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Sample records for absolute frequency dependence

  1. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  2. [Frequency dependance of compliance].

    PubMed

    Gayrard, P

    1975-01-01

    Resistance of peripheral or "small" airways is only a small part of the total pulmonary resistance (Raw). Even considerable obstruction in these airways will have little effect on total resistance. Conversely this will lead to inequality in the time constants of units in parallel, and dynamic lung compliance (C dyn) shall fall as respiratory frequence increases. C dyn is measured from simultaneous recordings of transpulmonary pressure (esophageal balloon) and volume obtained from a volume displacement plethysmograph. If Raw and static compliance are found to be normal, the frequency dependance of compliance will result from peripheral airway obstruction only. Early stages of chronic airway obstruction can be established by this method. However this appear not suitable for wide-scale studies.

  3. The assessment of protective behavioral strategies: comparing the absolute frequency and contingent frequency response scales.

    PubMed

    Kite, Benjamin A; Pearson, Matthew R; Henson, James M

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the present studies was to examine the effects of response scale on the observed relationships between protective behavioral strategies (PBS) measures and alcohol-related outcomes. We reasoned that an "absolute frequency" scale (stem: "how many times …"; response scale: 0 times to 11+ times) conflates the frequency of using PBS with the frequency of consuming alcohol; thus, we hypothesized that the use of an absolute frequency response scale would result in positive relationships between types of PBS and alcohol-related outcomes. Alternatively, a "contingent frequency" scale (stem: "When drinking … how often …"; response scale: never to always) does not conflate frequency of alcohol use with use of PBS; therefore, we hypothesized that use of a contingent frequency scale would result in negative relationships between use of PBS and alcohol-related outcomes. Two published measures of PBS were used across studies: the Protective Behavioral Strategies Survey (PBSS) and the Strategy Questionnaire (SQ). Across three studies, we demonstrate that when measured using a contingent frequency response scale, PBS measures relate negatively to alcohol-related outcomes in a theoretically consistent manner; however, when PBS measures were measured on an absolute frequency response scale, they were nonsignificantly or positively related to alcohol-related outcomes. We discuss the implications of these findings for the assessment of PBS.

  4. Absolute distance measurement using frequency-sweeping heterodyne interferometer calibrated by an optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuejian; Wei, Haoyun; Zhang, Hongyuan; Ren, Libing; Li, Yan; Zhang, Jitao

    2013-04-01

    We present a frequency-sweeping heterodyne interferometer to measure an absolute distance based on a frequency-tunable diode laser calibrated by an optical frequency comb (OFC) and an interferometric phase measurement system. The laser frequency-sweeping process is calibrated by the OFC within a range of 200 GHz and an accuracy of 1.3 kHz, which brings about a precise temporal synthetic wavelength of 1.499 mm. The interferometric phase measurement system consisting of the analog signal processing circuit and the digital phase meter achieves a phase difference resolution better than 0.1 deg. As the laser frequency is sweeping, the absolute distance can be determined by measuring the phase difference variation of the interference signals. In the laboratory condition, our experimental scheme realizes micrometer accuracy over meter distance.

  5. Noninvasive absolute cerebral oximetry with frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallacoglu, Bertan

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements of absolute concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin in the human brain can provide critical information about cerebral physiology in terms of cerebral blood volume, blood flow, oxygen delivery, and metabolic rate of oxygen. We developed several frequency domain NIRS data acquisition and analysis methods aimed at absolute measurements of hemoglobin concentration and saturation in cerebral tissue of adult human subjects. Extensive experimental investigations were carried out in various homogenous and two-layered tissue-mimicking phantoms, and biological tissues. The advantages and limitations of commonly used homogenous models and inversion strategies were thoroughly investigated. Prior to human subjects, extensive studies were carried out in in vivo animal models. In rabbits, absolute hemoglobin oxygen desaturation was shown to depend strongly on surgically induced testicular torsion. Methods developed in this study were then adapted for measurements in the rat brain. Absolute values were demonstrated to discern cerebrovascular impairment in a rat model of diet-induced vascular cognitive impairment. These results facilitated the development of clinically useful optical measures of cerebrovascular health. In a large group of human subjects, employing a homogeneous model for absolute measurements was shown to be reliable and robust. However, it was also shown to be limited due to the relatively thick extracerebral tissue. The procedure we develop in this work and the thesis thereof performs a nonlinear inversion procedure with six unknown parameters with no other prior knowledge for the retrieval of the optical coefficients and top layer thickness with high accuracy on two-layered media. Our absolute measurements of cerebral hemoglobin concentration and saturation are based on the discrimination of extracerebral and cerebral tissue layers, and they can enhance the impact of NIRS for cerebral hemodynamics and

  6. Coexistence under positive frequency dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Molofsky, J.; Bever, J. D.; Antonovics, J.

    2001-01-01

    Negative frequency dependence resulting from interspecific interactions is considered a driving force in allowing the coexistence of competitors. While interactions between species and genotypes can also result in positive frequency dependence, positive frequency dependence has usually been credited with hastening the extinction of rare types and is not thought to contribute to coexistence. In the present paper, we develop a stochastic cellular automata model that allows us to vary the scale of frequency dependence and the scale of dispersal. The results of this model indicate that positive frequency dependence will allow the coexistence of two species at a greater rate than would be expected from chance. This coexistence arises from the generation of banding patterns that will be stable over long time-periods. As a result, we found that positive frequency-dependent interactions over local spatial scales promote coexistence over neutral interactions. This result was robust to variation in boundary conditions within the simulation and to variation in levels of disturbance. Under all conditions, coexistence is enhanced as the strength of positive frequency-dependent interactions is increased. PMID:11217898

  7. Single-track absolute position encoding method based on spatial frequency of stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xiansong; Lu, Yancong; Wei, Chunlong; Zhou, Changhe

    2014-11-01

    A new method of single-track absolute position encoding based on spatial frequency of stripes is proposed. Instead of using pseudorandom-sequence arranged stripes as in conventional situations, this kind of encoding method stores the location information in the frequency space of the stripes, which means the spatial frequency of stripes varies with position and indicates position. This encoding method has a strong fault-tolerant capability with single-stripe detecting errors. The method can be applied to absolute linear encoders, absolute photoelectric angle encoders or two-dimensional absolute linear encoders. The measuring apparatus includes a CCD image sensor and a microscope system, and the method of decoding this frequency code is based on FFT algorithm. This method should be highly interesting for practical applications as an absolute position encoding method.

  8. Femtosecond frequency comb measurement of absolute frequencies and hyperfine coupling constants in cesium vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Stalnaker, Jason E.; Mbele, Vela; Gerginov, Vladislav; Fortier, Tara M.; Diddams, Scott A.; Hollberg, Leo; Tanner, Carol E.

    2010-04-15

    We report measurements of absolute transition frequencies and hyperfine coupling constants for the 8S{sub 1/2}, 9S{sub 1/2}, 7D{sub 3/2}, and 7D{sub 5/2} states in {sup 133}Cs vapor. The stepwise excitation through either the 6P{sub 1/2} or 6P{sub 3/2} intermediate state is performed directly with broadband laser light from a stabilized femtosecond laser optical-frequency comb. The laser beam is split, counterpropagated, and focused into a room-temperature Cs vapor cell. The repetition rate of the frequency comb is scanned and we detect the fluorescence on the 7P{sub 1/2,3/2{yields}}6S{sub 1/2} branches of the decay of the excited states. The excitations to the different states are isolated by the introduction of narrow-bandwidth interference filters in the laser beam paths. Using a nonlinear least-squares method we find measurements of transition frequencies and hyperfine coupling constants that are in agreement with other recent measurements for the 8S state and provide improvement by 2 orders of magnitude over previously published results for the 9S and 7D states.

  9. Frequency dependence of organic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemans, W.; Janssen, P.; van der Heijden, E. H. M.; Kemerink, M.; Koopmans, B.

    2010-09-01

    To identify the microscopic mechanisms of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR), the dependency on the frequency of the applied magnetic field is explored, which consists of a dc and ac component. The measured magnetoconductance decreases when the frequency is increased. The decrease is stronger for lower voltages, which is shown to be linked to the presence of a negative capacitance, as measured with admittance spectroscopy. The negative capacitance disappears when the frequency becomes comparable to the inverse transit time of the minority carriers. These results are in agreement with recent interpretations that magnetic field effects on minority carrier mobility dominate OMAR.

  10. Enhanced Lamb dip for absolute laser frequency stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegman, A. E.; Byer, R. L.; Wang, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Enhanced Lamb dip width is 5 MHz and total depth is 10 percent of peak power. Present configuration is useful as frequency standard in near infrared. Technique extends to other lasers, for which low pressure narrow linewidth gain tubes can be constructed.

  11. Frequency dependence of organic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fujian; Rybicki, James; Lin, Ran; Hutchinson, Kent; Hou, Jia; Wohlgenannt, Markus

    2011-03-01

    Organic magnetoresistive (OMAR) devices show a large enough magnetoresistive response (typically 10%) for potential applications as magnetic field sensors. However, applications often require sensing high frequency magnetic fields, and the examination of the frequency-dependent magnetoresistive response is therefore required. Analysis of time constants that limit the frequency response may also shed light on the mechanism behind the OMAR effect, because different OMAR mechanisms occur at different time scales In our experiments, the AC magnetic field is supplied by a coil with a ferrite core which is driven by a function generator The AC magnet shows a frequency response that is almost flat up to 1MHz. We found that the OMAR frequency limit is about 10 kHz for a typical organic semiconductor device and at least 100 kHz for devices made from a doped polymer film. We also performed capacitance and conductance vs. frequency measurements to understand the origin of the observed limit frequencies. This work was supported by Army MURI under GrantNo. W911NF-08-1-0317 and NSF under Grant No. ECS 0725280.

  12. High-precision absolute distance and vibration measurement with frequency scanned interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.-J.; Deibel, Jason; Nyberg, Sven; Riles, Keith

    2005-07-01

    We report high-precision absolute distance and vibration measurements performed with frequency scanned interferometry using a pair of single-mode optical fibers. Absolute distance was determined by counting the interference fringes produced while scanning the laser frequency. A high-finesse Fabry-Perot interferometer was used to determine frequency changes during scanning. Two multiple-distance-measurement analysis techniques were developed to improve distance precision and to extract the amplitude and frequency of vibrations. Under laboratory conditions, measurement precision of {approx}50 nm was achieved for absolute distances ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 m by use of the first multiple-distance-measurement technique. The second analysis technique has the capability to measure vibration frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 100 Hz with an amplitude as small as a few nanometers without a priori knowledge.

  13. High-precision absolute distance and vibration measurement with frequency scanned interferometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-Jun; Deibel, Jason; Nyberg, Sven; Riles, Keith

    2005-07-01

    We report high-precision absolute distance and vibration measurements performed with frequency scanned interferometry using a pair of single-mode optical fibers. Absolute distance was determined by counting the interference fringes produced while scanning the laser frequency. A high-finesse Fabry-Perot interferometer was used to determine frequency changes during scanning. Two multiple-distance-measurement analysis techniques were developed to improve distance precision and to extract the amplitude and frequency of vibrations. Under laboratory conditions, measurement precision of approximately 50 nm was achieved for absolute distances ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 m by use of the first multiple-distance-measurement technique. The second analysis technique has the capability to measure vibration frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 100 Hz with an amplitude as small as a few nanometers without a priori knowledge.

  14. Absolute frequency measurement of rubidium 5S-7S two-photon transitions.

    PubMed

    Morzyński, Piotr; Wcisło, Piotr; Ablewski, Piotr; Gartman, Rafał; Gawlik, Wojciech; Masłowski, Piotr; Nagórny, Bartłomiej; Ozimek, Filip; Radzewicz, Czesław; Witkowski, Marcin; Ciuryło, Roman; Zawada, Michał

    2013-11-15

    We report the absolute frequency measurements of rubidium 5S-7S two-photon transitions with a cw laser digitally locked to an atomic transition and referenced to an optical frequency comb. The narrow, two-photon transition, 5S-7S (760 nm), insensitive to first-order in a magnetic field, is a promising candidate for frequency reference. The performed tests yielded more accurate transition frequencies than previously reported.

  15. Age Dependent Absolute Plate and Plume Motion Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, D. E.; Koppers, A. A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Current absolute plate motion (APM) models from 80 - 0 Ma are constrained by the location of mantle plume related hotspot seamounts, in particular those of the Hawaiian-Emperor and Louisville seamount trails. Originally the 'fixed' hotspot hypothesis was developed to explain past plate motion based on linear age progressive intra-plate volcanism. However, now that 'moving' hotspots are accepted, it is becoming clear that APM models need to be corrected for individual plume motion vectors. For older seamount trails that were active between roughly 50 and 80 Ma the APM models that use 'fixed' hotspots overestimate the measured age progression in those trails, while APM models corrected for 'moving' hotspots underestimate those age progressions. These mismatches are due to both a lack of reliable ages in the older portions of both the Hawaii and Louisville seamount trails and insufficient APM modeling constraints from other seamount trails in the Pacific Basin. Seamounts are difficult to sample and analyze because many are hydrothermally altered and have low potassium concentrations. New 40Ar/39Ar Age results from International Ocean Drilling Project (IODP) Expedition 330 Sites U1372 (n=18), U1375 (n=3), U1376 (n=15) and U1377 (n=7) aid in constraining the oldest end of the Louisville Seamount trail. A significant observation in this study is that the age range recovered in the drill cores match the range of ages that were acquired on dredging cruises at the same seamounts (e.g. Koppers et al., 2011). This is important for determining the inception age of a seamount. The sections recovered from IODP EXP 330 are in-situ volcanoclastic breccia and lava flows. Comparing the seismic interpretations of Louisville guyots (Contreras-Reyes et al., 2010), Holes U1372, U1373 and U1374 penetrated the extrusive and volcanoclastic sections of the seamount. The ages obtained are consistent over stratigraphic intervals >100-450 m thick, providing evidence that these seamounts

  16. Frequency-scanning interferometry for dynamic absolute distance measurement using Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Tao, Long; Liu, Zhigang; Zhang, Weibo; Zhou, Yangli

    2014-12-15

    We propose a frequency-scanning interferometry using the Kalman filtering technique for dynamic absolute distance measurement. Frequency-scanning interferometry only uses a single tunable laser driven by a triangle waveform signal for forward and backward optical frequency scanning. The absolute distance and moving speed of a target can be estimated by the present input measurement of frequency-scanning interferometry and the previously calculated state based on the Kalman filter algorithm. This method not only compensates for movement errors in conventional frequency-scanning interferometry, but also achieves high-precision and low-complexity dynamic measurements. Experimental results of dynamic measurements under static state, vibration and one-dimensional movement are presented.

  17. Quantifying discipline practices using absolute versus relative frequencies: clinical and research implications for child welfare.

    PubMed

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Shaffer, Anne; Kolko, David J

    2014-01-01

    In the parent intervention outcome literatures, discipline practices are generally quantified as absolute frequencies or, less commonly, as relative frequencies. These differences in methodology warrant direct comparison as they have critical implications for study results and conclusions among treatments targeted at reducing parental aggression and harsh discipline. In this study, we directly compared the absolute frequency method and the relative frequency method for quantifying physically aggressive, psychologically aggressive, and nonaggressive discipline practices. Longitudinal data over a 3-year period came from an existing data set of a clinical trial examining the effectiveness of a psychosocial treatment in reducing parental physical and psychological aggression and improving child behavior (N = 139). Discipline practices (aggressive and nonaggressive) were assessed using the Conflict Tactics Scale. The two methods yielded different patterns of results, particularly for nonaggressive discipline strategies. We suggest that each method makes its own unique contribution to a more complete understanding of the association between parental aggression and intervention effects.

  18. Absolute frequency measurement at 10-16 level based on the international atomic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, H.; Fujieda, M.; Kumagai, M.; Ido, T.

    2016-06-01

    Referring to International Atomic Time (TAI), we measured the absolute frequency of the 87Sr lattice clock with its uncertainty of 1.1 x 10-15. Unless an optical clock is continuously operated for the five days of the TAI grid, it is required to evaluate dead time uncertainty in order to use the available five-day average of the local frequency reference. We homogeneously distributed intermittent measurements over the five-day grid of TAI, by which the dead time uncertainty was reduced to low 10-16 level. Three campaigns of the five (or four)-day consecutive measurements have resulted in the absolute frequency of the 87Sr clock transition of 429 228 004 229 872.85 (47) Hz, where the systematic uncertainty of the 87Sr optical frequency standard amounts to 8.6 x 10-17.

  19. Dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurements with high resolution.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jidong; Liu, Shenggang; Ma, Heli; Tao, Tianjiong; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Hua

    2014-11-01

    A unique dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurement has been developed recently. This paper presents the working principle of the new interferometric system, which uses a photonic crystal fiber to transmit the wide-spectrum light beams and a high-speed streak camera or frame camera to record the interference stripes. Preliminary measurements of harmonic vibrations of a speaker, driven by a radio, and the changes in the tip clearance of a rotating gear wheel show that this new type of interferometer has the ability to perform absolute distance measurements both with high time- and distance-resolution.

  20. Dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurements with high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Jidong; Liu, Shenggang; Ma, Heli; Tao, Tianjiong; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Hua

    2014-11-15

    A unique dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurement has been developed recently. This paper presents the working principle of the new interferometric system, which uses a photonic crystal fiber to transmit the wide-spectrum light beams and a high-speed streak camera or frame camera to record the interference stripes. Preliminary measurements of harmonic vibrations of a speaker, driven by a radio, and the changes in the tip clearance of a rotating gear wheel show that this new type of interferometer has the ability to perform absolute distance measurements both with high time- and distance-resolution.

  1. Absolute positioning by multi-wavelength interferometry referenced to the frequency comb of a femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guochao; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Hyun, Sangwon; Chun, Byung Jae; Kang, Hyun Jay; Yan, Shuhua; Kim, Seung-Woo; Kim, Young-Jin

    2015-04-06

    A multi-wavelength interferometer utilizing the frequency comb of a femtosecond laser as the wavelength ruler is tested for its capability of ultra-precision positioning for machine axis control. The interferometer uses four different wavelengths phase-locked to the frequency comb and then determines the absolute position through a multi-channel scheme of detecting interference phases in parallel so as to enable fast, precise and stable measurements continuously over a few meters of axis-travel. Test results show that the proposed interferometer proves itself as a potential candidate of absolute-type position transducer needed for next-generation ultra-precision machine axis control, demonstrating linear errors of less than 61.9 nm in peak-to-valley over a 1-meter travel with an update rate of 100 Hz when compared to an incremental-type He-Ne laser interferometer.

  2. A Laser Frequency Comb System for Absolute Calibration of the VTT Echelle Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, H.-P.; Steinmetz, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Kentischer, T.; Schmidt, W.

    2012-10-01

    A wavelength calibration system based on a laser frequency comb (LFC) was developed in a co-operation between the Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Freiburg, Germany and the Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Garching, Germany for permanent installation at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) on Tenerife, Canary Islands. The system was installed successfully in October 2011. By simultaneously recording the spectra from the Sun and the LFC, for each exposure a calibration curve can be derived from the known frequencies of the comb modes that is suitable for absolute calibration at the meters per second level. We briefly summarize some topics in solar physics that benefit from absolute spectroscopy and point out the advantages of LFC compared to traditional calibration techniques. We also sketch the basic setup of the VTT calibration system and its integration with the existing echelle spectrograph.

  3. Subnanometer absolute displacement measurement using a frequency comb referenced dual resonance tracking Fabry-Perot interferometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Minhao; Wei, Haoyun; Zhao, Shijie; Wu, Xuejian; Li, Yan

    2015-05-10

    Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometry is a traceable high-resolution method for displacement metrology that has no nonlinearity. Compared with the single resonance tracking F-P interferometry, the dual resonance tracking (DRT) F-P interferometer system is able to realize tens of millimeters measurement range while maintaining the intrinsic high resolution. A DRT F-P system is thus developed for absolute displacement measurement in metrology applications. Two external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) are simultaneously locked to two resonances of a high-finesse F-P cavity using the Pound-Drever-Hall locking scheme. The absolute optical frequencies of the locked ECDLs are measured using a reference diode laser, with the frequency stabilized and controlled by an optical frequency comb. The absolute cavity resonance order numbers are investigated. The measurement range is experimentally tested to achieve 20 mm, while the resolution reaches ~10 pm level, mainly limited by the mechanical stability of the F-P cavity. Compared with the measurement results from a self-developed displacement-angle heterodyne interferometer, the displacement residuals are within 10 nm in the range of 20 mm. This high-resolution interferometer may become a candidate for length metrology such as in Watt balance or Joule balance projects.

  4. Absolute frequency stabilization of an injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Plusquellic, D.F.; Votava, O.; Nesbitt, D.J.

    1996-03-01

    A method is described that provides absolute frequency stabilization and calibration of the signal and idler waves generated by an injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The method makes use of a He{endash}Ne stabilized transfer cavity (TC) to control the frequencies of the cw sources used to seed both the pump laser and OPO cavity. The TC serves as a stable calibration source for the signal and idler waves by providing marker fringes as the seed laser is scanned. Additionally, an acoustic-optic modulator (AOM) is used to shift the OPO seed laser{close_quote}s frequency before locking it onto the TC. The sidebands of the AOM are tunable over more than one free spectral range of the TC, thereby permitting stabilization of the signal and idler waves at any frequency. A {plus_minus}25-MHz residual error in the absolute frequency stabilities of the pump, signal, and idler waves is experimentally demonstrated, which is roughly 30{percent} of the 160-MHz near-transform-limited linewidths of the signal and idler pulses. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  5. A novel absolute measurement for the low-frequency figure correction of aspheric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Shenq-Tsong; Ho, Cheng-Fang; Kuo, Ching-Hsiang; Chung, Chien-Kai; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Tseng, Shih-Feng; Sung, Cheng-Kuo

    2015-07-01

    This study proposes an absolute measurement method with a computer-generated hologram (CGHs) to assist the identification of manufacturing form error, and gravity and mounting resulted distortions for a 300 mm aspherical mirror. This method adopts the frequency of peaks and valleys of each Zernike coefficient grabbed by the measurement with various orientations of the mirror in horizontal optical-axis configuration. In addition, the rotational-symmetric aberration (spherical aberration) is calibrated with random ball test method. According to the measured absolute surface figure, a high accuracy aspherical surface with peak to valley (P-V) value of 1/8 wave @ 632.8 nm was fabricated after surface figure correction with the reconstructed error map.

  6. Measuring absolute frequencies beyond the GPS limit via long-haul optical frequency dissemination.

    PubMed

    Clivati, Cecilia; Cappellini, Giacomo; Livi, Lorenzo F; Poggiali, Francesco; de Cumis, Mario Siciliani; Mancini, Marco; Pagano, Guido; Frittelli, Matteo; Mura, Alberto; Costanzo, Giovanni A; Levi, Filippo; Calonico, Davide; Fallani, Leonardo; Catani, Jacopo; Inguscio, Massimo

    2016-05-30

    Global Positioning System (GPS) dissemination of frequency standards is ubiquitous at present, providing the most widespread time and frequency reference for the majority of industrial and research applications worldwide. On the other hand, the ultimate limits of the GPS presently curb further advances in high-precision, scientific and industrial applications relying on this dissemination scheme. Here, we demonstrate that these limits can be reliably overcome even in laboratories without a local atomic clock by replacing the GPS with a 642-km-long optical fiber link to a remote primary caesium frequency standard. Through this configuration we stably address the 1S0-3P0 clock transition in an ultracold gas of 173Yb, with a precision that exceeds the possibilities of a GPS-based measurement, dismissing the need for a local clock infrastructure to perform beyond-GPS high-precision tasks. We also report an improvement of two orders of magnitude in the accuracy on the transition frequency reported in literature.

  7. Absolute frequency measurement with uncertainty below 1× 10^{-15} using International Atomic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Hidekazu; Petit, Gérard; Ido, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    The absolute frequency of the ^{87}Sr clock transition measured in 2015 (Jpn J Appl Phys 54:112401, 2015) was reevaluated using an improved frequency link to the SI second. The scale interval of International Atomic Time (TAI) that we used as the reference was calibrated for an evaluation interval of 5 days instead of the conventional interval of 1 month which is regularly employed in Circular T. The calibration on a 5-day basis removed the uncertainty in assimilating the TAI scale of the 5-day mean to that of the 1-month mean. The reevaluation resulted in the total uncertainty of 10^{-16} level for the first time without local cesium fountains. Since there are presumably no correlations among systematic shifts of cesium fountains worldwide, the measurement is not limited by the systematic uncertainty of a specific primary frequency standard.

  8. Use of the absolute phase in frequency modulated continuous wave plasma reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, G.

    2008-08-15

    In frequency modulated continuous wave reflectometry, used for density profile measurement in fusion plasmas, it is usual to measure the beat frequency between the launched wave and the reflected wave, and from this to calculate the position of the reflecting layer in the plasma. The absolute phase of the beat signal is usually neglected. The reason is that the phase shift between sweeps is usually comparable with or more than 2{pi}, leading to an ambiguity that is impossible to resolve. However, recent observations on the MAST tokamak have shown that, under quiet plasma conditions (this term has to be defined), the phase shift between sweeps is small compared with 2{pi} and the phase ambiguity can be readily resolved. The reflectometer signal is then being analyzed as an interferometer signal would normally be, and there is a substantial improvement in spatial resolution. The method is illustrated by application to small edge localized mode precursor and allows what is believed to be the first quantitative measurement of the displacement of the plasma boundary by such a precursor mode. The errors in both the absolute phase measurement and the more conventional frequency measurement are also estimated.

  9. The dependency of timbre on fundamental frequency.

    PubMed

    Marozeau, Jeremy; de Cheveigné, Alain; McAdams, Stephen; Winsberg, Suzanne

    2003-11-01

    The dependency of the timbre of musical sounds on their fundamental frequency (F0) was examined in three experiments. In experiment I subjects compared the timbres of stimuli produced by a set of 12 musical instruments with equal F0, duration, and loudness. There were three sessions, each at a different F0. In experiment II the same stimuli were rearranged in pairs, each with the same difference in F0, and subjects had to ignore the constant difference in pitch. In experiment III, instruments were paired both with and without an F0 difference within the same session, and subjects had to ignore the variable differences in pitch. Experiment I yielded dissimilarity matrices that were similar at different F0's, suggesting that instruments kept their relative positions within timbre space. Experiment II found that subjects were able to ignore the salient pitch difference while rating timbre dissimilarity. Dissimilarity matrices were symmetrical, suggesting further that the absolute displacement of the set of instruments within timbre space was small. Experiment III extended this result to the case where the pitch difference varied from trial to trial. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) of dissimilarity scores produced solutions (timbre spaces) that varied little across conditions and experiments. MDS solutions were used to test the validity of signal-based predictors of timbre, and in particular their stability as a function of F0. Taken together, the results suggest that timbre differences are perceived independently from differences of pitch, at least for F0 differences smaller than an octave. Timbre differences can be measured between stimuli with different F0's.

  10. The dependency of timbre on fundamental frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marozeau, Jeremy; de Cheveigné, Alain; McAdams, Stephen; Winsberg, Suzanne

    2003-11-01

    The dependency of the timbre of musical sounds on their fundamental frequency (F0) was examined in three experiments. In experiment I subjects compared the timbres of stimuli produced by a set of 12 musical instruments with equal F0, duration, and loudness. There were three sessions, each at a different F0. In experiment II the same stimuli were rearranged in pairs, each with the same difference in F0, and subjects had to ignore the constant difference in pitch. In experiment III, instruments were paired both with and without an F0 difference within the same session, and subjects had to ignore the variable differences in pitch. Experiment I yielded dissimilarity matrices that were similar at different F0's, suggesting that instruments kept their relative positions within timbre space. Experiment II found that subjects were able to ignore the salient pitch difference while rating timbre dissimilarity. Dissimilarity matrices were symmetrical, suggesting further that the absolute displacement of the set of instruments within timbre space was small. Experiment III extended this result to the case where the pitch difference varied from trial to trial. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) of dissimilarity scores produced solutions (timbre spaces) that varied little across conditions and experiments. MDS solutions were used to test the validity of signal-based predictors of timbre, and in particular their stability as a function of F0. Taken together, the results suggest that timbre differences are perceived independently from differences of pitch, at least for F0 differences smaller than an octave. Timbre differences can be measured between stimuli with different F0's.

  11. A dedicated pistonphone for absolute calibration of infrasound sensors at very low frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wen; He, Longbiao; Zhang, Fan; Rong, Zuochao; Jia, Shushi

    2016-02-01

    Aimed at the absolute calibration of infrasound sensors at very low frequencies, an upgraded and improved infrasonic pistonphone has been developed. The pistonphone was designed such that a very narrow clearance between the piston and its guide was realized based on an automatically-centered clearance-sealing structure, and a large volume rigid-walled chamber was also adopted, which improved the leakage time-constant of the chamber. A composite feedback control system was applied to the electromagnetic vibrator to control the precise motion of the piston. Performance tests and uncertainty analysis show that the leakage time-constant is so large, and the distortion of the sound pressure is so small, that the pistonphone can be used as a standard infrasound source in the frequency range from 0.001 Hz to 20 Hz. The low frequency property of the pistonphone has been verified through calibrating low frequency microphones. Comparison tests with the reciprocity method have shown that the pressure sensitivities from the pistonphone are not only reliable at common frequencies but also have smaller uncertainties at low frequencies.

  12. High-accuracy absolute distance measurement with a mode-resolved optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Dirk; van den Berg, Steven A.; Lešundák, Adam; van Eldik, Sjoerd; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2016-04-01

    Optical interferometry enables highly accurate non-contact displacement measurement. The optical phase ambiguity needs to be resolved for absolute distance ranging. In controlled laboratory conditions and for short distances it is possible to track a non-interrupted displacement from a reference position to a remote target. With large distances covered in field applications this may not be feasible, e.g. in structure monitoring, large scale industrial manufacturing or aerospace navigation and attitude control. We use an optical frequency comb source to explore absolute distance measurement by means of a combined spectral and multi-wavelength homodyne interferometry. This relaxes the absolute distance ambiguity to a few tens of centimeters, covered by simpler electronic distance meters, while maintaining highly accurate optical phase measuring capability. A virtually imaged phased array spectrometer records a spatially dispersed interferogram in a single exposure and allows for resolving the modes of our near infrared comb source with 1 GHz mode separation. This enables measurements with direct traceability of the atomic clock referenced comb source. We observed agreement within 500 nm in comparison with a commercial displacement interferometer for target distances up to 50 m. Furthermore, we report on current work toward applicability in less controlled conditions. A filter cavity decimates the comb source to an increased mode separation larger than 20 GHz. A simple grating spectrometer then allows to record mode-resolved interferograms.

  13. Absolute measurements of the high-frequency magnetic dynamics in high-{Tc} superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, S.M.; Aeppli, G.; Dai, P.; Mook, H.A.; Perring, T.G.; Cheong, S.W.; Fisk, Z.; Dogan, F.; Mason, T.E.

    1997-08-07

    The authors review recent measurements of the high-frequency dynamic magnetic susceptibility in the high-T{sub c} superconducting systems La{sub 2{minus}x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x}. Experiments were performed using the chopper spectrometers HET and MARI at the ISIS spallation source. The authors have placed their measurements on an absolute intensity scale, this allows systematic trends to be seen and comparisons with theory to be made. They find that the insulating S = 1/2 antiferromagnetic parent compounds show a dramatic renormalization in the spin wave intensity. The effect of doping on the response is to cause broadenings in wave vector and large redistributions of spectral weight in frequency.

  14. Absolute and relative surface profile interferometry using multiple frequency-scanned lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peca, Marek; Psota, Pavel; Vojtíšek, Petr; Lédl, Vít.

    2016-11-01

    An interferometer has been used to measure the surface profile of generic object. Frequency scanning interferometry has been employed to provide unambiguous phase readings, to suppress etalon fringes, and to supersede phase-shifting. The frequency scan has been performed in three narrow wavelength bands, each generated by a temperature tuned laser diode. It is shown, that for certain portions of measured object, it was possible to get absolute phase measurement, counting all wave periods from the point of zero path difference, yielding precision of 2.7nm RMS over 11.75mm total path difference. For the other areas where steep slopes were present in object geometry, a relative measurement is still possible, at measured surface roughness comparable to that of machining process (the same 2.7nm RMS). It is concluded, that areas containing steep slopes exhibit systematic error, attributed to a combined factors of dispersion and retrace error.

  15. Frequency Dependence of APATS Antenna Gain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    ESD-TR-82-120 HTR-8354 3FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF APATS ANTENNA GAIN 0 By G. A. ROBERTSHAW MARCH 1982 Prepared for DEPUTY FOR SURVEILLANCE AND CONTROL...FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF APATS ANTENNA GAIN 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER MTR-8354 7. AUTHOR(*) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) G. A. ROBERTSHAW F19628-81-C...employed, each channel will lose 1.76 dB of gain. * E.g., if "a" is aperture length in array azimuth plane, frequency dependence begins for 0 > srFl

  16. Simplified fringe order correction for absolute phase maps recovered with multiple-spatial-frequency fringe projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yi; Peng, Kai; Lu, Lei; Zhong, Kai; Zhu, Ziqi

    2017-02-01

    Various kinds of fringe order errors may occur in the absolute phase maps recovered with multi-spatial-frequency fringe projections. In existing methods, multiple successive pixels corrupted by fringe order errors are detected and corrected pixel-by-pixel with repeating searches, which is inefficient for applications. To improve the efficiency of multiple successive fringe order corrections, in this paper we propose a method to simplify the error detection and correction by the stepwise increasing property of fringe order. In the proposed method, the numbers of pixels in each step are estimated to find the possible true fringe order values, repeating the search in detecting multiple successive errors can be avoided for efficient error correction. The effectiveness of our proposed method is validated by experimental results.

  17. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy of Doppler-broadened absorption line with sub-MHz absolute frequency accuracy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C-F; Sun, Y R; Pan, H; Lu, Y; Li, X-F; Wang, J; Liu, A-W; Hu, S-M

    2012-04-23

    A continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectrometer has been built for precise determination of absolute frequencies of Doppler-broadened absorption lines. Using a thermo-stabilized Fabry-Pérot interferometer and Rb frequency references at the 780 nm and 795 nm, 0.1 - 0.6 MHz absolute frequency accuracy has been achieved in the 775-800 nm region. A water absorption line at 12579 cm(-1) is studied to test the performance of the spectrometer. The line position at zero-pressure limit is determined with an uncertainty of 0.3 MHz (relative accuracy of 0.8 × 10(-9)).

  18. Correlation of symptom clusters of schizophrenia with absolute powers of main frequency bands in quantitative EEG

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Andres; Joutsiniemi, Sirkka-Liisa; Rimon, Ranan; Appelberg, Björn

    2006-01-01

    Background Research of QEEG activity power spectra has shown intriguing results in patients with schizophrenia. Different symptom clusters have been correlated to QEEG frequency bands. The findings have been to some extent inconsistent. Replication of the findings of previous research is thus an important task. In the current study we investigated the correlations between the absolute powers of delta, theta, alpha, and beta frequency bands over the fronto-central scalp area (FC) with the PANSS subscales and the Liddle's factors in 16 patients with schizophrenia. The authors hypothesised a priori the correlations reported by Harris et al (1999) of PANSS negative subscale with delta power, Liddle's psychomotor poverty with delta and beta powers, disorganisation with delta power and reality distortion with alpha power on the midline FC. Methods The sample consisted of 16 patients with chronic schizophrenia considered as having insufficient clinical response to conventional antipsychotic treatment and evidencing a relapse. The correlations between quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) absolute powers of delta (1.5–3.0 Hz), theta (3.0–7.5 Hz), alpha (7.5–12.5 Hz), and beta (12.5–20.0 Hz) frequency bands over the fronto-central scalp area (FC) with PANSS subscales and Liddle's factors (reality distortion, disorganisation, psychomotor poverty) were investigated. Results Significant positive correlations were found between the beta and psychomotor poverty (p < 0.05). Trends towards positive correlations (p < 0.1) were observed between delta and PANSS negative subscale and psychomotor poverty. Alpha did not correlate with reality distortion and delta did not correlate with disorganisation. Post hoc analysis revealed correlations of the same magnitude between beta and psychopathology generally over FC. Conclusion The a priori hypothesis was partly supported by the correlation of the beta and psychomotor poverty. Liddle's factors showed correlations of the same

  19. Local frequency dependence in transcranial ultrasound transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, P. J.; Clement, G. T.; Hynynen, K.

