Science.gov

Sample records for absolute flux density

  1. Absolute Calibration of the Radio Astronomy Flux Density Scale at 22 to 43 GHz Using Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, B.; López-Caniego, M.; Perley, R. A.; Stevens, J.; Butler, B. J.; Rocha, G.; Walter, B.; Zacchei, A.

    2016-04-01

    The Planck mission detected thousands of extragalactic radio sources at frequencies from 28 to 857 GHz. Planck's calibration is absolute (in the sense that it is based on the satellite’s annual motion around the Sun and the temperature of the cosmic microwave background), and its beams are well characterized at sub-percent levels. Thus, Planck's flux density measurements of compact sources are absolute in the same sense. We have made coordinated Very Large Array (VLA) and Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of 65 strong, unresolved Planck sources in order to transfer Planck's calibration to ground-based instruments at 22, 28, and 43 GHz. The results are compared to microwave flux density scales currently based on planetary observations. Despite the scatter introduced by the variability of many of the sources, the flux density scales are determined to 1%-2% accuracy. At 28 GHz, the flux density scale used by the VLA runs 2%-3% ± 1.0% below Planck values with an uncertainty of +/- 1.0%; at 43 GHz, the discrepancy increases to 5%-6% ± 1.4% for both ATCA and the VLA.

  2. Absolute flux density calibrations of radio sources: 2.3 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freiley, A. J.; Batelaan, P. D.; Bathker, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    A detailed description of a NASA/JPL Deep Space Network program to improve S-band gain calibrations of large aperture antennas is reported. The program is considered unique in at least three ways; first, absolute gain calibrations of high quality suppressed-sidelobe dual mode horns first provide a high accuracy foundation to the foundation to the program. Second, a very careful transfer calibration technique using an artificial far-field coherent-wave source was used to accurately obtain the gain of one large (26 m) aperture. Third, using the calibrated large aperture directly, the absolute flux density of five selected galactic and extragalactic natural radio sources was determined with an absolute accuracy better than 2 percent, now quoted at the familiar 1 sigma confidence level. The follow-on considerations to apply these results to an operational network of ground antennas are discussed. It is concluded that absolute gain accuracies within + or - 0.30 to 0.40 db are possible, depending primarily on the repeatability (scatter) in the field data from Deep Space Network user stations.

  3. The brightness temperature of Venus and the absolute flux-density scale at 608 MHz.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Berge, G. L.; Orton, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    The disk temperature of Venus was measured at 608 MHz near the inferior conjunction of 1972, and a value of 498 plus or minus 33 K was obtained using a nominal CKL flux-density scale. The result is consistent with earlier measurements, but has a much smaller uncertainty. Our theoretical model prediction is larger by a factor of 1.21 plus or minus 0.09. This discrepancy has been noticed previously for frequencies below 1400 MHz, but was generally disregarded because of the large observational uncertainties. No way could be found to change the model to produce agreement without causing a conflict with well-established properties of Venus. Thus it is suggested that the flux-density scale may require an upward revision, at least near this frequency, in excess of what has previously been considered likely.

  4. Development of a vector-tensor system to measure the absolute magnetic flux density and its gradient in magnetically shielded rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, J.; Knappe-Grüneberg, S.; Gutkelch, D.; Neuber, S.; Schnabel, A.; Burghoff, M.; Haueisen, J.

    2015-05-15

    Several experiments in fundamental physics demand an environment of very low, homogeneous, and stable magnetic fields. For the magnetic characterization of such environments, we present a portable SQUID system that measures the absolute magnetic flux density vector and the gradient tensor. This vector-tensor system contains 13 integrated low-critical temperature (LTc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) inside a small cylindrical liquid helium Dewar with a height of 31 cm and 37 cm in diameter. The achievable resolution depends on the flux density of the field under investigation and its temporal drift. Inside a seven-layer mu-metal shield, an accuracy better than ±23 pT for the components of the static magnetic field vector and ±2 pT/cm for each of the nine components of the gradient tensor is reached by using the shifting method.

  5. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  6. Absolute flux measurements for swift atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M.; Kohl, D. A.; Keto, J. W.; Antoniewicz, P.

    1987-01-01

    While a torsion balance in vacuum can easily measure the momentum transfer from a gas beam impinging on a surface attached to the balance, this measurement depends on the accommodation coefficients of the atoms with the surface and the distribution of the recoil. A torsion balance is described for making absolute flux measurements independent of recoil effects. The torsion balance is a conventional taut suspension wire design and the Young modulus of the wire determines the relationship between the displacement and the applied torque. A compensating magnetic field is applied to maintain zero displacement and provide critical damping. The unique feature is to couple the impinging gas beam to the torsion balance via a Wood's horn, i.e., a thin wall tube with a gradual 90 deg bend. Just as light is trapped in a Wood's horn by specular reflection from the curved surfaces, the gas beam diffuses through the tube. Instead of trapping the beam, the end of the tube is open so that the atoms exit the tube at 90 deg to their original direction. Therefore, all of the forward momentum of the gas beam is transferred to the torsion balance independent of the angle of reflection from the surfaces inside the tube.

  7. Absolute flux calibration of optical spectrophotometric standard stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colina, Luis; Bohlin, Ralph C.

    1994-01-01

    A method based on Landolt photometry in B and V is developed to correct for a wavelength independent offset of the absolute flux level of optical spectrophotometric standards. The method is based on synthetic photometry techniques in B and V and is accurate to approximately 1%. The correction method is verified by Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph absolute fluxes for five calibration stars, which agree with Landolt photometry to 0.5% in B and V.

  8. EUV mirror based absolute incident flux detector

    DOEpatents

    Berger, Kurt W.

    2004-03-23

    A device for the in-situ monitoring of EUV radiation flux includes an integrated reflective multilayer stack. This device operates on the principle that a finite amount of in-band EUV radiation is transmitted through the entire multilayer stack. This device offers improvements over existing vacuum photo-detector devices since its calibration does not change with surface contamination.

  9. From Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, S. R.; Lindler, D.

    2016-05-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R˜1000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.03 μ. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsl/. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We have therefore developed an observing procedure, data-reduction procedure, and correction algorithms that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1%.

  10. Regional absolute conductivity reconstruction using projected current density in MREIT.

    PubMed

    Sajib, Saurav Z K; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2012-09-21

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a non-invasive technique for imaging the internal conductivity distribution in tissue within an MRI scanner, utilizing the magnetic flux density, which is introduced when a current is injected into the tissue from external electrodes. This magnetic flux alters the MRI signal, so that appropriate reconstruction can provide a map of the additional z-component of the magnetic field (B(z)) as well as the internal current density distribution that created it. To extract the internal electrical properties of the subject, including the conductivity and/or the current density distribution, MREIT techniques use the relationship between the external injection current and the z-component of the magnetic flux density B = (B(x), B(y), B(z)). The tissue studied typically contains defective regions, regions with a low MRI signal and/or low MRI signal-to-noise-ratio, due to the low density of nuclear magnetic resonance spins, short T(2) or T*(2) relaxation times, as well as regions with very low electrical conductivity, through which very little current traverses. These defective regions provide noisy B(z) data, which can severely degrade the overall reconstructed conductivity distribution. Injecting two independent currents through surface electrodes, this paper proposes a new direct method to reconstruct a regional absolute isotropic conductivity distribution in a region of interest (ROI) while avoiding the defective regions. First, the proposed method reconstructs the contrast of conductivity using the transversal J-substitution algorithm, which blocks the propagation of severe accumulated noise from the defective region to the ROI. Second, the proposed method reconstructs the regional projected current density using the relationships between the internal current density, which stems from a current injection on the surface, and the measured B(z) data. Combining the contrast conductivity distribution in the entire

  11. Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Haddad, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet have extended to short wavelengths by use of rare-gas ionization chambers. The technique involves the measurement of the ion current as a function of the gas pressure in the ion chamber. The true value of the ion current, and hence the absolute photon flux, is obtained by extrapolating the ion current to zero gas pressure. Examples are given at 162 and 266 A. The short-wavelength limit is determined only by the sensitivity of the current-measuring apparatus and by present knowledge of the photoionization processes that occur in the rate gases.

  12. Absolute flux density calibrations: Receiver saturation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freiley, A. J.; Ohlson, J. E.; Seidel, B. L.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of receiver saturation was examined for a total power radiometer which uses an ambient load for calibration. Extension to other calibration schemes is indicated. The analysis shows that a monotonic receiver saturation characteristic could cause either positive or negative measurement errors, with polarity depending upon operating conditions. A realistic model of the receiver was made by using a linear-cubic voltage transfer characteristic. The evaluation of measurement error for this model provided a means for correcting radio source measurements.

  13. The absolute energy flux envelopes of B type stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underhill, A. B.

    1972-01-01

    Absolute energy flux envelopes covering the region of 1100 to 6000 A for main-sequence stars of types B3, B7 and A0 derived from published, ground-based observations and from spectrum scans with OAO-II are presented. These flux envelopes are compared with the predicted flux envelopes from lightly line-blanketed model atmospheres. The line blanketing at wavelengths shorter than 3000 A is severe, about one-half the predicted light being observed at 1600 A. These results demonstrate that a model which represents well the observed visible spectrum of a star may fail seriously for representing the ultraviolet spectrum.

  14. Absolute density measurements in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, M.; Gumbel, J.; Lübken, F.-J.

    2001-05-01

    In the last ten years a total of 25 sounding rockets employing ionization gauges have been launched at high latitudes ( ~ 70° N) to measure total atmospheric density and its small scale fluctuations in an altitude range between 70 and 110 km. While the determination of small scale fluctuations is unambiguous, the total density analysis has been complicated in the past by aerodynamical disturbances leading to densities inside the sensor which are enhanced compared to atmospheric values. Here, we present the results of both Monte Carlo simulations and wind tunnel measurements to quantify this aerodynamical effect. The comparison of the resulting ‘ram-factor’ profiles with empirically determined density ratios of ionization gauge measurements and falling sphere measurements provides excellent agreement. This demonstrates both the need, but also the possibility, to correct aerodynamical influences on measurements from sounding rockets. We have determined a total of 20 density profiles of the mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT) region. Grouping these profiles according to season, a listing of mean density profiles is included in the paper. A comparison with density profiles taken from the reference atmospheres CIRA86 and MSIS90 results in differences of up to 40%. This reflects that current reference atmospheres are a significant potential error source for the determination of mixing ratios of, for example, trace gas constituents in the MLT region.

  15. Absolute measurement of the extreme UV solar flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Ogawa, H. S.; Judge, D. L.; Phillips, E.

    1984-01-01

    A windowless rare-gas ionization chamber has been developed to measure the absolute value of the solar extreme UV flux in the 50-575-A region. Successful results were obtained on a solar-pointing sounding rocket. The ionization chamber, operated in total absorption, is an inherently stable absolute detector of ionizing UV radiation and was designed to be independent of effects from secondary ionization and gas effusion. The net error of the measurement is + or - 7.3 percent, which is primarily due to residual outgassing in the instrument, other errors such as multiple ionization, photoelectron collection, and extrapolation to the zero atmospheric optical depth being small in comparison. For the day of the flight, Aug. 10, 1982, the solar irradiance (50-575 A), normalized to unit solar distance, was found to be 5.71 + or - 0.42 x 10 to the 10th photons per sq cm sec.

  16. AN ACCURATE FLUX DENSITY SCALE FROM 1 TO 50 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, R. A.; Butler, B. J. E-mail: BButler@nrao.edu

    2013-02-15

    We develop an absolute flux density scale for centimeter-wavelength astronomy by combining accurate flux density ratios determined by the Very Large Array between the planet Mars and a set of potential calibrators with the Rudy thermophysical emission model of Mars, adjusted to the absolute scale established by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The radio sources 3C123, 3C196, 3C286, and 3C295 are found to be varying at a level of less than {approx}5% per century at all frequencies between 1 and 50 GHz, and hence are suitable as flux density standards. We present polynomial expressions for their spectral flux densities, valid from 1 to 50 GHz, with absolute accuracy estimated at 1%-3% depending on frequency. Of the four sources, 3C286 is the most compact and has the flattest spectral index, making it the most suitable object on which to establish the spectral flux density scale. The sources 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, NGC 7027, NGC 6542, and MWC 349 show significant variability on various timescales. Polynomial coefficients for the spectral flux density are developed for 3C48, 3C138, and 3C147 for each of the 17 observation dates, spanning 1983-2012. The planets Venus, Uranus, and Neptune are included in our observations, and we derive their brightness temperatures over the same frequency range.

  17. HST Stellar Standards with 1% Accuracy in Absolute Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlin, R. C.

    2007-04-01

    Free of any atmospheric contamination, the {Hubble Space Telescope} provides the best available spectrophotometry from the far-UV to the near-IR for stars as faint as V˜16. The HST CALSPEC standard star network is based on three standard candles: the hot, pure hydrogen white dwarf (WD) stars G 191B2B, GD 153, and GD 71, which have Hubeny NLTE flux calculations that require the atomic physics for only one atom. These model flux distributions are normalized to the absolute flux for Vega of 3.46×10-9 erg cm-2 s-1 Å-1 at 5556 Å using precise Landolt V band photometry and the V bandpass function corrected for atmospheric transmission by M. Cohen. The three primary WD standards provide absolute flux calibrations for FOS, STIS and NICMOS spectrophotometry from these instruments on the HST. About 32 stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) have been constructed with a primary pedigree from the STIS data, which extends from 1150 Å for the hot stars to a long wavelength limit of 1 μm. NICMOS grism spectrophotometry provides an extension to 1.9 μm in the IR for 17 of the HST standards and longward to 2.5 μm for a few of the brighter stars. Included among these HST standards are Vega, the Sloan standard BD+17 4708, three bright solar analog candidates, three cool stars of type M or later, and five hot WDs. In addition, four K giants and four main sequence A-stars have NICMOS spectrophotometry from 0.8-2.5 μm. The WD fluxes are compared to their modeled SEDs and demonstrate an internal precision of 1-2%, while the A-stars agree with the Cohen IR fluxes to ˜2%. Three solar analog candidate stars differ from the solar spectrum by up to 10% in the region of heavy line blanketing from 3000-4000 Å and show differences in shape of ˜5% in the IR around 1.8 μm.

  18. Absolute Measurement of Electron Cloud Density in aPositively-Charged Particle Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kireeff Covo, Michel; Molvik, Arthur W.; Friedman, Alex; Vay,Jean-Luc; Seidl, Peter A.; Logan, Grant; Baca, David; Vujic, Jasmina L.

    2006-04-27

    Clouds of stray electrons are ubiquitous in particle accelerators and frequently limit the performance of storage rings. Earlier measurements of electron energy distribution and flux to the walls provided only a relative electron cloud density. We have measured electron accumulation using ions expelled by the beam. The ion energy distribution maps the depressed beam potential and gives the dynamic cloud density. Clearing electrode current reveals the static background cloud density, allowing the first absolute measurement of the time-dependent electron cloud density during the beam pulse.

  19. Absolute Measurement of Electron Cloud Density in a Positively-Charged Particle Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Friedman, A; Vay, J; Seidl, P A; Logan, B G; Baca, D; Vujic, J L

    2006-05-18

    Clouds of stray electrons are ubiquitous in particle accelerators and frequently limit the performance of storage rings. Earlier measurements of electron energy distribution and flux to the walls provided only a relative electron cloud density. We have measured electron accumulation using ions expelled by the beam. The ion energy distribution maps the depressed beam potential and gives the dynamic cloud density. Clearing electrode current reveals the static background cloud density, allowing the first absolute measurement of the time-dependent electron cloud density during the beam pulse.

  20. Absolute measurement of electron-cloud density in a positively charged particle beam.

    PubMed

    Kireeff Covo, Michel; Molvik, Arthur W; Friedman, Alex; Vay, Jean-Luc; Seidl, Peter A; Logan, Grant; Baca, David; Vujic, Jasmina L

    2006-08-04

    Clouds of stray electrons are ubiquitous in particle accelerators and frequently limit the performance of storage rings. Earlier measurements of electron energy distribution and flux to the walls provided only a relative electron-cloud density. We have measured electron accumulation using ions expelled by the beam. The ion energy distribution maps the depressed beam potential and gives the dynamic cloud density. Clearing electrode current reveals the static background cloud density, allowing the first absolute measurement of the time-dependent electron-cloud density during the beam pulse.

  1. Far-Ultraviolet Absolute Flux of α Virginis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Carmen; Trapero, Joaquín; Gómez, José F.; Giménez, Álvaro; Orozco, Verónica; Bowyer, Stuart; Edelstein, Jerry; Korpela, Eric; Lampton, Michael; Cobb, Jeff

    2000-02-01

    We present the far-ultraviolet spectrum of α Virginis taken with Espectrógrafo Ultravioleta extremo para la Radiación Difusa (EURD) spectrograph on board MINISAT-01. The spectral range covered is from ~900 to 1080 Å with 5 Å spectral resolution. We have fitted Kurucz models to IUE spectra of α Vir and compared the extension of the model to our wavelengths with EURD data. This comparison shows that EURD fluxes are consistent with the prediction of the model within ~20%-30%, depending on the reddening assumed. EURD fluxes are consistent with Voyager observations but are ~60% higher than most previous rocket observations of α Vir. Based on the development and utilization of the Espectrógrafo Ultravioleta de Radiación Difusa, a collaboration of the Spanish Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial and the Center for EUV Astrophysics, University of California, Berkeley.

  2. Interactive Database of Pulsar Flux Density Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koralewska, O.; Krzeszowski, K.; Kijak, J.; Lewandowski, W.

    2012-12-01

    The number of astronomical observations is steadily growing, giving rise to the need of cataloguing the obtained results. There are a lot of databases, created to store different types of data and serve a variety of purposes, e. g. databases providing basic data for astronomical objects (SIMBAD Astronomical Database), databases devoted to one type of astronomical object (ATNF Pulsar Database) or to a set of values of the specific parameter (Lorimer 1995 - database of flux density measurements for 280 pulsars on the frequencies up to 1606 MHz), etc. We found that creating an online database of pulsar flux measurements, provided with facilities for plotting diagrams and histograms, calculating mean values for a chosen set of data, filtering parameter values and adding new measurements by the registered users, could be useful in further studies on pulsar spectra.

  3. Sounding rocket measurement of the absolute solar EUV flux utilizing a silicon photodiode

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, H.S.; McMullin, D.; Judge, D.L. ); Canfield, L.R. )

    1990-04-01

    A newly developed stable and high quantum efficiency silicon photodiode was used to obtain an accurate measurement of the integrated absolute magnitude of the solar extreme ultraviolet photon flux in the spectral region between 50 and 800 {angstrom}. The detector was flown aboard a solar point sounding rocket launched from White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico on October 24, 1988. The adjusted daily 10.7-cm solar radio flux and sunspot number were 168.4 and 121, respectively. The unattenuated absolute value of the solar EUV flux at 1 AU in the specified wavelength region was 6.81 {times} 10{sup 10} photons cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. Based on a nominal probable error of 7% for National Institute of Standards and Technology detector efficiency measurements in the 50- to 500-{angstrom} region (5% on longer wavelength measurements between 500 and 1216 {angstrom}), and based on experimental errors associated with their rocket instrumentation and analysis, a conservative total error estimate of {approximately}14% is assigned to the absolute integral solar flux obtained.

  4. 47 CFR 25.208 - Power flux density limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... flux density at the Earth's surface produced by emissions from a space station for all conditions and... and 10.7-11.7 GHz for NGSO FSS space stations, the power flux-density at the Earth's surface produced... frequency bands, the power flux density at the Earth's surface produced by emissions from a space...

  5. Absolute electron density measurements in the equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. D.; Howlett, L. C.; Rao, N. B.; Ulwick, J. C.; Labelle, J.

    1985-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the electron density profile and its variations is crucial to further progress in understanding the physics of the disturbed equatorial ionosphere. To accomplish this, a plasma frequency probe was included in the payload complement of two rockets flown during the Condor rocket campaign conducted from Peru in March 1983. This paper presents density profiles of the disturbed equatorial ionosphere from a night-time flight in which spread-F conditions were present and from a day-time flight during strong electrojet conditions. Results from both flights are in excellent agreement with simultaneous radar data in that the regions of highly disturbed plasma coincide with the radar signatures. The spread-F rocket penetrated a topside depletion during both the upleg and downleg. The electrojet measurements showed a profile peaking at 1.3 x 10 to the 5th per cu cm at 106 km, with large scale fluctuations having amplitudes of roughly 10 percent seen only in the upward gradient in electron density. This is in agreement with plasma instability theory. It is further shown that simultaneous measurements by fixed-bias Langmuir probes, when normalized at a single point to the altitude profile of electron density, are inadequate to correctly parameterize the observed enhancements and depletions.

  6. ABSOLUTE FLUX CALIBRATION OF THE IRAC INSTRUMENT ON THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE USING HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE FLUX STANDARDS

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, R. C.; Gordon, K. D.; Deustua, S.; Ferguson, H. C.; Flanagan, K.; Kalirai, J.; Meixner, M.; Rieke, G. H.; Engelbracht, C.; Su, K. Y. L.; Ardila, D.; Tremblay, P.-E.

    2011-05-15

    The absolute flux calibration of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be based on a set of stars observed by the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes. In order to cross-calibrate the two facilities, several A, G, and white dwarf stars are observed with both Spitzer and Hubble and are the prototypes for a set of JWST calibration standards. The flux calibration constants for the four Spitzer IRAC bands 1-4 are derived from these stars and are 2.3%, 1.9%, 2.0%, and 0.5% lower than the official cold-mission IRAC calibration of Reach et al., i.e., in agreement within their estimated errors of {approx}2%. The causes of these differences lie primarily in the IRAC data reduction and secondarily in the spectral energy distributions of our standard stars. The independent IRAC 8 {mu}m band-4 fluxes of Rieke et al. are about 1.5% {+-} 2% higher than those of Reach et al. and are also in agreement with our 8 {mu}m result.

  7. Electronic and nuclear flux densities in the H2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, G.; Paulus, B.; Pérez-Torres, J. F.; Pohl, V.

    2014-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic and nuclear flux densities of a vibrating H2 molecule after an electronic excitation by a short femtosecond laser pulse. The final state, a coherent superposition of the electronic ground state X1Σg+ and the electronic excited state B1Σu+, evolves freely and permits the partition of the electronic flux density into two competing fluxes: the adiabatic and the transition flux density. The nature of the two fluxes allows us to identify two alternating dynamics of the electronic motion, occurring on the attosecond and the femtosecond time scales. In contradistinction to the adiabatic electronic flux density, the transition electronic flux density shows a dependence on the carrier-envelope phase of the laser field, encoding information of the interaction of the electrons with the electric field. Furthermore, the nuclear flux density displays multiple reversals, a quantum effect recently discovered by Manz et al. [J. Manz, J. F. Pérez-Torres, and Y. Yang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 153004 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.153004], calling for investigation of the electronic flux density.

  8. Correlation between -ray flux density and redshift for Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hu-Bing; Pei, Zhi-Yuan; Xie, Hong-Jing; Hao, Jing-Meng; Yang, Jiang-He; Yuan, Yu-Hai; Liu, Yi; Fan, Jun-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Blazars are strong -ray emitters, the -ray emissions are likely strongly beamed, therefore, one should use the intrinsic (de-beamed) emissions to investigate its emission nature. In this work, we compiled a sample of Fermi blazars with available beaming Doppler factors, , to investigate the correlation between -ray flux density, , and redshift, . The analysis shows that there is no correlation between and for the observed -ray flux density, but there is a clear strong correlation between the intrinsic flux densities, and . We also discussed the relationship of -ray luminosity and short time scale for the observed data and the intrinsic data. Our analysis suggests that the intrinsic -ray flux density obeys the flux density and redshift relation, and the jet in -rays maybe a continuous case. The intrinsic luminosity and the short time scales obey the Elliot and Shapiro relation and Abramowicz and Nobili relation as well.

  9. Absolute densities of Cu, Zn, Sn, and S atoms in magnetron sputtering plasmas employing a Cu2ZnSnS4 target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafarizal, Nayan; Sasaki, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    Absolute densities of Cu, Zn, Sn, and S atoms in magnetron sputtering plasmas were measured by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. A stoichiometric Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) target was used in this work. It was found that, at various Ar pressures, the S density ranged between (2-8) × 1010 cm-3, the Cu and Sn densities ranged between (0.6-3) × 1010 cm-3, and the Zn density ranged between (2-3) × 109 cm-3. The effective depositing flux, which was evaluated from the absolute densities and the sticking probabilities, was comparable with that evaluated from the deposition rate of the CZTS film. However, the composition ratio of Cu, Zn, Sn, and S in the gas phase deviated from the ideal stoichiometry of CZTS. We discussed the possible mechanisms for the difference among the element compositions of the target, the deposited film, and the gas-phase densities.

  10. Measurements Of Absolute Ca II H And K Flux In FGKM Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvin, Christopher; Reiners, A.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Jeffers, S.; Boro-Saikia, S.

    2016-09-01

    M dwarfs are the most numerous stars in the universe, yet they still lack absolute chromospheric Ca II H and K (R'_HK) calibrations to effectively compare their activity with FGK stars. We scale high-S/N, high-resolution template spectra, obtained by co-adding multiple HARPS spectra of the same star, to PHOENIX stellar atmosphere models, and obtain chromospheric line measurements of Ca II H & K in physical units of 106 M dwarfs. We also derive new Mt. Wilson S-index to R'_HK conversions appropriate for cooler stars, ranging from 0.82 <= B-V <= 2.00. We establish a chromospheric activity database by combining archival data of FGK stars and using our technique to extend absolute chromospheric measurements to M dwarfs. Our results show that using model atmospheres provides a reliable way to scale uncalibrated spectra and also estimate photospheric flux for M dwarfs, but note that accurate stellar parameter determination is essential to compare chromospheric emission of different spectral types.

  11. Particle visualization in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering. II. Absolute density dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Britun, Nikolay Palmucci, Maria; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Snyders, Rony

    2015-04-28

    Time-resolved characterization of an Ar-Ti high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge has been performed. The present, second, paper of the study is related to the discharge characterization in terms of the absolute density of species using resonant absorption spectroscopy. The results on the time-resolved density evolution of the neutral and singly-ionized Ti ground state atoms as well as the metastable Ti and Ar atoms during the discharge on- and off-time are presented. Among the others, the questions related to the inversion of population of the Ti energy sublevels, as well as to re-normalization of the two-dimensional density maps in terms of the absolute density of species, are stressed.

  12. Density-Modulation-Induced Absolute Laser-Plasma-Instabilities in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Yan, Rui; Ren, Chuang

    2016-10-01

    Fluid simulations show that when a static sinusoidal density modulation is superimposed on a linear density profile, convective instabilities can become absolutely unstable. This conversion can occur for two-plasmon-decay and stimulated Raman scattering instabilities under realistic direct-drive inertial confinement fusion conditions and can affect hot-electron generation and laser-energy deposition. Analysis of the three-wave model shows that a sufficiently large change of the density gradient in a linear density profile can turn convective instabilities into absolute ones. An analytical expression is given for the threshold of the gradient change, which depends only on the convective gain. This work was supported by DOE under Grant No. DE-SC0012316; by NSF under Grant No. PHY-1314734; and by Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center.

  13. Spectra of random operators with absolutely continuous integrated density of states

    SciTech Connect

    Rio, Rafael del E-mail: delriomagia@gmail.com

    2014-04-15

    The structure of the spectrum of random operators is studied. It is shown that if the density of states measure of some subsets of the spectrum is zero, then these subsets are empty. In particular follows that absolute continuity of the integrated density of states implies singular spectra of ergodic operators is either empty or of positive measure. Our results apply to Anderson and alloy type models, perturbed Landau Hamiltonians, almost periodic potentials, and models which are not ergodic.

  14. Injury response of Phaseolus vulgaris to ozone flux density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiro, B. D.; Gillespie, T. J.; Thurtell, G. W.

    This study describes a quantitative relationship between mean O 3 flux density and the length of exposure needed for the occurrence of visual injury to Phaseolus vulgaris L. Similar relationships were found for 14 day old and 6 week old plants using a whole leaf gas exchange cuvette system. Cultivars Seafarer (O 3 sensitive) and Gold Crop (O 3 resistant) exhibited similar responses at flux densities > 3 mg m -2 h -1 but only Seafarer was injured below this flux density. O 3 concentration and length of exposure period alone did not contain sufficient information to describe the onset of visual foliar injury. The use of O 3 concentrations in excess of normal ambient conditions compensated for low leaf conductances so that flux densities in the cuvette were similar to those found in the field.

  15. The IAG solar flux atlas: Accurate wavelengths and absolute convective blueshift in standard solar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiners, A.; Mrotzek, N.; Lemke, U.; Hinrichs, J.; Reinsch, K.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new solar flux atlas with the aim of understanding wavelength precision and accuracy in solar benchmark data. The atlas covers the wavelength range 405-2300 nm and was observed at the Institut für Astrophysik, Göttingen (IAG), with a Fourier transform spectrograph (FTS). In contrast to other FTS atlases, the entire visible wavelength range was observed simultaneously using only one spectrograph setting. We compare the wavelength solution of the new atlas to the Kitt Peak solar flux atlases and to the HARPS frequency-comb calibrated solar atlas. Comparison reveals systematics in the two Kitt Peak FTS atlases resulting from their wavelength scale construction, and shows consistency between the IAG and the HARPS atlas. We conclude that the IAG atlas is precise and accurate on the order of ± 10 m s-1 in the wavelength range 405-1065 nm, while the Kitt Peak atlases show deviations as large as several ten to 100 m s-1. We determine absolute convective blueshift across the spectrum from the IAG atlas and report slight differences relative to results from the Kitt Peak atlas that we attribute to the differences between wavelength scales. We conclude that benchmark solar data with accurate wavelength solution are crucial to better understand the effect of convection on stellar radial velocity measurements, which is one of the main limitations of Doppler spectroscopy at m s -1 precision. Data (FITS files of the spectra) and Table A.1 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A65

  16. Flux of optical meteors down to M sub pg = +12. [photographic absolute magnitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, A. F.; Weekes, T. C.; Williams, J. T.; Omongain, E.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of the flux of optical meteors down to photographic magnitudes of +12 are reported. The meteors were detected by photometry using a 10-m optical reflector from December 12-15, 1974, during the Geminid shower. A total of 2222 light pulses is identified as coming from meteors within the 1 deg field of view of the detector, most of which correspond to sporadic meteors traversing the detector beam at various angles and velocities and do not differ with the date, indicating that the Geminid contribution at faint luminosities is small compared to the sporadic contribution. A rate of 1.1 to 3.3 x 10 to the -12th meteors/sq cm per sec is obtained together with a power law meteor spectrum which is used to derive a relationship between cumulative meteor flux and magnitude which is linear for magnitudes from -2.4 through +12. Expressions for the cumulative flux upon the earth's atmosphere and at a test surface at 1 AU far from the earth as a function of magnitude are also obtained along with an estimate of the cumulative number density of particles.

  17. The area and absolute magnetic flux of sunspots over the past 400 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagovitsyn, Yu. A.; Tlatov, A. G.; Nagovitsyna, E. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    A new series of yearly-mean relative sunspot numbers SN 2 that has been extrapolated into the past (to 1610) is presented. The Kislovodsk series with the scale factor b = 1.0094 ± 0.0059 represents a reasonable continuation of the mean-monthly and mean-yearly total sunspot areas of the Greenwich series after 1976. The second maximum of the 24th solar-activity cycle was not anomalously low, and was no lower than 6 of the past 13 cycles. A series A 2 of values for the total sunspot area in 1610-2015 has been constructed, and is complementary to new versions of the series of the relative number of sunspots SN 2 and the number of sunspot groups GN 2. When needed, this series can be reduced to yield a quantity having a clear physical meaning—the spot absolute magnetic flux Φ Σ( t)[Mx] = 2.16 × 1019 A( t) [mvh]. The maximum sunspot area during the Maunder minimum is much higher in the new series compared to the previous version. This at least partially supports the validity of arguments that cast doubt on the anomalously low ampltude of the solar cycles during the Maunder minimum that has been assumed by many researchers earlier.

  18. Absolute fluxes of six hot stars in the ultraviolet (912-1600 Angstroms)

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, T.N.

    1985-01-01

    Six hot stars were observed on 1984 March 2 from a Black Brant V sounding rocket (NASA 21.085UG). The absolute fluxes from ..gamma../sup 2/ Vel, zeta Pup, ..cap alpha.. CMa, ..gamma.. Ori, ..beta.. Tau, and epsilon Per were measured in the spectral region between 912 and 1600 A at 10 A resolution. Comparisons with revised Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 Ultraviolet Spectrometer data (Holberg 1984) and previous sounding rocket data (Brune et al. 1979) are evaluated. In general, the two sounding rocket experiments are in good agreement, and the revised Voyager data and the sounding rocket data are in agreement except at wavelengths below 1000 A. Comparisons with stellar models (Kurucz 1979) are presented showing discrepancies near 1200 A and below 1000 A. Determination of interstellar absorption using the data on these stars proved to be unsatisfactory due partly to the inaccuracies of the stellar models; however, a list of hot stars suitable for deriving the interstellar extinction is included to aid future extreme ultraviolet experiments, such as the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT).

  19. Fast tokamak plasma flux and electron density reconstruction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, K.L.; Hallock, G.A.; Wootton, A.J.; Wang, L.

    1997-01-01

    Density profiles in TEXT-U are obtained using a vertical viewing far-infrared (FIR) interferometer. To obtain the local (inverted) density, we have developed a simple analytic model of the plasma equilibrium configuration which is faster than EFIT (a flux surface reconstruction program) and can be easily computed between discharges. This analytic solution of the Grad{endash}Shafranov equation is valid as long as the pressure p is a function of poloidal flux {psi}, i.e., p=p({psi}). The procedure incorporates both magnetic and FIR density data to solve the Grad{endash}Shafranov equation, and provides a density profile which is self-consistent with the reconstructed equilibrium flux surfaces. Examples are presented. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Absolute measurements of night-time electron density using ISR gyro lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Asti; Kelley, Michael; Nicolls, Michael; Sulzer, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Gyro line in Incoherent Scatter Spectrum is the underused cousin of the more popular Plasma line. This is because it is very weak during the day and stronger during dawn and dusk hours. When the electron density is such that the electron plasma frequency drops below the electron gyro frequency, the gyro line frequency becomes proportional to the electron density. This is during a time when the plasma line is no longer detected, and we have no other means for getting precise measurements for absolute electron density. In this paper, we will present a linear equation for the gyro line frequency and measurements from the Arecibo radar in Puerto Rico, showing comparison with the plasma line data and derived electron density.

  1. Magnetic Helicity Density and Its Flux in Weakly Inhomogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Brandenburg, Axel

    2006-09-01

    A gauge-invariant and hence physically meaningful definition of magnetic helicity density for random fields is proposed, using the Gauss linking formula, as the density of correlated field line linkages. This definition is applied to the random small-scale field in weakly inhomogeneous turbulence, whose correlation length is small compared with the scale on which the turbulence varies. For inhomogeneous systems, with or without boundaries, our technique then allows one to study the local magnetic helicity density evolution in a gauge-independent fashion, which was not possible earlier. This evolution equation is governed by local sources (owing to the mean field) and by the divergence of a magnetic helicity flux density. The role of magnetic helicity fluxes in alleviating catastrophic quenching of mean field dynamos is discussed.

  2. Absolute Power Spectral Density Changes in the Magnetoencephalographic Activity During the Transition from Childhood to Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Carlos M; Rodríguez-Martínez, Elena I; Fernández, Alberto; Maestú, Fernando; Poza, Jesús; Gómez, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the pattern of reduction in absolute power spectral density (PSD) of magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals throughout development. Specifically, we wanted to explore whether the human skull's high permeability for electromagnetic fields would allow us to question whether the pattern of absolute PSD reduction observed in the human electroencephalogram is due to an increase in the skull's resistive properties with age. Furthermore, the topography of the MEG signals during maturation was explored, providing additional insights about the areas and brain rhythms related to late maturation in the human brain. To attain these goals, spontaneous MEG activity was recorded from 148 sensors in a sample of 59 subjects divided into three age groups: children/adolescents (7-14 years), young adults (17-20 years) and adults (21-26 years). Statistical testing was carried out by means of an analysis of variance (ANOVA), with "age group" as between-subject factor and "sensor group" as within-subject factor. Additionally, correlations of absolute PSD with age were computed to assess the influence of age on the spectral content of MEG signals. Results showed a broadband PSD decrease in frontal areas, which suggests the late maturation of this region, but also a mild increase in high frequency PSD with age in posterior areas. These findings suggest that the intensity of the neural sources during spontaneous brain activity decreases with age, which may be related to synaptic pruning.

  3. Density variations of meteor flux along the Earth's orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svetashkova, N. T.

    1987-01-01

    No model of distribution of meteor substance is known to explain the observed diurnal and annual variations of meteor rates, if that distribution is assumed to be constant during the year. Differences between the results of observations and the prediction of diurnal variation rates leads to the conclusion that the density of the orbits of meteor bodies changes with the motion of the Earth along its orbit. The distributions of the flux density over the celestial sphere are obtained by the method described previously by Svetashkova, 1984. The results indicate that the known seasonal and latitudinal variations of atmospheric conditions does not appear to significantly affect the value of the mean flux density of meteor bodies and the matter influx onto the Earth.

  4. Diagnostics principle of microwave cut-off probe for measuring absolute electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Hyun-Su

    2014-08-15

    A generalized diagnostics principle of microwave cut-off probe is presented with a full analytical solution. In previous studies on the microwave cut-off measurement of weakly ionized plasmas, the cut-off frequency ω{sub c} of a given electron density is assumed to be equal to the plasma frequency ω{sub p} and is predicted using electromagnetic simulation or electric circuit model analysis. However, for specific plasma conditions such as highly collisional plasma and a very narrow probe tip gap, it has been found that ω{sub c} and ω{sub p} are not equal. To resolve this problem, a generalized diagnostics principle is proposed by analytically solving the microwave cut-off condition Re[ε{sub r,eff}(ω = ω{sub c})] = 0. In addition, characteristics of the microwave cut-off condition are theoretically tested for correct measurement of the absolute electron density.

  5. Absolute Density Calibration Cell for Laser Induced Fluorescence Erosion Rate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.; Stevens, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Flight qualification of ion thrusters typically requires testing on the order of 10,000 hours. Extensive knowledge of wear mechanisms and rates is necessary to establish design confidence prior to long duration tests. Consequently, real-time erosion rate measurements offer the potential both to reduce development costs and to enhance knowledge of the dependency of component wear on operating conditions. Several previous studies have used laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure real-time, in situ erosion rates of ion thruster accelerator grids. Those studies provided only relative measurements of the erosion rate. In the present investigation, a molybdenum tube was resistively heated such that the evaporation rate yielded densities within the tube on the order of those expected from accelerator grid erosion. This work examines the suitability of the density cell as an absolute calibration source for LIF measurements, and the intrinsic error was evaluated.

  6. A rare gas optics-free absolute photon flux and energy analyzer to provide absolute photoionization rates of inflowing interstellar neutrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, Darrell L.

    1994-01-01

    A prototype spectrometer has been developed for space applications requiring long term absolute EUV photon flux measurements. The energy spectrum of the incoming photons is transformed directly into an electron energy spectrum by taking advantage of the photoelectric effect in one of several rare gases at low pressures. Using an electron energy spectrometer, followed by an electron multiplier detector, pulses due to individual electrons are counted. The overall efficiency of this process can be made essentially independent of gain drifts in the signal path, and the secular degradation of optical components which is often a problem in other techniques is avoided. A very important feature of this approach is its freedom from the problem of overlapping spectral orders that plagues grating EUV spectrometers. An instrument with these features has not been flown before, but is essential to further advances in our understanding of solar EUV flux dynamics, and the coupled dynamics of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres. The detailed characteristics of this optics-free spectrometer are presented in the publications section.

  7. Leaf conductance response of phaseolus vulgaris to ozone flux density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiro, B. D.; Gillespie, T. J.

    The effect of ozone flux density on leaf conductance to ozone in Phaseolus vulgaris was examined. The change in conductance was measured within the first two hours of fumigation for mature, fruiting 6-week-old plants of an ozone sensitive cultivar (Seafarer); for young, 14-day-old plants of the same cultivar; and for an ozone resistant cultivar (Gold Crop). Young Seafarer plants showed no change in conductance to ozone over a wide range of ozone flux densities. Gold Crop showed a decrease in conductance of -3.1 % /(mgO 3 m -2 h -1) whereas mature Seafarer plants exhibited a stronger decrease of -7.7% /(mgO 3 m -2 h -1). Diffusion porometer measurements taken on fruiting Seafarer plants in the field illustrated that a decrease in leaf diffusive conductance to water is related to visual ozone injury.

  8. 47 CFR 25.208 - Power flux density limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for angles of arrival between 0 and 5 degrees above the horizontal plane; −152+(δ−5)/2 dB(W/m2) in any 4 kHz band for angles of arrival δ (in degrees) between 5 and 25 degrees above the horizontal plane... horizontal plane These limits relate to the power flux density which would be obtained under assumed...

  9. 47 CFR 25.208 - Power flux density limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for angles of arrival between 0 and 5 degrees above the horizontal plane; −152+(δ−5)/2 dB(W/m2) in any 4 kHz band for angles of arrival δ (in degrees) between 5 and 25 degrees above the horizontal plane... horizontal plane These limits relate to the power flux density which would be obtained under assumed...

  10. 47 CFR 25.208 - Power flux density limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for angles of arrival between 0 and 5 degrees above the horizontal plane; −152+(δ−5)/2 dB(W/m2) in any 4 kHz band for angles of arrival δ (in degrees) between 5 and 25 degrees above the horizontal plane... horizontal plane These limits relate to the power flux density which would be obtained under assumed...

  11. 47 CFR 25.208 - Power flux density limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for angles of arrival between 0 and 5 degrees above the horizontal plane; −152+(δ−5)/2 dB(W/m2) in any 4 kHz band for angles of arrival δ (in degrees) between 5 and 25 degrees above the horizontal plane... horizontal plane These limits relate to the power flux density which would be obtained under assumed...

  12. Rates, flux densities, and spectral indices of meteor radio afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenberger, K. S.; Dowell, J. D.; Hancock, P. J.; Holmes, J. M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Schinzel, F. K.; Taylor, G. B.

    2016-07-01

    Using the narrowband all-sky imager mode of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1), we have now detected 30 transients at 25.6 MHz, 1 at 34 MHz, and 93 at 38.0 MHz. While we have only optically confirmed that 37 of these events are radio afterglows from meteors, evidence suggests that most, if not all, are. Using the beam-forming mode of the LWA1, we have also captured the broadband spectra between 22.0 and 55.0 MHz of four events. We compare the smooth, spectral components of these four events and fit the frequency-dependent flux density to a power law, and find that the spectral index is time variable, with the spectrum steepening over time for each meteor afterglow. Using these spectral indices along with the narrowband flux density measurements of the 123 events at 25.6 and 38 MHz, we predict the expected flux densities and rates for meteor afterglows potentially observable by other low-frequency radio telescopes.

  13. Absolute objects and counterexamples: Jones-Geroch dust, Torretti constant curvature, tetrad-spinor, and scalar density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brian Pitts, J.

    James L. Anderson analyzed the novelty of Einstein's theory of gravity as its lack of "absolute objects." Michael Friedman's related work has been criticized by Roger Jones and Robert Geroch for implausibly admitting as absolute the timelike 4-velocity field of dust in cosmological models in Einstein's theory. Using Rosen-Sorkin Lagrange multiplier trick, I complete Anna Maidens's argument that the problem is not solved by prohibiting variation of absolute objects in an action principle. Recalling Anderson's proscription of "irrelevant" variables, I generalize that proscription to locally irrelevant variables that do no work in some places in some models. This move vindicates Friedman's intuitions and removes the Jones-Geroch counterexample: some regions of some models of gravity with dust are dust-free and so naturally lack a timelike 4-velocity, so diffeomorphic equivalence to (1,0,0,0) is spoiled. Torretti's example involving constant curvature spaces is shown to have an absolute object on Anderson's analysis, viz., the conformal spatial metric density. The previously neglected threat of an absolute object from an orthonormal tetrad used for coupling spinors to gravity appears resolvable by eliminating irrelevant fields. However, given Anderson's definition, GTR itself has an absolute object (as Robert Geroch has observed recently): a change of variables to a conformal metric density and a scalar density shows that the latter is absolute.

  14. Absolute densities, masses, and radii of the WASP-47 system determined dynamically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almenara, J. M.; Díaz, R. F.; Bonfils, X.; Udry, S.

    2016-10-01

    We present a self-consistent modelling of the available light curve and radial velocity data of WASP-47 that takes into account the gravitational interactions between all known bodies in the system. The joint analysis of light curve and radial velocity data in a multi-planetary system allows deriving absolute densities, radii, and masses without the use of theoretical stellar models. For WASP-47 the precision is limited by the reduced dynamical information that is due to the short time span of the K2 light curve. We achieve a precision of around 22% for the radii of the star and the transiting planets, between 40% and 60% for their masses, and between 1.5% and 38% for their densities. All values agree with previously reported measurements. When theoretical stellar models are included, the system parameters are determined with a precision that exceeds that achieved by previous studies, thanks to the self-consistent modelling of light curve and radial velocity data.

  15. Method for determining transport critical current densities and flux penetration depth in bulk superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, Ulf E. (Inventor); Strayer, Donald M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A contact-less method for determining transport critical current density and flux penetration depth in bulk superconductor material. A compressor having a hollow interior and a plunger for selectively reducing the free space area for distribution of the magnetic flux therein are formed of superconductor material. Analytical relationships, based upon the critical state model, Maxwell's equations and geometrical relationships define transport critical current density and flux penetration depth in terms of the initial trapped magnetic flux density and the ratio between initial and final magnetic flux densities whereby data may be reliably determined by means of the simple test apparatus for evaluating the current density and flux penetration depth.

  16. Spillage and flux density on a receiver aperture lip. [of solar thermal collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1985-01-01

    In a dish-type point-focusing solar thermal collector, the spillage and the flux density on the receiver aperture lip are related in a very simple way, if the aperture is circular and centered on the optical axis. Specifically, the flux density on the lip is equal to the spillage times the peak flux density in the plane of the lip.

  17. Measurements of absolute radical densities in atmospheric pressure plasmas with complex gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Deborah

    2015-05-01

    Low temperature plasmas are emerging as an exciting development for therapeutics. Non-equilibrium plasmas, operated at ambient atmospheric pressure and temperature, are very efficient sources for highly reactive neutral particles, including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), which are known to play a crucial role in biological systems and existing therapeutics. Transport of these plasma components to the target is complex. In order to understand the chemical kinetics and plasma-liquid-biological interaction mechanisms measurements of the relevant RONS are key. Under atmospheric pressure these are challenging, primarily due to the multi-phase and highly collisional environment, requiring extremely high temporal (picosecond to nanosecond) and spatial (microns) resolution. Absolute measurements of radical densities (including O and OH) using picosecond two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (ps-TALIF), UV and high-resolution synchrotron VUV absorption spectroscopy will be presented. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of the laser-excited radicals are possible with picosecond resolution and this provides us with information about collisional quenching partners and thus collision kinetics with the surrounding environment. The authors acknowledge support by the UK EPSRC EP/H003797 and EP/K018388.

  18. Energy flux density and angular momentum density of Pearcey-Gauss vortex beams in the far field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, K.; Lu, G.; Zhong, X.

    2017-02-01

    The longitudinal and transverse energy flux density (EFD) and angular momentum density (AMD) of a Pearcey-Gauss vortex beam in the far field are studied using the vector angular spectrum representation and stationary phase method, where the influence of topological charge, noncanonical strength and off-axis distance of the embedded optical vortex on far-field vectorial structures of the corresponding beam is emphasized. For comparison, the EFD and AMD of the Pearcey-Gauss beam with non-vortex in the far field are also discussed. The results show that the longitudinal EFDs of the Pearcey-Gauss vortex beam exhibit parabolic patterns, and the number of parabolic dark zones equals the absolute value of topological charge of the embedded optical vortex in the input plane. While for the Pearcey-Gauss beam, the dark zones are not found owing to the non-vortex in the input plane. The motion of zero-intensity spot of whole beam appears by varying the off-axis distance. Noncanonical strength and off-axis distance both can adjust the magnitudes and directions of transverse EFD and control the spatial energy distributions of longitudinal EFD, but not change the net AMD.

  19. Electromagnetic potentials basis for energy density and power flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthoff, H. E.

    2016-09-01

    In rounding out the education of students in advanced courses in applied electromagnetics it is incumbent on us as mentors to raise issues that encourage appreciation of certain subtle aspects that are often overlooked during first exposure to the field. One of these has to do with the interplay between fields and potentials, with the latter often seen as just a convenient mathematical artifice useful in solving Maxwell’s equations. Nonetheless, to those practiced in application it is well understood that various alternatives in the use of fields and potentials are available within electromagnetic (EM) theory for the definitions of energy density, momentum transfer, EM stress-energy tensor, and so forth. Although the various options are all compatible with the basic equations of electrodynamics (e.g., Maxwell’s equations, Lorentz force law, gauge invariance), nonetheless certain alternative formulations lend themselves to being seen as preferable to others with regard to the transparency of their application to physical problems of interest. Here we argue for the transparency of an energy density/power flux option based on the EM potentials alone.

  20. A rare gas optics-free absolute photon flux and energy analyzer for solar and planetary observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, Darrell L.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a prototype spectrometer for space applications requiring long term absolute EUV photon flux measurements. In this recently developed spectrometer, the energy spectrum of the incoming photons is transformed directly into an electron energy spectrum by taking advantage of the photoelectric effect in one of several rare gases at low pressures. Using an electron energy spectrometer, followed by an electron multiplier detector, pulses due to individual electrons are counted. The overall efficiency of this process can be made essentially independent of gain drifts in the signal path, and the secular degradation of optical components which is often a problem in other techniques is avoided. A very important feature of this approach is its freedom from the problem of overlapping spectral orders that plagues grating EUV spectrometers. An instrument with these features has not been flown before, but is essential to further advances in our understanding of solar EUV flux dynamics, and the coupled dynamics of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres. The detailed characteristics of this optics-free spectrometer are presented in the publications section.

  1. Absolute measurements of the densities of silicon crystals in vacuum for a determination of the Avogadro constant

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K.; Tanaka, M.; Nezu, Y.

    1994-12-31

    Absolute measurements of the densities of 1-kg single-crystal silicon spheres have been performed for a determination of the Avogadro constant. A scanning type optical interferometer was used to measure the diameters of the spheres in vacuum, and the volumes were obtained by fitting the diameters to a series of spherical harmonics. Thickness of oxide layers on the surfaces of the spheres has been determined by using an ellipsometer to evaluate the effect on the density. Total uncertainties of the densities are estimated to be 0.1 ppm.

  2. Measurement of absolute CO number densities in CH3F/O2 plasmas by optical emission self-actinometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakas, Erdinc; Kaler, Sanbir; Lou, Qiaowei; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.

    2014-02-01

    CH3F/O2 inductively coupled plasmas at 10 mTorr were investigated using optical emission spectroscopy. A ‘self-actinometry’ method was developed to measure the absolute number density of CO that formed in reactions following dissociation of CH3F and O2 in the plasma. In this method, small amounts of CO were added to the plasma, leading to small increases in the CO emission intensity. By carefully accounting for small perturbations to the plasma electron density and/or electron energy distribution, and by showing that very little of the CO added to the plasma was decomposed by electron impact or other reactions, it was possible to derive absolute number densities for the CO content of the plasma. With equal fractions (0.50) of CH3F and O2 in the feed gas, the CO mole fraction as a function of plasma power saturated at a value of 0.20-0.25. As O2 in the feed gas was varied at a constant power of 100 W, the CO mole fraction went through a maximum of about 0.25 near an O2 feed gas fraction of 0.5. The relative CO number densities determined by ‘standard’ actinometry followed the same functional dependence as the absolute mole fractions determined by self-actinometry, aided by the fact that electron temperature did not change appreciably with power or feed gas composition.

  3. Plasmaspheric Electron Densities and Plasmashere-Ionosphere Coupling Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberger, Janos; Cherneva, Nina; Shevtsov, Boris; Sannikov, Dmitry; Ferencz, Csaba; Koronczay, David

    The Automatic Whistler Detector and Analyzer Network (AWDANet) is able to detect and analyze whistlers in quasi-realtime and can provide equatorial electron density data. The plasmaspheric electron densities and ionosphere-plasmasphere coupling fluxes are key parameters for plasmasphere models in Space Weather related investigations, particularly in modeling charged particle accelerations and losses in Radiation Belts. The global AWDANet [1] detects millions of whistlers in a year. The system has been recently completed with automatic analyzer capability in PLASMON (http://plasmon.elte.hu) project. It is based on a recently developed whistler inversion model [2], that opened the way for an automated process of whistler analysis, not only for single whistler events but for complex analysis of multiple-path propagation whistler groups [3]. In this paper we present the results of quasi-real-time runs processing whistlers from quiet and disturb periods from Karymshina station (Kamchatka, Russia). Refilling rates, that are not yet known in details are also presented for the various periods. 1.Lichtenberger, J., C. Ferencz, L. Bodnár, D. Hamar, and P. Steinbach (2008), Automatic whistler detector and analyzer system: Automatic whistler detector, J. Geophys. Res., 113, A12201, doi:10.1029/2008JA013467. 2. Lichtenberger, J. (2009), A new whistler inversion method, J. Geophys. Res., 114, A07222, doi:10.1029/2008JA013799. 3. Lichtenberger, J., C. Ferencz, D. Hamar, P. Steinbach, C. J. Rodger, M. A. Clilverd, and A. B. Collier (2010), Automatic Whistler Detector and Analyzer system: Implementation of the analyzer algorithm, J. Geophys. Res., 115, A12214, doi:10.1029/2010JA015931.

