission fragment mass distribution of 210Po populated using fusion of 4He+206Pb at different excitation energies and compare the result with recent theoretical predictions as well as with our previous measurement for the same nucleus populated through a different entrance channel. Mass distribution in the fission of the neighboring nuclei 213At is also studied for comparison. Methods: Two large area multiwire proportional counters (MWPC) were used for complete kinematical measurement of the coincident fission fragments. The time of flight differences of the coincident fission fragments were used to directly extract the fission fragment mass distributions. Results: The measured fragment mass distribution for the reactions 4He+206Pb and 4He+209Bi were symmetric and the width of the mass distributions were found to increase monotonically with excitation energy above 36.7 MeV and 32.9 MeV, respectively, indicating the absence of shell effects at the saddle. However, in the fission of 210Po, we find minor deviation from symmetric mass distributions at the lowest excitation energy (30.8 MeV). Conclusion: Persistence of shell effect in fission fragment mass distribution of 210Po was observed at the excitation energy ≈31 MeV as predicted by the theory; at higher excitation energy, however, the present study reaffirms the absence of any shell correction in the fission of 210Po.

  2. Improved Fission Neutron Data Base for Active Interrogation of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, Sara; Czirr, J. Bart; Haight, Robert

    2013-11-06

    This project will develop an innovative neutron detection system for active interrogation measurements. Many active interrogation methods to detect fissionable material are based on the detection of neutrons from fission induced by fast neutrons or high-energy gamma rays. The energy spectrum of the fission neutrons provides data to identify the fissionable isotopes and materials such as shielding between the fissionable material and the detector. The proposed path for the project is as follows. First, the team will develop new neutron detection systems and algorithms by Monte Carlo simulations and bench-top experiments. Next, They will characterize and calibrate detection systems bothmore » with monoenergetic and white neutron sources. Finally, high-fidelity measurements of neutron emission from fissions induced by fast neutrons will be performed. Several existing fission chambers containing U-235, Pu-239, U-238, or Th-232 will be used to measure the neutron-induced fission neutron emission spectra. The challenge for making confident measurements is the detection of neutrons in the energy ranges of 0.01 – 1 MeV and above 8 MeV, regions where the basic data on the neutron energy spectrum emitted from fission is least well known. In addition, improvements in the specificity of neutron detectors are required throughout the complete energy range: they must be able to clearly distinguish neutrons from other radiations, in particular gamma rays and cosmic rays. The team believes that all of these challenges can be addressed successfully with emerging technologies under development by this collaboration. In particular, the collaboration will address the area of fission neutron emission spectra for isotopes of interest in the advanced fuel cycle initiative (AFCI).« less

  3. Impact of fission neutron energies on reactor antineutrino spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littlejohn, B. R.; Conant, A.; Dwyer, D. A.; Erickson, A.; Gustafson, I.; Hermanek, K.

    2018-04-01

    Recent measurements of reactor-produced antineutrino fluxes and energy spectra are inconsistent with models based on measured thermal fission beta spectra. In this paper, we examine the dependence of antineutrino production on fission neutron energy. In particular, the variation of fission product yields with neutron energy has been considered as a possible source of the discrepancies between antineutrino observations and models. In simulations of low-enriched and highly-enriched reactor core designs, we find a substantial fraction of fissions (from 5% to more than 40%) are caused by nonthermal neutrons. Using tabulated evaluations of nuclear fission and decay, we estimate the variation in antineutrino emission by the prominent fission parents U 235 , Pu 239 , and Pu 241 versus neutron energy. The differences in fission neutron energy are found to produce less than 1% variation in detected antineutrino rate per fission of U 235 , Pu 239 , and Pu 241 . Corresponding variations in the antineutrino spectrum are found to be less than 10% below 7 MeV antineutrino energy, smaller than current model uncertainties. We conclude that insufficient modeling of fission neutron energy is unlikely to be the cause of the various reactor anomalies. Our results also suggest that comparisons of antineutrino measurements at low-enriched and highly-enriched reactors can safely neglect the differences in the distributions of their fission neutron energies.