    2006-05-01

    The development of large-aperture multiple-source transducer arrays for ultrasound transmission through the human skull has demonstrated the possibility of controlled and substantial acoustic energy delivery into the brain parenchyma without the necessitation of a craniotomy. The individual control of acoustic parameters from each ultrasound source allows for the correction of distortions arising from transmission through the skull bone and also opens up the possibility for electronic steering of the acoustic focus within the brain. In addition, the capability to adjust the frequency of insonation at different locations on the skull can have an effect on ultrasound transmission. To determine the efficacy and applicability of a multiple-frequency approach with such a device, this study examined the frequency dependence of ultrasound transmission in the range of 0.6-1.4 MHz through a series of 17 points on four ex vivo human skulls. Effects beyond those that are characteristic of frequency-dependent attenuation were examined. Using broadband pulses, it was shown that the reflected spectra from the skull revealed information regarding ultrasound transmission at specific frequencies. A multiple-frequency insonation with optimized frequencies over the entirety of five skull specimens was found to yield on average a temporally brief 230% increase in the transmitted intensity with an 88% decrease in time-averaged intensity transmission within the focal volume. This finding demonstrates a potential applicability of a multiple-frequency approach in transcranial ultrasound transmission.

  20. Local Frequency Dependence in Transcranial Ultrasound Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, P. J.; Clement, G. T.; Hynynen, K.

    2006-05-01

    The development of large-aperture multiple-source transducer arrays for ultrasound transmission through the human skull has demonstrated the possibility of controlled and substantial acoustic energy delivery into the brain parenchyma without the necessitation of a craniotomy. The individual control of acoustic parameters from each ultrasound source allows for the correction of distortions arising from transmission through the skull bone and also opens up the possibility for electronic steering of the acoustic focus within the brain. In addition, the capability to adjust the frequency of sonication at different locations on the skull can have an effect on ultrasound transmission. To determine the efficacy and applicability of a multiple-frequency approach with such a device, this study examined the frequency dependence of ultrasound transmission in the range of 0.6-1.4 MHz through a series of seventeen points on four ex vivo human skulls. Effects beyond those that are characteristic of frequency-dependent attenuation were examined. Using broadband pulses, it was shown that the reflected spectra from the skull revealed information regarding ultrasound transmission at specific frequencies. This finding demonstrates a potential applicability of a multiple-frequency approach in transcranial ultrasound transmission.

  1. Kinship as a frequency dependent strategy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ting; Zheng, Xiu-Deng; He, Qiao-Qiao; Wu, Jia-Jia; Mace, Ruth; Tao, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Humans divide themselves up into separate cultures, which is a unique and ubiquitous characteristic of our species. Kinship norms are one of the defining features of such societies. Here we show how norms of marital residence can evolve as a frequency-dependent strategy, using real-world cases from southwestern China and an evolutionary game model. The process of kinship change has occurred in the past and is also occurring now in southwestern China. Our data and models show how transitions between residence types can occur both as response to changing costs and benefits of co-residence with kin, and also due to the initial frequency of the strategies adopted by others in the population: patrilocal societies can become matrilocal, and neolocal societies can become duolocal. This illustrates how frequency-dependent selection plays a role both in the maintenance of group-level cultural diversity and in cultural extinction.

  2. Kinship as a frequency dependent strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Ting; Zheng, Xiu-Deng; He, Qiao-Qiao; Wu, Jia-Jia; Tao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Humans divide themselves up into separate cultures, which is a unique and ubiquitous characteristic of our species. Kinship norms are one of the defining features of such societies. Here we show how norms of marital residence can evolve as a frequency-dependent strategy, using real-world cases from southwestern China and an evolutionary game model. The process of kinship change has occurred in the past and is also occurring now in southwestern China. Our data and models show how transitions between residence types can occur both as response to changing costs and benefits of co-residence with kin, and also due to the initial frequency of the strategies adopted by others in the population: patrilocal societies can become matrilocal, and neolocal societies can become duolocal. This illustrates how frequency-dependent selection plays a role both in the maintenance of group-level cultural diversity and in cultural extinction. PMID:26998333

  3. Frequency-dependence of psychophysical and physiological responses to hand-transmitted vibration.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    This invited paper reviews experimental studies of the frequency-dependence of absolute thresholds for the perception of vibration, equivalent comfort contours, temporary changes in sensation caused by vibration, and reductions in finger blood flow caused by hand-transmitted vibration. Absolute thresholds depend on the contact conditions but for a typical hand grip the thresholds show greatest sensitivity to acceleration around 125 Hz. The frequency-dependence of discomfort caused by hand-transmitted vibration depends on vibration magnitude: similar to absolute thresholds at low magnitudes, but the discomfort at higher magnitudes is similar when the vibration velocity is similar (at frequencies between about 16 and 400 Hz). Hand-transmitted vibration induces temporary elevations in vibrotactile thresholds that reflect the sensory mechanisms excited by the vibration and are therefore highly dependent on the frequency of vibration. Hand-transmitted vibration reduces finger blood flow during and after exposure; when the vibration velocity is similar at all frequencies there is more vasoconstriction at frequencies greater than 63 Hz than at lower frequencies. A single frequency weighting cannot provide a good indication of how all effects of hand-transmitted vibration depend on vibration frequency. Furthermore, a single frequency weighting provides only an approximate indication of any single response, because many factors influence the frequency-dependence of responses to hand-transmitted vibration, including the magnitude of vibration, contact conditions, and individual differences. Although the frequency weighting in current standards extends from 8 to 1,000 Hz, frequencies greater than 400 Hz rarely increase the weighted value on tools and there is currently little psychophysical or physiological evidence of their effects.

  4. Temperature-dependent Absolute Refractive Index Measurements of Synthetic Fused Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Frey, Bradley J.

    2006-01-01

    Using the Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, we have measured the absolute refractive index of five specimens taken from a very large boule of Corning 7980 fused silica from temperatures ranging from 30 to 310 K at wavelengths from 0.4 to 2.6 microns with an absolute uncertainty of plus or minus 1 x 10 (exp -5). Statistical variations in derived values of the thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) are at the plus or minus 2 x 10 (exp -8)/K level. Graphical and tabulated data for absolute refractive index, dispersion, and thermo-optic coefficient are presented for selected wavelengths and temperatures along with estimates of uncertainty in index. Coefficients for temperature-dependent Sellmeier fits of measured refractive index are also presented to allow accurate interpolation of index to other wavelengths and temperatures. We compare our results to those from an independent investigation (which used an interferometric technique for measuring index changes as a function of temperature) whose samples were prepared from the same slugs of material from which our prisms were prepared in support of the Kepler mission. We also compare our results with sparse cryogenic index data from measurements of this material from the literature.

  5. Frequency-Dependent Changes in NMDAR-Dependent Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arvind; Mehta, Mayank R.

    2011-01-01

    The NMDAR-dependent synaptic plasticity is thought to mediate several forms of learning, and can be induced by spike trains containing a small number of spikes occurring with varying rates and timing, as well as with oscillations. We computed the influence of these variables on the plasticity induced at a single NMDAR containing synapse using a reduced model that was analytically tractable, and these findings were confirmed using detailed, multi-compartment model. In addition to explaining diverse experimental results about the rate and timing dependence of synaptic plasticity, the model made several novel and testable predictions. We found that there was a preferred frequency for inducing long-term potentiation (LTP) such that higher frequency stimuli induced lesser LTP, decreasing as 1/f when the number of spikes in the stimulus was kept fixed. Among other things, the preferred frequency for inducing LTP varied as a function of the distance of the synapse from the soma. In fact, same stimulation frequencies could induce LTP or long-term depression depending on the dendritic location of the synapse. Next, we found that rhythmic stimuli induced greater plasticity then irregular stimuli. Furthermore, brief bursts of spikes significantly expanded the timing dependence of plasticity. Finally, we found that in the ∼5–15-Hz frequency range both rate- and timing-dependent plasticity mechanisms work synergistically to render the synaptic plasticity most sensitive to spike timing. These findings provide computational evidence that oscillations can have a profound influence on the plasticity of an NMDAR-dependent synapse, and show a novel role for the dendritic morphology in this process. PMID:21994493

  6. A simple setup to simultaneously measure the resonant frequency and the absolute dissipation factor of a quartz crystal microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodahl, Michael; Kasemo, Bengt

    1996-09-01

    An experimental setup is described that can simultaneously measure the absolute dissipation factor and the resonant frequency of a short-circuited quartz crystal microbalance. The crystal is driven at approximately its resonant frequency by a signal generator which is intermittently disconnected by a relay, causing the crystal oscillation amplitude to decay exponentially. The decay is measured using a ferrite toroid transformer. One of the crystal leads is fed through the center of the ferrite toroid and thereby acts as the primary winding of the transformer. The secondary winding of the transformer is connected to a digitizing oscilloscope which records the decay of the crystal oscillation. From the recorded decay curve, the absolute dissipation factor (calculated from the decay time constant) and the series resonant frequency of the freely oscillating crystal are obtained. Alternatively, the dissipation factor and resonant frequency can be measured for the crystal oscillating under open-circuit conditions, i.e., in the parallel mode. The measurements are automated.

  7. Frequency dependence of pulsar integrated profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsett, S.E. )

    1991-08-01

    The dependence of component separation on observing frequency has been studied for seven pulsars that exhibit double- or multiple-component average profiles. In each case, a review of all available data shows a smooth variation of given form. No evidence is found for a 'break frequency' at which the separation behavior discretely changes. It is argued that previous reports of such a discontinuity are due to insufficiently sampled data together with a prejudice toward pure power-law functional behaviors. The absence of such a break has implications for theories of the pulsar emission mechanism and of the propagation of radio waves in the pulsar magnetosphere. 44 refs.

  8. Frequency-Dependent Escherichia coli Chemotaxis Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuejun; Si, Guangwei; Deng, Nianpei; Ouyang, Qi; Wu, Tailin; He, Zhuoran; Jiang, Lili; Luo, Chunxiong; Tu, Yuhai

    2012-03-01

    We study Escherichia coli chemotaxis behavior in environments with spatially and temporally varying attractant sources by developing a unique microfluidic system. Our measurements reveal a frequency-dependent chemotaxis behavior. At low frequency, the E. coli population oscillates in synchrony with the attractant. In contrast, in fast-changing environments, the population response becomes smaller and out of phase with the attractant waveform. These observations are inconsistent with the well-known Keller-Segel chemotaxis equation. A new continuum model is proposed to describe the population level behavior of E. coli chemotaxis based on the underlying pathway dynamics. With the inclusion of a finite adaptation time and an attractant consumption rate, our model successfully explains the microfluidic experiments at different stimulus frequencies.

  9. Frequency-Dependent Fracture Specific Stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Folz, M. A.; Acosta-Colon, A.

    2003-12-01

    Monitoring the hydraulic properties of fractures remotely through their seismic signatures is an important goal for field hydrology. Empirical studies have shown that the hydraulic properties of a fracture are implicitly related to the fracture specific stiffness through the amount and distribution of contact area and apertures that arise from two rough surfaces in contact. Complicating this simple picture are seismic measurements that indicate frequency-dependent stiffness, i.e., a scale-dependent fracture stiffness where the scale is set by the wavelength. Thus relating the hydraulic properties of fractures to seismic measurements becomes a scale dependent problem. We have performed laboratory experiments to examine the phenomenon of frequency dependent fracture specific stiffness to aid in the assessment of the hydraulic properties of a fracture using seismic techniques. To this end, we have developed a photolithographic technique with which we can construct synthetic fractures of known fracture geometry with feature sizes controlled over several orders of magnitude. The synthetic fracture (and the control non-fractured samples) are made from acrylic cylinders that measure 15.0 cm in diameter by 7.7 cm in height. The diameter of the samples enables us to sample the acoustic properties of the fracture using acoustic lens over regions that range in scale from 10 mm to 60 mm. A confinement cell controls the normal stress on the fracture. Seismic measurements were made with broadband compressional-mode piezoelectric transducers enabling one-order of magnitude in frequency. We found that when the wavelength is smaller than the asperity size, a linear dependence of fracture specific stiffness on frequency occurs. In this geometric ray regime the asymptotic value of the transmission function provides a direct measure of the contact area of the fracture. On the other hand, when the asperity spacing is less than an eighth of a wavelength, the fracture behaves as a

  10. Analysis of frequency dependent pump light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlmuth, Matthias; Pflaum, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    Simulations have to accurately model thermal lensing in order to help improving resonator design of diode pumped solid state lasers. To this end, a precise description of the pump light absorption is an important prerequisite. In this paper, we discuss the frequency dependency of the pump light absorption in the laser crystal and its influence on the simulated laser performance. The results show that the pump light absorption has to include the spectral overlap of the emitting pump source and the absorbing laser material. This information can either be used for a fully frequency dependent absorption model or, at least in the shown examples, to compute an effective value for an exponential Beer-Lambert law of absorption. This is particularly significant at pump wavelengths coinciding with a peak of absorption. Consequences for laser stability and performance are analyzed for different pump wavelengths in a Nd:YAG laser.

  11. Absolute frequency measurement of the {{}^{1}}{{\\text{S}}_{0}} – {{}^{3}}{{\\text{P}}_{0}} transition of 171Yb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzocaro, Marco; Thoumany, Pierre; Rauf, Benjamin; Bregolin, Filippo; Milani, Gianmaria; Clivati, Cecilia; Costanzo, Giovanni A.; Levi, Filippo; Calonico, Davide

    2017-02-01

    We report the absolute frequency measurement of the unperturbed transition {{}1}{{\\text{S}}0} – {{}3}{{\\text{P}}0} at 578 nm in 171Yb realized in an optical lattice frequency standard relative to a cryogenic caesium fountain. The measurement result is 518 295 836 590 863.59(31) Hz with a relative standard uncertainty of 5.9× {{10}-16} . This value is in agreement with the ytterbium frequency recommended as a secondary representation of the second in the International System of Units.

  12. Frequency dependent thermal expansion in binary viscoelasticcomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, James G.

    2007-12-01

    The effective thermal expansion coefficient beta* of abinary viscoelastic composite is shown to be frequency dependent even ifthe thermal expansion coefficients beta A and beta B of both constituentsare themselves frequency independent. Exact calculations for binaryviscoelastic systems show that beta* is related to constituent valuesbeta A, beta B, volume fractions, and bulk moduli KA, KB, as well as tothe overall bulk modulus K* of the composite system. Then, beta* isdetermined for isotropic systems by first bounding (or measuring) K* andtherefore beta*. For anisotropic systems with hexagonal symmetry, theprincipal values of the thermal expansion beta*perp and beta*para can bedetermined exactly when the constituents form a layered system. In allthe examples studied, it is shown explicitly that the eigenvectors of thethermoviscoelastic system possess non-negative dissipation -- despite thecomplicated analytical behavior of the frequency dependent thermalexpansivities themselves. Methods presented have a variety ofapplications from fluid-fluid mixtures to fluid-solid suspensions, andfrom fluid-saturated porous media to viscoelastic solid-solidcomposites.

  13. Absolute pressure dependence of the second ionization level of EL2 in GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, D.E.; Walukiewicz, W.; Nolte, D.D.; Haller, E.E.

    1989-11-01

    We report the results of DLTS experiments under uniaxial stress on the second ionization level of EL2(++/+) in p-type GaAs. We measured the shift in the hole emission rate as a function of stress applied in the (100) and (110) directions. By modeling the valence band with two independently displacing bands and appropriately derived effective masses, we obtain a small absolute hydrostatic pressure derivative for the defect, 39 {plus minus} 15 MeV GPa{sup {minus}1}. The shear contribution is negligible. This result is very different than for the first ionization level, EL2(+/o) with a emission energy pressure derivative of 90 {plus minus} 15 MeV GPa{sup {minus}1}. The difference can be accounted for by the pressure dependence of the electron capture barrier of EL2(+/o), 49 {plus minus} 15 MeV GPa{sup {minus}1}. The absolute pressure derivatives of the two levels are then comparable and in good agreement with simple theory for Ga site point defects. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Excitation power dependent population pathways and absolute quantum yields of upconversion nanoparticles in different solvents.

    PubMed

    Würth, C; Kaiser, M; Wilhelm, S; Grauel, B; Hirsch, T; Resch-Genger, U

    2017-03-23

    The rational design of brighter upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) requires a better understanding of the radiationless deactivation pathways in these materials. Here, we demonstrate the potential of excitation power density (P)-dependent studies of upconversion (UC) luminescence intensities, slope factors, and absolute quantum yields (ΦUC) of popular β-NaYF4:20% Yb(3+),2% Er(3+) UCNPs of different surface chemistries in organic solvents, D2O, and water as a tool to gain deeper insight into the UC mechanism including population and deactivation pathways particularly of the red emission. Our measurements, covering a P regime of three orders of magnitude, reveal a strong difference of the P-dependence of the ratio of the green and red luminescence bands (Ig/r) in water and organic solvents and P-dependent population pathways of the different emissive energy levels of Er(3+). In summary, we provide experimental evidence for three photon processes in UCNPs, particularly for the red emission. Moreover, we demonstrate changes in the excited population dynamics via bi- and triphotonic processes dependent on the environment, surface chemistry, and P, and validate our findings theoretically.

  15. Approximation by Absolutely Continuous Invariant Measures of Iterated Function Systems with Place-Dependent Probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md Shafiqul; Chandler, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    Let S be the attractor (fractal) of a contractive iterated function system (IFS) with place-dependent probabilities. An IFS with place-dependent probabilities is a random map T = {τ1(x),τ2(x),…,τK(x); p1(x),p2(x),…,pK(x)}, where the probabilities p1(x),p2(x),…,pK(x) of switching from one transformation to another are functions of positions, that is, at each step, the random map T moves the point x to τk(x) with probability pk(x). If the random map T has a unique invariant measure μ, then the support of μ is the attractor S. For a bounded region X ⊆ ℝN, we prove the existence of a sequence {T0,n∗} of IFSs with place-dependent probabilities whose invariant measures {μn} are absolutely continuous with respect to Lebesgue measure. Moreover, if X is a compact metric space, we prove that μn converges weakly to μ as n →∞. We present examples with computations.

  16. Time dependent corrections to absolute gravity determinations in the establishment of modern gravity control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykowski, Przemyslaw; Krynski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The establishment of modern gravity control with the use of exclusively absolute method of gravity determination has significant advantages as compared to the one established mostly with relative gravity measurements (e.g. accuracy, time efficiency). The newly modernized gravity control in Poland consists of 28 fundamental stations (laboratory) and 168 base stations (PBOG14 - located in the field). Gravity at the fundamental stations was surveyed with the FG5-230 gravimeter of the Warsaw University of Technology, and at the base stations - with the A10-020 gravimeter of the Institute of Geodesy and Cartography, Warsaw. This work concerns absolute gravity determinations at the base stations. Although free of common relative measurement errors (e.g. instrumental drift) and effects of network adjustment, absolute gravity determinations for the establishment of gravity control require advanced corrections due to time dependent factors, i.e. tidal and ocean loading corrections, atmospheric corrections and hydrological corrections that were not taken into account when establishing the previous gravity control in Poland. Currently available services and software allow to determine high accuracy and high temporal resolution corrections for atmospheric (based on digital weather models, e.g. ECMWF) and hydrological (based on hydrological models, e.g. GLDAS/Noah) gravitational and loading effects. These corrections are mostly used for processing observations with Superconducting Gravimeters in the Global Geodynamics Project. For the area of Poland the atmospheric correction based on weather models can differ from standard atmospheric correction by even ±2 µGal. The hydrological model shows the annual variability of ±8 µGal. In addition the standard tidal correction may differ from the one obtained from the local tidal model (based on tidal observations). Such difference at Borowa Gora Observatory reaches the level of ±1.5 µGal. Overall the sum of atmospheric and

  17. Absolute frequency list of the ν3-band transitions of methane at a relative uncertainty level of 10(-11).

    PubMed

    Okubo, Sho; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Iwakuni, Kana; Inaba, Hajime; Sasada, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-21

    We determine the absolute frequencies of 56 rotation-vibration transitions of the ν(3) band of CH(4) from 88.2 to 90.5 THz with a typical uncertainty of 2 kHz corresponding to a relative uncertainty of 2.2 × 10(-11) over an average time of a few hundred seconds. Saturated absorption lines are observed using a difference-frequency-generation source and a cavity-enhanced absorption cell, and the transition frequencies are measured with a fiber-laser-based optical frequency comb referenced to a rubidium atomic clock linked to the international atomic time. The determined value of the P(7) F(2)((2)) line is consistent with the International Committee for Weights and Measures recommendation within the uncertainty.

  18. Global survey of frequency dependent attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Benz, H.; Gee, L. S.; Frankel, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    We analyze frequency-dependent attenuation of Lg waves, 1/Q(f), for numerous tectonic environments. Tectonic environments studied include: south Pacific oceanic subduction zone near Samoa, the oblique subduction zone off Hispaniola, two continental-oceanic subduction zones in Chile and Alaska, the continental-continental collision zone of the Tibetan Plateau, stable continental interior regions of the central US and Colorado Plateau, the eastern US passive margin and the active margins of the western US. Lg propagates with a group velocity of about 3.5 km/s, the average crustal shear wave velocity. This wave is commonly observed as the dominant phase on high-frequency seismograms at regional distances and is generated by a superposition of higher-mode surface waves or multiply-reflected shear energy in a crustal waveguide. Consequently, Lg provides a good measure of path-averaged crustal properties, such as shear-wave velocity and attenuation. Lg is particularly useful since its amplitude is sensitive to lateral heterogeneity in the crust due to varying tectonic environment. In this global survey we observe that Lg attenuation is generally higher for tectonically active regions than for stable continental interiors. Q(f) is an important physical parameter and is required for a variety of USGS research projects such as the simulation of strong ground motion and seismic network magnitude detection threshold modeling.

  19. Ultra-low-frequency vertical vibration isolator based on a two-stage beam structure for absolute gravimetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Wu, K; Hu, H; Li, G; Wang, L J

    2016-10-01

    To reduce seismic and environmental vibration noise, ultra-low-frequency vertical vibration isolation systems play an important role in absolute gravimetry. For this purpose, an isolator based on a two-stage beam structure is proposed and demonstrated. The isolator has a simpler and more robust structure than the present ultra-low-frequency vertical active vibration isolators. In the system, two beams are connected to a frame using flexural pivots. The upper beam is suspended from the frame with a normal hex spring and the lower beam is suspended from the upper one using a zero-length spring. The pivot of the upper beam is not vertically above the pivot of the lower beam. With this special design, the attachment points of the zero-length spring to the beams can be moved to adjust the effective stiffness. A photoelectric detector is used to detect the angle between the two beams, and a voice coil actuator attached to the upper beam is controlled by a feedback circuit to keep the angle at a fixed value. The system can achieve a natural period of 100 s by carefully moving the attachment points of the zero-length spring to the beams and tuning the feedback parameters. The system has been used as an inertial reference in the T-1 absolute gravimeter. The experiment results demonstrate that the system has significant vibration isolation performance that holds promise in applications such as absolute gravimeters.

  20. Ultra-low-frequency vertical vibration isolator based on a two-stage beam structure for absolute gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Wu, K.; Hu, H.; Li, G.; Wang, L. J.

    2016-10-01

    To reduce seismic and environmental vibration noise, ultra-low-frequency vertical vibration isolation systems play an important role in absolute gravimetry. For this purpose, an isolator based on a two-stage beam structure is proposed and demonstrated. The isolator has a simpler and more robust structure than the present ultra-low-frequency vertical active vibration isolators. In the system, two beams are connected to a frame using flexural pivots. The upper beam is suspended from the frame with a normal hex spring and the lower beam is suspended from the upper one using a zero-length spring. The pivot of the upper beam is not vertically above the pivot of the lower beam. With this special design, the attachment points of the zero-length spring to the beams can be moved to adjust the effective stiffness. A photoelectric detector is used to detect the angle between the two beams, and a voice coil actuator attached to the upper beam is controlled by a feedback circuit to keep the angle at a fixed value. The system can achieve a natural period of 100 s by carefully moving the attachment points of the zero-length spring to the beams and tuning the feedback parameters. The system has been used as an inertial reference in the T-1 absolute gravimeter. The experiment results demonstrate that the system has significant vibration isolation performance that holds promise in applications such as absolute gravimeters.

  1. DPOAE generation dependence on primary frequencies ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botti, Teresa; Sisto, Renata; Moleti, Arturo; D'Amato, Luisa; Sanjust, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Two different mechanisms are responsible for the DPOAE generation. The nonlinear distortion wave-fixed mechanism generates the DPOAE Zero-Latency (ZL) component, as a backward traveling wave from the "overlap" region. Linear reflection of the forward DP wave (IDP) generates the DPOAE Long-Latency (LL) component through a place-fixed mechanism. ZL and LL components add up vectorially to generate the DPOAE recorded in the ear canal. The 2f1 - f2 and 2f2 - f1 DPOAE intensity depends on the stimulus level and on the primary frequency ratio r = f2/f1, where f1 and f2 are the primary stimuli frequencies. Here we study the behavior of the ZL and LL DPOAE components as a function of r by both numerical and laboratory experiments, measuring DPAOEs with an equal primary levels (L1 = L2) paradigm in the range [35, 75] dB SPL, with r ranging in [1.1, 1.45]. Numerical simulations of a nonlocal nonlinear model have been performed without cochlear roughness, to suppress the linear reflection mechanism. In this way the model solution at the base represents the DPOAE ZL component, and the solution at the corresponding DPOAE tonotopic place corresponds to the IDP. This technique has been not effectual to study the 2f2 - f1 DPOAE, as a consequence of its generation mechanism. While the 2f1 - f2 generation place is known to be the tonotopic place x(f2), the 2f2 - f1 DPOAE one has to be assumed basal to its corresponding reflection place. That is because ZL components generated in x(f2) cannot significantly pass through their resonant place. Moreover increasing the ratio r, 2f2 - f1 ZL and LL generation place approach each other, because the overlap region of primary tones decreases. Consequently, the distinction between the two places becomes complicated. DPOAEs have been measured in six young normal-hearing subjects. DPOAE ZL and LL components have been separated by a time-frequency filtering method based on the wavelet transform 1. due to their different phase gradient delay

  2. Absolute frequency measurement of the 674-nm {sup 88}Sr{sup +} clock transition using a femtosecond optical frequency comb

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, H.S.; Huang, G.; Barwood, G.P.; Lea, S.N.; Klein, H.A.; Rowley, W.R.C.; Gill, P.; Windeler, R.S.

    2003-03-01

    The frequency of the 5s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} electric quadrupole transition at 674 nm in a single, trapped, laser-cooled {sup 88}Sr{sup +} ion has been measured with respect to the Systeme International (SI) second using a femtosecond laser optical frequency comb. The measured frequency of 444 779 044 095.52 kHz, with an estimated standard uncertainty of 0.10 kHz, is more accurate than, and in agreement with, the value previously measured using a conventional frequency chain.

  3. Pore Size Determination Using Frequency-Dependent Electro-Osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, P. M.; Morgan, F. D.

    2001-12-01

    Frequency-dependent electro-osmosis has the potential for use as an alternative method for determining the average pore size of porous media. It has been previously shown for the frequency-dependent streaming potential case that the frequency response of the streaming potential coupling coefficient is directly related to the pore size of the rock. However, a drawback to using frequency-dependent streaming potentials is that it is difficult to generate sufficient pressures at intermediate frequencies where both mechanical and piezoelectric devices are not efficient. Frequency-dependent electro-osmosis does not have this problem since the driving electric field can efficiently be applied in the frequency range of interest. Although the underlying physics of both the frequency-dependent electro-osmosis and frequency-dependent streaming potential cases are similar, there are differences in their frequency responses. Similar to the frequency-dependent streaming potential case, it is shown that the electro-osmosis frequency-dependent coupling coefficient is constant with increasing frequency until the critical frequency is reached, at which time the coupling coefficient starts to decrease with increasing frequency. The frequency response of the electro-osmosis coupling coefficient is dependent on the capillary radius. As the capillary radius decreases, the rollover frequency increases. The theory is developed that demonstrates the rollover frequency for the electro-osmosis frequency response is higher than that for the related streaming potential frequency response for the same size capillary. It is shown that this higher rollover frequency is due to the presence of velocity zeros within the bulk fluid of the capillary which serve to reduce the effective radius of the capillary. Data is presented for a 0.127 mm capillary that supports the theoretical findings. Frequency-dependent electro-osmosis can be used for the laboratory determination of average pore sizes of rocks

  4. Protection against deprivation amblyopia depends on relative not absolute daily binocular exposure.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Donald E; Sengpiel, Frank; Hamilton, David C; Schwarzkopf, D Samuel; Kennie, Jan

    2011-06-16

    Short daily periods of binocular exposure (BE) can offset longer single daily episodes of monocular exposure (ME) to prevent the development of deprivation amblyopia. To determine whether the outcome depended upon an absolute daily amount of BE or its proportion of the daily visual exposure, daily mixed visual input of 3 different durations (3.5, 7, or 12 h) was imposed on 3 cohorts of kittens. Measurements of the visual acuity of the deprived eye at the end of mixed daily visual input revealed that the acuity of the deprived eye developed to normal values so long as the proportion of the total exposure that was binocular was 30% or more. By contrast, the development of functional ocular dominance domains in V1 revealed by optical imaging suggests that normal domains emerge with a fixed amount of daily binocular exposure. The latter result is consistent with the effects of any daily period of ME, or BE, or both, effectively saturating with a small dose so that the effects of ME of any length can be offset by a short period of BE. The different result for vision may reflect neural events at higher and/or multiple levels in the visual pathway.

  5. Frequency dependent polarization analysis of high-frequency seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeffrey; Vernon, Frank L., III; Lindberg, Craig R.

    1987-11-01

    We present a multitaper algorithm to estimate the polarization of particle motion as a function of frequency from three-component seismic data. This algorithm is based on a singular value decomposition of a matrix of eigenspectra at a given frequency. The right complex eigenvector zˆ corresonding to the largest singular value of the matrix has the same direction as the dominant polarization of seismic motion at that frequency. The elements of the polarization vector zˆ specify the relative amplitudes and phases of motion measured along the recorded components within a chosen frequency band. The width of this frequency band is determined by the time-bandwidth product of the prolate spheroidal tapers used in the analysis. We manipulate the components of zˆ to determine the apparent azimuth and angle of incidence of seismic motion as a function of frequency. The orthogonality of the eigentapers allows one to calculate easily uncertainties in the estimated azimuth and angle of incidence. We apply this algorithm to data from the Anza Seismic Telemetered Array in the frequency band 0 ≤ ƒ ≤ 30 Hz. The polarization is not always a smooth function of frequency and can exhibit sharp jumps, suggesting the existence of scattered modes within the crustal waveguide and/or receiver site resonances.

  6. 3D absolute shape measurement of live rabbit hearts with a superfast two-frequency phase-shifting technique

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yajun; Laughner, Jacob I.; Efimov, Igor R.; Zhang, Song

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a two-frequency binary phase-shifting technique to measure three-dimensional (3D) absolute shape of beating rabbit hearts. Due to the low contrast of the cardiac surface, the projector and the camera must remain focused, which poses challenges for any existing binary method where the measurement accuracy is low. To conquer this challenge, this paper proposes to utilize the optimal pulse width modulation (OPWM) technique to generate high-frequency fringe patterns, and the error-diffusion dithering technique to produce low-frequency fringe patterns. Furthermore, this paper will show that fringe patterns produced with blue light provide the best quality measurements compared to fringe patterns generated with red or green light; and the minimum data acquisition speed for high quality measurements is around 800 Hz for a rabbit heart beating at 180 beats per minute. PMID:23482151

  7. High-resolution absolute frequency referenced fiber optic sensor for quasi-static strain sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Timothy T.-Y.; Chow, Jong H.; Shaddock, Daniel A.; Littler, Ian C. M.; Gagliardi, Gianluca; Gray, Malcolm B.; McClelland, David E.

    2010-07-20

    We present a quasi-static fiber optic strain sensing system capable of resolving signals below nanostrain from 20 mHz. A telecom-grade distributed feedback CW diode laser is locked to a fiber Fabry-Perot sensor, transferring the detected signals onto the laser. An H{sup 13}C{sup 14}N absorption line is then used as a frequency reference to extract accurate low-frequency strain signals from the locked system.

  8. Absolute group refractive index measurement of air by dispersive interferometry using frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Yang, L J; Zhang, H Y; Li, Y; Wei, H Y

    2015-12-28

    The absolute group refractive index of air at 1563 nm is measured by dispersive interferometry, and a combined uncertainty of 1.2 × 10(-8) is achieved. The group refractive index of air is calculated from the dispersive interferograms of the two beams passing through the inner and outer regions of a vacuum cell by fast-Fourier-transform. Experimental results show that the discrepancies between our method and modified Edlén equation are less than 3.43 × 10(-8) and 4.4 × 10(-8) for short-term and long-term experiments, respectively. The interferogram update rate is 15 ms, which makes it suitable for application of real-time monitoring. Furthermore, it is promising to improve the measurement uncertainty to 3.0 × 10(-9) by changing the material of the vacuum cell and measuring its length more accurately through optical interferometry.

  9. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.20, respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ("Dee" voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result.

  10. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata.

    PubMed

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.2(0), respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ("Dee" voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result.

  11. Absolute distance measurement by multi-heterodyne interferometry using a frequency comb and a cavity-stabilized tunable laser.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanzhong; Zhang, Fumin; Liu, Tingyang; Balling, Petr; Qu, Xinghua

    2016-05-20

    In this paper, we develop a multi-heterodyne system capable of absolute distance measurement using a frequency comb and a tunable diode laser locked to a Fabry-Perot cavity. In a series of subsequent measurements, numerous beat components can be obtained by downconverting the optical frequency into the RF region with multi-heterodyne interferometry. The distances can be measured via the mode phases with a series of synthetic wavelengths. The comparison with the reference interferometer shows an agreement within 1.5 μm for the averages of five measurements and 2.5 μm for the single measurement, which is at the 10-8 relative precision level.

  12. Absolute Frequency Measurements with a Set of Transportable HE-NE/CH4 Optical Frequency Standards and Prospects for Future Design and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubin, M.; Kovalchuk, E.; Petrukhin, E.; Shelkovnikov, A.; Tyurikov, D.; Gamidov, R.; Erdogan, C.; Sahin, E.; Felder, R.; Gill, P.; Lea, S. N.; Kramer, G.; Lipphardt, B.

    2002-04-01

    The accumulated results of absolute frequency measurements (AFM) carried out in 1997-2000 with transportable double-mode He-Ne/CH4 optical frequency standards (λ = 3 .39μm) in a collaboration of several laboratories are presented. The performance of this secondary optical frequency standard is estimated on the level of 10-13 (in repeatability), and 1 × 10-14/s (in stability). The next steps towards He-Ne/CH4 standards with one order of magnitude better performance, including devices based on monolithic zerodur resonators, are discussed. Important applications of transportable He-Ne/CH4 optical frequency standards have appeared now due to dramatic progress in the field of optical frequency measurements. Used to stabilize the repetition rate of a Ti:Sa fs laser, these compact secondary standards can transfer their performance into the whole optical range covered by a fs comb. Thus they can play the role of a narrow spectrum interrogative oscillator for super-accurate optical or microwave frequency standards substituting in some tasks a H-maser or oscillators based on cryogenic sapphire resonators.