  4. Effect of Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density on Carboxylation Efficiency 1

    PubMed Central

    Weber, James A.; Tenhunen, John D.; Gates, David M.; Lange, Otto L.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) on photosynthetic response (A) to CO2 partial pressures between 35 pascals and CO2 compensation point (Γ) was investigated, especially below PPFD saturation. Spinacia oleracea cv `Atlanta,' Glycine max cv `Clark,' and Arbutus unedo were studied in detail. The initial slope of the photosynthetic response to CO2 (∂A/∂C[Γ]) was constant above a PPFD of about 500 to 600 micromoles per square meter per second for all three species; but declined rapidly with PPFD below this critical level. For Γ there was also a critical PPFD (approximately 200 micromoles per square meter per second for S. oleracea and G. max; 100 for A. unedo) above which Γ was essentially constant, but below which Γ increased with decreasing PPFD. All three species showed a dependence of ∂A/∂C(Γ) on PPFD at low PPFD. Simulated photosynthetic responses obtained with a biochemically based model of whole-leaf photosynthesis were similar to measured responses. PMID:16665640

  5. Fine structure of the age-chromospheric activity relation in solar-type stars. I. The Ca II infrared triplet: Absolute flux calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo-Oliveira, D.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; Dutra-Ferreira, L.; Ribas, I.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Strong spectral lines are useful indicators of stellar chromospheric activity. They are physically linked to the convection efficiency, differential rotation, and angular momentum evolution and are a potential indicator of age. However, for ages > 2 Gyr, the age-activity relationship remains poorly constrained thus hampering its full application. Aims: The Ca II infrared triplet (IRT lines, λλ 8498, 8542, and 8662) has been poorly studied compared to classical chromospheric indicators. We report in this paper absolute chromospheric fluxes in the three Ca II IRT lines, based on a new calibration tied to up-to-date model atmospheres. Methods: We obtain the Ca II IRT absolute fluxes for 113 FGK stars from high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and high-resolution spectra covering an extensive domain of chromospheric activity levels. We perform an absolute continuum flux calibration for the Ca II IRT lines anchored in atmospheric models calculated as an explicit function of effective temperatures (Teff), metallicity ([Fe/H]), and gravities (log g) avoiding the degeneracy usually present in photometric continuum calibrations based solely on color indices. Results: The internal uncertainties achieved for continuum absolute flux calculations are ≈2% of the solar chromospheric flux, one order of magnitude lower than for photometric calibrations. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we gauge the impact of observational errors on the final chromospheric fluxes due to the absolute continuum flux calibration and find that Teffuncertainties are properly mitigated by the photospheric correction leaving [Fe/H] as the dominating factor in the chromospheric flux uncertainty. Conclusions: Across the FGK spectral types, the Ca II IRT lines are sensitive to chromospheric activity. The reduced internal uncertainties reported here enable us to build a new chromospheric absolute flux scale and explore the age-activity relation from the active regime down to very low activity levels and

  6. The relationship between absolute vorticity flux along the main flow and convection heat transfer in a tube inserting a twisted tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhi-Min; Sun, Dong-Liang; Wang, Liang-Bi

    2009-09-01

    As passive enhancement devices, twisted tape insert has been used for almost a century, the most dominant heat transfer enhancement mechanism of circular tube fitted with twisted tape is the secondary flow generated by the tape. There is a parameter to specify the intensity of secondary flow, but this parameter cannot be applied to more general cases. Here cross-averaged absolute vorticity flux in the main flow direction is used to specify the intensity of secondary flow produced by twisted tape inserted in a tube. The relationship between the intensity of secondary flow and the intensity of laminar convective heat transfer is studied using a numerical method. The results reveal that the cross-averaged absolute vorticity flux in the main flow direction can reflect the intensity of secondary flow and a significant relationship between this cross-averaged absolute vorticity flux and Nusselt number exists for studied cases. The presented results validate that the cross-averaged absolute vorticity flux in the main flow direction is a general specifying of the intensity of secondary flow and can be used in other cases.

  7. Redefinition of the crater-density and absolute-age boundaries for the chronostratigraphic system of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, S.C.; Tanaka, K.L.

    2011-01-01

    For the boundaries of each chronostratigraphic epoch on Mars, we present systematically derived crater-size frequencies based on crater counts of geologic referent surfaces and three proposed " standard" crater size-frequency production distributions as defined by (a) a simple -2 power law, (b) Neukum and Ivanov, (c) Hartmann. In turn, these crater count values are converted to model-absolute ages based on the inferred cratering rate histories. We present a new boundary definition for the Late Hesperian-Early Amazonian transition. Our fitting of crater size-frequency distributions to the chronostratigraphic record of Mars permits the assignment of cumulative counts of craters down to 100. m, 1. km, 2. km, 5. km, and 16. km diameters to martian epochs. Due to differences in the " standard" crater size-frequency production distributions, a generalized crater-density-based definition to the chronostratigraphic system cannot be provided. For the diameter range used for the boundary definitions, the resulting model absolute age fits vary within 1.5% for a given set of production function and chronology model ages. Crater distributions translated to absolute ages utilizing different curve descriptions can result in absolute age differences exceeding 10%. ?? 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  8. Systematic Uncertainties in the Spectroscopic Measurements of Neutron-star Masses and Radii from Thermonuclear X-Ray Bursts. III. Absolute Flux Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güver, Tolga; Özel, Feryal; Marshall, Herman; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Guainazzi, Matteo; Díaz-Trigo, Maria

    2016-09-01

    Many techniques for measuring neutron star radii rely on absolute flux measurements in the X-rays. As a result, one of the fundamental uncertainties in these spectroscopic measurements arises from the absolute flux calibrations of the detectors being used. Using the stable X-ray burster, GS 1826-238, and its simultaneous observations by Chandra HETG/ACIS-S and RXTE/PCA as well as by XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and RXTE/PCA, we quantify the degree of uncertainty in the flux calibration by assessing the differences between the measured fluxes during bursts. We find that the RXTE/PCA and the Chandra gratings measurements agree with each other within their formal uncertainties, increasing our confidence in these flux measurements. In contrast, XMM-Newton EPIC-pn measures 14.0 ± 0.3% less flux than the RXTE/PCA. This is consistent with the previously reported discrepancy with the flux measurements of EPIC-pn, compared with EPIC MOS1, MOS2, and ACIS-S detectors. We also show that any intrinsic time-dependent systematic uncertainty that may exist in the calibration of the satellites has already been implicity taken into account in the neutron star radius measurements.

  9. Influences of environmental factors on the radial profile of sap flux density in Fagus crenata growing at different elevations in the Naeba Mountains, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Mitsumasa; Tenhunen, John; Zimmerman, Reiner; Schmidt, Markus; Adiku, Samuel; Kakubari, Yoshitaka

    2005-05-01

    Sap flux density was measured continuously during the 1999 and 2000 growing seasons by the heat dissipation method in natural Fagus crenata Blume (Japanese beech) forests growing between 550 and 1600 m on the northern slope of the Kagura Peak of the Naeba Mountains, Japan. Sap flux density decreased radially toward the inner xylem and the decrease was best expressed in relation to the number of annual rings from the cambium, or in relation to the relative depth between the cambium and the trunk center, rather than as a function of absolute depth. The relative influences of radiation, vapor pressure deficit and soil water on sap flux density during the growing season were similar for the outer and inner xylem, and at all sites. Measurements of soil water content and water potential at a depth of 0.25 m demonstrated that sap flux density responded similarly and sensitively to water potential changes in this soil layer, despite large differences in rooting depth at different elevations, localizing one important control point in the functioning of this forest ecosystem. Identification of the relative influences of radiation, vapor pressure deficit and drying of the upper soil layer on sap flux density provides a framework for in-depth analysis of the control of transpiration in Japanese beech forests. In addition, the finding that the same general controls are operating on sap flux density despite climate gradients and large differences in overall forest stand structure will enhance understanding of water use by forests along elevation gradients.

  10. Calibration system for measuring the radon flux density.

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, A; Zhukovsky, M; Bastrikov, V

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of radon flux from soil surface is the useful tool for the assessment of radon-prone areas and monitoring of radon releases from uranium mining and milling residues. The accumulation chambers with hollow headspace and chambers with activated charcoal are the most used devices for these purposes. Systematic errors of the measurements strongly depend on the geometry of the chamber and diffusion coefficient of the radon in soil. The calibration system for the attestation of devices for radon flux measurements was constructed. The calibration measurements of accumulation chambers and chambers with activated charcoal were conducted. The good agreement between the results of 2D modelling of radon flux and measurements results was observed. It was demonstrated that reliable measurements of radon flux can be obtained by chambers with activated charcoal (equivalent volume ~75 l) or by accumulation chambers with hollow headspace of ~7-10 l and volume/surface ratio (height) of >15 cm.

  11. The fluxes across a diffusive interface at low values of the density ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, John

    1988-04-01

    Measurements of the heat and salt fluxes across a diffusive interface at low density ratios show significant differences from some of the accepted parameterizations of the diffusive fluxes. Using fluxes calculated from the present experimental results, there is good agreement between the depth-averaged turbulent dissipation and estimated buoyancy flux through a series of oceanic diffusive layers reported by LARSON and GREGG (1983, Nature, 306, 26-32).

  12. Absolute density of precursor SiH3 radicals and H atoms in H2-diluted SiH4 gas plasma for deposition of microcrystalline silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Tsutsumi, Takayoshi; Fukushima, Atsushi; Kondo, Hiroki; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2017-01-01

    Microcrystalline hydrogenated silicon films were produced at a high deposition rate of about 2 nm/s by using a capacitively coupled plasma under a practical pressure of around 1 kPa. The SiH4 source gas was almost fully dissociated when highly diluted with H2 gas, and the dominant species in the gas phase were found to be SiH3 radicals, which are film-growth precursors, and H atoms. The absolute density of these species was measured as the partial pressure of SiH4 gas was varied. With the increasing SiH4 gas flow rate, the SiH3 radical density, which was on the order of 1012 cm-3, increased linearly, while the H-atom density remained constant at about 1012 cm-3. The film growth mechanism was described in terms of precursors, based on the measured flux of SiH3 radicals and H atoms, and the relative fraction of higher-order radicals.

  13. Determination of the absolute configuration of the natural product Klaivanolide via density functional calculations of vibrational circular dichroism (VCD).

    PubMed

    Devlin, Frank J; Stephens, Philip J; Figadère, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The absolute configuration (AC) of the antiprotozoal lactone, Klaivanolide, 1, from Uvaria klaineana, has been determined using Vibrational Circular Dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy. The experimental VCD spectrum of the (+) enantiomer of 1 was measured. To analyze the AC of (+)-1, the conformationally-averaged VCD spectrum of 7-S-1 was calculated using density functional theory (DFT) and the GAUSSIAN 03 program. The B3PW91/TZ2P conformationally-averaged VCD spectrum of 7-S-1 proves that the AC of 1 is 7-S-(+).

  14. Flux avalanche in a superconducting film with non-uniform critical current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yurong; Jing, Ze; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2016-10-01

    The flux avalanche in type-II superconducting thin film is numerically simulated in this paper. We mainly consider the effect of non-uniform critical current density on the thermomagnetic stability. The nonlinear electromagnetic constitutive relation of the superconductor is adopted. Then, Maxwell's equations and heat diffusion equation are numerically solved by the fast Fourier transform technique. We find that the non-uniform critical current density can remarkably affect the behaviour of the flux avalanche. The external magnetic field ramp rate and the environmental temperature have been taken into account. The results are compared with a film with uniform critical current density. The flux avalanche first appears at the interface where the critical current density is discontinuous. Under the same environmental temperature or magnetic field, the flux avalanche occurs more easily for the film with the non-uniform critical current density. The avalanche structure is a finger-like pattern rather than a dendritic structure at low environmental temperatures.

  15. Satellite observations of middle atmosphere gravity wave absolute momentum flux and of its vertical gradient during recent stratospheric warmings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, Manfred; Trinh, Quang Thai; Kaufmann, Martin; Krisch, Isabell; Preusse, Peter; Ungermann, Jörn; Zhu, Yajun; Gille, John C.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Russell, James M., III; Schwartz, Michael J.; Riese, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs) are circulation anomalies in the polar region during winter. They mostly occur in the Northern Hemisphere and affect also surface weather and climate. Both planetary waves and gravity waves contribute to the onset and evolution of SSWs. While the role of planetary waves for SSW evolution has been recognized, the effect of gravity waves is still not fully understood, and has not been comprehensively analyzed based on global observations. In particular, information on the gravity wave driving of the background winds during SSWs is still missing.We investigate the boreal winters from 2001/2002 until 2013/2014. Absolute gravity wave momentum fluxes and gravity wave dissipation (potential drag) are estimated from temperature observations of the satellite instruments HIRDLS and SABER. In agreement with previous work, we find that sometimes gravity wave activity is enhanced before or around the central date of major SSWs, particularly during vortex-split events. Often, SSWs are associated with polar-night jet oscillation (PJO) events. For these events, we find that gravity wave activity is strongly suppressed when the wind has reversed from eastward to westward (usually after the central date of a major SSW). In addition, gravity wave potential drag at the bottom of the newly forming eastward-directed jet is remarkably weak, while considerable potential drag at the top of the jet likely contributes to the downward propagation of both the jet and the new elevated stratopause. During PJO events, we also find some indication for poleward propagation of gravity waves. Another striking finding is that obviously localized gravity wave sources, likely mountain waves and jet-generated gravity waves, play an important role during the evolution of SSWs and potentially contribute to the triggering of SSWs by preconditioning the shape of the polar vortex. The distribution of these hot spots is highly variable and strongly depends on the zonal and

  16. Gas Flux and Density Surrounding a Cylindrical Aperture in the Free Molecular Flow Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    2011-01-01

    The equations for rigorously calculating the particle flux and density surrounding a cylindrical aperture in the free molecular flow regime are developed and presented. The fundamental equations for particle flux and density from a reservoir and a diffusely reflecting surface will initially be developed. Assumptions will include a Maxwell-Boltzmann speed distribution, equal particle and wall temperatures, and a linear flux distribution along the cylindrical aperture walls. With this information, the equations for axial flux and density surrounding a cylindrical aperture will be developed. The cylindrical aperture will be divided into multiple volumes and regions to rigorously determine the surrounding axial flux and density, and appropriate limits of integration will be determined. The results of these equations will then be evaluated. The linear wall flux distribution assumption will be assessed. The axial flux and density surrounding a cylindrical aperture with a thickness-to-radius ratio of 1.25 will be presented. Finally, the equations determined in this study will be verified using multiple methods.

  17. Modeling of Fluctuating Mass Flux in Variable Density Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Mongia, H. C.; Nikjooy, M.

    1983-01-01

    The approach solves for both Reynolds and Favre averaged quantities and calculates the scalar pdf. Turbulent models used to close the governing equations are formulated to account for complex mixing and variable density effects. In addition, turbulent mass diffusivities are not assumed to be in constant proportion to turbulent momentum diffusivities. The governing equations are solved by a combination of finite-difference technique and Monte-Carlo simulation. Some preliminary results on simple variable density shear flows are presented. The differences between these results and those obtained using conventional models are discussed.

  18. Estimating the amount and distribution of radon flux density from the soil surface in China.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Weihai; Guo, Qiuju; Chen, Bo; Cheng, Guan

    2008-07-01

    Based on an idealized model, both the annual and the seasonal radon ((222)Rn) flux densities from the soil surface at 1099 sites in China were estimated by linking a database of soil (226)Ra content and a global ecosystems database. Digital maps of the (222)Rn flux density in China were constructed in a spatial resolution of 25 km x 25 km by interpolation among the estimated data. An area-weighted annual average (222)Rn flux density from the soil surface across China was estimated to be 29.7+/-9.4 mBq m(-2)s(-1). Both regional and seasonal variations in the (222)Rn flux densities are significant in China. Annual average flux densities in the southeastern and northwestern China are generally higher than those in other regions of China, because of high soil (226)Ra content in the southeastern area and high soil aridity in the northwestern one. The seasonal average flux density is generally higher in summer/spring than winter, since relatively higher soil temperature and lower soil water saturation in summer/spring than other seasons are common in China.

  19. Thermophotovoltaic and photovoltaic conversion at high-flux densities

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, T.J.; Ward, J.S.

    1999-10-01

    The authors first discuss the similarities between generation of electricity using thermophotovoltaic (TPV) and high-optical-concentration solar photovoltaic (PC) devices. Following this, the authors consider power losses due to above- and below-bandgap photons, and estimate the ideal bandgap by minimizing the sum of these, for a 6,000 K black-body spectrum. The ideal bandgap, based on this approach, is less than that previously predicted, which could have a significant influence on the performance of devices and systems. To reduce the losses, the authors show that the low-energy photons may be removed from both types of cells and consider the specific case of a back-surface reflector. This approach to the management of waste heat may offer a useful additional tool with which to facilitate the design of high-photo-flux solar cells. In the case of the high-energy photons and the associated problem of thermalization of hot electrons, however, the heat must be removed by other means, and the authors consider the applicability of microchannel cooling systems. These appear to have the potential to handle thermal loads at least several times those generated by 1,000 times concentrators, or by black-body TPV radiators at a temperature of far greater than 1,500 K. The authors go on to consider the management of the very high currents generated in both concentrator TPV and PV systems and discuss the concept of the monolithically integrated minimodule.

  20. Measurement of absolute cell volume, osmotic membrane water permeability, and refractive index of transmembrane water and solute flux by digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Daniel; Kühn, Jonas; Jourdain, Pascal; Depeursinge, Christian; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Marquet, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    A dual-wavelength digital holographic microscope to measure absolute volume of living cells is proposed. The optical setup allows us to reconstruct two quantitative phase contrast images at two different wavelengths from a single hologram acquisition. When adding the absorbing dye fast green FCF as a dispersive agent to the extracellular medium, cellular thickness can be univocally determined in the full field of view. In addition to the absolute cell volume, the method can be applied to derive important biophysical parameters of living cells including osmotic membrane water permeability coefficient and the integral intracellular refractive index (RI). Further, the RI of transmembrane flux can be determined giving an indication about the nature of transported solutes. The proposed method is applied to cultured human embryonic kidney cells, Chinese hamster ovary cells, human red blood cells, mouse cortical astrocytes, and neurons.

  1. Inferring cetacean population densities from the absolute dynamic topography of the ocean in a hierarchical Bayesian framework.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Mario A; Gerrodette, Tim; Beier, Emilio; Gendron, Diane; Forney, Karin A; Chivers, Susan J; Barlow, Jay; Palacios, Daniel M

    2015-01-01

    We inferred the population densities of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) and short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) in the Northeast Pacific Ocean as functions of the water-column's physical structure by implementing hierarchical models in a Bayesian framework. This approach allowed us to propagate the uncertainty of the field observations into the inference of species-habitat relationships and to generate spatially explicit population density predictions with reduced effects of sampling heterogeneity. Our hypothesis was that the large-scale spatial distributions of these two cetacean species respond primarily to ecological processes resulting from shoaling and outcropping of the pycnocline in regions of wind-forced upwelling and eddy-like circulation. Physically, these processes affect the thermodynamic balance of the water column, decreasing its volume and thus the height of the absolute dynamic topography (ADT). Biologically, they lead to elevated primary productivity and persistent aggregation of low-trophic-level prey. Unlike other remotely sensed variables, ADT provides information about the structure of the entire water column and it is also routinely measured at high spatial-temporal resolution by satellite altimeters with uniform global coverage. Our models provide spatially explicit population density predictions for both species, even in areas where the pycnocline shoals but does not outcrop (e.g. the Costa Rica Dome and the North Equatorial Countercurrent thermocline ridge). Interannual variations in distribution during El Niño anomalies suggest that the population density of both species decreases dramatically in the Equatorial Cold Tongue and the Costa Rica Dome, and that their distributions retract to particular areas that remain productive, such as the more oceanic waters in the central California Current System, the northern Gulf of California, the North Equatorial Countercurrent thermocline ridge, and the more southern portion of the

  2. Inferring Cetacean Population Densities from the Absolute Dynamic Topography of the Ocean in a Hierarchical Bayesian Framework

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, Mario A.; Gerrodette, Tim; Beier, Emilio; Gendron, Diane; Forney, Karin A.; Chivers, Susan J.; Barlow, Jay; Palacios, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    We inferred the population densities of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) and short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) in the Northeast Pacific Ocean as functions of the water-column’s physical structure by implementing hierarchical models in a Bayesian framework. This approach allowed us to propagate the uncertainty of the field observations into the inference of species-habitat relationships and to generate spatially explicit population density predictions with reduced effects of sampling heterogeneity. Our hypothesis was that the large-scale spatial distributions of these two cetacean species respond primarily to ecological processes resulting from shoaling and outcropping of the pycnocline in regions of wind-forced upwelling and eddy-like circulation. Physically, these processes affect the thermodynamic balance of the water column, decreasing its volume and thus the height of the absolute dynamic topography (ADT). Biologically, they lead to elevated primary productivity and persistent aggregation of low-trophic-level prey. Unlike other remotely sensed variables, ADT provides information about the structure of the entire water column and it is also routinely measured at high spatial-temporal resolution by satellite altimeters with uniform global coverage. Our models provide spatially explicit population density predictions for both species, even in areas where the pycnocline shoals but does not outcrop (e.g. the Costa Rica Dome and the North Equatorial Countercurrent thermocline ridge). Interannual variations in distribution during El Niño anomalies suggest that the population density of both species decreases dramatically in the Equatorial Cold Tongue and the Costa Rica Dome, and that their distributions retract to particular areas that remain productive, such as the more oceanic waters in the central California Current System, the northern Gulf of California, the North Equatorial Countercurrent thermocline ridge, and the more southern portion of

  3. 3-D density imaging with muon flux measurements from underground galleries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesparre, N.; Cabrera, J.; Marteau, J.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric muon flux measurements provide information on subsurface density distribution. In this study, muon flux was measured underground, in the Tournemire experimental platform (France). The objective was to image the medium between the galleries and the surface and evaluate the feasibility to detect the presence of discontinuities, for example, produced by secondary subvertical faults or by karstic networks. Measurements were performed from three different sites with a partial overlap of muon trajectories, offering the possibility to seek density variations at different depths. The conversion of the measured muon flux to average density values showed global variations further analysed through a 3-D nonlinear inversion procedure. Main results are the presence of a very low density region at the level of the upper aquifer, compatible with the presence of a karstic network hosting local cavities, and the absence of secondary faults. We discuss the validity of the present results and propose different strategies to improve the accuracy of such measurements and analysis.

  4. Cluster electric current density measurements within a magnetic flux rope in the plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Lepping, R. P.; Gjerloev, J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Fairfield, D. H.; Acuna, M. H.; Balogh, A.; Dunlop, M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K.

    2003-01-01

    On August 22, 2001 all 4 Cluster spacecraft nearly simultaneously penetrated a magnetic flux rope in the tail. The flux rope encounter took place in the central plasma sheet, Beta(sub i) approx. 1-2, near the leading edge of a bursty bulk flow. The "time-of-flight" of the flux rope across the 4 spacecraft yielded V(sub x) approx. 700 km/s and a diameter of approx.1 R(sub e). The speed at which the flux rope moved over the spacecraft is in close agreement with the Cluster plasma measurements. The magnetic field profiles measured at each spacecraft were first modeled separately using the Lepping-Burlaga force-free flux rope model. The results indicated that the center of the flux rope passed northward (above) s/c 3, but southward (below) of s/c 1, 2 and 4. The peak electric currents along the central axis of the flux rope predicted by these single-s/c models were approx.15-19 nA/sq m. The 4-spacecraft Cluster magnetic field measurements provide a second means to determine the electric current density without any assumption regarding flux rope structure. The current profile determined using the curlometer technique was qualitatively similar to those determined by modeling the individual spacecraft magnetic field observations and yielded a peak current density of 17 nA/m2 near the central axis of the rope. However, the curlometer results also showed that the flux rope was not force-free with the component of the current density perpendicular to the magnetic field exceeding the parallel component over the forward half of the rope, perhaps due to the pressure gradients generated by the collision of the BBF with the inner magnetosphere. Hence, while the single-spacecraft models are very successful in fitting flux rope magnetic field and current variations, they do not provide a stringent test of the force-free condition.

  5. Effects of periodic fluctuations of photon flux density on anatomical and photosynthetic characteristics of soybean leaves.

    PubMed

    Gaudillere, J P; Drevon, J J; Bernoud, J P; Jardinet, F; Euvrard, M

    1987-01-01

    The development of soybean leaves grown at fluctuating photon flux density between 100 and 1500μM m(-2)s(-1) with a period of 160 sec were compared to leaves developed under continuous light with the same mean photon flux density. Number of epidermal cells and stomata, leaf area and specific leaf weight were not affected by the periodic fluctuation of photon flux density. Chloroplastic pigment concentration and chlorophyll fluorescence reveal some photoinhibitory effects of the high photon flux density phase. Stomatal and internal CO2 conductance and the quantum yield were not affected by the light regime. In contrast ribulose 1.5 bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity before in vitro activation by CO2 and Mg(++) was stimulated by the periodic illumination whereas the total amount of the enzyme and the internal leaf CO2 conductance remained steady. In conclusion, there was no major difference between leaves of plant grown either under a steady or under a periodic fluctuation of the photon flux density except some photoinhibitory symptoms under fluctuating illumination, and a higher in vivo level of activation of the Rubisco.

  6. Measuring Fluxes with Better Certainty without a Need for Density Corrections or Pressure Term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G.; Nakai, T.; Schmidt, A.; Scott, R.; Kathilankal, J.; Fratini, G.; Hanson, C.; Law, B.; McDermitt, D.; Eckles, R.

    2012-04-01

    Eddy Covariance flux measurements using gas analyzers of an enclosed design rely on the covariance between instantaneous vertical wind speed and instantaneous output of gas mixing ratio, such that density data are corrected on-the-fly using instantaneous water vapor, temperature and pressure measurements in the cell, collected and aligned with CO2 or other gas of interest. This approach implicitly accounts for the effects of fluctuations in water vapor, temperature and pressure on the density of the gas of interest. Therefore no sensible heat or latent heat portions of Webb-Pearman-Leuning density corrections (WPL) are required, and the pressure term, which is usually neglected in traditional WPL implementation, is accounted for in these mixing ratio-based measurements. A somewhat similar way of calculating fluxes has been used frequently with traditional closed-path analyzers, with some assumptions: (i) slow temperature measurements were used to convert from density to mixing ratio, assuming fast fluctuations of the air temperature to be fully attenuated in the long intake tube; (ii) slow pressure measurements were used, assuming negligible instantaneous pressure fluctuations. Nine field experiments were conducted in a wide range of environmental conditions from Florida to Alaska using an enclosed CO2/H2O gas analyzer. These experiments presented an opportunity to verify the performance of the mixing ratio approach, and examine the differences from traditional density-based measurements. Results indicate that the mixing ratio-based approach helps to minimize or eliminate a number of uncertainties associated with traditional density-based approach, including: (i) uncertainties associated with correcting the product of fast covariances of gas density using sensible and latent heat flux calculated over half-hour or an hour; (ii) uncertainties in the magnitudes of the sensible and latent heat fluxes used in correcting gas flux; (iii) bias in long-term accumulated CO2

  7. Frequency dependent power and energy flux density equations of the electromagnetic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhibbullah, M.; Haleem, Ashraf M. Abdel; Ikuma, Yasuro

    The calculation of the power and energy of the electromagnetic wave is important for numerous applications. There are some equations to compute the power and energy density of the electromagnetic wave radiation. For instance, the Poynting vector is frequently used to calculate the power density. However those including the Poynting vector are not perfect to represent the actual values because the equations are frequency independent. In the present study we have derived the frequency-dependent equations to calculate the power and energy flux density of the electromagnetic wave by help of the classical electromagnetic theories. It is seems that the Poynting vector with a certain electric and magnetic fields is correct only for a specific frequency. However our equations are perfect to calculate the values of the power and energy flux density for all frequencies of the electromagnetic radiation. The equations may help to develop the applications of the electromagnetic wave radiation.

  8. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  9. SOL density profile formation and intermittent ion fluxes to the first wall in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkden, Nicholas; Militello, F.; Matthews, G.; Harrison, J.; Moulton, D.; Wynn, A.; Lipschultz, B.; Guillemaut, C.; JET Team

    2016-10-01

    The ion flux in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of a tokamak is highly non-diffusive due to the radial propagation of intermittent burst events known as filaments. As a result the formation of mean profiles in the SOL and the flux incident on the outer wall are strongly impacted by transient events. This has been investigated over a series of pulses in an Ohmic L-mode horizontal target configuration in JET. Broadening of the SOL density profile is reduced as plasma current is increased or the density is decreased. The mean and variance of the ion flux at the outer wall change concurrently with this broadening. Upon renormalization the PDFs of the ion flux at the outer-wall collapse indicating universality in the dynamics of their constituent fluctuations. This universality is shown to result from a balance between the duration and frequency of burst events which keeps the intermittency parameter constant. These measurements will be compared to synthetically produced measurements created using a stochastic framework based on filamentary dynamics. Through this comparison possible models of filamentary dynamics will be assessed and compared quantitatively to gain an understanding of the processes underlying density profile formation and fluxes to the outer wall of JET. This work has been carried out within the framework of the EURO- fusion Consortium.

  10. Dynamics of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and estimates in coastal northern California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The seasonal trends and diurnal patterns of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) were investigated in the San Francisco Bay Area of Northern California from March through August in 2007 and 2008. During these periods, the daily values of PAR flux density (PFD), energy loading with PAR (PARE), a...

  11. Calculating the Flux Density Decay of Cas A with LWA1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erazo, Jaquelin; Schinzel, Frank; LWA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A) is one of the brightest objects on the low frequency radio sky in the Northern hemisphere. Due to the expansion of the cloud of material left from the supernova, its flux density keeps decreasing at a rate of ~0.7-0.8% per year. Deviations from this steady decay were noted and a systematic monitoring of Cas A is recommended in order to better trace these fluctuations. The first station of the Long Wavelength Array, co-located with the Very Large Array in New Mexico, has been performing a systematic monitoring of the flux density ratio between the radio galaxy Cygnus A and Cas A below 100 MHz since 2013. In combination with archival observations using the VLA 74 MHz system, this dataset covers a wide range of temporal scales from days to decades. This analysis is expected to lead to a better understanding of the reliability of Cas A for low frequency flux density calibration and provide insights into the physical interaction between the expanding supernova remnant shell and the interstellar medium through light curve analysis. I will present an update on the monitoring effort and preliminary light curves that reveal a non-linear decay of the flux density of Cas A.

  12. Effect of Thermospheric Neutral Density upon Inner Trapped-belt Proton Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Lodhi, M. A. K.; Diaz, Abel B.

    2007-01-01

    We wish to point out that a secular change in the Earth's atmospheric neutral density alters charged-particle lifetime in the inner trapped radiation belts, in addition to the changes recently reported as produced by greenhouse gases. Heretofore, changes in neutral density have been of interest primarily because of their effect on the orbital drag of satellites. We extend this to include the orbital lifetime of charged particles in the lower radiation belts. It is known that the charged-belt population is coupled to the neutral density of the atmosphere through changes induced by solar activity, an effect produced by multiple scattering off neutral and ionized atoms along with ionization loss in the thermosphere where charged and neutral populations interact. It will be shown here that trapped-belt flux J is bivariant in energy E and thermospheric neutral density , as J(E,rho). One can conclude that proton lifetimes in these belts are also directly affected by secular changes in the neutral species populating the Earth s thermosphere. This result is a consequence of an intrinsic property of charged-particle flux, that flux is not merely a function of E but is dependent upon density rho when a background of neutrals is present.

  13. Flux Surface Variation of Impurity Density and Flows in the Pedestal Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Michael; Lipschultz, Bruce; Theiler, Christian; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-10-01

    Measured impurity density and flows in the pedestal region of Alcator C-Mod can deviate significantly on a flux surface from current model predictions. Comparing localized measurements at the low-field side (LFS) midplane and the high-field side (HFS) midplane, boron (B5 +) impurity density asymmetries larger than 10x are observed in H-mode plasmas, with larger densities at the HFS. The LFS density pedestal varies in position and width with varying plasma conditions, while the HFS impurity density profile remains rather fixed. Impurity density asymmetries are not observed in plasmas with small gradients, i.e L-mode, suggesting the drive for the asymmetry may be the strong gradients in the H-mode pedestal region. However, impurity density asymmetries are also absent in I-mode plasmas, despite the presence of a strong radial gradient in temperature (with no main ion density pedestal). This indicates an interplay between the gradient scale lengths of the main ion density and temperature in the drive of the impurity density asymmetry. Impurity flows in the pedestal show the opposite behavior; flows measured in H-mode plasmas are close to the expected in-out variation, while in I-mode they deviate significantly. Supported by USDoE award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  14. Scaling of the Heat Flux Width with Plasma Density in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, M. A.; Lasnier, C. J.; Nichols, J.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Snyder, P. B.

    2013-10-01

    The previous study of the relationship between the heat flux width and upstream profiles is extended with the addition of density scans. These scans range from a low-density, attached state to a high-density, detached state on both the inner and outer divertors in both L- and H-mode discharges. Under attached conditions in L-mode both the inner and outer heat flux profiles are well fit by Eich's fitting function and clearly indicate the transition from attached to detached states. Analysis of the density scans will be combined with previous scaling results to extend the heat flux width database. Comparisons to a critical gradient model will also be made to assess its validity under these new conditions. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by the U.S. Department of Energy under DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  15. The 3D heat flux density distribution on a novel parabolic trough wavy absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demagh, Yassine; Kabar, Yassine; Bordja, Lyes; Noui, Samira

    2016-05-01

    The non-uniform concentrated solar flux distribution on the outer surface of the absorber pipe can lead to large circumferential gradient temperature and high concentrated temperature of the absorber pipe wall, which is one of the primary causes of parabolic trough solar receiver breakdown. In this study, a novel shape of the parabolic trough absorber pipe is proposed as a solution to well homogenize the solar flux distribution, as well as, the temperature in the absorber wall. The conventional straight absorber located along the focal line of the parabola is replaced by wavy one (invention patent by Y. Demagh [1]) for which the heat flux density distribution on the outer surface varies in both axial and azimuthal directions (3D) while it varies only in the azimuthal direction on the former (2D). As far as we know, there is not previous study which has used a longitudinally wavy pipe as an absorber into the parabolic trough collector unit.

  16. Simplified Solar Modulation Model of Inner Trapped Belt Proton Flux As a Function of Atmospheric Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Lodhi, M. A. K.; Diaz, Abel B.

    2005-01-01

    No simple algorithm seems to exist for calculating proton fluxes and lifetimes in the Earth's inner, trapped radiation belt throughout the solar cycle. Most models of the inner trapped belt in use depend upon AP8 which only describes the radiation environment at solar maximum and solar minimum in Cycle 20. One exception is NOAAPRO which incorporates flight data from the TIROS/NOAA polar orbiting spacecraft. The present study discloses yet another, simple formulation for approximating proton fluxes at any time in a given solar cycle, in particular between solar maximum and solar minimum. It is derived from AP8 using a regression algorithm technique from nuclear physics. From flux and its time integral fluence, one can then approximate dose rate and its time integral dose. It has already been published in this journal that the absorbed dose rate, D, in the trapped belts exhibits a power law relationship, D = A(rho)(sup -n), where A is a constant, rho is the atmospheric density, and the index n is weakly dependent upon shielding. However, that method does not work for flux and fluence. Instead, we extend this idea by showing that the power law approximation for flux J is actually bivariant in energy E as well as density rho. The resulting relation is J(E,rho)approx.(sum of)A(E(sup n))rho(sup -n), with A itself a power law in E. This provides another method for calculating approximate proton flux and lifetime at any time in the solar cycle. These in turn can be used to predict the associated dose and dose rate.

  17. Double-cavity radiometer for high-flux density solar radiation measurements.

    PubMed

    Parretta, A; Antonini, A; Armani, M; Nenna, G; Flaminio, G; Pellegrino, M

    2007-04-20

    A radiometric method has been developed, suitable for both total power and flux density profile measurement of concentrated solar radiation. The high-flux density radiation is collected by a first optical cavity, integrated, and driven to a second optical cavity, where, attenuated, it is measured by a conventional radiometer operating under a stationary irradiation regime. The attenuation factor is regulated by properly selecting the aperture areas in the two cavities. The radiometer has been calibrated by a pulsed solar simulator at concentration levels of hundreds of suns. An optical model and a ray-tracing study have also been developed and validated, by which the potentialities of the radiometer have been largely explored.

  18. Uncertainty and Sensitivity of Alternative Rn-222 Flux Density Models Used in Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Greg J. Shott, Vefa Yucel, Lloyd Desotell Non-Nstec Authors: G. Pyles and Jon Carilli

    2007-06-01

    Performance assessments for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site have used three different mathematical models to estimate Rn-222 flux density. This study describes the performance, uncertainty, and sensitivity of the three models which include the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 3.64 analytical method and two numerical methods. The uncertainty of each model was determined by Monte Carlo simulation using Latin hypercube sampling. The global sensitivity was investigated using Morris one-at-time screening method, sample-based correlation and regression methods, the variance-based extended Fourier amplitude sensitivity test, and Sobol's sensitivity indices. The models were found to produce similar estimates of the mean and median flux density, but to have different uncertainties and sensitivities. When the Rn-222 effective diffusion coefficient was estimated using five different published predictive models, the radon flux density models were found to be most sensitive to the effective diffusion coefficient model selected, the emanation coefficient, and the radionuclide inventory. Using a site-specific measured effective diffusion coefficient significantly reduced the output uncertainty. When a site-specific effective-diffusion coefficient was used, the models were most sensitive to the emanation coefficient and the radionuclide inventory.

  19. Localization of a Radio-Frequency Identification Tag from Measurements of the Fourier Coefficients of Its Magnetic Flux Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Takaaki; Takanashi, Yuushi; Watanabe, Hirotoshi

    This paper presents a method for estimating the position of a radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag in two-dimensional (2D) space. A low-frequency (135 kHz), passive RFID tag with a loop antenna transmits its ID number to the tag reader by electromagnetic induction. This study reveals that the radial distance and the azimuth of the RFID tag in a 2D plane can be determined from the absolute value and phase of the first-order Fourier coefficient of the magnetic flux density generated by the tag. The authors develop a sensor unit that consists of four coils: two special coils that generate electromotive forces that are proportional to the first-order Fourier cosine and sine coefficients and two conventional loop coils. Using the developed sensor, a 29-mm-diameter disk-shaped RFID tag can be localized with a maximum (average) error of 18 mm (5 mm) within a circular domain of radius 140 mm.

  20. Validation of absolute axial neutron flux distribution calculations with MCNP with 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction rate distribution measurements at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor.

    PubMed

    Radulović, Vladimir; Štancar, Žiga; Snoj, Luka; Trkov, Andrej

    2014-02-01

    The calculation of axial neutron flux distributions with the MCNP code at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor has been validated with experimental measurements of the (197)Au(n,γ)(198)Au reaction rate. The calculated absolute reaction rate values, scaled according to the reactor power and corrected for the flux redistribution effect, are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effect of different cross-section libraries on the calculations has been investigated and shown to be minor.

  1. One-point fitting of the flux density produced by a heliostat

    SciTech Connect

    Collado, Francisco J.

    2010-04-15

    Accurate and simple models for the flux density reflected by an isolated heliostat should be one of the basic tools for the design and optimization of solar power tower systems. In this work, the ability and the accuracy of the Universidad de Zaragoza (UNIZAR) and the DLR (HFCAL) flux density models to fit actual energetic spots are checked against heliostat energetic images measured at Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA). Both the fully analytic models are able to acceptably fit the spot with only one-point fitting, i.e., the measured maximum flux. As a practical validation of this one-point fitting, the intercept percentage of the measured images, i.e., the percentage of the energetic spot sent by the heliostat that gets the receiver surface, is compared with the intercept calculated through the UNIZAR and HFCAL models. As main conclusions, the UNIZAR and the HFCAL models could be quite appropriate tools for the design and optimization, provided the energetic images from the heliostats to be used in the collector field were previously analyzed. Also note that the HFCAL model is much simpler and slightly more accurate than the UNIZAR model. (author)

  2. Long-term Longitudinal Recurrences of the Open Magnetic Flux Density in the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dósa, M.; Erdős, G.

    2017-04-01

    Open magnetic flux in the heliosphere is determined from the radial component of the magnetic field vector measured onboard interplanetary space probes. Previous Ulysses research has shown remarkable independence of the flux density from heliographic latitude, explained by super-radial expansion of plasma. Here we are investigating whether any longitudinal variation exists in the 50 year long OMNI magnetic data set. The heliographic longitude of origin of the plasma package was determined by applying a correction according to the solar wind travel time. Significant recurrent enhancements of the magnetic flux density were observed throughout solar cycle 23, lasting for several years. Similar, long-lasting recurring features were observed in the solar wind velocity, temperature and the deviation angle of the solar wind velocity vector from the radial direction. Each of the recurrent features has a recurrence period slightly differing from the Carrington rotation rate, although they show a common trend in time. Examining the coronal temperature data of ACE leads to the possible explanation that these long-term structures are caused by slow–fast solar wind interaction regions. A comparison with MESSENGER data measured at 0.5 au shows that these longitudinal magnetic modulations do not exist closer to the Sun, but are the result of propagation.

  3. Ion flux, ion energy distribution and neutral density in an inductively coupled argon discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevolleau, T.; Fukarek, W.

    2000-11-01

    The dependence of ion flux, ion energy distribution and neutral density of a planar radiofrequency (RF) driven inductively coupled plasma source on pressure and power is analysed using a plasma monitor and a Faraday cup. The ion flux is about 7 mA cm-2 at 5 Pa and 300 W and increases as RF power and argon pressure increase. The ion energy distribution consists of a single peak with a full width at half maximum of 3 eV for a discharge power in the range from 50 to 300 W and for a pressure in the range from 0.5 to 5 Pa. This indicates that inductive coupling mainly drives the discharge while capacitive coupling between coil and plasma is weak. A significant decrease in Ar neutral density is observed when the plasma is ignited. The Ar depletion increases with increasing RF power and increasing Ar base pressure and reaches 30% at 5 Pa and 300 W. The contributions of the different mechanisms resulting in an Ar depletion are estimated and compared. The decrease in neutral density cannot be explained by the ionization of Ar atoms only but is significantly attributed to the heating of Ar atoms by collisions with energetic particles. The increase in neutral gas temperature is estimated and found to be in reasonable agreement with measurements of the gas temperature reported previously by other groups.

  4. Measurement of current density fluctuations and ambipolar particle flux due to magnetic fluctuations in MST

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Weimin.

    1992-08-01

    Studies of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport on Reversed Field Pinch plasmas were done on the Madison Symmetric Torus. Plasma current density and current density fluctuations were measured using a multi-coil magnetic probes. The low frequency (f<50 kHz) current density fluctuations are consistent with the global resistive tearing instabilities predicted by 3-D MHD simulations. At frequencies above 50 kHz, the magnetic fluctuations were detected to be localized with a radial correlation length of about 1--2 cm. These modes are locally resonant modes since the measured dominant mode number spectra match the local safety factor q. The net charged particle flux induced by magnetic fluctuations was obtained by measuring the correlation term <{tilde j}{sub {parallel}} {tilde B}{sub r}>. The result of zero net charged particle loss was obtained, meaning the flux is ambipolar. The ambipolarity of low frequency global tearing modes is satisfied through the phase relations determined by tearing instabilities. The ambipolarity of high frequency localized modes could be partially explained by the simple model of Waltz based on the radial average of small scale turbulence.

  5. Picosecond-TALIF and VUV absorption measurements of absolute atomic nitrogen densities from an RF atmospheric pressure plasma jet with He/O2/N2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Andrew; Niemi, Kari; Schröter, Sandra; Bredin, Jerome; Gans, Timo; Wagenaars, Erik

    2015-09-01

    Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen species (RONS) from RF atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are important in biomedical applications as well as industrial plasma processing such as surface modification. Atomic oxygen has been well studied, whereas, despite its importance in the plasma chemistry, atomic nitrogen has been somewhat neglected due to its difficulty of measurement. We present absolute densities of atomic nitrogen in APPJs operating with He/O2/N2 gas mixtures in open air, using picosecond Two-photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence (ps-TALIF) and vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. In order to apply the TALIF technique in complex, He/O2/N2 mixtures, we needed to directly measure the collisional quenching effects using picosecond pulse widths (32ps). Traditional calculated quenching corrections, used in nanosecond TALIF, are inadequate due to a lack of quenching data for complex mixtures. Absolute values for the densities were found by calibrating against a known density of Krypton. The VUV absorption experiments were conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Atomic nitrogen densities were on the order of 1020 m-3 with good agreement between TALIF and VUV absorption. UK EPSRC grant EP/K018388/1.

  6. Sensing magnetic flux density of artificial neurons with a MEMS device.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Jesus A; Herrera-May, Agustin L; García-Ramírez, Pedro J; Martinez-Castillo, Jaime; Figueras, Eduard; Flores, Amira; Manjarrez, Elías

    2011-04-01

    We describe a simple procedure to characterize a magnetic field sensor based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, which exploits the Lorentz force principle. This sensor is designed to detect, in future applications, the spiking activity of neurons or muscle cells. This procedure is based on the well-known capability that a magnetic MEMS device can be used to sense a small magnetic flux density. In this work, an electronic neuron (FitzHugh-Nagumo) is used to generate controlled spike-like magnetic fields. We show that the magnetic flux density generated by the hardware of this neuron can be detected with a new MEMS magnetic field sensor. This microdevice has a compact resonant structure (700 × 600 × 5 μm) integrated by an array of silicon beams and p-type piezoresistive sensing elements, which need an easy fabrication process. The proposed microsensor has a resolution of 80 nT, a sensitivity of 1.2 V.T(-1), a resonant frequency of 13.87 kHz, low power consumption (2.05 mW), quality factor of 93 at atmospheric pressure, and requires a simple signal processing circuit. The importance of our study is twofold. First, because the artificial neuron can generate well-controlled magnetic flux density, we suggest it could be used to analyze the resolution and performance of different magnetic field sensors intended for neurobiological applications. Second, the introduced MEMS magnetic field sensor may be used as a prototype to develop new high-resolution biomedical microdevices to sense magnetic fields from cardiac tissue, nerves, spinal cord, or the brain.

  7. A methodology for mapping forest latent heat flux densities using remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Lars L.; Congalton, Russell G.

    1988-01-01

    Surface temperatures and reflectances of an upper elevation Sierran mixed conifer forest were monitored using the Thematic Mapper Simulator sensor during the summer of 1985 in order to explore the possibility of using remote sensing to determine the distribution of solar energy on forested watersheds. The results show that the method is capable of quantifying the relative energy allocation relationships between the two cover types defined in the study. It is noted that the method also has the potential to map forest latent heat flux densities.

  8. Measurement of magnetic characteristics along arbitrary directions of grain-oriented silicon steel up to high flux densities

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, T.; Takahashi, N.; Fujiwara, K.; Nakano, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    A new technique for measuring B-H curves of grain-oriented silicon steel along arbitrary directions has been developed. As the control of waveform is not necessary in the new technique, it is possible to measure B-H curves up to high flux densities which are required for calculating flux distribution using the finite element method.

  9. 4-Arylflavan-3-ols as Proanthocyanidin Models: Absolute Configuration via Density Functional Calculation of Electronic Circular Dichroism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Density functional theory/B3LYP has been employed to optimize the conformations of selected 4-arylflavan-3-ols and their phenolic methyl ether 3-O-acetates. The electronic circular dichroism spectra of the major conformers have been calculated using time-dependent density functional theory to valida...

  10. Sapflow+: a four-needle heat-pulse sap flow sensor enabling nonempirical sap flux density and water content measurements.

    PubMed

    Vandegehuchte, Maurits W; Steppe, Kathy

    2012-10-01

    • To our knowledge, to date, no nonempirical method exists to measure reverse, low or high sap flux density. Moreover, existing sap flow methods require destructive wood core measurements to determine sapwood water content, necessary to convert heat velocity to sap flux density, not only damaging the tree, but also neglecting seasonal variability in sapwood water content. • Here, we present a nonempirical heat-pulse-based method and coupled sensor which measure temperature changes around a linear heater in both axial and tangential directions after application of a heat pulse. By fitting the correct heat conduction-convection equation to the measured temperature profiles, the heat velocity and water content of the sapwood can be determined. • An identifiability analysis and validation tests on artificial and real stem segments of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) confirm the applicability of the method, leading to accurate determinations of heat velocity, water content and hence sap flux density. • The proposed method enables sap flux density measurements to be made across the entire natural occurring sap flux density range of woody plants. Moreover, the water content during low flows can be determined accurately, enabling a correct conversion from heat velocity to sap flux density without destructive core measurements.

  11. Arrangement Analysis of Leaves Optimized on Photon Flux Density or Photosynthetic Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Shin'ya; Tanno, Itaru

    By clarifying a plant evolutive process, useful information may be obtained on engineering. Consequently, an analysis algorithm that investigates the optimal arrangement of plant leaves was developed. In the developed algorithm, the Monte Carlo method is introduced and sunlight is simulated. Moreover, the arrangement optimization of leaves is analyzed using a Genetic Algorithm (GA). The number of light quanta (photon flux density) that reaches leaves, or the average photosynthetic rate of the same was set as the objective function, and leaf models of a dogwood and a ginkgo tree were analyzed. The number of leaf models was set between two to four, and the position of the leaf was expressed in terms of the angle of direction, elevation angle, rotation angle, and the representative length of the branch of a leaf. The chromosome model introduced into GA consists of information concerning the position of the leaf. Based on the analysis results, the characteristics of the leaf of an actual plant could be simulated by ensuring the algorithm had multiple constrained conditions. The optimal arrangement of leaves differs in maximization of the photon flux density, and that of the average value of a photosynthetic rate. Furthermore, the leaf form affecting the optimal arrangement of leave and also having a significant influence also on a photosynthetic rate was shown.

  12. The 30 cm radio flux as a solar proxy for thermosphere density modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudok de Wit, Thierry; Bruinsma, Sean

    2017-03-01

    The 10.7 cm radio flux (F10.7) is widely used as a proxy for solar UV forcing of the upper atmosphere. However, radio emissions at other centimetric wavelengths have been routinely monitored since the 1950 s, thereby offering prospects for building proxies that may be better tailored to space weather needs. Here we advocate the 30 cm flux (F30) as a proxy that is more sensitive than F10.7 to longer wavelengths in the UV and show that it improves the response of the thermospheric density to solar forcing, as modelled with DTM (Drag Temperature Model). In particular, the model bias drops on average by 0-20% when replacing F10.7 by F30; it is also more stable (the standard deviation of the bias is 15-40% smaller) and the density variation at the the solar rotation period is reproduced with a 35-50% smaller error. We compare F30 to other solar proxies and discuss its assets and limitations.

  13. QUENCHING STAR FORMATION AT INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFTS: DOWNSIZING OF THE MASS FLUX DENSITY IN THE GREEN VALLEY

    SciTech Connect

    Goncalves, Thiago S.; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Martin, D. Christopher; Wyder, Ted K.; Koekemoer, Anton

    2012-11-01

    The bimodality in galaxy properties has been observed at low and high redshifts, with a clear distinction between star-forming galaxies in the blue cloud and passively evolving objects in the red sequence; the absence of galaxies with intermediate properties indicates that the quenching of star formation and subsequent transition between populations must happen rapidly. In this paper, we present a study of over 100 transiting galaxies in the so-called green valley at intermediate redshifts (z {approx} 0.8). By using very deep spectroscopy with the DEIMOS instrument at the Keck telescope we are able to infer the star formation histories of these objects and measure the stellar mass flux density transiting from the blue cloud to the red sequence when the universe was half its current age. Our results indicate that the process happened more rapidly and for more massive galaxies in the past, suggesting a top-down scenario in which the massive end of the red sequence is forming first. This represents another aspect of downsizing, with the mass flux density moving toward smaller galaxies in recent times.

  14. The effect of exposure to high flux density static and pulsed magnetic fields on lymphocyte function.

    PubMed

    Aldinucci, Carlo; Garcia, Julian Blanco; Palmi, Mitri; Sgaragli, Gianpietro; Benocci, Alberto; Meini, Antonella; Pessina, Federica; Rossi, Claudio; Bonechi, Claudia; Pessina, Gian Paolo

    2003-09-01

    We investigated whether a combination of static electromagnetic field (EMF) at a flux density of 4.75 T together with pulsed EMF at a flux density of 0.7 mT generated by an NMR apparatus (NMRF), could promote movements of Ca(2+), cell proliferation, and the eventual production of proinflammatory cytokines in human lymphocytes as well as in Jurkat cells, after exposure to the field for 1 h. The same study was also performed after activation of cells with 5 micro g/ml phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) immediately before the exposure period. Our results clearly demonstrate that NMRF exposure increases the [Ca(2+)](i), without any proliferative, or activating, or proinflammatory effect on both normal and PHA stimulated lymphocytes. Accordingly, the levels of interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1beta, interleukin-2, and interleukin-6 remained unvaried after exposure. Exposure of Jurkat cells statistically decreased the [Ca(2+)](i) and the proliferation. This is consistent with the low levels of IL-2 measured in supernatants of these cells after exposure. On the whole our data suggest that static and pulsed NMRF exposure contribute synergistically in the increase of the [Ca(2+)](i) without any activating or proinflammatory effect either in normal or in PHA challenged lymphocytes. In Jurkat cells, by changing the properties of cell membranes, NMRF exposure can influence Ca(2+) transport processes and hence Ca(2+) homeostasis, causing a marked decrease of proliferation.