  4. Measurement of absolute response functions and detection efficiencies of an NE213 scintillator up to 600 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Sanami, Toshiya; Ishibashi, Kenji; Haight, Robert C.; Fotiades, Nikolaos

    2011-02-01

    Absolute neutron response functions and detection efficiencies of an NE213 liquid scintillator that was 12.7 cm in diameter and 12.7 cm in thickness were measured for neutron energies between 15 and 600 MeV at the Weapons Neutron Research facility of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The experiment was performed with continuous-energy neutrons on a spallation neutron source by 800-MeV proton incidence. The incident neutron flux was measured using a 238U fission ionization chamber. Measured response functions and detection efficiencies were compared with corresponding calculations using the SCINFUL-QMD code. The calculated and experimental values were in good agreement for data below 70 MeV. However, there were discrepancies in the energy region between 70 and 150 MeV. Thus, the code was partly modified and the revised code provided better agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Solid-state track recorder dosimetry device to measure absolute reaction rates and neutron fluence as a function of time

    DOEpatents

    Gold, Raymond; Roberts, James H.

    1989-01-01

    A solid state track recording type dosimeter is disclosed to measure the time dependence of the absolute fission rates of nuclides or neutron fluence over a period of time. In a primary species an inner recording drum is rotatably contained within an exterior housing drum that defines a series of collimating slit apertures overlying windows defined in the stationary drum through which radiation can enter. Film type solid state track recorders are positioned circumferentially about the surface of the internal recording drum to record such radiation or its secondary products during relative rotation of the two elements. In another species both the recording element and the aperture element assume the configuration of adjacent disks. Based on slit size of apertures and relative rotational velocity of the inner drum, radiation parameters within a test area may be measured as a function of time and spectra deduced therefrom.

  6. Results of interlaboratory comparison of fission track ages for 1992 fission track workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, D.S.; Crowley, K.D.; Dokka, R.K.; Galbraith, R.F.; Kowallis, B.J.; Naeser, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    Two apatites and one sphene were made available to the fission track research community for analysis prior to the 1992 Fission Track Workshop held in Philadelphia, U.S.A., 13-17 July. Eighteen laboratories throughout the world received aliquots of apatite and sphene. To date, analyses by 33 different scientists have been representing 15 different laboratories. With respect to the previous two interlaboratory comparisons, there is a noticeable improvement in the accuracy of the age results (Naeser and Cebula, 1978; Naeser et al., 1981; Miller et al., 1985;Miller et al.1990). Ninety-four percent of the analysis used the external detector method (EDM) combined with the zeta technique while the remaining individuals used the population method (POP). Track length measurements (requested for the first time in the interlaboratory comparison studies) were in relatively good agreement. ?? 1993.

  7. Report on simulation of fission gas and fission product diffusion in UO 2

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders David; Perriot, Romain Thibault; Pastore, Giovanni