  13. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffrey D; Kelly, Thompson G; Urbatish, Todd J

    2010-11-17

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

  14. Absolute pressure dependence of the second ionization level of EL2 in GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, D.E.; Nolte, D.D.; Walukiewicz, W.; Haller, E.E. Department of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 ); Lagowski, J. )

    1990-03-19

    We report the results of deep level transient spectroscopy experiments with the second ionization level of the double donor defect (EL2) under uniaxial stress in {ital p}-type GaAs. We measure the shift in the hole emission rate as a function of stress applied in the (100) and (110) directions. By modeling the valence band with two independently displacing bands and appropriately derived effective masses, we determine the absolute hydrostatic pressure derivative of the defect to be 39{plus minus}15 meV GPa{sup {minus}1}. The shear contribution is negligible. These results are very different from those obtained for the first ionization level, which has a much higher absolute pressure derivative of 90 meV GPa{sup {minus}1}.

  15. Drug Treated Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective and Bipolar Disorder Patients Evaluated by qEEG Absolute Spectral Power and Mean Frequency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wix-Ramos, Richard; Moreno, Xiomara; Capote, Eduardo; González, Gilbert; Uribe, Ezequiel

    2014-01-01

    Objective Research of electroencephalograph (EEG) power spectrum and mean frequency has shown inconsistent results in patients with schizophrenic, schizoaffective and bipolar disorders during medication when compared to normal subjects thus; the characterization of these parameters is an important task. Methods We applied quantitative EEG (qEEG) to investigate 38 control, 15 schizophrenic, 7 schizoaffective and 11 bipolar disorder subjects which remaine under the administration of psychotropic drugs (except control group). Absolute spectral power (ASP), mean frequency and hemispheric electrical asymmetry were measured by 19 derivation qEEG. Group mean values were compared with non parametrical Mann-Whitney test and spectral EEG maps with z-score method at p < 0.05. Results Most frequent drug treatments for schizophrenic patients were neuroleptic+antiepileptic (40% of cases) or 2 neuroleptics (33.3%). Schizoaffective patients received neuroleptic+benzodiazepine (71.4%) and for bipolar disorder patients neuroleptic+antiepileptic (81.8%). Schizophrenic (at all derivations except for Fp1, Fp2, F8 and T6) and schizoaffective (only at C3) show higher values of ASP (+57.7% and +86.1% respectively) compared to control group. ASP of bipolar disorder patients did not show differences against control group. The mean frequency was higher at Fp1 (+14.2%) and Fp2 (+17.4%) in bipolar disorder patients than control group, but no differences were found in frequencies between schizophrenic or schizoaffective patients against the control group. Majority of spectral differences were found at the left hemisphere in schizophrenic and schizoaffective but not in bipolar disorder subjects. Conclusion The present report contributes to characterize quantitatively the qEEG in drug treated schizophrenic, schizoaffective or bipolar disorder patients. PMID:24851121

  16. Gravitational constant is likely dependent on the absolute velocity of galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    ({2) -1}m (({2) -1}\\underline{m}) and only arises when ({2) -1}m(A) and ({2) -1}m(B) to be superposed. Though the turn-advance values U of ({2) -1}m had been counteracted, but when ({2) -1}m(A) superposes with ({2) -1}m (B) the ne(0) (A) of ({2) -1}m (A) and the ne (0) (B) of ({2) -1} m(B) can interact directly. The interaction shows as the piπ exchange force with the short-distance and saturation characters as the covalence. One nucleon has two ({2) -1}m (nuclear valences), the nuclear structure stability is dependent on the conjugation state of nuclear valences (to constitute nucleus). When two nuclear valences of all nucleons are conjugated entirely in the valences saturation state, then it is most stabilization and this element in a large natural abundance. The cubic with 4 angles, hexagon with 6 angles, double floor hexagon with 10 angles and three floor hexagon with 14 angles four kinds formation are all nuclear valences in saturation state, each angle also may be two or four particles, so that these elements: He (4) , Li, Be, B, C (12) , N (14) , O (16) , Ne (20) , Mg (24) , Si (28) , Fe (56) , Ni (58) , Ni (62) , Sn (112) ,Pb (208) are abundance, it accord to the fact. The charge q is the turn quantity U, and the mass m is absolute value of U. From \\underline{P} • \\underline{P} = 0: m (0) = e (0) = ±± (1/2 (1/2) ) (E (0) /c (2) ), q _{0} = e _{0} (nuυ _{0} (0) nuυ) = 2 (1/2) 2 e (0) = 2 (1/2) 2 q (0) . The electromagnetic (weak) interaction constant is alphaα = q _{℮} q _{℮} /h c (betaβ = q (0) q (0) /h c). The electronic outside layer is one _{0}nuυ (1 q (0) ) and one e = 9 e _{0} (nuυ _{0} (0) nuυ) = 9 q _{0}, q _{℮} = 9.5q _{0} = 19*2 (1/2) q (0) . The alphaα / betaβ = (q _{℮} (2) / h c) / (q (0) (2) /h c) = (19 *2 (1/2) ) (2) = 722. To take alphaα = 1/137.0302, then betaβ = alphaα / 722 = 1.010756*10 (-5) , alphaα is about 10 _{0}nuυ /(10 _{0}nuυ + 1359 nuυ _{0}). Because of the ne (0) of nucleon inside layer (5) m, (4) m

  17. Auto-elimination of fiber optical path-length drift in a frequency scanning interferometer for absolute distance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Long; Liu, Zhigang; Zhang, Weibo

    2015-09-01

    Because of its compact size and portability, optical fiber has been wildly used as optical paths in frequency-scanning interferometers for high-precision absolute distance measurements. However, since the fiber is sensitive to ambient temperature, its length and refractive index change with temperature, resulting in an optical path length drift that influences the repeatability of measurements. To improve the thermal stability of the measurement system, a novel frequency-scanning interferometer composed of two Michelson-type interferometers sharing a common fiber optical path is proposed. One interferometer defined as origin interferometer is used to monitor the drift of the measurement origin due to the optical path length drift of the optical fiber under on-site environment. The other interferometer defined as measurement interferometer is used to measure the distance to the target. Because the optical path length drift of the fiber appears in both interferometers, its influence can be eliminated by subtracting the optical path difference of the origin interferometer from the optical path difference of the measurement interferometer. A prototype interferometer was developed in our research, and experimental results demonstrate its robustness and stability. Under on-site environment, an accuracy about 4 μm was achieved for a distance of about 1 m.

  18. Optimized frequency dependent photothermal beam deflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korte, D.; Cabrera, H.; Toro, J.; Grima, P.; Leal, C.; Villabona, A.; Franko, M.

    2016-12-01

    In the letter the optimization of the experimental setup for photothermal beam deflection spectroscopy is performed by analyzing the influence of its geometrical parameters (detector and sample position, probe beam radius and its waist position etc) on the detected signal. Furthermore, the effects of the fluid’s thermo-optical properties, for optimized geometrical configuration, on the measurement sensitivity and uncertainty determination of sample thermal properties is also studied. The examined sample is a recently developed CuFeInTe3 material. It is seen from the obtained results, that it is a complex problem to choose the proper geometrical configuration as well as sensing fluid to enhance the sensitivity of the method. A signal enhancement is observed at low modulation frequencies by placing the sample in acetonitrile (ACN), while at high modulation frequencies the sensitivity is higher for measurements made in air. For both, detection in air and acetonitrile the determination of CuFeInTe3 thermal properties is performed. The determined values of thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity are (0.048  ±  0.002)  ×  10-4 m2 s-1 and 4.6  ±  0.2 W m-1 K-1 and (0.056  ±  0.005)  ×  10-4 m2 s-1 and 4.8  ±  0.4 W m-1 K-1 for ACN and air, respectively. It is seen, that the determined values agree well within the range of their measurement uncertainties for both cases, although the measurement uncertainty is two times lower for the measurements in ACN providing more accurate results. The analysis is performed by the use of recently developed theoretical description based on the complex geometrical optics. It is also shown, how the presented work fits into the current status of photothermal beam deflection spectroscopy.

  19. Frequency dependence of ionic conductivity of electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Amalendu; Bagchi, Biman

    2000-01-01

    A theory for the frequency dependence of ionic conductivity of an electrolyte solution is presented. In this theory contributions to the conductivity from both the ion atmosphere relaxation and the electrophoretic effects are included in a self-consistent fashion. Mode coupling theory, combined with time-dependent density functional theory of ion atmosphere fluctuations, leads to expressions for these two contributions at finite frequencies. These expressions need to be solved self-consistently for the frequency dependence of the electrolyte friction and the ion conductivity at varying ion concentrations. In the limit of low concentration, the present theory reduces exactly to the well-known Debye-Falkenhagen (DF) expression of the frequency-dependent electrolyte friction when the non-Markovian effects in the ion atmosphere relaxation are ignored and in addition the ions are considered to be pointlike. The present theory also reproduces the expressions of the frequency-dependent conductivity derived by Chandra, Wei, and Patey when appropriate limiting situations are considered. We have carried out detailed numerical solutions of the self-consistent equations for concentrated solutions of a 1:1 electrolyte by using the expressions of pair correlation functions given by Attard. Numerical results reveal that the frequency dependence of the electrolyte friction at finite concentration can be quite different from that given by the DF expression. With the increase of ion concentration, the dispersion of the friction is found to occur at a higher frequency because of faster relaxation of the ion atmosphere. At low frequency, the real part of the conductivity shows a small increase with frequency which can be attributed to the well-known Debye-Falkenhagen effect. At high frequency, the conductivity decreases as expected. The extensions of the present theory to treat frequency-dependent diffusivities of charged colloid suspensions and conductivity of a dilute

  20. Frequency-dependent conductivity in bismuth-vanadate glassy semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aswini

    1990-01-01

    The first measurements are reported for the frequency-dependent (ac) conductivity (real as well as imaginary parts) for various compositions of the bismuth-vanadate glassy semiconductors in the frequency range 102-105 Hz and in the temperature range 77-420 K. The behavior of the ac conductivity is broadly similar to what has been observed previously in many other types of amorphous semiconductors, namely, nearly linear frequency dependence and weak temperature dependence. The experimental results are analyzed with reference to various theoretical models based on quantum-mechanical tunneling and classical hopping over barriers. The analysis shows that the temperature dependence of the ac conductivity is consistent with the simple quantum-mechanical tunneling model at low temperatures; however, this model completely fails to predict the observed temperature dependence of the frequency exponent. The overlapping-large-polaron tunneling model can explain the temperature dependence of the frequency exponent at low temperatures. Fitting of this model to the low-temperature data yields a reasonable value of the wave-function decay constant. However, this model predicts the temperature dependence of the ac conductivity much higher than what actual data showed. The correlated barrier hopping model is consistent with the temperature dependence of both the ac conductivity and its frequency exponent. This model provides reasonable values of the maximum barrier heights but higher values of characteristic relaxation times.

  1. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  2. Frequency-Dependent Attenuation of Blasting Vibration Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Junru; Lu, Wenbo; Yan, Peng; Chen, Ming; Wang, Gaohui

    2016-10-01

    The dominant frequency, in addition to the peak particle velocity, is a critical factor for assessing adverse effects of the blasting vibration on surrounding structures; however, it has not been fully considered in blasting design. Therefore, the dominant frequency-dependent attenuation mechanism of blast-induced vibration is investigated in the present research. Starting with blasting vibration induced by a spherical charge propagating in an infinite viscoelastic medium, a modified expression of the vibration amplitude spectrum was derived to reveal the frequency dependency of attenuation. Then, ground vibration induced by more complex and more commonly used cylindrical charge that propagates in a semi-infinite viscoelastic medium was analyzed by numerical simulation. Results demonstrate that the absorptive property of the medium results in the frequency attenuation versus distance, whereas a rapid drop or fluctuation occurs during the attenuation of ground vibration. Fluctuation usually appears at moderate to far field, and the dominant frequency generally decreases to half the original value when rapid drop occurs. The decay rate discrepancy between different frequency components and the multimodal structure of vibration spectrum lead to the unsmooth frequency-dependent attenuation. The above research is verified by two field experiments. Furthermore, according to frequency-based vibration standards, frequency drop and fluctuation should be considered when evaluating blast safety. An optimized piecewise assessment is proposed for more accurate evaluation: With the frequency drop point as the breakpoint, the assessment is divided into two independent sections along the propagating path.

  3. Frequency-dependent FDTD methods using Z transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Dennis M.

    1992-01-01

    While the frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain, or (FD)2TD, method can correctly calculate EM propagation through media whose dielectric properties are frequency-dependent, more elaborate applications lead to greater (FD)2TD complexity. Z-transform theory is presently used to develop the mathematical bases of the (FD)2TD method, simultaneously obtaining a clearer formulation and allowing researchers to draw on the existing literature of systems analysis and signal-processing.

  4. Frequency-Dependent Selection Predicts Patterns of Radiations and Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Melián, Carlos J.; Alonso, David; Vázquez, Diego P.; Regetz, James; Allesina, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Most empirical studies support a decline in speciation rates through time, although evidence for constant speciation rates also exists. Declining rates have been explained by invoking pre-existing niches, whereas constant rates have been attributed to non-adaptive processes such as sexual selection and mutation. Trends in speciation rate and the processes underlying it remain unclear, representing a critical information gap in understanding patterns of global diversity. Here we show that the temporal trend in the speciation rate can also be explained by frequency-dependent selection. We construct a frequency-dependent and DNA sequence-based model of speciation. We compare our model to empirical diversity patterns observed for cichlid fish and Darwin's finches, two classic systems for which speciation rates and richness data exist. Negative frequency-dependent selection predicts well both the declining speciation rate found in cichlid fish and explains their species richness. For groups like the Darwin's finches, in which speciation rates are constant and diversity is lower, speciation rate is better explained by a model without frequency-dependent selection. Our analysis shows that differences in diversity may be driven by incipient species abundance with frequency-dependent selection. Our results demonstrate that genetic-distance-based speciation and frequency-dependent selection are sufficient to explain the high diversity observed in natural systems and, importantly, predict decay through time in speciation rate in the absence of pre-existing niches. PMID:20865126

  5. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction OH + C2H2 from 228 to 413 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.; Borkowski, R. P.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction of the hydroxyl radical with acetylene, important in both atmospheric and combustion chemistry, is determined for temperatures between 228 and 413 K. The flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique was employed at five temperatures over wide ranges of pressure and acetylene concentrations, with the OH produced by water photolysis and hydroxyl resonance fluorescent photons measured by multiscaling techniques. Results indicate that, except at the lowest temperature, the bimolecular rate constant for the reaction depends strongly on total pressure, with the pressure effect becoming more pronounced with increasing temperature. At limiting high pressures, the rate constant is found to be equal to 6.83 + or - 1.19 x 10 to the -12th exp (-646 + or - 47/T) cu cm/molecule per sec, where T is the temperature. Results thus demonstrate the importance of environmental conditions in theoretical studies of atmospheric and combustion product compositions

  6. Frequency-Dependent Properties of Magnetic Nanoparticle Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Majetich, Sara

    2016-05-17

    In the proposed research program we will investigate the time- and frequency-dependent behavior of ordered nanoparticle assemblies, or nanoparticle crystals. Magnetostatic interactions are long-range and anisotropic, and this leads to complex behavior in nanoparticle assemblies, particularly in the time- and frequency-dependent properties. We hypothesize that the high frequency performance of composite materials has been limited because of the range of relaxation times; if a composite is a dipolar ferromagnet at a particular frequency, it should have the advantages of a single phase material, but without significant eddy current power losses. Arrays of surfactant-coated monodomain magnetic nanoparticles can exhibit long-range magnetic order that is stable over time. The magnetic domain size and location of domain walls is governed not by structural grain boundaries but by the shape of the array, due to the local interaction field. Pores or gaps within an assembly pin domain walls and limit the domain size. Measurements of the magnetic order parameter as a function of temperature showed that domains can exist at high temoerature, and that there is a collective phase transition, just as in an exchange-coupled ferromagnet. Dipolar ferromagnets are not merely of fundamental interest; they provide an interesting alternative to exchange-based ferromagnets. Dipolar ferromagnets made with high moment metallic particles in an insulating matrix could have high permeability without large eddy current losses. Such nanocomposites could someday replace the ferrites now used in phase shifters, isolators, circulators, and filters in microwave communications and radar applications. We will investigate the time- and frequency-dependent behavior of nanoparticle crystals with different magnetic core sizes and different interparticle barrier resistances, and will measure the magnetic and electrical properties in the DC, low frequency (0.1 Hz - 1 kHz), moderate frequency (10 Hz - 500

  7. AC Magnetic Field Frequency Dependence of Magnetoacoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Wincheski, B.; Fulton, J. P.; DeNale, R.

    1992-01-01

    Our recent study has proved a strong correlation between the low-frequency AC applied magnetic field amplitude dependence of the asymmetry of the magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) burst and the strength of the domain wall-defect interaction in iron-base ferromagnets. For the present study the AC magnetic field frequency dependence of the asymmetry has been investigated in the range of 1 to 200 Hz. When represented by the third moment of the rectified acoustic emission pulses, the asymmetry becomes a bell-shaped function of frequency with its center located around 25 Hz. This experiment has been performed with low carbon, high yield stress steel specimens of three different levels of domain wall-defect interaction strength. The results show that the increase in the interaction strength causes a vertical down shift of the asymmetry in the entire frequency range investigated.

  8. Measurement of absolute transition frequencies of {sup 87}Rb to nS and nD Rydberg states by means of electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Markus; Karlewski, Florian; Hattermann, Helge; Hoeckh, Simone; Jessen, Florian; Cano, Daniel; Fortagh, Jozsef

    2011-05-15

    We report the measurement of absolute excitation frequencies of {sup 87}Rb to nS and nD Rydberg states. The Rydberg transition frequencies are obtained by observing electromagnetically induced transparency on a rubidium vapor cell. The accuracy of the measurement of each state is < or approx. 1 MHz, which is achieved by frequency stabilizing the two diode lasers employed for the spectroscopy to a frequency comb and a frequency comb calibrated wavelength meter, respectively. Based on the spectroscopic data we determine the quantum defects of {sup 87}Rb, and compare it with previous measurements on {sup 85}Rb. We determine the ionization frequency from the 5S{sub 1/2}(F=1) ground state of {sup 87}Rb to 1010.029 164 6(3)THz, providing the binding energy of the ground state with an accuracy improved by two orders of magnitude.

  9. Frequency-dependent effective hydraulic conductivity of strongly heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Caspari, E; Gurevich, B; Müller, T M

    2013-10-01

    The determination of the transport properties of heterogeneous porous rocks, such as an effective hydraulic conductivity, arises in a range of geoscience problems, from groundwater flow analysis to hydrocarbon reservoir modeling. In the presence of formation-scale heterogeneities, nonstationary flows, induced by pumping tests or propagating elastic waves, entail localized pressure diffusion processes with a characteristic frequency depending on the pressure diffusivity and size of the heterogeneity. Then, on a macroscale, a homogeneous equivalent medium exists, which has a frequency-dependent effective conductivity. The frequency dependence of the conductivity can be analyzed with Biot's equations of poroelasticity. In the quasistatic frequency regime of this framework, the slow compressional wave is a proxy for pressure diffusion processes. This slow compressional wave is associated with the out-of-phase motion of the fluid and solid phase, thereby creating a relative fluid-solid displacement vector field. Decoupling of the poroelasticity equations gives a diffusion equation for the fluid-solid displacement field valid in a poroelastic medium with spatial fluctuations in hydraulic conductivity. Then, an effective conductivity is found by a Green's function approach followed by a strong-contrast perturbation theory suggested earlier in the context of random dielectrics. This theory leads to closed-form expressions for the frequency-dependent effective conductivity as a function of the one- and two-point probability functions of the conductivity fluctuations. In one dimension, these expressions are consistent with exact solutions in both low- and high-frequency limits for arbitrary conductivity contrast. In 3D, the low-frequency limit depends on the details of the microstructure. However, the derived approximation for the effective conductivity is consistent with the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds.

  10. Frequency-dependent Lg Q within the continental United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, D.; McNamara, D.E.; Benz, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Frequency-dependent crustal attenuation (1/Q) is determined for seven distinct physiographic/tectonic regions of the continental United States using high-quality Lg waveforms recorded on broadband stations in the frequency band 0.5 to 16 Hz. Lg attenuation is determined from time-domain amplitude measurements in one-octave frequency bands centered on the frequencies 0.75, 1.0, 3.0, 6.0, and 12.0 Hz. Modeling errors are determined using a delete-j jackknife resampling technique. The frequency-dependent quality factor is modeled in the form of Q = Q0 fη. Regions were initially selected based on tectonic provinces but were eventually limited and adjusted to maximize ray path coverage in each area. Earthquake data was recorded on several different networks and constrained to events occurring within the crust (<40 km depth) and at least mb 3.5 in size. A singular value decomposition inversion technique was applied to the data to simultaneously solve for source and receiver terms along with Q for each region at specific frequencies. The lowest crustal Q was observed in northern and southern California where Q is described by the functions Q = 152(±37)f0.72(±0.16) and Q = 105(±26)f0.67(±0.16), respectively. The Basin and Range Province, Pacific Northwest, and Rocky Mountain states also display lower Q and a strong frequency dependence characterized by the functions Q = 200(±40)f0.68(±0.12), Q = 152(±49)f0.76(±0.18), and Q = 166(±37)f0.61(±0.14), respectively. In contrast, in the central and northeast United States Q functions are Q = 640(±225)f0.344(±0.22) and Q = 650(±143)f0.36(±0.14), respectively, show a high crustal Q and a weaker frequency dependence. These results improve upon previous Lg modeling by subdividing the United States into smaller, distinct tectonic regions and using significantly more data that provide improved constraints on frequency-dependent attenuation and errors. A detailed attenuation map of the continental United States can

  11. Frequency dependent Lg attenuation in south-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    The characteristics of seismic energy attenuation are determined using high frequency Lg waves from 27 crustal earthquakes, in south-central Alaska. Lg time-domain amplitudes are measured in five pass-bands and inverted to determine a frequency-dependent quality factor, Q(f), model for south-central Alaska. The inversion in this study yields the frequency-dependent quality factor, in the form of a power law: Q(f) = Q0fη = 220(±30) f0.66(±0.09) (0.75≤f≤12Hz). The results from this study are remarkably consistent with frequency dependent quality factor estimates, using local S-wave coda, in south-central Alaska. The consistency between S-coda Q(f) and Lg Q(f) enables constraints to be placed on the mechanism of crustal attenuation in south-central Alaska. For the range of frequencies considered in this study both scattering and intrinsic attenuation mechanisms likely play an equal role.

  12. The frequency dependent impedance of an HVdc converter

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A.R.; Arrillaga, J.

    1995-07-01

    A linear and direct method of determining the frequency dependent impedance of a 12 pulse HVdc converter is presented. Terms are developed for both the dc and ac side impedances of the converter, including the effect of the firing angle control system, the commutation period, and the variability of the commutation period. The impedance predictions are verified by dynamic simulation.

  13. Frequency and temperature dependence of dielectric properties of chicken meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectric properties of chicken breast meat were measured with an open-ended coaxial-line probe between 200 MHz and 20 GHz at temperatures ranging from -20 degree C to +25 degree C. At a given temperature, the frequency dependence of the dielectric constant reveals two relaxations while those of th...

  14. Orientation Tuning Depends on Spatial Frequency in Mouse Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yuste, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The response properties of neurons to sensory stimuli have been used to identify their receptive fields and to functionally map sensory systems. In primary visual cortex, most neurons are selective to a particular orientation and spatial frequency of the visual stimulus. Using two-photon calcium imaging of neuronal populations from the primary visual cortex of mice, we have characterized the response properties of neurons to various orientations and spatial frequencies. Surprisingly, we found that the orientation selectivity of neurons actually depends on the spatial frequency of the stimulus. This dependence can be easily explained if one assumed spatially asymmetric Gabor-type receptive fields. We propose that receptive fields of neurons in layer 2/3 of visual cortex are indeed spatially asymmetric, and that this asymmetry could be used effectively by the visual system to encode natural scenes. PMID:27699210

  15. Effects of Frequency-Dependent Membrane Capacitance on Neural Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Grill, Warren M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Models of excitable cells consider the membrane specific capacitance as a ubiquitous and constant parameter. However, experimental measurements show that the membrane capacitance declines with increasing frequency, i.e., exhibits dispersion. We quantified the effects of frequency-dependent membrane capacitance, c(f), on the excitability of cells and nerve fibers across the frequency range from dc to hundreds of kilohertz. Approach We implemented a model of c(f) using linear circuit elements, and incorporated it into several models of neurons with different channel kinetics: the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model of an unmyelinated axon, the McIntyre-Richardson-Grill (MRG) of a mammalian myelinated axon, and a model of a cortical neuron from prefrontal cortex. We calculated thresholds for excitation and kHz frequency conduction block, the conduction velocity, recovery cycle, strength-distance relationship and firing rate. Main results The impact of c(f) on activation thresholds depended on the stimulation waveform and channel kinetics. We observed no effect using rectangular pulse stimulation, and a reduction for frequencies of 10 kHz and above using sinusoidal signals only for the MRG model. c(f) had minimal impact on the recovery cycle and the strength-distance relationship, whereas the conduction velocity increased by up to 7.9% and 1.7% for myelinated and unmyelinated fibers, respectively. Block thresholds declined moderately when incorporating c(f), the effect was greater at higher frequencies, and the maximum reduction was 11.5%. Finally, c(f) marginally altered the firing pattern of a model of a prefrontal cortex cell, reducing the median interspike interval by less than 2%. Significance This is the first comprehensive analysis of the effects of dispersive capacitance on neural excitability, and as the interest on stimulation with kHz signals gains more attention, it defines the regions over which frequency-dependent membrane capacitance, c(f), should be

  16. FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT DISPERSION MEASURES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PULSAR TIMING

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, J. M.; Shannon, R. M.; Stinebring, D. R. E-mail: ryan.shannon@csiro.au

    2016-01-20

    The dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, is shown to be frequency dependent because of multipath scattering from small-scale electron-density fluctuations. DMs vary between propagation paths whose transverse extent varies strongly with frequency, yielding arrival times that deviate from the high-frequency scaling expected for a cold, uniform, unmagnetized plasma (1/frequency{sup 2}). Scaling laws for thin phase screens are verified with simulations; extended media are also analyzed. The rms DM difference across an octave band near 1.5 GHz is ∼ 4 × 10{sup −5} pc cm{sup −3} for pulsars at ∼1 kpc distance. The corresponding arrival-time variations are a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for DM ≲ 30 pc cm{sup −3} but increase rapidly to microseconds or more for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges. Chromatic DMs introduce correlated noise into timing residuals with a power spectrum of “low pass” form. The correlation time is roughly the geometric mean of the refraction times for the highest and lowest radio frequencies used, ranging from days to years, depending on the pulsar. We discuss implications for methodologies that use large frequency separations or wide bandwidth receivers for timing measurements. Chromatic DMs are partially mitigable by including an additional chromatic term in arrival time models. Without mitigation, an additional term in the noise model for pulsar timing is implied. In combination with measurement errors from radiometer noise, an arbitrarily large increase in total frequency range (or bandwidth) will yield diminishing benefits and may be detrimental to overall timing precision.

  17. Frequency-dependent Dispersion Measures and Implications for Pulsar Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J. M.; Shannon, R. M.; Stinebring, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, is shown to be frequency dependent because of multipath scattering from small-scale electron-density fluctuations. DMs vary between propagation paths whose transverse extent varies strongly with frequency, yielding arrival times that deviate from the high-frequency scaling expected for a cold, uniform, unmagnetized plasma (1/frequency2). Scaling laws for thin phase screens are verified with simulations; extended media are also analyzed. The rms DM difference across an octave band near 1.5 GHz is ˜ 4 × 10-5 pc cm-3 for pulsars at ˜1 kpc distance. The corresponding arrival-time variations are a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for DM ≲ 30 pc cm-3 but increase rapidly to microseconds or more for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges. Chromatic DMs introduce correlated noise into timing residuals with a power spectrum of “low pass” form. The correlation time is roughly the geometric mean of the refraction times for the highest and lowest radio frequencies used, ranging from days to years, depending on the pulsar. We discuss implications for methodologies that use large frequency separations or wide bandwidth receivers for timing measurements. Chromatic DMs are partially mitigable by including an additional chromatic term in arrival time models. Without mitigation, an additional term in the noise model for pulsar timing is implied. In combination with measurement errors from radiometer noise, an arbitrarily large increase in total frequency range (or bandwidth) will yield diminishing benefits and may be detrimental to overall timing precision.

  18. Improving Planck calibration by including frequency-dependent relativistic corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Quartin, Miguel; Notari, Alessio E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es

    2015-09-01

    The Planck satellite detectors are calibrated in the 2015 release using the 'orbital dipole', which is the time-dependent dipole generated by the Doppler effect due to the motion of the satellite around the Sun. Such an effect has also relativistic time-dependent corrections of relative magnitude 10{sup −3}, due to coupling with the 'solar dipole' (the motion of the Sun compared to the CMB rest frame), which are included in the data calibration by the Planck collaboration. We point out that such corrections are subject to a frequency-dependent multiplicative factor. This factor differs from unity especially at the highest frequencies, relevant for the HFI instrument. Since currently Planck calibration errors are dominated by systematics, to the point that polarization data is currently unreliable at large scales, such a correction can in principle be highly relevant for future data releases.

  19. Improving Planck calibration by including frequency-dependent relativistic corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartin, Miguel; Notari, Alessio

    2015-09-01

    The Planck satellite detectors are calibrated in the 2015 release using the "orbital dipole", which is the time-dependent dipole generated by the Doppler effect due to the motion of the satellite around the Sun. Such an effect has also relativistic time-dependent corrections of relative magnitude 10-3, due to coupling with the "solar dipole" (the motion of the Sun compared to the CMB rest frame), which are included in the data calibration by the Planck collaboration. We point out that such corrections are subject to a frequency-dependent multiplicative factor. This factor differs from unity especially at the highest frequencies, relevant for the HFI instrument. Since currently Planck calibration errors are dominated by systematics, to the point that polarization data is currently unreliable at large scales, such a correction can in principle be highly relevant for future data releases.

  20. Input-Dependent Frequency Modulation of Cortical Gamma Oscillations Shapes Spatial Synchronization and Enables Phase Coding

    PubMed Central

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark; Hadjipapas, Avgis; Peter, Alina; van der Eerden, Jan; De Weerd, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Fine-scale temporal organization of cortical activity in the gamma range (∼25–80Hz) may play a significant role in information processing, for example by neural grouping (‘binding’) and phase coding. Recent experimental studies have shown that the precise frequency of gamma oscillations varies with input drive (e.g. visual contrast) and that it can differ among nearby cortical locations. This has challenged theories assuming widespread gamma synchronization at a fixed common frequency. In the present study, we investigated which principles govern gamma synchronization in the presence of input-dependent frequency modulations and whether they are detrimental for meaningful input-dependent gamma-mediated temporal organization. To this aim, we constructed a biophysically realistic excitatory-inhibitory network able to express different oscillation frequencies at nearby spatial locations. Similarly to cortical networks, the model was topographically organized with spatially local connectivity and spatially-varying input drive. We analyzed gamma synchronization with respect to phase-locking, phase-relations and frequency differences, and quantified the stimulus-related information represented by gamma phase and frequency. By stepwise simplification of our models, we found that the gamma-mediated temporal organization could be reduced to basic synchronization principles of weakly coupled oscillators, where input drive determines the intrinsic (natural) frequency of oscillators. The gamma phase-locking, the precise phase relation and the emergent (measurable) frequencies were determined by two principal factors: the detuning (intrinsic frequency difference, i.e. local input difference) and the coupling strength. In addition to frequency coding, gamma phase contained complementary stimulus information. Crucially, the phase code reflected input differences, but not the absolute input level. This property of relative input-to-phase conversion, contrasting with latency

  1. Input-dependent frequency modulation of cortical gamma oscillations shapes spatial synchronization and enables phase coding.

    PubMed

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark; Hadjipapas, Avgis; Peter, Alina; van der Eerden, Jan; De Weerd, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Fine-scale temporal organization of cortical activity in the gamma range (∼25-80Hz) may play a significant role in information processing, for example by neural grouping ('binding') and phase coding. Recent experimental studies have shown that the precise frequency of gamma oscillations varies with input drive (e.g. visual contrast) and that it can differ among nearby cortical locations. This has challenged theories assuming widespread gamma synchronization at a fixed common frequency. In the present study, we investigated which principles govern gamma synchronization in the presence of input-dependent frequency modulations and whether they are detrimental for meaningful input-dependent gamma-mediated temporal organization. To this aim, we constructed a biophysically realistic excitatory-inhibitory network able to express different oscillation frequencies at nearby spatial locations. Similarly to cortical networks, the model was topographically organized with spatially local connectivity and spatially-varying input drive. We analyzed gamma synchronization with respect to phase-locking, phase-relations and frequency differences, and quantified the stimulus-related information represented by gamma phase and frequency. By stepwise simplification of our models, we found that the gamma-mediated temporal organization could be reduced to basic synchronization principles of weakly coupled oscillators, where input drive determines the intrinsic (natural) frequency of oscillators. The gamma phase-locking, the precise phase relation and the emergent (measurable) frequencies were determined by two principal factors: the detuning (intrinsic frequency difference, i.e. local input difference) and the coupling strength. In addition to frequency coding, gamma phase contained complementary stimulus information. Crucially, the phase code reflected input differences, but not the absolute input level. This property of relative input-to-phase conversion, contrasting with latency codes

  2. Frequency-range discriminations and absolute pitch in black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus), mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli), and zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata).

    PubMed

    Lee, Tiffany T Y; Charrier, Isabelle; Bloomfield, Laurie L; Weisman, Ronald G; Sturdy, Christopher B

    2006-08-01

    The acoustic frequency ranges in birdsongs provide important absolute pitch cues for the recognition of conspecifics. Black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus), mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli), and zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) were trained to sort tones contiguous in frequency into 8 ranges on the basis of associations between response to the tones in each range and reward. All 3 species acquired accurate frequency-range discriminations, but zebra finches acquired the discrimination in fewer trials and to a higher standard than black-capped or mountain chickadees, which did not differ appreciably in the discrimination. Chickadees' relatively poorer accuracy was traced to poorer discrimination of tones in the higher frequency ranges. During transfer tests, the discrimination generalized to novel tones when the training tones were included, but not when they were omitted.

  3. Frequency Dependent Topological Patterns of Resting-State Brain Networks

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Long; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Li; Shang, Yuqing; Gao, Jia-Hong; Liu, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    The topological organization underlying brain networks has been extensively investigated using resting-state fMRI, focusing on the low frequency band from 0.01 to 0.1 Hz. However, the frequency specificities regarding the corresponding brain networks remain largely unclear. In the current study, a data-driven method named complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition (CEEMD) was introduced to separate the time series of each voxel into several intrinsic oscillation rhythms with distinct frequency bands. Our data indicated that the whole brain BOLD signals could be automatically divided into five specific frequency bands. After applying the CEEMD method, the topological patterns of these five temporally correlated networks were analyzed. The results showed that global topological properties, including the network weighted degree, network efficiency, mean characteristic path length and clustering coefficient, were observed to be most prominent in the ultra-low frequency bands from 0 to 0.015 Hz. Moreover, the saliency of small-world architecture demonstrated frequency-density dependency. Compared to the empirical mode decomposition method (EMD), CEEMD could effectively eliminate the mode-mixing effects. Additionally, the robustness of CEEMD was validated by the similar results derived from a split-half analysis and a conventional frequency division method using the rectangular window band-pass filter. Our findings suggest that CEEMD is a more effective method for extracting the intrinsic oscillation rhythms embedded in the BOLD signals than EMD. The application of CEEMD in fMRI data analysis will provide in-depth insight in investigations of frequency specific topological patterns of the dynamic brain networks. PMID:25927525

  4. Frequency-dependent complex modulus of the uterus: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Miklos Z.; Hobson, Maritza A.; Varghese, Tomy; Harter, Josephine; Kliewer, Mark A.; Hartenbach, Ellen M.; Zagzebski, James A.