  15. Microsystem for remote sensing of high energy radiation with associated extremely low photon flux densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, A.; Jain, V. K.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a microsystem for remote sensing of high energy radiation in extremely low flux density conditions. With wide deployment in mind, potential applications range from nuclear non-proliferation, to hospital radiation-safety. The daunting challenge is the low level of photon flux densities - emerging from a Scintillation Crystal (SC) on to a ~1 mm-square detector, which are a factor of 10000 or so lower than those acceptable to recently reported photonic chips (including `single-photon detection' chips), due to a combination of low Lux, small detector size, and short duration SC output pulses - on the order of 1 μs. These challenges are attempted to be overcome by the design of an innovative `System on a Chip' type microchip, with high detector sensitivity, and effective coupling from the SC to the photodetector. The microchip houses a tiny n+ diff p-epi photodiode (PD) as well as the associated analog amplification and other related circuitry, all fabricated in 0.5micron, 3-metal 2-poly CMOS technology. The amplification, together with pulse-shaping of the photocurrent-induced voltage signal, is achieved through a tandem of two capacitively coupled, double-cascode amplifiers. Included in the paper are theoretical estimates and experimental results.

  16. Density effect on critical current density and flux pinning properties of polycrystalline SmFeAsO1 - xFx superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Sun, Y.; Zhuang, J. C.; Cui, L. J.; Shi, Z. X.; Sumption, M. D.; Majoros, M.; Susner, M. A.; Kovacs, C. J.; Li, G. Z.; Collings, E. W.; Ren, Z. A.

    2011-12-01

    A series of polycrystalline SmFeAs1 - xOx bulks was prepared to systematically investigate the influence of sample density on flux pinning properties. Different sample densities were achieved by controlling the pelletizing pressure. The superconducting volume fraction, the critical current densities Jcm and the flux pinning force densities Fp were estimated from the magnetization measurements. Experimental results show that: (1) the superconducting volume fraction increases with the increasing of sample density; (2) the Jcm values have a similar trend except for the sample with very high density due to different connectivity and pinning mechanisms, moreover, the Jcm(B) curve develops a peak effect at approximately the same field at which the high density sample shows a kink; (3) the Fp(B) curve of the high density sample shows a low-field peak and a high-field peak at several temperatures, which can be explained by improved intergranular current, while only one peak can be observed in Fp(B) of the low density samples. Based on the scaling behaviour of flux pinning force densities, the main intragranular pinning is normal point pinning.

  17. The revised electromagnetic fields directive and worker exposure in environments with high magnetic flux densities.

    PubMed

    Stam, Rianne

    2014-06-01

    Some of the strongest electromagnetic fields (EMF) are found in the workplace. A European Directive sets limits to workers' exposure to EMF. This review summarizes its origin and contents and compares magnetic field exposure levels in high-risk workplaces with the limits set in the revised Directive. Pubmed, Scopus, grey literature databases, and websites of organizations involved in occupational exposure measurements were searched. The focus was on EMF with frequencies up to 10 MHz, which can cause stimulation of the nervous system. Selected studies had to provide individual maximum exposure levels at the workplace, either in terms of the external magnetic field strength or flux density or as induced electric field strength or current density. Indicative action levels and the corresponding exposure limit values for magnetic fields in the revised European Directive will be higher than those in the previous version. Nevertheless, magnetic flux densities in excess of the action levels for peripheral nerve stimulation are reported for workers involved in welding, induction heating, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The corresponding health effects exposure limit values for the electric fields in the worker's body can be exceeded for welding and MRI, but calculations for induction heating and transcranial magnetic stimulation are lacking. Since the revised European Directive conditionally exempts MRI-related activities from the exposure limits, measures to reduce exposure may be necessary for welding, induction heating, and transcranial nerve stimulation. Since such measures can be complicated, there is a clear need for exposure databases for different workplace scenarios with significant EMF exposure and guidance on good practices.

  18. The Revised Electromagnetic Fields Directive and Worker Exposure in Environments With High Magnetic Flux Densities

    PubMed Central

    Stam, Rianne

    2014-01-01

    Some of the strongest electromagnetic fields (EMF) are found in the workplace. A European Directive sets limits to workers’ exposure to EMF. This review summarizes its origin and contents and compares magnetic field exposure levels in high-risk workplaces with the limits set in the revised Directive. Pubmed, Scopus, grey literature databases, and websites of organizations involved in occupational exposure measurements were searched. The focus was on EMF with frequencies up to 10 MHz, which can cause stimulation of the nervous system. Selected studies had to provide individual maximum exposure levels at the workplace, either in terms of the external magnetic field strength or flux density or as induced electric field strength or current density. Indicative action levels and the corresponding exposure limit values for magnetic fields in the revised European Directive will be higher than those in the previous version. Nevertheless, magnetic flux densities in excess of the action levels for peripheral nerve stimulation are reported for workers involved in welding, induction heating, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The corresponding health effects exposure limit values for the electric fields in the worker’s body can be exceeded for welding and MRI, but calculations for induction heating and transcranial magnetic stimulation are lacking. Since the revised European Directive conditionally exempts MRI-related activities from the exposure limits, measures to reduce exposure may be necessary for welding, induction heating, and transcranial nerve stimulation. Since such measures can be complicated, there is a clear need for exposure databases for different workplace scenarios with significant EMF exposure and guidance on good practices. PMID:24557933

  19. A model of heat transfer in sapwood and implications for sap flux density measurements using thermal dissipation probes.

    PubMed

    Wullschleger, Stan D; Childs, Kenneth W; King, Anthony W; Hanson, Paul J

    2011-06-01

    A variety of thermal approaches are used to estimate sap flux density in stems of woody plants. Models have proved valuable tools for interpreting the behavior of heat pulse, heat balance and heat field deformation techniques, but have seldom been used to describe heat transfer dynamics for the heat dissipation method. Therefore, to better understand the behavior of heat dissipation probes, a model was developed that takes into account the thermal properties of wood, the physical dimensions and thermal characteristics of the probes, and the conductive and convective heat transfer that occurs due to water flow in the sapwood. Probes were simulated as aluminum tubes 20 mm in length and 2 mm in diameter, whereas sapwood, heartwood and bark each had a density and water fraction that determined their thermal properties. Base simulations assumed a constant sap flux density with sapwood depth and no wounding or physical disruption of xylem beyond the 2 mm diameter hole drilled for probe installation. Simulations across a range of sap flux densities showed that the dimensionless quantity k [defined as (ΔT(m) -ΔT)/ΔT, where ΔT(m) is the temperature differential (ΔT) between the heated and unheated probe under zero-flow conditions] was dependent on the thermal conductivity of the sapwood. The relationship between sap flux density and k was also sensitive to radial gradients in sap flux density and to xylem disruption near the probe. Monte Carlo analysis in which 1000 simulations were conducted while simultaneously varying thermal conductivity and wound diameter revealed that sap flux density and k showed considerable departure from the original calibration equation used with this technique. The departure was greatest for variation in sap flux density typical of ring-porous species. Depending on the specific combination of thermal conductivity and wound diameter, use of the original calibration equation resulted in an 81% under- to 48% overestimation of sap flux density

  20. Estimating sap flux densities in date palm trees using the heat dissipation method and weighing lysimeters.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Or; Shapira, Or; Cohen, Shabtai; Tripler, Effi; Schwartz, Amnon; Lazarovitch, Naftali

    2012-09-01

    In a world of diminishing water reservoirs and a rising demand for food, the practice and development of water stress indicators and sensors are in rapid progress. The heat dissipation method, originally established by Granier, is herein applied and modified to enable sap flow measurements in date palm trees in the southern Arava desert of Israel. A long and tough sensor was constructed to withstand insertion into the date palm's hard exterior stem. This stem is wide and fibrous, surrounded by an even tougher external non-conducting layer of dead leaf bases. Furthermore, being a monocot species, water flow does not necessarily occur through the outer part of the palm's stem, as in most trees. Therefore, it is highly important to investigate the variations of the sap flux densities and determine the preferable location for sap flow sensing within the stem. Once installed into fully grown date palm trees stationed on weighing lysimeters, sap flow as measured by the modified sensors was compared with the actual transpiration. Sap flow was found to be well correlated with transpiration, especially when using a recent calibration equation rather than the original Granier equation. Furthermore, inducing the axial variability of the sap flux densities was found to be highly important for accurate assessments of transpiration by sap flow measurements. The sensors indicated no transpiration at night, a high increase of transpiration from 06:00 to 09:00, maximum transpiration at 12:00, followed by a moderate reduction until 08:00; when transpiration ceased. These results were reinforced by the lysimeters' output. Reduced sap flux densities were detected at the stem's mantle when compared with its center. These results were reinforced by mechanistic measurements of the stem's specific hydraulic conductivity. Variance on the vertical axis was also observed, indicating an accelerated flow towards the upper parts of the tree and raising a hypothesis concerning dehydrating

  1. An Approximate Analytic Expression for the Flux Density of Scintillation Light at the Photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Braverman, Joshua B; Harrison, Mark J; Ziock, Klaus-Peter

    2012-01-01

    The flux density of light exiting scintillator crystals is an important factor affecting the performance of radiation detectors, and is of particular importance for position sensitive instruments. Recent work by T. Woldemichael developed an analytic expression for the shape of the light spot at the bottom of a single crystal [1]. However, the results are of limited utility because there is generally a light pipe and photomultiplier entrance window between the bottom of the crystal and the photocathode. In this study, we expand Woldemichael s theory to include materials each with different indices of refraction and compare the adjusted light spot shape theory to GEANT 4 simulations [2]. Additionally, light reflection losses from index of refraction changes were also taken into account. We found that the simulations closely agree with the adjusted theory.

  2. Model for Calculating Photosynthetic Photon Flux Densities in Forest Openings on Slopes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing M.; Black, T. Andrew; Price, David T.; Carter, Reid E.

    1993-10-01

    A model has been developed to calculate the spatial distribution of the photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) in elliptical forest openings of given slopes and orientations. The PPFD is separated into direct and diffuse components. The direct component is calculated according to the opening and radiation geometries, and pathlength of the solar beam through the forest canopy. The diffuse component is obtained from the sky, tree, and landscape view factors. In this model, the distribution of foliage area with height and the effect of foliage clumping on both direct and diffuse radiation transmission are considered.The model has been verified using measurements for six quantum sensors (LI-COR Inc.) located at different positions in a small clear-cut (0.37 ha) in a 90-year-old western hemlock-Douglas fir forest.

  3. Erosion of CFC at medium flux densities in the plasma generator PSI-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohmeyer, W.; Markin, A.; Biedermann, C.

    2009-12-01

    Mass spectrometry and CH emission spectroscopy are applied for the evaluation of the erosion yield under conditions when the eroded hydrocarbons undergo several cycles of sticking and erosion before leaving the target chamber. Two differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMS) installed at the target chamber and at the pump duct show quantitatively the same spectra for carbon erosion and during calibration by methane or ethane injection. With this information the amount of eroded carbon can be readily evaluated by comparing QMS or CH emission spectra. The procedure has been applied to determine the temperature dependence of the erosion yield in the range 370-920 K, for ion energies 30 and 100 eV. The maximum ion flux density was 1.1×1022 H+ m-2 s-1.

  4. The effect of an on-orbit near encounter on the number flux density of micron sized particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maag, Carl R.; Tanner, William G.; Stevenson, Tim J.; Borg, Janet; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Alexander, W. Merle; Maag, Andrew J.

    1993-01-01

    Many materials and techniques have been developed by the authors to sample the flux of particles in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), and through regular insitu sampling of the flux in LEO, the materials and techniques have produced data which complement the data now being amassed by the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) research activities. Recent flight experiments on STS-32, STS-44, STS-46, and STS-52 have been conducted to develop an understanding of the spatial density as a function of size (mass) for particle sizes 1x10(exp -6) cm and larger. In addition to the enumeration of particle impacts, it was also the intent of these experiments that hypervelocity particles be captured and returned intact. Measurements were performed post-flight to determine the flux density, diameters, and subsequent effects on various optical, thermal control, and structural materials. During the course of the STS-44 mission, the Space Shuttle corrected its altitude by 26 km to evade a spent upper stage. The results of this near encounter suggests that a cloud of micron sized particles exist in the vicinity of the object. Data also suggest that the flux density is nearly two (2) orders of magnitude higher than background flux. A comparison of the number flux density along with microphotographs of the captured particles will be presented for the referenced shuttle flights.

  5. ATLBS EXTENDED SOURCE SAMPLE: THE EVOLUTION IN RADIO SOURCE MORPHOLOGY WITH FLUX DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Saripalli, L.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Thorat, K.; Ekers, R. D.; Hunstead, R. W.; Johnston, H. M.; Sadler, E. M.

    2012-04-01

    Based on the Australia Telescope Low Brightness Survey (ATLBS) we present a sample of extended radio sources and derive morphological properties of faint radio sources. One hundred nineteen radio galaxies form the ATLBS Extended Source Sample (ATLBS-ESS) consisting of all sources exceeding 30'' in extent and integrated flux densities exceeding 1 mJy. We give structural details along with information on galaxy identifications and source classifications. The ATLBS-ESS, unlike samples with higher flux-density limits, has almost equal fractions of FR-I and FR-II radio galaxies, with a large fraction of the FR-I population exhibiting 3C31-type structures. Significant asymmetry in lobe extents appears to be a common occurrence in the ATLBS-ESS FR-I sources compared with FR-II sources. We present a sample of 22 FR-Is at z > 0.5 with good structural information. The detection of several giant radio sources, with size exceeding 0.7 Mpc, at z > 1 suggests that giant radio sources are not less common at high redshifts. The ESS also includes a sample of 28 restarted radio galaxies. The relative abundance of dying and restarting sources is indicative of a model where radio sources undergo episodic activity in which an active phase is followed by a brief dying phase that terminates with restarting of the central activity; in any massive elliptical a few such activity cycles wherein adjacent events blend may constitute the lifetime of a radio source and such bursts of blended activity cycles may be repeated over the age of the host. The ATLBS-ESS includes a 2 Mpc giant radio galaxy with the lowest surface brightness lobes known to date.

  6. A model of heat transfer in sapwood and implications for sap flux density measurements using thermal dissipation probes

    SciTech Connect

    Wullschleger, Stan D; Childs, Kenneth W; King, Anthony Wayne; Hanson, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    A variety of thermal approaches are used to estimate sap flux density in stems of woody plants. Models have proven valuable tools for interpreting the behavior of heat pulse, heat balance, and heat field deformation techniques, but have seldom been used to describe heat transfer dynamics for the heat dissipation method. Therefore, to better understand the behavior of heat dissipation probes, a model was developed that takes into account the thermal properties of wood, the physical dimensions and thermal characteristics of the probes, and the conductive and convective heat transfer that occurs due to water flow in the sapwood. Probes were simulated as aluminum tubes 20 mm in length and 2 mm in diameter, whereas sapwood, heartwood, and bark each had a density and water fraction that determined their thermal properties. Base simulations assumed a constant sap flux density with sapwood depth and no wounding or physical disruption of xylem beyond the 2 mm diameter hole drilled for probe installation. Simulations across a range of sap flux densities showed that the dimensionless quantity k defined as ( Tm T)/ T where Tm is the temperature differential ( T) between the heated and unheated probe under zero flow conditions was dependent on the thermal conductivity of the sapwood. The relationship between sap flux density and k was also sensitive to radial gradients in sap flux density and to xylem disruption near the probe. Monte Carlo analysis in which 1000 simulations were conducted while simultaneously varying thermal conductivity and wound diameter revealed that sap flux density and k showed considerable departure from the original calibration equation used with this technique. The departure was greatest for abrupt patterns of radial variation typical of ring-porous species. Depending on the specific combination of thermal conductivity and wound diameter, use of the original calibration equation resulted in an 81% under- to 48% over-estimation of sap flux density at

  7. High-resolution tangential absolute extreme ultraviolet arrays for radiated power density measurements on NSTX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Kozub, T. A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Stratton, B. C.; Faust, I.; Tritz, K.

    2014-11-15

    The radiated-power-density diagnostic on the equatorial midplane for the NSTX-U tokamak will be upgraded to measure the radial structure of the photon emissivity profile with an improved radial resolution. This diagnostic will enhance the characterization and studies of power balance, impurity transport, and MHD. The layout and response expected of the new system is shown for different plasma conditions and impurity concentrations. The effect of toroidal rotation driving poloidal asymmetries in the core radiation from high-Z impurities is also addressed.

  8. Time-resolved postdischarge absolute silicon monoxide density measurement by resonant absorption spectroscopy in a nonthermal atmospheric plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Motret, Olivier; Coursimault, Fabien; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel

    2006-11-01

    In this study we present the technique of resonant absorption spectroscopy diagnostic developed to estimate the density of silicon monoxide (SiO) molecules during the postdischarge of an atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma. The ultraviolet (0,0) rovibrational band of the SiO(A {sup 1}{pi}-X {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +}) electronic transition was investigated. Effective values of absorption coefficient and absorption cross section for the rotational transitions under consideration were calculated. The SiO concentration was estimated by comparison between experimental and computed spectra. The self-absorption in the probe reactor was taken into account in the computed spectra.

  9. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  10. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie; Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm- 3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm- 3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges.

  11. Density of Gadolinium Nitrate Solutions for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Paul Allen; Lee, Denise L

    2009-05-01

    In late 1992, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was planning to switch the solution contained in the poison injection tank from cadmium nitrate to gadolinium nitrate. The poison injection system is an emergency system used to shut down the reactor by adding a neutron poison to the cooling water. This system must be able to supply a minimum of 69 pounds of gadolinium to the reactor coolant system in order to guarantee that the reactor would become subcritical. A graph of the density of gadolinium nitrate solutions over a concentration range of 5 to 30 wt% and a temperature range of 15 to 40{sup o}C was prepared. Routine density measurements of the solution in the poison injection tank are made by HFIR personnel, and an adaptation of the original graph is used to determine the gadolinium nitrate concentration. In late 2008, HFIR personnel decided that the heat tracing that was present on the piping for the poison injection system could be removed without any danger of freezing the solution; however, the gadolinium nitrate solution might get as cold as 5{sup o}C. This was outside the range of the current density-concentration correlation, so the range needed to be expanded. This report supplies a new density-concentration correlation that covers the extended temperature range. The correlation is given in new units, which greatly simplifies the calculation that is required to determine the pounds of gadolinium in the tank solution. The procedure for calculating the amount of gadolinium in the HFIR poison injection system is as follows: (1) Calculate the usable volume in the system; (2) Measure the density of the solution; (3) Calculate the gadolinium concentration using the following equation: Gd(lb/ft{sup 3}) = measured density (g/mL) x 34.681 - 34.785; (4) Calculate the amount of gadolinium in the system using the following equation: Amount of Gd(lb) = Gd concentration (lb/ft{sup 3}) x usable volume (ft{sup 3}). The equation in step 3 is exact for a temperature of

  12. An investigation into the torque density capabilities of flux-focusing magnetic gearboxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uppalapati, Krishna Kiran

    Wind and many rotary based ocean energy conversion devices rely on a mechanical gearbox to increase their speed so as to match the requirements of the electromagnetic generator. However, mechanical gearboxes have a number of disadvantages such as the need for gear lubrication, no overload protection and the creation of acoustic noise. Frequently direct-drive generators are employed to overcome these issues, wherein the gearbox is removed and the shaft of the turbine is directly connected to the synchronous generator, either with an electrically excited or permanent magnet rotor. If the input speed to the generator is very low the torque must be very high in order to generate the necessary power. However, as the electrical loading of a synchronous generator is thermally limited, the size of the generator will become excessively large at high power levels. An alternative to these technologies is to consider replacing the mechanical gearbox with a magnetic gear. A magnetic gear can create speed change without any physical contact. It has inherent overload protection, and its non-contact operation offers the potential for high reliability. Despite significant progress, existing magnetic gear designs do not achieve torque densities that are competitive with mechanical gearboxes. This research has focused on designing a coaxial magnetic gear that can operate at a volumetric torque density that is comparable to a mechanical gearbox. A flux-focusing rotor topology also called spoke-type rotor magnet arrangement was adopted to improve the air-gap magnetic flux density which in turn improves the torque transferred between the rotors. Finite element analysis was utilized to conduct a parameter sweep analysis of the different geometric parameters of the magnetic gear. A sub-scale magnetic gear with a diameter of 110 mm and a scaled-up magnetic gear with a diameter of 228 mm was designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated. The torque and torque density of sub

  13. Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.

    2013-07-15

    Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at 0.1 vol. %.

  14. A density-functional study of the phase diagram of cementite-type (Fe,Mn)3C at absolute zero temperature.

    PubMed

    Von Appen, Jörg; Eck, Bernhard; Dronskowski, Richard

    2010-11-15

    The phase diagram of (Fe(1-x) Mn(x))(3)C has been investigated by means of density-functional theory (DFT) calculations at absolute zero temperature. The atomic distributions of the metal atoms are not random-like as previously proposed but we find three different, ordered regions within the phase range. The key role is played by the 8d metal site which forms, as a function of the composition, differing magnetic layers, and these dominate the physical properties. We calculated the magnetic moments, the volumes, the enthalpies of mixing and formation of 13 different compositions and explain the changes of the macroscopic properties with changes in the electronic and magnetic structures by means of bonding analyses using the Crystal Orbital Hamilton Population (COHP) technique.

  15. Bidirectional flux of cholesterol between cells and lipoproteins. Effects of phospholipid depletion of high density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.J.; Bamberger, M.J.; Latta, R.A.; Rapp, P.E.; Phillips, M.C.; Rothblat, G.H.

    1986-05-05

    The bidirectional surface transfer of free cholesterol (FC) between Fu5AH rat hepatoma cells and human high density lipoprotein (HDL) was studied. Cells and HDL were prelabeled with (4-/sup 14/C)FC and (7-/sup 3/H)FC, respectively. Influx and efflux of FC were measured simultaneously from the appearance of /sup 3/H counts in cells and /sup 14/C counts in medium. Results were analyzed by a computerized procedure which fitted sets of kinetic data to a model assuming that cell and HDL FC populations each formed a single homogeneous pool and that together the pools formed a closed system. This analysis yielded values for the first-order rate constants of FC influx and efflux (ki and ke), from which influx and efflux of FC mass (Fi and Fe) could be calculated. With normal HDL, the uptake and release of FC tracers conformed well to the above-described model; Fi and Fe were approximately equal, suggesting an exchange of FC between cells and HDL. HDL was depleted of phospholipid (PL) by treatment with either phospholipase A2 or heparin-releasable rat hepatic lipase, followed by incubation with bovine serum albumin. PL depletion of HDL had little or no effect on ki, but reduced ke, indicating that PL-deficient HDL is a relatively poor acceptor of cell cholesterol. The reduction in ke resulted in initial Fi greater than Fe and, thus, in net uptake of FC by the cells. This result explained previous results demonstrating net uptake of FC from PL-depleted HDL. In the presence of an inhibitor of acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase, the steady state distribution of FC mass between cells and HDL was accurately predicted by the ratio of rate constants for FC flux. This result provided additional validation for describing FC flux in terms of first-order rate constants and homogeneous cell and HDL FC pools.

  16. An empirical study of the wound effect on sap flux density measured with thermal dissipation probes.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Andreas; Marañón-Jiménez, Sara; Rebmann, Corinna; Herbst, Mathias; Cuntz, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    The insertion of thermal dissipation (TD) sensors on tree stems for sap flux density (SFD) measurements can lead to SFD underestimations due to a wound formation close to the drill hole. However, the wound effect has not been assessed experimentally for this method yet. Here, we propose an empirical approach to investigate the effect of the wound healing on measured sap flux with TD probes. The approach was performed for both, diffuse-porous (Fagus sylvatica (Linnaeus)) and ring-porous (Quercus petraea (Lieblein)) species. Thermal dissipation probes were installed on different dates along the growing season to document the effects of the dynamic wound formation. The trees were cut in autumn and additional sensors were installed in the cut stems, therefore, without potential effects of wound development. A range of water pressures was applied to the stem segments and SFDs were simultaneously measured by TD sensors as well as gravimetrically in the laboratory. The formation of wounds around sensors installed in living tree stems led to underestimation of SFD by 21.4 ± 3 and 47.5 ± 3.8% in beech and oak, respectively. The differences between SFD underestimations of diffuse-porous beech and ring-porous oak were, however, not statistically significant. Sensors with 5-, 11- and 22-week-old wounds also showed no significant differences, which implies that the influence of wound formation on SFD estimates was completed within the first few weeks after perforation. These results were confirmed by time courses of SFD measurements in the field. Field SFD values decreased immediately after sensor installation and reached stable values after ~2 weeks with similar underestimations to the ones observed in the laboratory. We therefore propose a feasible approach to correct directly field observations of SFD for potential underestimations due to the wound effect.

  17. A Model of Median Auroral Electron Flux Deduced from Hardy 2008 Model Probability Density Maps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    example of the precipitating electron energy flux map in the Northern hemisphere for Kp=3 produced by AF- Geospace software...AF- Geospace Software (Hilmer, 2010) illustrates the precipitating electron energy flux map in the Northern hemisphere for Kp = 3...precipitating electron energy flux map in the Northern hemisphere for Kp=3 produced by AF- Geospace software. The green line specifies the auroral oval

  18. Leaf photosynthetic and solar-tracking responses of mallow, Malva parviflora, to photon flux density.

    PubMed

    Greer, Dennis H; Thorpe, Michael R

    2009-10-01

    Malva parviflora L. (mallow) is a species that occupies high-light habitats as a weedy invader in orchards and vineyards. Species of the Malvaceae are known to solar track and anecdotal evidence suggests this species may also. How M. parviflora responds physiologically to light in comparison with other species within the Malvaceae remains unknown. Tracking and photosynthetic responses to photon flux density (PFD) were evaluated on plants grown in greenhouse conditions. Tracking ability was assessed in the growth conditions and by exposing leaves to specific light intensities and measuring changes in the angle of the leaf plane. Light responses were also determined by photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence. Leaves followed a heliotropic response which was highly PFD-dependent, with tracking rates increasing in a curvilinear pattern. Maximum tracking rates were up to 20 degrees h(-1) and saturated for light above 1,300 micromol (photons) m(-2) s(-1). This high-light saturation, both for tracking (much higher than the other species), and for photosynthesis, confirmed mallow as a high-light demanding species. Further, because there was no photoinhibition, the leaves could capture the potential of an increased carbon gain in higher irradiance by resorting to solar tracking. Modelling suggested the tracking response could increase the annual carbon gain by as much as 25% compared with leaves that do not track the sun. The various leaf attributes associated with solar tracking, therefore, help to account for the success of this species as a weed in many locations worldwide.

  19. Industrialization of nanocrystalline Fe-Si-B-P-Cu alloys for high magnetic flux density cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Kana; Setyawan, Albertus D.; Sharma, Parmanand; Nishiyama, Nobuyuki; Makino, Akihiro

    2016-03-01

    Nanocrystalline Fe-Si-B-P-Cu alloys exhibit high saturation magnetic flux density (Bs) and extremely low magnetic core loss (W), simultaneously. Low amorphous-forming ability of these alloys hinders their application potential in power transformers and motors. Here we report a solution to this problem. Minor addition of C is found to be effective in increasing the amorphous-forming ability of Fe-Si-B-P-Cu alloys. It allows fabrication of 120 mm wide ribbons (which was limited to less than 40 mm) without noticeable degradation in magnetic properties. The nanocrystalline (Fe85.7Si0.5B9.5P3.5Cu0.8)99C1 ribbons exhibit low coercivity (Hc)~4.5 A/m, high Bs~1.83 T and low W~0.27 W/kg (@ 1.5 T and 50 Hz). Success in fabrication of long (60-100 m) and wide (~120 mm) ribbons, which are made up of low cost elements is promising for mass production of energy efficient high power transformers and motors

  20. Influence of stem temperature changes on heat pulse sap flux density measurements.

    PubMed

    Vandegehuchte, Maurits W; Burgess, Stephen S O; Downey, Alec; Steppe, Kathy

    2015-04-01

    While natural spatial temperature gradients between measurement needles have been thoroughly investigated for continuous heat-based sap flow methods, little attention has been given to how natural changes in stem temperature impact heat pulse-based methods through temporal rather than spatial effects. By modelling the theoretical equation for both an ideal instantaneous pulse and a step pulse and applying a finite element model which included actual needle dimensions and wound effects, the influence of a varying stem temperature on heat pulse-based methods was investigated. It was shown that the heat ratio (HR) method was influenced, while for the compensation heat pulse and Tmax methods changes in stem temperatures of up to 0.002 °C s(-1) did not lead to significantly different results. For the HR method, rising stem temperatures during measurements led to lower heat pulse velocity values, while decreasing stem temperatures led to both higher and lower heat pulse velocities, and to imaginary results for high flows. These errors of up to 40% can easily be prevented by including a temperature correction in the data analysis procedure, calculating the slope of the natural temperature change based on the measured temperatures before application of the heat pulse. Results of a greenhouse and outdoor experiment on Pinus pinea L. show the influence of this correction on low and average sap flux densities.

  1. Photosynthetic photon flux density, carbon dioxide concentration, and vapor pressure deficit effects on photosynthesis in cacao seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao) is a shade plant, native to the under-story of the evergreen rain forest of the Amazon basin and adapted to low levels of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD). The influence of PPFD, leaf to air water vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and external carbon dioxide concentration...

  2. The influence of walking with an orthosis on bone mineral density by determination of the absolute values of the loads applied on the limb.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mohammad Taghi

    2012-03-01

    Spinal cord injury is damage to the spinal cord that results in loss of mobility and sensation below the level of injury. Most patients use various types of orthoses to stand and walk. It has been claimed that walking and standing with orthosis reduces bone osteoporosis, improves joint range of motion and decreases muscle spasm. Unfortunately, there are discrepancies regarding the clinical effects of walking and standing on bone mineral density. The aim of this research was to find the absolute values of the loads transmitted by body and orthosis in walking with use of an orthosis. 5 normal subjects were recruited to stand and walk with a new design of reciprocal gait orthosis. The loads transmitted through the orthosis and anatomy was measured by use of strain gauge and motion analysis systems. It has been shown that the loads applied on the anatomy were significantly more than that transmitted through the orthosis. Moreover, the patterns of the forces and moments of the orthosis and body completely differed from each other. As the most part of the loads applied on the complex transmitted by anatomy in walking with an orthosis, walking with orthosis can influence bone mineral density.

  3. The turbulent heat flux in low Mach number flows with large density variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orourke, Peter J.; Collins, Lance R.

    1988-01-01

    A transport equation has been derived which is the difference between the volume- and mass-averaged velocities and is simply related to the turbulent heat flux phi sup h. Using this equation and an assumption analogous to the drift flux approximation of two-phase flow modeling, an algebraic closure relation for phi sup h that exibits fluxes due to directed transport proportional to -del anti p and due to gradient transport proportional to -del tau has been obtained.

  4. Implications of Saito's coronal density model on the polar solar wind flow and heavy ion abundances. [mathematical models of proton flux density and solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of polar solar wind proton flux upper limits derived using a coronal density model, with Lyman alpha measurements of the length of the neutral H tail of comet Bennet at high latitudes, shows that either extended heating beyond 2 solar radii is necessary some of the time or that the model's polar densities are too low. Whichever possibility is the case, the fact that the solar wind particle flux does not appear to decrease with increasing latitude indicates that the heavy element content of the high latitude wind may be similar to that observed in the ecliptic. It was then shown that solar wind heavy ion observations at high latitudes allow a determination of the electron temperature at heights which bracket the nominal location of the coronal temperature maximum thus providing information concerning the magnitude and extent of mechanical dissipation in the intermediate corona.

  5. Probability Density Functions of Floating Potential Fluctuations Due to Local Electron Flux Intermittency in a Linear ECR Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Eiki; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    An intermittent behavior of local electron flux in a laboratory ECR plasma is statistically analyzed by means of probability density functions (PDFs). The PDF constructed from a time series of the floating potential signal on a Langmuir probe has a fat tail in the negative value side, which reflects the intermittency of the local electron flux. The PDF of the waiting time, which is defined by the time interval between two successive events, is found to exhibit an exponential distribution, suggesting that the phenomenon is characterized by a stationary Poisson process. The underlying Poisson process is also confirmed by the number of events in given time intervals that is Poisson distributed.

  6. A dynamo theory prediction for solar cycle 22 - Sunspot number, radio flux, exospheric temperature, and total density at 400 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.; Hedin, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    Using the 'dynamo theory' method to predict solar activity, a value for the smoothed sunspot number of 109 + or - 20 is obtained for solar cycle 22. The predicted cycle is expected to peak near December, 1990 + or - 1 year. Concommitantly, F(10.7) radio flux is expected to reach a smoothed value of 158 + or - 18 flux units. Global mean exospheric temperature is expected to reach 1060 + or - 50 K and global total average total thermospheric density at 400 km is expected to reach 4.3 x 10 to the -15th gm/cu cm + or - 25 percent.

  7. A dynamo theory prediction for solar cycle 22: Sunspot number, radio flux, exospheric temperature, and total density at 400 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.; Hedin, A. E.

    1986-01-01

    Using the dynamo theory method to predict solar activity, a value for the smoothed sunspot number of 109 + or - 20 is obtained for solar cycle 22. The predicted cycle is expected to peak near December, 1990 + or - 1 year. Concommitantly, F(10.7) radio flux is expected to reach a smoothed value of 158 + or - 18 flux units. Global mean exospheric temperature is expected to reach 1060 + or - 50 K and global total average total thermospheric density at 400 km is expected to reach 4.3 x 10 to the -15th gm/cu cm + or - 25 percent.

  8. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  9. Optimization of multiply acquired magnetic flux density B(z) using ICNE-Multiecho train in MREIT.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyun Soo; Kwon, Oh In

    2010-05-07

    The aim of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is to visualize the electrical properties, conductivity or current density of an object by injection of current. Recently, the prolonged data acquisition time when using the injected current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) method has been advantageous for measurement of magnetic flux density data, Bz, for MREIT in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, the ICNE method results in undesirable side artifacts, such as blurring, chemical shift and phase artifacts, due to the long data acquisition under an inhomogeneous static field. In this paper, we apply the ICNE method to a gradient and spin echo (GRASE) multi-echo train pulse sequence in order to provide the multiple k-space lines during a single RF pulse period. We analyze the SNR of the measured multiple B(z) data using the proposed ICNE-Multiecho MR pulse sequence. By determining a weighting factor for B(z) data in each of the echoes, an optimized inversion formula for the magnetic flux density data is proposed for the ICNE-Multiecho MR sequence. Using the ICNE-Multiecho method, the quality of the measured magnetic flux density is considerably increased by the injection of a long current through the echo train length and by optimization of the voxel-by-voxel noise level of the B(z) value. Agarose-gel phantom experiments have demonstrated fewer artifacts and a better SNR using the ICNE-Multiecho method. Experimenting with the brain of an anesthetized dog, we collected valuable echoes by taking into account the noise level of each of the echoes and determined B(z) data by determining optimized weighting factors for the multiply acquired magnetic flux density data.

  10. The effects of nonuniform magnetic field strength on density flux and test particle transport in drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Dewhurst, J. M.; Hnat, B.; Dendy, R. O.

    2009-07-15

    The extended Hasegawa-Wakatani equations generate fully nonlinear self-consistent solutions for coupled density n and vorticity {nabla}{sup 2}{phi}, where {phi} is electrostatic potential, in a plasma with background density inhomogeneity {kappa}=-{partial_derivative} ln n{sub 0}/{partial_derivative}x and magnetic field strength inhomogeneity C=-{partial_derivative} ln B/{partial_derivative}x. Finite C introduces interchange effects and {nabla}B drifts into the framework of drift turbulence through compressibility of the ExB and diamagnetic drifts. This paper addresses the direct computation of the radial ExB density flux {gamma}{sub n}=-n{partial_derivative}{phi}/{partial_derivative}y, tracer particle transport, the statistical properties of the turbulent fluctuations that drive {gamma}{sub n} and tracer motion, and analytical underpinnings. Systematic trends emerge in the dependence on C of the skewness of the distribution of pointwise {gamma}{sub n} and in the relative phase of density-velocity and density-potential pairings. It is shown how these effects, together with conservation of potential vorticity {pi}={nabla}{sup 2}{phi}-n+({kappa}-C)x, account for much of the transport phenomenology. Simple analytical arguments yield a Fickian relation {gamma}{sub n}=({kappa}-C)D{sub x} between the radial density flux {gamma}{sub n} and the radial tracer diffusivity D{sub x}, which is shown to explain key trends in the simulations.

  11. Effect of a magnetic flux line on the quantum beats in the Henon-Heiles level density.

    PubMed

    Brack, M.; Bhaduri, R. K.; Law, J.; Maier, Ch.; Murthy, M. V. N.

    1995-03-01

    The quantum density of states of the Henon-Heiles potential displays a pronounced beating pattern. This has been explained by the interference of three isolated classical periodic orbits with nearby actions and periods. A singular magnetic flux line, passing through the origin, drastically alters the beats even though the classical Lagrangian equations of motion remain unchanged. Some of the changes can be easily understood in terms of the Aharonov-Bohm effect. However, we find that the standard periodic orbit theory does not reproduce the diffraction-like quantum effects on those classical orbits which intersect the singular flux line, and argue that corrections of relative order variant Planck's over 2pi are necessary to describe these effects. We also discuss the changes in the distribution of nearest-neighbor spacings in the eigenvalue spectrum, brought about by the flux line. (c) 1995 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Temperature and Magnetic Field Dependence of Critical Current Density of YBCO with Varying Flux Pinning Additions (POSTPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    coverage corresponding to M phase 1 nm thickness was found to be necessary to increase compared to YBCO . The op- timal layer thickness for each M phase was...kept constant in this experiment: , Y211 0.8 nm , and [17]. Using the optimal M phase thickness, the YBCO layer was also systematically varied for...AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2010-2083 TEMPERATURE AND MAGNETIC FIELD DEPENDENCE OF CRITICAL CURRENT DENSITY OF YBCO WITH VARYING FLUX PINNING ADDITIONS

  13. Measurement of the light flux density patterns from luminaires proposed as photon sources for photosynthesis during space travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Paul N.

    1989-01-01

    Two luminaires were evaluated to determine the light flux density pattern on a horizontal plane surface. NASA supplied both luminaires; one was made by NASA and the other is commercially available. Tests were made for three combinations of luminaire height and luminaire lens material using the NASA luminaire; only one configuration of the commercial luminaire was tested. Measurements were made using four sensors with different wavelength range capabilities. The data are presented in graphical and tabular formats.

  14. Optimizing Power Density and Efficiency of a Double-Halbach Array Permanent-Magnet Ironless Axial-Flux Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating hybrid electric and turboelectric propulsion concepts for future aircraft to reduce fuel burn, emissions, and noise. Systems studies show that the weight and efficiency of the electric system components need to be improved for this concept to be feasible. This effort aims to identify design parameters that affect power density and efficiency for a double-Halbach array permanent-magnet ironless axial flux motor configuration. These parameters include both geometrical and higher-order parameters, including pole count, rotor speed, current density, and geometries of the magnets, windings, and air gap.

  15. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  16. Solar Modulation of Inner Trapped Belt Radiation Flux as a Function of Atmospheric Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lodhi, M. A. K.

    2005-01-01

    No simple algorithm seems to exist for calculating proton fluxes and lifetimes in the Earth's inner, trapped radiation belt throughout the solar cycle. Most models of the inner trapped belt in use depend upon AP8 which only describes the radiation environment at solar maximum and solar minimum in Cycle 20. One exception is NOAAPRO which incorporates flight data from the TIROS/NOAA polar orbiting spacecraft. The present study discloses yet another, simple formulation for approximating proton fluxes at any time in a given solar cycle, in particular between solar maximum and solar minimum. It is derived from AP8 using a regression algorithm technique from nuclear physics. From flux and its time integral fluence, one can then approximate dose rate and its time integral dose.

  17. Absolute Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, George

    1990-12-01

    The absolute sensitivity of the FOS will be determined in SV by observing 2 stars at 3 epochs, first in 3 apertures (1.0", 0.5", and 0.3" circular) and then in 1 aperture (1.0" circular). In cycle 1, one star, BD+28D4211 will be observed in the 1.0" aperture to establish the stability of the sensitivity and flat field characteristics and improve the accuracy obtained in SV. This star will also be observed through the paired apertures since these are not calibrated in SV. The stars will be observed in most detector/grating combinations. The data will be averaged to form the inverse sensitivity functions required by RSDP.

  18. Performance of a high resolution, high flux density SGM undulator beamline at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, T.; Heimann, P.; Mossessian, D.; McKinney, W.; Padmore, H.

    1994-07-15

    The performance of ALS beamline 7.0 is described. This is an integrated system for delivering radiation from a 5cm period undulator to spectroscopy and microscopy experiments across the range of photon energies from 60eV to 1200eV. The beamline is engineered to deliver the highest possible flux, with negligible deformation of the optic surfaces due to heating. Two experiment stations are served with rapid interchangeability. We report on the measured operational parameters, the resolution and flux delivered, and the refocus of the light into a small spot at the experiment.

  19. High resolution absolute flux profiles of the MC 2 h and k lines in evolved F8 to M5 stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, R. E.; Mullan, D. J.; Basri, G. S.; Linsky, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    The central results of a survey of the Mg II resonance line emission in a sample of over 50 evolved late type stars, including spectral-luminosity type F8 to M5 and La to IV are presented. Observed and surface fluxes are derived and correlations noted. The major findings include: (1) Mg II k emission core asymmetry transition near K1 III, analogous to that known for Ca II K; (2) a small gravity and temperature dependence of the Mg II chromospheric radiative loss rate.

  20. Sap flow measurements combining sap-flux density radial profiles with punctual sap-flux density measurements in oak trees (Quercus ilex and Quercus pyrenaica) - water-use implications in a water-limited savanna-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, J. Leonardo; Lubczynski1, Maciek W.

    2010-05-01

    Sap flow measurement is a key aspect for understanding how plants use water and their impacts on the ecosystems. A variety of sensors have been developed to measure sap flow, each one with its unique characteristics. When the aim of a research is to have accurate tree water use calculations, with high temporal and spatial resolution (i.e. scaled), a sensor with high accuracy, high measurement efficiency, low signal-to-noise ratio and low price is ideal, but such has not been developed yet. Granier's thermal dissipation probes (TDP) have been widely used in many studies and various environmental conditions because of its simplicity, reliability, efficiency and low cost. However, it has two major flaws when is used in semi-arid environments and broad-stem tree species: it is often affected by high natural thermal gradients (NTG), which distorts the measurements, and it cannot measure the radial variability of sap-flux density in trees with sapwood thicker than two centimeters. The new, multi point heat field deformation sensor (HFD) is theoretically not affected by NTG, and it can measure the radial variability of the sap flow at different depths. However, its high cost is a serious limitation when simultaneous measurements are required in several trees (e.g. catchment-scale studies). The underlying challenge is to develop a monitoring schema in which HFD and TDP are combined to satisfy the needs of measurement efficiency and accuracy in water accounting. To assess the level of agreement between TDP and HFD methods in quantifying sap flow rates and temporal patterns on Quercus ilex (Q.i ) and Quercus pyrenaica trees (Q.p.), three measurement schemas: standard TDP, TDP-NTG-corrected and HFD were compared in dry season at the semi-arid Sardon area, near Salamanca in Spain in the period from June to September 2009. To correct TDP measurements with regard to radial sap flow variability, a radial sap flux density correction factor was applied and tested by adjusting TDP

  1. Demonstartion of density dependence of x-ray flux in a laser-driven hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P E; Rosen, M D; Hammer, J H; Hsing, W S; Glendinning, S G; Turner, R E; Kirkwood, R; Schein, J; Sorce, C; Satcher, J; Hamza, A; Reibold, R A; Hibbard, R; Landen, O; Reighard, A; McAlpin, S; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B

    2008-02-11

    Experiments have been conducted using laser-driven cylindrical hohlraums whose walls are machined from Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} foams of 100 mg/cc and 4 g/cc densities. Measurements of the radiation temperature demonstrate that the lower density walls produce higher radiation temperatures than the high density walls. This is the first experimental demonstration of the prediction that this would occur [M. D. Rosen and J. H. Hammer, Phys. Rev. E 72, 056403 (2005)]. For high density walls, the radiation front propagates subsonically, and part of the absorbed energy is wasted by the flow kinetic energy. For the lower wall density, the front velocity is supersonic and can devote almost all of the absorbed energy to heating the wall.

  2. Optimization of Magneto-Rheological Damper for Maximizing Magnetic Flux Density in the Fluid Flow Gap Through FEA and GA Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Hemanth; Kumar, Hemantha; Gangadharan, Kalluvalappil

    2016-06-01

    A magneto rheological (MR) fluid damper offers cost effective solution for semiactive vibration control in an automobile suspension. The performance of MR damper is significantly depends on the electromagnetic circuit incorporated into it. The force developed by MR fluid damper is highly influenced by the magnetic flux density induced in the fluid flow gap. In the present work, optimization of electromagnetic circuit of an MR damper is discussed in order to maximize the magnetic flux density. The optimization procedure was proposed by genetic algorithm and design of experiments techniques. The result shows that the fluid flow gap size less than 1.12 mm cause significant increase of magnetic flux density.

  3. Spatial variations in xylem sap flux density in the trunk of orchard-grown, mature mango trees under changing soil water conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Müller, Warren J.; Chacko, Elias K.

    2000-05-01

    Circumferential and radial variations in xylem sap flux density in trunks of 13-year-old mango (Mangifera indica L.) trees were investigated with Granier sap flow sensor probes under limiting and non-limiting soil water conditions. Under non-limiting soil water conditions, circumferential variation was substantial, but there was no apparent relationship between sap flux density and aspect (i.e., the radial position of the sensor probes on the trunk relative to the compass). Hourly sap flux densities over 24 hours at different aspects were highly pair-wise correlated. The relationships between different aspects were constant during well-watered periods but highly variable under changing soil water conditions. Sap flux density showed marked radial variation within the trunk and a substantial flux was observed at the center of the trunk. For each selected aspect on each tree, changes in sap flux densities over time at different depths were closely correlated, so flux at a particular depth could be extrapolated as a multiple of flux from 0 to 2 cm beneath the cambium. However, depth profiles of sap flux density differed between trees and even between aspects within a tree, and also varied in an unpredictable manner as soil water conditions changed. Nevertheless, over a period of non-limiting soil water conditions, depth profiles remained relatively constant. Based on the depth profiles obtained during these periods, a method is described for calculating total sap flow in a mango tree from sap flux density at 0-2 cm beneath the cambium. Total daily sap flows obtained were consistent with water use estimated from soil water balance.

  4. Observation of the X-ray source Sco X-1 from Skylab. [radiant flux density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    An attempt to observe the discrete X-ray source Sco X-1 on 20 September 1973 between 0856 and 0920 UT is reported. Data obtained with the ATM/S-056 X-ray event analyzer, in particular the flux observed with the 1.71 to 4.96 KeV counter, is analyzed. No photographic image of the source was obtained because Sco X-1 was outside the field of view of the X-ray telescope.

  5. A state-space modeling approach to estimating canopy conductance and associated uncertainties from sap flux density data.

    PubMed

    Bell, David M; Ward, Eric J; Oishi, A Christopher; Oren, Ram; Flikkema, Paul G; Clark, James S

    2015-07-01

    Uncertainties in ecophysiological responses to environment, such as the impact of atmospheric and soil moisture conditions on plant water regulation, limit our ability to estimate key inputs for ecosystem models. Advanced statistical frameworks provide coherent methodologies for relating observed data, such as stem sap flux density, to unobserved processes, such as canopy conductance and transpiration. To address this need, we developed a hierarchical Bayesian State-Space Canopy Conductance (StaCC) model linking canopy conductance and transpiration to tree sap flux density from a 4-year experiment in the North Carolina Piedmont, USA. Our model builds on existing ecophysiological knowledge, but explicitly incorporates uncertainty in canopy conductance, internal tree hydraulics and observation error to improve estimation of canopy conductance responses to atmospheric drought (i.e., vapor pressure deficit), soil drought (i.e., soil moisture) and above canopy light. Our statistical framework not only predicted sap flux observations well, but it also allowed us to simultaneously gap-fill missing data as we made inference on canopy processes, marking a substantial advance over traditional methods. The predicted and observed sap flux data were highly correlated (mean sensor-level Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.88). Variations in canopy conductance and transpiration associated with environmental variation across days to years were many times greater than the variation associated with model uncertainties. Because some variables, such as vapor pressure deficit and soil moisture, were correlated at the scale of days to weeks, canopy conductance responses to individual environmental variables were difficult to interpret in isolation. Still, our results highlight the importance of accounting for uncertainty in models of ecophysiological and ecosystem function where the process of interest, canopy conductance in this case, is not observed directly. The StaCC modeling

  6. Nanoscale friction: kinetic friction of magnetic flux quanta and charge density waves.

    PubMed

    Maeda, A; Inoue, Y; Kitano, H; Savel'ev, Sergey; Okayasu, S; Tsukada, I; Nori, Franco

    2005-02-25

    In analogy with the standard macroscopic friction, here we present a comparative study of the friction force felt by moving vortices in superconductors and charge density waves. Using experiments and a model for this data, our observations (1) provide a link between friction at the micro- and macroscopic scales, (2) explain the roundness of the static-kinetic friction transition in terms of thermal fluctuations, particle interactions, and system size (critical-phenomena view), and (3) explain the crossing of the kinetic friction F(k) versus velocity V for our pristine (high density of very weak defects) and our irradiated samples (with lower density of deeper pinning defects).

  7. Space density distribution of galaxies in the absolute magnitude - rotation velocity plane: a volume-complete Tully-Fisher relation from CALIFA stellar kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekeraité, S.; Walcher, C. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Garcia Lorenzo, B.; Lyubenova, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Spekkens, K.; van de Ven, G.; Wisotzki, L.; Ziegler, B.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; García-Benito, R.

    2016-10-01

    We measured the distribution in absolute magnitude - circular velocity space for a well-defined sample of 199 rotating galaxies of the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area Survey (CALIFA) using their stellar kinematics. Our aim in this analysis is to avoid subjective selection criteria and to take volume and large-scale structure factors into account. Using stellar velocity fields instead of gas emission line kinematics allows including rapidly rotating early-type galaxies. Our initial sample contains 277 galaxies with available stellar velocity fields and growth curve r-band photometry. After rejecting 51 velocity fields that could not be modelled because of the low number of bins, foreground contamination, or significant interaction, we performed Markov chain Monte Carlo modelling of the velocity fields, from which we obtained the rotation curve and kinematic parameters and their realistic uncertainties. We performed an extinction correction and calculated the circular velocity vcirc accounting for the pressure support of a given galaxy. The resulting galaxy distribution on the Mr-vcirc plane was then modelled as a mixture of two distinct populations, allowing robust and reproducible rejection of outliers, a significant fraction of which are slow rotators. The selection effects are understood well enough that we were able to correct for the incompleteness of the sample. The 199 galaxies were weighted by volume and large-scale structure factors, which enabled us to fit a volume-corrected Tully-Fisher relation (TFR). More importantly, we also provide the volume-corrected distribution of galaxies in the Mr-vcirc plane, which can be compared with cosmological simulations. The joint distribution of the luminosity and circular velocity space densities, representative over the range of -20 > Mr > -22 mag, can place more stringent constraints on the galaxy formation and evolution scenarios than linear TFR fit parameters or the luminosity function alone. Galaxies main

  8. An improved multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver for three-dimensional flows with large density ratio and high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Shu, C.; Yang, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    An improved multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver (MLBFS) is proposed in this work for effective simulation of three-dimensional (3D) multiphase flows with large density ratio and high Reynolds number. As a finite volume scheme, the MLBFS originally proposed in [27] applies the finite volume method to solve for macroscopic flow variables directly. The fluxes are reconstructed locally at each cell interface by using the standard LBM solutions. Due to the modeling error of the standard LBM, the reconstructed fluxes deviate from those in the Navier-Stokes equations; and to compensate this error, a complex tensor is introduced in the original MLBFS. However, the computation of the tensor introduces additional complexity and usually needs a relatively thicker interface thickness to maintain numerical stability, which makes the solver be complex and inefficient in the 3D case. To remove this drawback, in this work, a theoretical analysis to the formulations obtained from the Chapman-Enskog expansion is conducted. It is shown that the modeling error can be effectively removed by modifying the computation of the equilibrium density distribution function. With this improvement, the proposed 3D MLBFS not only avoids the calculation of the compensation tensor but also is able to maintain numerical stability with very thin interface thickness. Several benchmark cases, including the challenging droplet impacting on a dry surface, head-on collisions of binary droplets and droplet splashing on a thin film with density ratio 1000 and Reynolds number up to 3000, are studied to validate the proposed solver. The obtained results agree well with the published data.

  9. FeCo-Zr-O nanogranular soft-magnetic thin films with a high magnetic flux density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuma, S.; Fujimori, H.; Masumoto, T.; Xiong, X. Y.; Ping, D. H.; Hono, K.

    2003-02-01

    Soft-magnetic thin films with high magnetic flux densities of about 23 kG have been fabricated in the (Fe-Co)-Zr-O nanogranular system. The films were prepared by reactive sputtering under an oxygen-argon atmosphere using a target of Fe-Co-Zr alloys. The microstructure was composed of base-centered-cubic Fe-Co nanograins, where nanoparticles of amorphous Zr oxide are dispersed. These Zr-oxide nanoparticles are thought to hinder the growth of Fe-Co grains during the film deposition, causing low coercivity.