    2016-07-22

    In UO 2 nuclear fuel, the retention and release of fission gas atoms such as xenon (Xe) are important for nuclear fuel performance by, for example, reducing the fuel thermal conductivity, causing fuel swelling that leads to mechanical interaction with the clad, increasing the plenum pressure and reducing the fuel–clad gap thermal conductivity. We use multi-­scale simulations to determine fission gas diffusion mechanisms as well as the corresponding rates in UO 2 under both intrinsic and irradiation conditions. In addition to Xe and Kr, the fission products Zr, Ru, Ce, Y, La, Sr and Ba have been investigated. Density functionalmore » theory (DFT) calculations are used to study formation, binding and migration energies of small clusters of Xe atoms and vacancies. Empirical potential calculations enable us to determine the corresponding entropies and attempt frequencies for migration as well as investigate the properties of large clusters or small fission gas bubbles. A continuum reaction-­diffusion model is developed for Xe and point defects based on the mechanisms and rates obtained from atomistic simulations. Effective fission gas diffusivities are then obtained by solving this set of equations for different chemical and irradiation conditions using the MARMOT phase field code. The predictions are compared to available experimental data. The importance of the large Xe U3O cluster (a Xe atom in a uranium + oxygen vacancy trap site with two bound uranium vacancies) is emphasized, which is a consequence of its high mobility and high binding energy. We find that the Xe U3O cluster gives Xe diffusion coefficients that are higher for intrinsic conditions than under irradiation over a wide range of temperatures. Under irradiation the fast-­moving Xe U3O cluster recombines quickly with irradiation-induced interstitial U ions, while this mechanism is less important for intrinsic conditions. The net result is higher concentration of the Xe U3O cluster for intrinsic

  8. On similarity of various reactor spectra and 235U prompt fission neutron spectrum.

    PubMed

    Košťál, Michal; Matěj, Zdeněk; Losa, Evžen; Huml, Ondřej; Štefánik, Milan; Cvachovec, František; Schulc, Martin; Jánský, Bohumil; Novák, Evžen; Harutyunyan, Davit; Rypar, Vojtěch

    2018-05-01

    A well-defined neutron spectrum is an essential tool not only for calibration and testing of neutron detectors used in dosimetry and spectroscopy but also for validation and verification of evaluated cross sections. A new evaluation of thermal-neutron induced 235 U PFNS was performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the CIELO (Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organisation Project) project; new measurements of Spectral Averaged Cross sections averaged in the evaluated spectrum are to be obtained. In general, a neutron spectrum in the core is not identical to the pure fission one because fission neutrons undergo many scattering reactions, but it can be shown that PFNS and reactor spectra become undistinguishable from a certain energy boundary. This limit is important for experiments, because when the studied reaction threshold is over this limit, the spectral averaged cross sections in PFNS can be derived from the measured reactions in the reactor core. The evaluation of the neutron spectrum measurements in three different thermal-reactor cores shows that this lower limit is around the energy of 5.5 - 6 MeV. Above this energy the reactor spectra becomes identical with the 235 U PFNS. IAEA CIELO PFNS is within 5% of the measured PFNS from 10 to 14 MeV in a LR-0 reactor, while ENDF/B-VII evaluated PFNS underestimated measured neutron spectra. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Physical determinants of bipolar mitotic spindle assembly and stability in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Sweezy-Schindler, Oliver; Lamson, Adam; Gergely, Zachary R.; O’Toole, Eileen; Crapo, Ammon; Hough, Loren E.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, Meredith D.

    2017-01-01

    Mitotic spindles use an elegant bipolar architecture to segregate duplicated chromosomes with high fidelity. Bipolar spindles form from a monopolar initial condition; this is the most fundamental construction problem that the spindle must solve. Microtubules, motors, and cross-linkers are important for bipolarity, but the mechanisms necessary and sufficient for spindle assembly remain unknown. We describe a physical model that exhibits de novo bipolar spindle formation. We began with physical properties of fission-yeast spindle pole body size and microtubule number, kinesin-5 motors, kinesin-14 motors, and passive cross-linkers. Our model results agree quantitatively with our experiments in fission yeast, thereby establishing a minimal system with which to interrogate collective self-assembly. By varying the features of our model, we identify a set of functions essential for the generation and stability of spindle bipolarity. When kinesin-5 motors are present, their bidirectionality is essential, but spindles can form in the presence of passive cross-linkers alone. We also identify characteristic failed states of spindle assembly—the persistent monopole, X spindle, separated asters, and short spindle, which are avoided by the creation and maintenance of antiparallel microtubule overlaps. Our model can guide the identification of new, multifaceted strategies to induce mitotic catastrophes; these would constitute novel strategies for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:28116355