    2006-08-01

    The frequency-dependent complex moduli of human uterine tissue have been characterized. Quantification of the modulus is required for developing uterine ultrasound elastography as a viable imaging modality for diagnosing and monitoring causes for abnormal uterine bleeding and enlargement, as well assessing the integrity of uterine and cervical tissue. The complex modulus was measured in samples from hysterectomies of 24 patients ranging in age from 31 to 79 years. Measurements were done under small compressions of either 1 or 2%, at low pre-compression values (either 1 or 2%), and over a frequency range of 0.1-100 Hz. Modulus values of cervical tissue monotonically increased from approximately 30-90 kPa over the frequency range. Normal uterine tissue possessed modulus values over the same range, while leiomyomas, or uterine fibroids, exhibited values ranging from approximately 60-220 kPa.

  5. Frequency-dependent Lg-wave attenuation in northern Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, Raquel; Ugalde, Arantza; Villaseñor, Antonio; Harnafi, Mimoun

    2015-11-01

    Frequency-dependent attenuation (Q- 1) in the crust of northern Morocco is estimated from Lg-wave spectral amplitude measurements every quarter octave in the frequency band 0.8 to 8 Hz. This study takes advantage of the improved broadband data coverage in the region provided by the deployment of the IberArray seismic network. Earthquake data consist of 71 crustal events with magnitudes 4 ≤ mb ≤ 5.5 recorded on 110 permanent and temporary seismic stations between January 2008 and December 2013 with hypocentral distances between 100 and 900 km. 1274 high-quality Lg waveforms provide dense path coverage of northern Morocco, crossing a region with a complex structure and heterogeneous tectonic setting as a result of continuous interactions between the African and Eurasian plates. We use two different methods: the coda normalization (CN) analysis, that allows removal of the source and site effects from the Lg spectra, and the spectral amplitude decay (SAD) method, that simultaneously inverts for source, site, and path attenuation terms. The CN and SAD methods return similar results, indicating that the Lg Q models are robust to differences in the methodologies. Larger errors and no significant frequency dependence are observed for frequencies lower than 1.5 Hz. For distances up to 400 km and the frequency band 1.5 ≤ ƒ (Hz) ≤ 4.5, the model functions Q(f) = (529- 22+ 23)(f/1.5)0.23 ± 0.06 and Q(f) = (457- 7+ 7)(f/1.5)0.44 ± 0.02 are obtained using the CN and SAD methods, respectively. A change in the frequency dependence is observed above 4.5 Hz for both methods which may be related to the influence of the Sn energy on the Lg window. The frequency-dependent Q- 1 estimates represent an average attenuation beneath a broad region including the Rif and Tell mountains, the Moroccan and Algerian mesetas, the Atlas Mountains and the Sahara Platform structural domains, and correlate well with areas of moderate seismicity where intermediate Q values have been obtained.

  6. Doping dependent frequency response of MQW infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billaha, Md. Aref; Das, Mukul K.; Kumar, S.

    2017-04-01

    This work is to study the effect of doping concentration in the active layer on the performance of multiple quantum well (MQW) infrared photodetector based on inter sub-band transitions. A theoretical model for the photocurrent and hence, responsivity of the detector in frequency domain is developed considering the effect of doping dependent absorption and carrier capture at the hetero-interfaces. Transit time and capture time limited bandwidth of the detector is computed from the frequency dependent photocurrent. Results show that, besides the usual effect of capture time, doping concentration in the active layer has an important effect on the bandwidth and responsivity of the device particularly for high value of capture time.

  7. FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF PULSE WIDTH FOR 150 RADIO NORMAL PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J. L.; Wang, H. G.

    2014-11-01

    The frequency dependence of the pulse width is studied for 150 normal pulsars, mostly selected from the European Pulsar Network, for which the 10% multifrequency pulse widths can be well fit with the Thorsett relationship W {sub 10} = Aν{sup μ} + W {sub 10,} {sub min}. The relative fraction of pulse width change between 0.4 GHz and 4.85 GHz, η = (W {sub 4.85} – W {sub 0.4})/W {sub 0.4}, is calculated in terms of the best-fit relationship for each pulsar. It is found that 81 pulsars (54%) have η < –10% (group A), showing considerable profile narrowing at high frequencies, 40 pulsars (27%) have –10% ≤η ≤ 10% (group B), meaning a marginal change in pulse width, and 29 pulsars (19%) have η > 10% (group C), showing a remarkable profile broadening at high frequencies. The fractions of the group-A and group-C pulsars suggest that the profile narrowing phenomenon at high frequencies is more common than the profile broadening phenomenon, but a large fraction of the group-B and group-C pulsars (a total of 46%) is also revealed. The group-C pulsars, together with a portion of group-B pulsars with slight pulse broadening, can hardly be explained using the conventional radius-to-frequency mapping, which only applies to the profile narrowing phenomenon. Based on a recent version of the fan beam model, a type of broadband emission model, we propose that the diverse frequency dependence of pulse width is a consequence of different types of distribution of emission spectra across the emission region. The geometrical effect predicting a link between the emission beam shrinkage and spectrum steepening is tested but disfavored.

  8. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction OH + C2H2 from 228 to 413K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Borokowski, R. P.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure dependence of absolute rate constants for the reaction of OH + C2H2 yields products has been examined at five temperatures ranging from 228 to 413 K. The experimental techniques which was used is flash photolysis-resonance fluoresence. OH was produced by water photolysis and hydroxyl resonance fluorescent photons were measured by multiscaling techniques. The results indicate that the low pressure bimolecular rate constant is 4 x 10 the the minus 13th power cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1) over the temperature range studied. A substantial increase in the bimolecular rate constant with an increase in pressure was observed at all temperatures except 228 K. This indicates the importance of initial adduct formation and subsequent stablization. The high pressure results are well represented by the Arrhenius expression (k sub bi) sub infinity = (6.83 + or - 1.19) x 10 to the minus 12th power exp(-646 + or - 47/T)cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1). The results are compared to previous investigated and are theoretically discussed. The implications of these results on modeling of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and also in combustion chemistry are discussed.

  9. Probing the Crystal Structure, Composition-Dependent Absolute Energy Levels, and Electrocatalytic Properties of Silver Indium Sulfide Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Saji, Pintu; Ganguli, Ashok K; Bhat, Mohsin A; Ingole, Pravin P

    2016-04-18

    The absolute electronic energy levels in silver indium sulfide (AIS) nanocrystals (NCs) with varying compositions and crystallographic phases have been determined by using cyclic voltammetry. Different crystallographic phases, that is, metastable cubic, orthorhombic, monoclinic, and a mixture of cubic and orthorhombic AIS NCs, were studied. The band gap values estimated from the cyclic voltammetry measurements match well with the band gap values calculated from the diffuse reflectance spectra measurements. The AIS nanostructures were found to show good electrocatalytic activity towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Our results clearly establish that the electronic and electrocatalytic properties of AIS NCs are strongly sensitive to the composition and crystal structure of AIS NCs. Monoclinic AIS was found to be the most active HER electrocatalyst, with electrocatalytic activity that is almost comparable to the MoS2 -based nanostructures reported in the literature, whereas cubic AIS was observed to be the least active of the studied crystallographic phases and compositions. In view of the HER activity and electronic band structure parameters observed herein, we hypothesize that the Fermi energy level of AIS NCs is an important factor that decides the electrocatalytic efficiency of these nanocomposites. The work presented herein, in addition to being the first of its kind regarding the composition and phase-dependence of electrochemical aspects of AIS NCs, also presents a simple solvothermal method for the synthesis of different crystallographic phases with various Ag/In molar ratios.

  10. Absolute configuration-dependent epoxide formation from isoflavan-4-ol stereoisomers by biphenyl dioxygenase of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes strain KF707.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jiyoung; Kang, Su-Il; Won, Dongho; Kim, Mihyang; Ryu, Ji-Young; Kang, Suk-Woo; Um, Byung-Hun; Pan, Cheol-Ho; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Chong, Youhoon; Kanaly, Robert A; Han, Jaehong; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2011-03-01

    Biphenyl dioxygenase from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes strain KF707 expressed in Escherichia coli was found to exhibit monooxygenase activity toward four stereoisomers of isoflavan-4-ol. LC-MS and LC-NMR analyses of the metabolites revealed that the corresponding epoxides formed between C2' and C3' on the B-ring of each isoflavan-4-ol substrate were the sole products. The relative reactivity of the stereoisomers was found to be in the order: (3S,4S)-cis-isoflavan-4-ol > (3R,4S)-trans-isoflavan-4-ol > (3S,4R)-trans-isoflavan-4-ol > (3R,4R)-cis-isoflavan-4-ol and this likely depended upon the absolute configuration of the 4-OH group on the isoflavanols, as explained by an enzyme-substrate docking study. The epoxides produced from isoflavan-4-ols by P. pseudoalcaligenes strain KF707 were further abiotically transformed into pterocarpan, the molecular structure of which is commonly found as part of plant-protective phytoalexins, such as maackiain from Cicer arietinum and medicarpin from Medicago sativa.

  11. Removal of interference from fetal MEG by frequency dependent subtraction

    PubMed Central

    Vrba, J.; McCubbin, J.; Govindan, R.B.; Vairavan, S.; Murphy, P.; Preissl, H.; Lowery, C.L.; Eswaran, H.

    2011-01-01

    Fetal magnetoencephalography (fMEG) recordings are contaminated by maternal and fetal magnetocardiography (MCG) signals and by other biological and environmental interference. Currently, all methods for the attenuation of these signals are based on a time-domain approach. We have developed and tested a frequency dependent procedure for removal of MCG and other interference from the fMEG recordings. The method uses a set of reference channels and performs subtraction of interference in the frequency domain (SUBTR). The interference-free frequency domain signals are converted back to the time domain. We compare the performance of the frequency dependent approach with our present approach for MCG attenuation based on orthogonal projection (OP). SUBTR has an advantage over OP and similar template approaches because it removes not only the MCG but also other small amplitude biological interference, avoids the difficulties with inaccurate determination of the OP operator, provides more consistent and stable fMEG results, does not cause signal redistribution, and if references are selected judiciously, it does not reduce fMEG signal amplitude. SUBTR was found to perform well in simulations and on real fMEG recordings, and has a potential to improve the detection of fetal brain signals. The SUBTR removes interference without the need for a model of the individual interference sources. The method may be of interest for any sensor array noise reduction application where signal-free reference channels are available. PMID:21930216

  12. Frequency dependence of microparticle charge in a radio frequency discharge with Margenau electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Cheng-Ran; Khrapak, Sergey A.; Antonova, Tetyana; Steffes, Bernd; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2011-01-15

    rf discharges are widely used in complex plasma experiments. In this paper, we theoretically investigate the dependence of the particle floating potential on the discharge frequency, assuming the model Margenau expression for the electron velocity distribution function. In doing so we use the orbital motion limited cross section to calculate the electron flux to the particle and collision enhanced collection approximation for the ion flux to the particle. The floating potential is then obtained from the flux balance condition. It is shown that for typical plasma conditions in laboratory rf discharges, normalized floating potential grows with increase of the discharge frequency in collisionless regime and decreases in weakly collisional regime. However, variations in the floating potential are usually small when plasma parameters do not depend on the rf frequency.

  13. Measurements of absolute absorption cross sections of ozone in the 185- to 254-nm wavelength region and the temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Freeman, D. E.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of the relative absorption cross sections of ozone at temperatures 195, 228, and 295 K have been made throughout the 185 to 254 nm wavelength region. The absolute absorption cross sections at the same temperatures have been measured at several discrete wavelengths in the 185 to 250 nm region. The absolute cross sections of ozone have been used to put the relative cross sections on a firm absolute basis throughout the 185 to 255 nm region. These recalibrated cross sections are slightly lower than those of Molina and Molina (1986), but the differences are within a few percent and would not be significant in atmospheric applications.

  14. Phase-dependent dual-frequency contrast imaging at sub-harmonic frequency.

    PubMed

    Shen, Che-Chou; Cheng, Chih-Hao; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2011-02-01

    Sub-harmonic imaging techniques have been shown to provide a higher contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) at the cost of relatively low signal intensity from ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs). In this study, we propose a method of dual-frequency excitation to further enhance the CTR of subharmonic imaging. A dual-frequency excitation pulse is an amplitude-modulated waveform which consists of two sinusoids with frequencies of f₁ (e.g., 9 MHz) and f₂ (e.g., 6 MHz) and the resulting envelope component at (f₁ - f₂) (e.g., 3 MHz) can serve as a driving force to excite the nonlinear response of UCAs. In this study, the f₂, at twice of the resonance frequency of UCAs, is adopted to efficiently generate a sub-harmonic component at half of the f₂ frequency, and f₁ is included to enhance the high-order nonlinear response of UCAs at the sub-harmonic frequency. The second- and third-order nonlinear components resulting from the envelope component would spectrally overlap at the sub-harmonic frequency when f₁ and f₂ are properly selected. We further optimize the generation of the sub-harmonic component by tuning the phase terms between second- and third-order nonlinear components. The results show that, with dual-frequency excitation, the CTR at sub-harmonic frequency improves compared with the conventional tone-burst method. Moreover, the CTR changes periodically with the relative phase of the separate frequency component in the dual-frequency excitation, leading to a difference of as much as 9.1 dB between the maximal and minimal CTR at 300 kPa acoustic pressure. The echo produced from the envelope component appears to be specific for UCAs, and thus the proposed method has the potential to improve both SNR and CTR in sub-harmonic imaging. Nevertheless, the dual-frequency waveform may suffer from frequency-dependent attenuation that degrades the generation of the envelope component. The deviation of the microbubble's resonance characteristics from the selection of

  15. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  16. Frequency dependent and transient characteristics of substation grounding systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grcev, L.D. Heimbach, M.

    1997-01-01

    In spite of the existence of a number of analytical models aimed for transient analysis of large grounding systems, more detailed analysis of the influence of different parameters on the transient performance of large ground grids subjected to lightning current impulse is not available. This paper presents analysis of the influence of soil conductivity, location of feed point, grid size, depth, conductor separation, ground rods, and shape of the lightning current impulse, on the transient performance of ground grids with sizes ranging from 10 x 10 m{sup 2} to 120 x 120 m{sup 2} and with 4 to 124 meshes. Maximal transient ground potential rise and frequency dependent impedance are analyzed in time and frequency domain, respectively. Computations are made with computer model based on the electromagnetic field theory approach, taking accurately into account frequency dependent characteristics of large ground grids. Instead of usual simple approximations of the lightning current impulse, recorded channel base currents from triggered lightning are used for the time domain analysis.

  17. Frequency-dependent micromechanics of cellularized biopolymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Chris; Kim, Jihan; McIntyre, David; Sun, Bo

    Mechanical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) influence many cellular behaviors such as growth, differentiation, and migration. These are dynamic processes in which the cells actively remodel the ECM. Reconstituted collagen gel is a common model ECM for studying cell-ECM interactions in vitro because collagen is the most abundant component of mammalian ECM and gives the ECM its material stiffness. We embed micron-sized particles in collagen and use holographic optical tweezers to apply forces to the particles in multiple directions and over a range of frequencies up to 10 Hz. We calculate the local compliance and show that it is dependent on both the direction and frequency of the applied force. Performing the same measurement on many particles allows us to characterize the spatial inhomogeneity of the mechanical properties and shows that the compliance decreases at higher frequencies. Performing these measurements on cell-populated collagen gels shows that cellular remodeling of the ECM changes the mechanical properties of the collagen and we investigate whether this change is dependent on the local strain and distance from nearby cells.

  18. A Magnus Expansion Analysis of Frequency-Dependent Mueller Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, Michael; Yevick, David

    2006-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated that, for any physical system characterized by a non-singular, frequency dependent Jones matrix, the frequency evolution of the corresponding Mueller matrix is described by a differential equation whose general solution can be compactly formulated through the Magnus expansion [M. Reimer, D. Yevick, and D. Dumas, submitted to J. Opt. Soc. Am. A, Photon. Technol. Lett.]. [D. Yevick, T. Lu, W. Huang and W. Bardyszewski to be published in J. Opt. Soc. Am. A]. We subsequently applied our analytic results to optical compensators for communications networks and to the estimation of a system's frequency dependent Mueller matrix based on repeated measurements of the output state of polarization for randomly generated input polarization states [M. Reimer, D. Yevick and D. Dumas, submitted to Photon. Technol. Lett.]. We have also incorporated the Magnus expansion into a Clifford algebra description of polarization evolution. This procedure reformulates numerous physical transformations in a simple and transparent manner [M. Reimer and D. Yevick, submitted to Photon. Technol. Lett.].

  19. Microdomain organization and frequency-dependence of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling in heart cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobrinsky, Evgeny; Duong, Son Q.; Sheydina, Anna; Soldatov, Nikolai M.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated Cav1.2 calcium channels couple membrane depolarization to cAMP response-element-binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcriptional activation. To investigate the spatial and temporal organization of CREB-dependent transcriptional nuclear microdomains, we combined perforated patch-clamp technique and FRET microscopy for monitoring CREB and CREB-binding protein interaction in the nuclei of live cells. The experimental approach to the quantitative assessment of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling evoked by cAMP- and Cav1.2-dependent mechanisms was devised in COS1 cells expressing recombinant Cav1.2 calcium channels. Using continuous 2-dimensional wavelet transform and time series analyses, we found that nuclear CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling is organized differentially in spatially and temporally separated microdomains of 4 distinct types. In rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, CREB-dependent transcription is mediated by the cAMP-initiated CaMKII-sensitive and Cav1.2-initiated CaMKII-insensitive mechanisms. The latter microdomains show a tendency to exhibit periodic behavior correlated with spontaneous contraction of myocytes suggestive of frequency-dependent CREB-dependent transcriptional regulation in the heart.—Kobrinsky, E., Duong, S.Q., Sheydina, A., Soldatov, N. M. Microdomain organization and frequency-dependence of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling in heart cells. PMID:21248242

  20. Frequency-dependent core shifts and parameter estimation in Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Aditi

    2016-07-01

    We study the core shift effect in the parsec-scale jet of blazars using the 4.8-36.8 GHz radio light curves obtained from four decades of continuous monitoring. From a piecewise Gaussian fit to each flare, time lags between the observation frequencies and spectral indices (α) based on peak amplitudes (A) are determined. Index k is calculated and found to be ˜1, indicating equipartition between the magnetic field energy density and the particle energy density. A mean magnetic field strength at 1 pc (B1) and at the core (Bcore) are inferred which are found to be consistent with previous estimates. The measure of core position offset is also performed by averaging over all frequency pairs. Based on the statistical trend shown by the measured core radius as a function of frequency, we infer that the synchrotron opacity model may not be valid for all cases. A Fourier periodogram analysis yields power-law slopes in the range -1.6 to -3.5 describing the power spectral density shape and gives bend timescales. This result, and both positive and negative spectral indices, indicate that the flares originate from multiple shocks in a small region. Important objectives met in our study include: the demonstration of the computational efficiency and statistical basis of the piecewise Gaussian fit; consistency with previously reported results; evidence for the core shift dependence on observation frequency and its utility in jet diagnostics in the region close to the resolving limit of very long baseline interferometry observations.

  1. Frequency-dependent acoustic properties of gassy marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Angus I.; Tuffin, Michael D. J.; Dix, Justin K.; Bull, Jonathan M.

    2003-10-01

    Acoustic velocity and attenuation were measured during two in-situ experiments in gassy intertidal muds in Southampton Water, United Kingdom. The horizontal transmission results gave frequency-independent velocity (1431 m/s) and attenuation (4 dB/m) over the frequency range 600 to 3000 Hz, representative of the soft (non-gassy) muds shallower than about 1 m. The results from a vertical transmission experiment straddling the top of the gassy zone (about 1 m depth) showed strong frequency-dependent velocity and attenuation over 600 to 3000 Hz. They showed velocity and attenuation maxima predicted by the Anderson and Hampton model, associated with gas bubble resonance. Moreover, attenuation maxima shifted in frequency with water depth over a tidal cycle that was monitored, suggesting variations in gas bubble size with hydrostatic pressure. X-ray CT images on a sealed core from the site revealed vertically-aligned, centimeter-scale, gas-filled cracks in the muddy sediments. Ultrasonic (300 to 700 kHz) velocities and attenuations were higher in the gassy zone than in the nongassy parts of the core. Overall, the results give a fascinating insight into the acoustical behavior of gassy sediments that could be used to extract sediment physical properties information from seabed acoustic reflection data. [Work supported by NERC].

  2. Measurement of plasma wave frequency from absolute stimulated Raman scattering near the quarter-critical surface in a laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve, D. M.; Bernard, J. E.; Baldis, H. A.

    1987-12-01

    Thomson scattering techniques were used to measure the frequency of plasma waves near the quarter-critical surface in a well-diagnosed plasma irradiated by a nanosecond CO2 laser with intensity ˜1014 W/cm2. The frequency ωp was shown to be less than ω0/2, in disagreement with the commonly used estimate ωp=ω0/2+ (9)/(8) (ve/c)2ω0. The theory of Afeyan and Williams [Phys. Fluids 28, 3397 (1985)] gives better agreement, and shows that the density scale length is more important than the temperature in determining the frequency shift.

  3. Dispersive white light combined with a frequency-modulated continuous-wave interferometer for high-resolution absolute measurements of distance.

    PubMed

    Rovati, L; Minoni, U; Docchio, F

    1997-06-15

    A nonincremental interferometer for the absolute measurement of distances is presented. The measuring technique is based on both dispersive white-light (DWL) interferometry and frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) interferometry. The proposed configuration integrates both techniques in the same interferometer by use of a single laser diode. This solution enables the results from the coarse measurements from the FMCW interferometer to be combined with the fine readouts from the DWL interferometer. Preliminary experimental results confirm the capability of the system to combine the advantages of the two techniques.

  4. Universal frequency-dependent conduction of electron glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Ariel

    2014-03-01

    Characterizing the frequency-dependent response of amorphous systems and glasses can provide important insights into their physics. Here, we study the response of an electronic glass, where Coulomb interactions are important and have previously been shown to significantly modify the conductance and lead to memory effects and aging. We propose a model which allows us to take the interactions into account in a self-consistent way, and explore the transport properties at all frequencies. Within the model, the response maps exactly to a (linear) network of resistors, self-capacitances and mutual capacitances. The response of this equivalent electric circuit is found numerically, and is shown to obey the universal scaling which is experimentally observed for a large class of amorphous solids.

  5. Absolute frequency of cesium 6S-8S 822 nm two-photon transition by a high-resolution scheme.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Ming; Liu, Tze-Wei; Wu, Ming-Hsuan; Lee, Ray-Kuang; Cheng, Wang-Yau

    2013-08-15

    We present an alternative scheme for determining the frequencies of cesium (Cs) atom 6S-8S Doppler-free transitions. With the use of a single electro-optical crystal, we simultaneously narrow the laser linewidth, lock the laser frequency, and resolve a narrow spectrum point by point. The error budget for this scheme is presented, and we prove that the transition frequency obtained from the Cs cell at room temperature and with one-layer μ-metal shielding is already very near that for the condition of zero collision and zero magnetic field. We point out that a sophisticated linewidth measurement could be a good guidance for choosing a suitable Cs cell for better frequency accuracy.

  6. Accurate absolute frequencies of the {nu}{sub 1}+{nu}{sub 3} band of {sup 13}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} determined using an infrared mode-locked Cr:YAG laser frequency comb

    SciTech Connect

    Madej, Alan A.; Bernard, John E.; John Alcock, A.; Czajkowski, Andrzej; Chepurov, Sergei

    2006-04-15

    Absolute frequency measurements, with up to 1x10{sup -11} level accuracies, are presented for 60 lines of the P and R branches for the {nu}{sub 1}+{nu}{sub 3} band of {sup 13}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} at 1.5 {mu}m (194 THz). The measurements were made using cavity-enhanced, diode-laser-based saturation spectroscopy. With one laser system stabilized to the P(16) line and a second laser system stabilized to the line whose frequency was to be determined, a Cr:YAG frequency comb was employed to accurately measure the tetrahertz level frequency intervals. The results are compared with recent work from other groups and indicate that these lines would form a basis for a high-quality atlas of reference frequencies for this region of the spectrum.

  7. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-15

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ{sub 1}(r) cos(kz) cos(ωt−lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ω{sub R}, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ v{sub r}/ω{sub T}, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  8. In-situ Frequency Dependent Dielectric Sensing of Cure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, David E.

    1996-01-01

    With the expanding use of polymeric materials as composite matrices, adhesives, coatings and films, the need to develop low cost, automated fabrication processes to produce consistently high quality parts is critical. Essential to the development of reliable, automated, intelligent processing is the ability to continuously monitor the changing state of the polymeric resin in-situ in the fabrication tool. This final report discusses work done on developing dielectric sensing to monitor polymeric material cure and which provides a fundamental understanding of the underlying science for the use of frequency dependent dielectri sensors to monitor the cure process.

  9. RWM Critical Rotation Frequency and Beta Dependence in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sontag, Aaron; Sabbagh, S. A.; Menard, J. E.; Battaglia, D. J.

    2005-10-01

    The resistive wall mode (RWM) can be stabilized by maintaining the plasma toroidal rotation frequency (φφ) above a critical rotation frequency (φcrit). Recent experiments on NSTX seek to determine φcrit and rotation profile effects through actively braking plasma rotation by the application of external magnetic fields. Results from these experiments indicate that maintaining φφ at the q = 2 surface above φA/4q^2 is a necessary condition for RWM stability where φA is the local Alfven frequency. This result is in agreement with a theoretical model derived from a drift-kinetic energy principle. Similarity experiments with DIII-D are being performed to examine the aspect ratio dependence of the φcrit scaling. When φφ at the q = 2 surface drops below φcrit, the growth of internal kink/ballooning modes can prevent the RWM from terminating the discharge. A small beta collapse which drops φcrit, accompanies this mode growth allowing a recovery of RWM rotational stabilization while maintaining βN> βN^no-wall.

  10. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Patrick A.; Siegmund, Gunter P.; Schouten, Alfred C.; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular information is relevant to postural control, while in neck muscles they are maintained regardless of the requirement to maintain head on trunk balance. Recent investigations have also shown that the bandwidth of vestibular input on neck muscles is much broader than appendicular muscles (up to a factor of 3). This result challenges the notion that vestibular reflexes only contribute to postural control across the behavioral and physiological frequency range of the vestibular organ (i.e., 0–20 Hz). In this review, we explore and integrate these task-, muscle- and frequency-related differences in the vestibular system’s contribution to posture, and propose that the human nervous system has adapted vestibular signals to match the mechanical properties of the system that each group of muscles controls. PMID:25620919

  11. Absolute infrared transition moments for open shell diatomics from J dependence of transition intensities - Application to OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, David D., Jr.; Schiffman, Aram; Nesbitt, David J.; Yaron, David J.

    1989-05-01

    A general approach to the determination of the dipole moment function and of the absolute vibrational transition moments for diatomic molecules is presented. This method utilizes the variation of intensity with J within a vibrational transition, together with permanent dipole moment information, to extract the absolute transition moments. An essential feature of the model is its use of algebraic expressions for calculating vibration-rotation line intensities. These expressions can be rapidly evaluated in a least squares fit which determines the dipole moment function.

  12. Time and frequency dependent rheology of reactive silica gels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Winter, H Henning; Auernhammer, Günter K

    2014-01-01

    In a mixture of sodium silicate and low concentrated sulfuric acid, nano-sized silica particles grow and may aggregate to a system spanning gel network. We studied the influence of the finite solubility of silica at high pH on the mechanical properties of the gel with classical and piezo-rheometers. Direct preparation of the gel sample in the rheometer cell avoided any pre-shear of the gel structure during the filling of the rheometer. The storage modulus of the gel grew logarithmically with time with two distinct growth laws. The system passes the gel point very quickly but still shows relaxation at low frequency, typically below 6 rad/s. We attribute this as a sign of structural rearrangements due to the finite solubility of silica at high pH. The reaction equilibrium between bond formation and dissolution maintains a relatively large bond dissolution rate, which leads to a finite life time of the bonds and behavior similar to physical gels. This interpretation is also compatible with the logarithmic time dependence of the storage modulus. The frequency dependence was more pronounced for lower water concentrations, higher temperatures and shorter reaction times. With two relaxation models (the modified Cole-Cole model and the empirical Baumgaertel-Schausberger-Winter model) we deduced characteristic times from the experimental data. Both models approximately described the data and resulted in similar relaxation times.

  13. Accurate absolute reference frequencies from 1511 to 1545 nm of the {nu}{sub 1}+{nu}{sub 3} band of {sup 12}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} determined with laser frequency comb interval measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Madej, Alan A.; Alcock, A. John; Czajkowski, Andrzej; Bernard, John E.; Chepurov, Sergei

    2006-10-15

    Absolute frequency measurements, with uncertainties as low as 2 kHz (1x10{sup -11}), are presented for the {nu}{sub 1}+{nu}{sub 3} band of {sup 12}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} at 1.5 {mu}m (194-198 THz). The measurements were made using cavity-enhanced, diode-laser-based saturation spectroscopy. With one laser system stabilized to the P(16) line of {sup 13}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and a system stabilized to the line in {sup 12}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} whose frequency was to be determined, a Cr:YAG laser-based frequency comb was employed to measure the frequency intervals. The systematic uncertainty is notably reduced relative to that of previous studies, and the region of measured lines has been extended. Improved molecular constants are obtained.

  14. A frequency dependent preconditioned wavelet method for atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudytskiy, Mykhaylo; Helin, Tapio; Ramlau, Ronny

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric tomography, i.e. the reconstruction of the turbulence in the atmosphere, is a main task for the adaptive optics systems of the next generation telescopes. For extremely large telescopes, such as the European Extremely Large Telescope, this problem becomes overly complex and an efficient algorithm is needed to reduce numerical costs. Recently, a conjugate gradient method based on wavelet parametrization of turbulence layers was introduced [5]. An iterative algorithm can only be numerically efficient when the number of iterations required for a sufficient reconstruction is low. A way to achieve this is to design an efficient preconditioner. In this paper we propose a new frequency-dependent preconditioner for the wavelet method. In the context of a multi conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) system simulated on the official end-to-end simulation tool OCTOPUS of the European Southern Observatory we demonstrate robustness and speed of the preconditioned algorithm. We show that three iterations are sufficient for a good reconstruction.

  15. Frequency-dependent energy harvesting via magnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayyaadi, Hassan; Askari Farsangi, Mohammad Amin

    2015-11-01

    This paper is focused on presenting an accurate framework to describe frequency-dependent energy harvesting via magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs). Modeling strategy incorporates the phenomenological constitutive model developed formerly together with the magnetic diffusion equation. A hyperbolic hardening function is employed to define reorientation-induced strain hardening in the material, and the diffusion equation is used to add dynamic effects to the model. The MSMA prismatic specimen is surrounded by a pickup coil, and the induced voltage during martensite-variant reorientation is investigated with the help of Faraday’s law of magnetic field induction. It has been shown that, in order to harvest the maximum RMS voltage in the MSMA-based energy harvester, an optimum value of bias magnetic field exists, which is the corresponding magnetic field for the start of pseudoelasticity behavior. In addition, to achieve a more compact energy harvester with higher energy density, a specimen with a lower aspect ratio can be chosen. As the main novelty of the paper, it is found that the dynamic effects play a major role in determining the harvested voltage and power, especially for high excitation frequency or specimen thickness.

  16. Inverse characterisation of frequency-dependent properties of adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouleau, Lucie; Deü, Jean-François; Legay, Antoine

    2016-09-01

    Traditional damping treatments are usually applied to the vibrating structure by means of adhesive layers. Environmental parameters, such as frequencies of excitation, may influence the behaviour of the bonding layer and modify the damping efficiency of the treatment. Therefore it is desired to take into account the viscoelastic behaviour of the adhesive layer in the finite element model. The goal of this work is to present a procedure to characterise and model the adhesive layer. To that purpose, an experimental-numerical method for inverse characterisation of the frequency dependent properties of the adhesive layer is applied. The proposed inverse approach is based on a four-parameter fractional derivative model whose parameters are identified by minimising the difference between the simulated and the measured dynamic response of a multi-layered structure assembled by bonding. In the finite element model used for the optimisation, the adhesive layer is modelled by interface finite elements. The influence of the adhesive layer on the efficiency of a damping treatment is evidenced by performing dynamic testing on a sandwich structure with a viscoelastic core, assembled by bonding. The proposed approach is applied to the characterisation of a pressure-sensitive adhesive.

  17. Frequency-dependent selection at rough expanding fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhr, Jan-Timm; Stark, Holger

    2015-10-01

    Microbial colonies are experimental model systems for studying the colonization of new territory by biological species through range expansion. We study a generalization of the two-species Eden model, which incorporates local frequency-dependent selection, in order to analyze how social interactions between two species influence surface roughness of growing microbial colonies. The model includes several classical scenarios from game theory. We then concentrate on an expanding public goods game, where either cooperators or defectors take over the front depending on the system parameters. We analyze in detail the critical behavior of the nonequilibrium phase transition between global cooperation and defection and thereby identify a new universality class of phase transitions dealing with absorbing states. At the transition, the number of boundaries separating sectors decays with a novel power law in time and their superdiffusive motion crosses over from Eden scaling to a nearly ballistic regime. In parallel, the width of the front initially obeys Eden roughening and, at later times, passes over to selective roughening.

  18. Low-frequency rTMS over the Parieto-frontal network during a sensorimotor task: The role of absolute beta power in the sensorimotor integration.

    PubMed

    Gongora, Mariana; Bittencourt, Juliana; Teixeira, Silmar; Basile, Luis F; Pompeu, Fernando; Droguett, Enrique López; Arias-Carrion, Oscar; Budde, Henning; Cagy, Mauricio; Velasques, Bruna; Nardi, Antonio Egídio; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2016-01-12

    Several studies have demonstrated that Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) promotes alterations in the Central Nervous System circuits and networks. The focus of the present study is to examine the absolute beta power patterns in the Parieto-frontal network. We hypothesize that rTMS alters the mechanisms of the sensorimotor integration process during a visuomotor task. Twelve young healthy volunteers performed a visuomotor task involving decision making recorded (Catch a ball in a free fall) by Electroencephalography. rTMS was applied on the Superior Parietal Cortex (SPC; Brodmann area [BA] 7) with low-frequency (1 Hz - 15 min - 80% Resting Motor Threshold). For each Frontal and Parietal region, a two-way ANOVA was used to compare the absolute beta power before and after TMS for each condition of the study (Rest 1, Task and Rest 2). The results demonstrated interactions (TMS vs. Condition) for the Frontal electrodes: Fp1, Fp2 and F7 and an effect of TMS (before and after) for F4.The results for the Parietal region showed a main effect of Condition for the P3, PZ and P4 electrodes. Thus, our paradigm was useful to better understand the reorganization and neural plasticity mechanisms in the parieto-frontal network during the sensorimotor integration process.

  19. Instrumentation for direct, low frequency scanning capacitance microscopy, and analysis of position dependent stray capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, David T.; Pelz, J. P.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2002-10-01

    We describe instrumentation for scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM), using an atomic force microscope, that is designed to make calibrated, low frequency measurements of tip-sample capacitance and spreading resistance of thin dielectric films. We also characterize spatial variations in stray capacitance Cstray that must be understood before such measurements can be interpreted. Existing SCM circuits are generally optimized for measuring dC/dV, and not for calibrated low frequency measurements of absolute capacitance. Our circuit uses a commercially available current amplifier and low frequency (˜5 kHz) lock-in detection. This circuit adds an inverted, constant amplitude current to suppress the stray displacement current from the large (˜0.5 pF) stray capacitance Cstray between the sample and the mm-sized cantilever-probe assembly. The capacitance noise spectrum is ˜0.35 aF/√Hz and is flat down to 1 Hz measurement frequency, with an integrated noise <5 aF integrated over a 1-160 Hz bandwidth. We have also used this instrumentation to identify and characterize significant (>1 fF) variations in Cstray that must be understood in order to accurately measure aF-level variations in the nm-scale tip-sample capacitance. We find that Cstray varies with lateral probe position. This is due to tilting of the probe assembly as the piezoelectric scanner tube bends during scanning. We also find that Cstray varies significantly with probe-assembly height. This causes topography related artifacts in capacitance images of rough surfaces. However, we show that stray capacitance artifacts can be mostly eliminated by properly characterizing position and height dependent variations in Cstray and subtracting them from measured capacitance data.