  10. Simulation study of geometric shape factor approach to estimating earth emitted flux densities from wide field-of-view radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, W. L.; Green, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    A study was performed on the use of geometric shape factors to estimate earth-emitted flux densities from radiation measurements with wide field-of-view flat-plate radiometers on satellites. Sets of simulated irradiance measurements were computed for unrestricted and restricted field-of-view detectors. In these simulations, the earth radiation field was modeled using data from Nimbus 2 and 3. Geometric shape factors were derived and applied to these data to estimate flux densities on global and zonal scales. For measurements at a satellite altitude of 600 km, estimates of zonal flux density were in error 1.0 to 1.2%, and global flux density errors were less than 0.2%. Estimates with unrestricted field-of-view detectors were about the same for Lambertian and non-Lambertian radiation models, but were affected by satellite altitude. The opposite was found for the restricted field-of-view detectors.

  11. Seeding magnetic fields for laser-driven flux compression in high-energy-density plasmas.

    PubMed

    Gotchev, O V; Knauer, J P; Chang, P Y; Jang, N W; Shoup, M J; Meyerhofer, D D; Betti, R

    2009-04-01

    A compact, self-contained magnetic-seed-field generator (5 to 16 T) is the enabling technology for a novel laser-driven flux-compression scheme in laser-driven targets. A magnetized target is directly irradiated by a kilojoule or megajoule laser to compress the preseeded magnetic field to thousands of teslas. A fast (300 ns), 80 kA current pulse delivered by a portable pulsed-power system is discharged into a low-mass coil that surrounds the laser target. A >15 T target field has been demonstrated using a <100 J capacitor bank, a laser-triggered switch, and a low-impedance (<1 Omega) strip line. The device has been integrated into a series of magnetic-flux-compression experiments on the 60 beam, 30 kJ OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The initial application is a novel magneto-inertial fusion approach [O. V. Gotchev et al., J. Fusion Energy 27, 25 (2008)] to inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where the amplified magnetic field can inhibit thermal conduction losses from the hot spot of a compressed target. This can lead to the ignition of massive shells imploded with low velocity-a way of reaching higher gains than is possible with conventional ICF.

  12. A study of the effects of flux density and frequency of pulsed electromagnetic field on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Ding, Jun; Duan, Wei

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of pulsed electromagnetic fields with various flux densities and frequencies on neurite outgrowth in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells. We have studied the percentage of neurite-bearing cells, average length of neurites and directivity of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells cultured for 96 hours in the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). PC12 cells were exposed to 50 Hz pulsed electromagnetic fields with a flux density of 1.37 mT, 0.19 mT and 0.016 mT respectively. The field was generated through a Helmholtz coil pair housed in one incubator and the control samples were placed in another identical incubator. It was found that exposure to both a relatively high flux density (1.37 mT) and a medium flux density (0.19 mT) inhibited the percentage of neurite-bearing cells and promoted neurite length significantly. Exposure to high flux density (1.37 mT) also resulted in nearly 20% enhancement of neurite directivity along the field direction. However, exposure to low flux density field (0.016 mT) had no detectable effect on neurite outgrowth. We also studied the effect of frequency at the constant flux density of 1.37 mT. In the range from 1 approximately 100 Hz, only 50 and 70 Hz pulse frequencies had significant effects on neurite outgrowth. Our study has shown that neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells is sensitive to flux density and frequency of pulsed electromagnetic field.

  13. Turbulent mass flux closure modeling for variable density turbulence in the wake of an air-entraining transom stern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickson, Kelli; Yue, Dick

    2016-11-01

    This work presents the development and a priori testing of closure models for the incompressible highly-variable density turbulent (IHVDT) flow in the near wake region of a transom stern. This complex, three-dimensional flow includes three regions with distinctly different flow behavior: (i) the convergent corner waves that originate from the body and collide on the ship center plane; (ii) the "rooster tail" that forms from the collision; and (iii) the diverging wave train. The characteristics of these regions involve violent free-surface flows and breaking waves with significant turbulent mass flux (TMF) at Atwood number At = (ρ2 -ρ1) / (ρ2 +ρ1) 1 for which there is little guidance in turbulence closure modeling for the momentum and scalar transport along the wake. Utilizing datasets from high-resolution simulations of the near wake of a canonical three-dimensional transom stern using conservative Volume-of-Fluid (cVOF), implicit Large Eddy Simulation (iLES), and Boundary Data Immersion Method (BDIM), we develop explicit algebraic turbulent mass flux closure models that incorporate the most relevant physical processes. Performance of these models in predicting the turbulent mass flux in all three regions of the wake will be presented. Office of Naval Research.

  14. BOREAS RSS-17 Xylem Flux Density Measurements at the SSA-OBS Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Reiner; Way, JoBea; McDonald, Kyle; Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    As part of its efforts to determine environmental and phenological states from radar imagery, the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Remote Sensing Science (RSS)-17 team collected in situ tree xylem flow measurements for one growing season on five Picea mariana (black spruce) trees. The data were collected to obtain information on the temporal and spatial variability in water uptake by trees in the Southern Study Area-Old Black Spruce (SSA-OBS) stand in the BOREAS SSA. Temporally, the data were collected in 30-minute intervals for 120 days from 31 May 1994 until 27 September 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The xylem flux data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  15. Emergence flux declines disproportionately to larval density along a stream metals gradient.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Travis S; Kraus, Johanna M; Walters, David M; Wanty, Richard B

    2013-08-06

    Effects of contaminants on adult aquatic insect emergence are less well understood than effects on insect larvae. We compared responses of larval density and adult emergence along a metal contamination gradient. Nonlinear threshold responses were generally observed for larvae and emergers. Larval densities decreased significantly at low metal concentrations but precipitously at concentrations of metal mixtures above aquatic life criteria (cumulative criterion accumulation ratio (CCAR) ≥ 1). In contrast, adult emergence declined precipitously at low metal concentrations (CCAR ≤ 1), followed by a modest decline above this threshold. Adult emergence was a more sensitive indicator of the effect of low metals concentrations on aquatic insect communities compared to larvae, presumably because emergence is limited by a combination of larval survival and other factors limiting successful emergence. Thus effects of exposure to larvae are not manifest until later in life (during metamorphosis and emergence). This loss in emergence reduces prey subsidies to riparian communities at concentrations considered safe for aquatic life. Our results also challenge the widely held assumption that adult emergence is a constant proportion of larval densities in all streams.

  16. Emergence flux declines disproportionately to larval density along a stream metals gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Travis S.; Kraus, Johanna M.; Walters, David M.; Wanty, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of contaminants on adult aquatic insect emergence are less well understood than effects on insect larvae. We compared responses of larval density and adult emergence along a metal contamination gradient. Nonlinear threshold responses were generally observed for larvae and emergers. Larval densities decreased significantly at low metal concentrations but precipitously at concentrations of metal mixtures above aquatic life criteria (Cumulative Criterion Accumulation Ratio (CCAR) ≥ 1). In contrast, adult emergence declined precipitously at low metal concentrations (CCAR ≤ 1), followed by a modest decline above this threshold. Adult emergence was a more sensitive indicator of the effect of low metals concentrations on aquatic insect communities compared to larvae, presumably because emergence is limited by a combination of larval survival and other factors limiting successful emergence. Thus effects of exposure to larvae are not manifest until later in life (during metamorphosis and emergence). This loss in emergence reduces prey subsidies to riparian communities at concentrations considered safe for aquatic life. Our results also challenge the widely held assumption that adult emergence is a constant proportion of larval densities in all streams.

  17. Flux motion, proximity effect, and critical current density in YBa2Cu3O7-δ/silver composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Mohamed, M. A.-K.; Cheng, S. C.; Franck, J. P.

    1990-10-01

    We report on studies of magnetic and transport properties, as well as on characterization of defects in the pure YBa2Cu3O7-δ and the YBa2Cu3O7-δ/Ag(10 and 30 wt. %) composites. The studies of magnetic properties include the diamagnetic shielding, the Meissner effect, the trapped field [for both zero-field-cooling (ZFC) and field-cooling (FC) cases], and their dependence on applied magnetic field, temperature, and time. High- and low-magnetic-field hysteresis loops were measured and the intragrain ``magnetic'' critical current density was calculated. The studies of transport properties include the resistivity and intergrain ``transport'' critical-current-density measurements. Distribution, spacing, and size of intragrain twin boundaries were investigated. The results show the degradation of superconducting properties if silver is added to YBa2Cu3O7-δ during the sintering process, except the enhancement of the intergrain critical current density JCT in YBa2Cu3O7-δ/Ag(10 wt. %) composite. The activation energy for intergranular flux creep of 1.6 and ~0.3 eV was found for the pure YBa2Cu3O7-δ and the YBa2Cu3O7-δ/Ag composites, respectively. The results did not show any relationship between JCT, the activation energy, and the number of pinning centers (the trapped field) in these samples. It is suggested that the proximity junctions superconductor-normal-metal-superconductor built up by intergranular silver, and not flux pinning, are responsible for the increase of JCT. Defect characterization by transmission electron microscopy revealed that silver does not affect the structure of twin boundaries inside the grains of YBa2Cu3O7-δ.

  18. High density flux of Co nanoparticles produced by a simple gas aggregation apparatus.

    PubMed

    Landi, G T; Romero, S A; Santos, A D

    2010-03-01

    Gas aggregation is a well known method used to produce clusters of different materials with good size control, reduced dispersion, and precise stoichiometry. The cost of these systems is relatively high and they are generally dedicated apparatuses. Furthermore, the usual sample production speed of these systems is not as fast as physical vapor deposition devices posing a problem when thick samples are needed. In this paper we describe the development of a multipurpose gas aggregation system constructed as an adaptation to a magnetron sputtering system. The cost of this adaptation is negligible and its installation and operation are both remarkably simple. The gas flow for flux in the range of 60-130 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) is able to completely collimate all the sputtered material, producing spherical nanoparticles. Co nanoparticles were produced and characterized using electron microscopy techniques and Rutherford back-scattering analysis. The size of the particles is around 10 nm with around 75 nm/min of deposition rate at the center of a Gaussian profile nanoparticle beam.

  19. High density flux of Co nanoparticles produced by a simple gas aggregation apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, G. T.; Romero, S. A.; Santos, A. D.

    2010-03-15

    Gas aggregation is a well known method used to produce clusters of different materials with good size control, reduced dispersion, and precise stoichiometry. The cost of these systems is relatively high and they are generally dedicated apparatuses. Furthermore, the usual sample production speed of these systems is not as fast as physical vapor deposition devices posing a problem when thick samples are needed. In this paper we describe the development of a multipurpose gas aggregation system constructed as an adaptation to a magnetron sputtering system. The cost of this adaptation is negligible and its installation and operation are both remarkably simple. The gas flow for flux in the range of 60-130 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) is able to completely collimate all the sputtered material, producing spherical nanoparticles. Co nanoparticles were produced and characterized using electron microscopy techniques and Rutherford back-scattering analysis. The size of the particles is around 10 nm with around 75 nm/min of deposition rate at the center of a Gaussian profile nanoparticle beam.

  20. Convective heat flow in space cryogenics plugs - Critical and moderate He II heat flux densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1990-01-01

    Plug flow rates of entropy, heat and normal fluid in phase separators and in zero net mass flow systems are, to some extent, quite similar. A simplified analysis of critical conditions is presented in agreement with data trends. A critical temperature gradient arises on the basis of the He II two-fluid model at the stability limit constraining the thermohydrodynamics of the system. Thus, the question of critical thermodynamic fluctuations associated with nucleation versus the possibility of critical gradients in externally imposed parameters is answered in favor of the latter route toward turbulence. Furthermore, a similarity equation is presented which incorporates size dependent rates for moderate heat flow densities observed in experiments.

  1. Topside equatorial ionospheric density, temperature, and composition under equinox, low solar flux conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysell, D. L.; Milla, M. A.; Rodrigues, F. S.; Varney, R. H.; Huba, J. D.

    2015-05-01

    We present observations of the topside ionosphere made at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory in March and September 2013, made using a full-profile analysis approach. Recent updates to the methodology employed at Jicamarca are also described. Measurements of plasma number density, electron and ion temperatures, and hydrogen and helium ion fractions up to 1500 km altitude are presented for 3 days in March and September. The main features of the observations include a sawtooth-like diurnal variation in ht, the transition height where the O+ ion fraction falls to 50%, the appearance of weak He+ layers just below ht, and a dramatic increase in plasma temperature at dawn followed by a sharp temperature depression around local noon. These features are consistent from day to day and between March and September. Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation data from the Communication Navigation Outage Forecast System satellite are used to help validate the March Jicamarca data. The SAMI2-PE model was able to recover many of the features of the topside observations, including the morphology of the plasma density profiles and the light-ion composition. The model, forced using convection speeds and meridional thermospheric winds based on climatological averages, did not reproduce the extreme temperature changes in the topside between sunrise and noon. Some possible causes of the discrepancies are discussed.

  2. Secure Mass Measurements from Transit Timing: 10 Kepler Exoplanets between 3 and 8 M⊕ with Diverse Densities and Incident Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Van Laerhoven, Christa; Agol, Eric; Deck, Katherine M.; Holczer, Tomer; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2016-03-01

    We infer dynamical masses in eight multiplanet systems using transit times measured from Kepler's complete data set, including short-cadence data where available. Of the 18 dynamical masses that we infer, 10 pass multiple tests for robustness. These are in systems Kepler-26 (KOI-250), Kepler-29 (KOI-738), Kepler-60 (KOI-2086), Kepler-105 (KOI-115), and Kepler-307 (KOI-1576). Kepler-105 c has a radius of 1.3 R⊕ and a density consistent with an Earth-like composition. Strong transit timing variation (TTV) signals were detected from additional planets, but their inferred masses were sensitive to outliers or consistent solutions could not be found with independently measured transit times, including planets orbiting Kepler-49 (KOI-248), Kepler-57 (KOI-1270), Kepler-105 (KOI-115), and Kepler-177 (KOI-523). Nonetheless, strong upper limits on the mass of Kepler-177 c imply an extremely low density of ˜0.1 g cm-3. In most cases, individual orbital eccentricities were poorly constrained owing to degeneracies in TTV inversion. For five planet pairs in our sample, strong secular interactions imply a moderate to high likelihood of apsidal alignment over a wide range of possible eccentricities. We also find solutions for the three planets known to orbit Kepler-60 in a Laplace-like resonance chain. However, nonlibrating solutions also match the transit timing data. For six systems, we calculate more precise stellar parameters than previously known, enabling useful constraints on planetary densities where we have secure mass measurements. Placing these exoplanets on the mass-radius diagram, we find that a wide range of densities is observed among sub-Neptune-mass planets and that the range in observed densities is anticorrelated with incident flux.

  3. Phototactic number-density flux in the localized bioconvection of Euglena gracilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Erika; Suematsu, Nobuhiko; Nishimori, Hiraku; Awazu, Akinori; Izumi, Shunsuke; Iima, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    Euglena gracilis is a unicellular phototactic flagellate; it escapes from light sources if the light intensity is higher than 200 W/m2 (negative phototaxis). When the suspension of E. gracilis is illuminated from the bottom by strong light, bioconvection patterns are generated. In the case of E. gracilis, the patterns can be spatially localized. The localization mechanism has not been clarified. We report experimental results related to the localization mechanism. In particular, we experimentally measured the strength of the phototaxis in the lateral direction as well as vertical direction. We prepared a thin container in which the suspension is included, and gave the linearly-changing light intensity. We found the number density gets a peak at a particular light intensity, which never happens if the suspension has the vertical phototaxis only. Further, we succeeded in getting the function representing lateral phototaxis. The relationship between the measured functions and the localized convection cells will be also reported.

  4. Scanning micro-Hall probe mapping of magnetic flux distributions and current densities in YBa2Cu3O7 thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xing, W.; Heinrich, B.; Zhou, HU; Fife, A. A.; Cragg, A. R.; Grant, P. D.

    1995-01-01

    Mapping of the magnetic flux density B(sub z) (perpendicular to the film plane) for a YBa2Cu3O7 thin-film sample was carried out using a scanning micro-Hall probe. The sheet magnetization and sheet current densities were calculated from the B(sub z) distributions. From the known sheet magnetization, the tangential (B(sub x,y)) and normal components of the flux density B were calculated in the vicinity of the film. It was found that the sheet current density was mostly determined by 2B(sub x,y)/d, where d is the film thickness. The evolution of flux penetration as a function of applied field will be shown.

  5. Scanning micro-Hall probe mapping of magnetic flux distributions and current densities in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, W.; Heinrich, B.; Zhou, H.

    1994-12-31

    Mapping of the magnetic flux density B{sub z} (perpendicular to the film plane) for a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin-film sample was carried out using a scanning micro-Hall probe. The sheet magnetization and sheet current densities were calculated from the B{sub z} distributions. From the known sheet magnetization, the tangential (B{sub x,y}) and normal components of the flux density B were calculated in the vicinity of the film. It was found that the sheet current density was mostly determined by 2B{sub x,y}/d, where d is the film thickness. The evolution of flux penetration as a function of applied field will be shown.

  6. Wavelet and Fractal Analysis of Remotely Sensed Surface Temperature with Applications to Estimation of Surface Sensible Heat Flux Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schieldge, John

    2000-01-01

    Wavelet and fractal analyses have been used successfully to analyze one-dimensional data sets such as time series of financial, physical, and biological parameters. These techniques have been applied to two-dimensional problems in some instances, including the analysis of remote sensing imagery. In this respect, these techniques have not been widely used by the remote sensing community, and their overall capabilities as analytical tools for use on satellite and aircraft data sets is not well known. Wavelet and fractal analyses have the potential to provide fresh insight into the characterization of surface properties such as temperature and emissivity distributions, and surface processes such as the heat and water vapor exchange between the surface and the lower atmosphere. In particular, the variation of sensible heat flux density as a function of the change In scale of surface properties Is difficult to estimate, but - in general - wavelets and fractals have proved useful in determining the way a parameter varies with changes in scale. We present the results of a limited study on the relationship between spatial variations in surface temperature distribution and sensible heat flux distribution as determined by separate wavelet and fractal analyses. We analyzed aircraft imagery obtained in the thermal infrared (IR) bands from the multispectral TIMS and hyperspectral MASTER airborne sensors. The thermal IR data allows us to estimate the surface kinetic temperature distribution for a number of sites in the Midwestern and Southwestern United States (viz., San Pedro River Basin, Arizona; El Reno, Oklahoma; Jornada, New Mexico). The ground spatial resolution of the aircraft data varied from 5 to 15 meters. All sites were instrumented with meteorological and hydrological equipment including surface layer flux measuring stations such as Bowen Ratio systems and sonic anemometers. The ground and aircraft data sets provided the inputs for the wavelet and fractal analyses

  7. Rapid tuning CW laser technique for measurements of gas velocity, temperature, pressure, density, and mass flux using NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Albert Y.; Dirosa, Michael D.; Davidson, David F.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    1991-01-01

    An intracavity-doubled rapid-tuning CW ring dye laser was used to acquire fully resolved absorption profiles of NO line pairs in the A-X band at 225 nm at a rate of 4 kHz. These profiles were utilized for simultaneous measurements of flow parameters in the high-speed 1D flows generated in a shock tube. Velocity was determined from the Doppler shift, measured using a pair of profiles simultaneously acquired at different angles with respect to the flow direction. Temperature was determined from the intensity ratio of the adjacent lines. Pressure and density were found both from the collisional broadening and the fractional absorption. From this information the mass flux was determined. The results compare well to 1D shock calculations.

  8. Theoretical position-velocity diagrams of flux, electron density, and electron temperature in Herbig-Haro objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Indebetouw, Remy; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto

    1995-01-01

    Many features of Herbig-Haro objects can be reproduced using a kinematical bow shock model. We use the model to generate position-velocity (PV) diagrams of flux in H-alpha (O I) lambda lambda 6300+63, (S II) lambda lambda 6716+31, (O III) lambda lambda 4959+5007, and (C I) lambda lambda 9823+50, line ratios of (O I)/H-alpha, (O I)/(S II), (S II)/H-alpha, H-alpha(S II), and (O III)/H-alpha, electron density N(sub e), and electron temperature T(sub e). We show how position-velocity diagrams of N(sub e) and flux vary with shock velocity. By matching the diagrams from single lines, the line ratios, and N(sub e) with observations, we determined a narrow range of shock parameters for HH 1F, 2(A' + H), and 43 (B + C). We model the N(sub e) features of HH 2(A' + H) as a superposition of two bowshocks. We also show that the effects of slight misalignments of the two diagrams to be divided can produce artifacts in the line ratios and N(sub e) which obliterate the physical features. We show that N(sub e) in HH 1 can only be explained using the kinematical model by taking these misalignments into account.

  9. Analysis and Simulation on the Effect of Rotor Interturn Short Circuit on Magnetic Flux Density of Turbo-Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu-Ling; Ke, Meng-Qiang; Tang, Gui-Ji; Jiang, Hong-Chun; Yuan, Xing-Hua

    2016-09-01

    The intent of this paper is to investigate the effect of the interturn short circuit fault (ISCF) in rotor on the magnetic flux density (MFD) of turbo-generator. Different from other studies, this work not only pays attention to the influence of the faulty degrees on the general magnetic field, but also investigates the effect of the short circuit positions on the harmonic components of MFD. The theoretical analysis and the digital simulation through the FEM software Ansoft are performed for a QSFN-600-2YHG turbo-generator. Several significant formulas and conclusions drawn from the analysis and the simulation results are obtained to indicate the relation between the harmonic amplitude of the MFD and the faulty degree (via nm, the number of the short circuit turns), and the relation between the MFD harmonic amplitude and the faulty position (via αr, the angle of the two slots in which the interturn short circuit occurs). Also, the developing tendency of the general magnetic field intensity, the distribution of the magnetic flux lines, and the peak-to-peak value of MFD are presented.

  10. Comparison of Uniform and Non-uniform Water Flux Density Approaches Applied on a Mathematical Model of Heat Transfer and Solidification for a Continuous Casting of Round Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assuncao, Charles Sostenes; Tavares, Roberto Parreiras; Oliveira, Guilherme; Pereira, Luiz Carlos

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, the water flux densities of nozzles with flat jet and full cone jet were experimentally measured using an apparatus in industrial scale that reproduces the secondary cooling of the continuous casting of round billets of Vallourec Tubos do Brasil. A mathematical function was defined to express the water flux density in both longitudinal and angular directions of the strand. A mathematical model for heat transfer and solidification for the continuous casting of round billets was developed applying the experimental water flux density profile, establishing a non-uniform water distribution approach. The mathematical model was validated by experimental measurements of the billet superficial temperature, performed at the industrial plant. The results of the mathematical model using both uniform and non-uniform water flux density approaches were compared. The non-uniform water distribution approach enabled to identify important variations of the heat transfer coefficients and the billet temperatures, especially in the first cooling zones where the steel temperature is higher, and to assess more accurately the local effects of the water distribution on the thermal behavior of the strand. The non-uniform water flux density approach applied to the mathematical model was a useful and more accurate tool to improve the comprehension of the thermal behavior of the steel along the secondary cooling.

  11. An ensemble average method to estimate absolute TEC using radio beacon-based differential phase measurements: Applicability to regions of large latitudinal gradients in plasma density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, Smitha V.; Bagiya, Mala S.; Chakrabarty, D.; Acharya, Y. B.; Yamamoto, M.

    2014-12-01

    A GNU Radio Beacon Receiver (GRBR) system for total electron content (TEC) measurements using 150 and 400 MHz transmissions from Low-Earth Orbiting Satellites (LEOS) is fabricated in house and made operational at Ahmedabad (23.04°N, 72.54°E geographic, dip latitude 17°N) since May 2013. This system receives the 150 and 400 MHz transmissions from high-inclination LEOS. The first few days of observations are presented in this work to bring out the efficacy of an ensemble average method to convert the relative TECs to absolute TECs. This method is a modified version of the differential Doppler-based method proposed by de Mendonca (1962) and suitable even for ionospheric regions with large spatial gradients. Comparison of TECs derived from a collocated GPS receiver shows that the absolute TECs estimated by this method are reliable estimates over regions with large spatial gradient. This method is useful even when only one receiving station is available. The differences between these observations are discussed to bring out the importance of the spatial differences between the ionospheric pierce points of these satellites. A few examples of the latitudinal variation of TEC during different local times using GRBR measurements are also presented, which demonstrates the potential of radio beacon measurements in capturing the large-scale plasma transport processes in the low-latitude ionosphere.

  12. Compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam probe system for measurement of two-dimensional electron density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Y. Manabe, T.; Ohno, N.; Takagi, M.; Kajita, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Morisaki, T.

    2014-09-15

    A compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam source for two-dimensional measurement of electron density profiles has been developed. The thermal-lithium-beam oven is heated by a carbon heater. In this system, the maximum particle flux of the thermal lithium beam was ∼4 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −2} s{sup −1} when the temperature of the thermal-lithium-beam oven was 900 K. The electron density profile was evaluated in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. The electron density profile was reconstructed using the thermal-lithium-beam probe data and this profile was consistent with the electron density profile measured with a Langmuir electrostatic probe. We confirm that the developed thermal-lithium-beam probe can be used to measure the two-dimensional electron density profile with high time and spatial resolutions.

  13. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  14. Absolute OH and O radical densities in effluent of a He/H2O micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikt, J.; Schröder, D.; Schneider, S.; Willems, G.; Pajdarová, A.; Vlček, J.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.

    2016-08-01

    The effluent of a micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μ-APPJ) operated in helium with admixtures of water vapor (≲ {{10}4} ppm) has been analyzed by means of cavity ring-down laser absorption spectroscopy and molecular beam mass spectrometry to measure hydroxyl (OH) radical densities, and by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy to measure atomic oxygen (O) densities. Additionally, the performance of the bubbler as a source of water vapor in the helium feed gas has been carefully characterized and calibrated. The largest OH and O densities in the effluent of 2× {{10}14}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} and 3.2× {{10}13}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , respectively, have been measured at around 6000 ppm. The highest selectivity is reached around 1500 ppm, where the OH density is at  ∼63% of its maximum value and is 14 times larger than the O density. The measured density profiles and distance variations are compared to the results of a 2D axially symmetric fluid model of species transport and reaction kinetics in the plasma effluent. It is shown that the main loss of OH radicals in the effluent is their mutual reaction. In the case of O, reactions with other species than OH also have to be considered to explain the density decay in the effluent. The results presented here provide additional information for understanding the plasma-chemical processes in non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas. They also open the way to applying μ-APPJ with He/H2O as a selective source of OH radicals.

  15. Origin of dc voltage in type II superconducting flux pumps: field, field rate of change, and current density dependence of resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, J.; Matsuda, K.; Fu, L.; Fagnard, J.-F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Shen, B.; Dong, Q.; Baghdadi, M.; Coombs, T. A.

    2016-03-01

    Superconducting flux pumps are the kind of devices which can generate direct current into superconducting circuit using external magnetic field. The key point is how to induce a dc voltage across the superconducting load by ac fields. Giaever (1966 IEEE Spectr. 3 117) pointed out flux motion in superconductors will induce a dc voltage, and demonstrated a rectifier model which depended on breaking superconductivity. van de Klundert et al (1981 Cryogenics 21 195, 267) in their review(s) described various configurations for flux pumps all of which relied on inducing the normal state in at least part of the superconductor. In this letter, following their work, we reveal that a variation in the resistivity of type II superconductors is sufficient to induce a dc voltage in flux pumps and it is not necessary to break superconductivity. This variation in resistivity is due to the fact that flux flow is influenced by current density, field intensity, and field rate of change. We propose a general circuit analogy for travelling wave flux pumps, and provide a mathematical analysis to explain the dc voltage. Several existing superconducting flux pumps which rely on the use of a travelling magnetic wave can be explained using the analysis enclosed. This work can also throw light on the design and optimization of flux pumps.

  16. High critical current density and improved flux pinning in bulk MgB2 synthesized by Ag addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Chandra; Giri, Rajiv; Tiwari, R. S.; Srivastava, O. N.; Malik, S. K.

    2007-02-01

    In the present investigation, we report a systematic study of Ag admixing in MgB2 prepared by solid-state reaction at ambient pressure. All the samples in the present investigation have been subjected to structural/ microstructural characterization employing x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. The magnetization measurements were performed by physical property measurement system. The TEM investigations reveal the formation of MgAg nanoparticles in Ag admixed samples. These nanoparticles may enhance critical current density due to their size (˜5-20nm ) which is compatible with the coherence length of MgB2 (˜5-6nm ). In order to study the flux pinning effect of Ag admixing in MgB2, the evaluation of intragrain critical current density (Jc) has been carried out through magnetic measurements on the fine powdered version of the as synthesized samples. The optimum result on intragrain Jc is obtained for 10at.% Ag admixed sample at 5K. This corresponds to ˜9.23×107A /cm2 in self-field, ˜5.82×107A/cm2 at 1T, ˜4.24×106A/cm2 at 3.6T, and ˜1.52×105A/cm2 at 5T. However, intragrain Jc values for MgB2 sample without Ag admixing are ˜2.59×106, ˜1.09×106, ˜4.53×104, and 2.91×103A /cm2 at 5K in self-field, 1T, 3.6T, and 5T, respectively. The high value of intragrain Jc for Ag admixed MgB2 superconductor has been attributed to the inclusion of MgAg nanoparticles into the crystal matrix of MgB2, which are capable of providing effective flux pinning centers. A feasible correlation between microstructural features and superconducting properties has been put forward.

  17. Inverse relationship between photon flux densities and nanotesla magnetic fields over cell aggregates: Quantitative evidence for energetic conservation

    PubMed Central

    Persinger, Michael A.; Dotta, Blake T.; Karbowski, Lukasz M.; Murugan, Nirosha J.

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative relationship between local changes in magnetic fields and photon emissions within ∼2 mm of aggregates of 105–106 cells was explored experimentally. The vertical component of the earth’s magnetic field as measured by different magnetometers was ∼15 nT higher when plates of cells removed from incubation were measured compared to plates containing only medium. Additional experiments indicated an inverse relationship over the first ∼45 min between changes in photon counts (∼10−12 W·m−2) following removal from incubation and similar changes in magnetic field intensity. Calculations indicated that the energy within the aqueous volume containing the cells was equivalent for that associated with the flux densities of the magnetic fields and the photon emissions. For every approximately 1 nT increase in magnetic field intensity value there was a decrease of ∼2 photons (equivalent of 10−18 J). These results complement correlation studies and suggest there may be a conservation of energy between expression as magnetic fields that are subtracted or added to the adjacent geomagnetic field and reciprocal changes in photon emissions when aggregates of cells within a specific volume of medium (water) adapt to new environments. PMID:26005634

  18. Superfluid Density and Flux-Flow Resistivity Measurements of Multiple-Band Superconductor β-PdBi2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Tatsunori; Imai, Yoshinori; Maeda, Atsutaka

    β -PdBi2 (Tcmax = 5 . 4 K) is a newcomer of the multiple-band superconductors, revealed by the specific heat and the upper critical field measurements, and the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. In addition, authors of ref. observed the spin-polarized band dispersion and proposed that β-PdBi2 is a candidate of topological superconductor. However, there is less information on superconducting properties so far. In order to clarify the superconducting gap function, we measured the temperature (T) and magnetic field (B) dependence of microwave complex conductivity of β-PdBi2 single crystals. We found that the superfluid density exhibits the thermally activated T dependence, manifesting the absence of nodes in the superconducting gaps. We also found that the flux-flow resistivity increased with B with downward-convex shape. Based on some theories, we considered that such a behavior originated from the backflow of supercurrents around vortices reflecting rather small Ginzburg-Landau parameter (κ ~= 5). This work was supported by the JSPS KAKENHI (Grant Numbers 15K17697 and 26-9315), and the JSPS Research Fellowship for Young Scientists.

  19. The epoxy resin variation effect on microstructure and physical properties to improve bonded NdFeB flux magnetic density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusnaeni, N.; Sarjono, Priyo; Muljadi; Noer, Nasrudin

    2016-11-01

    NdFeB magnets have been fabricated from a mixture of powder NdFeB (MPQ-B+) and epoxy resins (ER) with a variation of 0% wt, 2% wt, 4% wt and 6% wt. The pellets samples were made by pressing 4 tons of the mixture powder at room temperature before curing at 100°C for 1 hour. The SEM-EDX results showed the microstructure with ER were evenly smeared the NdFeB magnetic particles due to higher percent C and lower transition metals value. Sample with 2% wt epoxy resin was able to achieve the highest density of 5.35 g/cm3 and the highest magnetic flux of 2121 Gauss. The magnetic properties characterization using the permagraph indicates that the sample pellets with 2% wt epoxy resin has a value of remanence (Br) = 4.92 kG, coercivity (Hc) = 7.76 kOe, and energy product (Bhmax) = 4.58 MGOe. Despite low remanence value in the pellet samples, the resistance to demagnetization value was still acceptable.

  20. Absolute nitrogen atom density measurements by two-photon laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges of pure nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Es-Sebbar, Et-Touhami; Sarra-Bournet, Christian; Naude, Nicolas; Gherardi, Nicolas; Massines, Francoise

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy is used to follow the nitrogen atom density in flowing dielectric barrier discharges fed with pure nitrogen and operating at atmospheric pressure. Two different dielectric barrier discharge regimes are investigated: the Townsend regime, which is homogeneous although operating at atmospheric pressure, and the more common filamentary regime. In both regimes, densities as high as 3x10{sup 14}/cm{sup 3} are detected. However, the N atoms kinetic formation depends on the discharge regime. The saturation level is reached more rapidly with a filamentary discharge. For a given discharge regime, the N atom density depends strongly on the energy dissipated in the plasma between the gas inlet and the measurement position, whether the energy is varied by varying the position of the measurements, the gas flow, or the dissipated power. Experiments performed in the postdischarge show that the N atom decay cannot be simply attributed to three-body recombination of atomic nitrogen with nitrogen molecules, meaning that other mechanisms such as surface recombination or gas impurities play a role.

  1. Absolute CF{sub 2} density and gas temperature measurements by absorption spectroscopy in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF{sub 4}/Ar plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wen-Yao; Xu, Yong Peng, Fei; Gong, Fa-Ping; Li, Xiao-Song; Zhu, Ai-Min; Liu, Yong-Xin; Wang, You-Nian

    2014-10-15

    Broadband ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the CF{sub 2} radical density in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF{sub 4}/Ar plasmas, using the CF{sub 2} A{sup ~1}B{sub 1}←X{sup ~1}A{sub 1} system of absorption spectrum. The rotational temperature of ground state CF{sub 2} and excited state CF was also estimated by using A{sup ~1}B{sub 1}←X{sup ~1}A{sub 1} system and B{sup 2}Δ−X{sup 2}Π system, respectively. The translational gas temperature was deduced from the Doppler width of the Ar{sup *}({sup 3}P{sub 2}) and Ar{sup *}({sup 3}P{sub 0}) metastable atoms absorption line by using the tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The rotational temperatures of the excited state CF are about 100 K higher than those of ground state CF{sub 2}, and about 200 K higher than the translational gas temperatures. The dependences of the radical CF{sub 2} density, electron density, electron temperature, rotational temperature, and gas temperature on the high frequency power and pressure have been analyzed. Furthermore, the production and loss mechanisms of CF{sub 2} radical and the gas heating mechanisms have also been discussed.

  2. Absolute CF2 density and gas temperature measurements by absorption spectroscopy in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF4/Ar plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Yao; Xu, Yong; Liu, Yong-Xin; Peng, Fei; Gong, Fa-Ping; Li, Xiao-Song; Zhu, Ai-Min; Wang, You-Nian

    2014-10-01

    Broadband ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the CF2 radical density in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF4/Ar plasmas, using the CF2 A ˜ 1 B 1 ← X ˜ 1 A 1 system of absorption spectrum. The rotational temperature of ground state CF2 and excited state CF was also estimated by using A ˜ 1 B 1 ← X ˜ 1 A 1 system and B 2 Δ - X 2 Π system, respectively. The translational gas temperature was deduced from the Doppler width of the Ar*(3P2) and Ar*(3P0) metastable atoms absorption line by using the tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The rotational temperatures of the excited state CF are about 100 K higher than those of ground state CF2, and about 200 K higher than the translational gas temperatures. The dependences of the radical CF2 density, electron density, electron temperature, rotational temperature, and gas temperature on the high frequency power and pressure have been analyzed. Furthermore, the production and loss mechanisms of CF2 radical and the gas heating mechanisms have also been discussed.

  3. Plant lighting system with five wavelength-band light-emitting diodes providing photon flux density and mixing ratio control

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plant growth and development depend on the availability of light. Lighting systems therefore play crucial roles in plant studies. Recent advancements of light-emitting diode (LED) technologies provide abundant opportunities to study various plant light responses. The LED merits include solidity, longevity, small element volume, radiant flux controllability, and monochromaticity. To apply these merits in plant light response studies, a lighting system must provide precisely controlled light spectra that are useful for inducing various plant responses. Results We have developed a plant lighting system that irradiated a 0.18 m2 area with a highly uniform distribution of photon flux density (PFD). The average photosynthetic PFD (PPFD) in the irradiated area was 438 micro-mol m–2 s–1 (coefficient of variation 9.6%), which is appropriate for growing leafy vegetables. The irradiated light includes violet, blue, orange-red, red, and far-red wavelength bands created by LEDs of five types. The PFD and mixing ratio of the five wavelength-band lights are controllable using a computer and drive circuits. The phototropic response of oat coleoptiles was investigated to evaluate plant sensitivity to the light control quality of the lighting system. Oat coleoptiles irradiated for 23 h with a uniformly distributed spectral PFD (SPFD) of 1 micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 at every peak wavelength (405, 460, 630, 660, and 735 nm) grew almost straight upwards. When they were irradiated with an SPFD gradient of blue light (460 nm peak wavelength), the coleoptiles showed a phototropic curvature in the direction of the greater SPFD of blue light. The greater SPFD gradient induced the greater curvature of coleoptiles. The relation between the phototropic curvature (deg) and the blue-light SPFD gradient (micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 m–1) was 2 deg per 1 micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 m–1. Conclusions The plant lighting system, with a computer with a graphical user interface

  4. Photosynthetic response of Cannabis sativa L. to variations in photosynthetic photon flux densities, temperature and CO2 conditions.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Suman; Lata, Hemant; Khan, Ikhlas A; Elsohly, Mahmoud A

    2008-10-01

    Effect of different photosynthetic photon flux densities (0, 500, 1000, 1500 and 2000 μmol m(-2)s(-1)), temperatures (20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 °C) and CO2 concentrations (250, 350, 450, 550, 650 and 750 μmol mol(-1)) on gas and water vapour exchange characteristics of Cannabis sativa L. were studied to determine the suitable and efficient environmental conditions for its indoor mass cultivation for pharmaceutical uses. The rate of photosynthesis (PN) and water use efficiency (WUE) of Cannabis sativa increased with photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFD) at the lower temperatures (20-25 °C). At 30 °C, PN and WUE increased only up to 1500 μmol m(-2)s(-1) PPFD and decreased at higher light levels. The maximum rate of photosynthesis (PN max) was observed at 30 °C and under 1500 μmol m(-2)s(-1) PPFD. The rate of transpiration (E) responded positively to increased PPFD and temperature up to the highest levels tested (2000 μmol m(-2)s(-1) and 40 °C). Similar to E, leaf stomatal conductance (gs) also increased with PPFD irrespective of temperature. However, gs increased with temperature up to 30 °C only. Temperature above 30 °C had an adverse effect on gs in this species. Overall, high temperature and high PPFD showed an adverse effect on PN and WUE. A continuous decrease in intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) and therefore, in the ratio of intercellular CO2 to ambient CO2 concentration (Ci/Ca) was observed with the increase in temperature and PPFD. However, the decrease was less pronounced at light intensities above 1500 μmol m(-2)s(-1). In view of these results, temperature and light optima for photosynthesis was concluded to be at 25-30 °C and ∼1500 μmol m(-2)s(-1) respectively. Furthermore, plants were also exposed to different concentrations of CO2 (250, 350, 450, 550, 650 and 750 μmol mol(-1)) under optimum PPFD and temperature conditions to assess their photosynthetic response. Rate of photosynthesis, WUE and Ci decreased by 50 %, 53 % and 10

  5. Korean VLBI Network Calibrator Survey (KVNCS). 1. Source Catalog of KVN Single-dish Flux Density Measurement in the K and Q Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Ae; Sohn, Bong Won; Jung, Taehyun; Byun, Do-Young; Lee, Jee Won

    2017-02-01

    We present the catalog of the KVN Calibrator Survey (KVNCS). This first part of the KVNCS is a single-dish radio survey simultaneously conducted at 22 (K band) and 43 GHz (Q band) using the Korean VLBI Network (KVN) from 2009 to 2011. A total of 2045 sources are selected from the VLBA Calibrator Survey with an extrapolated flux density limit of 100 mJy at the K band. The KVNCS contains 1533 sources in the K band with a flux density limit of 70 mJy and 553 sources in the Q band with a flux density limit of 120 mJy; it covers the whole sky down to ‑32.°5 in decl. We detected 513 sources simultaneously in the K and Q bands; ∼76% of them are flat-spectrum sources (‑0.5 ≤ α ≤ 0.5). From the flux–flux relationship, we anticipated that most of the radiation of many of the sources comes from the compact components. The sources listed in the KVNCS therefore are strong candidates for high-frequency VLBI calibrators.

  6. Absolutely classical spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

  7. Two new methods used to simulate the circumferential solar flux density concentrated on the absorber of a parabolic trough solar collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Minghuan; Wang, Zhifeng; Sun, Feihu

    2016-05-01

    The optical efficiencies of a solar trough concentrator are important to the whole thermal performance of the solar collector, and the outer surface of the tube absorber is a key interface of energy flux. So it is necessary to simulate and analyze the concentrated solar flux density distributions on the tube absorber of a parabolic trough solar collector for various sun beam incident angles, with main optical errors considered. Since the solar trough concentrators are linear focusing, it is much of interest to investigate the solar flux density distribution on the cross-section profile of the tube absorber, rather than the flux density distribution along the focal line direction. Although a few integral approaches based on the "solar cone" concept were developed to compute the concentrated flux density for some simple trough concentrator geometries, all those integral approaches needed special integration routines, meanwhile, the optical parameters and geometrical properties of collectors also couldn't be changed conveniently. Flexible Monte Carlo ray trace (MCRT) methods are widely used to simulate the more accurate concentrated flux density distribution for compound parabolic solar trough concentrators, while generally they are quite time consuming. In this paper, we first mainly introduce a new backward ray tracing (BRT) method combined with the lumped effective solar cone, to simulate the cross-section flux density on the region of interest of the tube absorber. For BRT, bundles of rays are launched at absorber-surface points of interest, directly go through the glass cover of the absorber, strike on the uniformly sampled mirror segment centers in the close-related surface region of the parabolic reflector, and then direct to the effective solar cone around the incident sun beam direction after the virtual backward reflection. All the optical errors are convoluted into the effective solar cone. The brightness distribution of the effective solar cone is supposed

  8. Temperature and density characteristics of the Helicity Injected Torus-II spherical tokamak indicating closed flux sustainment using coaxial helicity injection

    SciTech Connect

    Hamp, W. T.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Raman, R.; Redd, A. J.; Stewart, B. T.; Mueller, D.

    2008-08-15

    The electron temperature and density profiles of plasmas in the Helicity Injected Torus [HIT-II: T. R. Jarboe et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1807 (1998)] experiment are measured by multipoint Thomson scattering (MPTS). The HIT-II device is a small low-aspect-ratio tokamak (major radius 0.3 m, minor radius 0.2 m, toroidal field of up to 0.5 T), capable of inductive ohmic (OH) current drive, Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) current drive, or combinations of both. The temperature and density characteristics have been characterized by a ruby laser MPTS diagnostic at up to six locations within the plasma for a single diagnostic time per discharge. Observed hollow temperature profiles of CHI discharges are inconsistent with open flux only predictions for CHI and indicate a closed flux region during CHI current drive.

  9. Studies of velocity fluctuations in the lower atmosphere using the MU radar. I - Azimuthal anisotropy. II - Momentum fluxes and energy densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.; Smith, S. A.; Tsuda, T.; Sato, T.; Fritts, D. C.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from a six-day campaign to observe velocity fluctuations in the lower atmosphere using the MU radar (Fukao et al., 1985) in Shigaraki, Japan in March, 1986. Consideration is given to the azimuthal anisotropy, the frequency spectra, the vertical profiles of energy density, and the momentum flux of the motion field. It is found that all of the observed azimuthal variations are probably caused by a gravity wave field whose parameters vary with time. The results show significant differences between the mean zonal and meridional frequency spectra and different profiles of mean energy density with height for different frequency bands and for zonal and meridional components.

  10. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  11. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  12. Simulation study of a geometric shape factor technique for estimating earth-emitted radiant flux densities from wide-field-of-view radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, W. L.; Green, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    Geometric shape factors were computed and applied to satellite simulated irradiance measurements to estimate Earth emitted flux densities for global and zonal scales and for areas smaller than the detector field of view (FOV). Wide field of view flat plate detectors were emphasized, but spherical detectors were also studied. The radiation field was modeled after data from the Nimbus 2 and 3 satellites. At a satellite altitude of 600 km, zonal estimates were in error 1.0 to 1.2 percent and global estimates were in error less than 0.2 percent. Estimates with unrestricted field of view (UFOV) detectors were about the same for Lambertian and limb darkening radiation models. The opposite was found for restricted field of view detectors. The UFOV detectors are found to be poor estimators of flux density from the total FOV and are shown to be much better as estimators of flux density from a circle centered at the FOV with an area significantly smaller than that for the total FOV.

  13. Effects of Quantum Flux Density on Photosynthesis and Chloroplast Ultrastructure in Tissue-Cultured Plantlets and Seedlings of Liquidambar styraciflua L. towards Improved Acclimatization and Field Survival 1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ni; Wetzstein, Hazel Y.; Sommer, Harry E.

    1985-01-01

    Liquidambar styraciflua L. seedlings and tissue-cultured plantlets were grown under high, medium, or low (315, 155, or 50 microeinsteins per square meter per second photosynthetically active radiation) quantum flux densities. Net photosynthesis, chlorophyll content, and chloroplast ultrastructure of leaves differentiated from these conditions were investigated. Seedling photosynthetic rates at light saturation were positively related to light pretreatments, being 6.44, 4.73, and 2.75 milligrams CO2 per square decimeter per hour for high, medium, and low light, respectively. Cultured plantlets under all light conditions had appreciably higher photosynthetic rates than noncultured seedlings; corresponding rates were 12.14, 13.55, and 11.36 milligrams CO2 per square decimeter per hour. Chlorophyll in seedlings and plantlets was significantly higher in low light-treated plants. Seedling leaves had chloroplasts with abundant starch regardless of light pretreatment. In high light, starch granules were predominant and associated with disrupted granal structure. Low light seedling chloroplasts had smaller starch grains and well-formed grana. In contrast, tissue culture-differentiated leaves were devoid of starch; grana were well organized in higher quantum flux density treatments, but disorganized at low flux densities. Images Figs. 2 to 7 PMID:16664297

  14. Solar Flux Effect on the Reproducibility of Global/Local-Time Variations of Ion Density Structure at Low-Latitude Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shin-Yi

    Longitudinal/seasonal (l/s) variations of ion density structures at the 600-km low-latitude ionosphere observed by ROCSAT-1 between two similar solar activity years of 2000 and 2002 are examined at four different local-time (LT) regions. The gross feature of l/s density structure is almost identical to each other at the four LT regions examined. A complete reproducibility of density structure can be assumed, including the shape of equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA), for identical solar flux input that also implicitly affect other atmospheric components such as the neutral O/N2 ratio and neutral wind variation. The fact that the solar variability effect is thought as the ultimate driver to shape the global ionospheric structure can be confirmed with the reproduction of ROCSAT observations with the simulation results of the TIEGCM model runs using the observed solar flux inputs for various seasons. However, the EIA crestto-valley ratio or no-valley signature in this background density structure can not be used to infer the post-sunset irregularity occurrence rates because the l/s variation of the magnetic declination effect that determines the post-sunset ionospheric conductivity for the ionospheric electrodynamics can not be readily obtained from this ionospheric background structure.

  15. Surface Renewal: An Advanced Micrometeorological Method for Measuring and Processing Field-Scale Energy Flux Density Data

    PubMed Central

    McElrone, Andrew J.; Shapland, Thomas M.; Calderon, Arturo; Fitzmaurice, Li; Paw U, Kyaw Tha; Snyder, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced micrometeorological methods have become increasingly important in soil, crop, and environmental sciences. For many scientists without formal training in atmospheric science, these techniques are relatively inaccessible. Surface renewal and other flux measurement methods require an understanding of boundary layer meteorology and extensive training in instrumentation and multiple data management programs. To improve accessibility of these techniques, we describe the underlying theory of surface renewal measurements, demonstrate how to set up a field station for surface renewal with eddy covariance calibration, and utilize our open-source turnkey data logger program to perform flux data acquisition and processing. The new turnkey program returns to the user a simple data table with the corrected fluxes and quality control parameters, and eliminates the need for researchers to shuttle between multiple processing programs to obtain the final flux data. An example of data generated from these measurements demonstrates how crop water use is measured with this technique. The output information is useful to growers for making irrigation decisions in a variety of agricultural ecosystems. These stations are currently deployed in numerous field experiments by researchers in our group and the California Department of Water Resources in the following crops: rice, wine and raisin grape vineyards, alfalfa, almond, walnut, peach, lemon, avocado, and corn. PMID:24378712

  16. Dynamic Characteristics of the Main Indexes of Space Weather and Their Application to the Analysis Monitoring Observations Flux Densities of Power Radio Sources on RT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglya, L.; Ryabov, M.; Panishko, S.; Suharev, A.

    On radio telescope "URAN-4" of the Odessa observatory of Radio-astronomical Institute during twenty five years (since 1987 till present) monitoring of power galactic and extragalactic radio sources on frequencies 25 and 20MHz has been carried out. Data of the observation was spent in a current of the 22-23th cycles of solar activity and in the beginning of the 24th cycle. Long-term variations density fluxes of radio sources connection with change of a condition of ionosphere in a cycle of solar activity are considered. Means Fourier and Wavelet analysis determine dynamics of changes of the main indexes of space weather and the basic periods of activity are revealed. The obtained data will be used for interpretation of the observation changes flux of radio sources for during all investigated cycle of activity and periods of extreme developments of space weather.

  17. Magnetic-flux pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A magnetic flux pump is described for increasing the intensity of a magnetic field by transferring flux from one location to the magnetic field. The device includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, and a piston for displacing the trapped magnetic flux into the secondary cavity producing a field having an intense flux density.

  18. KEY COMPARISON: Final Report of CCEM Key Comparison CCEM.M-K1: Magnetic flux density by means of transfer standard coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyand, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    The delegates of the CCEM discussion meeting on international comparisons in magnetism recommended in May 2000 in Sydney that a worldwide intercomparison of magnetic flux density by means of a transfer standard coil should be proposed in addition to and in accordance with the EUROMET project No 446. A field coil of the Garret type was prepared and provided as transfer standard by PTB acting again as pilot laboratory. The single layer coil produces a field with a flux density of about 2 mT if it carries the maximum permitted current of 1 A. This standard was circulated in 2001 and 2002 to nine other national metrology institutes worldwide. The standard coil has also be used to compare the ac field calibration set-ups of the various laboratories. In order to provide a frequency response different to that of the standard used for the EUROMET comparison, the current distribution network at both flanges of the standard coil had been modified with the result that the frequency dependence of the coil constant shows a minimum at f = 4 kHz. Each participant was asked to apply the measuring methods and to use the equipment as available for his daily work to tranfer the unit of magnetic dc and ac flux density. So, quite different methods have been applied within the intercomparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  19. Landscape Soil Respiration Fluxes are Related to Leaf Area Index, Stand Height and Density, and Soil Nitrogen in Rocky Mountain Subalpine Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryman, E.; Bradford, J. B.; Hawbaker, T. J.; Birdsey, R.; Ryan, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    There is a recent multi-agency push for accurate assessments of terrestrial carbon stocks and fluxes in the United States. Assessing the state of the carbon cycle in the US requires estimates of stocks and fluxes at large spatial scales. Such assessments are difficult, especially for soil respiration, which dominates ecosystem respiration and is notoriously highly variable over space and time. Here, we report three consecutive years of measurement of soil respiration fluxes in three 1 km2 subalpine forest landscapes: Fraser Experimental Forest (Colorado), Glacier Lakes Ecosystems Experimental Site ("GLEES", Wyoming), and Niwot Ridge (Colorado). Plots were established following the protocol of the US Forest Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program. Clusters of plots were distributed across the landscape in a 0.25 km grid pattern. From 2004 through 2006, measurements of soil respiration were made once monthly during the growing season and twice during snowpack coverage for each year. Annual cumulative soil respiration was 6.10 (+/- 0.21) Mg ha-1y-1 for Fraser, 6.55 (+/- 0.27) Mg ha-1y-1 for GLEES, and 6.97 (+/- 0.20) Mg ha-1y-1 for Niwot. Variability in annual cumulative soil respiration varied by less than 20% among the three subalpine forests, despite differences in terrain, climate, disturbance history and anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. We quantified the relationship between respiration fluxes and commonly-measured forest properties and found that soil respiration was nonlinearly related to leaf area index, peaking around 2.5 m2m-2 then slowly declining. Annual litterfall (FA) was subtracted from soil respiration (FR) to calculate total belowground carbon flux (TBCF), which declined with increasing tree height, density and soil nitrogen. This landscape analysis of soil respiration confirmed experimentally-derived principles governing carbon fluxes in forests: as trees age and get taller, and in high-fertility areas, carbon flux to roots declines

  20. The effect of anisotropic flux pinning microstructure on the sample length dependence of the magnetization critical current density in niobium-titanium superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, C. Bormio; Heussner, R. W.; Larbalestier, D. C.