  10. Mechanics and morphogenesis of fission yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Davì, Valeria; Minc, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    The integration of biochemical and biomechanical elements is at the heart of morphogenesis. While animal cells are relatively soft objects which shape and mechanics is mostly regulated by cytoskeletal networks, walled cells including those of plants, fungi and bacteria are encased in a rigid cell wall which resist high internal turgor pressure. How these particular mechanical properties may influence basic cellular processes, such as growth, shape and division remains poorly understood. Recent work using the model fungal cell fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, highlights important contribution of cell mechanics to various morphogenesis processes. We envision this genetically tractable system to serve as a novel standard for the mechanobiology of walled cell. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Preparation of Total RNA from Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Bähler, Jürg; Wise, Jo Ann

    2017-04-03

    Treatment with hot phenol breaks open fission yeast cells and begins to strip away bound proteins from RNA. Deproteinization is completed by multiple extractions with chloroform/isoamyl alcohol and separation of the aqueous and organic phases using MaXtract gel, an inert material that acts as a physical barrier between the phases. The final step is concentration of the RNA by ethanol precipitation. The protocol can be used to prepare RNA from several cultures grown in parallel, but it is important not to process too many samples at once because delays can be detrimental to RNA quality. A reasonable number of samples to process at once would be three to four for microarray or RNA sequencing analyses and six for preliminary investigations of mutants implicated in RNA metabolism. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  12. Detecting fission from special nuclear material sources

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA

    2012-06-05

    A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source. The system includes a graphing component that displays the plot of the neutron distribution from the unknown source over a Poisson distribution and a plot of neutrons due to background or environmental sources. The system further includes a known neutron source placed in proximity to the unknown source to actively interrogate the unknown source in order to accentuate differences in neutron emission from the unknown source from Poisson distributions and/or environmental sources.

  13. Intramolecular Singlet Fission in Oligoacene Heterodimers

    DOE PAGES

    Sanders, Samuel N.; Kumarasamy, Elango; Pun, Andrew B.; ...

    2016-02-02

    In this Communication we investigate singlet fission (SF) in heterodimers comprising a pentacene unit covalently bonded to another acene as we systematically vary the singlet and triplet pair energies. We find that these energies control the SF process, where dimers undergo SF provided that the resulting triplet pair energy is similar or lower in energy than the singlet state. In these systems the singlet energy is determined by the lower energy chromophore, and the rate of SF is found to be relatively independent of the driving force. However, triplet pair recombination in these heterodimers follows the energy gap law. Themore » ability to tune the energies of these materials provides a key strategy to study and design new SF materials – an important process for third generation photovoltaics.« less

  14. Control system for a small fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Burelbach, J.P.; Kann, W.J.; Saiveau, J.G.

    1985-02-08

    A system for controlling the reactivity of a small fission reactor includes an elongated, flexible hollow tube in the general form of a helical coiled spring axially positioned around and outside of the reactor vessel in an annular space between the reactor vessel and a surrounding cylindrical-shaped neutron reflector. A neutron absorbing material is provided within the hollow tube with the rate of the reaction controlled by the extension and compression of the hollow tube, e.g., extension of the tube increases reactivity while its compression reduces reactivity, in varying the amount of neutron absorbing material disposed between the reactor vessel and the neutron reflector. Conventional mechanical displacement means may be employed to control the coil density of the hollow tube as desired.