  20. Polarization dependence of the direct two photon transitions of 87Rb atoms by erbium: Fiber laser frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shaoyang; Xia, Wei; Zhang, Yin; Zhao, Jianye; Zhou, Dawei; Wang, Qing; Yu, Qi; Li, Kunqian; Qi, Xianghui; Chen, Xuzong

    2016-11-01

    The femtosecond fiber-based optical frequency combs have been proved to be powerful tools for investigating the energy levels of atoms and molecules. In this paper, an Er-doped fiber femtosecond optical frequency comb has been implemented for studying the polarization dependence of 5S-5D two-photon transitions in thermal gas of atomic rubidium 87 using an entirely symmetrical optical configuration. By changing the polarization states of the counter-propagating light beams, the polarization dependence of direct two photon transition spectrum is demonstrated, and a dramatic variation (up to 5.5 times) of the two-photon transitions strength has been observed. The theory for the polarization dependence of two photon transition based on the second-order perturbation was established, which is in good agreement with the experimental results. The measurement results indicate that the polarization state manipulation with the existing frequency comb is used for femtosecond optical frequency comb based two photon transition spectroscopic purposes, which will improve the precision measurement of the absolute transition frequency and related applications.

  1. Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.

    2013-07-15

    Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at 0.1 vol. %.

  2. Multi-channel absolute distance measurement system with sub ppm-accuracy and 20 m range using frequency scanning interferometry and gas absorption cells.

    PubMed

    Dale, John; Hughes, Ben; Lancaster, Andrew J; Lewis, Andrew J; Reichold, Armin J H; Warden, Matthew S

    2014-10-06

    We present an implementation of an absolute distance measurement system which uses frequency scanning interferometry (FSI). The technique, referred to as dynamic FSI, uses two frequency scanning lasers, a gas absorption cell and a reference interferometer to determine the unknown optical path length difference (OPD) of one or many measurement interferometers. The gas absorption cell is the length reference for the measurement system and is traceable to international standards through knowledge of the frequencies of its absorption features. The OPD of the measurement interferometers can vary during the measurement and the variation is measured at the sampling rate of the system (2.77 MHz in the system described here). The system is shown to measure distances from 0.2 m to 20 m with a combined relative uncertainty of 0.41 × 10⁻⁶ at the two sigma level (k = 2). It will be shown that within a scan the change in OPD of the measurement interferometer can be determined to a resolution of 40 nm.

  3. Seismic noise frequency dependent P and S wave sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, E.; Schimmel, M.; Gualtieri, L.; Farra, V.; Ardhuin, F.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic noise in the period band 3-10 sec is generated in the oceans by the interaction of ocean waves. Noise signal is dominated by Rayleigh waves but body waves can be extracted using a beamforming approach. We select the TAPAS array deployed in South Spain between June 2008 and September 2009 and we use the vertical and horizontal components to extract noise P and S waves, respectively. Data are filtered in narrow frequency bands and we select beam azimuths and slownesses that correspond to the largest continuous sources per day. Our procedure automatically discard earthquakes which are localized during short time durations. Using this approach, we detect many more noise P-waves than S-waves. Source locations are determined by back-projecting the detected slowness/azimuth. P and S waves are generated in nearby areas and both source locations are frequency dependent. Long period sources are dominantly in the South Atlantic and Indian Ocean whereas shorter period sources are rather in the North Atlantic Ocean. We further show that the detected S-waves are dominantly Sv-waves. We model the observed body waves using an ocean wave model that takes into account all possible wave interactions including coastal reflection. We use the wave model to separate direct and multiply reflected phases for P and S waves respectively. We show that in the South Atlantic the complex source pattern can be explained by the existence of both coastal and pelagic sources whereas in the North Atlantic most body wave sources are pelagic. For each detected source, we determine the equivalent source magnitude which is compared to the model.

  4. Frequency-dependent selection and the evolution of assortative mating.

    PubMed

    Otto, Sarah P; Servedio, Maria R; Nuismer, Scott L

    2008-08-01

    A long-standing goal in evolutionary biology is to identify the conditions that promote the evolution of reproductive isolation and speciation. The factors promoting sympatric speciation have been of particular interest, both because it is notoriously difficult to prove empirically and because theoretical models have generated conflicting results, depending on the assumptions made. Here, we analyze the conditions under which selection favors the evolution of assortative mating, thereby reducing gene flow between sympatric groups, using a general model of selection, which allows fitness to be frequency dependent. Our analytical results are based on a two-locus diploid model, with one locus altering the trait under selection and the other locus controlling the strength of assortment (a "one-allele" model). Examining both equilibrium and nonequilibrium scenarios, we demonstrate that whenever heterozygotes are less fit, on average, than homozygotes at the trait locus, indirect selection for assortative mating is generated. While costs of assortative mating hinder the evolution of reproductive isolation, they do not prevent it unless they are sufficiently great. Assortative mating that arises because individuals mate within groups (formed in time or space) is most conducive to the evolution of complete assortative mating from random mating. Assortative mating based on female preferences is more restrictive, because the resulting sexual selection can lead to loss of the trait polymorphism and cause the relative fitness of heterozygotes to rise above homozygotes, eliminating the force favoring assortment. When assortative mating is already prevalent, however, sexual selection can itself cause low heterozygous fitness, promoting the evolution of complete reproductive isolation (akin to "reinforcement") regardless of the form of natural selection.

  5. DFT + U (ω) : Frequency-dependent Hubbard U correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, David D.; Marzari, Nicola

    In contemporary first-principles atomistic simulation based on DFT, the augmentation of approximate exchange-correlation functionals with spatially or energetically localized corrections, such as DFT + U , is a successful approach for improving its applicability to strongly interacting systems. Electronic screening is a dynamical process, and since the Hubbard U parameter, in particular, is a measure of the screened Coulomb interaction, its frequency-dependent generalisation for the dynamical regime is possible. We introduce a conceptually pragmatic and computationally straightforward method, named DFT + U (ω) , for calculating and incorporating strong dynamical screening effects in spectroscopic calculations based on Kohn-Sham DFT. Our method is designed to be a minimal dynamical extension of DFT + U , one in which computing approximate dynamical Hubbard U functions only requires functionality that is widely available. We demonstrate our effective plasmon fitting and self-energy approximation scheme for DFT + U (ω) , which enables the resulting low-energy dynamical model to be solved at the G0W0 level, and beyond, efficiently and effectively.

  6. Female elk contacts are neither frequency nor density dependent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, Paul C.; Creech, Tyler G.; Ebinger, Michael R.; Manlove, Kezia R.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Henningsen, John C.; Rogerson, Jared D.; Scurlock, Brandon M.; Creely, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Identifying drivers of contact rates among individuals is critical to understanding disease dynamics and implementing targeted control measures. We studied the interaction patterns of 149 female elk (Cervus canadensis) distributed across five different regions of western Wyoming over three years, defining a contact as an approach within one body length (∼2 m). Using hierarchical models that account for correlations within individuals, pairs, and groups, we found that pairwise contact rates within a group declined by a factor of three as group sizes increased 33-fold. Per capita contact rates, however, increased with group size according to a power function, such that female elk contact rates fell in between the predictions of density- or frequency-dependent disease models. We found similar patterns for the duration of contacts. Our results suggest that larger elk groups are likely to play a disproportionate role in the disease dynamics of directly transmitted infections in elk. Supplemental feeding of elk had a limited impact on pairwise interaction rates and durations, but per capita rates were more than two times higher on feeding grounds. Our statistical approach decomposes the variation in contact rate into individual, dyadic, and environmental effects, and provides insight into factors that may be targeted by disease control programs. In particular, female elk contact patterns were driven more by environmental factors such as group size than by either individual or dyad effects.

  7. Female elk contacts are neither frequency nor density dependent.

    PubMed

    Cross, P C; Creech, T G; Ebinger, M R; Manlove, K; Irvine, K; Henningsen, J; Rogerson, J; Scurlock, B M; Creel, S

    2013-09-01

    Identifying drivers of contact rates among individuals is critical to understanding disease dynamics and implementing targeted control measures. We studied the interaction patterns of 149 female elk (Cervus canadensis) distributed across five different regions of western Wyoming over three years, defining a contact as an approach within one body length (-2 min). Using hierarchical models that account for correlations within individuals, pairs, and groups, we found that pairwise contact rates within a group declined by a factor of three as group sizes increased 33-fold. Per capita contact rates, however, increased with group size according to a power function, such that female elk contact rates fell in between the predictions of density- or frequency-dependent disease models. We found similar patterns for the duration of contacts. Our results suggest that larger elk groups are likely to play a disproportionate role in the disease dynamics of directly transmitted infections in elk. Supplemental feeding of elk had a limited impact on pairwise interaction rates and durations, but per capita rates were more than two times higher on feeding grounds. Our statistical approach decomposes the variation in contact rate into individual, dyadic, and environmental effects, and provides insight into factors that may be targeted by disease control programs. In particular, female elk contact patterns were driven more by environmental factors such as group size than by either individual or dyad effects.

  8. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency) by removing the source spectrum (moment-rate spectrum) from

  9. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  10. Frequency dependency of temporal contrast adaptation in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Hohberger, Bettina; Rössler, Christopher W; Jünemann, Anselm G M; Horn, Folkert K; Kremers, Jan

    2011-06-21

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of temporal frequency of temporal contrast adaptation on contrast sensitivity in healthy subjects. Temporal contrast sensitivities (TCS) were measured monocularly in seven healthy subjects with a modified ERG full-field bowl stimulator at eight different test temporal frequencies (9, 15, 20, 25, 31, 37, 44, 51 Hz) using a two-alternative-forced-choice strategy. Before each presentation of the test stimulus, a 100% contrast adapting flicker stimulus was presented (frequencies: 9, 15, 20, 25, 31, 37, 44, 51, 100 Hz). At each adapting frequency, a complete set of TCSs was measured. All temporal contrast sensitivities decreased with increasing temporal frequencies. Adaptation led to a general temporal contrast sensitivity decrease. Largest adaptation effects were seen at an adaptation frequency of 25 Hz. Reduction of contrast sensitivity was significantly larger at 25 Hz adaptation than at 9 Hz adaptation (t-test of paired samples, Bonferroni corrected). The results of this study showed a general TCS decrease with the largest effect at an adaptation frequency of 25 Hz. This finding indicates that the contrast adaptation probably occurred in the magnocellular-pathway. In future clinical studies adaptation effects could be investigated in patients with reduced temporal contrast sensitivity.

  11. Temperature and pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reactions of NH2 radicals with acetylene and ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Nava, D. F.; Brobst, W. D.; Stief, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute rate constants for the reaction between the NH2 free radical and acetylene and ethylene is measured experimentally using a flash photolysis technique. The constant is considered to be a function of temperature and pressure. At each temperature level of the experiment, the observed pseudo-first-order rate constants were assumed to be independent of flash intensity. The results of the experiment indicate that the bimolecular rate constant for the NH2 + C2H2 reaction increases with pressure at 373 K and 459 K but not at lower temperatures. Results near the pressure limit conform to an Arrhenius expression of 1.11 (+ or -) 0.36 x 10 to the -13th over the temperature range from 241 to 459 K. For the reaction NH2 + C2H4, a smaller rate of increase in the bimolecular rate constant was observed over the temperature range 250-465 K. The implications of these results for current theoretical models of NH2 + C2H2 (or H4) reactions in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are discussed.

  12. Frequency-Dependent Viscosity of Xenon Near the Critical Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    1999-01-01

    We used a novel, overdamped oscillator aboard the Space Shuttle to measure the viscosity eta of xenon near its critical density rho(sub c), and temperature T(sub c). In microgravity, useful data were obtained within 0.1 mK of T(sub c), corresponding to a reduced temperature t = (T -T(sub c))/T(sub c) = 3 x 10(exp -7). The data extend two decades closer to T(sub c) than the best ground measurements, and they directly reveal the expected power-law behavior eta proportional to t(sup -(nu)z(sub eta)). Here nu is the correlation length exponent, and our result for the small viscosity exponent is z(sub eta) = 0.0690 +/- 0.0006. (All uncertainties are one standard uncertainty.) Our value for z(sub eta) depends only weakly on the form of the viscosity crossover function, and it agrees with the value 0.067 +/- 0.002 obtained from a recent two-loop perturbation expansion. The measurements spanned the frequency range 2 Hz less than or equal to f less than or equal to 12 Hz and revealed viscoelasticity when t less than or equal to 10(exp -1), further from T(sub c) than predicted. The viscoelasticity scales as Af(tau), where tau is the fluctuation-decay time. The fitted value of the viscoelastic time-scale parameter A is 2.0 +/- 0.3 times the result of a one-loop perturbation calculation. Near T(sub c), the xenon's calculated time constant for thermal diffusion exceeded days. Nevertheless, the viscosity results were independent of the xenon's temperature history, indicating that the density was kept near rho(sub c), by judicious choices of the temperature vs. time program. Deliberately bad choices led to large density inhomogeneities. At t greater than 10(exp -5), the xenon approached equilibrium much faster than expected, suggesting that convection driven by microgravity and by electric fields slowly stirred the sample.

  13. Complete FDTD analysis of microwave heating processes in frequency-dependent and temperature dependent media

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, F.; Jecko, B.

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that the temperature rise in a material modifies its physical properties and, particularly, its dielectric permittivity. The dissipated electromagnetic power involved in microwave heating processes depending on {var_epsilon}({omega}), the electrical characteristics of the heated media must vary with the temperature to achieve realistic simulations. In this paper, the authors present a fast and accurate algorithm allowing, through a combined electromagnetic and thermal procedure, to take into account the influence of the temperature on the electrical properties of materials. First, the temperature dependence of the complex permittivity ruled by a Debye relaxation equation is investigated, and a realistic model is proposed and validated. Then, a frequency-dependent finite-differences time-domain ((FD){sup 2}TD) method is used to assess the instantaneous electromagnetic power lost by dielectric hysteresis. Within the same iteration, a time-scaled form of the heat transfer equation allows one to calculate the temperature distribution in the heated medium and then to correct the dielectric properties of the material using the proposed model. These new characteristics will be taken into account by the EM solver at the next iteration. This combined algorithm allows a significant reduction of computation time. An application to a microwave oven is proposed.

  14. Frequency-Dependent Blanking with Digital Linear Chirp Waveform Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter; Andrews, John M.

    2014-07-01

    Wideband radar systems, especially those that operate at lower frequencies such as VHF and UHF, are often restricted from transmitting within or across specific frequency bands in order to prevent interference to other spectrum users. Herein we describe techniques for notching the transmitted spectrum of a generated and transmitted radar waveform. The notches are fully programmable as to their location, and techniques are given that control the characteristics of the notches.

  15. Temperature and frequency dependence of ultrasonic attenuation in selected tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.; Croissette, D. H. L.; Heyser, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation over the frequency range of 1.5-10 MHz has been measured as a function of temperature for porcine liver, backfat, kidney and spleen as well as for a single specimen of human liver. The attenuation in these excised specimens increases nearly linearly with frequency. Over the temperature range of approximately 4-37 C the attenuation decreases with increasing temperature for most soft tissue studied.

  16. Frequency and temperature dependence of high damping elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1993-08-01

    High damping steel-laminated elastomeric seismic isolation bearings are one of the preferred devices for isolating large buildings and structures. In the US, the current reference design for the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) uses laminated bearings for seismic isolation. These bearings are constructed from alternating layers of high damping rubber and steel plates. They are typically designed for shear strains between 50 and 100% and are expected to sustain two to three times these levels for beyond design basis loading conditions. Elastomeric bearings are currently designed to provide a system frequency between 0.4 and 0.8 Hz and expected to operate between {minus}20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. To assure proper performance of isolation bearings, it is necessary to characterize the elastomer`s response under expected variations of frequency and temperature. The dynamic response of the elastomer must be characterized within the frequency range that spans the bearing acceptance test frequency, which may be as low as 0.005 Hz, and the design frequency. Similarly, the variation in mechanical characteristics of the elastomer must be determined over the design temperature range, which is between {minus}20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. This paper reports on (1) the capabilities of a testing facility at ANL for testing candidate elastomers, (2) the variation with frequency and temperature of the stiffness and damping of one candidate elastomer, and (3) the effect of these variations on bearing acceptance testing criteria and on the choice of bearing design values for stiffness and damping.

  17. Absolute and relative emission spectroscopy study of 3 cm wide planar radio frequency atmospheric pressure bio-plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xiaolong; Nikiforov, Anton Yu Leys, Christophe; Ionita, Eusebiu-Rosini; Dinescu, Gheorghe

    2015-08-03

    The dynamics of low power atmospheric pressure radio frequency discharge generated in Ar gas in long gap of 3 cm is investigated. This plasma source is characterized and analyzed for possible large scale biomedical applications where low gas temperature and potential-less effluent are required. The discharge forms a homogenous glow-like afterglow in ambient air at input power of 30 W with low gas temperature of 330 K, which is desirable in biomedical applications. With absolute calibrated spectroscopy of the discharge, electron density of 0.4 × 10{sup 18} m{sup −3} and electron temperature of 1.5 eV are obtained from continuum Bremsstrahlung radiation of the source. Time and spatial resolved emission spectroscopy is used to analyze discharge generation mechanism and active species formation. It is found that discharge dynamics strongly correlates with the discharge current waveform. Strong Ar(2p) excited states emission is observed nearby the electrodes surface on a distance up to 200 μm in the plasma sheath region at 10 ns after the current peak, whereas OH(A) emission is uniform along of the interelectrode gap.

  18. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  19. Refined Monte Carlo method for simulating angle-dependent partial frequency redistributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.-S.

    1982-01-01

    A refined algorithm for generating emission frequencies from angle-dependent partial frequency redistribution functions R sub II and R sub III is described. The improved algorithm has as its basis a 'rejection' technique that, for absorption frequencies x less than 5, involves no approximations. The resulting procedure is found to be essential for effective studies of radiative transfer in optically thick or temperature varying media involving angle-dependent partial frequency redistributions.

  20. Nonlinear frequency-dependent synchronization in the developing hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Prida, L M; Sanchez-Andres, J V

    1999-07-01

    Synchronous population activity is present both in normal and pathological conditions such as epilepsy. In the immature hippocampus, synchronous bursting is an electrophysiological conspicuous event. These bursts, known as giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs), are generated by the synchronized activation of interneurons and pyramidal cells via GABAA, N-methyl-D-aspartate, and AMPA receptors. Nevertheless the mechanism leading to this synchronization is still controversial. We have investigated the conditions under which synchronization arises in developing hippocampal networks. By means of simultaneous intracellular recordings, we show that GDPs result from local cooperation of active cells within an integration period prior to their onset. During this time interval, an increase in the number of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) takes place building up full synchronization between cells. These EPSPs are correlated with individual action potentials simultaneously occurring in neighboring cells. We have used EPSP frequency as an indicator of the neuronal activity underlying GDP generation. By comparing EPSP frequency with the occurrence of synchronized GDPs between CA3 and the fascia dentata (FD), we found that GDPs are fired in an all-or-none manner, which is characterized by a specific threshold of EPSP frequency from which synchronous GDPs emerge. In FD, the EPSP frequency-threshold for GDP onset is 17 Hz. GDPs are triggered similarly in CA3 by appropriate periodic stimulation of mossy fibers. The frequency threshold for CA3 GDP onset is 12 Hz. These findings clarify the local mechanism of synchronization underlying bursting in the developing hippocampus, indicating that GDPs are fired when background levels of EPSPs or action potentials have built up full synchronization by firing at specific frequencies (>12 Hz). Our results also demonstrate that spontaneous EPSPs and action potentials are important for the initiation of synchronous bursts in the

  1. Frequency dependence and intensity fluctuations due to shallow water internal waves.

    PubMed

    Badiey, Mohsen; Katsnelson, Boris G; Lynch, James F; Pereselkov, Serguey

    2007-08-01

    A theory and experimental results for sound propagation through an anisotropic shallow water environment are presented to examine the frequency dependence of the scintillation index in the presence of internal waves. The theory of horizontal rays and vertical modes is used to establish the azimutal and frequency behavior of the sound intensity fluctuations, specifically for shallow water broadband acoustic signals propagating through internal waves. This theory is then used to examine the frequency dependent, anisotropic acoustic field measured during the SWARM'95 experiment. The frequency dependent modal scintillation index is described for the frequency range of 30-200 Hz on the New Jersey continental shelf.

  2. Frequency-Dependence of Relative Permeability in Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bowler, N.

    2006-03-06

    A study to characterize metal plates by means of a model-based, broadband, four-point potential drop measurement technique has shown that the relative permeability of alloy 1018 low-carbon steel is complex and a function of frequency. A magnetic relaxation is observed at approximately 5 kHz. The relaxation can be described in terms of a parametric (Cole-Cole) model. Factors which influence the frequency, amplitude and breadth of the relaxation, such as applied current amplitude, sample geometry and disorder (e.g. percent carbon content and surface condition), are considered.

  3. Pressure dependent resonant frequency of micromechanical drumhead resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, D. R.; Craighead, H. G.; Parpia, J. M.

    2009-05-25

    We examine the relationship between squeeze film effects and resonance frequency in drum-type resonators. We find that the resonance frequency increases linearly with pressure as a result of the additional restoring force contribution from compression of gas within the drum cavity. We demonstrate trapping of the gas by squeeze film effects and geometry. The pressure sensitivity is shown to scale inversely with cavity height and sound radiation is found to be the predominant loss mechanism near and above atmospheric pressure. Drum resonators exhibit linearity and sensitivity suitable to barometry from below 10 Torr up to several atmospheres.

  4. Absolute Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, George

    1990-12-01

    The absolute sensitivity of the FOS will be determined in SV by observing 2 stars at 3 epochs, first in 3 apertures (1.0", 0.5", and 0.3" circular) and then in 1 aperture (1.0" circular). In cycle 1, one star, BD+28D4211 will be observed in the 1.0" aperture to establish the stability of the sensitivity and flat field characteristics and improve the accuracy obtained in SV. This star will also be observed through the paired apertures since these are not calibrated in SV. The stars will be observed in most detector/grating combinations. The data will be averaged to form the inverse sensitivity functions required by RSDP.

  5. Frequency dependence of CO2 elimination and respiratory resistance in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Watson, J W; Jackson, A C

    1985-02-01

    In dogs, respiratory system resistance (Rrs) is frequency independent, and during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFO) the relationship between CO2 elimination (VCO2) and frequency is linear. In contrast, we found in rabbits a large frequency-dependent decrease in Rrs with increasing frequency along with a nonlinear relationship between frequency and VCO2 (J. Appl. Physiol. 57: 354-359, 1984). We proposed that frequency dependent mechanical properties of the lung account for inter-species differences in the frequency dependence of gas exchange during HFO. In the current study we tested this hypothesis further by measuring VCO2 and Rrs as a function of frequency in a species of monkey (Macaca radiata). In these monkeys, Rrs decreased minimally between 4 and 8 Hz and in general increased at higher frequencies, whereas VCO2 was linearly related to frequency. This is further evidence supporting the hypothesis that nonlinear frequency-VCO2 behavior during HFO is related to frequency-dependent behavior in Rrs.

  6. Frequency dependence of laser ultrasonic SAW phase velocities measurements.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunhui; Song, Shaozhen; Guan, Guangying; Wang, Ruikang K; Huang, Zhihong

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the field of laser ultrasonics have opened up new possibilities in applications in many areas. This paper verifies the relationship between phase velocities of different materials, including hard solid and soft solid, and the frequency range of SAW signal. We propose a novel approach that utilizes a low coherence interferometer to detect the laser-induced surface acoustic waves (SAWs). A Nd:YAG focused laser line-source is applied to steel, iron, plastic plates and a 3.5% agar-agar phantom. The generated SAW signals are detected by a time domain low coherence interferometry system. SAW phase velocity dispersion curves were calculated, from which the elasticity of the specimens was evaluated. The relationship between frequency content and phase velocities was analyzed. We show that the experimental results agreed well with those of the theoretical expectations.

  7. Anti-inflammatory effects of low-intensity extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation: frequency and power dependence.

    PubMed

    Gapeyev, A B; Mikhailik, E N; Chemeris, N K

    2008-04-01

    Using a model of acute zymosan-induced footpad edema in NMRI mice, the frequency and power dependence of anti-inflammatory effect of low-intensity extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation (EHF EMR) was found. Single whole-body exposure of animals to EHF EMR at the intensity of 0.1 mW/cm(2) for 20 min at 1 h after zymosan injection reduced both the footpad edema and local hyperthermia on average by 20% at the frequencies of 42.2, 51.8, and 65 GHz. Some other frequencies from the frequency range of 37.5-70 GHz were less effective or not effective at all. At fixed frequency of 42.2 GHz and intensity of 0.1 mW/cm(2), the effect had bell-shaped dependence on exposure duration with a maximum at 20-40 min. Reduction of intensity to 0.01 mW/cm(2) resulted in a change of the effect dependence on exposure duration to a linear one. Combined action of cyclooxygenase inhibitor sodium diclofenac and EHF EMR exposure caused a partial additive effect of decrease in footpad edema. Combined action of antihistamine clemastine and EHF EMR exposure caused a dose-dependent abolishment of the anti-inflammatory effect of EHF EMR. The results obtained suggest that arachidonic acid metabolites and histamine are involved in realization of anti-inflammatory effects of low-intensity EHF EMR.

  8. Frequency dependence of magnetoresistance in MEH-PPV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdem Djidjou, Thaddee; Nguyen, Tho; Valy Vardeny, Z.; Rogachev, Andrey

    2012-02-01

    The organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) in organic light emitting diodes (OLED) made of MEH-PPV was investigated by means of DC transport and the admittance spectroscopy in the range of 1 Hz to 10 MHz at room temperature. The measurements were carried out on unipolar and bipolar OLEDs made of pristine MEH-PPV as well as MEH-PPV with traps introduced by the UV light irradiation. We found that in bipolar, UV-exposed OLEDs, the magnitude of magnetoresistance effect in real part of admittance increases with DC bias, reaches very high value of 35 % (in the field 30mT) at bias 4.8 V and decreases at higher bias voltages. Also, we observed that the cutoff frequency of OMAR effect monotonically increases with DC bias voltage. The cutoff has extrinsic origin and is likely caused by a dissipative process related to the reorientation of permanent dipoles. At the highest tested bias voltage 6.7 V, we were able to detect the OMAR at the highest frequency of our system, 10 MHz. We have found that imaginary part of the admittance is also affected by magnetic field. The effect of magnetic field on dynamical capacitance of the device at low frequencies is very strong and opens up a possibility of using these devices as magnetic field sensors.

  9. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction Cl + C2H2 from 210-361 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunning, J.; Stief, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been given to the role of chlorine compounds in the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone. However, while some reactions have been studied extensively, the kinetic data for the reaction of Cl with C2H2 is sparse with only three known determinations of the rate constant k3. The reactions involved are Cl + C2H2 yields reversibly ClC2H2(asterisk) (3a) and ClC2H2(asterisk) + M yields ClC2H2 + M (3b). In the present study, flash photolysis coupled with chlorine atomic resonance fluorescence have been employed to determine the pressure and temperature dependence of k3 with the third body M = Ar. Room temperature values are also reported for M = N2. The pressure dependence observed in the experiments confirms the expectation that the reaction involves addition of Cl to the unsaturated C2H2 molecule followed by collisional stabilization of the resulting adduct radical.

  10. Absolute rate determinations and temperature dependences of the gas-phase reactions of O( 3P) with halogenated propenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cometto, Pablo M.; Teruel, Mariano A.; Taccone, Raúl A.; Lane, Silvia I.

    2006-01-01

    The rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of ground state oxygen atoms with CF 3CH dbnd CH 2 (1), CF 3CF dbnd CF 2 (2) and CF 3CCl dbnd CCl 2 (3) have been measured directly using a discharge flow tube employing the O( 3P) chemiluminescence titration method. The experiments were carried out under pseudo-first-order conditions with [O( 3P)] 0 ≪ [propene] 0. The temperature dependences of the reactions were studied for the first time in the range 298-363 K. The Arrhenius expressions obtained (in units of cm 3 molecule -1 s -1) were: k1 = (0.28 ± 0.09) × 10 -11 exp[-(10.4 ± 0.9) × 10 3/ RT], k2 = (1.57 ± 0.72) × 10 -11 exp[-(15.6 ± 1.3) × 10 3/ RT], k3 = (2.23 ± 1.27) × 10 -11 exp[-(16.0 ± 1.6) × 10 3/ RT]. All the rate coefficients display a positive temperature dependence which points to the importance of the irreversibility of the addition mechanism for these reactions. Halogen substitution in the alkenes is discussed in terms of reactivity with O( 3P) and its relation with the ionization potential.

  11. Frequency Dependence of the Exact Exchange-Correlation Kernel of Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, M.; Kümmel, S.

    2014-02-01

    We present a scheme for numerically reconstructing the exact and the Kohn-Sham time-dependent density-density response functions, and from their inverse the numerical representation of the exact frequency-dependent exchange-correlation kernel fxc of time-dependent Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. We investigate the exact fxc in detail for a system that is known to show strong memory effects. The reconstructed kernel fulfills the appropriate sum rule. Using it in linear response calculations, we show how the exact fxc, due to its frequency dependence, yields the exact excitation energies, including the ones of double excitation character.

  12. Frequency-dependent conductivity contrast for tissue characterization using a dual-frequency range conductivity mapping magnetic resonance method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Chauhan, Munish; Kim, Min-Oh; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kim, Hyung Joong; Sersa, Igor; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2015-02-01

    Electrical conductivities of biological tissues show frequency-dependent behaviors, and these values at different frequencies may provide clinically useful diagnostic information. MR-based tissue property mapping techniques such as magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) and magnetic resonance electrical property tomography (MREPT) are widely used and provide unique conductivity contrast information over different frequency ranges. Recently, a new method for data acquisition and reconstruction for low- and high-frequency conductivity images from a single MR scan was proposed. In this study, we applied this simultaneous dual-frequency range conductivity mapping MR method to evaluate its utility in a designed phantom and two in vivo animal disease models. Magnetic flux density and B(1)(+) phase map for dual-frequency conductivity images were acquired using a modified spin-echo pulse sequence. Low-frequency conductivity was reconstructed from MREIT data by the projected current density method, while high-frequency conductivity was reconstructed from MREPT data by B(1)(+) mapping. Two different conductivity phantoms comprising varying ion concentrations separated by insulating films with or without holes were used to study the contrast mechanism of the frequency-dependent conductivities related to ion concentration and mobility. Canine brain abscess and ischemia were used as in vivo models to evaluate the capability of the proposed method to identify new electrical properties-based contrast at two different frequencies. The simultaneous dual-frequency range conductivity mapping MR method provides unique contrast information related to the concentration and mobility of ions inside tissues. This method has potential to monitor dynamic changes of the state of disease.

  13. Photonic band gap enhancement in frequency-dependent dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Toader, Ovidiu; John, Sajeev

    2004-10-01

    We illustrate a general technique for evaluating photonic band structures in periodic d -dimensional microstructures in which the dielectric constant epsilon (omega) exhibits rapid variations with frequency omega . This technique involves the evaluation of generalized electromagnetic dispersion surfaces omega ( k--> ,epsilon) in a (d+1) -dimensional space consisting of the physical d -dimensional space of wave vectors k--> and an additional dimension defined by the continuous, independent, variable epsilon . The physical band structure for the photonic crystal is obtained by evaluating the intersection of the generalized dispersion surfaces with the "cutting surface" defined by the function epsilon (omega) . We apply this method to evaluate the band structure of both two- and three-dimensional (3D) periodic microstructures. We consider metallic photonic crystals with free carriers described by a simple Drude conductivity and verify the occurrence of electromagnetic pass bands below the plasma frequency of the bulk metal. We also evaluate the shift of the photonic band structure caused by free carrier injection into semiconductor-based photonic crystals. We apply our method to two models in which epsilon (omega) describes a resonant radiation-matter interaction. In the first model, we consider the addition of independent, resonant oscillators to a photonic crystal with an otherwise frequency-independent dielectric constant. We demonstrate that for an inhomogeneously broadened distribution of resonators impregnated within an inverse opal structure, the full 3D photonic band gap (PBG) can be considerably enhanced. In the second model, we consider a coupled resonant oscillator mode in a photonic crystal. When this mode is an optical phonon, there can be a synergetic interplay between the polaritonic resonance and the geometrical scattering resonances of the structured dielectric, leading to PBG enhancement. A similar effect may arise when resonant atoms that are

  14. Frequency-dependent optical steering from subwavelength plasmonic structures.

    PubMed

    Djalalian-Assl, A; Gómez, D E; Roberts, A; Davis, T J

    2012-10-15

    We show theoretically and with numerical simulations that the direction of the in-plane scattering from a subwavelength optical antenna system can be controlled by the frequency of the incident light. This optical steering effect does not rely on propagation phase shifts or diffraction but arises from phase shifts in the localized surface plasmon modes of the antenna. An analytical model is developed to optimize the parameters for the configuration, showing good agreement with a rigorous numerical simulation. The simulation predicts a 25° angular shift in the direction of the light scattered from two gold nanorods for a wavelength change of 12 nm.

  15. Action potential broadening and frequency-dependent facilitation of calcium signals in pituitary nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M B; Konnerth, A; Augustine, G J

    1991-01-15

    Hormone release from nerve terminals in the neurohypophysis is a sensitive function of action potential frequency. We have investigated the cellular mechanisms responsible for this frequency-dependent facilitation by combining patch clamp and fluorimetric Ca2+ measurements in single neurosecretory terminals in thin slices of the rat posterior pituitary. In these terminals both action potential-induced changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and action potential duration were enhanced by high-frequency stimuli, all with a frequency dependence similar to that of hormone release. Furthermore, brief voltage clamp pulses inactivated a K+ current with a very similar frequency dependence. These results support a model for frequency-dependent facilitation in which the inactivation of a K+ current broadens action potentials, leading to an enhancement of [Ca2+]i signals. Further experiments tested for a causal relationship between action potential broadening and facilitation of [Ca2+]i changes. First, increasing the duration of depolarization, either by broadening action potentials with the K(+)-channel blocker tetraethylammonium or by applying longer depolarizing voltage clamp steps, increased [Ca2+]i changes. Second, eliminating frequency-dependent changes in duration, by voltage clamping the terminal with constant duration pulses, substantially reduced the frequency-dependent enhancement of [Ca2+]i changes. These results indicate that action potential broadening contributes to frequency-dependent facilitation of [Ca2+]i changes. However, the small residual frequency dependence of [Ca2+]i changes seen with constant duration stimulation suggests that a second process, distinct from action potential broadening, also contributes to facilitation. These two frequency-dependent mechanisms may also contribute to activity-dependent plasticity in synaptic terminals.

  16. Dependences of ultrasonic properties on frequency and trabecular spacing in trabecular-bone-mimicking phantoms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Il

    2015-02-01

    The dependences of ultrasonic properties on the frequency and the trabecular spacing were investigated in 20 trabecular-bone-mimicking phantoms consisting of cellular copper foams. The strong slow waves were consistently observed in the signals transmitted through all of the phantoms. The frequency-dependent phase velocity and attenuation coefficient of the slow wave were measured at frequencies from 0.7 to 1.3 MHz. The phase velocity decreased approximately linearly with increasing frequency while the attenuation coefficients increased with increasing frequency. The phase velocity increased monotonically with increasing trabecular spacing from 1337 to 2931 μm while the attenuation coefficient decreased with increasing spacing.