    1996-08-01

    Magnetization measurements of the critical current density Jc in Nb 47 wt % Ti with Nb artificial pinning centers revealed that the shape and magnitude of the field dependent magnetization hysteresis ΔM(H) was a strong function of the sample length and that ΔM(H) for short wire samples was up to six times smaller than for long wires. This is caused by the strong anisotropy of the critical current density Jc. The magnitude of Jc flowing perpendicular to the wire axis J⊥ was deduced to be 50-175 times smaller than the longitudinal current density J∥. The source of the anisotropy lies in the anisotropic flux pinning microstructure of the wires. When the magnetization current crosses perpendicular to the filament axis at each end of the wire, the Lorentz force is parallel to the pinning center axis. The pinning force is weak in this direction and J⊥ is correspondingly small. The technologically important critical current density is the longitudinal current density J∥. It can be extracted from magnetization measurements only in the case of large length to diameter filaments, as is quantitatively analyzed here.

  1. Influence of the vapor flux on temperature, density, and abundance distributions in a multicomponent, porous, icy body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benkhoff, J.; Huebner, W. F.

    1995-01-01

    We calculated the vapor flux of the icy components in the surface layer of a porous, short-period, Jupiter-class comet, in order to investigate the relationship of the observed relative molecular abundances in the coma with those in the nucleus. The model assumes a body containing one major ice component (H20) and up to three minor components of higher volatility (e.g., CO, CO2, CH3OH). The body's porous structure is modeled as a bundle of tubes with a given tortuosity and initially a constant pore diameter. The mass and energy equations for the different volatiles are solved simultaneously under appropiate boundary conditions. Heat is conducted by the matrix and carried by the vapors. The one-dimensional model includes radially inward and outward flowing vapor within the body, complete depletion of less volatile ices in outer layers, and recondensation of vapor in deeper, coller layers. As a result, we obtain the temperature and abundance distribution in the nucleus and the gas flux into the interior and into the coma for each of the volatiles at various positions in the orbit. The ratio of the gas flux of minor volatiles to that of H2) in the coma varies by several orders of magnitude throughout the orbit. Thus, the relative abundances of species observed in the coma are in most cases not the same as those in the nucleus. Results also indicate that it will be impossible to determine the relative abundances of ices more volatile than water from samples taken a few meters below the surface during a comet rendezvous mission. We made calculations for a wide range of different parameters, such as porosity, pore radius, and thermal conductivity of the matrix. To introduce the model we present typical results for a dust-free comet.

  2. Time-resolved ion flux, electron temperature and plasma density measurements in a pulsed Ar plasma using a capacitively coupled planar probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnon, Maxime; Cunge, Gilles; Braithwaite, Nicholas St. J.

    2014-04-01

    The resurgence of industrial interest in pulsed radiofrequency plasmas for etching applications highlights the fact that these plasmas are much less well characterized than their continuous wave counterparts. A capacitively coupled planar probe is used to determine the time variations of the ion flux, electron temperature (of the high-energy tail of the electron energy distribution function) and plasma density. For a pulsing frequency of 1 kHz or higher, the plasma never reaches a steady state during the on-time and is not fully extinguished during the off-time. The drop of plasma density during the off-time leads to an overshoot in the electron temperature at the beginning of each pulse, particularly at low frequencies, in good agreement with modeling results from the literature.

  3. Absolute and relative blindsight.

    PubMed

    Balsdon, Tarryn; Azzopardi, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The concept of relative blindsight, referring to a difference in conscious awareness between conditions otherwise matched for performance, was introduced by Lau and Passingham (2006) as a way of identifying the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) in fMRI experiments. By analogy, absolute blindsight refers to a difference between performance and awareness regardless of whether it is possible to match performance across conditions. Here, we address the question of whether relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers can be accounted for by response bias. In our replication of Lau and Passingham's experiment, the relative blindsight effect was abolished when performance was assessed by means of a bias-free 2AFC task or when the criterion for awareness was varied. Furthermore, there was no evidence of either relative or absolute blindsight when both performance and awareness were assessed with bias-free measures derived from confidence ratings using signal detection theory. This suggests that both relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers amount to no more than variations in response bias in the assessment of performance and awareness. Consideration of the properties of psychometric functions reveals a number of ways in which relative and absolute blindsight could arise trivially and elucidates a basis for the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 blindsight.

  4. Effects of temperature, frequency, flux density, and excitation waveform on the core loss and dynamic B-H loops of supermalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.; Wieserman, William R.; Niedra, Janis M.

    1995-01-01

    The availability of experimental data which characterize the performance of soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of temperature and frequency over a wide flux density range for different types of excitation is almost nonexistent. An experimental investigation of an 80-20 Ni-Fe alloy (Supermalloy) was conducted over the temperature (T) range of 23 to 300 C, frequency (f) range of 1 to 50 kHz, and maximum flux densities (B(sub M)) from 0.1 T up to 0.7 T for both sine and square wave voltage excitation. The investigation focused on the effects of (B(sub M)), f, T, and excitation waveform on the specific core loss (SCL) and dynamic B-H loops. The results show that the ratio (R) of sine to square wave excitation specific core loss was always greater than unity for a given f and T and identical values of B(sub M). The values of R ranged from 1.07 to 1.34. The classical theory of core loss separation into a hysteresis and eddy current loss component was used to theoretically determine the lower and upper bounds on R, against which the experimental R-values were compared. The experimental R-values were also used to make a comparison of the core loss of a sine and square wave voltage driven transformer.

  5. Interaction between the spectral photon flux density distributions of light during growth and for measurements in net photosynthetic rates of cucumber leaves.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Keach; Matsuda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Kazuhiro

    2016-10-01

    The net photosynthetic rate of a leaf becomes acclimated to the plant's environment during growth. These rates are often measured, evaluated and compared among leaves of plants grown under different light conditions. In this study, we compared net photosynthetic rates of cucumber leaves grown under white light-emitting diode (LED) light without and with supplemental far-red (FR) LED light (W- and WFR-leaves, respectively) under three different measuring light (ML) conditions: their respective growth light (GL), artificial sunlight (AS) and blue and red (BR) light. The difference in the measured photosynthetic rates between W- and WFR-leaves was greater under BR than under GL and AS. In other words, an interaction between supplemental FR light during growth and the spectral photon flux density distribution (SPD) of ML affected the measured net photosynthetic rates. We showed that the comparison and evaluation of leaf photosynthetic rates and characteristics can be biased depending on the SPD of ML, especially for plants grown under different photon flux densities in the FR waveband. We also investigated the mechanism of the interaction. We confirmed that the distribution of excitation energy between the two photosystems (PSs) changed in response to the SPD of GL, and that this change resulted in the interaction, as suggested in previous reports. However, changes in PS stoichiometry could not completely explain the adjustment in excitation energy distribution observed in this study, suggesting that other mechanisms may be involved in the interaction.

  6. Adjoint-based sensitivity analysis for high-energy density radiative transfer using flux-limited diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humbird, Kelli D.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2017-03-01

    Uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analyses are a vital component for predictive modeling in the sciences and engineering. The adjoint approach to sensitivity analysis requires solving a primary system of equations and a mathematically related set of adjoint equations. The information contained in the equations can be combined to produce sensitivity information in a computationally efficient manner. In this work, sensitivity analyses are performed on systems described by flux-limited radiative diffusion using the adjoint approach. The sensitivities computed are shown to agree with standard perturbation theory and require significantly less computational time. The adjoint approach saves the computational cost of one forward solve per sensitivity, making the method attractive when multiple sensitivities are of interest.

  7. Tracer kinetic studies of the low density lipoprotein metabolism in the fetal rat: An example for estimation of flux rates in the nonsteady state

    SciTech Connect

    Plonne, D.; Schlag, B.; Winkler, L.; Dargel, R. )

    1990-05-01

    To get insight into the low density lipoprotein (LDL)-apoB flux in the rat fetus near term and in the early postnatal period, homologous apoE-free 125I-labeled LDL was injected into the umbilical vein of the rat fetus immediately after Caesarean section. Since the serum LDL-apoB spontaneously declined after birth, a time-dependent two-pool model was used to calculate the flux rates in the neonate from the specific activities of LDL-apoB up to 15 h post partum. An approximate value of LDL-apoB flux in the fetus at birth was obtained by extrapolation of the kinetic data to the time of injection of the tracer. The data revealed that the turnover of LDL-apoB in the fetus (18.6 micrograms LDL-apoB/h per g body weight) exceeded that in the adult rat (0.4 microgram/h per g body weight) by at least one order of magnitude. Even 15 h after delivery, the LDL-apoB influx amounted to 2.5 micrograms/h per g body weight. The fractional catabolic rate of LDL-apoB in the fetus at term (0.39, h-1) slightly exceeded that in the adult animal (0.15, h-1) and reached the adult level within the first 3 h after birth and remained constant thereafter. In the rat fetus, LDL-apoB flux greatly exceeds that of VLDL-apoB. The data support the view of a direct synthesis and secretion of LDL, most probably by the fetal membranes.

  8. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  9. Absolute neutrino mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Silvia; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2013-04-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments firmly established non-vanishing neutrino masses, a result that can be regarded as a strong motivation to extend the Standard Model. In spite of being the lightest massive particles, neutrinos likely represent an important bridge to new physics at very high energies and offer new opportunities to address some of the current cosmological puzzles, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter. In this context, the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale is a key issue within modern High Energy Physics. The talks in this parallel session well describe the current exciting experimental activity aiming to determining the absolute neutrino mass scale and offer an overview of a few models beyond the Standard Model that have been proposed in order to explain the neutrino masses giving a prediction for the absolute neutrino mass scale and solving the cosmological puzzles.

  10. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  11. Leaf conductance in relation to rate of CO/sub 2/ assimilation. II. Effects of short-term exposures to different photon flux densities. [Zea mays; Phaseolus vulgaris; Eucalyptus pauciflora

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.C.; Cowan, I.R.; Farquhar, G.D.

    1985-01-01

    When photon flux density incident on attached leaves of Zea mays L. was varied from the equivalent of 0.12 of full sunlight to full sunlight, leaf conductance to CO/sub 2/ transfer, g, changed in proportion to the change in rate of CO/sub 2/, assimilation, A, with the result that intercellular partial pressure of CO/sub 2/ remained almost constant. The proportionality was the same as the previously found in g and A measured at one photon flux density in plants of Zea mays L. grown at different levels of mineral nutrition, light intensities, and ambient partial pressures of CO/sub 2/. In shade-grown Phaseolus vulgaris L., plants, A as photon flux density was increased from about 0.12 up to about 0.5 full sunlight, the proportionality being almost the same in plants grown at low and at high light intensity. When photon flux density incident on the adaxial an abaxial surfaces of the isolateral leaves of Eucalyptus pauciflora Sieb. ex Spreng was varied, g and A also varied proportionally. The leaf conductance in a particular surface was affected by the photon flux density at the opposite surface to a greater extent than was expected on the basis of transmittance. The results indicated that stomata may, in some way, be sensitive to the photon flux absorbed within the leaf as a whole. 5 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  12. Microstructure, Physical Properties, and Magnetic Flux Density Analysis of Permanent Magnet BaFe12O19 using Milling and Sintering Preparation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardjono, Priyo; Suprapedi; Muljadi; Rusnaeni Djauhari, Nenen

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to analyze the influence of sintering temperature to the microstructure, physical, and magnetic properties of BaFe12O19 materials. The permanent magnet BaFe12O19 was made by using milling and sintering method, BaFe12O19 commercial powder was used as the raw material in this experiment. The raw material was pulverized by using ball mill for 15 hours and compacted at 400 MPa pressure to obtain a 16mm diameter and 4mm thick pellet. The pellet was sintered with 10oC/minute heating rate at various temperature ranges of 1050, 1100, 1150, and 1200oC for 1 hour. The microstructure and particle size of the pellet was investigated using XRD, SEM, and Particle Size Analyzer (PSA). The result shows that the milled powder has hexagonal BaFe12O19 crystal structure as the dominant phase, inhomogeneous size and shape of the grains, and average particle size is 19.60 pm. The bulk density measurement, shrinkage, and magnetic properties of the sintered samples were being observed and analyzed. It was found through this experiment that the optimum sintering temperature is 1150oC to obtain optimum bulk density (4.71 g/cm3), constant shrinkage (12.07%), 550 Gauss magnetic flux density, 1.79 kGauss remanence Br, and 1.75 kOe coercivity.

  13. The synthesis of lamellar nano MgB2 grains with nanoimpurities, flux pinning centers and their significantly improved critical current density.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zongqing; Liu, Yongchang; Cai, Qi

    2012-03-21

    MgB(2) superconductors with unique microstructures were rapidly fabricated at low temperatures, and exhibited significantly improved critical current density (J(c)). According to the microstructure observations, the prepared samples consisted of lamellar nano MgB(2) grains with many embedded nanoimpurities (about 10 nm). The formation of these lamellar nano MgB(2) grains is associated with the presence of a local Mg-Cu liquid at sintering temperatures as low as 575 °C. The ball milling treatment of the original powders also plays a positive role in the growth of lamellar grains. Based on an analysis of the relationship between resistivity and temperature, the lamellar nano MgB(2) grains in the prepared sample possess better grain connectivity than the typical morphology of MgB(2) samples prepared by traditional high-temperature sintering. Furthermore, the presence of many nano MgB(2) grain boundaries and nano impurities in the prepared sample can obviously increase the flux pinning centers in accordance with the analysis of flux pinning behavior. Both factors mentioned above contribute to the significant improvement in J(c) from low field to relative high field. The method developed in the present work is an effective and low-cost way to further enhance J(c) in MgB(2) superconductors across a wide range of applied magnetic fields without using expensive nanometer-sized dopants.

  14. The critical current density, irreversibility line, and flux pinning properties of Ba2CaCu2O4(O,F)2 high-Tc superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirage, P. M.; Tanaka, Y.; Iyo, A.

    2010-05-01

    The high-Tc superconductor of Ba2CaCu2O4(O,F)2 (F-0212) is an appealing material for application as it has a simple crystal structure with a highest Tc of 108 K. We have derived the intragrain critical current density (Jc), irreversibility field (Birr), flux pinning properties, etc., for the polycrystalline samples from under doping (Tc=82 K) to slightly-over doping (Tc=106 K) from the dc magnetization hysteresis loops. The Jc and Birr properties were found to improve rapidly as the doping state changes from under doping to slightly-over doping. Here we show that property of the spacing is crucial to enhance Birr as well as its thickness. An anisotropy factor for under doped Ba2CaCu2O4F2 was reckoned to 118 from a three-dimensional-two-dimensional crossover field of about 0.28 T. The double logarithmic plot of irreversibility field versus [1-(T /Tc)] analysis hints that the flux line melting model is adopted. Analysis of the normalized pinning force reveals that a surface pinning mechanism is dominant and reduced magnetic field bmax=0.2 agree with surface pinning mechanism with closely spaced pins.

  15. Determination of ¹⁵N-incorporation into plant proteins and their absolute quantitation: a new tool to study nitrogen flux dynamics and protein pool sizes elicited by plant-herbivore interactions.

    PubMed

    Ullmann-Zeunert, Lynn; Muck, Alexander; Wielsch, Natalie; Hufsky, Franziska; Stanton, Mariana A; Bartram, Stefan; Böcker, Sebastian; Baldwin, Ian T; Groten, Karin; Svatoš, Aleš

    2012-10-05

    Herbivory leads to changes in the allocation of nitrogen among different pools and tissues; however, a detailed quantitative analysis of these changes has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate that a mass spectrometric data-independent acquisition approach known as LC-MS(E), combined with a novel algorithm to quantify heavy atom enrichment in peptides, is able to quantify elicited changes in protein amounts and (15)N flux in a high throughput manner. The reliable identification/quantitation of rabbit phosphorylase b protein spiked into leaf protein extract was achieved. The linear dynamic range, reproducibility of technical and biological replicates, and differences between measured and expected (15)N-incorporation into the small (SSU) and large (LSU) subunits of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) and RuBisCO activase 2 (RCA2) of Nicotiana attenuata plants grown in hydroponic culture at different known concentrations of (15)N-labeled nitrate were used to further evaluate the procedure. The utility of the method for whole-plant studies in ecologically realistic contexts was demonstrated by using (15)N-pulse protocols on plants growing in soil under unknown (15)N-incorporation levels. Additionally, we quantified the amounts of lipoxygenase 2 (LOX2) protein, an enzyme important in antiherbivore defense responses, demonstrating that the approach allows for in-depth quantitative proteomics and (15)N flux analyses of the metabolic dynamics elicited during plant-herbivore interactions.

  16. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  17. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  18. Biases of CO2 Storage in Eddy Flux Measurements pertinent to Vertical Configurations of a Profile System and CO2 Density Averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bai; Hanson, Paul J; Riggs, Jeffery S; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Hosman, K. P.; Meyers, T. P.; Wullschleger, Stan D; Gu, Lianhong; Heuer, Mark

    2007-01-01

    be subject to the site properties, e.g., canopy architecture and the resulted thermodynamic and flow structures. If CO2 density from a single profile is averaged in time and then used in assessing CO2 storage to make this measurement more spatially representative, biases associated with this averaging procedure become inevitable. Generally, larger window sizes used in averaging CO2 density generate poorer estimates of CO2 storage. If absolute errors are concerned, it appears that the more significant the CO2 storage is during a period (nighttime and early morning hours versus late morning and afternoon, peak growing season versus early growing season), the larger effects the averaging procedure has.

  19. Absolute calibration in the 1750 - 3350 A region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strongylis, G. J.; Bohlin, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The absolute flux measurements in the rocket ultraviolet made by Bohlin, Frimout, and Lillie (BFL) are revised using a more correct treatment of the air extinction that enters the air calibration of their instrument. The absorption by molecular oxygen and ozone, Rayleigh scattering, and extinction by aerosols is tabulated for general use in ultraviolet calibrations performed in air. The revised absolute flux of eta UMa and final fluxes for alpha Lyr and zeta Oph are presented in the 1750-3350 A region. The absolute flux of the star eta UMa is compared to four other independent determinations in the 1200-3400 A region and a maximum difference of 35% is found near 1500 A between the OAO-2 and Apollo 17 fluxes. The rocket measurements of BFL, the ANS and TD-1 satellite data, and the Apollo 17 data are compared to the ultraviolet fluxes from the OAO-2, demonstrating a photometric reproducibility of about + or - 3 percent. Therefore, all four sets of spectrophotometry can be reduced to a common absolute scale.

  20. Absolute-structure reports.

    PubMed

    Flack, Howard D

    2013-08-01

    All the 139 noncentrosymmetric crystal structures published in Acta Crystallographica Section C between January 2011 and November 2012 inclusive have been used as the basis of a detailed study of the reporting of absolute structure. These structure determinations cover a wide range of space groups, chemical composition and resonant-scattering contribution. Defining A and D as the average and difference of the intensities of Friedel opposites, their level of fit has been examined using 2AD and selected-D plots. It was found, regardless of the expected resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, that the Friedel-difference intensities are often dominated by random uncertainty and systematic error. An analysis of data collection strategy is provided. It is found that crystal-structure determinations resulting in a Flack parameter close to 0.5 may not necessarily be from crystals twinned by inversion. Friedifstat is shown to be a robust estimator of the resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, very little affected by the particular space group of a structure nor by the occupation of special positions. There is considerable confusion in the text of papers presenting achiral noncentrosymmetric crystal structures. Recommendations are provided for the optimal way of treating noncentrosymmetric crystal structures for which the experimenter has no interest in determining the absolute structure.

  1. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  2. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m‑1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  3. Optimizing LED lighting for space plant growth unit: Joint effects of photon flux density, red to white ratios and intermittent light pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avercheva, O. V.; Berkovich, Yu. A.; Konovalova, I. O.; Radchenko, S. G.; Lapach, S. N.; Bassarskaya, E. M.; Kochetova, G. V.; Zhigalova, T. V.; Yakovleva, O. S.; Tarakanov, I. G.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work were to choose a quantitative optimality criterion for estimating the quality of plant LED lighting regimes inside space greenhouses and to construct regression models of crop productivity and the optimality criterion depending on the level of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), the proportion of the red component in the light spectrum and the duration of the duty cycle (Chinese cabbage Brassica сhinensis L. as an example). The properties of the obtained models were described in the context of predicting crop dry weight and the optimality criterion behavior when varying plant lighting parameters. Results of the fractional 3-factor experiment demonstrated the share of the PPFD level participation in the crop dry weight accumulation was 84.4% at almost any combination of other lighting parameters, but when PPFD value increased up to 500 μmol m-2 s-1 the pulse light and supplemental light from red LEDs could additionally increase crop productivity. Analysis of the optimality criterion response to variation of lighting parameters showed that the maximum coordinates were the following: PPFD = 500 μmol m-2 s-1, about 70%-proportion of the red component of the light spectrum (PPFDLEDred/PPFDLEDwhite = 1.5) and the duty cycle with a period of 501 μs. Thus, LED crop lighting with these parameters was optimal for achieving high crop productivity and for efficient use of energy in the given range of lighting parameter values.

  4. Effects of Ultraviolet-B Irradiance on Soybean : V. The Dependence of Plant Sensitivity on the Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density during and after Leaf Expansion.

    PubMed

    Mirecki, R M; Teramura, A H

    1984-03-01

    Soybeans (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Essex) were grown in a green-house, and the first trifoliate leaf was either allowed to expand under a high photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) (1.4 millimoles per square meter per second) or a low PPFD (0.8 millimoles per square meter per second). After full leaf expansion, plants from each treatment were placed into a factorial design experiment with two levels of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation (0 and 80 milliwatts per square meter biologically effective UV-B) and two levels of concomitant PPFD (0.8 and 1.4 millimoles per square meter per second) resulting in a total of eight treatments. Measurements of net photosynthesis and the associated diffusion conductances, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity, chlorophyll and flavonoid concentrations, and leaf anatomy were examined for all treatments. Leaves expanded in the high PPFD were unaffected by UV-B radiation while those expanded in the low PPFD were sensitive to UV-B-induced damage. Likewise, plants which were UV-B irradiated concomitantly with the high PPFD were resistant to UV-B damage, while plants irradiated under the low PPFD were sensitive. The results of this study indicate that both anatomical/morphological and physiological/biochemical factors contribute toward plant sensitivity to UV-B radiation.

  5. Superconductivity, critical current density, and flux pinning in MgB2-x(SiC)x/2 superconductor after SiC nanoparticle doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S. X.; Pan, A. V.; Zhou, S.; Ionescu, M.; Wang, X. L.; Horvat, J.; Liu, H. K.; Munroe, P. R.

    2003-08-01

    We investigated the effect of SiC nanoparticle doping on the crystal lattice structure, critical temperature Tc, critical current density Jc, and flux pinning in MgB2 superconductor. A series of MgB2-x(SiC)x/2 samples with x=0-1.0 were fabricated using an in situ reaction process. The contraction of the lattice and depression of Tc with increasing SiC doping level remained rather small most likely due to the counterbalancing effect of Si and C co-doping. The high level Si and C co-doping allowed the creation of intragrain defects and highly dispersed nanoinclusions within the grains which can act as effective pinning centers for vortices, improving Jc behavior as a function of the applied magnetic field. The enhanced pinning is mainly attributable to the substitution-induced defects and local structure fluctuations within grains. A pinning mechanism is proposed to account for different contributions of different defects in MgB2-x(SiC)x/2 superconductors.

  6. Optimizing LED lighting for space plant growth unit: Joint effects of photon flux density, red to white ratios and intermittent light pulses.

    PubMed

    Avercheva, O V; Berkovich, Yu A; Konovalova, I O; Radchenko, S G; Lapach, S N; Bassarskaya, E M; Kochetova, G V; Zhigalova, T V; Yakovleva, O S; Tarakanov, I G

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work were to choose a quantitative optimality criterion for estimating the quality of plant LED lighting regimes inside space greenhouses and to construct regression models of crop productivity and the optimality criterion depending on the level of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), the proportion of the red component in the light spectrum and the duration of the duty cycle (Chinese cabbage Brassica сhinensis L. as an example). The properties of the obtained models were described in the context of predicting crop dry weight and the optimality criterion behavior when varying plant lighting parameters. Results of the fractional 3-factor experiment demonstrated the share of the PPFD level participation in the crop dry weight accumulation was 84.4% at almost any combination of other lighting parameters, but when PPFD value increased up to 500µmol m(-2)s(-1) the pulse light and supplemental light from red LEDs could additionally increase crop productivity. Analysis of the optimality criterion response to variation of lighting parameters showed that the maximum coordinates were the following: PPFD = 500µmol m(-2)s(-1), about 70%-proportion of the red component of the light spectrum (PPFDLEDred/PPFDLEDwhite = 1.5) and the duty cycle with a period of 501µs. Thus, LED crop lighting with these parameters was optimal for achieving high crop productivity and for efficient use of energy in the given range of lighting parameter values.

  7. Effects of magnetic flux density and substrate bias voltage on Ni films prepared on a flexible substrate material using unbalanced magnetron sputtering assisted by inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Koda, Tatsunori; Toyota, Hiroshi

    2014-03-15

    The authors fabricated Ni films on a flexible substrate material using unbalanced magnetron sputtering assisted by inductively coupled plasma. The effects of magnetic flux density B{sub C} and substrate DC bias voltage V{sub S} on the Ni film structures were investigated. For V{sub S} = −40 V, the average surface grain size D{sub G} measured by atomic force microscopy for B{sub C} = 0, 3, and 5 mT was 88.2, 95.4, and 104.4 nm, respectively. In addition, D{sub G} increased with V{sub S}. From x-ray diffraction measurements, the (111) and (200) peaks were clearly visible for the fabricated Ni films. The ratio of the integrated intensities of I(111)/I(200) increased with V{sub S}. For V{sub S} = −40 V and B{sub C} = 3 mT, a film resistivity ρ of 8.96 × 10{sup −6} Ω cm was observed, which is close to the Ni bulk value of 6.84 × 10{sup −6} Ω cm. From these results, the authors determined that the structure of the fabricated Ni films on the flexible substrate material was affected by the values of B{sub C} and V{sub S}.

  8. Determination of neutron flux density distribution in the core with LEU fuel IRT-4M at the training reactor VR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Huml, O.

    2008-07-15

    The objective of this work was to determine the neutron flux density distribution in various places of the training reactor VR-1 Sparrow. This experiment was performed on the new core design C1, composed of the new low-enriched uranium fuel cells IRT-4M (19.7 %). This fuel replaced the old high-enriched uranium fuel IRT-3M (36 %) within the framework of the RERTR Program in September 2005. The measurement used the neutron activation analysis method with gold wires. The principle of this method consists in neutron capture in a nucleus of the material forming the activation detector. This capture can change the nucleus in a radioisotope, whose activity can be measured. The absorption cross-section values were evaluated by MCNP computer code. The gold wires were irradiated in seven different positions in the core C1. All irradiations were performed at reactor power level 1E8 (1 kW{sub therm}). The activity of segments of irradiated wires was measured by special automatic device called 'Drat' (Wire in English). (author)

  9. Computer processing of spectrograms for absolute intensities.

    PubMed

    Guttman, A; Golden, J; Galbraith, H J

    1967-09-01

    A computer program was developed to process photographically recorded spectra for absolute intensity. Test and calibration films are subjected to densitometric scans that provide digitally recorded densities on magnetic tapes. The nonlinear calibration data are fitted by least-squares cubic polynomials to yield a good approximation to the monochromatic H&D curves for commonly used emulsions (2475 recording film, Royal-X, Tri-X, 4-X). Several test cases were made. Results of these cases show that the machine processed absolute intensities are accurate to within 15%o. Arbitrarily raising the sensitivity threshold by 0.1 density units above gross fog yields cubic polynomial fits to the H&D curves that are radiometrically accurate within 10%. In addition, curves of gamma vs wavelength for 2475, Tri-X, and 4-X emulsions were made. These data show slight evidence of the photographic Purkinje effect in the 2475 emulsion.

  10. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency) by removing the source spectrum (moment-rate spectrum) from

  11. Light-induced systemic regulation of photosynthesis in primary and trifoliate leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris: effects of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) versus spectrum.

    PubMed

    Murakami, K; Matsuda, R; Fujiwara, K

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this work using Phaseolus vulgaris were to examine whether the light spectrum incident on mature primary leaves (PLs) is related to leaf-to-leaf systemic regulation of developing trifoliate leaves (TLs) in photosynthetic characteristics, and to investigate the relative importance of spectrum and photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) in light-induced systemic regulation. Systemic regulation was induced by altering PPFD and the spectrum of light incident on PLs using a shading treatment and lighting treatments including either white, blue, green or red light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Photosynthetic characteristics were evaluated by measuring the light-limited and light-saturated net photosynthetic rates and the amounts of nitrogen (N), chlorophyll (Chl) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco; EC 4.1.1.39). Shading treatment on PLs decreased the amounts of N, Chl and Rubisco of TLs and tended to decrease the photosynthetic rates. However, we observed no systemic effects induced by the light spectrum on PLs in this study, except that a higher amount of Rubisco of TLs was observed when the PLs were irradiated with blue LEDs. Our results imply that photoreceptors in mature leaves have little influence on photosynthetic rates and amounts of N and Chl of developing leaves through systemic regulation, although the possibility of the action of blue light irradiation on the amount of Rubisco cannot be ruled out. Based on these results, we concluded that the light spectrum incident on mature leaves has little systemic effect on developing leaves in terms of photosynthetic characteristics and that the light-induced systemic regulation was largely accounted for by PPFD.

  12. Temperature and CO2 dependency of the photosynthetic photon flux density responses of leaves of Vitis vinifera cvs. Chardonnay and Merlot grown in a hot climate.

    PubMed

    Greer, Dennis H

    2017-02-01

    Comparisons of the photosynthetic responses to light and temperature between related cultivars are important to understand how well matched they are to the climate where they are grown. Photosynthetic light responses at a range of leaf temperatures and two CO2 concentrations were measured on leaves of two grapevine cultivars (Vitis vinifera L.) Chardonnay and Merlot vines growing in field conditions. The objective was to assess the interaction between photon flux density (PFD), leaf temperature and CO2 on photosynthesis and to compare the two cultivars. Merlot leaves maintained higher light-saturated rates of photosynthesis at all leaf temperatures compared with the Chardonnay leaves. At low temperatures, a reduced photon yield offset with a high stomatal conductance accounted for the low rates of the Chardonnay leaves. At moderate to high temperatures, photon yields, PFDs at light saturation and stomatal conductances did not account for differences between Merlot and Chardonnay leaves. At elevated CO2 (800 μmol mol(-1)) concentrations, the differences in photosynthetic performance between the cultivars were enhanced, with 30% higher light saturated rates for Merlot compared with Chardonnay leaves. Merlot berries accumulated more sugar, consistent with published data. These results demonstrate Chardonnay, unlike Merlot, appeared to be poorly matched to the hot climate. However, considering the current market and political trends, low alcoholic wines (and, thus, low sugar grapes) should be preferred. Especially in hot climates, it is always hard to obtain such kind of wines and, thus, the most interesting agronomical challenge, especially for Chardonnay vines could be interpreted in an opposite way.

  13. Analysis of standard reference materials by absolute INAA

    SciTech Connect

    Heft, R.E.; Koszykowski, R.F.

    1981-07-01

    Three standard reference materials, flyash, soil, and ASI 4340 steel, were analyzed by a method of absolute instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Two different light water pool-type reactors were used to produce equivalent analytical results even though the epithermal to thermal flux ratio in one reactor was higher than that in the other by a factor of two.

  14. Charged Particle Flux Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, D. A.; Stocks, C. D.

    1983-01-01

    Improved version of Faraday cup increases accuracy of measurements of flux density of charged particles incident along axis through collection aperture. Geometry of cone-and-sensing cup combination assures most particles are trapped.

  15. Critical current density, irreversibility line, and flux creep activation energy in silver-sheathed Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]Ca[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub x] superconducting tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, D.; Wang, Z.; Sengupta, S.; Smith, M. ); Goodrich, L.F. , Boulder, CO . Electromagnetic Technology Div.); Dou, S.X.; Liu, H.K.; Guo, Y.C. . School of Materials and Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    Transport data, magnetic hysteresis and flux creep activation energy experimental results are presented for silver-sheathed high-[Tc] Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]Ca[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub x] superconducting tapes. The 110 K superconducting phase was formed by lead doping in a Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-0 system. The transport critical current density was measured at 4.0 K to be 0.7 [times] 10[sup 5] A/cm[sup 2] (the corresponding critical current is 74 A) at zero field and 1.6 [times] 10[sup 4] A/cm[sup 2] at 12 T for H[parallel]ab. Excellent grain alignment in the a-b plane was achieved by a short-melting method, which considerably improved the critical current density and irreversibility line. Flux creep activation energy as a function of current is obtained based on the magnetic relaxation measurements.

  16. Critical current density, irreversibility line, and flux creep activation energy in silver-sheathed Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} superconducting tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, D.; Wang, Z.; Sengupta, S.; Smith, M.; Goodrich, L.F.; Dou, S.X.; Liu, H.K.; Guo, Y.C.

    1992-08-01

    Transport data, magnetic hysteresis and flux creep activation energy experimental results are presented for silver-sheathed high-{Tc} Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} superconducting tapes. The 110 K superconducting phase was formed by lead doping in a Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-0 system. The transport critical current density was measured at 4.0 K to be 0.7 {times} 10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2} (the corresponding critical current is 74 A) at zero field and 1.6 {times} 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} at 12 T for H{parallel}ab. Excellent grain alignment in the a-b plane was achieved by a short-melting method, which considerably improved the critical current density and irreversibility line. Flux creep activation energy as a function of current is obtained based on the magnetic relaxation measurements.

  17. Monitoring of the time and spatial distribution of neutron-flux spectral density outside the Russian segment of the International Space Station based on data from the BTN-Neutron space experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, M. L.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Nuzhdin, I. O.; Vostrukhin, A. V.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Sanin, A. B.; Tretyakov, V. I.; Fedosov, F. S.

    2017-03-01

    Results of measurements of neutron-flux spectral density in the vicinity of the International Space Station (ISS) based on BTN-Neutron space experimental data acquired in 2007-2014 have been presented in this paper. It has been shown that, during the flight of the ISS over different regions of the Earth's surface, neutron flux in the energy range of 0.4 eV-15 MeV varies from 0.1 n/sm2/s in equatorial regions to 50 n/sm2/s in the South Atlantic anomaly region. The measurements were used to estimate the contribution of the neutron component to the overall exposure dose rate. The total contribution of fast neutrons is about 0.1-0.4 μ Zv/h above the equator area and more than 50 μ Zv/h above the South Atlantic anomaly region. A data analysis of BTN-Neutron data also showed that the time profile of neutron flux has long-periodic variations. It was found that, under the influence of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), modulation during 24th solar cycle neutron flux changed almost twofold (above high latitude regions). Maximum values of neutron flux were observed in January 2010 and minimum values were observed in January 2014.

  18. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  19. An absolute radius scale for Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Cooke, Maren L.; Pelton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Radio and stellar occultation observations of Saturn's rings made by the Voyager spacecraft are discussed. The data reveal systematic discrepancies of almost 10 km in some parts of the rings, limiting some of the investigations. A revised solution for Saturn's rotation pole has been proposed which removes the discrepancies between the stellar and radio occultation profiles. Corrections to previously published radii vary from -2 to -10 km for the radio occultation, and +5 to -6 km for the stellar occultation. An examination of spiral density waves in the outer A Ring supports that the revised absolute radii are in error by no more than 2 km.

  20. Absolute Hugoniot measurements for CH foams in the 1.5-8 Mbar range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Velikovich, A. L.; Schmitt, A. J.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Oh, J.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    We report the absolute Hugoniot measurements for dry CH foams at 10% of solid polystyrene density. The 400 μm thick, 500 μm wide planar foam slabs covered with a 10 μm solid plastic ablator were driven with 4 ns long Nike KrF laser pulses whose intensity was varied between 10 and 50 TW/cm2. The trajectories of the shock front and the ablative piston, as well as the rarefaction fan emerging after the shock breakout from the rear surface of the target were clearly observed using the side-on monochromatic x-ray imaging radiography. From these measurements the shock density compression ratio and the shock pressure are evaluated directly. The observed compression ratios varied between 4 and 8, and the corresponding shock pressures - between 1.5 and 8 Mbar. The data was simulated with the FASTRAD3D hydrocode, using standard models of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption, flux-limited thermal conduction, and multi-group radiation diffusion. The demonstrated diagnostics technique applied in a cryo experiment would make it possible to make the first absolute Hugoniot measurements for liquid deuterium or DT-wetted CH foams, which is relevant for designing the wetted-foam indirect-drive ignition targets for NIF. This work was supported by the US DOE/NNSA.

  1. Absolute, Extreme-Ultraviolet, Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor (AESSIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Martin C. E.; Smith, Peter L.; Parkinson, W. H.; Kuehne, M.; Kock, M.

    1988-01-01

    AESSIM, the Absolute, Extreme-Ultraviolet, Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor, is designed to measure the absolute solar spectral irradiance at extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths. The data are required for studies of the processes that occur in the earth's upper atmosphere and for predictions of atmospheric drag on space vehicles. AESSIM is comprised of sun-pointed spectrometers and newly-developed, secondary standards of spectral irradiance for the EUV. Use of the in-orbit standard sources will eliminate the uncertainties caused by changes in spectrometer efficiency that have plagued all previous measurements of the solar spectral EUV flux.

  2. Experimental Study on Thermal-Hydraulics During Start-Up in the Natural Circulation Boiling Water Reactor Concept: Effects of System Pressure and Increasing Heat Flux on the Geysering and Density Wave Oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Hadid Subki, M.; Masanori Aritomi; Noriyuki Watanabe; Chaiwat Muncharoen

    2002-07-01

    The feasibility study in thermal-hydraulics for the future light water reactor concept is carried out. One of the essential studies is the two-phase flow instability during start-up in the natural circulation boiling water reactor (BWR) concept. It is anticipated that the occurrence of the two-phase flow instabilities during start-up significantly affects the feasibility concept, since it would cause the complexity in raising and maneuvering the power output. The purpose of the current study is to experimentally investigate the driving mechanism of the geysering and density wave oscillation in the natural circulation loop, induced by a range of system operating pressure and increasing heat flux in vertical parallel channels. The pressure range of atmospheric up to about 4 bars, and the input heat flux range of 0 up to 577 kW/m{sup 2} are applied in these experiments. An experimental apparatus of twin boiling upflow channels to simulate natural circulation flow loop has been designed, constructed and operated. The natural circulation in the loop occurs due to the density difference between two-phase region in the channels and the single-phase liquid in the downcomer. The objective of the study is to propose a rational start-up procedure in which the geysering and density wave oscillation can be prevented during startup, according to its system pressure and heat flux. Previous studies have clarified that three (3) kinds of thermo-hydraulics instabilities may occur during start-up in the natural circulation BWR depending on its procedure and reactor configuration, which are (1) geysering induced by condensation, (2) natural circulation induced by hydrostatic head fluctuation in steam separator, and (3) density wave oscillation. (authors)

  3. Absolute magnetic helicity and the cylindrical magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Low, B. C.

    2011-05-15

    The different magnetic helicities conserved under conditions of perfect electrical conductivity are expressions of the fundamental property that every evolving fluid surface conserves its net magnetic flux. This basic hydromagnetic point unifies the well known Eulerian helicities with the Lagrangian helicity defined by the conserved fluxes frozen into a prescribed set of disjoint toroidal tubes of fluid flowing as a permanent partition of the entire fluid [B. C. Low, Astrophys. J. 649, 1064 (2006)]. This unifying theory is constructed from first principles, beginning with an analysis of the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of fluids, separating the ideas of fluid and magnetic-flux tubes and removing the complication of the magnetic vector potential's free gauge from the concept of helicity. The analysis prepares for the construction of a conserved Eulerian helicity, without that gauge complication, to describe a 3D anchored flux in an upright cylindrical domain, this helicity called absolute to distinguish it from the well known relative helicity. In a version of the Chandrasekhar-Kendall representation, the evolving field at any instant is a unique superposition of a writhed, untwisted axial flux with a circulating flux of field lines all closed and unlinked within the cylindrical domain. The absolute helicity is then a flux-weighted sum of the writhe of that axial flux and its mutual linkage with the circulating flux. The absolute helicity is also conserved if the frozen-in field and its domain are continuously deformed by changing the separation between the rigid cylinder-ends with no change of cylinder radius. This hitherto intractable cylindrical construction closes a crucial conceptual gap for the fundamentals to be complete at last. The concluding discussion shows the impact of this development on our understanding of helicity, covering (i) the helicities of wholly contained and anchored fields; (ii) the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of field

  4. Absolute calibration of neutron detectors on the C-2U advanced beam-driven FRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, R. M.; Clary, R.; Korepanov, S.; Jauregui, F.; Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Valentine, T.; Smirnov, A.

    2016-11-01

    In the C-2U fusion energy experiment, high power neutral beam injection creates a large fast ion population that sustains a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The diagnosis of the fast ion pressure in these high-performance plasmas is therefore critical, and the measurement of the flux of neutrons from the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion reaction is well suited to the task. Here we describe the absolute, in situ calibration of scintillation neutron detectors via two independent methods: firing deuterium beams into a high density gas target and calibration with a 2 × 107 n/s AmBe source. The practical issues of each method are discussed and the resulting calibration factors are shown to be in good agreement. Finally, the calibration factor is applied to C-2U experimental data where the measured neutron rate is found to exceed the classical expectation.

  5. Database applicaton for absolute spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, Valery V.; Shumko, Sergiy

    2002-12-01

    32-bit database application with multidocument interface for Windows has been developed to calculate absolute energy distributions of observed spectra. The original database contains wavelength calibrated observed spectra which had been already passed through apparatus reductions such as flatfielding, background and apparatus noise subtracting. Absolute energy distributions of observed spectra are defined in unique scale by means of registering them simultaneously with artificial intensity standard. Observations of sequence of spectrophotometric standards are used to define absolute energy of the artificial standard. Observations of spectrophotometric standards are used to define optical extinction in selected moments. FFT algorithm implemented in the application allows performing convolution (deconvolution) spectra with user-defined PSF. The object-oriented interface has been created using facilities of C++ libraries. Client/server model with Windows Socket functionality based on TCP/IP protocol is used to develop the application. It supports Dynamic Data Exchange conversation in server mode and uses Microsoft Exchange communication facilities.

  6. Absolute classification with unsupervised clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An absolute classification algorithm is proposed in which the class definition through training samples or otherwise is required only for a particular class of interest. The absolute classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering when one cluster is known initially. The definitions and statistics of the other classes are automatically developed through the weighted unsupervised clustering procedure, which is developed to keep the cluster corresponding to the class of interest from losing its identity as the class of interest. Once all the classes are developed, a conventional relative classifier such as the maximum-likelihood classifier is used in the classification.

  7. Documentation for the machine-readable version of the Absolute Calibration of Stellar Spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The machine-readable data file of The Absolute Calibration of Stellar Spectrophotometry as distributed by the Astronomical Data Center is described. The data file contains the absolute fluxes for 16 stars published in Tables 1 and 2 of Johnson (1980). The absolute calibrations were accomplished by combining the 13-color photometry calibrations of Johnson and Mitchell (1975) with spectra obtained with a Michelson spectrophotometer and covering the wavelength range 4000 to 10300 A (Johnson 1977). The agreement between this absolute calibration and another recent one based upon data for a Lyr and 109 Vir by Tug, White and Lockwood (1977) is shown by Johnson (1980) to be quite good.

  8. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  9. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  10. Absolute Standards for Climate Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, J.

    2016-10-01

    In a world of changing climate, political uncertainty, and ever-changing budgets, the benefit of measurements traceable to SI standards increases by the day. To truly resolve climate change trends on a decadal time scale, on-orbit measurements need to be referenced to something that is both absolute and unchanging. One such mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to definitively quantify climate change. In the CLARREO mission, we will utilize phase change cells in which a material is melted to calibrate the temperature of a blackbody that can then be observed by a spectrometer. A material's melting point is an unchanging physical constant that, through a series of transfers, can ultimately calibrate a spectrometer on an absolute scale. CLARREO consists of two primary instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer and a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy to calibrate other space-based instrumentation and thus transferring the absolute traceability. The status of various mission options will be presented.

  11. Flux Quanta Driven by High-Density Currents in Low-Impurity V3Si and LuNi2B2C: Free Flux Flow and Fluxon-Core Size Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gapud, Albert A.; Moraes, S.; Khadka, R. P.; Favreau, P.; Henderson, C.; Canfield, P. C.; Kogan, V. G.; Reyes, A. P.; Lumata, L. L.; Christen, David K; Thompson, James R

    2009-01-01

    High-density direct currents are used to drive flux quanta via the Lorentz force toward a highly ordered 'free flux flow' (FFF) dynamic state, made possible by the weak-pinning environment of high-quality, single-crystal samples of two low-T{sub c} superconducting compounds, V{sub 3}Si and LuNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C. We report the effect of the magnetic field-dependent fluxon-core size on flux flow resistivity {rho}{sub f}. Much progress has been made in minimizing the technical challenges associated with the use of high currents. Attainment of a FFF phase is indicated by the saturation at highest currents of flux flow dissipation levels that are well below the normal-state resistance and have field-dependent values. The field dependence of the corresponding {rho}{sub f} is shown to be consistent with a prediction based on a model for the decrease of fluxon-core size at higher fields in weak-coupling BCS s-wave materials.

  12. Absolute Infrared Calibration of Standard Stars by the Midcourse Space Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    fluxes of standard stars. Using standard stars to calibrate space- and ground-based observations of astronomical sources and Earth satellites has the... Satellite (IRAS). "* Cohen et al. (1 992a; Paper I) derived the absolute infrared flux for a Lyr by extrapolating the recommended visual flux of Hayes... characterized spectral bands. Cohen et al. (1992a) assigned the 1.45 percent uncertainty derived by Hayes (1985) for the calibration in the visual to the

  13. Optical and Radio Properties of QSOS as a Function of Absolute Luminosity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pica, Andrew Joseph

    1982-03-01

    Photometric data for nearly 250 quasars, BL Lacertids, and active galaxies have been obtained at the Rosemary Hill Observatory during a continuous 13-year monitoring program. Long-term optical records for 130 of these sources are employed in an effort to assess the physical and cosmological properties of quasi-stellar objects. Photographic P and B magnitudes were obtained with the 76- and 46-cm telescopes at Rosemary Hill. Corrections for galactic absorption, emission lines, and the K-term are applied to the raw data yielding monochromatic flux densities at a standard emitted wavelength of 2500 (ANGSTROM). Long -term light curves are compiled for all objects and 3 levels of activity are determined for each individual source. The MEAN, BASE, and MAX brightness levels are then used to study QSOs in their average, quiescent, and active phases, respectively. Absolute intrinsic luminosities of all sources in the sample are computed from the monochromatic flux densities based on relativistic cosmological models. Radio -emitting quasars, radio-quiet QSOs, and active galaxies fall into 3 distinct groups and are examined separately. The cosmological properties of QSOs are studied by plotting apparent magnitude vs. redshift, the so-called Hubble diagram. Scatter in the diagram due to variability is substantially reduced by plotting log z vs. the MEAN, BASE, and MAX flux densities. The brightest QSOs at each redshift are then chosen as "standard candles" in an effort to determine if quasars obey Hubble's law for expanding universe. It is found that they fit the Hubble relation quite well if certain selection effects are accounted for. Other evidence for the cosmological origin of QSOs is briefly discussed. Variability provides a test as to whether individual quasars are essentially multiple in nature (the "Christmas Tree" model), or are single coherent sources (such as a massive black hole). The amplitude of variability vs. absolute luminosity relation is used to discriminate

  14. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  15. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  16. Physics of negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  17. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  18. [Estimation of absolute risk for fracture].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2009-03-01

    Osteoporosis treatment aims to prevent fractures and maintain the QOL of the elderly. However, persons at high risk of future fracture cannot be effectively identified on the basis of bone density (BMD) alone, although BMD is used as an diagnostic criterion. Therefore, the WHO recommended that absolute risk for fracture (10-year probability of fracture) for each individual be evaluated and used as an index for intervention threshold. The 10-year probability of fracture is calculated based on age, sex, BMD at the femoral neck (body mass index if BMD is not available), history of previous fractures, parental hip fracture history, smoking, steroid use, rheumatoid arthritis, secondary osteoporosis and alcohol consumption. The WHO has just announced the development of a calculation tool (FRAX: WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool) in February this year. Fractures could be prevented more effectively if, based on each country's medical circumstances, an absolute risk value for fracture to determine when to start medical treatment is established and persons at high risk of fracture are identified and treated accordingly.

  19. Oblique-incidence sounder measurements with absolute propagation delay timing

    SciTech Connect

    Daehler, M.

    1990-05-03

    Timing from the Global Position Satellite (GPS) system has been applied to HF oblique incidence sounder measurements to produce ionograms whose propagation delay time scale is absolutely calibrated. Such a calibration is useful for interpreting ionograms in terms of the electron density true-height profile for the ionosphere responsible for the propagation. Use of the time variations in the shape of the electron density profile, in conjunction with an HF propagation model, is expected to provide better near-term (1-24 hour) HF propagation forecasts than are available from current updating systems, which use only the MUF. Such a capability may provide the basis for HF frequency management techniques which are more efficient than current methods. Absolute timing and other techniques applicable to automatic extraction of the electron-density profile from an ionogram will be discussed.

  20. Absolute calibration of optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Viana, N.B.; Mazolli, A.; Maia Neto, P.A.; Nussenzveig, H.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Mesquita, O.N.

    2006-03-27

    As a step toward absolute calibration of optical tweezers, a first-principles theory of trapping forces with no adjustable parameters, corrected for spherical aberration, is experimentally tested. Employing two very different setups, we find generally very good agreement for the transverse trap stiffness as a function of microsphere radius for a broad range of radii, including the values employed in practice, and at different sample chamber depths. The domain of validity of the WKB ('geometrical optics') approximation to the theory is verified. Theoretical predictions for the trapping threshold, peak position, depth variation, multiple equilibria, and 'jump' effects are also confirmed.

  1. Optimizing three-frequency Na, Fe, and He lidars for measurements of wind, temperature, and species density and the vertical fluxes of heat and constituents.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Chester S; Vargas, Fabio A

    2014-07-01

    The measurement accuracies of three-frequency resonance fluorescence Doppler lidars are limited by photon noise and uncertainties in the laser frequency and line width. We analyze the performance of Na, Fe, and He lidars using a new technique, which incorporates precise information about the absorption spectrum of the species and the pulse spectrum of the lasers. We derive the measurement errors associated with photon noise, laser frequency errors, and laser line width errors. Optimizing the lidar design, based upon the measurement requirements, can improve system performance by reducing the required integration times, enabling measurements to be made in less time or at higher altitudes where the densities and signal levels are smaller. The optimum frequency shift for observing heat and constituent transport velocities is 689 MHz (580 MHz) at night (day) for Na lidars and 774 MHz (597 MHz) for Fe lidars. The optimum frequency shift for observing winds, temperature, and He densities is 3.66 GHz (3.16 GHz) at night (day) for He lidars.

  2. Enhancement of the critical current density and flux pinning of MgB2 superconductor by nanoparticle SiC doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S. X.; Soltanian, S.; Horvat, J.; Wang, X. L.; Zhou, S. H.; Ionescu, M.; Liu, H. K.; Munroe, P.; Tomsic, M.

    2002-10-01

    Doping of MgB2 by nano-SiC and its potential for the improvement of flux pinning were studied for MgB2-x)(SiCx/2 with x=0, 0.2, and 0.3 and for 10 wt % nano-SiC-doped MgB2 samples. Cosubstitution of B by Si and C counterbalanced the effects of single-element doping, decreasing Tc by only 1.5 K, introducing intragrain pinning centers effective at high fields and temperatures, and significantly enhancing Jc and Hirr. Compared to the undoped sample, Jc for the 10 wt % doped sample increased by a factor of 32 at 5 K and 8 T, 42 at 20 K and 5 T, and 14 at 30 K and 2 T. At 20 K and 2 T, the Jc for the doped sample was 2.4 x105 A/cm2, which is comparable to Jc values for the best Ag/Bi-2223 tapes. At 20 K and 4 T, Jc was twice as high as for the best MgB2 thin films and an order of magnitude higher than for the best Fe/MgB2 tapes. The magnetic Jc is consistent with the transport Jc which remains at 20 000 A/cm2 even at 10 T and 5 K for the doped sample, an order of magnitude higher than the undoped one. Because of such high performance, it is anticipated that the future MgB2 conductors will be made using a formula of MgBxSiyCz instead of pure MgB2.

  3. An absolute photometric system at 10 and 20 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.; Lebofsky, M. J.; Low, F. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two new direct calibrations at 10 and 20 microns are presented in which terrestrial flux standards are referred to infrared standard stars. These measurements give both good agreement and higher accuracy when compared with previous direct calibrations. As a result, the absolute calibrations at 10 and 20 microns have now been determined with accuracies of 3 and 8 percent, respectively. A variety of absolute calibrations based on extrapolation of stellar spectra from the visible to 10 microns are reviewed. Current atmospheric models of A-type stars underestimate their fluxes by about 10 percent at 10 microns, whereas models of solar-type stars agree well with the direct calibrations. The calibration at 20 microns can probably be determined to about 5 percent by extrapolation from the more accurate result at 10 microns. The photometric system at 10 and 20 microns is updated to reflect the new absolute calibration, to base its zero point directly on the colors of A0 stars, and to improve the accuracy in the comparison of the standard stars.