  15. Fission Surface Power System Initial Concept Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Under the NASA Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) and in partnership with the Department of Energy (DOE), NASA has embarked on a project to develop Fission Surface Power (FSP) technology. The primary goals of the project are to 1) develop FSP concepts that meet expected surface power requirements at reasonable cost with added benefits over other options, 2) establish a hardwarebased technical foundation for FSP design concepts and reduce overall development risk, 3) reduce the cost uncertainties for FSP and establish greater credibility for flight system cost estimates, and 4) generate the key products to allow NASA decision-makers to consider FSP as a preferred option for flight development. The FSP project was initiated in 2006 as the Prometheus Program and the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission were phased-out. As a first step, NASA Headquarters commissioned the Affordable Fission Surface Power System Study to evaluate the potential for an affordable FSP development approach. With a cost-effective FSP strategy identified, the FSP team evaluated design options and selected a Preliminary Reference Concept to guide technology development. Since then, the FSP Preliminary Reference Concept has served as a point-of-departure for several NASA mission architecture studies examining the use of nuclear power and has provided the foundation for a series of "Pathfinder" hardware tests. The long-term technology goal is a Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) integrated system test using full-scale components and a non-nuclear reactor simulator. The FSP team consists of Glenn Research Center (GRC), Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the DOE National Laboratories at Los Alamos (LANL), Idaho (INL), Oak Ridge (ORNL), and Sandia (SNL). The project is organized into two main elements: Concept Definition and Risk Reduction. Under Concept Definition, the team performs trade studies, develops analytical tools, and formulates system concepts. Under Risk

  16. Fission dynamics with microscopic level densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randrup, Jørgen; Ward, Daniel; Carlsson, Gillis; Døssing, Thomas; Möller, Peter; Åberg, Sven

    2018-03-01

    Working within the Langevin framework of nuclear shape dynamics, we study the dependence of the evolution on the degree of excitation. As the excitation energy of the fissioning system is increased, the pairing correlations and the shell effects diminish and the effective potential-energy surface becomes ever more liquid-drop like. This feature can be included in the treatment in a formally well-founded manner by using the local level densities as a basis for the shape evolution. This is particularly easy to understand and implement in the Metropolis treatment where the evolution is simulated by means of a random walk on the five-dimensional lattice of shapes for which the potential energy has been tabulated. Because the individual steps between two neighboring lattice sites are decided on the basis of the ratio of the statistical weights, what is needed is the ratio of the local level densities for those shapes, evaluated at the associated local excitation energies. For this purpose, we adapt a recently developed combinatorial method for calculating level densities which employs the same single-particle levels as those that were used for the calculation of the pairing and shell contributions to the macroscopic-microscopic deformation-energy surface. For each nucleus under consideration, the level density (for a fixed total angular momentum) is calculated microscopically for each of the over five million shapes given in the three-quadratic-surface parametrization. This novel treatment, which introduces no new parameters, is illustrated for the fission fragment mass distributions for selected uranium and plutonium cases.

  17. Modification of apparent fission yields by Chemical Fractionation following Fission (CFF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenberg, Charles; Meshik, Alex

    2008-04-01

    Grain-by-grain studies of the 2 billion year old Oklo natural reactor, using laser micro-extraction^1,2, yield detailed information about Oklo, a water-moderated pulsed reactor, cycle times, total neutron fluence and duration, but it also demonstrates Chemical Fractionation following Fission. In the CFF process, members of an isobaric yield chain with long half-lives are subject to migration before decay can occur. Of particular interest is the 129 isobar where 17 million ^129I can migrate out of the host grain before decay, and iodine compounds are water soluble. This is amply demonstated by the variation of Xe spectra between micron-sized uranium-bearing minerals and adjacent uranium-free minerals. Fission 129 yields for the spontaneous fission of ^238U generally come from measured ^129Xe in pitchblend^2, ores emplaced by aqueous activity, and are incorrect due to the CFF process. ^238U yields for the 131 and 129 chains, reported in Hyde^3, as 0.455 +- .02 and < 0.012, respectively, the latter being anomalously low. ^1A Meshik, C Hohenberg and O Pravdivtesva, PRL 93, 182302 (2004); A Meshik Sci. Am. Nov (2005), 55; ^2E K Hyde, Nucl Prop of Heavy Elements III (1964).