  17. Measurement of absolute frequency of continuous-wave terahertz radiation in real time using a free-running, dual-wavelength mode-locked, erbium-doped fibre laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guoqing; Mizuguchi, Tatsuya; Zhao, Xin; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizuno, Takahiko; Yang, Yuli; Li, Cui; Bai, Ming; Zheng, Zheng; Yasui, Takeshi

    2017-02-01

    A single, free-running, dual-wavelength mode-locked, erbium-doped fibre laser was exploited to measure the absolute frequency of continuous-wave terahertz (CW-THz) radiation in real time using dual THz combs of photo-carriers (dual PC-THz combs). Two independent mode-locked laser beams with different wavelengths and different repetition frequencies were generated from this laser and were used to generate dual PC-THz combs having different frequency spacings in photoconductive antennae. Based on the dual PC-THz combs, the absolute frequency of CW-THz radiation was determined with a relative precision of 1.2 × 10‑9 and a relative accuracy of 1.4 × 10‑9 at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. Real-time determination of the absolute frequency of CW-THz radiation varying over a few tens of GHz was also demonstrated. Use of a single dual-wavelength mode-locked fibre laser, in place of dual mode-locked lasers, greatly reduced the size, complexity, and cost of the measurement system while maintaining the real-time capability and high measurement precision.

  18. Measurement of absolute frequency of continuous-wave terahertz radiation in real time using a free-running, dual-wavelength mode-locked, erbium-doped fibre laser

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guoqing; Mizuguchi, Tatsuya; Zhao, Xin; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizuno, Takahiko; Yang, Yuli; Li, Cui; Bai, Ming; Zheng, Zheng; Yasui, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    A single, free-running, dual-wavelength mode-locked, erbium-doped fibre laser was exploited to measure the absolute frequency of continuous-wave terahertz (CW-THz) radiation in real time using dual THz combs of photo-carriers (dual PC-THz combs). Two independent mode-locked laser beams with different wavelengths and different repetition frequencies were generated from this laser and were used to generate dual PC-THz combs having different frequency spacings in photoconductive antennae. Based on the dual PC-THz combs, the absolute frequency of CW-THz radiation was determined with a relative precision of 1.2 × 10−9 and a relative accuracy of 1.4 × 10−9 at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. Real-time determination of the absolute frequency of CW-THz radiation varying over a few tens of GHz was also demonstrated. Use of a single dual-wavelength mode-locked fibre laser, in place of dual mode-locked lasers, greatly reduced the size, complexity, and cost of the measurement system while maintaining the real-time capability and high measurement precision. PMID:28186148

  19. [Frequency dependence of heating of human skin exposed to millimeter waves].

    PubMed

    Alekseev, S I; Ziskin, M S; Fesenko, E E

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we studied experimentally the frequency dependence of heating of human skin exposed to millimeter waves. Theoretical modeling of obtained data was performed using the hybrid bio-heat equation. It was found that the skin heating and SAR increased with increasing the exposure frequency. The frequency dependence of heating was entirely resulted from that of reflection from the skin. Unlike temperature, the frequency dependence of the SAR was due to the increased absorption of millimeter wave energy within the thin surface layer of the skin.

  20. Unmasking frequency-dependent selection in tri-cultures of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Adell, J C; Molina, V; Castro, J A; Mensua, J L

    1989-01-01

    Larval-to-adult viability was measured for three strains of Drosophila melanogaster: a wild strain and two eye colour mutant strains (cardinal and sepia) starting from seventy different genotypic compositions. Analyses of a sub-set of the data (not considering all genotypic frequencies) demonstrate frequency-dependence in the three strains. These results suggest that in this experiment, frequency-dependent selection may be masked by other selective forces, only being apparent when specific analyses are carried out.

  1. Temperature dependence of the Raman-active phonon frequencies in indium sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasanly, N. M.; Özkan, H.; Aydinli, A.; Yilmaz, İ.

    1999-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the Raman-active mode frequencies in indium sulfide was measured in the range from 10 to 300 K. The analysis of the temperature dependence of the A g intralayer optical modes show that Raman frequency shift results from the change of harmonic frequency with volume expansion and anharmonic coupling to phonons of other branches. The pure-temperature contribution (phonon-phonon coupling) is due to three- and four-phonon processes.

  2. Spatial resolution improvement for Lamb wave-based damage detection using frequency dependency compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Liang; Lin, Jing; Bao, Jingjing; Joseph, Roshan Prakash; Huang, Liping

    2017-04-01

    In Lamb wave inspection systems, the transfer functions of the transmitter and receiver, and the attenuation as Lamb wave propagates through the structure, result in frequency dependency in the amplitude of Lamb modes. This frequency dependency in amplitude also influences the testing resolution and complicates the damage evaluation. With the goal of spatial resolution improving, a frequency dependency compensation method is proposed. In this method, an accurate estimation of the frequency-dependent amplitude is firstly obtained, then a refined inverse filter is designed and applied to the raw Lamb mode signals to compensate the frequency dependency. An experimental example is introduced to illustrate the process of the proposed method. Besides, its sensitivity to the propagation distance and Taylor expansion order is thoroughly investigated. Finally, the proposed method is employed for damage detection. Its effectiveness in testing resolution improvement and damage identification could be obviously demonstrated by the imaging result of the damage.

  3. Frequency Dependence of Single-Event Upset in Highly Advanced PowerPC Microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Farokh; Farmanesh, Farhad; White, Mark; Kouba, Coy K.

    2006-01-01

    Single-event upset effects from heavy ions were measured for Motorola silicon-on-insulator (SOI) microprocessor with 90 nm feature sizes at three frequencies of 500, 1066 and 1600 MHz. Frequency dependence of single-event upsets is discussed. The results of our studies suggest the single-event upset in registers and D-Cache tend to increase with frequency. This might have important implications for the overall single-event upset trend as technology moves toward higher frequencies.

  4. Frequency-dependent fine structure in the frequency-following response: The byproduct of multiple generators.

    PubMed

    Tichko, Parker; Skoe, Erika

    2017-01-28

    The frequency-following response (FFR) is an auditory-evoked response recorded at the scalp that captures the spectrotemporal properties of tonal stimuli. Previous investigations report that the amplitude of the FFR fluctuates as a function of stimulus frequency, a phenomenon thought to reflect multiple neural generators phase-locking to the stimulus with different response latencies. When phase-locked responses are offset by different latencies, constructive and destructive phase interferences emerge in the volume-conducted signals, culminating in an attenuation or amplification of the scalp-recorded response in a frequency-specific manner. Borrowing from the literature on the audiogram and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs), we refer to this frequency-specific waxing and waning of the FFR amplitude as fine structure. While prior work on the human FFR was limited by small sets of stimulus frequencies, here, we provide the first systematic investigation of FFR fine structure using a broad stimulus set (90 + frequencies) that spanned the limits of human pitch perception. Consistent with predictions, the magnitude of the FFR response varied systematically as a function of stimulus frequency between 16.35 and 880 Hz. In our dataset, FFR high points (local maxima) emerged at ∼44, 87, 208, and 415 Hz with FFR valleys (local minima) emerging ∼62, 110, 311, and 448 Hz. To investigate whether these amplitude fluctuations are the result of multiple neural generators with distinct latencies, we created a theoretical model of the FFR that included six putative generators. Based on the extant literature on the sources of the FFR, our model adopted latencies characteristic of the cochlear microphonic (0 ms), cochlear nucleus (∼1.25 ms), superior olive (∼3.7 ms), and inferior colliculus (∼5 ms). In addition, we included two longer latency putative generators (∼13 ms, and ∼25 ms) reflective of the characteristic latencies of primary and non-primary auditory

  5. Frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in internet gaming disorder.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao; Jia, Xize; Zang, Yu-Feng; Dong, Guangheng

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have revealed that the task-related functional brain activities are impaired in internet gaming disorder (IGD) subjects. However, little is known about the alternations in spontaneous brain activities about them. Recent studies have proposed that the brain activities of different frequency ranges are generated by different nervous activities and have different physiological and psychological functions. Thus, in this study, we set to explore the spontaneous brain activities in IGD subjects by measuring the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF), to investigate band-specific changes of resting-state fALFF. We subdivided the frequency range into five bands based on literatures. Comparing to healthy controls, the IGD group showed decreased fALFF values in the cerebellum posterior lobe and increased fALFF values in superior temporal gyrus. Significant interactions between frequency bands and groups were found in the cerebellum, the anterior cingulate, the lingual gyrus, the middle temporal gyrus, and the middle frontal gyrus. Those brain regions are proved related to the executive function and decision-making. These results revealed the changed spontaneous brain activity of IGD, which contributed to understanding the underlying pathophysiology of IGD.

  6. A Meteorological Model's Dependence on Radiation Update Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, Joseph L.; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Kumar, Sujay; Tian, Yudong; Lang, Stephen E.; Zeng, Xiping

    2004-01-01

    Numerical weather models are used to simulate circulations in the atmosphere including clouds and precipitation by applying a set of mathematical equations over a three-dimensional grid. The grid is composed of discrete points at which the meteorological variables are defined. As computing power continues to rise these models are being used at finer grid spacing, but they must still cover a wide range of scales. Some of the physics that must be accounted for in the model cannot be explicitly resolved, and their effects, therefore, must be estimated or "parameterized". Some of these parameterizations are computationally expensive. To alleviate the problem, they are not always updated at the time resolution of the model with the assumption being that the impact will be small. In this study, a coupled land-atmosphere model is used to assess the impact of less frequent updates of the computationally expensive radiation physics for a case on June 6, 2002, that occurred during a field experiment over the central plains known as International H20 Project (IHOP). The model was tested using both the original conditions, which were dry, and with modified conditions wherein moisture was added to the lower part of the atmosphere to produce clouds and precipitation (i.e., a wet case). For each of the conditions (i.e., dry and wet), four set of experiments were conducted wherein the model was run for a period of 24 hours and the radiation fields (including both incoming solar and outgoing longwave) were updated every 1, 3, 10, and 100 time steps. Statistical tests indicated that average quantities of surface variables for both the dry and wet cases were the same for the various update frequencies. However, spatially the results could be quite different especially in the wet case after it began to rain. The near-surface wind field was found to be different most of the time even for the dry case. In the wet case, rain intensities and average vertical profiles of heating associated

  7. Strings on a Violin: Location Dependence of Frequency Tuning in Active Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anindita; Rathour, Rahul K.; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2017-01-01

    Strings on a violin are tuned to generate distinct sound frequencies in a manner that is firmly dependent on finger location along the fingerboard. Sound frequencies emerging from different violins could be very different based on their architecture, the nature of strings and their tuning. Analogously, active neuronal dendrites, dendrites endowed with active channel conductances, are tuned to distinct input frequencies in a manner that is dependent on the dendritic location of the synaptic inputs. Further, disparate channel expression profiles and differences in morphological characteristics could result in dendrites on different neurons of the same subtype tuned to distinct frequency ranges. Alternately, similar location-dependence along dendritic structures could be achieved through disparate combinations of channel profiles and morphological characteristics, leading to degeneracy in active dendritic spectral tuning. Akin to strings on a violin being tuned to different frequencies than those on a viola or a cello, different neuronal subtypes exhibit distinct channel profiles and disparate morphological characteristics endowing each neuronal subtype with unique location-dependent frequency selectivity. Finally, similar to the tunability of musical instruments to elicit distinct location-dependent sounds, neuronal frequency selectivity and its location-dependence are tunable through activity-dependent plasticity of ion channels and morphology. In this morceau, we explore the origins of neuronal frequency selectivity, and survey the literature on the mechanisms behind the emergence of location-dependence in distinct forms of frequency tuning. As a coda to this composition, we present some future directions for this exciting convergence of biophysical mechanisms that endow a neuron with frequency multiplexing capabilities. PMID:28348519

  8. Impact of the frequency dependence of tidal Q on the evolution of planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auclair-Desrotour, P.; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Mathis, S.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Tidal dissipation in planets and in stars is one of the key physical mechanisms that drive the evolution of planetary systems. Aims: Tidal dissipation properties are intrinsically linked to the internal structure and the rheology of the studied celestial bodies. The resulting dependence of the dissipation upon the tidal frequency is strongly different in the cases of solids and fluids. Methods: We computed the tidal evolution of a two-body coplanar system, using the tidal-quality factor frequency-dependencies appropriate to rocks and to convective fluids. Results: The ensuing orbital dynamics is smooth or strongly erratic, depending on the way the tidal dissipation depends upon frequency. Conclusions: We demonstrate the strong impact of the internal structure and of the rheology of the central body on the orbital evolution of the tidal perturber. A smooth frequency-dependence of the tidal dissipation causes a smooth orbital evolution, while a peaked dissipation can produce erratic orbital behaviour.

  9. Absolute CF{sub 2} density and gas temperature measurements by absorption spectroscopy in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF{sub 4}/Ar plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wen-Yao; Xu, Yong Peng, Fei; Gong, Fa-Ping; Li, Xiao-Song; Zhu, Ai-Min; Liu, Yong-Xin; Wang, You-Nian

    2014-10-15

    Broadband ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the CF{sub 2} radical density in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF{sub 4}/Ar plasmas, using the CF{sub 2} A{sup ~1}B{sub 1}←X{sup ~1}A{sub 1} system of absorption spectrum. The rotational temperature of ground state CF{sub 2} and excited state CF was also estimated by using A{sup ~1}B{sub 1}←X{sup ~1}A{sub 1} system and B{sup 2}Δ−X{sup 2}Π system, respectively. The translational gas temperature was deduced from the Doppler width of the Ar{sup *}({sup 3}P{sub 2}) and Ar{sup *}({sup 3}P{sub 0}) metastable atoms absorption line by using the tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The rotational temperatures of the excited state CF are about 100 K higher than those of ground state CF{sub 2}, and about 200 K higher than the translational gas temperatures. The dependences of the radical CF{sub 2} density, electron density, electron temperature, rotational temperature, and gas temperature on the high frequency power and pressure have been analyzed. Furthermore, the production and loss mechanisms of CF{sub 2} radical and the gas heating mechanisms have also been discussed.

  10. Absolute CF2 density and gas temperature measurements by absorption spectroscopy in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF4/Ar plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Yao; Xu, Yong; Liu, Yong-Xin; Peng, Fei; Gong, Fa-Ping; Li, Xiao-Song; Zhu, Ai-Min; Wang, You-Nian

    2014-10-01

    Broadband ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the CF2 radical density in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF4/Ar plasmas, using the CF2 A ˜ 1 B 1 ← X ˜ 1 A 1 system of absorption spectrum. The rotational temperature of ground state CF2 and excited state CF was also estimated by using A ˜ 1 B 1 ← X ˜ 1 A 1 system and B 2 Δ - X 2 Π system, respectively. The translational gas temperature was deduced from the Doppler width of the Ar*(3P2) and Ar*(3P0) metastable atoms absorption line by using the tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The rotational temperatures of the excited state CF are about 100 K higher than those of ground state CF2, and about 200 K higher than the translational gas temperatures. The dependences of the radical CF2 density, electron density, electron temperature, rotational temperature, and gas temperature on the high frequency power and pressure have been analyzed. Furthermore, the production and loss mechanisms of CF2 radical and the gas heating mechanisms have also been discussed.

  11. Frequency-dependent quantum capacitance and plasma wave in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Kai-Tak; Guo, Jing

    2014-03-10

    Frequency-dependent quantum capacitance C{sub Q} of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is computed and compared to that of graphene. It is found that the frequency dependence of C{sub Q} in TMDs differs drastically from that of graphene which has a divergent point. The plasma resonance forms when the quantum capacitance is negative and has the same magnitude as the electrostatic capacitance. The calculation shows that the plasma in TMDs depends on the band-structure-limited velocity, band gap, and doping density, which can be controlled via gate biases. The plasma frequencies of TMDs are in the rage of terahertz useful for various applications.

  12. Seismic dynamic monitoring in CO2 flooding based on characterization of frequency-dependent velocity factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun-Hua; Li, Jun; Xiao, Wen; Tan, Ming-You; Zhang, Yun-Ying; Cui, Shi-Ling; Qu, Zhi-Peng

    2016-06-01

    The phase velocity of seismic waves varies with the propagation frequency, and thus frequency-dependent phenomena appear when CO2 gas is injected into a reservoir. By dynamically considering these phenomena with reservoir conditions it is thus feasible to extract the frequency-dependent velocity factor with the aim of monitoring changes in the reservoir both before and after CO2 injection. In the paper, we derive a quantitative expression for the frequency-dependent factor based on the Robinson seismic convolution model. In addition, an inversion equation with a frequency-dependent velocity factor is constructed, and a procedure is implemented using the following four processing steps: decomposition of the spectrum by generalized S transform, wavelet extraction of cross-well seismic traces, spectrum equalization processing, and an extraction method for frequency-dependent velocity factor based on the damped least-square algorithm. An attenuation layered model is then established based on changes in the Q value of the viscoelastic medium, and spectra of migration profiles from forward modeling are obtained and analyzed. Frequency-dependent factors are extracted and compared, and the effectiveness of the method is then verified using a synthetic data. The frequency-dependent velocity factor is finally applied to target processing and oil displacement monitoring based on real seismic data obtained before and after CO2 injection in the G89 well block within Shengli oilfield. Profiles and slices of the frequency-dependent factor determine its ability to indicate differences in CO2 flooding, and the predicting results are highly consistent with those of practical investigations within the well block.

  13. Computationally efficient bioelectric field modeling and effects of frequency-dependent tissue capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracey, Brian; Williams, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Standard bioelectric field models assume that the tissue is purely resistive and frequency independent, and that capacitance, induction, and propagation effects can be neglected. However, real tissue properties are frequency dependent, and tissue capacitance can be important for problems involving short stimulation pulses. A straightforward interpolation scheme is introduced here that can account for frequency-dependent effects, while reducing runtime over a direct computation by several orders of magnitude. The exact Helmholtz solution is compared to several approximate field solutions and is used to study neural stimulation. Results show that frequency-independent tissue capacitance always acts to attenuate the stimulation pulse, thereby increasing firing thresholds, while the dispersion effects introduced by frequency-dependent capacitance may decrease firing thresholds.

  14. An asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme for frequency-dependent radiative transfer equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wenjun; Jiang, Song; Xu, Kun; Li, Shu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an extension of previous work (Sun et al., 2015 [22]) of the unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) for the gray radiative transfer equations to the frequency-dependent (multi-group) radiative transfer system. Different from the gray radiative transfer equations, where the optical opacity is only a function of local material temperature, the simulation of frequency-dependent radiative transfer is associated with additional difficulties from the frequency-dependent opacity. For the multiple frequency radiation, the opacity depends on both the spatial location and the frequency. For example, the opacity is typically a decreasing function of frequency. At the same spatial region the transport physics can be optically thick for the low frequency photons, and optically thin for high frequency ones. Therefore, the optical thickness is not a simple function of space location. In this paper, the UGKS for frequency-dependent radiative system is developed. The UGKS is a finite volume method and the transport physics is modeled according to the ratio of the cell size to the photon's frequency-dependent mean free path. When the cell size is much larger than the photon's mean free path, a diffusion solution for such a frequency radiation will be obtained. On the other hand, when the cell size is much smaller than the photon's mean free path, a free transport mechanism will be recovered. In the regime between the above two limits, with the variation of the ratio between the local cell size and photon's mean free path, the UGKS provides a smooth transition in the physical and frequency space to capture the corresponding transport physics accurately. The seemingly straightforward extension of the UGKS from the gray to multiple frequency radiation system is due to its intrinsic consistent multiple scale transport modeling, but it still involves lots of work to properly discretize the multiple groups in order to design an asymptotic preserving (AP) scheme in all

  15. Coherent states and uncertainty relations for the damped harmonic oscillator with time-dependent frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeon, Kyu-Hwang; Um, Chung-In; George, Thomas F.; Pandey, Lakshmi N.

    1993-01-01

    Starting with evaluations of propagator and wave function for the damped harmonic oscillator with time-dependent frequency, exact coherent states are constructed. These coherent states satisfy the properties which coherent states should generally have.

  16. Frequency-dependent selection for rare genotypes promotes genetic diversity of a tropical palm.

    PubMed

    Browne, Luke; Karubian, Jordan

    2016-12-01

    Negative frequency-dependent selection among species is a key driver of community diversity in natural systems, but the degree to which negative frequency-dependent selection shapes patterns of survival and genetic diversity within species is poorly understood. In a 5-year field experiment, we show that seedlings of a tropical palm with rare genotypes had a pronounced survival advantage over seedlings with common genotypes, with effect sizes comparable to that of light availability. This 'rare genotype advantage' led to an increase in population-wide genetic diversity among seedlings compared to null expectations, as predicted by negative frequency-dependent selection, and increased reproductive success in adult trees with rare genotypes. These results suggest that within-species negative frequency-dependent selection of genotypes can shape genetic variation on ecologically relevant timescales in natural systems and may be a key, overlooked source of non-random mortality for tropical plants.

  17. Combined nonmetallic electronegativity equalisation and point-dipole interaction model for the frequency-dependent polarisability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalø, Hans S.; Åstrand, Per-Olof; Mayer, Alexandre

    2013-07-01

    A molecular mechanics model for the frequency-dependent polarisability is presented. It is a combination of a recent model for the frequency dependence in a charge-dipole model [Nanotechnology 19, 025203, 2008] and a nonmetallic modification of the electronegativity equalisation model rephrased as atom-atom charge-transfer terms [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 044101, 2009]. An accurate model for the frequency-dependent polarisability requires a more accurate partitioning into charge and dipole contributions than the static polarisability, which has resulted in several modifications of the charge-transfer model. Results are presented for hydrocarbons, including among others, alkanes, polyenes and aromatic systems. Although their responses to an electric field are quite different in terms of the importance of charge-transfer contributions, it is demonstrated that their frequency-dependent polarisabilities can be described with the same model and the same set of atom-type parameters.

  18. Dependence of the brillouin frequency shift on strain and temperature in a photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lufan; Bao, Xiaoyi; Afshar V, Shahraam; Chen, Liang

    2004-07-01

    The dependence of the Brillouin frequency shift on strain in a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) was measured at a wavelength of 1320 nm for the first time to the authors' knowledge. Together with measurements of the dependence of the Brillouin frequency shift on temperature in the PCF, we demonstrate the feasibility of the highly precise simultaneous measurement of temperature and strain by use of the PCF in a distributed Brillouin sensing system with a spatial resolution of 15 cm.

  19. Frequency-dependent moment release of very low frequency earthquakes in the Cascadia subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeo, A.; Houston, H.

    2014-12-01

    Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) has been observed in Cascadia subduction zone at two different time scales: tremor at a high-frequency range of 2-8 Hz and slow slip events at a geodetic time-scale of days-months. The intermediate time scale is needed to understand the source spectrum of slow earthquakes. Ghosh et al. (2014, IRIS abs) recently reported the presence of very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) in Cascadia. In southwest Japan, VLFEs are usually observed at a period range around 20-50 s, and coincide with tremors (e.g., Ito et al. 2007). In this study, we analyzed VLFEs in and around the Olympic Peninsula to confirm their presence and estimate their moment release. We first detected VLFE events by using broadband seismograms with a band-pass filter of 20-50 s. The preliminary result shows that there are at least 16 VLFE events with moment magnitudes of 3.2-3.7 during the M6.8 2010 ETS. The focal mechanisms are consistent with the thrust earthquakes at the subducting plate interface. To detect signals of VLFEs below noise level, we further stacked long-period waveforms at the peak timings of tremor amplitudes for tremors within a 10-15 km radius by using tremor catalogs in 2006-2010, and estimated the focal mechanisms for each tremor source region as done in southwest Japan (Takeo et al. 2010 GRL). As a result, VLFEs could be detected for almost the entire tremor source region at a period range of 20-50 s with average moment magnitudes in each 5-min tremor window of 2.4-2.8. Although the region is limited, we could also detect VLFEs at a period range of 50-100 s with average moment magnitudes of 3.0-3.2. The moment release at 50-100 s is 4-8 times larger than that at 20-50 s, roughly consistent with an omega-squared spectral model. Further study including tremor, slow slip events and characteristic activities, such as rapid tremor reversal and tremor streaks, will reveal the source spectrum of slow earthquakes in a broader time scale from 0.1 s to days.

  20. Modeling and experimental verification of frequency-, amplitude-, and magneto-dependent viscoelasticity of magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Fu-Long; Bai, Xian-Xu; Qian, Li-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers (MREs), a smart composite, exhibit dual characteristics of both MR materials and particle reinforced composites, i.e., the viscoelasticity of MREs depends on external magnetic field as well as strain amplitude and excitation frequency. In this article, the principle of a frequency-, amplitude-, and magneto-dependent linear dynamic viscoelastic model for isotropic MREs is proposed and investigated. The viscoelasticity of MREs is divided into frequency- and amplitude-dependent mechanical viscoelasticity and frequency-, amplitude-, and magneto-dependent magnetic viscoelasticity. Based on the microstructures of ferrous particles and matrix, the relationships between mechanical shear modulus corresponding to the mechanical viscoelasticity and strain amplitude and excitation frequency are obtained. The relationships between magnetic shear modulus corresponding to the magnetic viscoelasticity with strain amplitude, excitation frequency, and further external magnetic field are derived using the magneto-elastic theory. The influence of magnetic saturation on the MR effect is also considered. The dynamic characteristics of a fabricated isotropic MRE sample under different strain amplitudes, excitation frequencies and external magnetic fields are tested. The parameters of the proposed model are identified with the experimental data and the theoretical expressions of shear storage modulus and shear loss modulus of the MRE sample are obtained. In the light of the theoretical expressions, the loss factors of the MRE sample under different loading conditions are analyzed and compared with the test results to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  1. Negative frequency-dependent preferences and variation in male facial hair.

    PubMed

    Janif, Zinnia J; Brooks, Robert C; Dixson, Barnaby J

    2014-01-01

    Negative frequency-dependent sexual selection maintains striking polymorphisms in secondary sexual traits in several animal species. Here, we test whether frequency of beardedness modulates perceived attractiveness of men's facial hair, a secondary sexual trait subject to considerable cultural variation. We first showed participants a suite of faces, within which we manipulated the frequency of beard thicknesses and then measured preferences for four standard levels of beardedness. Women and men judged heavy stubble and full beards more attractive when presented in treatments where beards were rare than when they were common, with intermediate preferences when intermediate frequencies of beardedness were presented. Likewise, clean-shaven faces were least attractive when clean-shaven faces were most common and more attractive when rare. This pattern in preferences is consistent with negative frequency-dependent selection.

  2. Frequency-Dependent Spherical-Wave Reflection in Acoustic Media: Analysis and Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingnan; Wang, Shangxu; Wang, Jingbo; Dong, Chunhui; Yuan, Sanyi

    2017-02-01

    Spherical-wave reflectivity (SWR), which describes the seismic wave reflection in real subsurface media more accurately than plane-wave reflectivity (PWR), recently, again attracts geophysicists' attention. The recent studies mainly focus on the amplitude variation with offset/angle (AVO/AVA) attributes of SWR. For a full understanding of the reflection mechanism of spherical wave, this paper systematically investigates the frequency-dependent characteristics of SWR in a two-layer acoustic medium model with a planar interface. Two methods are used to obtain SWR. The first method is through the calculation of classical Sommerfeld integral. The other is by 3D wave equation numerical modeling. To enhance computation efficiency, we propose to perform wave equation simulation in cylindrical coordinates, wherein we for the first time implement unsplit convolutional perfectly matched layer as the absorbing boundary. Both methods yield the same results, which demonstrate the validity and accuracy of the computation. From both the numerical tests and the theoretical demonstration, we find that the necessary condition when frequency dependence of SWR occurs is that the upper and lower media have different velocities. At the precritical small angle, the SWR exhibits complicated frequency-dependent characteristics for varying medium parameters. Especially when the impedance of upper medium equals that of lower one, the PWR is zero according to geometric seismics. Whereas the SWR is nonzero: the magnitude of SWR decreases with growing frequency, and approaches that of the corresponding PWR at high frequency; the phase of SWR increases with growing frequency, but approaches 90° or -90° at high frequency. At near- and post-critical angles, large difference exists between SWR and PWR, and the difference is particularly great at low frequencies. Finally, we propose a nonlinear inversion method to estimate physical parameters and interface depth of media by utilizing the frequency-dependent

  3. Temperature dependence of vibrational frequency fluctuation of N3- in D2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayama, Jumpei; Ishihara, Akane; Banno, Motohiro; Ohta, Kaoru; Saito, Shinji; Tominaga, Keisuke

    2010-07-01

    We have studied the temperature dependence of the vibrational frequency fluctuation of the antisymmetric stretching mode of N3- in D2O by three-pulse infrared (IR) photon echo experiments. IR pump-probe measurements were also carried out to investigate the population relaxation and the orientational relaxation of the same band. It was found that the time-correlation function (TCF) of the frequency fluctuation of this mode is well described by a biexponential function with a quasistatic term. The faster decay component has a time constant of about 0.1 ps, and the slower component varies from 1.4 to 1.1 ps in the temperature range from 283 to 353 K. This result indicates that liquid dynamics related to the frequency fluctuation are not highly sensitive to temperature. We discuss the relationship between the temperature dependence of the vibrational frequency fluctuation and that of the molecular motion of the system to investigate the molecular origin of the frequency fluctuation of the solute. We compare the temperature dependence of the frequency fluctuation with that of other dynamics such as dielectric relaxation of water. In contrast to the Debye dielectric relaxation time of D2O, the two time constants of the TCF of the frequency fluctuation do not exhibit strong temperature dependence. We propose a simple theoretical model for the frequency fluctuation in solutions based on perturbation theory and the dipole-dipole interaction between the vibrational mode of the solute and the solvent molecules. This model suggests that the neighboring solvent molecules in the vicinity of the solute play an important role in the frequency fluctuation. We suggest that the picosecond component of the frequency fluctuation results from structural fluctuation of the hydrogen-bonding network in water.

  4. Intensity and frequency dependence of laryngeal afferent inputs to respiratory hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, S W

    1997-12-01

    Inspiratory hypoglossal motoneurons (IHMs) mediate contraction of the genioglossus muscle and contribute to the regulation of upper airway patency. Intracellular recordings were obtained from antidromically identified IHMs in anesthetized, vagotomized cats, and IHM responses to electrical activation of superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) afferent fibers at various frequencies and intensities were examined. SLN stimulus frequencies <2 Hz evoked an excitatory-inhibitory postsynaptic potential (EPSP-IPSP) sequence or only an IPSP in most IHMs that did not change in amplitude as the stimulus was maintained. During sustained stimulus frequencies of 5-10 Hz, there was a reduction in the amplitude of SLN-evoked IPSPs with time with variable changes in the EPSP. At stimulus frequencies >25 Hz, the amplitude of EPSPs and IPSPs was reduced over time. At a given stimulus frequency, increasing stimulus intensity enhanced the decay of the SLN-evoked postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). Frequency-dependent attenuation of SLN inputs to IHMs also occurred in newborn kittens. These results suggest that activation of SLN afferents evokes different PSP responses in IHMs depending on the stimulus frequency. At intermediate frequencies, inhibitory inputs are selectively filtered so that excitatory inputs predominate. At higher frequencies there was no discernible SLN-evoked PSP temporally locked to the SLN stimuli. Alterations in SLN-evoked PSPs could play a role in the coordination of genioglossal contraction during respiration, swallowing, and other complex motor acts where laryngeal afferents are activated.

  5. Frequency-dependent selection on female morphs driven by premating interactions with males.

    PubMed

    Bots, Jessica; Iserbyt, Arne; Van Gossum, Hans; Hammers, Martijn; Sherratt, Thomas N

    2015-07-01

    Species showing color polymorphisms-the presence of two or more genetically determined color morphs within a single population-are excellent systems for studying the selective forces driving the maintenance of genetic diversity. Despite a shortage of empirical evidence, it is often suggested that negative frequency-dependent mate preference by males (or diet choice by predators) results in fitness benefits for the rare female morph (or prey type). Moreover, most studies have focused on the male (or predator) behavior in these systems and largely overlooked the importance of female (or prey) resistance behavior. Here, we provide the first explicit test of the role of frequency-dependent and frequency-independent intersexual interactions in female polymorphic damselflies. We identify the stage of the mating sequence when frequency-dependent selection is likely to act by comparing indexes of male mate preference when the female has little (females presented on sticks), moderate (females in cages), and high (females free to fly in the field) ability to avoid male mating attempts. Frequency-dependent male preferences were found only in those experiments where females had little ability to resist male harassment, indicating that premating interactions most likely drive negative frequency-dependent selection in this system. In addition, by separating frequency-dependent male mating preference from the baseline frequency-independent component, we reconcile the seemingly contradictory results of previous studies and highlight the roles of both forms of selection in maintaining the polymorphism at a given equilibrium. We conclude that considering interactions among all players-here, males and females-is crucial to fully understanding the mechanisms underlying the maintenance of genetic polymorphisms in the wild.

  6. Differential effects of K(+) channel blockers on frequency-dependent action potential broadening in supraoptic neurons.

    PubMed

    Hlubek, M D; Cobbett, P

    2000-09-15

    Recordings were made from magnocellular neuroendocrine cells dissociated from the supraoptic nucleus of the adult guinea pig to determine the role of voltage gated K(+) channels in controlling the duration of action potentials and in mediating frequency-dependent action potential broadening exhibited by these neurons. The K(+) channel blockers charybdotoxin (ChTx), tetraethylammonium (TEA), and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) increased the duration of individual action potentials indicating that multiple types of K(+) channel are important in controlling action potential duration. The effect of these K(+) channel blockers was almost completely reversed by simultaneous blockade of voltage gated Ca(2+) channels with Cd(2+). Frequency-dependent action potential broadening was exhibited by these neurons during trains of action potentials elicited by membrane depolarizing current pulses presented at 10 Hz but not at 1 Hz. 4-AP but not ChTx or TEA inhibited frequency-dependent action potential broadening indicating that frequency-dependent action potential broadening is dependent on increasing steady-state inactivation of A-type K(+) channels (which are blocked by 4-AP). A model of differential contributions of voltage gated K(+) channels and voltage gated Ca(2+) channels to frequency-dependent action potential broadening, in which an increase of Ca(2+) current during each successive action potential is permitted as a result of the increasing steady-state inactivation of A-type K(+) channels, is presented.

  7. The analysis of frequency-dependent characteristics for fluid detection: a physical model experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuang-Quan; Li, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Shang-Xu

    2012-06-01

    According to the Chapman multi-scale rock physical model, the seismic response characteristics vary for different fluid-saturated reservoirs. For class I AVO reservoirs and gas-saturation, the seismic response is a high-frequency bright spot as the amplitude energy shifts. However, it is a low-frequency shadow for the Class III AVO reservoirs saturated with hydrocarbons. In this paper, we verified the high-frequency bright spot results of Chapman for the Class I AVO response using the frequency-dependent analysis of a physical model dataset. The physical model is designed as inter-bedded thin sand and shale based on real field geology parameters. We observed two datasets using fixed offset and 2D geometry with different fluidsaturated conditions. Spectral and time-frequency analyses methods are applied to the seismic datasets to describe the response characteristics for gas-, water-, and oil-saturation. The results of physical model dataset processing and analysis indicate that reflection wave tuning and fluid-related dispersion are the main seismic response characteristic mechanisms. Additionally, the gas saturation model can be distinguished from water and oil saturation for Class I AVO utilizing the frequency-dependent abnormal characteristic. The frequency-dependent characteristic analysis of the physical model dataset verified the different spectral response characteristics corresponding to the different fluid-saturated models. Therefore, by careful analysis of real field seismic data, we can obtain the abnormal spectral characteristics induced by the fluid variation and implement fluid detection using seismic data directly.

  8. Dependence of low-frequency sonophoresis on ultrasound parameters; distance of the horn and intensity.

    PubMed

    Terahara, T; Mitragotri, S; Kost, J; Langer, R

    2002-03-20

    Sonophoresis at a frequency of 20 kHz has been shown to enhance transdermal drug delivery, a phenomenon referred to as low-frequency sonophoresis. This study provides an investigation of the dependence of low-frequency sonophoresis on various ultrasound parameters, including the distance of the horn from the skin, intensity, and frequency. We performed in vitro experiments with full thickness pig skin to measure enhancements of skin conductivity and drug permeability. Ultrasound was applied to pretreat the skin using a sonicator operating at a frequency of either 20 or 40 kHz. We also measured pitting of aluminum foil to measure cavitation, which is the principal mechanism of low-frequency sonophoresis. The skin conductivity enhancement was found to be inversely proportional to the distance of the horn from the skin. As the intensity increased, skin conductivity enhancement also increased up to a certain threshold, and then dropped off. The intensities (I(max)) at which maximum enhancement occur are about 14 W/cm2 for 20 kHz and 17 W/cm2 for 40 kHz. These findings may be useful in optimizing low-frequency sonophoresis. Overall, the dependence of transport on ultrasound parameters is similar to that of aluminum foil pitting. These results support the role of cavitation in low-frequency sonophoresis.