  4. Absolute far-ultraviolet spectrophotometry of hot subluminous stars from Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holberg, J. B.; Ali, B.; Carone, T. E.; Polidan, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    Observations, obtained with the Voyager ultraviolet spectrometers, are presented of absolute fluxes for two well-known hot subluminous stars: BD + 28 deg 4211, an sdO, and G191 - B2B, a hot DA white dwarf. Complete absolute energy distributions for these two stars, from the Lyman limit at 912 A to 1 micron, are given. For BD + 28 deg 4211, a single power law closely represents the entire observed energy distribution. For G191 - B2B, a pure hydrogen model atmosphere provides an excellent match to the entire absolute energy distribution. Voyager absolute fluxes are discussed in relation to those reported from various sounding rocket experiments, including a recent rocket observation of BD + 28 deg 4211.

  5. Conical electromagnetic radiation flux concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Concentrator provides method of concentrating a beam of electromagnetic radiation into a smaller beam, presenting a higher flux density. Smaller beam may be made larger by sending radiation through the device in the reverse direction.

  6. Critical current density and flux pinning in La 2- xPr xCa 2 x Ba 2Cu 4+2 xO z ( x=0.1-0.5) superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayaprol, S.; Thaker, C. M.; Shah, N. A.; Kuberkar, D. G.

    2004-07-01

    Polycrystalline La 2- xPr xCa 2 xBa 2Cu 4+2 xO z (LPCaBCO) compounds with x=0.1-0.5 were synthesized by solid-state reaction method and studied by room temperature X-ray diffraction, dc resistivity, dc magnetization and iodometry. The superconducting transition temperatures in these tetragonal triple perovskite compounds increases from 32 to 62 K ( Tconset values) with increasing dopant concentration. The mixing of rare earth La 3+ and Pr 3+/4+ ions at rare earth site (La 3+) along with substitution of divalent Ca 2+ results in the shrinkage of unit cell volume. The contraction of unit cell volume due to larger ion being substituted by smaller ions, gives rise to creation of pinning centres in the unit cell leading to increase in critical current density and flux pinning.

  7. Combined Effect of Upper Critical Field and Flux Pinning on Enhancing Critical Current Density of In-situ MgB2/Fe Tapes with Various Carbon Sources Simultaneously Doped

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xifeng; Matsumoto, Akiyoshi; Kumakura, Hiroaki; Zhao, Yong; Yan, Guo; Feng, Yong

    2012-01-01

    MgB2/Fe tapes with various forms of mono- and co-doped C sources were prepared by an in-situ powder-in-tube (PIT) method to study the effect of different C sources on the transport critical current density Jc behavior of MgB2. A remarkable Jc improvement at 4.2 K under higher fields and a significant increase in the actual content of C substitution for B were achieved for the tapes with various C sources co-doped. For these co-doped tapes, both enhanced Hc2 and flux pinning properties are responsible for their Jc improvement in this work. Comparing the 4 wt % C9H11NO doped tape with the 20 wt % malic acid doped tape, the latter possesses much better in-field Jc performance at 4.2 K and 10 T and sharper field dependence of Jc, which suggests that the flux pinning plays a crucial role in determining its Jc behavior.

  8. Consistent set of nuclear parameters values for absolute INAA

    SciTech Connect

    Heft, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Gamma spectral analysis of irradiated material can be used to determine absolute disintegration rates for specific radionuclides. These data, together with measured values for the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes, and irradiation, cooling and counting time values, are all the experimental information required to do absolute Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. The calculations required to go from product photon emission rate to target nuclide amount depend upon values used for the thermal neutron capture cross-section, the resonance absorption integral, the half-life and photon branching ratios. Values for these parameters were determined by irradiating and analyzing a series of elemental standards. The results of these measurements were combined with values reported by other workers to arrive at a set of recommended values for the constants. Values for 114 nuclides are listed.

  9. Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2Flux) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, M

    2005-01-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The fluxes are obtained by the eddy covariance technique, which computes the flux as the mean product of the vertical wind component with CO2 and H2O densities, or estimated virtual temperature. A three-dimensional sonic anemometer is used to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the virtual (sonic) temperature. An infrared gas analyzer is used to obtain the CO2 and H2O densities. A separate sub-system also collects half-hour average measures of meteorological and soil variables from separate 4-m towers.

  10. Strategy for the absolute neutron emission measurement on ITER.

    PubMed

    Sasao, M; Bertalot, L; Ishikawa, M; Popovichev, S

    2010-10-01

    Accuracy of 10% is demanded to the absolute fusion measurement on ITER. To achieve this accuracy, a functional combination of several types of neutron measurement subsystem, cross calibration among them, and in situ calibration are needed. Neutron transport calculation shows the suitable calibration source is a DT/DD neutron generator of source strength higher than 10(10) n/s (neutron/second) for DT and 10(8) n/s for DD. It will take eight weeks at the minimum with this source to calibrate flux monitors, profile monitors, and the activation system.

  11. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Schönau, T; Zakosarenko, V; Schmelz, M; Stolz, R; Anders, S; Linzen, S; Meyer, M; Meyer, H-G

    2015-10-01

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth's magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz(1/2). The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 μm in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 μT amplitude without the need for recalibration.

  12. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Schönau, T.; Schmelz, M.; Stolz, R.; Anders, S.; Linzen, S.; Meyer, H.-G.; Zakosarenko, V.; Meyer, M.

    2015-10-15

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth’s magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}. The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 μm in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 μT amplitude without the need for recalibration.

  13. Absolute determination of local tropospheric OH concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armerding, Wolfgang; Comes, Franz-Josef

    1994-01-01

    Long path absorption (LPA) according to Lambert Beer's law is a method to determine absolute concentrations of trace gases such as tropospheric OH. We have developed a LPA instrument which is based on a rapid tuning of the light source which is a frequency doubled dye laser. The laser is tuned across two or three OH absorption features around 308 nm with a scanning speed of 0.07 cm(exp -1)/microsecond and a repetition rate of 1.3 kHz. This high scanning speed greatly reduces the fluctuation of the light intensity caused by the atmosphere. To obtain the required high sensitivity the laser output power is additionally made constant and stabilized by an electro-optical modulator. The present sensitivity is of the order of a few times 10(exp 5) OH per cm(exp 3) for an acquisition time of a minute and an absorption path length of only 1200 meters so that a folding of the optical path in a multireflection cell was possible leading to a lateral dimension of the cell of a few meters. This allows local measurements to be made. Tropospheric measurements have been carried out in 1991 resulting in the determination of OH diurnal variation at specific days in late summer. Comparison with model calculations have been made. Interferences are mainly due to SO2 absorption. The problem of OH self generation in the multireflection cell is of minor extent. This could be shown by using different experimental methods. The minimum-maximum signal to noise ratio is about 8 x 10(exp -4) for a single scan. Due to the small size of the absorption cell the realization of an open air laboratory is possible in which by use of an additional UV light source or by additional fluxes of trace gases the chemistry can be changed under controlled conditions allowing kinetic studies of tropospheric photochemistry to be made in open air.

  14. The solar wind mass flux problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leer, E.; Holzer, T. E.

    1991-01-01

    The variation of the proton flux with coronal temperature and density in thermally driven solar wind models is discussed. It is shown that the rapid increase of the proton flux with increasing temperature can be reduced by adiabatic cooling of the expanding plasma. A significant coronal helium abundance can also act as a 'regulator' for the solar wind proton flux.

  15. Elevation correction factor for absolute pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, Joseph W.; Sorrells, Mark R.

    1996-01-01

    With the arrival of highly accurate multi-port pressure measurement systems, conditions that previously did not affect overall system accuracy must now be scrutinized closely. Errors caused by elevation differences between pressure sensing elements and model pressure taps can be quantified and corrected. With multi-port pressure measurement systems, the sensing elements are connected to pressure taps that may be many feet away. The measurement system may be at a different elevation than the pressure taps due to laboratory space or test article constraints. This difference produces a pressure gradient that is inversely proportional to height within the interface tube. The pressure at the bottom of the tube will be higher than the pressure at the top due to the weight of the tube's column of air. Tubes with higher pressures will exhibit larger absolute errors due to the higher air density. The above effect is well documented but has generally been taken into account with large elevations only. With error analysis techniques, the loss in accuracy from elevation can be easily quantified. Correction factors can be applied to maintain the high accuracies of new pressure measurement systems.

  16. Astronomical Flux Standards: Getting to 1%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deustua, Susana; Cikota, Aleksandar; Hines, Dean C.; Bohlin, Ralph; Gordon, Karl

    2015-08-01

    The objective for pursuing sub-1% absolute photometric accuracies, and, establishing the Absolute Physical Flux of ever fainter standard stars, is motivated by the requirements of Dark Energy science with JWST and other facilities. Even with the best data available, the current determination of absolute physical flux is is plagued by the reliance on the Vega photometric system, which is known to be problematic primarily due to the fact that Vega is a pole-on rapid rotator with an infrared excess from its circumstellar disk! which makes it difficult to model. Vega is also far too bright for large aperture telescopes. In an effort to remedy these difficulties, teams from e.g. the National Institute of Standards (NIST), University of New Mexico, Johns Hopkins University and STScI have begun to develop a catalog of stars that have spectral energy distributions that are tied directly to SI (diode) standards with very precisely determined physical characteristics. A key element in this pursuit has been the efforts at STScI to measure the spectra of many of these objects with STIS. We discuss our program to extend this effort into the near-IR which is crucial to reliably extend the SEDs to longer wavelengths, including the mid IR. We describe results from our effort towards 1% absolute color calibration in the UV-VIS-NIR with Hubble Space Telescope's WFC3/IR observations of 15 carefully selected stars with the immediate objective of establishing their absolute flux.

  17. Interpreting Flux from Broadband Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Peter J.; Breeveld, Alice; Roming, Peter W. A.; Siegel, Michael

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the transformation of observed photometry into flux for the creation of spectral energy distributions (SED) and the computation of bolometric luminosities. We do this in the context of supernova studies, particularly as observed with the Swift spacecraft, but the concepts and techniques should be applicable to many other types of sources and wavelength regimes. Traditional methods of converting observed magnitudes to flux densities are not very accurate when applied to UV photometry. Common methods for extinction and the integration of pseudo-bolometric fluxes can also lead to inaccurate results. The sources of inaccuracy, though, also apply to other wavelengths. Because of the complicated nature of translating broadband photometry into monochromatic flux densities, comparison between observed photometry and a spectroscopic model is best done by forward modeling the spectrum into the count rates or magnitudes of the observations. We recommend that integrated flux measurements be made using a spectrum or SED which is consistent with the multi-band photometry rather than converting individual photometric measurements to flux densities, linearly interpolating between the points, and integrating. We also highlight some specific areas where the UV flux can be mischaracterized.

  18. Leaf conductance in relation to rate of CO/sub 2/ assimilation. I. Influence of nitrogen nutrition, phosphorus nutrition, photon flux density, and ambient partial pressure of CO/sub 2/ during ontogeny. [Zea mays

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.C.; Cowan, I.R.; Farquhar, G.D.

    1985-01-01

    Plants of Zea mays were grown with different concentrations of nitrate (0.6, 4, 12, and 24 millimolar) and phosphate (0.04, 0.13, 0.53, and 1.33 millimolar) supplied to the roots, photon flux densities (0.04, 0.13, 0.53, and 1.33 millimolar) supplied to the roots, photon flux densities (0.12, 0.5, and 2 millimoles per square meter per second), and ambient partial pressures of CO/sub 2/ (305 and 610 microbars). Differences in mineral nutrition and irradiance led to a large variation in rate of CO/sub 2/ assimilation per unit leaf area (A, 11 to 58 micromoles per square meter per second) when measured under standard conditions. The variation was shown, with the plants that had received different amounts of nitrate, to be related to variations in the nitrogen and chlorophyll contents, and phosphoenolpyruvate and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activities per unit leaf area. Irrespective of growth treatment, A and leaf conductance to CO/sub 2/ transfer (g), measured under standard conditions were in almost constant proportion, implying that intercellular partial pressure of CO/sub 2/ (p/sub i/), was almost constant at 95 microbars. The same proportionality was maintained as A and g increased in an initially nitrogen-deficient plant that had been supplied with abundant nitrate. It was shown that p/sub i/ measured at a given ambient partial pressure was not affected by the ambient partial pressure at which the plants had been grown, although it was different when measured at different ambient partial pressures. This suggests that the close coupling between A and g in these experiments is not associated with sensitivity of stomata to change in p/sub i/. Similar, though less comprehensive, experiments were done with Gosypium hirsutum, and yielded similar conclusions, except that the proportionality between A and g at normal ambient partial pressure of CO/sub 2/ implied p/sub i/ approx. = 200 microbars. 11 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  19. Instruments for measuring radiant thermal fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerashenko, O. A.; Sazhina, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    An absolute two-sided radiometer, designed on the principle of replacing absorbed radiant energy with electrical energy, is described. The sensitive element of the detector is a thermoelectric transducer of thermal flux. The fabrication technology, methods of measurement, technical characteristics, and general operation of the instrument are presented.

  20. Adiabatic Betatron deceleration of ionospheric charged particles: a new explanation for (i) the rapid outflow of ionospheric O ions, and for (ii) the increase of plasma mass density observed in magnetospheric flux tubes during main phases of geomagnetic s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, Joseph; Pierrard, Viviane; Darrouzet, Fabien

    2013-04-01

    Using European arrays of magnetometers and the cross-phase analysis to determine magnetic field line resonance frequencies, it has been found by Kale et al. (2009) that the plasma mass density within plasmaspheric flux tubes increased rapidly after the SSC of the Hallowe'en 2003 geomagnetic storms. These observations tend to confirm other independent experimental results, suggesting that heavy ion up-flow from the ionosphere is responsible for the observed plasma density increases during main phases of geomagnetic storms. The aim of our contribution is to point out that, during main phases, reversible Betatron effect induced by the increase of the southward Dst-magnetic field component (|Δ Bz|), diminishes slightly the perpendicular kinetic energy (W?) of charged particles spiraling along field lines. Furthermore, due to the conservation of the first adiabatic invariant (μ = Wm/ Bm) the mirror points of all ionospheric ions and electrons are lifted up to higher altitudes i.e. where the mirror point magnetic field (Bm) is slightly smaller. Note that the change of the mirror point altitude is given by: Δ hm = -1/3 (RE + hm) Δ Bm / Bm. It is independent of the ion species and it does not depend of their kinetic energy. The change of kinetic energy is determined by: Δ Wm = Wm Δ Bm / Bm. Both of these equations have been verified numerically by Lemaire et al. (2005; doi: 10.1016/S0273-1177(03)00099-1) using trajectory calculations in a simple time-dependant B-field model: i.e. the Earth's magnetic dipole, plus an increasing southward B-field component: i.e. the Dst magnetic field whose intensity becomes more and more negative during the main phase of magnetic storms. They showed that a variation of Bz (or Dst) by more than - 50 nT significantly increases the mirror point altitudes by more than 100 km which is about equal to scale height of the plasma density in the topside ionosphere where particles are almost collisionless (see Fig. 2 in Lemaire et al., 2005

  1. Hook spectroscopy as an atomic number density diagnostic applied to laser-ablated copper plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zerkle, D.K.; Sappey, A.D.; Gamble, T.K.

    1993-11-01

    Hook spectroscopy has been used to determine the absolute number density of ground state copper atoms in laser-ablated plasma plumes. An ablation laser power flux of {approximately} 1.5 GW/cm{sup 2} is applied to a solid copper target in a background gas, producing a plasma plume suitable for studying homogeneous copper vapor condensation. Density is measured at post-ablation time delays ranging from 10 {mu}s to 3 ms with 25 torr of argon as the background gas. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLEF) images containing relative density information are used in conjunction with the hook spectra to resolve spatially the absolute density within the plume. Copper atom densities thus measured ranged from 1.9 {times} 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} at a delay of 10 {mu}s to 2.7 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} at 3 ms delay in 25 torr of argon The decrease in density is due to the condensation of copper vapor to form fine particulate. As a combustion diagnostic, the hook method may prove extremely useful for the determination of metal impurity density in coal fired flames as well as a single -- shot OH density and temperature diagnostic.

  2. Force sensor using changes in magnetic flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor); Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A force sensor includes a magnetostrictive material and a magnetic field generator positioned in proximity thereto. A magnetic field is induced in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material such that lines of magnetic flux pass through the magnetostrictive material. A sensor positioned in the vicinity of the magnetostrictive material measures changes in one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux.

  3. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  4. ON A SUFFICIENT CONDITION FOR ABSOLUTE CONTINUITY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The formulation of a condition which yields absolute continuity when combined with continuity and bounded variation is the problem considered in the...Briefly, the formulation is achieved through a discussion which develops a proof by contradiction of a sufficiently theorem for absolute continuity which uses in its hypothesis the condition of continuity and bounded variation .

  5. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  6. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  7. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  8. Absolute measurements of short-pulse, long-pulse, and capsule-implosion backlighter sources at x-ray energies greater than 10 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, Brian

    2010-11-01

    Laser-generated x-ray backlighters with x-ray energies > 10 keV are becoming essential diagnostic tools for many high energy density experiments. Examples include studies of high areal density cores for ignition designs, mid- to high-Z capsule implosion experiments, absolute equation of state experiments, dynamic diffraction under extreme pressures, and the study of material strength. Significant progress has been made recently using short pulse lasers, coupled to metal foil targets [1], and imploding capsules for producing high energy backlighters. Measuring the absolute x-ray flux and spectra from these sources is required for quantitative analysis of experimental data and for the design and planning of future experiments. We have performed an extensive series of experiments to measure the absolute x-ray flux and spectra on the Titan, Omega, Omega-EP, and NIF laser systems, employing single-photon-counting detectors, crystal spectrometers, and multichannel differential filtering (Ross-pair) and filter stack bremsstrahlung spectrometers. Calibrations were performed on these instruments [2] enabling absolute measurements of backlighter spectra to be made from 10 keV to 1 MeV. Various backlighter techniques that generate either quasi-monochromatic sources or broadband continuum sources will be presented and compared. For Molybdenum Kα backlighters at x-ray energy of ˜17 keV we measure conversion efficiencies of 1.3x10-4 using 1 μm wavelength short-pulse lasers at an intensity of ˜1x10^17 W/cm^2. This is a factor of ˜2 high than using 0.3 μm wavelength long-pulse lasers at an intensity of ˜1x10^16 W/cm^2. Other types of backlighter targets include capsule implosion backlighters that can generate a very bright ``white-light'' continuum x-ray source and high-Z gas filled capsules that generate a quasi-line-source of x rays. We will present and compare the absolute laser energy to x-ray conversion efficiencies for these different backlighter techniques and give

  9. On the role of precursor powder composition in controlling microstructure, flux pinning, and the critical current density of Ag/Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pei; Naderi, Golsa; Schwartz, Justin; Shen, Tengming

    2017-03-01

    Precursor powder composition is known to strongly affect the critical current density (J c) of Ag/Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (Bi-2212) wires. However, reasons for such J c dependence have not yet been fully understood, compromising our ability to achieve further optimization. We systematically examined superconducting properties, microstructural evolution and phase transformation, and grain boundaries of Bi-2212 conductors fabricated from precursor powders with a range of compositions using a combination of transport-current measurements, a quench technique to freeze microstructures at high temperatures during heat treatment, and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Samples include both dip-coated tapes and round wires, among which a commercial round wire carries a high J c of 7600 A mm-2 at 4.2 K, self-field and 2600 A mm-2 at 4.2 K, 20 T, respectively. In the melt, this high-J c conductor, made using a composition of Bi2.17Sr1.94Ca0.89Cu2Ox, contains a uniform dispersion of fine alkaline-earth cuprate (AEC) and copper-free solid phases, whereas several low-J c conductors contain large AEC particles. Such significant differences in the phase morphologies in the melt are accompanied by a drastic difference in the formation kinetics of Bi-2212 during recrystallization cooling. STEM studies show that Bi-2212 grain colonies in the high-J c conductors have a high density of Bi2Sr2CuO y (Bi-2201) intergrowths, whereas a low-J c conductor, made using Bi2.14Sr1.66Ca1.24Cu1.96O x , is nearly free of them. STEM investigation shows grain boundaries in low-J c conductors are often insulated with a Bi-rich amorphous phase. High-J c conductors also show higher flux-pinning strength, which we ascribe to their higher Bi-2201 intergrowth density.

  10. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM

  11. Absolute limit on rotation of gravitationally bound stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1994-03-01

    The authors seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein`s theory of relativity, Le Chatelier`s principle, causality and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass-shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a M = 1.442 M{circle_dot} neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). If the limit were found to be broken by any pulsar, it would signal that the confined hadronic phase of ordinary nucleons and nuclei is only metastable, an extraordinary conclusion.

  12. Absolute limit on rotation of gravitationally bound stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendenning, N. K.

    1994-03-01

    The authors seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein's theory of relativity, Le Chatelier's principle, causality, and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass-shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a M = 1.442 solar mass neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). If the limit were found to be broken by any pulsar, it would signal that the confined hadronic phase of ordinary nucleons and nuclei is only metastable.

  13. Absolute realization of low BRDF value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zilong; Liao, Ningfang; Li, Ping; Wang, Yu

    2010-10-01

    Low BRDF value is widespread used in many critical domains such as space and military fairs. These values below 0.1 Sr-1 . So the Absolute realization of these value is the most critical issue in the absolute measurement of BRDF. To develop the Absolute value realization theory of BRDF , defining an arithmetic operators of BRDF , achieving an absolute measurement Eq. of BRDF based on radiance. This is a new theory method to solve the realization problem of low BRDF value. This theory method is realized on a self-designed common double orientation structure in space. By designing an adding structure to extend the range of the measurement system and a control and processing software, Absolute realization of low BRDF value is achieved. A material of low BRDF value is measured in this measurement system and the spectral BRDF value are showed within different angles allover the space. All these values are below 0.4 Sr-1 . This process is a representative procedure about the measurement of low BRDF value. A corresponding uncertainty analysis of this measurement data is given depend on the new theory of absolute realization and the performance of the measurement system. The relative expand uncertainty of the measurement data is 0.078. This uncertainty analysis is suitable for all measurements using the new theory of absolute realization and the corresponding measurement system.

  14. Theoretical and experimental analysis of the sedimentation kinetics of concentrated red cell suspensions in a centrifugal field: determination of the aggregation and deformation of RBC by flux density and viscosity functions.

    PubMed

    Lerche, D; Frömer, D

    2001-01-01

    The flow properties of blood are mostly determined using various viscometric approaches, and described in terms of a shear rate or shear stress dependent apparent viscosity. The interpretation of results are rather difficult, especially at low shear rates when particle sedimentation and migration within the viscometer gap are significant. By contrast, analysing the separation process in concentrated RBC suspensions in a centrifugal field also yields information about the viscosity function, including particle-particle interaction and deformation parameters. In this paper, the sedimentation process is approached by means of the theory of kinematic waves and theoretically described by solving the corresponding one-dimensional quasi-linear partial differential equation based on viscosity/flow function as a function of volume concentration. The sedimentation kinetics of rigid spherical RBC suspended in saline and normal RBC suspended in Dx-saline solutions were investigated by means of a separation analyser (LUMiFuge 114). The instrument detects the light transmission over the total length of the cell containing the suspension. During centrifugation the analyser automatically determines the position of the particle free fluid/suspension interface or the sediment by means of a special algorithm. The data obtained with sedimentation of rigid spherical RBC at different volume concentrations demonstrate that, in the case of suspensions rotated in containers of constant cross section, there is good agreement between the theory of kinematic waves developed by Anestis and Schneider (1983) and the results of the experiments. Such good agreement was obtained even though a restrictive one-dimensional model was used to obtain the theoretically derived sedimentation time course. In addition, we describe an algorithm enabling the experimental determination of the viscosity and related flux density function to be made for any suspension. Through this approach, we investigated in

  15. VCD to determine absolute configuration of natural product molecules: secolignans from Peperomia blanda.

    PubMed

    Felippe, Lidiane G; Batista, João M; Baldoqui, Debora C; Nascimento, Isabele R; Kato, Massuo J; He, Yanan; Nafie, Laurence A; Furlan, Maysa

    2012-06-07

    The absolute configuration and solution-state conformers of three peperomin-type secolignans isolated from Peperomia blanda (Piperaceae) are unambiguously determined by using vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy associated with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Advantages of VCD over the electronic form of CD for the analysis of diastereomers are also discussed. This work extends our growing knowledge about secondary metabolites within the Piperaceae family species while providing a definitive and straightforward method to assess the absolute stereochemistry of secolignans.

  16. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  17. Magnifying absolute instruments for optically homogeneous regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tyc, Tomas

    2011-09-15

    We propose a class of magnifying absolute optical instruments with a positive isotropic refractive index. They create magnified stigmatic images, either virtual or real, of optically homogeneous three-dimensional spatial regions within geometrical optics.

  18. The Simplicity Argument and Absolute Morality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the author has maintained that there is a similarity of thought to be found in the writings of Cudworth, Emerson, and Husserl in his investigation of an absolute system of morality. (Author/RK)

  19. Absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, O. A.

    1993-11-01

    The program SEEF is a Fortran IV computer code for the extraction of absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions. When the evaporation residue is fed by its parents, only cumulative cross sections will be obtained from off-line gamma ray measurements. But, if one has the parent excitation function (experimental or calculated), this code will make it possible to determine absolute cross sections of any exit channel.

  20. Kelvin and the absolute temperature scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlichson, Herman

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the absolute temperature scale of Kelvin (William Thomson). Kelvin found that Carnot's axiom about heat being a conserved quantity had to be abandoned. Nevertheless, he found that Carnot's fundamental work on heat engines was correct. Using the concept of a Carnot engine Kelvin found that Q1/Q2 = T1/T2. Thermometers are not used to obtain absolute temperatures since they are calculated temperatures.

  1. Integral Equation Space-Energy Flux Synthesis for Spherical Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    flux distribution eigenfunction An eigenvalue associated with in(r) n(E) neutron number density in units...technique for obtaining the spatial and energy neutron flux distributions in multiplying systems. In IES, the integral form of the neutron transport... FLUX SYNTHESIS FOR SPHERICAL SYSTEMS I. Introduction The calculations of neutron flux distributions and neutron growth rate (a) for multiplying

  2. Absolute Emission Spectroscopy of Electronically Excited Products of Dissociative Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypkowski, M. P.; Gougousi, T.; Golde, M. F.; Johnsen, R.

    1997-10-01

    We have employed spatially-resolved optical emission spectroscopy in a flowing afterglow plasma to investigate radiations in the 200-400 nm range resulting from electron-ion dissociative recombination. Calibrated emission data combined with Langmuir probe electron-density measurements are analyzed to obtain branching ratios for electronically excited recombination products. In particular, we will report absolute yields of CO(a^3Π) resulting from recombining CO_2^+ ions, NO(B^2Π) from N_2O^+, OH(A^2Σ^+) from HCO_2^+, as well as NH(A^3Π_i), and OH(A^2Σ^+) from the recombination of N_2OH^+ ions.

  3. Ultraviolet photometry from the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory. XXI - Absolute energy distribution of stars in the ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, R. C.; Code, A. D.; Fairchild, E. T.

    1976-01-01

    The absolute energy distribution in the ultraviolet is given for the stars alpha Vir, eta UMa, and alpha Leo. The calibration is based on absolute heterochromatic photometry between 2920 and 1370 A carried out with an Aerobee sounding rocket. The fundamental radiation standard is the synchrotron radiation from 240-MeV electrons in a certain synchrotron storage ring. On the basis of the sounding-rocket calibration, the preliminary OAO-2 spectrometer calibration has been revised; the fluxes for the three program stars are tabulated in energy per second per square centimeter per unit wavelength interval.

  4. Absolute stellar photometry on moderate-resolution FPA images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    An extensive database of star (and Moon) images has been collected by the ground-based RObotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) as part of the US Geological Survey program for lunar calibration. The stellar data are used to derive nightly atmospheric corrections for the observations from extinction measurements, and absolute calibration of the ROLO sensors is based on observations of Vega and published reference flux and spectrum data. The ROLO telescopes were designed for imaging the Moon at moderate resolution, thus imposing some limitations for the stellar photometry. Attaining accurate stellar photometry with the ROLO image data has required development of specialized processing techniques. A key consideration is consistency in discriminating the star core signal from the off-axis point spread function. The analysis and processing methods applied to the ROLO stellar image database are described. ?? 2009 BIPM and IOP Publishing Ltd.

  5. A SOLAR SPECTROSCOPIC ABSOLUTE ABUNDANCE OF ARGON FROM RESIK

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, J.; Sylwester, B.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Kuznetsov, V. D. E-mail: kjhp@mssl.ucl.ac.u

    2010-09-10

    Observations of He-like and H-like Ar (Ar XVII and Ar XVIII) lines at 3.949 A and 3.733 A, respectively, with the RESIK X-ray spectrometer on the CORONAS-F spacecraft, together with temperatures and emission measures from the two channels of GOES, have been analyzed to obtain the abundance of Ar in flare plasmas in the solar corona. The line fluxes per unit emission measure show a temperature dependence like that predicted from theory and lead to spectroscopically determined values for the absolute Ar abundance, A(Ar) = 6.44 {+-} 0.07 (Ar XVII) and 6.49 {+-} 0.16 (Ar XVIII), which are in agreement to within uncertainties. The weighted mean is 6.45 {+-} 0.06, which is between two recent compilations of the solar Ar abundance and suggests that the photospheric and coronal abundances of Ar are very similar.

  6. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed.

  7. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  8. Airborne stellar spectrophotometry from 1.2 to 5.5 microns - Absolute calibration and spectra of stars earlier than M3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strecker, D. W.; Erickson, E. F.; Witteborn, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    Airborne infrared spectrophotometry (1.2-5.5 microns, 1.5% resolution) is presented for 13 stars which have been extensively used as infrared calibration objects: alpha Lyr, alpha CMA, alpha UMi, beta Dra, and mu Her; the K giants beta Gem, alpha UMa, alpha Boo, gamma-1 And, and alpha Tau; and the M giants beta And, beta Peg, and alpha Cet. These spectra, obtained using NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory and Lear Jet Observatory, are virtually free of the interfering effects of terrestrial absorptions. Absolute calibration of the spectrophotometry was based on the theoretical model of alpha Lyr by Schild, Peterson, and Oke (1971), which fits photometric measurements at shorter wavelengths. The resulting flux densities are compared with previous ground-based photometry.

  9. Quantitative standards for absolute linguistic universals.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Steven T; Gibson, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Absolute linguistic universals are often justified by cross-linguistic analysis: If all observed languages exhibit a property, the property is taken to be a likely universal, perhaps specified in the cognitive or linguistic systems of language learners and users. In many cases, these patterns are then taken to motivate linguistic theory. Here, we show that cross-linguistic analysis will very rarely be able to statistically justify absolute, inviolable patterns in language. We formalize two statistical methods--frequentist and Bayesian--and show that in both it is possible to find strict linguistic universals, but that the numbers of independent languages necessary to do so is generally unachievable. This suggests that methods other than typological statistics are necessary to establish absolute properties of human language, and thus that many of the purported universals in linguistics have not received sufficient empirical justification.

  10. Absolute Distance Measurement with the MSTAR Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Peters, Robert; Burger, Johan; Ahn, Seh-Won; Steier, William H.; Fetterman, Harrold R.; Chang, Yian

    2003-01-01

    The MSTAR sensor (Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging) is a new system for measuring absolute distance, capable of resolving the integer cycle ambiguity of standard interferometers, and making it possible to measure distance with sub-nanometer accuracy. The sensor uses a single laser in conjunction with fast phase modulators and low frequency detectors. We describe the design of the system - the principle of operation, the metrology source, beamlaunching optics, and signal processing - and show results for target distances up to 1 meter. We then demonstrate how the system can be scaled to kilometer-scale distances.

  11. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed.

  12. Absolute Calibration of the AXAF Telescope Effective Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, E.; Cohen, L.; Edgar, R.; Evans, I.; Freeman, M.; Gaetz, T.; Jerius, D.; McDermott, W. C.; McKinnon, P.; Murray, S.; Podgorski, W.; Schwartz, D.; VanSpeybroeck, L.; Wargelin, B.; Zombeck, M.; Weisskopf, M.; Elsner, R.; ODell, S.; Tennant, A.; Kolodziejczak, J.

    1997-01-01

    The prelaunch calibration of AXAF encompasses many aspects of the telescope. In principle, all that is needed is the complete point response function. This is, however, a function of energy, off-axis angle of the source, and operating mode of the facility. No single measurement would yield the entire result. Also, any calibration made prior to launch will be affected by changes in conditions after launch, such as the change from one g to zero g. The reflectivity of the mirror and perhaps even the detectors can change as well, for example by addition or removal of small amounts of material deposited on their surfaces. In this paper, we give a broad view of the issues in performing such a calibration, and discuss how they are being addressed in prelaunch preparation of AXAF. As our title indicates, we concentrate here on the total throughput of the observatory. This can be thought of as the integral of the point response function, i.e. the encircled energy, out ot the largest practical solid angle for an observation. Since there is no standard x-ray source in the sky whose flux is known to the -1% accuracy we are trying to achieve, we must do this calibration on the ground. we also must provide a means for monitoring any possible changes in this calibration from pre-launch until on-orbit operation can transfer the calibration to a celestial x-ray source whose emission is stable. In this paper, we analyze the elements of the absolute throughput calibration, which we call Effective Area. We review the requirements for calibrations of components or subsystems of the AXAF facility, including mirror, detectors, and gratings. We show how it is necessary to calibrate this ground-based detection system at standard man-made x-ray sources, such as electron storage rings. We present the status of all these calibrations, with indications of the measurements remaining to be done, even though the measurements on the AXAF flight optics and detectors will have been completed by the

  13. Leonid Storm Flux Analysis From One Leonid MAC Video AL50R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gural, Peter S.; Jenniskens, Peter; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A detailed meteor flux analysis is presented of a seventeen-minute portion of one videotape, collected on November 18, 1999, during the Leonid Multi-instrument Aircraft Campaign. The data was recorded around the peak of the Leonid meteor storm using an intensified CCD camera pointed towards the low southern horizon. Positions of meteors on the sky were measured. These measured meteor distributions were compared to a Monte Carlo simulation, which is a new approach to parameter estimation for mass ratio and flux. Comparison of simulated flux versus observed flux levels, seen between 1:50:00 and 2:06:41 UT, indicate a magnitude population index of r = 1.8 +/- 0.1 and mass ratio of s = 1.64 +/- 0.06. The average spatial density of the material contributing to the Leonid storm peak is measured at 0.82 +/- 0.19 particles per square kilometer per hour for particles of at least absolute visual magnitude +6.5. Clustering analysis of the arrival times of Leonids impacting the earth's atmosphere over the total observing interval shows no enhancement or clumping down to time scales of the video frame rate. This indicates a uniformly random temporal distribution of particles in the stream encountered during the 1999 epoch. Based on the observed distribution of meteors on the sky and the model distribution, recommendations am made for the optimal pointing directions for video camera meteor counts during future ground and airborne missions.

  14. Leonid Storm Flux Analysis from One Leonid Mac Video AL50R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gural, Peter S.; Jenniskens, Peter

    A detailed meteor flux analysis is presented of a seventeen-minute portion of one videotape, collected on November 18, 1999, during the Leonid Multi-instrument Aircraft Campaign. The data was recorded around the peak of the Leonid meteor storm using an intensified CCD camera pointed towards the low southern horizon. Positions of meteors on the sky were measured. These measured meteor distributions were compared to a Monte Carlo simulation, which is a new approach to parameter estimation for mass ratio and flux. Comparison of simulated flux versus observed flux levels, seen between 1:50:00 and 2:06:41 UT, indicate a magnitude population index of r = 1.8 +/- 0.1 and mass ratio of s = 1.64 +/- 0.06. The average spatial density of the material contributing to the Leonid storm peak is measured at 0.82 +/- 0.19 particles per square kilometer per hour for particles of at least absolute visual magnitude +6.5. Clustering analysis of the arrival times of Leonids impacting the earth's atmosphere over the total observing interval shows no enhancement or clumping down to time scales of the video frame rate. This indicates a uniformly random temporal distribution of particles in the stream encountered during the 1999 epoch. Based on the observed distribution of meteors on the sky and the model distribution, recommendations are made for the optimal pointing directions for video camera meteor counts during future ground and airborne missions.

  15. Magnetic flux penetration into superconducting thin films.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peabody, G. E.; Meservey, R.

    1972-01-01

    The quantum-interference technique developed by Meservey (1965) is used to measure directly the absolute value of the penetration depth in lead in tin superconducting thin films. The technique assumes that the change in phase of the superconducting wave function around any contour within the superconductor must be 2 pi n, where n is a nonnegative integer. Results show that the critical current of a superconducting interferometer with two parallel junctions is not strictly periodic in the applied magnetic flux with a period equal to the flux quantum because of the magnetic field dependence of the critical currents of the junctions.

  16. A new determination of the Geneva photometric passbands and their absolute calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufener, F.; Nicolet, B.

    The consensus regarding the absolute calibrations of the spectra of alpha Lyr and subdwarfs provoked a revision of the calibration of the Geneva photometric system passbands. The alterations made to the earlier version by Rufener and Maeder (1971) are smaller than plus or minus -5 percent. The new response functions are presented in tabular form for an equiphotonic flux. An absolute spectrophotometric adjustment allows to obtain for each entry of the Geneva catalog (28,000 stars) a corresponding spectrophotometric description in SI units. The definition and the means of computing the necessary quasi-isophotal frequencies or wavelengths are given. The coherence of the Geneva catalog with several sets of absolute spectrophotometric data is examined. A correction for the entire Gunn and Stryker (1983) catalog is proposed.

  17. Impurity identifications, concentrations and particle fluxes from spectral measurements of the EXTRAP T2R plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menmuir, S.; Kuldkepp, M.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-10-01

    An absolute intensity calibrated 0.5 m spectrometer with optical multi-channel analyser detector was used to observe the visible-UV radiation from the plasma in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch experiment. Spectral lines were identified indicating the presence of oxygen, chromium, iron and molybdenum impurities in the hydrogen plasma. Certain regions of interest were examined in more detail and at different times in the plasma discharge. Impurity concentration calculations were made using the absolute intensities of lines of OIV and OV measured at 1-2 ms into the discharge generating estimates of the order of 0.2% of ne in the central region rising to 0.7% of ne at greater radii for OIV and 0.3% rising to 0.6% for OV. Edge electron temperatures of 0.5-5 eV at electron densities of 5-10×1011 cm-3 were calculated from the measured relative intensities of hydrogen Balmer lines. The absolute intensities of hydrogen lines and of multiplets of neutral chromium and molybdenum were used to determine particle fluxes (at 4-5 ms into the plasma) of the order 1×1016, 7×1013 and 3×1013 particles cm-2 s-1, respectively.

  18. Comparative vs. Absolute Judgments of Trait Desirability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstee, Willem K. B.

    1970-01-01

    Reversals of trait desirability are studied. Terms indicating conservativw behavior appeared to be judged relatively desirable in comparative judgement, while traits indicating dynamic and expansive behavior benefited from absolute judgement. The reversal effect was shown to be a general one, i.e. reversals were not dependent upon the specific…

  19. New Techniques for Absolute Gravity Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-07

    Hammond, J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J. A., and Iliff, R. L. (1979) The AFGL absolute gravity system...International Gravimetric Bureau, No. L:I-43. 7. Hammond. J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J.A., and

  20. An Absolute Electrometer for the Physics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.; Cartacci, A.

    2009-01-01

    A low-cost, easy-to-use absolute electrometer is presented: two thin metallic plates and an electronic balance, usually available in a laboratory, are used. We report on the very good performance of the device that allows precise measurements of the force acting between two charged plates. (Contains 5 footnotes, 2 tables, and 6 figures.)

  1. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  2. Absolute Positioning Using the Global Positioning System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has becom a useful tool In providing relativ survey...Includes the development of a low cost navigator for wheeled vehicles. ABSTRACT The Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has become a useful tool In providing...technique of absolute or point positioning involves the use of a single Global Positioning System ( GPS ) receiver to determine the three-dimenslonal

  3. The Solar Radio Microwave Flux and the Sunspot Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalgaard, L.; Hudson, H. S.

    2009-12-01

    Since 1947 the flux of microwaves from the Sun at wavelengths between 3 and 30 cm [frequencies between 10 and 1 GHz] has been routinely measured. This emission comes from both thromosphere and the corona and has two main sources: thermal bremsstrahlung (free-free emission) and thermal gyroradiation. These mechanisms give rise to enhanced radiation when the density and magnetic field increase, so the microwave radiation is a good measure of general solar activity. Strong magnetic fields occur in the network and can persist for weeks or longer; hence there is a strong rotational signal in the emission superposed on a solar cycle variation of the background coronal signal. The radio flux measurements can be calibrated absolutely and are not very sensitive to observing conditions, and in principle have no personal equation. They may thus be the most objective measure of solar activity, and our many decades-long flux record could throw light on the important issue of the long-term variation of solar activity. The longest series of observations F10.7, begun by Covington in Ottawa, Canada in April 1947 and maintained to this day. Other observatories also have long and continuing series of measurements of the microwave flux. One can now ask how this measure of solar activity compares to other measures, in particular the sunspot number. We correlate the sunspot number against the F10.7 flux for the interval 1951-1988, and obtain a good polynomial fit (R^2 = 0.977) up until ~1989.0 after which time the observed sunspot number falls progressively below the fitted number. Three obvious hypotheses present themselves: 1) The sunspot counting procedure or observers have changed, with resulting artificial changes of the sunspot number as they have in the past. 2) Physical changes in the corona or chromosphere have occurred. 3) Livingston & Penn’s observations that the sunspots are getting warmer during the last decade, leading to a decreased contrast with the surrounding

  4. Absolute Radiation Thermometry in the NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünger, L.; Taubert, R. D.; Gutschwager, B.; Anhalt, K.; Briaudeau, S.; Sadli, M.

    2017-04-01

    A near infrared (NIR) radiation thermometer (RT) for temperature measurements in the range from 773 K up to 1235 K was characterized and calibrated in terms of the "Mise en Pratique for the definition of the Kelvin" (MeP-K) by measuring its absolute spectral radiance responsivity. Using Planck's law of thermal radiation allows the direct measurement of the thermodynamic temperature independently of any ITS-90 fixed-point. To determine the absolute spectral radiance responsivity of the radiation thermometer in the NIR spectral region, an existing PTB monochromator-based calibration setup was upgraded with a supercontinuum laser system (0.45 μm to 2.4 μm) resulting in a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio. The RT was characterized with respect to its nonlinearity, size-of-source effect, distance effect, and the consistency of its individual temperature measuring ranges. To further improve the calibration setup, a new tool for the aperture alignment and distance measurement was developed. Furthermore, the diffraction correction as well as the impedance correction of the current-to-voltage converter is considered. The calibration scheme and the corresponding uncertainty budget of the absolute spectral responsivity are presented. A relative standard uncertainty of 0.1 % (k=1) for the absolute spectral radiance responsivity was achieved. The absolute radiometric calibration was validated at four temperature values with respect to the ITS-90 via a variable temperature heatpipe blackbody (773 K ...1235 K) and at a gold fixed-point blackbody radiator (1337.33 K).

  5. Fast flux locked loop

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-09-10

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  6. A Flux Scale for Southern Hemisphere 21 cm Epoch of Reionization Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Daniel C.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Aguirre, James E.; Ali, Zaki; Bowman, Judd; Bradley, Richard F.; Carilli, Chris L.; DeBoer, David R.; Dexter, Matthew R.; Gugliucci, Nicole E.; Klima, Pat; MacMahon, Dave H. E.; Manley, Jason R.; Moore, David F.; Pober, Jonathan C.; Stefan, Irina I.; Walbrugh, William P.

    2013-10-01

    We present a catalog of spectral measurements covering a 100-200 MHz band for 32 sources, derived from observations with a 64 antenna deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) in South Africa. For transit telescopes such as PAPER, calibration of the primary beam is a difficult endeavor and errors in this calibration are a major source of error in the determination of source spectra. In order to decrease our reliance on an accurate beam calibration, we focus on calibrating sources in a narrow declination range from -46° to -40°. Since sources at similar declinations follow nearly identical paths through the primary beam, this restriction greatly reduces errors associated with beam calibration, yielding a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of derived source spectra. Extrapolating from higher frequency catalogs, we derive the flux scale using a Monte Carlo fit across multiple sources that includes uncertainty from both catalog and measurement errors. Fitting spectral models to catalog data and these new PAPER measurements, we derive new flux models for Pictor A and 31 other sources at nearby declinations; 90% are found to confirm and refine a power-law model for flux density. Of particular importance is the new Pictor A flux model, which is accurate to 1.4% and shows that between 100 MHz and 2 GHz, in contrast with previous models, the spectrum of Pictor A is consistent with a single power law given by a flux at 150 MHz of 382 ± 5.4 Jy and a spectral index of -0.76 ± 0.01. This accuracy represents an order of magnitude improvement over previous measurements in this band and is limited by the uncertainty in the catalog measurements used to estimate the absolute flux scale. The simplicity and improved accuracy of Pictor A's spectrum make it an excellent calibrator in a band important for experiments seeking to measure 21 cm emission from the epoch of reionization.

  7. How the Saturnian Magnetosphere Conserves Magnetic Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, R. L.; Wei, H.; Russell, C. T.; Arridge, C. S.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2012-12-01

    The magnetospheric dynamics at Saturn are driven by the centrifugal force of near co-rotating water group ions released at a rate of hundreds of kilograms per second by Saturn's moon Enceladus. The plasma is accelerated up to co-rotation speed by the magnetospheric magnetic field coupled to the Saturnian ionosphere. The plasma is lost ultimately through the process of magnetic reconnection in the tail. Conservation of magnetic flux requires that plasma-depleted, "empty" flux tubes return magnetic flux to the inner magnetosphere. After completion of the initial inrush of the reconnected and largely emptied flux tubes inward of the reconnection point, the flux tubes face the outflowing plasma and must move inward against the flow. Observations of such flux tubes have been identified in the eight years of Cassini magnetometer data. The occurrence of these tubes is observed at all local times indicating slow inward transport of the tubes relative to the co-rotation speed. Depleted flux tubes observed in the equatorial region appear as an enhancement in the magnitude of the magnetic field, whereas the same flux tubes observed at higher latitudes appear as decreased field strength. The difference in appearance of the low latitude and the high latitude tubes is due to the plasma environment just outside the tube. Warm low-density plasma fills the inside of the flux tube at all latitudes. This flux tube thus will expand in the less dense regions away from the magnetic equator and will be observed as a decrease in the magnitude of the magnetic field from the background. These flux tubes near the equator, where the plasma density outside of the flux tube is much greater, will be observed as an enhancement in the magnitude of the magnetic field. Cassini magnetometer and CAPS data are examined to understand the properties of these flux tubes and their radial and latitudinal evolution throughout the Saturnian magnetospheric environment.

  8. Consistent thermostatistics forbids negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hilbert, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, a considerable number of theories and experiments have claimed the existence of negative absolute temperature in spin systems and ultracold quantum gases. This has led to speculation that ultracold gases may be dark-energy analogues and also suggests the feasibility of heat engines with efficiencies larger than one. Here, we prove that all previous negative temperature claims and their implications are invalid as they arise from the use of an entropy definition that is inconsistent both mathematically and thermodynamically. We show that the underlying conceptual deficiencies can be overcome if one adopts a microcanonical entropy functional originally derived by Gibbs. The resulting thermodynamic framework is self-consistent and implies that absolute temperature remains positive even for systems with a bounded spectrum. In addition, we propose a minimal quantum thermometer that can be implemented with available experimental techniques.

  9. Absolute measurement of length with nanometric resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, D.; Garoi, F.; Timcu, A.; Damian, V.; Logofatu, P. C.; Nascov, V.

    2005-08-01

    Laser interferometer displacement measuring transducers have a well-defined traceability route to the definition of the meter. The laser interferometer is de-facto length scale for applications in micro and nano technologies. However their physical unit -half lambda is too large for nanometric resolution. Fringe interpolation-usual technique to improve the resolution-lack of reproducibility could be avoided using the principles of absolute distance measurement. Absolute distance refers to the use of interferometric techniques for determining the position of an object without the necessity of measuring continuous displacements between points. The interference pattern as produced by the interference of two point-like coherent sources is fitted to a geometric model so as to determine the longitudinal location of the target by minimizing least square errors. The longitudinal coordinate of the target was measured with accuracy better than 1 nm, for a target position range of 0.4μm.

  10. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  11. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  12. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum.

  13. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Raffaele, L.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Marchetto, F.; Sacchi, R.; Giordanengo, S.; Monaco, V.

    2013-07-01

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  14. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  15. Reconnecting flux-rope dynamo.

    PubMed

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Barenghi, Carlo F; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-11-01

    We develop a model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multiscale model of turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. This model can be viewed as an implementation of the asymptotic limit R_{m}-->infinity for a continuous magnetic field, where magnetic dissipation is strongly localized to small regions of strong-field gradients. We investigate the kinetic-energy release into heat mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux-rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3 , consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  16. Reconnecting flux-rope dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-11-01

    We develop a model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multiscale model of turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. This model can be viewed as an implementation of the asymptotic limit Rm→∞ for a continuous magnetic field, where magnetic dissipation is strongly localized to small regions of strong-field gradients. We investigate the kinetic-energy release into heat mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux-rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3 , consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  17. Negative absolute temperature for mobile particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Simon; Ronzheimer, Philipp; Schreiber, Michael; Hodgman, Sean; Bloch, Immanuel; Schneider, Ulrich

    2013-05-01

    Absolute temperature is usually bound to be strictly positive. However, negative absolute temperature states, where the occupation probability of states increases with their energy, are possible in systems with an upper energy bound. So far, such states have only been demonstrated in localized spin systems with finite, discrete spectra. We realized a negative absolute temperature state for motional degrees of freedom with ultracold bosonic 39K atoms in an optical lattice, by implementing the attractive Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. This new state strikingly revealed itself by a quasimomentum distribution that is peaked at maximum kinetic energy. The measured kinetic energy distribution and the extracted negative temperature indicate that the ensemble is close to degeneracy, with coherence over several lattice sites. The state is as stable as a corresponding positive temperature state: The negative temperature stabilizes the system against mean-field collapse driven by negative pressure. Negative temperatures open up new parameter regimes for cold atoms, enabling fundamentally new many-body states. Additionally, they give rise to several counterintuitive effects such as heat engines with above unity efficiency.

  18. Measurement of absolute gravity acceleration in Firenze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, M.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the University of Firenze (Italy). In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the Newtonian law at short distances are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. The only available datum, pertaining to the italian zero-order gravity network, was taken more than 20 years ago at a distance of more than 60 km from the study site. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 absolute gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The absolute accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are (980 492 160.6 ± 4.0) μGal and (980 492 048.3 ± 3.0) μGal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the absolute value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.

  19. System for absolute measurements by interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Douglas A.

    1993-03-01

    The most common problem of interferometric sensors is their inability to measure absolute path imbalance. Presented in this paper is a signal processing system that gives absolute, unambiguous reading of optical path difference for almost any style of interferometric sensor. Key components are a wide band (incoherent) optical source, a polychromator, and FFT electronics. Advantages include no moving parts in the signal processor, no active components at the sensor location, and the use of standard single mode fiber for sensor illumination and signal transmission. Actual absolute path imbalance of the interferometer is determined without using fringe counting or other inferential techniques. The polychromator extracts the interference information that occurs at each discrete wavelength within the spectral band of the optical source. The signal processing consists of analog and digital filtering, Fast Fourier analysis, and a peak detection and interpolation algorithm. This system was originally designed for use in a remote pressure sensing application that employed a totally passive fiber optic interferometer. A performance qualification was made using a Fabry-Perot interferometer and a commercially available laser interferometer to measure the reference displacement.

  20. Chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil.

    PubMed

    Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-10

    Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) absolute oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the absolute oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound.

  1. Constrained Least Absolute Deviation Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhishun; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that least absolute deviation (LAD) criterion or L1-norm used for estimation of parameters is characterized by robustness, i.e., the estimated parameters are totally resistant (insensitive) to large changes in the sampled data. This is an extremely useful feature, especially, when the sampled data are known to be contaminated by occasionally occurring outliers or by spiky noise. In our previous works, we have proposed the least absolute deviation neural network (LADNN) to solve unconstrained LAD problems. The theoretical proofs and numerical simulations have shown that the LADNN is Lyapunov-stable and it can globally converge to the exact solution to a given unconstrained LAD problem. We have also demonstrated its excellent application value in time-delay estimation. More generally, a practical LAD application problem may contain some linear constraints, such as a set of equalities and/or inequalities, which is called constrained LAD problem, whereas the unconstrained LAD can be considered as a special form of the constrained LAD. In this paper, we present a new neural network called constrained least absolute deviation neural network (CLADNN) to solve general constrained LAD problems. Theoretical proofs and numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed CLADNN is Lyapunov stable and globally converges to the exact solution to a given constrained LAD problem, independent of initial values. The numerical simulations have also illustrated that the proposed CLADNN can be used to robustly estimate parameters for nonlinear curve fitting, which is extensively used in signal and image processing. PMID:18269958

  2. Absolute Radiation Measurements in Earth and Mars Entry Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the measurement of radiative heating for shock heated flows which simulate conditions for Mars and Earth entries. Radiation measurements are made in NASA Ames' Electric Arc Shock Tube at velocities from 3-15 km/s in mixtures of N2/O2 and CO2/N2/Ar. The technique and limitations of the measurement are summarized in some detail. The absolute measurements will be discussed in regards to spectral features, radiative magnitude and spatiotemporal trends. Via analysis of spectra it is possible to extract properties such as electron density, and rotational, vibrational and electronic temperatures. Relaxation behind the shock is analyzed to determine how these properties relax to equilibrium and are used to validate and refine kinetic models. It is found that, for some conditions, some of these values diverge from non-equilibrium indicating a lack of similarity between the shock tube and free flight conditions. Possible reasons for this are discussed.