  18. Results of interlaboratory comparison of fission-track age standards: Fission-track workshop-1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, D.S.; Duddy, I.R.; Green, P.F.; Hurford, A.J.; Naeser, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    Five samples were made available as standards for the 1984 Fission Track Workshop held in the summer of 1984 (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York). Two zircons, two apatites and a sphene were distributed prior to the meeting to 40 different laboratories. To date, 24 different analysts have reported results. The isotopic ages of the standards ranged from 16.8 to 98.7 Myr. Only the statement that the age of each sample was less than 200 Myr was provided with the set of standards distributed. Consequently, each laboratory was required to use their laboratory's accepted treatment (irradiation level, etching conditions, counting conditions, etc.) for these samples. The results show that some workers have serious problems in achieving accurate age determinations. This emphasizes the need to calibrate experimental techniques and counting procedures against age standards before unknown ages are determined. Any fission-track age determination published or submitted for publication can only be considered reliable if it is supported by evidence of consistent determinations on age standards. Only this can provide the scientific community with the background to build up confidence concerning the validity of the fission-track method. ?? 1985.

  19. Reexamining the role of the ( n , γ f ) process in the low-energy fission of U 235 and Pu 239

    DOE PAGES

    Lynn, J. E.; Talou, P.; Bouland, O.

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, themore » $$(n,{\\gamma}f)$$ process is reviewed in light of modern nuclear reaction calculations in both slow and fast neutron-induced fission reactions on $$^{235}\\mathrm{U}$$ and $$^{239}\\mathrm{Pu}$$. Observed fluctuations of the average prompt fission neutron multiplicity and average total $${\\gamma}$$-ray energy below 100-eV incident neutron energy are interpreted in this framework. The surprisingly large contribution of the $M1$ transitions to the prefission $${\\gamma}$$-ray spectrum of $$^{239}\\mathrm{Pu}$$ is explained by the dominant fission probabilities of $${0}^{+}$$ and $${2}^{+}$$ transition states, which can only be accessed from compound nucleus states formed by the interaction of $s$-wave neutrons with the target nucleus in its ground state, and decaying through $M1$ transitions. The impact of an additional low-lying $M1$ scissors mode in the photon strength function is analyzed. We review experimental evidence for fission fragment mass and kinetic-energy fluctuations in the resonance region and their importance in the interpretation of experimental data on prompt neutron data in this region. In conclusion, calculations are extended to the fast energy range where $$(n,{\\gamma}f)$$ corrections can account for up to 3% of the total fission cross section and about 20% of the capture cross section.« less

  20. Reexamining the role of the ( n , γ f ) process in the low-energy fission of U 235 and Pu 239

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, J. E.; Talou, P.; Bouland, O.

    In this paper, themore » $$(n,{\\gamma}f)$$ process is reviewed in light of modern nuclear reaction calculations in both slow and fast neutron-induced fission reactions on $$^{235}\\mathrm{U}$$ and $$^{239}\\mathrm{Pu}$$. Observed fluctuations of the average prompt fission neutron multiplicity and average total $${\\gamma}$$-ray energy below 100-eV incident neutron energy are interpreted in this framework. The surprisingly large contribution of the $M1$ transitions to the prefission $${\\gamma}$$-ray spectrum of $$^{239}\\mathrm{Pu}$$ is explained by the dominant fission probabilities of $${0}^{+}$$ and $${2}^{+}$$ transition states, which can only be accessed from compound nucleus states formed by the interaction of $s$-wave neutrons with the target nucleus in its ground state, and decaying through $M1$ transitions. The impact of an additional low-lying $M1$ scissors mode in the photon strength function is analyzed. We review experimental evidence for fission fragment mass and kinetic-energy fluctuations in the resonance region and their importance in the interpretation of experimental data on prompt neutron data in this region. In conclusion, calculations are extended to the fast energy range where $$(n,{\\gamma}f)$$ corrections can account for up to 3% of the total fission cross section and about 20% of the capture cross section.« less