  9. Effect of diffusion and surface recombination on the frequency-dependent characteristics of an OPFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vinaya K.

    1993-02-01

    Analytical studies have been made on the effect of diffusion and surface recombination on the frequency dependent characteristics of an ion-implanted GaAs optical field effect transistor. Modulated optical generation and voltage dependent depletion layer width in the active region have been considered whereas photovoltaic effect is ignored in this analysis. Result shows that drain-source current decreases with the increases of modulated signal frequency but diffusion effect increases the modulating frequency range from c.m. to m.m. wavelength. Moreover, I- V changes significantly with the trap center density only when Nr >= 1023/m2 with diffusion effect and >= 1020/m2 without diffusion effect at a particular dimension of the device. This model may be very much useful to measure the sensitivity of the device in terms of trap center density and modulating frequency.

  10. Frequency, pressure and strain dependence of nonlinear elasticity in Berea Sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Riviere, Jacques; Johnson, Paul Allan; Marone, Chris; Pimienta, Lucas; Scuderi, Marco; Candela, Thibault; Shokouhi, Parisa; Schubnel, Alexandre; Fortin, Jerome

    2016-04-14

    Acoustoelasticity measurements in a sample of room dry Berea sandstone are conducted at various loading frequencies to explore the transition between the quasi-static ( f → 0) and dynamic (few kilohertz) nonlinear elastic response. We carry out these measurements at multiple confining pressures and perform a multivariate regression analysis to quantify the dependence of the harmonic content on strain amplitude, frequency, and pressure. The modulus softening (equivalent to the harmonic at 0f) increases by a factor 2–3 over 3 orders of magnitude increase in frequency. Harmonics at 2f, 4f, and 6f exhibit similar behaviors. In contrast, the harmonic at 1f appears frequency independent. This result corroborates previous studies showing that the nonlinear elasticity of rocks can be described with a minimum of two physical mechanisms. This study provides quantitative data that describes the rate dependency of nonlinear elasticity. Furthermore, these findings can be used to improve theories relating the macroscopic elastic response to microstructural features.

  11. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Faqi; Zeng, Deping; He, Min; Wang, Zhibiao E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn; Song, Dan; Lei, Guangrong; Lin, Zhou; Zhang, Dong E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn; Wu, Junru

    2015-12-15

    Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102). This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results.

  12. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  13. Single-mode waveguide optical isolator based on direction-dependent cutoff frequency.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lingling; Drezdzon, Samuel M; Yoshie, Tomoyuki

    2008-09-29

    A single-mode-waveguide optical isolator based on propagation direction dependent cut-off frequency is proposed. The isolation bandwidth is the difference between the cut-off frequencies of the lowest forward and backward propagating modes. Perturbation theory is used for analyzing the correlation between the material distribution and the bandwidth. The mode profile determines an appropriate distribution of non-reciprocal materials.

  14. Frequency-Dependent Characteristics of Regional Seismic Phases: Propagation of Pn in Western China

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-31

    is a zone around the critical distance that larger amplitudes can be observed. Th e size of th is zone depends on the frequency content of the...source and lower frequencies will cause a larger sized zone (Braile and Smith, 1975). In figure B.3 and B.4, wide-angle reflections can easily be...Hi-CLIMB array. Introduction The Himalayan-Tibetan orogeny is the largest active continent-continent collision zone in the world (Yin and

  15. Accurate determination of frequency dependent three element equivalent circuit for symmetric step microstrip discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, M. J.; Easter, B.; Hornsby, J. S.

    1990-02-01

    A three element frequency dependent equivalent circuit which characterizes a symmetric step microstrip discontinuity is determined using the method of lines. This method was applied so as to exploit to the full the processing capabilities of the available Cyber 205 computer, and to obtain results with the highest possible accuracy at frequencies in the range 4-16 GHz. Numerical values of scattering parameters are given for three geometries.

  16. Stimulus-dependent modulation of spontaneous low-frequency oscillations in the rat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liangming; Liu, Yadong; Gui, Jianjun; Li, Ming; Hu, Dewen

    2014-06-09

    Research on spontaneous low-frequency oscillations is important to reveal underlying regulatory mechanisms in the brain. The mechanism for the stimulus modulation of low-frequency oscillations is not known. Here, we used the intrinsic optical imaging technique to examine stimulus-modulated low-frequency oscillation signals in the rat visual cortex. The stimulation was presented monocularly as a flashing light with different frequencies and intensities. The phases of low-frequency oscillations in different regions tended to be synchronized and the rhythms typically accelerated within a 30-s period after stimulation. These phenomena were confined to visual stimuli with specific flashing frequencies (12.5-17.5 Hz) and intensities (5-10 mA). The acceleration and synchronization induced by the flashing frequency were more marked than those induced by the intensity. These results show that spontaneous low-frequency oscillations can be modulated by parameter-dependent flashing lights and indicate the potential utility of the visual stimulus paradigm in exploring the origin and function of low-frequency oscillations.

  17. Analytical calculations of frequency-dependent hypermagnetizabilities and Cotton-Mouton constants using London atomic orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorvaldsen, Andreas J.; Ruud, Kenneth; Rizzo, Antonio; Coriani, Sonia

    2008-10-01

    We present the first gauge-origin-independent, frequency-dependent calculations of the hypermagnetizability anisotropy, which determines the temperature-independent contribution to magnetic-field-induced linear birefringence, the so-called Cotton-Mouton effect. A density-matrix-based scheme for analytical calculations of frequency-dependent molecular properties for self-consistent field models has recently been developed, which is also valid with frequency- and field-dependent basis sets. Applying this scheme to Hartree-Fock wave functions and using London atomic orbitals in order to obtain gauge-origin-independent results, we have calculated the hypermagnetizability anisotropy. Our results show that the use of London orbitals leads to somewhat better basis-set convergence for the hypermagnetizability compared to conventional basis sets and that London orbitals are mandatory in order to obtain reliable magnetizability anisotropies.

  18. Frequency dependence of electron spin-lattice relaxation for semiquinones in alcohol solutions.

    PubMed

    Elajaili, Hanan B; Biller, Joshua R; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2014-10-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation rates at 293 K for three anionic semiquinones (2,5-di-t-butyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, 2,6-di-t-butyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, and 2,3,5,6-tetramethoxy-1,4-benzosemiquinone) were studied at up to 8 frequencies between 250 MHz and 34 GHz in ethanol or methanol solution containing high concentrations of OH(-). The relaxation rates are about a factor of 2 faster at lower frequencies than at 9 or 34 GHz. However, in perdeuterated alcohols the relaxation rates exhibit little frequency dependence, which demonstrates that the dominant frequency-dependent contribution to relaxation is modulation of dipolar interactions with solvent nuclei. The relaxation rates were modeled as the sum of two frequency-independent contributions (spin rotation and a local mode) and two frequency-dependent contributions (modulation of dipolar interaction with solvent nuclei and a much smaller contribution from modulation of g anisotropy). The correlation time for modulation of the interaction with solvent nuclei is longer than the tumbling correlation time of the semiquinone and is consistent with hydrogen bonding of the alcohol to the oxygen atoms of the semiquinones.

  19. Frequency-Dependent Amplitude Versus Offset Variations in Porous Rocks with Aligned Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaohui; Cao, Siyuan; Guo, Quanshi; Kang, Yonggan; Yu, Pengfei; Hu, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The theory of frequency-dependent amplitude versus offset (AVO) was developed for patchy-saturated model. In this work, we consider this theory in the case of an anisotropic medium based on a fractured-sandstone model. Thus, building on viscoelastic theory, we introduce a method for the computation of frequency-dependent AVO that is suitable for use in the case of an anisotropic medium. We use both analytical methods and numerical simulations to study P-P and P-S reflection coefficients, and results suggest that dispersion and anisotropy should not be neglected in AVO analysis. Indeed, for class I AVO reservoirs, the reflection magnitude of P-wave increases with frequency, while the responses of class II AVO reservoirs suggest that phase reversal occurs as frequency increases positively. In the case of class III AVO reservoirs, reflection magnitude decreases as frequency increases positively, while in the offset domain, the presence of anisotropy can distort or even reverse AVO responses. Thus, when compared to reflection coefficients for P-wave, reflection magnitude features of S-wave are more complex. The frequency-dependent AVO responses reported in this study provide insights for the interpretation of seismic anomalies in vertical transverse isotropy (VTI) dispersive reservoirs.

  20. Frequency-Dependent Amplitude Versus Offset Variations in Porous Rocks with Aligned Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaohui; Cao, Siyuan; Guo, Quanshi; Kang, Yonggan; Yu, Pengfei; Hu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    The theory of frequency-dependent amplitude versus offset (AVO) was developed for patchy-saturated model. In this work, we consider this theory in the case of an anisotropic medium based on a fractured-sandstone model. Thus, building on viscoelastic theory, we introduce a method for the computation of frequency-dependent AVO that is suitable for use in the case of an anisotropic medium. We use both analytical methods and numerical simulations to study P-P and P-S reflection coefficients, and results suggest that dispersion and anisotropy should not be neglected in AVO analysis. Indeed, for class I AVO reservoirs, the reflection magnitude of P-wave increases with frequency, while the responses of class II AVO reservoirs suggest that phase reversal occurs as frequency increases positively. In the case of class III AVO reservoirs, reflection magnitude decreases as frequency increases positively, while in the offset domain, the presence of anisotropy can distort or even reverse AVO responses. Thus, when compared to reflection coefficients for P-wave, reflection magnitude features of S-wave are more complex. The frequency-dependent AVO responses reported in this study provide insights for the interpretation of seismic anomalies in vertical transverse isotropy (VTI) dispersive reservoirs.

  1. Resolution and Dynamical Core Dependence of Atmospheric River Frequency in Global Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Qing; Zhao, Chun; Lu, Jian

    2015-04-01

    This study examines the sensitivity of atmospheric river (AR) frequency simulated by a global model with different grid resolutions and dynamical cores. Analysis is performed on aquaplanet simulations using version 4 of Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) at 240, 120, 60 and 30 km model resolutions each with the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) and High-Order Methods Modeling Environment (HOMME) dynamical cores. The frequency of AR events decreases with model resolution and the HOMME dynamical core produces more AR events than MPAS. Comparing the frequencies determined using absolute and percentile thresholds of large-scale conditions used to define an AR, model sensitivity is found to be related to the overall sensitivity of sub-tropical westerlies, atmospheric precipitable water content and profile and to a lesser extent on extra-tropical Rossby wave activity to model resolution and dynamical core. Real world simulations using MPAS at 120 km and 30 km grid resolutions also exhibit a decrease of AR frequency with increasing resolution over southern East Pacific, but there difference is smaller over northern East Pacific. This inter-hemispheric difference is related to the enhancement of convection in over the tropics with increased resolution. This anomalous convection sets off Rossby wave patterns that weaken the subtropical westerlies over southern East Pacific but have relatively little effect on those over northern East Pacific. In comparison to NCEP2 reanalysis, MPAS real world simulations are found to underestimate AR frequencies at both resolutions likely because of their climatologically drier sub-tropics and poleward shifted jets. This study highlights the important links between model climatology of large-scale conditions and extremes.

  2. Frequency Dependence of Single-event Upset in Advanced Commerical PowerPC Microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Frokh; Farmanesh, Farhad F.; Swift, Gary M.; Johnston, Allen H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines single-event upsets in advanced commercial SOI microprocessors in a dynamic mode, studying SEU sensitivity of General Purpose Registers (GPRs) with clock frequency. Results are presented for SOI processors with feature sizes of 0.18 microns and two different core voltages. Single-event upset from heavy ions is measured for advanced commercial microprocessors in a dynamic mode with clock frequency up to 1GHz. Frequency and core voltage dependence of single-event upsets in registers is discussed.

  3. Colour polymorphism torn apart by opposing positive frequency-dependent selection, yet maintained in space.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Swanne P; Kokko, Hanna; Rojas, Bibiana; Nokelainen, Ossi; Mappes, Johanna

    2015-11-01

    Polymorphic warning signals in aposematic species are enigmatic because predator learning and discrimination should select for the most common coloration, resulting in positive frequency-dependent survival selection. Here, we investigated whether differential mating success could create sufficiently strong negative frequency-dependent selection for rare morphs to explain polymorphic (white and yellow) warning coloration in male wood tiger moths (Parasemia plantaginis). We conducted an experiment in semi-natural conditions where we estimated mating success for both white and yellow male moths under three different morph frequencies. Contrary to expectations, mating success was positively frequency-dependent: white morph males had high relative fitness when common, likewise yellow morph males had high relative fitness when instead they were common. We hence built a model parameterized with our data to examine whether polymorphism can be maintained despite two sources of positive frequency dependence. The model includes known spatial variation in the survival advantage enjoyed by the yellow morph and assumes that relative mating success follows our experimentally derived values. It predicts that polymorphism is possible under migration for up to approximately 20% exchange of individuals between subpopulations in each generation. Our results suggest that differential mating success combined with spatial variation in predator communities may operate as a selection mosaic that prevents complete fixation of either morph.

  4. Dynamical gap generation in graphene with frequency-dependent renormalization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrington, M. E.; Fischer, C. S.; von Smekal, L.; Thoma, M. H.

    2016-09-01

    We study the frequency dependencies in the renormalization of the fermion Green's function for the π -band electrons in graphene and their influence on the dynamical gap generation at sufficiently strong interaction. Adopting the effective QED-like description for the low-energy excitations within the Dirac-cone region, we self-consistently solve the fermion Dyson-Schwinger equation in various approximations for the photon propagator and the vertex function with special emphasis on frequency-dependent Lindhard screening and retardation effects.

  5. An angular frequency dependence on the Aharonov–Casher geometric phase

    SciTech Connect

    Barboza, P.M.T.; Bakke, K.

    2015-10-15

    A quantum effect characterized by a dependence of the angular frequency associated with the confinement of a neutral particle to a quantum ring on the quantum numbers of the system and the Aharonov–Casher geometric phase is discussed. Then, it is shown that persistent spin currents can arise in a two-dimensional quantum ring in the presence of a Coulomb-type potential. A particular contribution to the persistent spin currents arises from the dependence of the angular frequency on the geometric quantum phase.

  6. Frequency dependent magneto-transport in charge transfer Co(II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Bikash Kumar; Saha, Shyamal K.

    2014-09-01

    A charge transfer chelated system containing ferromagnetic metal centers is the ideal system to investigate the magneto-transport and magneto-dielectric effects due to the presence of both electronic as well as magnetic properties and their coupling. Magneto-transport properties in materials are usually studied through dc charge transport under magnetic field. As frequency dependent conductivity is an essential tool to understand the nature of carrier wave, its spatial extension and their mutual interaction, in the present work, we have investigated frequency dependent magneto-transport along with magnetization behavior in [Co2(II)-(5-(4-PhMe)-1,3,4-oxadiazole-H+-2-thiolate)5](OAc)4 metal complex to elucidate the nature of above quantities and their response under magnetic field in the transport property. We have used the existing model for ac conduction incorporating the field dependence to explain the frequency dependent magneto-transport. It is seen that the frequency dependent magneto-transport could be well explained using the existing model for ac conduction.

  7. Self-consistent modeling of terahertz waveguide and cavity with frequency-dependent conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. J.; Chu, K. R.; Thumm, M.

    2015-01-01

    The surface resistance of metals, and hence the Ohmic dissipation per unit area, scales with the square root of the frequency of an incident electromagnetic wave. As is well recognized, this can lead to excessive wall losses at terahertz (THz) frequencies. On the other hand, high-frequency oscillatory motion of conduction electrons tends to mitigate the collisional damping. As a result, the classical theory predicts that metals behave more like a transparent medium at frequencies above the ultraviolet. Such a behavior difference is inherent in the AC conductivity, a frequency-dependent complex quantity commonly used to treat electromagnetics of metals at optical frequencies. The THz region falls in the gap between microwave and optical frequencies. However, metals are still commonly modeled by the DC conductivity in currently active vacuum electronics research aimed at the development of high-power THz sources (notably the gyrotron), although a small reduction of the DC conductivity due to surface roughness is sometimes included. In this study, we present a self-consistent modeling of the gyrotron interaction structures (a metallic waveguide or cavity) with the AC conductivity. The resulting waveguide attenuation constants and cavity quality factors are compared with those of the DC-conductivity model. The reduction in Ohmic losses under the AC-conductivity model is shown to be increasingly significant as the frequency reaches deeper into the THz region. Such effects are of considerable importance to THz gyrotrons for which the minimization of Ohmic losses constitutes a major design consideration.

  8. Dependence of the colored frequency noise in spin torque oscillators on current and magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Eklund, Anders Sani, Sohrab R.; Chung, Sunjae; Amir Hossein Banuazizi, S.; Östling, Mikael; Gunnar Malm, B.; Bonetti, Stefano; Majid Mohseni, S.; Persson, Johan; Iacocca, Ezio; Åkerman, Johan

    2014-03-03

    The nano-scale spin torque oscillator (STO) is a compelling device for on-chip, highly tunable microwave frequency signal generation. Currently, one of the most important challenges for the STO is to increase its longer-time frequency stability by decreasing the 1/f frequency noise, but its high level makes even its measurement impossible using the phase noise mode of spectrum analyzers. Here, we present a custom made time-domain measurement system with 150 MHz measurement bandwidth making possible the investigation of the variation of the 1/f as well as the white frequency noise in a STO over a large set of operating points covering 18–25 GHz. The 1/f level is found to be highly dependent on the oscillation amplitude-frequency non-linearity and the vicinity of unexcited oscillation modes. These findings elucidate the need for a quantitative theoretical treatment of the low-frequency, colored frequency noise in STOs. Based on the results, we suggest that the 1/f frequency noise possibly can be decreased by improving the microstructural quality of the metallic thin films.

  9. Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) detection in concrete from frequency dependent ultrasonic attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Peng; Patton, Mark E.; Greve, David W.; Harley, Joel B.; Liu, Chang; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2014-02-01

    The alkali-silica reaction (ASR) occurs between the reactive aggregates and the alkaline cement paste in concrete, eventually producing damage such as swelling and cracking. This research uses mechanical tests and ultrasonic tests to detect ASR onset in concrete specimens. The test specimens are fabricated in pairs, one specimen typically subjected to an accelerated ASR environment (immersion in 1 N NaOH solution at 80°C) and the second specimen comparable but not exposed to the accelerated ASR environment. In mechanical tests, the transverse and longitudinal resonant frequencies are measured. Results show that ASR damage would lower the resonant frequencies. In the ultrasonic test, broadband excitations are used and pitch-catch records are obtained. The presence of ASR damage in concrete is shown to cause frequency dependent ultrasonic attenuation. Signals from ASR damaged specimens show strong attenuation at high frequencies and weak attenuation at low frequencies. In contrast, signals frompaired non-ASR specimens show comparable energy over the entire range of measured frequencies. The cumulative distribution function of frequency components (CDF) is used to characterize the ultrasonic passband changes caused by ASR damage and detect the existence of ASR damage in frequency domain.

  10. Phase-Shifted Based Numerical Method for Modeling Frequency-Dependent Effects on Seismic Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuehua; Qi, Yingkai; He, Xilei; He, Zhenhua; Chen, Hui

    2016-08-01

    The significant velocity dispersion and attenuation has often been observed when seismic waves propagate in fluid-saturated porous rocks. Both the magnitude and variation features of the velocity dispersion and attenuation are frequency-dependent and related closely to the physical properties of the fluid-saturated porous rocks. To explore the effects of frequency-dependent dispersion and attenuation on the seismic responses, in this work, we present a numerical method for seismic data modeling based on the diffusive and viscous wave equation (DVWE), which introduces the poroelastic theory and takes into account diffusive and viscous attenuation in diffusive-viscous-theory. We derive a phase-shift wave extrapolation algorithm in frequencywavenumber domain for implementing the DVWE-based simulation method that can handle the simultaneous lateral variations in velocity, diffusive coefficient and viscosity. Then, we design a distributary channels model in which a hydrocarbon-saturated sand reservoir is embedded in one of the channels. Next, we calculated the synthetic seismic data to analytically and comparatively illustrate the seismic frequency-dependent behaviors related to the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoir, by employing DVWE-based and conventional acoustic wave equation (AWE) based method, respectively. The results of the synthetic seismic data delineate the intrinsic energy loss, phase delay, lower instantaneous dominant frequency and narrower bandwidth due to the frequency-dependent dispersion and attenuation when seismic wave travels through the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoir. The numerical modeling method is expected to contribute to improve the understanding of the features and mechanism of the seismic frequency-dependent effects resulted from the hydrocarbon-saturated porous rocks.

  11. Frequency dependence in seismoacoustic imaging of shallow free gas due to gas bubble resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Zsuzsanna; Spiess, Volkhard; Keil, Hanno

    2015-12-01

    Shallow free gas is investigated in seismoacoustic data in 10 frequency bands covering a frequency range between 0.2 and 43 kHz. At the edge of a gassy patch in the Bornholm Basin (Baltic Sea), compressional wave attenuation caused by free gas is estimated from reflection amplitudes beneath the gassy sediment layer. Imaging of shallow free gas is considerably influenced by gas bubble resonance, because in the resonance frequency range attenuation is significantly increased. At the resonance frequency of the largest bubbles between 3 and 5 kHz, high scattering causes complete acoustic blanking beneath the top of the gassy sediment layer. In the wider resonance frequency range between 3 and 15 kHz, the effect of smaller bubbles becomes dominant and the attenuation slightly decreases. This allows acoustic waves to be transmitted and reflections can be observed beneath the gassy sediment layer for higher frequencies. Above resonance beginning at ˜19 kHz, attenuation is low and the presence of free gas can be inferred from the decreased reflection amplitudes beneath the gassy layer. Below the resonance frequency range (<1 kHz), attenuation is generally very low and not dependent on frequency. Using the geoacoustic model of Anderson and Hampton, the observed frequency boundaries suggest gas bubble sizes between 1 and 4-6 mm, and gas volume fractions up to 0.02% in a ˜2 m thick sediment layer, whose upper boundary is the gas front. With the multifrequency acoustic approach and the Anderson and Hampton model, quantification of free gas in shallow marine environments is possible if the measurement frequency range allows the identification of the resonance frequency peak. The method presented is limited to places with only moderate attenuation, where the amplitudes of a reflection can be analyzed beneath the gassy sediment layer.

  12. Frequency-dependent Effects of Rupture for the 2004 Parkfield, California, Mainshock at UPSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    We processed the accelerograms for the Sept. 28, 2004 Parkfield mainshock (M6) from the Parkfield Dense Seismograph Array (UPSAR) using beam forming techniques to determine coherence and slowness of incoming arrivals and we found that the frequency-dependent effects of rupture propagation of can be seen in the acceleration records in at least two ways. The first is the effect of directivity. During the 4-6s interval after nucleation, UPSAR lies in the forward azimuth of the rupture front and coherence and amplitudes are relatively high. In this interval, the records are rich in frequencies as high as 40 Hz. As the rupture front progresses, UPSAR becomes perpendicular to the location of the rupture front on the fault and then passes into the back azimuth. During this 5-7s interval, the coherence drops off, amplitudes are typically smaller and the traces are depleted in high frequencies compared to when UPSAR was in the forward azimuth. We model the rupture process of the Parkfield mainshock using realistic distributions of slip and show that they also have significant changes in frequency as the rupture passes from the forward to the back azimuth. The second effect is the frequency dependence of the rupture front. That is observations at UPSAR were used to address the question of whether low frequency energy emerges from the same parts of the fault as high frequency energy. Acceleration records of the Parkfield mainshock from UPSAR were filtered in 5 different narrow frequency bands (0.25-0.5 Hz, 0.5-1 Hz, 1-2 Hz, 2-4 Hz, and 4-8 Hz) and beam forming was repeated. Above 1 Hz the estimates of back azimuth and apparent velocity are about the same and are independent of frequency. Below 1 Hz, however, the estimates appear to be significantly different with a change of about of 0.34 km/s in apparent velocity and 22 degrees in back azimuth at 2s after the S wave arrival, for example, between the middle and lowest band. From previous work on mapping values of apparent

  13. Spatial resolution dependence on spectral frequency in human speech cortex electrocorticography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Leah; Hamilton, Liberty S.; Edwards, Erik; Bouchard, Kristofer E.; Chang, Edward F.

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Electrocorticography (ECoG) has become an important tool in human neuroscience and has tremendous potential for emerging applications in neural interface technology. Electrode array design parameters are outstanding issues for both research and clinical applications, and these parameters depend critically on the nature of the neural signals to be recorded. Here, we investigate the functional spatial resolution of neural signals recorded at the human cortical surface. We empirically derive spatial spread functions to quantify the shared neural activity for each frequency band of the electrocorticogram. Approach. Five subjects with high-density (4 mm center-to-center spacing) ECoG grid implants participated in speech perception and production tasks while neural activity was recorded from the speech cortex, including superior temporal gyrus, precentral gyrus, and postcentral gyrus. The cortical surface field potential was decomposed into traditional EEG frequency bands. Signal similarity between electrode pairs for each frequency band was quantified using a Pearson correlation coefficient. Main results. The correlation of neural activity between electrode pairs was inversely related to the distance between the electrodes; this relationship was used to quantify spatial falloff functions for cortical subdomains. As expected, lower frequencies remained correlated over larger distances than higher frequencies. However, both the envelope and phase of gamma and high gamma frequencies (30-150 Hz) are largely uncorrelated (<90%) at 4 mm, the smallest spacing of the high-density arrays. Thus, ECoG arrays smaller than 4 mm have significant promise for increasing signal resolution at high frequencies, whereas less additional gain is achieved for lower frequencies. Significance. Our findings quantitatively demonstrate the dependence of ECoG spatial resolution on the neural frequency of interest. We demonstrate that this relationship is consistent across patients and

  14. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  15. Maxwell-Wagner polarization and frequency-dependent injection at aqueous electrical interfaces.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Mitchell; Mavrogiannis, Nicholas; Gagnon, Zachary

    2012-11-02

    We demonstrate a new type of alternating current (ac) interfacial polarization and frequency-dependent fluid displacement phenomenon at a liquid-liquid electrical interface. Two fluid streams--one with a greater electrical conductivity and the other a greater dielectric constant--are made to flow side by side in a microfluidic channel. An ac electric field is applied perpendicular to the interface formed between the liquid lamellae, and fluid is observed to displace across the liquid-liquid interface. The direction and magnitude of this displacement is frequency dependent. At low ac frequency, below the interfacial inverse charge relaxation time, the high-conductivity fluid displaces into the high-dielectric stream. At high frequency the direction of liquid displacement reverses, and the high-dielectric stream injects into the high-conductivity stream. The interfacial crossover frequency where the liquid displacement direction reverses is dependent on differences in electrical properties between the two fluid streams, and is well explained by Maxwell-Wagner polarization mechanics.

  16. Dependence of kHz quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies on accretion-related parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkut, M. Hakan; Catmabacak, Onur; Duran, Sivan; Çatmabacak, Önder

    2016-07-01

    To study the possible dependence of kHz QPO frequencies on the parameters such as the mass accretion rate, the surface magnetic field strength, mass, and radius of the neutron star, we consider the up-to-date distribution of neutron star LMXBs in the kHz QPO frequency versus X-ray luminosity plane. We confirm the absence of any correlation between QPO frequencies and luminosity in the ensemble of LMXBs. Searching for the dependence of QPO data on accretion-related parameters, we find a correlation between the lower kHz QPO frequency and the parameter combining mass accretion rate with magnetic field strength. The correlation cannot be adequately described by a simple power law due to observed scattering of individual source data in the ensemble of Z and atoll sources. Based on disk-magnetosphere boundary region, the model function for QPO frequency can delineate the correlation taking into account the scattering of individual sources. In addition to mass accretion rate and magnetic field strength, the model function also depends on the radial width of the boundary region near the magnetopause. Modelling the variation of the width with mass accretion rate, we also provide an explanation for the parallel tracks phenomenon observed in the case of individual sources.

  17. Frequency-dependent inhibition of antidromic hippocampal compound action potentials by anti-convulsants.

    PubMed

    Teriakidis, Adrianna; Brown, Jon T; Randall, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Using rat hippocampal slices, extracellularly recorded antidromic compound action potentials (cAP) were produced in CA1 pyramidal cell populations by electrical stimulation of the alveus at 0.5 Hz. These responses were additionally examined across a range of stimulus frequencies between 0.5 and 100 Hz. Anticonvulsant drugs in clinical use were applied via perfusion of the recording chamber. Three anticonvulsants produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the cAP evoked at low frequency (0.5 Hz). The following IC(50) values were observed: lamotrigine, 210 microM (interpolated); carbamazepine, 210 microM (interpolated); phenytoin, 400 microM (extrapolated). The extent of inhibition produced was increased when trains of 30 cAPs were evoked at frequencies > or 30 Hz. This frequency dependence was quantified by measuring a response integral for a range of compound concentrations. Three other compounds valproate (5 mM), topiramate (500 microM) and levetiracetam (500 microM) produced no clear effect at any stimulus frequency tested. Using this simple neurophysiological assay it has been possible to compare the use-dependent inhibition of hippocampal action potentials by a range of anticonvulsants, providing a useful adjunct to patch clamp studies of such molecules at Na(+) channels. There is no clear correlation between the activity in this model and the clinical efficacy of these drugs in different forms of epilepsy.

  18. Temperature Dependence of the Radio-Frequency Dielectric Properties of Chicken Meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectric properties of chicken breast meat were measured with an open-ended coaxial-line probe between 200 MHz and 20 GHz at temperature ranging from -20 oC to +25 oC. At a given frequency, the temperature dependence reveals a sharp increase of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss factor a...

  19. Nonlinear and frequency-dependent transport phenomena in low-dimensional conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grüner, G.

    1983-07-01

    Nonlinear and frequency-dependent electrical conductivity is more a rule than an exception in materials with highly anisotropic electronic structure. Disorder leads to localization of the electronic wave functions, and the temperature-( T), electric field-( E), and frequency (ω)-dependent transport are due to random transfer rates between localized single particle states, a process fundamentally different from band transport. Interactions lead to collective modes, represented by a periodic modulation of the charge or spin density. The charge density wave (CDW) mode is pinned by impurities, but for small pinning forces, it can be depinned by moderate electric fields, leading to nonlinear conductivity due to a sliding CDW. Both classical and quantum models account for the field and frequency dependent response; they also describe current oscillation phenomena and effects which arise when both dc and ac excitations are applied. For strong pinning the collective mode cannot be depinned at small electric field strengths, but nonlinear (soliton) excitations of the collective modes may be responsible for the nonlinear conductivity observed. In all these cases field-and frequency-dependent transport is strongly related. This feature is reproduced by various models, and therefore a detailed study of σ( T, E,ω) is called for to distinguish between the various sources of novel transport phenomena in these new types of solids.

  20. Negative frequency-dependent selection between Pasteuria penetrans and its host Meloidogyne arenaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In negative frequency-dependant selection (NFDS), parasite genotypes capable of infecting the numerically dominant host genotype are favored, while host genotypes resistant to the dominant parasite genotype are favored, creating a cyclical pattern of resistant genotypes in the host population and, a...

  1. A time-dependent model of pulse-driven radio frequency capacitively coupled collisional plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. T.; Hossain, M. Mofazzal

    2017-01-01

    The time-dependent model of ion motion is used to propose an analytical model for dual frequency (DF) capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) sheath driven by a pulsed source and a radio-frequency source. In this model, the sheath is considered to be collisional. In this model, the time dependent terms of ion fluid equations are ignored, but the electric field, ion motion and ion density remain time dependent. Electron profile is assumed to be step-like. Analytical expressions for electron sheath width and sheath potential have been developed. The calculated sheath width and potential are compared with the dual radio frequency driven time dependent models of capacitively coupled plasma sheath. From the temporal evaluation of sheath motion and potential, it has been found that pulse driven sheath has higher sheath potential and sheath width than that of conventional radio frequency driven DF CCP. Moreover, it is also found that ion energy spread can be reduced using pulsed power. From the temporal investigation of sheath motion and potential, it has been found that the duty cycle of the pulse power significantly affects sheath width and sheath potential.

  2. FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION IN PRIMARY HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION IN PRIMARY HEPATOCYTES. X. Wang1 *, D.E. Housel *, J. Page2, C.F. Blackmanl. 1 National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711 USA, 2Oakland, California USA
    ...

  3. Pressure dependence of intramolecular mode frequencies in solid N2, O2, and CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Helmy, A.

    1983-01-01

    A microscopic description of the pressure dependence of intramolecular vibrational modes in simple molecular crystals has been formulated using a classical perturbation theory. Quantitative agreement with experiment is demonstrated and it is shown that frequency changes at phase transitions are large enough to be observed optically.

  4. An exponential ESS model and its application to frequency-dependent selection.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Liu, L

    1989-10-01

    A nonlinear ESS model is put forward, that is, a nonnegative exponential ESS model. For a simple case, we discuss the existence, uniqueness, and stability of an ESS. As an application of the model, we give a quantitative analysis of frequency-dependent selection in population genetics when the rare type has an advantage.

  5. Influence of damping on the frequency-dependent polarizabilities of doped quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Suvajit; Ghosh, Manas

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the profiles of diagonal components of frequency-dependent linear (αxx and αyy), and first nonlinear (βxxx and βyyy) optical response of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots. The dopant impurity potential chosen assumes Gaussian form. The study principally focuses on investigating the role of damping on the polarizability components. In view of this the dopant is considered to be propagating under damped condition which is otherwise linear inherently. The frequency-dependent polarizabilities are then analyzed by placing the doped dot to a periodically oscillating external electric field of given intensity. The damping strength, in conjunction with external oscillation frequency and confinement potentials, fabricate the polarizability components in a fascinating manner which is adorned with emergence of maximization, minimization, and saturation. The discrimination in the values of the polarizability components in x and y-directions has also been addressed in the present context.

  6. Audio-Band Frequency-Dependent Squeezing for Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    PubMed

    Oelker, Eric; Isogai, Tomoki; Miller, John; Tse, Maggie; Barsotti, Lisa; Mavalvala, Nergis; Evans, Matthew

    2016-01-29

    Quantum vacuum fluctuations impose strict limits on precision displacement measurements, those of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors among them. Introducing squeezed states into an interferometer's readout port can improve the sensitivity of the instrument, leading to richer astrophysical observations. However, optomechanical interactions dictate that the vacuum's squeezed quadrature must rotate by 90° around 50 Hz. Here we use a 2-m-long, high-finesse optical resonator to produce frequency-dependent rotation around 1.2 kHz. This demonstration of audio-band frequency-dependent squeezing uses technology and methods that are scalable to the required rotation frequency and validates previously developed theoretical models, heralding application of the technique in future gravitational-wave detectors.

  7. Frequency dependent piecewise fractional-order modelling of ultracapacitors using hybrid optimization and fuzzy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mano Ranjan; Ghosh, Subhojit; Das, Shantanu

    2016-12-01

    The usage of ultracapacitors for development of energy storage devices and alternative power sources is increasing at a very rapid rate. However accuracy in selection of ultracapacitor model parameter plays key role in the design of such devices, especially in applications involving wide operating frequency. Ultracapacitors are known to exhibit fractional dynamics and the model parameters vary significantly with frequency. This paper proposes a piecewise modelling and parameter estimation approach for ultracapacitors using a hybrid optimization and fuzzy clustering approach. The proposed modelling technique has been applied over impedance frequency response data acquired from a commercially available ultracapacitor. The model is able to represent the experimental data over different operating points with reduced number of model parameters. Comparative numerical simulations have been carried out to validate the benefits of the proposed approach. The estimated parameters revealed the disparity in the frequency dependent behavior of ultracapacitors and standard electrolytic capacitors.