  3. Absolute photometric calibration of detectors to 0.3 mmag using amplitude-stabilized lasers and a helium-cooled absolute radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    Laser sources whose intensity is determined with a cryogenic electrical substitution radiometer are described. Detectors are then calibrated against this known flux, with an overall error of 0.028 percent (0.3 mmag). Ongoing research has produced laser intensity stabilizers with flicker and drift of less than 0.01 percent. Recently, the useful wavelength limit of these stabilizers have been extended to 1.65 microns by using a new modular technology and InGaAs detector systems. Data from Si photodiode calibration using the method of Zalewski and Geist are compared against an absolute cavity radiometer calibration as an internal check on the calibration system.

  4. Pulse flux measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Riggan, William C.

    1985-01-01

    A device for measuring particle flux comprises first and second photodiode detectors for receiving flux from a source and first and second outputs for producing first and second signals representing the flux incident to the detectors. The device is capable of reducing the first output signal by a portion of the second output signal, thereby enhancing the accuracy of the device. Devices in accordance with the invention may measure distinct components of flux from a single source or fluxes from several sources.

  5. Hubble space telescope calspec flux standards: Sirius (and Vega)

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, R. C.

    2014-06-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) has measured the flux for Sirius from 0.17 to 1.01 μm on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) White Dwarf scale. Because of the cool debris disk around Vega, Sirius is commonly recommended as the primary IR flux standard. The measured STIS flux agrees well with predictions of a special Kurucz model atmosphere, adding confidence to the modeled IR flux predictions. The IR flux agrees to 2%-3% with respect to the standard template of Cohen and to 2% with the Midcourse Space Experiment absolute flux measurements in the mid-IR. A weighted average of the independent visible and mid-IR absolute flux measures implies that the monochromatic flux at 5557.5 Å (5556 Å in air) for Sirius and Vega, respectively, is 1.35 × 10{sup –8} and 3.44 × 10{sup –9} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} Å{sup –1} with formal uncertainties of 0.5%. Contrary to previously published conclusions, the Hipparcos photometry offers no support for the variability of Vega. Pulse pileup severely affects the Hp photometry for the brightest stars.

  6. Determination of meteor flux distribution over the celestial sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, V. V.; Belkovich, O. I.; Filimonova, T. K.; Sidorov, V. V.

    1992-01-01

    A new method of determination of meteor flux density distribution over the celestial sphere is discussed. The flux density was derived from observations by radar together with measurements of angles of arrival of radio waves reflected from meteor trails. The role of small meteor showers over the sporadic background is shown.

  7. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  8. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  9. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  10. Brownian motion: Absolute negative particle mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Alexandra; Eichhorn, Ralf; Regtmeier, Jan; Duong, Thanh Tu; Reimann, Peter; Anselmetti, Dario

    2005-08-01

    Noise effects in technological applications, far from being a nuisance, can be exploited with advantage - for example, unavoidable thermal fluctuations have found application in the transport and sorting of colloidal particles and biomolecules. Here we use a microfluidic system to demonstrate a paradoxical migration mechanism in which particles always move in a direction opposite to the net acting force (`absolute negative mobility') as a result of an interplay between thermal noise, a periodic and symmetric microstructure, and a biased alternating-current electric field. This counterintuitive phenomenon could be used for bioanalytical purposes, for example in the separation and fractionation of colloids, biological molecules and cells.

  11. Arbitrary segments of absolute negative mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruyin; Nie, Linru; Chen, Chongyang; Wang, Chaojie

    2017-01-01

    In previous research work, investigators have reported only one or two segments of absolute negative mobility (ANM) in a periodic potential. In fact, many segments of ANM also occur in the system considered here. We investigate transport of an inertial particle in a gating ratchet periodic potential subjected to a constant bias force. Our numerical results show that its mean velocity can decrease with the bias force increasing, i.e. ANM phenomenon. Furthermore, the ANM can take place arbitrary segments, even up to more than thirty. Intrinsic physical mechanism and conditions for arbitrary segments of ANM to occur are discussed in detail.

  12. Absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-07-21

    With the increasing availability of positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging, the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) has become popular in clinical settings. Quantitative MBF provides an important additional diagnostic or prognostic information over conventional visual assessment. The success of MBF quantification using PET/computed tomography (CT) has increased the demand for this quantitative diagnostic approach to be more accessible. In this regard, MBF quantification approaches have been developed using several other diagnostic imaging modalities including single-photon emission computed tomography, CT, and cardiac magnetic resonance. This review will address the clinical aspects of PET MBF quantification and the new approaches to MBF quantification.

  13. Absolute Rate Theories of Epigenetic Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, Jose N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2006-03-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape, and the transmission factor, depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates.

  14. Absolute rate theories of epigenetic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-12-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape and the transmission factor depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic, and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates. rate theory | stochastic gene expression | gene switches

  15. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  16. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  17. Stellar spectral flux calibration of auroral H-beta photometer signal and background channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackel, Brian J.; Unick, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Observations of optical aurora typically require the operation of sensitive instruments at remote field sites. Absolute radiometric calibration of these devices is essential for quantitative comparison over time and with other measurements. In this study we present absolute calibration of a proton auroral photometer using star transits observed during regular data collection. This requires absolute flux spectra with sufficient resolution to account for structure in stellar Hβ absorption line profiles. Several flux spectral catalogs are combined and corrected for systematic differences. The resulting estimates of instrumental sensitivity are consistent with darkroom calibration to roughly 15%.

  18. Channel size influence on the heat flux density at zero net mass flow in the non-linear transport regime between 1.2 and 2.1 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Yuan, S. W. K.; Lee, J. M.; Sun, G. S.

    1987-01-01

    Porous media and narrow ducts of simple shape at zero net mass flow (ZNMF) are used to investigate the influence of pore size on the entropy/heat convection rate at ZNMF. The study is relevant to the development of specific types of phase separators. Previous work on heat transport by convection is extended to porous media without mass loss. The experimental results show the influence of pore size on heat flux for permeabilities between 10 to the -8th and 10 to the -6th sq cm. ZNMF plug data are found to be similar to results obtained for vapor liquid phase separation.

  19. Monochromator-Based Absolute Calibration of a Standard Radiation Thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, J. M.; Hernanz, M. L.; Campos, J.; Martín, M. J.; Pons, A.; del Campo, D.

    2014-04-01

    Centro Español de Metrología (CEM) is disseminating the International Temperature Scale (ITS-90), at high temperatures, by using the fixed points of Ag and Cu and a standard radiation thermometer. However, the future mise-en-pratique for the definition of the kelvin ( MeP-K) will include the dissemination of the kelvin by primary methods and by indirect approximations capable of exceptionally low uncertainties or increased reliability. Primary radiometry is, at present, able to achieve uncertainties competitive with the ITS-90 above the silver point with one of the possible techniques the calibration for radiance responsivity of an imaging radiometer (radiance method). In order to carry out this calibration, IO-CSIC (Spanish Designated Institute for luminous intensity and luminous flux) has collaborated with CEM, allowing traceability to its cryogenic radiometer. A monochromator integrating sphere-based spectral comparator facility has been used to calibrate one of the CEM standard radiation thermometers. The absolute calibrated standard radiation thermometer has been used to determine the temperatures of the fixed points of Cu, Co-C, Pt-C, and Re-C. The results obtained are 1357.80 K, 1597.10 K, 2011.66 K, and 2747.64 K, respectively, with uncertainties ranging from 0.4 K to 1.1 K.

  20. Sensitivity of simulated hydrological fluxes towards changes in soil properties in response to land use change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, J. A.; Breuer, L.; Frede, H.-G.

    Current model studies on the impact of land use change on water resources often simulate changes in land use without considering changes in the soil properties due to the change in land use. In this study, an artificial study catchment representing the Dill catchment (Germany) was used within the eco-hydrological model SWAT-G to study the sensitivity of SWAT-G simulations towards changes in soil properties during land use change. Since there is little information on these soil-vegetation interactions, we performed a model sensitivity study to investigate the impact of changes in the depth of the top soil layer, bulk density, saturated hydraulic conductivity and available water content on several simulated hydrological fluxes. To assess the significance of the simulated changes due to the changing soil properties, we compared the model sensitivity with the uncertainty in the hydrological fluxes due to the uncertainty in the parameterization of the plant parameters. The results showed that the changes in soil properties due to a land use transition from cropland to pasture only have a minor impact on the simulated mean annual, summer and winter runoff and actual evapotranspiration. Soil-vegetation interactions have a stronger impact on the simulated mean surface runoff, although the absolute contribution of this flux is small in our conceptualization of the Dill catchment. A comparison of the sensitivity and uncertainty of the simulated hydrological fluxes led to the conclusion that changes in soil properties due to land use change are relatively unimportant in our model of the Dill catchment in the light of the low sensitivity of the dominating hydrological fluxes and the large output uncertainty due to the plant parameter uncertainty.

  1. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  2. Linear ultrasonic motor for absolute gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yue; Yao, Zhiyuan; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2017-02-01

    Thanks to their compactness and suitability for vacuum applications, linear ultrasonic motors are considered as substitutes for classical electromagnetic motors as driving elements in absolute gravimeters. Still, their application is prevented by relatively low power output. To overcome this limitation and provide better stability, a V-type linear ultrasonic motor with a new clamping method is proposed for a gravimeter. In this paper, a mechanical model of stators with flexible clamping components is suggested, according to a design criterion for clamps of linear ultrasonic motors. After that, an effect of tangential and normal rigidity of the clamping components on mechanical output is studied. It is followed by discussion of a new clamping method with sufficient tangential rigidity and a capability to facilitate pre-load. Additionally, a prototype of the motor with the proposed clamping method was fabricated and the performance tests in vertical direction were implemented. Experimental results show that the suggested motor has structural stability and high dynamic performance, such as no-load speed of 1.4m/s and maximal thrust of 43N, meeting the requirements for absolute gravimeters.

  3. Why to compare absolute numbers of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the absolute number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to absolute mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations.

  4. The absolute threshold of cone vision

    PubMed Central

    Koeing, Darran; Hofer, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of the absolute threshold of cone vision, which has been previously underestimated due to sub-optimal conditions or overly strict subjective response criteria. We avoided these limitations by using optimized stimuli and experimental conditions while having subjects respond within a rating scale framework. Small (1′ fwhm), brief (34 msec), monochromatic (550 nm) stimuli were foveally presented at multiple intensities in dark-adapted retina for 5 subjects. For comparison, 4 subjects underwent similar testing with rod-optimized stimuli. Cone absolute threshold, that is, the minimum light energy for which subjects were just able to detect a visual stimulus with any response criterion, was 203 ± 38 photons at the cornea, ∼0.47 log units lower than previously reported. Two-alternative forced-choice measurements in a subset of subjects yielded consistent results. Cone thresholds were less responsive to criterion changes than rod thresholds, suggesting a limit to the stimulus information recoverable from the cone mosaic in addition to the limit imposed by Poisson noise. Results were consistent with expectations for detection in the face of stimulus uncertainty. We discuss implications of these findings for modeling the first stages of human cone vision and interpreting psychophysical data acquired with adaptive optics at the spatial scale of the receptor mosaic. PMID:21270115

  5. Absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A and alterporriols.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Saki; Honma, Miho; Murakami, Takanori; Tsushima, Taro; Kudo, Shinji; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Nihei, Ken-Ichi; Nehira, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Masaru

    2012-02-01

    The absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A (1) was established by observing a positive exciton couplet in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of the C3,C4-O-bis(2-naphthoyl) derivative 10 and by chemical correlations with known compound 8. Before the discussion, the relative stereochemistry of 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The shielding effect at C7'-OMe group by C1-O-benzoylation established the relative stereochemical relationship between the C8-C8' axial bonding and the C1-C4/C1'-C4' polyol moieties of alterporriols E (3), an atropisomer of the C8-C8' dimer of 1. As 3 could be obtained by dimerization of 1 in vitro, the absolute configuration of its central chirality elements (C1-C4) must be identical to those of 1. Spectral comparison between the experimental and theoretical CD spectra supported the above conclusion. Axial stereochemistry of novel C4-O-deoxy dimeric derivatives, alterporriols F (4) and G (5), were also revealed by comparison of their CD spectra to those of 2 and 3.

  6. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  7. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. )

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  8. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometers Burst Mode Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, P.; Vigneron, P.; Hulot, G.; Crespo Grau, R.; Brocco, L.; Lalanne, X.; Sirol, O.; Leger, J. M.; Jager, T.; Bertrand, F.; Boness, A.; Fratter, I.

    2014-12-01

    Each of the three Swarm satellites embarks an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) to provide absolute scalar measurements of the magnetic field with high accuracy and stability. Nominal data acquisition of these ASMs is 1 Hz. But they can also run in a so-called "burst mode" and provide data at 250 Hz. During the commissioning phase of the mission, seven burst mode acquisition campaigns have been run simultaneously for all satellites, obtaining a total of ten days of burs-mode data. These campaigns allowed the identification of issues related to the operations of the piezo-electric motor and the heaters connected to the ASM, that do not impact the nominal 1 Hz scalar data. We analyze the burst mode data to identify high frequency geomagnetic signals, focusing the analysis in two regions: the low latitudes, where we seek signatures of ionospheric irregularities, and the high latitudes, to identify high frequency signals related to polar region currents. Since these campaigns have been conducted during the initial months of the mission, the three satellites where still close to each other, allowing to analyze the spatial coherency of the signals. Wavelet analysis have revealed 31 Hz signals appearing in the night-side in the equatorial region.

  9. Absolute Binding Energies of Core Levels in Solids from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Taisuke; Lee, Chi-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    A general method is presented to calculate absolute binding energies of core levels in metals and insulators, based on a penalty functional and an exact Coulomb cutoff method in the framework of density functional theory. The spurious interaction of core holes between supercells is avoided by the exact Coulomb cutoff method, while the variational penalty functional enables us to treat multiple splittings due to chemical shift, spin-orbit coupling, and exchange interaction on equal footing, both of which are not accessible by previous methods. It is demonstrated that the absolute binding energies of core levels for both metals and insulators are calculated by the proposed method in a mean absolute (relative) error of 0.4 eV (0.16%) for eight cases compared to experimental values measured with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy within a generalized gradient approximation to the exchange-correlation functional.

  10. Extracting infrared absolute reflectance from relative reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Berets, Susan L; Milosevic, Milan

    2012-06-01

    Absolute reflectance measurements are valuable to the optics industry for development of new materials and optical coatings. Yet, absolute reflectance measurements are notoriously difficult to make. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of extracting the absolute reflectance from a relative reflectance measurement using a reference material with known refractive index.

  11. A Conceptual Approach to Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. When absolute value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…

  12. High precision photon flux determination for photon tagging experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Teymurazyan, A.; Ahmidouch, A.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Asratyan, A.; Baker, K.; Benton, L.; Burkert, V.; Clinton, E.; Cole, P.; Collins, P.; Dale, D.; Danagoulian, S.; Davidenko, G.; Demirchyan, R.; Deur, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Dzyubenko, G.; Ent, R.; Evdokimov, A.; Feng, J.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gan, L.; Gasparian, A.; Glamazdin, A.; Goryachev, V.; Hardy, K.; He, J.; Ito, M.; Jiang, L.; Kashy, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kolarkar, A.; Konchatnyi, M.; Korchin, A.; Korsch, W.; Kosinov, O.; Kowalski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kubarovsky, V.; Larin, I.; Lawrence, D.; Li, X.; Martel, P.; Matveev, V.; McNulty, D.; Mecking, B.; Milbrath, B.; Minehart, R.; Miskimen, R.; Mochalov, V.; Nakagawa, I.; Overby, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Payen, M.; Pedroni, R.; Prok, Y.; Ritchie, B.; Salgado, C.; Shahinyan, A.; Sitnikov, A.; Sober, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Stevens, W.; Underwood, J.; Vasiliev, A.; Vishnyakov, V.; Wood, M.; Zhou, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Jefferson Laboratory PrimEx Collaboration has developed and implemented a method to control the tagged photon flux in photoproduction experiments at the 1% level over the photon energy range from 4.9 to 5.5 GeV. This method has been successfully implemented in a high precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime. Here, we outline the experimental equipment and the analysis techniques used to accomplish this. These include the use of a total absorption counter for absolute flux calibration, a pair spectrometer for online relative flux monitoring, and a new method for post-bremsstrahlung electron counting.

  13. PHASES: A Project to Perform Absolute Spectrophotometry from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Burgo, C.; Vather, D.; Allende Prieto, C.; Murphy, N.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the current status of the opto-mechanical design of PHASES (Planet Hunting and AsteroSeismology Explorer Spectrophotometer), which is a project to develop a space-borne telescope to obtain absolute flux calibrated spectra of bright stars. The science payload is intended to be housed in a micro-satellite launched into a low-earth Sun-synchronous orbit with an inclination to the equator of 98.7° and a local time ascending node LTAN of 6:00 AM. PHASES will be able to measure micromagnitude photometric variations due to stellar oscillations/activity and planet/moon transits. It consists of a 20 cm aperture modified Baker telescope feeding two detectors: the tracking detector provides the fine telescope guidance system with a required pointing stability of 0.2″, and the science detector performs spectrophotometry in the wavelength range 370-960 nm with a resolving power between 200 and 900. The spectrograph is designed to provide 1% RMS flux calibrated spectra with signal-to-noise ratios > 100 for stars with V < 10 in short integration times. Our strategy to calibrate the system using A type stars is explained. From comparison with model atmospheres it would be possible to determine the stellar angular diameters with an uncertainty of approximately 0.5%. In the case of a star hosting a transiting planet it would be possible to derive its light curve, and then the planet to stellar radius ratio. Bright stars have high precision Hipparcos parallaxes and the expected level of accuracy for their fluxes will be propagated to the stellar radii, and more significantly to the planetary radii. The scientific drivers for PHASES give rise to some design challenges, which are particularly related to the opto-mechanics for extreme environmental conditions. The optical design has been developed with the primary goal of avoiding stray light reaching the science detector. Three different proposals for the opto-mechanical design are under investigation.

  14. Parametric dependence of ion temperature and relative density in the NASA Lewis SUMMA facility. [superconducting magnetic mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, A.; Lauver, M. R.; Patch, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Further hot-ion plasma experiments were conducted in the SUMMA superconducting magnetic mirror facility. A steady-state ExB plasma was formed by applying a strong radially inward dc electric field between cylindrical anodes and hollow cathodes located near the magnetic mirror maxima. Extending the use of water cooling to the hollow cathodes, in addition to the anodes, resulted in higher maximum power input to the plasma. Steady-state hydrogen plasmas with ion kinetic temperatures as high as 830 eV were produced. Functional relations were obtained empirically among the plasma current, voltage, magnetic flux density, ion temperature, and relative ion density. The functional relations were deduced by use of a multiple correlation analysis. Data were obtained for midplane magnetic fields from 0.5 to 3.37 tesla and input power up to 45 kW. Also, initial absolute electron density measurements are reported from a 90 deg Thomson scattering laser system.

  15. Use of Absolute and Comparative Performance Feedback in Absolute and Comparative Judgments and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Don A.; Klein, William M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Which matters more--beliefs about absolute ability or ability relative to others? This study set out to compare the effects of such beliefs on satisfaction with performance, self-evaluations, and bets on future performance. In Experiment 1, undergraduate participants were told they had answered 20% correct, 80% correct, or were not given their…

  16. Black branes in flux compactifications

    SciTech Connect

    Torroba, Gonzalo; Wang, Huajia

    2013-10-01

    We construct charged black branes in type IIA flux compactifications that are dual to (2 + 1)-dimensional field theories at finite density. The internal space is a general Calabi-Yau manifold with fluxes, with internal dimensions much smaller than the AdS radius. Gauge fields descend from the 3-form RR potential evaluated on harmonic forms of the Calabi-Yau, and Kaluza-Klein modes decouple. Black branes are described by a four-dimensional effective field theory that includes only a few light fields and is valid over a parametrically large range of scales. This effective theory determines the low energy dynamics, stability and thermodynamic properties. Tools from flux compactifications are also used to construct holographic CFTs with no relevant scalar operators, that can lead to symmetric phases of condensed matter systems stable to very low temperatures. The general formalism is illustrated with simple examples such as toroidal compactifications and manifolds with a single size modulus. We initiate the classification of holographic phases of matter described by flux compactifications, which include generalized Reissner-Nordstrom branes, nonsupersymmetric AdS2×R2 and hyperscaling violating solutions.

  17. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  18. Absolute nonlocality via distributed computing without communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekaj, Ł.; Pawłowski, M.; Vértesi, T.; Grudka, A.; Horodecki, M.; Horodecki, R.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the role that quantum entanglement plays as a resource in various information processing tasks is one of the crucial goals of quantum information theory. Here we propose an alternative perspective for studying quantum entanglement: distributed computation of functions without communication between nodes. To formalize this approach, we propose identity games. Surprisingly, despite no signaling, we obtain that nonlocal quantum strategies beat classical ones in terms of winning probability for identity games originating from certain bipartite and multipartite functions. Moreover we show that, for a majority of functions, access to general nonsignaling resources boosts success probability two times in comparison to classical ones for a number of large enough outputs. Because there are no constraints on the inputs and no processing of the outputs in the identity games, they detect very strong types of correlations: absolute nonlocality.

  19. In vivo absorption spectroscopy for absolute measurement.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiromitsu; Fukuda, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    In in vivo spectroscopy, there are differences between individual subjects in parameters such as tissue scattering and sample concentration. We propose a method that can provide the absolute value of a particular substance concentration, independent of these individual differences. Thus, it is not necessary to use the typical statistical calibration curve, which assumes an average level of scattering and an averaged concentration over individual subjects. This method is expected to greatly reduce the difficulties encountered during in vivo measurements. As an example, for in vivo absorption spectroscopy, the method was applied to the reflectance measurement in retinal vessels to monitor their oxygen saturation levels. This method was then validated by applying it to the tissue phantom under a variety of absorbance values and scattering efficiencies.

  20. Determining Absolute Zero Using a Tuning Fork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldader, Jeffrey D.

    2008-04-01

    The Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales, we tell our students, are related. We explain that a change in temperature of 1°C corresponds to a change of 1 Kelvin and that atoms and molecules have zero kinetic energy at zero Kelvin, -273°C. In this paper, we will show how students can derive the relationship between the Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales using a simple, well-known physics experiment. By making multiple measurements of the speed of sound at different temperatures, using the classic physics experiment of determining the speed of sound with a tuning fork and variable-length tube, they can determine the temperature at which the speed of sound is zero—absolute zero.

  1. MAGSAT: Vector magnetometer absolute sensor alignment determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for accurately determining the absolute alignment of the magnetic axes of a triaxial magnetometer sensor with respect to an external, fixed, reference coordinate system. The method does not require that the magnetic field vector orientation, as generated by a triaxial calibration coil system, be known to better than a few degrees from its true position, and minimizes the number of positions through which a sensor assembly must be rotated to obtain a solution. Computer simulations show that accuracies of better than 0.4 seconds of arc can be achieved under typical test conditions associated with existing magnetic test facilities. The basic approach is similar in nature to that presented by McPherron and Snare (1978) except that only three sensor positions are required and the system of equations to be solved is considerably simplified. Applications of the method to the case of the MAGSAT Vector Magnetometer are presented and the problems encountered discussed.

  2. An estimate of global absolute dynamic topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, C.-K.; Wunsch, C.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute dynamic topography of the world ocean is estimated from the largest scales to a short-wavelength cutoff of about 6700 km for the period July through September, 1978. The data base consisted of the time-averaged sea-surface topography determined by Seasat and geoid estimates made at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The issues are those of accuracy and resolution. Use of the altimetric surface as a geoid estimate beyond the short-wavelength cutoff reduces the spectral leakage in the estimated dynamic topography from erroneous small-scale geoid estimates without contaminating the low wavenumbers. Comparison of the result with a similarly filtered version of Levitus' (1982) historical average dynamic topography shows good qualitative agreement. There is quantitative disagreement, but it is within the estimated errors of both methods of calculation.

  3. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  4. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium.

    PubMed

    Roshan, M V; Springham, S V; Rawat, R S; Lee, P; Krishnan, M

    2010-08-01

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f(n) approximately 4.1x10(-4) with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10(8) neutrons per discharge.

  5. Measured and modelled absolute gravity in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, E.; Forsberg, R.; Strykowski, G.

    2012-12-01

    Present day changes in the ice volume in glaciated areas like Greenland will change the load on the Earth and to this change the lithosphere will respond elastically. The Earth also responds to changes in the ice volume over a millennial time scale. This response is due to the viscous properties of the mantle and is known as Glaical Isostatic Adjustment (GIA). Both signals are present in GPS and absolute gravity (AG) measurements and they will give an uncertainty in mass balance estimates calculated from these data types. It is possible to separate the two signals if both gravity and Global Positioning System (GPS) time series are available. DTU Space acquired an A10 absolute gravimeter in 2008. One purpose of this instrument is to establish AG time series in Greenland and the first measurements were conducted in 2009. Since then are 18 different Greenland GPS Network (GNET) stations visited and six of these are visited more then once. The gravity signal consists of three signals; the elastic signal, the viscous signal and the direct attraction from the ice masses. All of these signals can be modelled using various techniques. The viscous signal is modelled by solving the Sea Level Equation with an appropriate ice history and Earth model. The free code SELEN is used for this. The elastic signal is modelled as a convolution of the elastic Greens function for gravity and a model of present day ice mass changes. The direct attraction is the same as the Newtonian attraction and is calculated as this. Here we will present the preliminary results of the AG measurements in Greenland. We will also present modelled estimates of the direct attraction, the elastic and the viscous signals.

  6. Absolute bioavailability of quinine formulations in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Babalola, C P; Bolaji, O O; Ogunbona, F A; Ezeomah, E

    2004-09-01

    This study compared the absolute bioavailability of quinine sulphate as capsule and as tablet against the intravenous (i.v.) infusion of the drug in twelve male volunteers. Six of the volunteers received intravenous infusion over 4 h as well as the capsule formulation of the drug in a cross-over manner, while the other six received the tablet formulation. Blood samples were taken at predetermined time intervals and plasma analysed for quinine (QN) using reversed-phase HPLC method. QN was rapidly absorbed after the two oral formulations with average t(max) of 2.67 h for both capsule and tablet. The mean elimination half-life of QN from the i.v. and oral dosage forms varied between 10 and 13.5 hr and were not statistically different (P > 0.05). On the contrary, the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and area under the curve (AUC) from capsule were comparable to those from i.v. (P > 0.05), while these values were markedly higher than values from tablet formulation (P < 0.05). The therapeutic QN plasma levels were not achieved with the tablet formulation. The absolute bioavailability (F) were 73% (C.l., 53.3 - 92.4%) and 39 % (C.I., 21.7 - 56.6%) for the capsule and tablet respectively and the difference was significant (P < 0.05). The subtherapeutic levels obtained from the tablet form used in this study may cause treatment failure during malaria and caution should be taken when predictions are made from results obtained from different formulations of QN.

  7. Absolute GPS Positioning Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, G.

    A new inverse approach for restoring the absolute coordinates of a ground -based station from three or four observed GPS pseudo-ranges is proposed. This stochastic method is based on simulations of natural evolution named genetic algorithms (GA). These iterative procedures provide fairly good and robust estimates of the absolute positions in the Earth's geocentric reference system. For comparison/validation, GA results are compared to the ones obtained using the classical linearized least-square scheme for the determination of the XYZ location proposed by Bancroft (1985) which is strongly limited by the number of available observations (i.e. here, the number of input pseudo-ranges must be four). The r.m.s. accuracy of the non -linear cost function reached by this latter method is typically ~10-4 m2 corresponding to ~300-500-m accuracies for each geocentric coordinate. However, GA can provide more acceptable solutions (r.m.s. errors < 10-5 m2), even when only three instantaneous pseudo-ranges are used, such as a lost of lock during a GPS survey. Tuned GA parameters used in different simulations are N=1000 starting individuals, as well as Pc=60-70% and Pm=30-40% for the crossover probability and mutation rate, respectively. Statistical tests on the ability of GA to recover acceptable coordinates in presence of important levels of noise are made simulating nearly 3000 random samples of erroneous pseudo-ranges. Here, two main sources of measurement errors are considered in the inversion: (1) typical satellite-clock errors and/or 300-metre variance atmospheric delays, and (2) Geometrical Dilution of Precision (GDOP) due to the particular GPS satellite configuration at the time of acquisition. Extracting valuable information and even from low-quality starting range observations, GA offer an interesting alternative for high -precision GPS positioning.

  8. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  9. Transport of magnetic flux in Saturn’s inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Christopher T.; Lai, H. R.; Wei, H. Y.; Jia, Y. D.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of the Saturnian magnetosphere, which rotates rapidly with an internal plasma source provided by Enceladus, qualitatively resembles those of the jovian magnetosphere powered by Io. The newly added plasma is accelerated to the corotation speed and moves outward together with the magnetic flux. In the near tail region, reconnection cuts the magnetic flux, reconnects it into plasma-depleted inward moving flux tubes and outward moving massive plasmoids. The buoyant empty tubes then convect inward against the outward flow to conserve the total magnetic flux established by the internal dynamo. In both jovian and saturnian magnetospheres, flux tubes with enhanced field strength relative to their surroundings are detected in the equatorial region. Recent observations show that there are flux tubes with reduced field strength off the equator in the saturnian magnetosphere. To understand the formation mechanism of both types of flux tubes, we have surveyed all the available 1-sec magnetic field data from Cassini. The systematic statistical study confirms the different latitudinal distributions of the two types of flux tubes. In addition, enhanced-field flux tubes are closer to the planet while reduced-field flux tubes can be detected at larger distances; both types of flux tubes become indistinguishable from the background magnetic flux inside an L-value of about 4; the local time distribution of both types of flux tubes are similar and they contain about the same amount of magnetic flux. Therefore, the two types of flux tubes are the same phenomena with different manifestations in different plasma environments. When the surrounding plasma density is high (near the equator and closer to the plasma source region), the flux tubes are compressed and have enhanced field strength inside; while in the low-plasma density region (off the equator and further from the plasma source region), the flux tubes expand and have reduced field strength inside.

  10. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-15

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  11. The importance of calculating absolute rather than relative fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Graeme; Metcalfe, Andrew; Pearce, Charles; Need, Allan G; Dick, Ian M; Prince, Richard L; Nordin, B E Christopher

    2007-12-01

    The relation between fracture risk and bone mineral density (BMD) is commonly expressed as a multiplicative factor which is said to represent the increase in risk for each standard deviation fall in BMD. This practice assumes that risk increases multiplicatively with each unit fall in bone density, which is not correct. Although odds increase multiplicatively, absolute risk, which lies between 0 and 1, cannot do so though it can be derived from odds by the term Odds/(1+Odds). This concept is illustrated in a prospective study of 1098 women over age 69 followed for 6 years in a calcium trial in which hip BMD was measured in the second year. 304 Women (27.6%) had prevalent fractures and 198 (18.1%) incident fractures with a significant association between them (P 0.005). Age-adjusted hip BMD and T-score were significantly lower in those with prevalent fractures than in those without (P 0.003) and significantly lower in those with incident fractures than in those without (P 0.001). When the data were analysed by univariate logistic regression, the fracture odds at zero T-score were 0.130 and the rise in odds for each unit fall in hip T-score was 1.55. When these odds were converted to risks, there was a progressive divergence between odds and risk at T-scores below zero. Multiple logistic regression yielded significant odds ratios of 1.47 for each 5-year increase in age, 1.47 for prevalent fracture and 1.49 for each unit fall in hip T-score. Calcium therapy was not significant. Poisson regression, logistic regression and Cox's proportional hazards yielded very similar outcomes when converted into absolute risks. A nomogram was constructed to enable clinicians to estimate the approximate 6-year fracture risk from hip T-score, age and prevalent fracture which can probably be applied (with appropriate correction) to men as well as to women. We conclude that multiplicative factors can be applied to odds but not to risk and that multipliers of risk tend to overstate the

  12. Structure and Mixing Characterization of Variable Density Transverse Jet Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorkyan, Levon

    This dissertation describes an experimental study of the structural and mixing characteristics of transverse jets, or jets in crossfiow (JICF). Hot-wire anemometry, stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV), and acetone planar laser-induced fiuorescence (PLIF) measurements were utilized to illuminate and quantify the wind-ward (upstream) jet shear layer instability characteristics and their relationship to the velocity field evolution, as well as the effect of the overall velocity field on the scalar field distribution and resulting mixing characteristics. Transverse jets of various jet-to-crossfiow momentum flux ratios in the range 41 ≥ J ≥ 2, and jet-to-crossfiow density ratios in the range 1.00 ≥ S ≥ 0.35, were generated using mixtures of helium and nitrogen in the jet fluid. Jets were injected from one of three different injectors explored: a convergent nozzle with circular geometry which was mounted flush with the wind tunnel floor, another convergent nozzle with circular geometry whose exit plane lies above the crossfiow boundary layer, and a flush-mounted straight pipe injector with a circular orifice. Jet Reynolds number was kept constant for the majority of the mixing and structural exploration experiments at Rej = 1900, except when the effect of Reynolds number on cross-sectional jet structure was explored. Previous hot-wire based measurements at UCLA suggest that the upstream jet shear layer transitions from convective instability to absolute instability, giving rise to self-excited nonlinear states, as either the momentum flux ratio is lowered below J ≈10, or the density ratio is lowered below S ≈ 0.45 for the JICF injected from the flush nozzle injector. A similar transition to absolute instability when lowering momentum flux ratio was found in this work for the flush-mounted pipe injector. Cross-sectional PLIF measurements in the present studies suggested clear correspondence between the formation of a symmetric counter-rotating vortex pair

  13. Relationships of a growing magnetic flux region to flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, S. F.; Bentley, R. D.; Schadee, A.; Antalova, A.; Kucera, A.; Dezso, L.; Gesztelyi, L.; Harvey, K. L.; Jones, H.; Livi, S. H. B.

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of flare sites at the boundaries of major new and growing magnetic flux regions within complexes of active regions has been analyzed using H-alpha images. A spectrum of possible relationships of growing flux regions to flares is described. An 'intimate' interaction between old and new flux and flare sites occurs at the boundaries of their regions. Forced or 'intimidated' interaction involves new flux pushing older, lower flux density fields toward a neighboring old polarity inversion line, followed by the occurrence of a flare. In 'influential' interaction, magnetic lines of force over an old polarity inversion line reconnect to new emerging flux, and a flare occurs when the magnetic field overlying the filament becomes too weak to prevent its eruption. 'Inconsequential' interaction occurs when a new flux region is too small or has the wrong orientation for creating flare conditions. 'Incidental' interaction involves a flare occurring without any significant relationship to new flux regions.

  14. Probability density distribution of velocity differences at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praskovsky, Alexander A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent understanding of fine-scale turbulence structure in high Reynolds number flows is mostly based on Kolmogorov's original and revised models. The main finding of these models is that intrinsic characteristics of fine-scale fluctuations are universal ones at high Reynolds numbers, i.e., the functional behavior of any small-scale parameter is the same in all flows if the Reynolds number is high enough. The only large-scale quantity that directly affects small-scale fluctuations is the energy flux through a cascade. In dynamical equilibrium between large- and small-scale motions, this flux is equal to the mean rate of energy dissipation epsilon. The pdd of velocity difference is a very important characteristic for both the basic understanding of fully developed turbulence and engineering problems. Hence, it is important to test the findings: (1) the functional behavior of the tails of the probability density distribution (pdd) represented by P(delta(u)) is proportional to exp(-b(r) absolute value of delta(u)/sigma(sub delta(u))) and (2) the logarithmic decrement b(r) scales as b(r) is proportional to r(sup 0.15) when separation r lies in the inertial subrange in high Reynolds number laboratory shear flows.

  15. Absolute calibration of forces in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, R. S.; Viana, N. B.; Maia Neto, P. A.; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2014-07-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past 15 years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spot, adapting frequently employed video microscopy techniques. Combined with interface spherical aberration, it reveals a previously unknown window of instability for trapping. Comparison with experimental data leads to an overall agreement within error bars, with no fitting, for a broad range of microsphere radii, from the Rayleigh regime to the ray optics one, for different polarizations and trapping heights, including all commonly employed parameter domains. Besides signaling full first-principles theoretical understanding of optical tweezers operation, the results may lead to improved instrument design and control over experiments, as well as to an extended domain of applicability, allowing reliable force measurements, in principle, from femtonewtons to nanonewtons.

  16. What is Needed for Absolute Paleointensity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Many alternative approaches to the Thellier and Thellier technique for absolute paleointensity have been proposed during the past twenty years. One reason is the time consuming aspect of the experiments. Another reason is to avoid uncertainties in determinations of the paleofield which are mostly linked to the presence of multidomain grains. Despite great care taken by these new techniques, there is no indication that they always provide the right answer and in fact sometimes fail. We are convinced that the most valid approach remains the original double heating Thellier protocol provided that natural remanence is controlled by pure magnetite with a narrow distribution of small grain sizes, mostly single domains. The presence of titanium, even in small amount generates biases which yield incorrect field values. Single domain grains frequently dominate the magnetization of glass samples, which explains the success of this selective approach. They are also present in volcanic lava flows but much less frequently, and therefore contribute to the low success rate of most experiments. However the loss of at least 70% of the magnetization at very high temperatures prior to the Curie point appears to be an essential prerequisite that increases the success rate to almost 100% and has been validated from historical flows and from recent studies. This requirement can easily be tested by thermal demagnetization while low temperature experiments can document the detection of single domain magnetite using the δFC/δZFC parameter as suggested (Moskowitz et al, 1993) for biogenic magnetite.

  17. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  18. Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a mission, led and developed by NASA, that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to quantify and attribute climate change. CLARREO consists of three separate instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer, a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer, and a radio occultation (RO) instrument. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy, including on orbit verification, to calibrate other space-based instrumentation, increasing their respective accuracy by as much as an order of magnitude. The IR spectrometer is a Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) working in the 5 to 50 microns wavelength region with a goal of 0.1 K (k = 3) accuracy. The FTS will achieve this accuracy using phase change cells to verify thermistor accuracy and heated halos to verify blackbody emissivity, both on orbit. The RS spectrometer will measure the reflectance of the atmosphere in the 0.32 to 2.3 microns wavelength region with an accuracy of 0.3% (k = 2). The status of the instrumentation packages and potential mission options will be presented.

  19. Tropical Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes and Latent Heating Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Zhou, Tiehan; Love, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent satellite determinations of global distributions of absolute gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes in the lower stratosphere show maxima over the summer subtropical continents and little evidence of GW momentum fluxes associated with the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). This seems to be at odds with parameterizations forGWmomentum fluxes, where the source is a function of latent heating rates, which are largest in the region of the ITCZ in terms of monthly averages. The authors have examined global distributions of atmospheric latent heating, cloud-top-pressure altitudes, and lower-stratosphere absolute GW momentum fluxes and have found that monthly averages of the lower-stratosphere GW momentum fluxes more closely resemble the monthly mean cloud-top altitudes rather than the monthly mean rates of latent heating. These regions of highest cloud-top altitudes occur when rates of latent heating are largest on the time scale of cloud growth. This, plus previously published studies, suggests that convective sources for stratospheric GW momentum fluxes, being a function of the rate of latent heating, will require either a climate model to correctly model this rate of latent heating or some ad hoc adjustments to account for shortcomings in a climate model's land-sea differences in convective latent heating.

  20. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Mano K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2015-12-01

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  1. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-06-05

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  2. Positioning, alignment and absolute pointing of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, F.; Distefano, C.; Antares Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    A precise detector alignment and absolute pointing is crucial for point-source searches. The ANTARES neutrino telescope utilises an array of hydrophones, tiltmeters and compasses for the relative positioning of the optical sensors. The absolute calibration is accomplished by long-baseline low-frequency triangulation of the acoustic reference devices in the deep-sea with a differential GPS system at the sea surface. The absolute pointing can be independently verified by detecting the shadow of the Moon in cosmic rays.

  3. Flux motion in thin superconductors with inhomogeneous pinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Thomas; Kuhn, Holger; Brandt, Ernst Helmut; Indenbom, Mikhail; Koblischka, Michael R.; Konczykowski, Marcin

    1994-12-01

    The penetration and exit of magnetic flux in thin superconductors in a perpendicular applied field is investigated in detail. Flux-density pictures and profiles are obtained by magneto-optics; magnetization curves are measured by torque magnetometry; theoretical space- and time-dependent flux-density and current-density profiles are calculated from Maxwell's equations in a planar approximation assuming a highly nonlinear current-voltage law E~(J/Jc)n (n>>1, E=electric field, J=sheet current) with a critical sheet current Jc(B,r) in general depending on the position and on the perpendicular flux density B. Our experiments and calculations show that for inhomogeneous pinning the additional nontrivial condition Jc=∞ for B=0 is appropriate. Our specimens are high-Tc superconductors in the form of platelets, strips, or rings. In two platelets, an inhomogeneous Jc was produced by heavy-ion irradiation of the edge zone or by thinning down the central part by sputtering. In all cases good qualitative agreement is found between the experimental and theoretical results. In particular, our time-dependent theory reproduces the recently derived static Bean-model profiles in perpendicular geometry, which we also confirm experimentally; field and current profiles in the ring are as predicted for a current-carrying strip in perpendicular field; in the platelet with enhanced edge pinning, when flux starts to leak into the central weak pinning zone the flux lines are driven immediately to the sample center and pile up there; for weaker inhomogeneity of Jc(r), when the flux front arrives from the edges at the central weak-pinning zone the flux lines jump to an intermediate position from where they fill the central zone gradually. Our experiments also confirm the predicted ``uphill motion'' of flux lines against the flux-density gradient and the occurrence of overcritical current densities in the flux-free regions.

  4. Absolute and Convective Instability of a Liquid Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Hudman, M.; Chen, J. N.

    1999-01-01

    The existence of absolute instability in a liquid jet has been predicted for some time. The disturbance grows in time and propagates both upstream and downstream in an absolutely unstable liquid jet. The image of absolute instability is captured in the NASA 2.2 sec drop tower and reported here. The transition from convective to absolute instability is observed experimentally. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical predictions on the transition Weber number as functions of the Reynolds number. The role of interfacial shear relative to all other relevant forces which cause the onset of jet breakup is explained.

  5. Absolute Measurements of Optical Oscillator Strengths of Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, N. D.

    1998-05-01

    The dramatically increased interest in Xe as a discharge medium for the efficient generation of UV radiation, and Xe use in high technology applications such as flat panel displays for laptop computer screens and home TV and theater applications, has created the need for significantly more accurate oscillator strength data. Modeling of plasma processing systems and lighting discharges critically depends on accurate, precise atomic data. We are measuring the optical oscillator strengths of several Xe resonance lines. These measurements use a 900 eV collimated electron beam to excite the Xe atoms. In the method of self absorption used here, the transmission of the emitted radiation is measured as a function of the gas density. The measured oscillator strengths are proportional to the distance between the electron beam and the fixed aperture of the spectrometer-detector system. Since the theoretical form of the transmission function is well understood, there are few systematic errors. Absolute errors as low as 3-4% can be obtained.

  6. Aspects of flux compactification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao

    In this thesis, we study three main aspects of flux compactifications: (1) classify supergravity solutions from flux compactification; (2) construct flux-deformed geometry and 4D low-energy theory to describe these flux vacua; and (3) study 4D particle phenomenology and cosmology of flux vacua. In the first part, we review G-structure, the basic tool to study supersymmetric flux solutions, and some typical solutions obtained in heterotic, type IIA and type IIB string theories. Then we present a comprehensive classification of supersymmetric vacua of M-theory compactification on 7D manifolds with general four-form fluxes. We analyze the cases where the resulting four-dimensional vacua have N = 1, 2, 3, 4 supersymmetry and the internal space allows for SU(2)-, SU(3)- or G 2-structures. In particular, we find for N = 2 supersymmetry, that the external space-time is Minkowski and the base manifold of the internal space is conformally Kahler for SU(2) structures, while for SU(3) structures the internal space has to be Einstein-Sasaki and no internal fluxes are allowed. Moreover, we provide a new vacuum with N = 1 supersymmetry and SU(3) structure, where all fluxes are non-zero and the first order differential equations are solved. In the second part, we simply review the methods used to construct one subclass of fluxed-deformed geometry or the so-called "twisted manifold", and the associated 4D effective theory describing these flux vacua. Then by employing (generalized) Scherk-Schwarz reduction, we construct the geometric twisting for Calabi-Yau manifolds of Voisin-Borcea type (K 3 x T2)/ Z2 and study the superpotential in a type IIA orientifold based on this geometry. The twists modify the direct product by fibering the K 3 over T2 while preserving the Z2 involution. As an important application, the Voisin-Borcea class contains T6/( Z2 x Z2 ), the usual setting for intersecting D6 brane model building. Past work in this context considered only those twists inherited

  7. Heat flux measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    A new automated, computer controlled heat flux measurement facility is described. Continuous transient and steady-state surface heat flux values varying from about 0.3 to 6 MW/sq m over a temperature range of 100 to 1200 K can be obtained in the facility. An application of this facility is the development of heat flux gauges for continuous fast transient surface heat flux measurement on turbine blades operating in space shuttle main engine turbopumps. The facility is useful for durability testing at fast temperature transients.

  8. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath plate interiors may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the sub-asthenospheric mantle. Here we analyze two global sets of shear-wave splitting data, that of Kreemer [2009] and an updated and expanded data set, to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. We also explore the effect of using geologically current plate velocities (i.e., the MORVEL set of angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]) compared with geodetically current plate velocities (i.e., the GSRM v1.2 angular velocities [Kreemer et al. 2014]). We demonstrate that the errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. The SKS-MORVEL absolute plate angular velocities (based on the Kreemer [2009] data set) are determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2° ) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6° ). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4° ) than for continental

  9. Orion Absolute Navigation System Progress and Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The absolute navigation design of NASA's Orion vehicle is described. It has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to benchmark the current state of the design and some of the rationale and analysis behind it. There are specific challenges to address when preparing a timely and effective design for the Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1), while still looking ahead and providing software extensibility for future exploration missions. The primary onboard measurements in a Near-Earth or Mid-Earth environment consist of GPS pseudo-range and delta-range, but for future explorations missions the use of star-tracker and optical navigation sources need to be considered. Discussions are presented for state size and composition, processing techniques, and consider states. A presentation is given for the processing technique using the computationally stable and robust UDU formulation with an Agee-Turner Rank-One update. This allows for computational savings when dealing with many parameters which are modeled as slowly varying Gauss-Markov processes. Preliminary analysis shows up to a 50% reduction in computation versus a more traditional formulation. Several state elements are discussed and evaluated, including position, velocity, attitude, clock bias/drift, and GPS measurement biases in addition to bias, scale factor, misalignment, and non-orthogonalities of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Another consideration is the initialization of the EKF in various scenarios. Scenarios such as single-event upset, ground command, and cold start are discussed as are strategies for whole and partial state updates as well as covariance considerations. Strategies are given for dealing with latent measurements and high-rate propagation using multi-rate architecture. The details of the rate groups and the data ow between the elements is discussed and evaluated.

  10. Evaluation of the Absolute Regional Temperature Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Absolute Regional Temperature Potential (ARTP) is one of the few climate metrics that provides estimates of impacts at a sub-global scale. The ARTP presented here gives the time-dependent temperature response in four latitude bands (90-28degS, 28degS-28degN, 28-60degN and 60-90degN) as a function of emissions based on the forcing in those bands caused by the emissions. It is based on a large set of simulations performed with a single atmosphere-ocean climate model to derive regional forcing/response relationships. Here I evaluate the robustness of those relationships using the forcing/response portion of the ARTP to estimate regional temperature responses to the historic aerosol forcing in three independent climate models. These ARTP results are in good accord with the actual responses in those models. Nearly all ARTP estimates fall within +/-20%of the actual responses, though there are some exceptions for 90-28degS and the Arctic, and in the latter the ARTP may vary with forcing agent. However, for the tropics and the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in particular, the +/-20% range appears to be roughly consistent with the 95% confidence interval. Land areas within these two bands respond 39-45% and 9-39% more than the latitude band as a whole. The ARTP, presented here in a slightly revised form, thus appears to provide a relatively robust estimate for the responses of large-scale latitude bands and land areas within those bands to inhomogeneous radiative forcing and thus potentially to emissions as well. Hence this metric could allow rapid evaluation of the effects of emissions policies at a finer scale than global metrics without requiring use of a full climate model.

  11. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  12. On the Taxonomy of Flux Vacua

    SciTech Connect

    Giryavets, Alexander

    2004-04-25

    We investigate several predictions about the properties of IIB flux vacua on Calabi-Yau orientifolds, by constructing and characterizing a very large set of vacua in a specific example, an orientifold of the Calabi-Yau hypersurface in WP{sub 1,1,1,1,4}{sup 4}. We find support for the prediction of Ashok and Douglas that the density of vacua on moduli space is governed by det(-R-{omega}) where R and {omega} are curvature and Kaehler forms on the moduli space. The conifold point {psi} = 1 on moduli space therefore serves as an attractor, with a significant fraction of the flux vacua contained in a small neighborhood surrounding {psi} = 1. We also study the functional dependence of the number of flux vacua on the D3 charge in the fluxes, finding simple power law growth.

  13. Video Meteor Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Braid, D.

    2011-01-01

    The flux of meteoroids, or number of meteoroids per unit area per unit time, is critical for calibrating models of meteoroid stream formation and for estimating the hazard to spacecraft from shower and sporadic meteors. Although observations of meteors in the millimetre to centimetre size range are common, flux measurements (particularly for sporadic meteors, which make up the majority of meteoroid flux) are less so. It is necessary to know the collecting area and collection time for a given set of observations, and to correct for observing biases and the sensitivity of the system. Previous measurements of sporadic fluxes are summarized in Figure 1; the values are given as a total number of meteoroids striking the earth in one year to a given limiting mass. The Gr n et al. (1985) flux model is included in the figure for reference. Fluxes for sporadic meteoroids impacting the Earth have been calculated for objects in the centimeter size range using Super-Schmidt observations (Hawkins & Upton, 1958); this study used about 300 meteors, and used only the physical area of overlap of the cameras at 90 km to calculate the flux, corrected for angular speed of meteors, since a large angular speed reduces the maximum brightness of the meteor on the film, and radiant elevation, which takes into account the geometric reduction in flux when the meteors are not perpendicular to the horizontal. They bring up corrections for both partial trails (which tends to increase the collecting area) and incomplete overlap at heights other than 90 km (which tends to decrease it) as effects that will affect the flux, but estimated that the two effects cancelled one another. Halliday et al. (1984) calculated the flux of meteorite-dropping fireballs with fragment masses greater than 50 g, over the physical area of sky accessible to the MORP fireball cameras, counting only observations in clear weather. In the micron size range, LDEF measurements of small craters on spacecraft have been used to

  14. Characterization of ion fluxes and heat fluxes for PMI relevant conditions on Proto-MPEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, Clyde; Shaw, Guinevere; Biewer, Theodore; Rapp, Juergen

    2016-10-01

    Plasma characterization, in particular, particle flux and electron and ion temperature distributions nearest to an exposed target, are critical to quantifying Plasma Surface Interaction (PSI). In the Proto-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX), the ion fluxes and heat fluxes are derived from double Langmuir Probes (DLP) and Thomson Scattering in front of the target assuming Bohm conditions at the sheath entrance. Power fluxes derived from ne and Te measurements are compared to heat fluxes measured with IR thermography. The comparison will allow conclusions on the sheath heat transmission coefficient to be made experimentally. Different experimental conditions (low and high density plasmas (0.5 - 6 x 1019 m-3) with different magnetic configuration are compared. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  15. FLUX EMERGENCE IN A MAGNETIZED CONVECTION ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, R. F.; Brun, A. S.

    2013-07-20

    We study the influence of a dynamo magnetic field on the buoyant rise and emergence of twisted magnetic flux ropes and their influence on the global external magnetic field. We ran three-dimensional MHD numerical simulations using the ASH code (anelastic spherical harmonics) and analyzed the dynamical evolution of such buoyant flux ropes from the bottom of the convection zone until the post-emergence phases. The global nature of this model can only very crudely and inaccurately represent the local dynamics of the buoyant rise of the implanted magnetic structure, but nonetheless allows us to study the influence of global effects, such as self-consistently generated differential rotation and meridional circulation, and of Coriolis forces. Although motivated by the solar context, this model cannot be thought of as a realistic model of the rise of magnetic structures and their emergence in the Sun, where the local dynamics are completely different. The properties of initial phases of the buoyant rise are determined essentially by the flux-rope's properties and the convective flows and consequently are in good agreement with previous studies. However, the effects of the interaction of the background dynamo field become increasingly strong as the flux ropes evolve. During the buoyant rise across the convection zone, the flux-rope's magnetic field strength scales as B{proportional_to}{rho}{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} {approx}< 1. An increase of radial velocity, density, and current density is observed to precede flux emergence at all longitudes. The geometry, latitude, and relative orientation of the flux ropes with respect to the background magnetic field influences the resulting rise speeds, zonal flow amplitudes (which develop within the flux ropes), and the corresponding surface signatures. This influences the morphology, duration and amplitude of the surface shearing, and the Poynting flux associated with magnetic flux-rope emergence. The emerged magnetic flux

  16. A new method to calibrate the absolute sensitivity of a soft X-ray streak camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jian; Liu, Shenye; Li, Jin; Yang, Zhiwen; Chen, Ming; Guo, Luting; Yao, Li; Xiao, Shali

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new method to calibrate the absolute sensitivity of a soft X-ray streak camera (SXRSC). The calibrations are done in the static mode by using a small laser-produced X-ray source. A calibrated X-ray CCD is used as a secondary standard detector to monitor the X-ray source intensity. In addition, two sets of holographic flat-field grating spectrometers are chosen as the spectral discrimination systems of the SXRSC and the X-ray CCD. The absolute sensitivity of the SXRSC is obtained by comparing the signal counts of the SXRSC to the output counts of the X-ray CCD. Results show that the calibrated spectrum covers the range from 200 eV to 1040 eV. The change of the absolute sensitivity in the vicinity of the K-edge of the carbon can also be clearly seen. The experimental values agree with the calculated values to within 29% error. Compared with previous calibration methods, the proposed method has several advantages: a wide spectral range, high accuracy, and simple data processing. Our calibration results can be used to make quantitative X-ray flux measurements in laser fusion research.

  17. Absolute pulse energy measurements of soft x-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Tiedtke, K; Sorokin, A A; Jastrow, U; Juranić, P; Kreis, S; Gerken, N; Richter, M; Arp, U; Feng, Y; Nordlund, D; Soufli, R; Fernández-Perea, M; Juha, L; Heimann, P; Nagler, B; Lee, H J; Mack, S; Cammarata, M; Krupin, O; Messerschmidt, M; Holmes, M; Rowen, M; Schlotter, W; Moeller, S; Turner, J J

    2014-09-08

    This paper reports novel measurements of x-ray optical radiation on an absolute scale from the intense and ultra-short radiation generated in the soft x-ray regime of a free electron laser. We give a brief description of the detection principle for radiation measurements which was specifically adapted for this photon energy range. We present data characterizing the soft x-ray instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) with respect to the radiant power output and transmission by using an absolute detector temporarily placed at the downstream end of the instrument. This provides an estimation of the reflectivity of all x-ray optical elements in the beamline and provides the absolute photon number per bandwidth per pulse. This parameter is important for many experiments that need to understand the trade-offs between high energy resolution and high flux, such as experiments focused on studying materials via resonant processes. Furthermore, the results are compared with the LCLS diagnostic gas detectors to test the limits of linearity, and observations are reported on radiation contamination from spontaneous undulator radiation and higher harmonic content.

  18. Measuring flux of soil fumigants using the aerodynamic and dynamic flux chamber methods.

    PubMed

    van Wesenbeeck, I J; Knuteson, J A; Barnekow, D E; Phillips, A M

    2007-01-01

    Methods for measuring and estimating flux density of soil fumigants under field conditions are important for the purpose of providing inputs to air dispersion models and for comparing the effects of management practices on emission reduction. The objective of this study was to measure the flux of 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin at a site in Georgia (GA) using the aerodynamic method and the dynamic flux chamber (FC) method. A secondary objective was to compare the effects of high density polyethylene (HDPE), and virtually impermeable film (VIF) tarps on fumigant flux at a site in Florida (FL). Chloropicrin and 1,3-D were applied by surface drip application of In-Line soil fumigant on vegetable beds covered by low density polyethylene (LDPE), HDPE, or VIF. The surface drip fumigation using In-Line and LDPE tarp employed in this study resulted in volatilization of 26.5% of applied 1,3-D and 11.2% of the applied chloropicrin at the GA site, as determined using the aerodynamic method. Estimates of mass loss obtained from dynamic FCs were 23.6% for 1,3-D and 18.0% for chloropicrin at the GA site. Flux chamber trials at the FL site indicate significant additional reduction in flux density, and cumulative mass loss when VIF tarp is used. This study supports the use of dynamic FCs as a valuable tool for estimating gas flux density from agricultural soils, and evaluating best management practices for reducing fumigant emissions to the atmosphere.

  19. Hall Effect–Mediated Magnetic Flux Transport in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Stone, James M.

    2017-02-01

    The global evolution of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) has recently been shown to be largely controlled by the amount of poloidal magnetic flux threading the disk. The amount of magnetic flux must also coevolve with the disk, as a result of magnetic flux transport, a process that is poorly understood. In weakly ionized gas as in PPDs, magnetic flux is largely frozen in the electron fluid, except when resistivity is large. When the disk is largely laminar, we show that the relative drift between the electrons and ions (the Hall drift), and the ions and neutral fluids (ambipolar drift) can play a dominant role on the transport of magnetic flux. Using two-dimensional simulations that incorporate the Hall effect and ambipolar diffusion (AD) with prescribed diffusivities, we show that when large-scale poloidal field is aligned with disk rotation, the Hall effect rapidly drags magnetic flux inward at the midplane region, while it slowly pushes flux outward above/below the midplane. This leads to a highly radially elongated field configuration as a global manifestation of the Hall-shear instability. This field configuration further promotes rapid outward flux transport by AD at the midplane, leading to instability saturation. In quasi-steady state, magnetic flux is transported outward at approximately the same rate at all heights, and the rate is comparable to the Hall-free case. For anti-aligned field polarity, the Hall effect consistently transports magnetic flux outward, leading to a largely vertical field configuration in the midplane region. The field lines in the upper layer first bend radially inward and then outward to launch a disk wind. Overall, the net rate of outward flux transport is about twice as fast as that of the aligned case. In addition, the rate of flux transport increases with increasing disk magnetization. The absolute rate of transport is sensitive to disk microphysics, which remains to be explored in future studies.

  20. Electron heat flux instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Sundas; Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.; Lazar, M.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2017-02-01

    The heat flux instability is an electromagnetic mode excited by a relative drift between the protons and two-component core-halo electrons. The most prominent application may be in association with the solar wind where drifting electron velocity distributions are observed. The heat flux instability is somewhat analogous to the electrostatic Buneman or ion-acoustic instability driven by the net drift between the protons and bulk electrons, except that the heat flux instability operates in magnetized plasmas and possesses transverse electromagnetic polarization. The heat flux instability is also distinct from the electrostatic counterpart in that it requires two electron species with relative drifts with each other. In the literature, the heat flux instability is often called the 'whistler' heat flux instability, but it is actually polarized in the opposite sense to the whistler wave. This paper elucidates all of these fundamental plasma physical properties associated with the heat flux instability starting from a simple model, and gradually building up more complexity towards a solar wind-like distribution functions. It is found that the essential properties of the instability are already present in the cold counter-streaming electron model, and that the instability is absent if the protons are ignored. These instability characteristics are highly reminiscent of the electron firehose instability driven by excessive parallel temperature anisotropy, propagating in parallel direction with respect to the ambient magnetic field, except that the free energy source for the heat flux instability resides in the effective parallel pressure provided by the counter-streaming electrons.

  1. Fluxes across a thermohaline interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, M.; Lueck, R. G.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of velocity and temperature microstructure and hydrography were made with a towed vehicle moving in and around a single interface in a double-diffusive staircase. The interface was traversed 222 times in a saw-tooth pattern over a track 35 km long. The salinity and potential temperature and density in the mixed layers adjacent to the interface were spatially uniform except for one 8 km long anomaly. The rate of dissipation of kinetic energy was uniformly low in the interface and in the mixed layers, except for one section 600 m long where a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability generated turbulence. For the non-turbulent section of the interface, the mean rate of dissipation was 30.2 × 10 -10 W kg -1 in the mixed layers and 9.5 × 10 -10 W kg -1 in the interface. The non-dimensional dissipation rate, ɛ/vN 2, was almost always less than 16 in the interface and therfore, there was no turblent buoyancy flux according to ROHRet al. (1988, Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 195, 77-111). The average double-diffusive flux of buoyancy by heat was 3.6 × 10 -10 W kg -1. Under certain assumptions the ratio of the flux of buoyancy by heat and salt can be estimated to be 0.53 ± 0.10, in good agreement with laboratory and theoretical estimates for salt fingers. The average Cox number was about 8 in the interface, consistent with the theories of STERN (1975, Ocean circulation physics, Academic Press) and KUNZE (1987, Journal of Marine Research, 45 533-556), but displayed an inverse dependence on the vertical temperature gradient which was not predicted. As a result, the flux of buoyancy, as well as the individual contributions by heat and salt, were independent of the local mean vertical temperature gradient and the buoyancy frequency. The length of the turbulent section of the interface was only 1.7% of the total length observed. However, the turbulence was intense—the mean rate of dissipation was 2.5 × 10 -8 W kg -1—and may have sufficiently enhanced the flux of heat to

  2. Evolution of a magnetic flux tube in two-dimensional penetrative convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, R. L.; Brandenburg, A.; Nordlund, A.; Stein, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    Highly supercritical compressible convection is simulated in a two-dimensional domain in which the upper half is unstable to convection while the lower half is stably stratified. This configuration is an idealization of the layers near the base of the solar convection zone. Once the turbulent flow is well developed, a toroidal magnetic field B sub tor is introduced to the stable layer. The field's evolution is governed by an advection-diffusion-type equation, and the Lorentz force does not significantly affect the flow. After many turnover times the field is stratified such that the absolute value of B sub tor/rho is approximately constant in the convective layer, where rho is density, while in the stable layer this ratio decreases linearly with depth. Consequently most of the magnetic flux is stored in the overshoot layer. The inclusion of rotation leads to travelling waves which transport magnetic flux latitudinally in a manner reminiscent of the migrations seen during the solar cycle.

  3. Determination of Absolute Zero Using a Computer-Based Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple computer-based laboratory experiment for evaluating absolute zero in degrees Celsius, which can be performed in college and undergraduate physical sciences laboratory courses. With a computer, absolute zero apparatus can help demonstrators or students to observe the relationship between temperature and pressure and use…

  4. A Global Forecast of Absolute Poverty and Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, M. J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Estimates are made of absolute poverty and employment under the hypothesis that existing trends continue. Concludes that while the number of people in absolute poverty is not likely to decline by 2000, the proportion will fall. Jobs will have to grow 3.9% per year in developing countries to achieve full employment. (JOW)

  5. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonality of Influenza (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaman, J. L.; Pitzer, V.; Viboud, C.; Grenfell, B.; Goldstein, E.; Lipsitch, M.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent re-analysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here we show that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. In addition, we show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility and changes in population mixing and contact rates.

  6. Novalis' Poetic Uncertainty: A "Bildung" with the Absolute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mika, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Novalis, the Early German Romantic poet and philosopher, had at the core of his work a mysterious depiction of the "absolute." The absolute is Novalis' name for a substance that defies precise knowledge yet calls for a tentative and sensitive speculation. How one asserts a truth, represents an object, and sets about encountering things…

  7. Absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The distinction between the uses of relative and absolute spectroradiometric calibration of remote sensing systems is discussed. The advantages of detector-based absolute calibration are described, and the categories of relative and absolute system calibrations are listed. The limitations and problems associated with three common methods used for the absolute calibration of remote sensing systems are addressed. Two methods are proposed for the in-flight absolute calibration of advanced multispectral linear array systems. One makes use of a sun-illuminated panel in front of the sensor, the radiance of which is monitored by a spectrally flat pyroelectric radiometer. The other uses a large, uniform, high-radiance reference ground surface. The ground and atmospheric measurements required as input to a radiative transfer program to predict the radiance level at the entrance pupil of the orbital sensor are discussed, and the ground instrumentation is described.

  8. A developmental study of latent absolute pitch memory.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Müllensiefen, Daniel; Stewart, Lauren

    2017-03-01

    The ability to recall the absolute pitch level of familiar music (latent absolute pitch memory) is widespread in adults, in contrast to the rare ability to label single pitches without a reference tone (overt absolute pitch memory). The present research investigated the developmental profile of latent absolute pitch (AP) memory and explored individual differences related to this ability. In two experiments, 288 children from 4 to12 years of age performed significantly above chance at recognizing the absolute pitch level of familiar melodies. No age-related improvement or decline, nor effects of musical training, gender, or familiarity with the stimuli were found in regard to latent AP task performance. These findings suggest that latent AP memory is a stable ability that is developed from as early as age 4 and persists into adulthood.

  9. Spectral estimates of net radiation and soil heat flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daughtry, C.S.T.; Kustas, W.P.; Moran, M.S.; Pinter, P. J.; Jackson, R. D.; Brown, P.W.; Nichols, W.D.; Gay, L.W.

    1990-01-01

    Conventional methods of measuring surface energy balance are point measurements and represent only a small area. Remote sensing offers a potential means of measuring outgoing fluxes over large areas at the spatial resolution of the sensor. The objective of this study was to estimate net radiation (Rn) and soil heat flux (G) using remotely sensed multispectral data acquired from an aircraft over large agricultural fields. Ground-based instruments measured Rn and G at nine locations along the flight lines. Incoming fluxes were also measured by ground-based instruments. Outgoing fluxes were estimated using remotely sensed data. Remote Rn, estimated as the algebraic sum of incoming and outgoing fluxes, slightly underestimated Rn measured by the ground-based net radiometers. The mean absolute errors for remote Rn minus measured Rn were less than 7%. Remote G, estimated as a function of a spectral vegetation index and remote Rn, slightly overestimated measured G; however, the mean absolute error for remote G was 13%. Some of the differences between measured and remote values of Rn and G are associated with differences in instrument designs and measurement techniques. The root mean square error for available energy (Rn - G) was 12%. Thus, methods using both ground-based and remotely sensed data can provide reliable estimates of the available energy which can be partitioned into sensible and latent heat under nonadvective conditions. ?? 1990.

  10. A calorimeter for neutron flux measurement. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chupp, T.E.

    1993-04-01

    A calorimeter for absolute neutron flux measurement has been built and tested. The calorimeter measures the heat produced in a 10{degrees}K thick LiPb target when neutrons are captured via the {sup 6}Li(n,{sup 3}H){sup 4}He reaction. The sensitivity achieved was 1.3x10{sup 6} n/s for a 1 hour measurement. Separate flux measurements with the calorimeter and a {sup 238}U fission chamber are in agreement and show that systematic errors are less than 3%. An improved calorimeter has been built which is sensitive to 10{sup 5} n/s for a 1 hour measurement.

  11. The Topology of Canonical Flux Tubes in Flared Jet Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander Lavine, Eric; You, Setthivoine

    2017-01-01

    Magnetized plasma jets are generally modeled as magnetic flux tubes filled with flowing plasma governed by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We outline here a more fundamental approach based on flux tubes of canonical vorticity, where canonical vorticity is defined as the circulation of the species’ canonical momentum. This approach extends the concept of magnetic flux tube evolution to include the effects of finite particle momentum and enables visualization of the topology of plasma jets in regimes beyond MHD. A flared, current-carrying magnetic flux tube in an ion-electron plasma with finite ion momentum is thus equivalent to either a pair of electron and ion flow flux tubes, a pair of electron and ion canonical momentum flux tubes, or a pair of electron and ion canonical vorticity flux tubes. We examine the morphology of all these flux tubes for increasing electrical currents, different radial current profiles, different electron Mach numbers, and a fixed, flared, axisymmetric magnetic geometry. Calculations of gauge-invariant relative canonical helicities track the evolution of magnetic, cross, and kinetic helicities in the system, and show that ion flow fields can unwind to compensate for an increasing magnetic twist. The results demonstrate that including a species’ finite momentum can result in a very long collimated canonical vorticity flux tube even if the magnetic flux tube is flared. With finite momentum, particle density gradients must be normal to canonical vorticities, not to magnetic fields, so observations of collimated astrophysical jets could be images of canonical vorticity flux tubes instead of magnetic flux tubes.

  12. A Challenge to the Flux-Tower Upscaling Hypothesis? A Multi-Tower Comparison From the Chequamegon Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, K. J.; Ricciuto, D. R.; Butler, M. P.; Desai, A. R.; Wang, W.; Yi, C.; Bakwin, P. S.; Cook, B. D.; Bolstad, P. V.; Carey, E.; Martin, J.; Teclaw, R.; Mackay, D. S.; Ewers, B. E.; Chen, J.; Noormets, A.; Heinsch, F. A.; Denning, A. S.

    2003-12-01

    The "flux-tower upscaling hypothesis" asserts that flux tower measurements of representative ecosystems can be upscaled to regional fluxes via ecosystems mapping and process models. Collecting an integrated set of measurements to attempt upscaling is challenging. The required sampling density is also uncertain, and at minimum depends on local soil and vegetation cover, land use patterns, and climate gradients. Measurements that can be used to evaluate upscaling efforts are similarly difficult to obtain. Thus the basic hypothesis behind the flux tower approach of studying regional and global carbon (and hydrologic) cycles remains difficult to implement and test. The Chequamegon Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (ChEAS) has endeavored to create a distributed set of stand-level flux tower and supporting measurements that can be used to upscale carbon and water flux measurements to the regional scale. The flux measurements collected at the 447m WLEF TV tower are proposed as a regional integral that can be used to evaluate the stand-level upscaling. Though more exhaustive analyses are warranted, the results to date bear a mixed message for tower-based upscaling. The absolute magnitude of the fluxes from two stand-level towers cannot be simply aggregated to explain the observations from the WLEF tower. Decomposition implies that while photosynthesis may upscale, respiration does not. Potential explanations will be discussed, including comparisons to chamber respiration data, wetland water table, and flux measurements across young, mature and old-growth stands. The data from WLEF show a regional source of carbon to the atmosphere, counter to most temperate forest data and counter to the stand-level towers in the region. Upscaling interannual variability, however, appears to be a more tractable problem. Though the temporal extent of the multiple flux tower system is limited, a tent caterpillar outbreak in 2001 provides an example of a strong, coherent perturbation to the regional

  13. Density Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keiter, Richard L.; Puzey, Whitney L.; Blitz, Erin A.

    2006-01-01

    Metal rods of high purity for many elements are now commercially available and may be used to construct a display of relative densities. We have constructed a display with nine metal rods (Mg, Al, Ti, V, Fe, Cu, Ag, Pb, and W) of equal mass whose densities vary from 1.74 to 19.3 g cm[superscript -3]. The relative densities of the metals may be…

  14. 3-D capacitance density imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, G.E.

    1988-03-18

    A three-dimensional capacitance density imaging of a gasified bed or the like in a containment vessel is achieved using a plurality of electrodes provided circumferentially about the bed in levels and along the bed in channels. The electrodes are individually and selectively excited electrically at each level to produce a plurality of current flux field patterns generated in the bed at each level. The current flux field patterns are suitably sensed and a density pattern of the bed at each level determined. By combining the determined density patterns at each level, a three-dimensional density image of the bed is achieved. 7 figs.

  15. Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, M.; Ali Cavasonza, L.; Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Aupetit, S.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bindi, V.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Bueno, E. F.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Creus, W.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, Y. M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Dong, F.; Donnini, F.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Egorov, A.; Eline, A.; Eronen, T.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Formato, V.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R. J.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gómez-Coral, D. M.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kang, S. C.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Konak, C.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. S.; Li, J. Q.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, Hu; Lu, S. Q.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Nelson, T.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Pilo, F.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Qin, X.; Qu, Z. Y.; Räihä, T.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schulz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shi, J. Y.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Song, J. W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vázquez Acosta, M.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Vitale, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, N. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. Q.; Wang, Z. X.; Wei, C. C.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Willenbrock, M.; Wu, H.; Wu, X.; Xia, X.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Yang, Y.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, S. D.; Zhang, S. W.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; AMS Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49 ×1 05 antiproton events and 2.42 ×1 09 proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ˜60 to ˜500 GV , the antiproton p ¯, proton p , and positron e+ fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e- flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p ¯/p ), (p ¯/e+), and (p /e+) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ˜60 to ˜500 GV , the (p ¯/p ), (p ¯/e+), and (p /e+) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  16. Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Ali Cavasonza, L; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H S; Li, J Q; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lu, S Q; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Qin, X; Qu, Z Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L Q; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, X; Wang, X Q; Wang, Z X; Wei, C C; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J H; Zhang, S D; Zhang, S W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhu, Z Q; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-08-26

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49×10^{5} antiproton events and 2.42×10^{9} proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the antiproton p[over ¯], proton p, and positron e^{+} fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e^{-} flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  17. Structure and absolute configuration of hydroxy-bis-dihydrofarinosin from Encelia farinosa.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Alfredo R; Ortiz-Pastrana, Naytzé; Quijano, Leovigildo; Becerra-Martínez, Elvia; Olmedo-Aguirre, José O; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2016-11-16

    The structure of the dimeric eudesmanolide hydroxy-bis-dihydrofarinosin (1) from Encelia farinosa followed after contrasting their (1) H and (13) C NMR spectra with those of encelin (6), hydroxy-bis-dihydroencelin (3), and farinosin (4). Structure 1 was verified by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, which further provided the stereochemistry of the hydroxy group at C-4. Comparison of the experimental vibrational circular dichroism spectrum of its derived diacetate 2 with that calculated by density functional theory provided the absolute configuration, which resulted the same as that of its biogenetic precursor 4. Evaluation of several chemical shift differences between the two eudesmanolide fragments of 1 and 3 allows also ascertaining the yet not reported absolute configuration of the C-4 stereogenic center of 3. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Directed flux motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  19. The study of the thermal neutron flux in the deep underground laboratory DULB-4900

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, V. V.; Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Dzhappuev, D. D.; Kazalov, V. V.; Kudzhaev, A. U.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.; Tekueva, D. A.; Yakimenko, S. P.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the study of thermal neutron flux using monitors based on mixture of ZnS(Ag) and LiF enriched with a lithium-6 isotope at the deep underground laboratory DULB-4900 at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory. An annual modulation of thermal neutron flux in DULB-4900 is observed. Experimental evidences were obtained of correlation between the long-term thermal neutron flux variations and the absolute humidity of the air in laboratory. The amplitude of the modulation exceed 5% of total neutron flux.

  20. A FLUX SCALE FOR SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE 21 cm EPOCH OF REIONIZATION EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Daniel C.; Bowman, Judd; Parsons, Aaron R.; Ali, Zaki; Pober, Jonathan C.; Aguirre, James E.; Moore, David F.; Bradley, Richard F.; Carilli, Chris L.; DeBoer, David R.; Dexter, Matthew R.; MacMahon, Dave H. E.; Gugliucci, Nicole E.; Klima, Pat; Manley, Jason R.; Walbrugh, William P.; Stefan, Irina I.

    2013-10-20

    We present a catalog of spectral measurements covering a 100-200 MHz band for 32 sources, derived from observations with a 64 antenna deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) in South Africa. For transit telescopes such as PAPER, calibration of the primary beam is a difficult endeavor and errors in this calibration are a major source of error in the determination of source spectra. In order to decrease our reliance on an accurate beam calibration, we focus on calibrating sources in a narrow declination range from –46° to –40°. Since sources at similar declinations follow nearly identical paths through the primary beam, this restriction greatly reduces errors associated with beam calibration, yielding a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of derived source spectra. Extrapolating from higher frequency catalogs, we derive the flux scale using a Monte Carlo fit across multiple sources that includes uncertainty from both catalog and measurement errors. Fitting spectral models to catalog data and these new PAPER measurements, we derive new flux models for Pictor A and 31 other sources at nearby declinations; 90% are found to confirm and refine a power-law model for flux density. Of particular importance is the new Pictor A flux model, which is accurate to 1.4% and shows that between 100 MHz and 2 GHz, in contrast with previous models, the spectrum of Pictor A is consistent with a single power law given by a flux at 150 MHz of 382 ± 5.4 Jy and a spectral index of –0.76 ± 0.01. This accuracy represents an order of magnitude improvement over previous measurements in this band and is limited by the uncertainty in the catalog measurements used to estimate the absolute flux scale. The simplicity and improved accuracy of Pictor A's spectrum make it an excellent calibrator in a band important for experiments seeking to measure 21 cm emission from the epoch of reionization.

  1. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration. The instruments used are: • a fast-response, three-dimensional (3D) wind sensor (sonic anemometer) to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the speed of sound (SOS) (used to derive the air temperature) • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain the water vapor density and the CO2 concentration, and • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain methane density and methane flux at one SGP EF and at the NSA CF. The ECOR systems are deployed at the locations where other methods for surface flux measurements (e.g., energy balance Bowen ratio [EBBR] systems) are difficult to employ, primarily at the north edge of a field of crops. A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed ECOR system in SGP, NSA, Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1), and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2). The surface energy balance system consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes. The SEBS at one SGP and one NSA site also support upwelling and downwelling PAR measurements to qualify those two locations as Ameriflux sites.

  2. Modeling the Historical Flux of Planetary Impactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorný, David; Roig, Fernando; Bottke, William F.

    2017-03-01

    The impact cratering record of the Moon and the terrestrial planets provides important clues about the formation and evolution of the solar system. Especially intriguing is the epoch ≃3.8–3.9 Gyr ago (Ga), known as the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB), when the youngest lunar basins such as Imbrium and Orientale formed. The LHB was suggested to originate from a slowly declining impactor flux or from a late dynamical instability. Here, we develop a model for the historical flux of large asteroid impacts and discuss how it depends on various parameters, including the time and nature of the planetary migration/instability. We find that the asteroid impact flux dropped by 1–2 orders of magnitude during the first 1 Gyr and remained relatively unchanged over the last 3 Gyr. The early impacts were produced by asteroids whose orbits became excited during the planetary migration/instability, and by those originating from the inner extension of the main belt. The profiles obtained for the early and late versions of the planetary instability initially differ, but end up being similar after ∼3 Ga. Thus, the time of the instability can only be determined by considering the cratering and other constraints during the first ≃1.5 Gyr of the solar system history. Our absolute calibration of the impact flux indicates that asteroids were probably not responsible for the LHB, independently of whether the instability happened early or late, because the calibrated flux is not large enough to explain Imbrium/Orientale and a significant proportion of large lunar craters.

  3. Mini-implants and miniplates generate sub-absolute and absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Consolaro, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The functional demand imposed on bone promotes changes in the spatial properties of osteocytes as well as in their extensions uniformly distributed throughout the mineralized surface. Once spatial deformation is established, osteocytes create the need for structural adaptations that result in bone formation and resorption that happen to meet the functional demands. The endosteum and the periosteum are the effectors responsible for stimulating adaptive osteocytes in the inner and outer surfaces. Changes in shape, volume and position of the jaws as a result of skeletal correction of the maxilla and mandible require anchorage to allow bone remodeling to redefine morphology, esthetics and function as a result of spatial deformation conducted by orthodontic appliances. Examining the degree of changes in shape, volume and structural relationship of areas where mini-implants and miniplates are placed allows us to classify mini-implants as devices of subabsolute anchorage and miniplates as devices of absolute anchorage.

  4. Effect of chemical degradation on BVOC fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, J.; Markkanen, T.; Ruuskanen, T.; Petdjd, T. T.; Crowley, J.; Vesala, T.

    2011-12-01

    Analyses of flux data of volatile organic compounds are usually based on assumption that flux above canopy equals to the emission at the surface. This assumption requires chemical reactions to be slow compared to the turbulent transport, i.e. Damköhler number to be sufficiently low. We explore the effect of chemical degradation on fluxes using stochastic Lagrangian transport model in which the chemical degradation is described as first order decay (SLT-C0). We study cases in which the VOC emission is in the canopy or in the ground level, and vary various parameters, such as chemical lifetime, canopy density, hydrostatic stability, in the model. The magnitude of the chemistry effect on fluxes depends strongly on chemical lifetime and friction velocity. With SLT-C0 model the above canopy fluxes were significantly decreased already at low Damköhler numbers. We will show an example on how much the above canopy flux of selected mono- and sesquiterpenes are decreased in Hyytiälä measurement site, according to SLT-C0 model and oxidant levels measured during HUMPPA-COPEC measurement campaign in August 2010.

  5. Characterizing flow in oil reservoir rock using SPH: absolute permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David W.; Williams, John R.; Tilke, Peter; Leonardi, Christopher R.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulator for modeling grain scale fluid flow in porous rock is presented. The versatility of the SPH method has driven its use in increasingly complex areas of flow analysis, including flows related to permeable rock for both groundwater and petroleum reservoir research. While previous approaches to such problems using SPH have involved the use of idealized pore geometries (cylinder/sphere packs etc), in this paper we detail the characterization of flow in models with geometries taken from 3D X-ray microtomographic imaging of actual porous rock; specifically 25.12 % porosity dolomite. This particular rock type has been well characterized experimentally and described in the literature, thus providing a practical `real world' means of verification of SPH that will be key to its acceptance by industry as a viable alternative to traditional reservoir modeling tools. The true advantages of SPH are realized when adding the complexity of multiple fluid phases, however, the accuracy of SPH for single phase flow is, as yet, under developed in the literature and will be the primary focus of this paper. Flow in reservoir rock will typically occur in the range of low Reynolds numbers, making the enforcement of no-slip boundary conditions an important factor in simulation. To this end, we detail the development of a new, robust, and numerically efficient method for implementing no-slip boundary conditions in SPH that can handle the degree of complexity of boundary surfaces, characteristic of an actual permeable rock sample. A study of the effect of particle density is carried out and simulation results for absolute permeability are presented and compared to those from experimentation showing good agreement and validating the method for such applications.

  6. a Portable Apparatus for Absolute Measurements of the Earth's Gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumberge, Mark Andrew

    We have developed a new, portable apparatus for making absolute measurements of the acceleration due to the earth's gravity. We use the method of interferometrically determining the acceleration of a freely falling corner -cube prism. The falling object is surrounded by a chamber which is driven vertically inside a fixed vacuum chamber. This falling chamber is servoed to track the falling corner -cube to shield it from drag due to background gas. In addition, the drag-free falling chamber removes the need for a magnetic release, shields the falling object from electrostatic forces, and provides a means of both gently arresting the falling object and quickly returning it to its start position, to allow rapid acquisition of data. A synthesized long period isolation device reduces the noise due to seismic oscillations. A new type of Zeeman laser is used as the light source in the interferometer, and is compared with the wavelength of an iodine stabilized laser. The times of occurrence of 45 interference fringes are measured to within 0.2 nsec over a 20 cm drop and are fit to a quadratic by an on-line minicomputer. 150 drops can be made in ten minutes resulting in a value of g having a precision of 3 to 6 parts in 10('9). Systematic errors have been determined to be less than 5 parts in 10('9) through extensive tests. Three months of gravity data have been obtained with a reproducibility ranging from 5 to 10 parts in 10('9). The apparatus has been designed to be easily portable. Field measurements are planned for the immediate future. An accuracy of 6 parts in 10('9) corresponds to a height sensitivity of 2 cm. Vertical motions in the earth's crust and tectonic density changes that may precede earthquakes are to be investigated using this apparatus.

  7. Cryogenic flux-concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, B. M.; Brechna, H.; Hill, D. A.

    1969-01-01

    Flux concentrator has high primary to secondary coupling efficiency enabling it to produce high magnetic fields. The device provides versatility in pulse duration, magnetic field strengths and power sources.

  8. Acid soldering flux poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    The harmful substances in soldering fluxes are called hydrocarbons. They include: Ammonium chloride Rosin Hydrochloric acid Zinc ... Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ... Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ...

  9. GEWEX Radiative Flux Assessment

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-20

    ... climate components (atmosphere, ocean, land, cryosphere, biosphere). The GEWEX Radiative Flux Assessment (RFA) project will provide a ... Spatial Coverage: (-20.45, -2.43)(-62.87, -47.90) Full Product Page ...

  10. Absolute dose verifications in small photon fields using BANGTM gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheib, S. G.; Schenkel, Y.; Gianolini, S.

    2004-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters change their magnetic resonance (MR) and optical properties with the absorbed dose when irradiated and are suitable for narrow photon beam dosimetry in radiosurgery. Such dosimeters enable relative and absolute 3D dose verifications in order to check the entire treatment chain from imaging to dose application during commissioning and quality assurance. For absolute 3D dose verifications in radiosurgery using Gamma Knife B, commercially available BANGTM Gels (BANG 25 Gy and BANG 3 Gy) together with dedicated phantoms were chosen in order to determine the potential of absolute gel dosimetry in radiosurgery.

  11. Measuring the absolute magnetic field using high-Tc SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, D. F.; Itozaki, H.

    2006-06-01

    SQUID normally can only measure the change of magnetic field instead of the absolute value of magnetic field. Using a compensation method, a mobile SQUID, which could keep locked when moving in the earth's magnetic field, was developed. Using the mobile SQUID, it was possible to measure the absolute magnetic field. The absolute value of magnetic field could be calculated from the change of the compensation output when changing the direction of the SQUID in a magnetic field. Using this method and the mobile SQUID, we successfully measured the earth's magnetic field in our laboratory.

  12. Absolute Antenna Calibration at the US National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, G. L.; Bilich, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Geodetic GNSS applications routinely demand millimeter precision and extremely high levels of accuracy. To achieve these accuracies, measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level must be understood. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the apparent point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers; additional research suggests that the addition of a radome or the choice of antenna mount can significantly alter those a priori phase center patterns. For the more demanding GNSS positioning applications and especially in cases of mixed-antenna networks, it is all the more important to know antenna phase center variations as a function of both elevation and azimuth in the antenna reference frame and incorporate these models into analysis software. Determination of antenna phase center behavior is known as "antenna calibration". Since 1994, NGS has computed relative antenna calibrations for more than 350 antennas. In recent years, the geodetic community has moved to absolute calibrations - the IGS adopted absolute antenna phase center calibrations in 2006 for use in their orbit and clock products, and NGS's CORS group began using absolute antenna calibration upon the release of the new CORS coordinates in IGS08 epoch 2005.00 and NAD 83(2011,MA11,PA11) epoch 2010.00. Although NGS relative calibrations can be and have been converted to absolute, it is considered best practice to independently measure phase center characteristics in an absolute sense. Consequently, NGS has developed and operates an absolute calibration system. These absolute antenna calibrations accommodate the demand for greater accuracy and for 2-dimensional (elevation and azimuth) parameterization. NGS will continue to provide calibration values via the NGS web site www.ngs.noaa.gov/ANTCAL, and will publish calibrations in the ANTEX format as well as the legacy ANTINFO

  13. Computing Fluxes Of Molecules On And Near A Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, H. K.; Rios, E. R.; Hakes, C. L.; Bui, B. D.

    1996-01-01

    Molecular Flux (MOLFLUX) computer code is versatile program used to compute following conditions on and near spacecraft: fluxes of molecules to, and deposition of molecules on, surfaces; densities and column densities of molecules in surrounding space, and return fluxes of molecules to surfaces caused by both collisions of molecules with ambient atmosphere and by self-scattering. User has option to modify spacecraft configurations and sources of contamination and to choose which critical surfaces to examine. Written in FORTRAN and C language. Three machine versions available: VAX version (MSC-22260), HP version (MSC-22565), and Cray version (MSC-22566).

  14. Flux Creep in Sintered Superconducting Y-Ba-Cu-O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Teruo; Funaba, Seiji; Nagamatsu, Yoshiyuki; Ni, Baorong; Funaki, Kazuo; Yamafuji, Kaoru

    1989-09-01

    The flux creep rate in sintered superconducting Y-Ba-Cu-O was measured at 77 K and in fields of up to 0.1 T. The pinning potential mainly caused by flux pinning inside grains was 0.25 eV at B{=}50 mT and decreased monotonically with increasing magnetic field. The obtained results can be explained by the theoretical model with observed intragrain current density. This theoretical model suggests that the flux creep at high fields is notable even if a superconducting wire with the critical current density of 2× 1010 A/m2 at B{=}5 T is realized.

  15. Dynamics of flux tubes in accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, E. T.; Duncan, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    The study of magnetized plasmas in astrophysics is complicated by a number of factors, not the least of which is that in considering magnetic fields in stars or accretion disks, we are considering plasmas with densities well above those we can study in the laboratory. In particular, whereas laboratory plasmas are dominated by the confining magnetic field pressure, stars, and probably accretion disks, have magnetic fields whose beta (ratio of gas pressure to magnetic field pressure) is much greater than 1. Observations of the Sun suggest that under such circumstances the magnetic field breaks apart into discrete flux tubes with a small filling factor. On the other hand, theoretical treatments of MHD turbulence in high-beta plasmas tend to assume that the field is more or less homogeneously distributed throughout the plasma. Here we consider a simple model for the distribution of magnetic flux tubes in a turbulent medium. We discuss the mechanism by which small inhomogeneities evolve into discrete flux tubes and the size and distribution of such flux tubes. We then apply the model to accretion disks. We find that the fibrilation of the magnetic field does not enhance magnetic buoyancy. We also note that the evolution of an initially diffuse field in a turbulent medium, e.g., any uniform field in a shearing flow, will initially show exponential growth as the flux tubes form. This growth saturates when the flux tube formation is complete and cannot be used as the basis for a self-sustaining dynamo effect. Since the typical state of the magnetic field is a collection of intense flux tubes, this effect is of limited interest. However, it may be important early in the evolution of the galactic magnetic field, and it will play a large role in numerical simulations. Finally, we note that the formation of flux tubes is an essential ingredient in any successful dynamo model for stars or accretion disks.

  16. Transport of absolute angular momentum in quasi-axisymmetric equatorial jet streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Read, P. L.

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that prograde equatorial jet stresses cannot occur in an axisymmetric inviscid fluid, owing to the constraints of local angular momentum conservation. For a viscous fluid, the constraints of mass conservation prevent the formation of any local maximum of absolute angular momentum (m) without a means of transferring m against its gradient (delta m) in the meridional plane. The circumstances under which m can be diffused up-gradient by normal molecular viscosity are derived, and illustrated with reference to numerical simulations of axisymmetric flows in a cylindrical annulus. Viscosity is shown to act so as to tend to expel m from the interior outwards from the rotation axis. Such an effect can produce local super-rotation even in a mechanically isolated fluid. The tendency of viscosity to result in the expulsion of m is shown to be analogous in certain respects to a vorticity-mixing hypothesis for the effects of non-axisymmetric eddies of the zonally-averaged flow. It is shown how the advective and diffusive transport of m by non-axisymmetric eddies can be represented by the Transformed Eulerian Mean meridional circulation and the Eliassen-Palm (EP) flux of Andrews and McIntyre respectively, in the zonal mean. Constraints on the form and direction of the EP flux in an advective/diffusive flow for such eddies are derived, by analogy with similar constraints on the diffusive flux of m due to viscosity.

  17. Monochromator-Based Absolute Calibration of Radiation Thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keawprasert, T.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, D. R.; Hartmann, J.

    2011-08-01

    A monochromator integrating-sphere-based spectral comparator facility has been developed to calibrate standard radiation thermometers in terms of the absolute spectral radiance responsivity, traceable to the PTB cryogenic radiometer. The absolute responsivity calibration has been improved using a 75 W xenon lamp with a reflective mirror and imaging optics to a relative standard uncertainty at the peak wavelength of approximately 0.17 % ( k = 1). Via a relative measurement of the out-of-band responsivity, the spectral responsivity of radiation thermometers can be fully characterized. To verify the calibration accuracy, the absolutely calibrated radiation thermometer is used to measure Au and Cu freezing-point temperatures and then to compare the obtained results with the values obtained by absolute methods, resulting in T - T 90 values of +52 mK and -50 mK for the gold and copper fixed points, respectively.

  18. Gibbs Paradox Revisited from the Fluctuation Theorem with Absolute Irreversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashita, Yûto; Ueda, Masahito

    2017-02-01

    The inclusion of the factor ln (1 /N !) in the thermodynamic entropy proposed by Gibbs is shown to be equivalent to the validity of the fluctuation theorem with absolute irreversibility for gas mixing.

  19. Absolute Value Boundedness, Operator Decomposition, and Stochastic Media and Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adomian, G.; Miao, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    The research accomplished during this period is reported. Published abstracts and technical reports are listed. Articles presented include: boundedness of absolute values of generalized Fourier coefficients, propagation in stochastic media, and stationary conditions for stochastic differential equations.

  20. Asteroid Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britt, D. T.; Yeomans, D.; Housen, K.; Consolmagno, G.

    2005-01-01

    This data set contains a tabulation of asteroid masses, diameters, and bulk densities compiled by D. T. Britt and published in Table 1 of Britt, et al. (2002) [BRITTETAL2002] in the 'Asteroids III' volume.

  1. Correcting eddy-covariance flux underestimates over a grassland.

    SciTech Connect

    Twine, T. E.; Kustas, W. P.; Norman, J. M.; Cook, D. R.; Houser, P. R.; Meyers, T. P.; Prueger, J. H.; Starks, P. J.; Wesely, M. L.; Environmental Research; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; DOE; National Aeronautics and Space Administration; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrationoratory

    2000-06-08

    Independent measurements of the major energy balance flux components are not often consistent with the principle of conservation of energy. This is referred to as a lack of closure of the surface energy balance. Most results in the literature have shown the sum of sensible and latent heat fluxes measured by eddy covariance to be less than the difference between net radiation and soil heat fluxes. This under-measurement of sensible and latent heat fluxes by eddy-covariance instruments has occurred in numerous field experiments and among many different manufacturers of instruments. Four eddy-covariance systems consisting of the same models of instruments were set up side-by-side during the Southern Great Plains 1997 Hydrology Experiment and all systems under-measured fluxes by similar amounts. One of these eddy-covariance systems was collocated with three other types of eddy-covariance systems at different sites; all of these systems under-measured the sensible and latent-heat fluxes. The net radiometers and soil heat flux plates used in conjunction with the eddy-covariance systems were calibrated independently and measurements of net radiation and soil heat flux showed little scatter for various sites. The 10% absolute uncertainty in available energy measurements was considerably smaller than the systematic closure problem in the surface energy budget, which varied from 10 to 30%. When available-energy measurement errors are known and modest, eddy-covariance measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes should be adjusted for closure. Although the preferred method of energy balance closure is to maintain the Bowen-ratio, the method for obtaining closure appears to be less important than assuring that eddy-covariance measurements are consistent with conservation of energy. Based on numerous measurements over a sorghum canopy, carbon dioxide fluxes, which are measured by eddy covariance, are underestimated by the same factor as eddy covariance evaporation

  2. Design of a Modular E-Core Flux Concentrating Axial Flux Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, Tausif; Sozer, Yilmaz; Husain, Iqbal; Muljadi, Eduard

    2015-09-02

    In this paper a novel E-Core axial flux machine is proposed. The machine has a double stator-single rotor configuration with flux concentrating ferrite magnets, and pole windings across each leg of an E-Core stator. E-Core stators with the proposed flux-concentrating rotor arrangement result in better magnet utilization and higher torque density. The machine also has a modular structure facilitating simpler construction. This paper presents a single phase and a three-phase version of the E-Core machine. Case study for a 1.1 kW, 400 rpm machine for both the single phase and three-phase axial flux machine is presented. The results are verified through 3D finite element analysis.

  3. Computing Fluxes Of Molecules On And Near A Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, H. K.; Rios, E. R.; Hakes, C. L.; Rodriguez, R. T.

    1995-01-01

    Molecular Flux (MOLFLUX) computer code versatile program used to compute following environmental effects induced by spacecraft: fluxes of molecules to, and deposition of molecules on, surfaces; densities and column densities of molecules in surrounding space, and return fluxes of molecules to surfaces caused by both collisions of molecules with ambient atmosphere and by self-scattering. Includes capability to predict buildup in density of ambient gas in front of surfaces exposed to ram conditions by specifying ambient flux rates for all species impinging on surfaces. Surface chemical reactions represented as rates of emission from surfaces. User has option to modify spacecraft configurations and sources of contamination, and to choose which critical surfaces to examine. Written in FORTRAN and C language.

  4. Energy and energy flux in axisymmetric slow and fast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreels, M. G.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Grant, S. D. T.; Jess, D. B.; Goossens, M.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We aim to calculate the kinetic, magnetic, thermal, and total energy densities and the flux of energy in axisymmetric sausage modes. The resulting equations should contain as few parameters as possible to facilitate applicability for different observations. Methods: The background equilibrium is a one-dimensional cylindrical flux tube model with a piecewise constant radial density profile. This enables us to use linearised magnetohydrodynamic equations to calculate the energy densities and the flux of energy for axisymmetric sausage modes. Results: The equations used to calculate the energy densities and the flux of energy in axisymmetric sausage modes depend on the radius of the flux tube, the equilibrium sound and Alfvén speeds, the density of the plasma, the period and phase speed of the wave, and the radial or longitudinal components of the Lagrangian displacement at the flux tube boundary. Approximate relations for limiting cases of propagating slow and fast sausage modes are also obtained. We also obtained the dispersive first-order correction term to the phase speed for both the fundamental slow body mode under coronal conditions and the slow surface mode under photospheric conditions. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Fundamentals of heat measurement. [heat flux transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerashchenko, O. A.

    1979-01-01

    Various methods and devices for obtaining experimental data on heat flux density over wide ranges of temperature and pressure are examined. Laboratory tests and device fabrication details are supplemented by theoretical analyses of heat-conduction and thermoelectric effects, providing design guidelines and information relevant to further research and development. A theory defining the measure of correspondence between transducer signal and the measured heat flux is established for individual (isolated) heat flux transducers subject to space and time-dependent loading. An analysis of the properties of stacked (series-connected) transducers of various types (sandwich-type, plane, and spiral) is used to derive a similarity theory providing general governing relationships. The transducers examined are used in 36 types of derivative devices involving direct heat loss measurements, heat conduction studies, radiation pyrometry, calorimetry in medicine and industry and nuclear reactor dosimetry.

  6. Flux-Feedback Magnetic-Suspension Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1990-01-01

    Flux-feedback magnetic-suspension actuator provides magnetic suspension and control forces having linear transfer characteristics between force command and force output over large range of gaps. Hall-effect devices used as sensors for electronic feedback circuit controlling currents flowing in electromagnetic windings to maintain flux linking suspended element at substantially constant value independent of changes in length of gap. Technique provides effective method for maintenance of constant flux density in gap and simpler than previous methods. Applications include magnetic actuators for control of shapes and figures of antennas and of precise segmented reflectors, magnetic suspensions in devices for storage of angular momentum and/or kinetic energy, and systems for control, pointing, and isolation of instruments.

  7. SAMOS Surface Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Shawn; Bourassa, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The development of a new surface flux dataset based on underway meteorological observations from research vessels will be presented. The research vessel data center at the Florida State University routinely acquires, quality controls, and distributes underway surface meteorological and oceanographic observations from over 30 oceanographic vessels. These activities are coordinated by the Shipboard Automated Meteorological and Oceanographic System (SAMOS) initiative in partnership with the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) project. Recently, the SAMOS data center has used these underway observations to produce bulk flux estimates for each vessel along individual cruise tracks. A description of this new flux product, along with the underlying data quality control procedures applied to SAMOS observations, will be provided. Research vessels provide underway observations at high-temporal frequency (1 min. sampling interval) that include navigational (position, course, heading, and speed), meteorological (air temperature, humidity, wind, surface pressure, radiation, rainfall), and oceanographic (surface sea temperature and salinity) samples. Vessels recruited to the SAMOS initiative collect a high concentration of data within the U.S. continental shelf and also frequently operate well outside routine shipping lanes, capturing observations in extreme ocean environments (Southern, Arctic, South Atlantic, and South Pacific oceans). These observations are atypical for their spatial and temporal sampling, making them very useful for many applications including validation of numerical models and satellite retrievals, as well as local assessments of natural variability. Individual SAMOS observations undergo routine automated quality control and select vessels receive detailed visual data quality inspection. The result is a quality-flagged data set that is ideal for calculating turbulent flux estimates. We will describe the bulk flux algorithms that have been applied to the

  8. Absolute Helmholtz free energy of highly anharmonic crystals: theory vs Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Yakub, Lydia; Yakub, Eugene

    2012-04-14

    We discuss the problem of the quantitative theoretical prediction of the absolute free energy for classical highly anharmonic solids. Helmholtz free energy of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystal is calculated accurately while accounting for both the anharmonicity of atomic vibrations and the pair and triple correlations in displacements of the atoms from their lattice sites. The comparison with most precise computer simulation data on sublimation and melting lines revealed that theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulation data in the whole range of temperatures and densities studied.

  9. Metabolite concentrations, fluxes, and free energies imply efficient enzyme usage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Junyoung O.; Rubin, Sara A.; Xu, Yi-Fan; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Fan, Jing; Shlomi, Tomer; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2016-01-01

    In metabolism, available free energy is limited and must be divided across pathway steps to maintain ΔG negative throughout. For each reaction, ΔG is log-proportional both to a concentration ratio (reaction quotient-to-equilibrium constant) and to a flux ratio (backward-to-forward flux). Here we use isotope labeling to measure absolute metabolite concentrations and fluxes in Escherichia coli, yeast, and a mammalian cell line. We then integrate this information to obtain a unified set of concentrations and ΔG for each organism. In glycolysis, we find that free energy is partitioned so as to mitigate unproductive backward fluxes associated with ΔG near zero. Across metabolism, we observe that absolute metabolite concentrations and ΔG are substantially conserved, and that most substrate (but not inhibitor) concentrations exceed the associated enzyme binding site affinity. The observed conservation of metabolite concentrations is consistent with an evolutionary drive to utilize enzymes efficiently given thermodynamic and osmotic constraints. PMID:27159581

  10. Metabolite concentrations, fluxes and free energies imply efficient enzyme usage

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Junyoung O.; Rubin, Sara A.; Xu, Yi -Fan; ...

    2016-05-02

    In metabolism, available free energy is limited and must be divided across pathway steps to maintain a negative ΔG throughout. For each reaction, ΔG is log proportional both to a concentration ratio (reaction quotient to equilibrium constant) and to a flux ratio (backward to forward flux). In this paper, we use isotope labeling to measure absolute metabolite concentrations and fluxes in Escherichia coli, yeast and a mammalian cell line. We then integrate this information to obtain a unified set of concentrations and ΔG for each organism. In glycolysis, we find that free energy is partitioned so as to mitigate unproductivemore » backward fluxes associated with ΔG near zero. Across metabolism, we observe that absolute metabolite concentrations and ΔG are substantially conserved and that most substrate (but not inhibitor) concentrations exceed the associated enzyme binding site dissociation constant (Km or Ki). Finally, the observed conservation of metabolite concentrations is consistent with an evolutionary drive to utilize enzymes efficiently given thermodynamic and osmotic constraints.« less

  11. Metabolite concentrations, fluxes and free energies imply efficient enzyme usage

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Junyoung O.; Rubin, Sara A.; Xu, Yi -Fan; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Fan, Jing; Shlomi, Tomer; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2016-05-02

    In metabolism, available free energy is limited and must be divided across pathway steps to maintain a negative ΔG throughout. For each reaction, ΔG is log proportional both to a concentration ratio (reaction quotient to equilibrium constant) and to a flux ratio (backward to forward flux). In this paper, we use isotope labeling to measure absolute metabolite concentrations and fluxes in Escherichia coli, yeast and a mammalian cell line. We then integrate this information to obtain a unified set of concentrations and ΔG for each organism. In glycolysis, we find that free energy is partitioned so as to mitigate unproductive backward fluxes associated with ΔG near zero. Across metabolism, we observe that absolute metabolite concentrations and ΔG are substantially conserved and that most substrate (but not inhibitor) concentrations exceed the associated enzyme binding site dissociation constant (Km or Ki). Finally, the observed conservation of metabolite concentrations is consistent with an evolutionary drive to utilize enzymes efficiently given thermodynamic and osmotic constraints.

  12. Flux pinning characteristics and irreversibility line in high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsushita, T.; Ihara, N.; Kiuchi, M.

    1995-01-01

    The flux pinning properties in high temperature superconductors are strongly influenced by thermally activated flux motion. The scaling relation of the pinning force density and the irreversibility line in various high temperature superconductors are numerically analyzed in terms of the flux creep model. The effect of two factors, i.e., the flux pinning strength and the dimensionality of the material, on these properties are investigated. It is speculated that the irreversibility line in Bi-2212 superconductors is one order of magnitude smaller than that in Y-123, even if the flux pinning strength in Bi-2212 is improved up to the level of Y-123. It is concluded that these two factors are equally important in determination of the flux pinning characteristics at high temperatures.

  13. ISS nocturnal images as a scientic tool against Light Pollution: Flux calibration and colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Zamorano, J.; Pascual, S.; López Cayuela, M.; Ocaña, F.; Challupner, P.; Gómez Castaño, J.; Fernández-Renau, A.; Gómez, J. A.; de Miguel, E.

    2013-05-01

    The potential of the pictures of the Earth taken at night from the International Space Station (ISS) with a Nikon D3s digital camera to fight against light pollution is shown. We show that RAW pictures should be used to obtain fluxes. We have developed a method to perform absolute photometric calibration measuring fluxes of the stars recorded in the pictures and also calibrated sources at earth.

  14. Protected Flux Pairing Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Matthew; Zhang, Wenyuan; Ioffe, Lev; Gershenson, Michael

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the coherent flux tunneling in a qubit containing two submicron Josephson junctions shunted by a superinductor (a dissipationless inductor with an impedance much greater than the resistance quantum). The two low energy quantum states of this device, 0 and 1, are represented by even and odd number of fluxes in the loop, respectively. This device is dual to the charge pairing Josephson rhombi qubit. The spectrum of the device, studied by microwave spectroscopy, reflects the interference between coherent quantum phase slips in the two junctions (the Aharonov-Casher effect). The time domain measurements demonstrate the suppression of the qubit's energy relaxation in the protected regime, which illustrates the potential of this flux pairing device as a protected quantum circuit. Templeton Foundation, NSF, and ARO.

  15. Synchronized flux limiting for gas dynamics variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Christoph; Kuzmin, Dmitri

    2016-12-01

    This work addresses the design of failsafe flux limiters for systems of conserved quantities and derived variables in numerical schemes for the equations of gas dynamics. Building on Zalesak's multidimensional flux-corrected transport (FCT) algorithm, we construct a new positivity-preserving limiter for the density, total energy, and pressure. The bounds for the underlying inequality constraints are designed to enforce local maximum principles in regions of strong density variations and become less restrictive in smooth regions. The proposed approach leads to closed-form expressions for the synchronized correction factors without the need to solve inequality-constrained optimization problems. A numerical study is performed for the compressible Euler equations discretized using a finite element based FCT scheme.

  16. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MaCarthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  17. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MacArthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic phosphors. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  18. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MacArthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  19. Optical heat flux gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

    1991-06-25

    A heat flux gauge is described comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator wherein each thermographic layer comprises respective thermographic phosphors. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  20. Optical heat flux gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

    1989-06-07

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figs.