  8. Frequency-dependent Effects of Vibration on Physiological Systems: Experiments with Animals and other Human Surrogates

    PubMed Central

    KRAJNAK, Kristine; RILEY, Danny A.; WU, John; MCDOWELL, Thomas; WELCOME, Daniel E.; XU, Xueyan S.; DONG, Ren G.

    2015-01-01

    Occupational exposure to vibration through the use of power- and pneumatic hand-tools results in cold-induced vasospasms, finger blanching, and alterations in sensorineural function. Collectively, these symptoms are referred to as hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). Currently the International Standards Organization (ISO) standard ISO 5349-1 contains a frequency-weighting curve to help workers and employers predict the risk of developing HAVS with exposure to vibration of different frequencies. However, recent epidemiological and experimental evidence suggests that this curve under-represents the risk of injuries to the hands and fingers induced by exposure to vibration at higher frequencies (>100 Hz). To improve the curve, better exposure-response data need to be collected. The goal of this review is to summarize the results of animal and computational modeling studies that have examined the frequency-dependent effects of vibration, and discuss where additional research would be beneficial to fill these research gaps. PMID:23060248

  9. Frequency dependent optical and dielectric properties of zinc sulfide in Terahertz regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganti, Satya R.; Sundaram, S. K.; McCloy, John S.

    2014-07-01

    Frequency dependent optical and dielectric properties for several grades of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) zinc sulfide (standard, elemental, and multi-spectral) was performed using a terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system in the frequency range from 0.15 THz to 2.5 THz. Zinc sulfide exhibits low frequency vibrational modes characterized by the THz-TDS. Two low-frequency phonon resonance lines were revealed at 0.78 THz and 2.20 THz. These samples were also characterized in the GHz range using a backward wave oscillator (BWO) source quasi-optical spectrometer, and the data obtained by both approaches were compared. Experimental data were also compared with an undamped harmonic oscillator model. These results compare well with the literature values obtained using other methods.

  10. Frequency dependent power and energy flux density equations of the electromagnetic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhibbullah, M.; Haleem, Ashraf M. Abdel; Ikuma, Yasuro

    The calculation of the power and energy of the electromagnetic wave is important for numerous applications. There are some equations to compute the power and energy density of the electromagnetic wave radiation. For instance, the Poynting vector is frequently used to calculate the power density. However those including the Poynting vector are not perfect to represent the actual values because the equations are frequency independent. In the present study we have derived the frequency-dependent equations to calculate the power and energy flux density of the electromagnetic wave by help of the classical electromagnetic theories. It is seems that the Poynting vector with a certain electric and magnetic fields is correct only for a specific frequency. However our equations are perfect to calculate the values of the power and energy flux density for all frequencies of the electromagnetic radiation. The equations may help to develop the applications of the electromagnetic wave radiation.

  11. Observation and Absolute Frequency Measurements of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} Optical Clock Transition in Neutral Ytterbium

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, C.W.; Barber, Z.W.; Oates, C.W.; Fortier, T.M.; Diddams, S.A.; Hollberg, L.

    2005-08-19

    We report the direct excitation of the highly forbidden (6s{sup 2}){sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible}(6s6p){sup 3}P{sub 0} optical transition in two odd isotopes of neutral ytterbium. As the excitation laser frequency is scanned, absorption is detected by monitoring the depletion from an atomic cloud at {approx}70 {mu}K in a magneto-optical trap. The measured frequency in {sup 171}Yb (F=1/2) is 518 295 836 591.6{+-}4.4 kHz. The measured frequency in {sup 173}Yb (F=5/2) is 518 294 576 847.6{+-}4.4 kHz. Measurements are made with a femtosecond-laser frequency comb calibrated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology cesium fountain clock and represent nearly a 10{sup 6}-fold reduction in uncertainty. The natural linewidth of these J=0 to J=0 transitions is calculated to be {approx}10 mHz, making them well suited to support a new generation of optical atomic clocks based on confinement in an optical lattice.

  12. Frequency-dependent amplification of stretch-evoked excitatory input in spinal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Powers, Randall K; Nardelli, Paul; Cope, T C

    2012-08-01

    Voltage-dependent calcium and sodium channels mediating persistent inward currents (PICs) amplify the effects of synaptic inputs on the membrane potential and firing rate of motoneurons. CaPIC channels are thought to be relatively slow, whereas the NaPIC channels have fast kinetics. These different characteristics influence how synaptic inputs with different frequency content are amplified; the slow kinetics of Ca channels suggest that they can only contribute to amplification of low frequency inputs (<5 Hz). To characterize frequency-dependent amplification of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), we measured the averaged stretch-evoked EPSPs in cat medial gastrocnemius motoneurons in decerebrate cats at different subthreshold levels of membrane potential. EPSPs were produced by muscle spindle afferents activated by stretching the homonymous and synergist muscles at frequencies of 5-50 Hz. We adjusted the stretch amplitudes at different frequencies to produce approximately the same peak-to-peak EPSP amplitude and quantified the amount of amplification by expressing the EPSP integral at different levels of depolarization as a percentage of that measured with the membrane hyperpolarized. Amplification was observed at all stretch frequencies but generally decreased with increasing stretch frequency. However, in many cells the amount of amplification was greater at 10 Hz than at 5 Hz. Fast amplification was generally reduced or absent when the lidocaine derivative QX-314 was included in the electrode solution, supporting a strong contribution from Na channels. These results suggest that NaPICs can combine with CaPICs to enhance motoneuron responses to modulations of synaptic drive over a physiologically significant range of frequencies.

  13. Differential frequency-dependent antidromic resonance of the Schaffer collaterals and mossy fibers.

    PubMed

    Franco, Luis M; Beltrán, Jesús Q; Tapia, Jesús A; Ortiz, Franco; Manjarrez, Elías; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2016-05-01

    To better understand information transfer along the hippocampal pathways and its plasticity, here we studied the antidromic responses of the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 to activation of the mossy fibers and Schaffer collaterals, respectively, in hippocampal slices from naïve and epileptic rats. We applied trains of 600 electrical stimuli at functionally meaningful frequencies (θ, β/γ and γ). The responses of the DG to θ frequency trains underwent rapid potentiation that lasted about 400 stimuli, after which they progressively returned to control value. At β/γ and γ frequencies, however, the initial potentiation was followed by a strong frequency-dependent depression within the first 50 stimuli. In kindled animals, the initial potentiation was stronger than in control preparations and the resonant phase at θ frequency lasted longer. In contrast, CA3 responses were exponentially depressed at all frequencies, but depression was significantly less intense at θ frequency in epileptic preparations. Failure of fibers to fire action potentials could account for some of the aforementioned characteristics, but waveforms of the intracellular action potentials also changed as the field responses did, i.e., half-duration and time-to-peak increased in both structures along the stimulation trains. Noteworthy, block of glutamate and GABA ionotropic receptors prevented resonance and reduced the depression of antidromic responses to β/γ and γ stimulation recorded in the DG, but not in CA3. We show that the different behavior in the information transfer along these pathways depends on the frequency at which action potentials are generated, excitability history and anatomical features, including myelination and tortuosity. In addition, the mossy fibers are endowed with ionotropic receptors and terminal active properties conferring them their sui generis non-passive antidromic responses.

  14. Frequency-dependent effects of rupture for the 2004 Parkfield mainshock, results from UPSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fletcher, Jon B.

    2014-01-01

    The frequency-dependent effects of rupture propagation of the Parkfield, California earthquake (Sept. 28, 2004, M6) to the northwest along the San Andreas fault can be seen in acceleration records at UPSAR (USGS Parkfield Seismic Array) in at least two ways. First, we can see the effects of directivity in the acceleration traces at UPSAR, which is about 11.5 km from the epicenter. Directivity or the seismic equivalent of a Doppler shift has been documented in many cases by comparing short duration, high-amplitude pulses (P or S) in the forward direction with longer duration body waves in the backward direction. In this case we detect a change from a relatively large amplitude, coherent, high-frequency signal at the start of rupture to a low-amplitude, low-coherent, low-frequency signal at about the time the rupture front transfers from the forward azimuth to the back azimuth at about 34-36 s (time is UTC and are the seconds after day 272 and 17 hours and 15 minutes. S arrival is just after 30s) for rays leaving the fault and propagating to UPSAR. The frequency change is obvious in the band about 5 to 30 Hz, which is significantly above the corner frequency of the earthquake (about 0.11Hz). From kinematic source models, the duration of faulting is about 9.2 s and the change in frequency is during faulting as the rupture extends to the northwest. Understanding the systematic change in frequency and amplitude of seismic waves in relation to the propagation of the rupture front is important for predicting strong ground motion. Second, we can filter the acceleration records from the array to determine if the low frequency energy emerges from the same part of the fault as the high frequency signal (e.g. has the same back azimuth and apparent velocity at UPSAR) an important clue to the dynamics of rupture. Analysis of sources of strong motion (characterized by relatively high frequencies) compared to kinematic slip models (relatively low frequency) for the

  15. Non-Lorentzian ion cyclotron resonance line shapes arising from velocity-dependent ion-neutral collision frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whealton, J. H.; Mason, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    An asymptotic solution of the Boltzmann equation is developed for ICR absorption, without restrictions on the ion-neutral collision frequency or mass ratio. Velocity dependence of the collision frequency causes deviations from Lorentzian line shape.

  16. MODELING THE FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF RADIO BEAMS FOR CONE-DOMINANT PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P. F.; Han, J. L.; Wang, C. E-mail: hjl@nao.cas.cn

    2013-05-10

    Beam radii for cone-dominant pulsars follow a power-law relation with frequency, thetav = ({nu}/{nu}{sub 0}) {sup k} + thetav{sub 0}, which has not been well explained in previous works. We study this frequency dependence of beam radius (FDB) for cone-dominant pulsars by using the curvature radiation mechanism. Considering various density and energy distributions of particles in the pulsar open field-line region, we numerically simulate the emission intensity distribution across emission height and rotation phase, get integrated profiles at different frequencies, and obtain the FDB curves. For the density model of a conal-like distribution, the simulated profiles always shrink to one component at high frequencies. In the density model with two separated density patches, the profiles generally have two distinct components, and the power-law indices k are found to be in the range from -0.1 to -2.5, consistent with observational results. Energy distributions of streaming particles have significant influence on the frequency-dependence behavior. Radial energy decay of particles is desired to get proper thetav{sub 0} in models. We conclude that by using the curvature radiation mechanism, the observed FDB for the cone-dominant pulsars can only be explained by the emission model of particles in two density patches with a Gaussian energy distribution and a radial energy loss.

  17. Experimental methods for the characterization of the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of soft materials

    PubMed Central

    Kazemirad, Siavash; K. Heris, Hossein; Mongeau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    A characterization method based on Rayleigh wave propagation was developed for the quantification of the frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties of soft materials at high frequencies; i.e., up to 4 kHz. Planar harmonic surface waves were produced on the surface of silicone rubber samples. The phase and amplitude of the propagating waves were measured at different locations along the propagation direction, which allowed the calculation of the complex Rayleigh wavenumbers at each excitation frequency using a transfer function method. An inverse wave propagation problem was then solved to obtain the complex shear/elastic moduli from the measured wavenumbers. In a separate, related investigation, dynamic indentation tests using atomic force microscopy (AFM) were performed at frequencies up to 300 Hz. No systematic verification study is available for the AFM-based method, which can be used when the dimensions of the test samples are too small for other existing testing methods. The results obtained from the Rayleigh wave propagation and AFM-based indentation methods were compared with those from a well-established method, which involves the generation of standing longitudinal compression waves in rod-shaped test specimens. The results were cross validated and qualitatively confirmed theoretical expectations presented in the literature for the frequency-dependence of polymers. PMID:23654420

  18. Mechanism of frequency-dependent broadening of molluscan neurone soma spikes.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, R W; Getting, P A; Thompson, S H

    1979-06-01

    1. Action potentials recorded from isolated dorid neurone somata increase in duration, i.e. broaden, during low frequency repetitive firing. Spike broadening is substantially reduced by external Co ions and implicates an inward Ca current. 2. During repetitive voltage clamp steps at frequencies slower than 1 Hz, in 100 mM-tetraethyl ammonium ions (TEA) inward Ca currents do not increase in amplitude. 3. Repetitive action potentials result in inactivation of delayed outward current. Likewise, repetitive voltage clamp steps which cause inactivation of delayed outward current also result in longer duration action potentials. 4. The frequency dependence of spike broadening and inactivation of the voltage dependent component (IK) of delayed outward current are similar. 5. Inactivation of IK is observed in all cells, however, only cells with relative large inward Ca currents show significant spike broadening. Spike broadening apparently results from the frequency dependent inactivation of IK which increases the expression of inward Ca current as a prominent shoulder on the repolarizing phase of the action potential. In addition, the presence of a prolonged Ca current increases the duration of the first action potential thereby allowing sufficient time for inactivation of IK.

  19. Nitric Oxide Donors Enhance the Frequency Dependence of Dopamine Release in Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, Henrike; Threlfell, Sarah; Cragg, Stephanie J

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is critically involved in normal as well as maladaptive motivated behaviors including drug addiction. Whether the striatal neuromodulator nitric oxide (NO) influences DA release in NAc is unknown. We investigated whether exogenous NO modulates DA transmission in NAc core and how this interaction varies depending on the frequency of presynaptic activation. We detected DA with cyclic voltammetry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes in mouse NAc in slices following stimuli spanning a full range of DA neuron firing frequencies (1–100 Hz). NO donors 3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1) or z-1-[N-(3-ammoniopropyl)-N-(n-propyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (PAPA/NONOate) enhanced DA release with increasing stimulus frequency. This NO-mediated enhancement of frequency sensitivity of DA release was not prevented by inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), DA transporters, or large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, and did not require glutamatergic or GABAergic input. However, experiments to identify whether frequency-dependent NO effects were mediated via changes in powerful acetylcholine–DA interactions revealed multiple components to NO modulation of DA release. In the presence of a nicotinic receptor antagonist (dihydro-β-erythroidine), NO donors increased DA release in a frequency-independent manner. These data suggest that NO in the NAc can modulate DA release through multiple GC-independent neuronal mechanisms whose net outcome varies depending on the activity in DA neurons and accumbal cholinergic interneurons. In the presence of accumbal acetylcholine, NO promotes the sensitivity of DA release to presynaptic activation, but with reduced acetylcholine input, NO will promote DA release in an activity-independent manner through a direct action on dopaminergic terminals. PMID:21508928

  20. Frequency-dependent stability of parallel-plate electrostatic actuators in conductive fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sounart, T. L.; Panchawagh, H. V.; Mahajan, R. L.

    2010-05-01

    We present an electromechanical stability analysis of passivated parallel-plate electrostatic actuators in conductive dielectric media and show that the pull-in instability can be eliminated by tuning the applied frequency below a design-dependent stability limit. A partial instability region is also obtained, where the actuator jumps from the pull-in displacement to another stable position within the gap. The results predict that the stability limit is always greater than the critical actuation frequency, and therefore any device that is feasible to actuate in a conductive fluid can be operated with stability over the full range of motion.

  1. Frequency dependence of optical third-harmonic generation from doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, Vl. A.; Muryumin, E. E.; Gaiduk, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    In connection with the controversial question about the frequency dependence of the optical third-harmonic generation (THG) from doped graphene, which has recently been discussed in the literature, we develop an analytical theory for the THG susceptibility of doped graphene by using the original Genkin-Mednis nonlinear-conductivity-theory formalism including mixed intra- and interband terms. The theory is free of any nonphysical divergences at zero frequency, and it predicts the main resonant peak in the THG spectrum to be located at the photon energy ħω equal to two thirds of the Fermi energy EF of charge carriers in doped graphene.

  2. Role of acoustic phonons in frequency dependent electronic thermal conductivity of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Pankaj

    2017-03-01

    We study the effect of the electron-phonon interaction on the finite frequency dependent electronic thermal conductivity of two dimensional graphene. We calculate it for various acoustic phonons present in graphene and characterized by different dispersion relations using the memory function approach. It is found that the electronic thermal conductivity κe (T) in the zero frequency limit follows different power law for the longitudinal/transverse and the flexural acoustic phonons. For the longitudinal/transverse phonons, κe (T) ∼T-1 at the low temperature and saturates at the high temperature. These signatures qualitatively agree with the results calculated by solving the Boltzmann equation analytically and numerically. Similarly, for the flexural phonons, we find that κe (T) shows T 1 / 2 law at the low temperature and then saturates at the high temperature. In the finite frequency regime, we observe that the real part of the electronic thermal conductivity, Re [κe (ω , T) ] follows ω-2 behavior at the low frequency and becomes frequency independent at the high frequency.

  3. Frequency-dependent damping in propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S. Krishna; Banerjee, D.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2014-07-10

    Propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves are often observed in polar plumes and active region fan loops. The observed periodicities of these waves range from a few minutes to a few tens of minutes and their amplitudes were found to decay rapidly as they travel along the supporting structure. Previously, thermal conduction, compressive viscosity, radiation, density stratification, and area divergence were identified to be some of the causes for change in the slow wave amplitude. Our recent studies indicate that the observed damping in these waves is frequency-dependent. We used imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly to study this dependence in detail and for the first time via observations we attempted to deduce a quantitative relation between the damping length and frequency of these oscillations. We developed a new analysis method to obtain this relation. The observed frequency dependence does not seem to agree with the current linear wave theory and it was found that the waves observed in the polar regions show a different dependence from those observed in the on-disk loop structures despite the similarity in their properties.

  4. Methods to calibrate the absolute receive sensitivity of single-element, focused transducers.

    PubMed

    Rich, Kyle T; Mast, T Douglas

    2015-09-01

    Absolute pressure measurements of acoustic emissions by single-element, focused passive cavitation detectors would be facilitated by improved wideband receive calibration techniques. Here, calibration methods were developed to characterize the absolute, frequency-dependent receive sensitivity of a spherically focused, single-element transducer using pulse-echo and pitch-catch techniques. Validation of these calibration methods on a focused receiver were made by generating a pulse from a small diameter source at the focus of the transducer and comparing the absolute pressure measured by a calibrated hydrophone to that of the focused transducer using the receive sensitivities determined here.

  5. Absolutely classical spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

  6. Frequency-dependent effects of background noise on subcortical response timing.

    PubMed

    Tierney, A; Parbery-Clark, A; Skoe, E; Kraus, N

    2011-12-01

    The addition of background noise to an auditory signal delays brainstem response timing. This effect has been extensively documented using manual peak selection. Peak picking, however, is impractical for large-scale studies of spectrotemporally complex stimuli, and leaves open the question of whether noise-induced delays are frequency-dependent or occur across the frequency spectrum. Here we use an automated, objective method to examine phase shifts between auditory brainstem responses to a speech sound (/da/) presented with and without background noise. We predicted that shifts in neural response timing would also be reflected in frequency-specific phase shifts. Our results indicate that the addition of background noise causes phase shifts across the subcortical response spectrum (70-1000 Hz). However, this noise-induced delay is not uniform such that some frequency bands show greater shifts than others: low-frequency phase shifts (300-500 Hz) are largest during the response to the consonant-vowel formant transition (/d/), while high-frequency shifts (720-1000 Hz) predominate during the response to the steady-state vowel (/a/). Most importantly, phase shifts occurring in specific frequency bands correlate strongly with shifts in the latencies of the predominant peaks in the auditory brainstem response, while phase shifts in other frequency bands do not. This finding confirms the validity of phase shift detection as an objective measure of timing differences and reveals that this method detects noise-induced shifts in timing that may not be captured by traditional peak latency measurements.

  7. Report on BIPM/CIPM key comparison CCAUV.U-K4: absolute calibration of medical hydrophones in the frequency range 0.5 MHz to 20 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, S.; Fury, C. R.; Zeqiri, B.; Brandt, M.; Wilkens, V.; Koch, C.; Matsuda, Y.; Yoshioka, M.; Ping, Y.; Yan, Z.; Wenping, B.; Costa-Felix, R. P. B.; Oliveira, E. G.

    2016-01-01

    The key compariosn CCAUV.U-K4 involved measurement of end-of-cable loaded sensitivity in units of volts/pascal of two travelling standards, 1 mm element diamater medical hydrophones at medical ultrasound frequencies. This is a repetition of key comparison CCAUV.U-K2 but the scope has been extended upwards to 20 MHz and downwards to 0.5 MHz. The reduction in the lower frequency provided an overlap with the underwater acoustics key comparison CCAUV.W-K1 which covers the range 1 kHz to 0.5 MHz. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence, suitable for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  8. Temperature and frequency dependencies of the switching field in glass-coated FeNbSiB microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabol, R.; Varga, R.; Hudak, J.; Blazek, J.; Praslicka, D.; Vojtanik, P.; Badini, G.; Vazquez, M.

    2012-03-01

    We are dealing with the temperature and frequency dependencies of the switching field in the glass-coated FeNbSiB microwire. Both dependencies can be described in terms of two contributions to the switching mechanism: magnetoelastic and structural relaxation. We show that by properly setting the frequency of the measurement, it is possible to vary the relative strength of both contributions. Hence, the temperature dependence of the switching field can be tailored according to desired conditions being temperature independent for low (<100 Hz) and high (>500 Hz) frequencies or almost linearly dependent for medium frequency ˜350 Hz.

  9. A Model for Rate-Dependent Hysteresis in Piezoceramic Materials Operating at Low Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ralph C.; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Wieman, Robert

    2001-01-01

    This paper addresses the modeling of certain rate-dependent mechanisms which contribute to hysteresis inherent to piezoelectric materials operating at low frequencies. While quasistatic models are suitable for initial material characterization in some applications, the reduction in coercive field and polarization values which occur as frequencies increase must be accommodated to achieve the full capabilities of the materials. The model employed here quantifies the hysteresis in two steps. In the first, anhysteretic polarization switching is modeled through the application of Boltzmann principles to balance the electrostatic and thermal energy. Hysteresis is then incorporated through the quantification of energy required to translate and bend domain walls pinned at inclusions inherent to the materials. The performance of the model is illustrated through a fit to low frequency data (0.1 Hz - 1 Hz) from a PZT5A wafer.

  10. A study of frequency dependent electrical and dielectric properties of NiO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usha, V.; Kalyanaraman, S.; Vettumperumal, R.; Thangavel, R.

    2017-01-01

    Nickel oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using low cost sol-gel method. The structure of as prepared NiO nanoparticles has been confirmed from X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray (SEM and EDX) spectroscopic analysis. The electrical and dielectric properties were characterized by complex impedance spectroscopy as a function of frequency at different temperatures. To study the dielectric behavior of the nanoparticles different plots like Nyquist plot, modulus plot and Bode plot were used. Also the frequency dependent ac conductivity is analyzed and the activation energy is calculated. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss as a function of frequency at various temperatures are also studied.

  11. Frequency-dependent dielectric function of semiconductors with application to physisorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fan; Tao, Jianmin; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    The dielectric function is one of the most important quantities that describes the electrical and optical properties of solids. Accurate modeling of the frequency-dependent dielectric function has great significance in the study of the long-range van der Waals (vdW) interaction for solids and adsorption. In this work we calculate the frequency-dependent dielectric functions of semiconductors and insulators using the G W method with and without exciton effects, as well as efficient semilocal density functional theory (DFT), and compare these calculations with a model frequency-dependent dielectric function. We find that for semiconductors with moderate band gaps, the model dielectric functions, G W values, and DFT calculations all agree well with each other. However, for insulators with strong exciton effects, the model dielectric functions have a better agreement with accurate G W values than the DFT calculations, particularly in high-frequency region. To understand this, we repeat the DFT calculations with scissors correction, by shifting the DFT Kohn-Sham energy levels to match the experimental band gap. We find that scissors correction only moderately improves the DFT dielectric function in the low-frequency region. Based on the dielectric functions calculated with different methods, we make a comparative study by applying these dielectric functions to calculate the vdW coefficients (C3 and C5) for adsorption of rare-gas atoms on a variety of surfaces. We find that the vdW coefficients obtained with the nearly free electron gas-based model dielectric function agree quite well with those obtained from the G W dielectric function, in particular for adsorption on semiconductors, leading to an overall error of less than 7% for C3 and 5% for C5. This demonstrates the reliability of the model dielectric function for the study of physisorption.

  12. Amplitude-frequency dependencies of wave attenuation in single-crystal quartz: Experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashinskii, E. I.

    2008-11-01

    The experiments have been conducted to investigate the effect of strain amplitude and frequency on the compressional and shear wave attenuation in quartz samples of three types: the intact quartz, fractured quartz, and smoky quartz. The measurements were performed using the reflection method on a pulse frequency of 1 MHz with changing strain in the range 0.3 ≤ ɛ ≤ 2.0 μstrain under a confining pressure of 10 MPa and at ambient temperature. The essential difference in amplitude-frequency characteristics of wave attenuation in three quartz types has been detected. The intact quartz shows the more "simple" behavior in comparison with the fractured and smoky quartz. The attenuation (the inverse quality factor Q) depends on strain amplitude as Q-1(ɛ) ˜ ɛ-n, where n ≅ 0.005-0.085, with the greatest decrease in the smoky and fractured quartz reaching of about 15%. Relaxation spectra of attenuation are presented in the frequency range from 0.4 to 1.4 MHz. The dependence Qp-1(f) ˜ f-1.2 characterizes the intact and fractured quartz, whereas the smoky quartz has the relaxation peak. The dependence Qs-1(f) ˜ f-0.84 presents S wave relaxation spectrum in the intact quartz; in the fractured and smoky quartz, the attenuation peaks take place. The strain amplitude variation exerts influence on the relaxation strength, the peak frequency, and the width of the relaxation peak. Such behavior of attenuation can be explained by a joint action of viscoelastic and microplastic mechanisms. These results can be considered as a contribution for providing the experimental background to the theory of attenuation in rocks. They can also be used in solving applied problems in material science, seismic prospecting, etc.

  13. Study of frequency and temperature dependent electrical resistivity in heavy fermion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baral, P. C.

    2017-02-01

    This paper focuses on the interplay of Kondo effect and magnetic ordering through a microscopic theory of the frequency and temperature dependent electrical resistivity as well as the dielectric function in heavy fermion systems. It is then analysed in Kondo lattice model in addition to Heisenberg-type interaction between localized f- electrons. The model Hamiltonian is solved by using mean-field approximation (MFA). The study of electrical resistivity is presented by considering phonon interaction to bare f -electrons, c -electrons and to the hybridization between c - and f -electrons and phonon Hamiltonian in harmonic approximation. An attempt has been made to calculate the temperature and frequency dependent electrical resistivity to study the peaks at TK (Kondo temperature) and T_{{ Cor}} (correlation temperature). The evolution of peaks exhibit change in slopes. These findings are compared to the experimental data.

  14. Time-domain representation of frequency-dependent foundation impedance functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.

    2006-01-01

    Foundation impedance functions provide a simple means to account for soil-structure interaction (SSI) when studying seismic response of structures. Impedance functions represent the dynamic stiffness of the soil media surrounding the foundation. The fact that impedance functions are frequency dependent makes it difficult to incorporate SSI in standard time-history analysis software. This paper introduces a simple method to convert frequency-dependent impedance functions into time-domain filters. The method is based on the least-squares approximation of impedance functions by ratios of two complex polynomials. Such ratios are equivalent, in the time-domain, to discrete-time recursive filters, which are simple finite-difference equations giving the relationship between foundation forces and displacements. These filters can easily be incorporated into standard time-history analysis programs. Three examples are presented to show the applications of the method.

  15. [On peculiarities of temperature dependences of water spectra in the terahertz frequency domain].

    PubMed

    Penkov, N V; Yashin, V A; Shvirst, N E; Fesenko, E E; Fesenko, E E

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed spectra of light and heavy water at temperatures from 4 up to 50 degrees C in a frequency range of 0.15 to 6.5 THz. It was shown that the amplitude of high-frequency relaxation absorption band with its maximum at 0.5 THz extends with increasing, temperature and this temperature dependence for light water has a marked feature at 35-40 degrees C as a sharp growth. This fact is noteworthy because this range corresponds to physiological values of a body temperature of the warm-blooded organisms. At the same time, the analogous temperature dependence for heavy water in the considered temperature range lacks this particular feature. Thus, the water with its properties differs significantly not only from other fluids, but also from its own isotopologues.

  16. Characterization of the anamorphic and frequency dependent phenomenon in Liquid Crystal on Silicon displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobato, L.; Lizana, A.; Márquez, A.; Moreno, I.; Iemmi, C.; Campos, J.; Yzuel, M. J.

    2011-04-01

    The diffractive efficiency of Liquid Crystal on Silicon (LCoS) displays can be greatly diminished by the appearance of temporal phase fluctuations in the reflected beam, depolarization effects and also because of phase modulation depths smaller than 2π. In order to maximize the efficiency of the Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) implemented in the LCoS device, the Minimum Euclidean Distance principle can be applied. However, not all the diffractive elements can be corrected in the same way due to the anamorphic and frequency dependent phenomenon, which is related to the LCoS response, largely dependending on the period and the spatial orientation of the generated DOE. Experimental evidence for the anamorphic and frequency dependent phenomenon is provided in this paper, as well as a comparative study between the efficiency obtained for binary gratings of different periods

  17. Frequency-dependent response of a pinned charge-density wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokur, Valerii; Fogler, Michael

    2003-03-01

    Recent theoretical advances in the theory of collective pinning [M. M. Fogler, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 186402 (2002)] enable us to go beyond the usual phenomenology in the theory of a finite-frequency response of a pinned charge-density wave (CDW) and to calculate ω and T dependences of the complex dielectric function without additional assumptions. According to our estimates, in typical electrical experiments on CDW, the dominant process is a thermal activation over atypically shallow barriers. It gives rise to a novel T^3/4-dependence of the linear response, in agreement with the experiment. A close analogy with acoustic attenuation in glassy dielectrics is noted.

  18. Pulsed arrays: A new method of flaw detection by generating a frequency dependent angle of propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, S. J.; Dixon, S. M.

    2012-05-01

    A new method of using an array of generation sources, pulsed simultaneously to generate a wavefront with a frequency dependant angle of propagation, has been developed. If pulsed arrays are used to generate a wave with a frequency dependent angle of propagation, the angle at which the wave was launched can be identified by measuring the frequency of the detected wave. In an isotropic material this means that it is possible use a second transducer to locate the position of the scatterer, whereas with a conventional single element generator method, it can only be located onto an ellipse. In addition to an increased scan speed, the resolution of detection should also be improved. A theoretical framework is put forward to explain how the wavefront is created from the superposition of the waves from the individual elements, and how the frequency varies along the wavefront. Finite element models and experimental measurements were also carried out, and both agreed with the analytic model. This method will have applications within NDE, but could also extend to sonar and radar techniques.

  19. Task-dependent transfer of perceptual to memory representations during delayed spatial frequency discrimination.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Jasmin; Chaudhuri, Avi

    2002-06-01

    Discrimination thresholds were obtained using a delayed spatial frequency discrimination task. In Experiment 1, we found that presentation of a mask 3 s before onset of a reference Gabor patch caused a selective, spatial frequency dependent interference in a subsequent discrimination task. However, a 10 s interval abolished this masking effect. In Experiment 2, the mask was associated with a second spatial frequency discrimination task so that a representation of the mask had to be coded into short-term perceptual memory. This experiment was performed to assess whether absence of masking in the 10 s condition of Experiment 1 might be due to decay of the mask information in the perceptual or the memory representational domain. The presence of this second discrimination task now caused similar interference effects on the primary discrimination task at both the 3 s and 10 s interstimulus intervals (ISI) conditions. Finally, to test the robustness of the masking effect, the nature of the secondary masking task was changed from a spatial frequency discrimination task to an orientation discrimination task in Experiment 3. The masking effect was now abolished in both the 3 and 10 s ISI conditions. Together, the results from these experiments are consistent with the idea of a two-level perceptual memory mechanism. The results also suggest that stimulus representations during a perceptual discrimination task are shared between the perceptual and memory representation domains in a task-dependent manner.

  20. Frequency, pressure and strain dependence of nonlinear elasticity in Berea Sandstone

    DOE PAGES

    Riviere, Jacques; Johnson, Paul Allan; Marone, Chris; ...

    2016-04-14

    Acoustoelasticity measurements in a sample of room dry Berea sandstone are conducted at various loading frequencies to explore the transition between the quasi-static ( f → 0) and dynamic (few kilohertz) nonlinear elastic response. We carry out these measurements at multiple confining pressures and perform a multivariate regression analysis to quantify the dependence of the harmonic content on strain amplitude, frequency, and pressure. The modulus softening (equivalent to the harmonic at 0f) increases by a factor 2–3 over 3 orders of magnitude increase in frequency. Harmonics at 2f, 4f, and 6f exhibit similar behaviors. In contrast, the harmonic at 1fmore » appears frequency independent. This result corroborates previous studies showing that the nonlinear elasticity of rocks can be described with a minimum of two physical mechanisms. This study provides quantitative data that describes the rate dependency of nonlinear elasticity. Furthermore, these findings can be used to improve theories relating the macroscopic elastic response to microstructural features.« less

  1. Estimate error of frequency-dependent Q introduced by linear regression and its nonlinear implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guofa; Huang, Wei; Zheng, Hao; Zhang, Baoqing

    2016-02-01

    The spectral ratio method (SRM) is widely used to estimate quality factor Q via the linear regression of seismic attenuation under the assumption of a constant Q. However, the estimate error will be introduced when this assumption is violated. For the frequency-dependent Q described by a power-law function, we derived the analytical expression of estimate error as a function of the power-law exponent γ and the ratio of the bandwidth to the central frequency σ . Based on the theoretical analysis, we found that the estimate errors are mainly dominated by the exponent γ , and less affected by the ratio σ . This phenomenon implies that the accuracy of the Q estimate can hardly be improved by adjusting the width and range of the frequency band. Hence, we proposed a two-parameter regression method to estimate the frequency-dependent Q from the nonlinear seismic attenuation. The proposed method was tested using the direct waves acquired by a near-surface cross-hole survey, and its reliability was evaluated in comparison with the result of SRM.

  2. Dependence of thresholds for pulmonary capillary hemorrhage on diagnostic ultrasound frequency.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary ultrasound examination has become routine for diagnosis in many clinical and point-of-care medical settings. However, the phenomenon of pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) induction during diagnostic ultrasound imaging presents a poorly understood risk factor. PCH was observed in anesthetized rats exposed to 1.5-, 4.5- and 12.0-MHz diagnostic ultrasound to investigate the frequency dependence of PCH thresholds. PCH was detected in the ultrasound images as growing comet tail artifacts and was assessed using photographs of the surface of excised lungs. Previous photographs acquired after exposure to 7.6-MHz diagnostic ultrasound were included for analysis. In addition, at each frequency we measured dosimetric parameters, including peak rarefactional pressure amplitude and spatial peak, pulse average intensity attenuated by rat chest wall samples. Peak rarefactional pressure amplitude thresholds determined at each frequency, based on the proportion of PCH in groups of five rats, were 1.03 ± 0.02, 1.28 ± 0.14, 1.18 ± 0.12 and 1.36 ± 0.15 MPa at 1.5, 4.5, 7.6 and 12.0 MHz, respectively. Although the PCH lesions decreased in size with increasing ultrasonic frequency, owing to the smaller beam widths and scan lengths, the peak rarefactional pressure amplitude thresholds remained approximately constant. This dependence was different from that of the mechanical index, which indicates a need for a specific dosimetric parameter for safety guidance in pulmonary ultrasound.

  3. On the frequency dependence and spatial coherence of PKP precursor amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancinelli, Nicholas; Shearer, Peter; Thomas, Christine

    2016-03-01

    Studies now agree that small-scale (˜10 km) weak (˜0.1%) velocity perturbations throughout the lowermost mantle generate the globally averaged amplitudes of 1 Hz precursors to the core phase, . The possible frequency dependence and spatial coherence of this scattered phase, however, has been given less attention. Using a large global data set of ˜150,000 PKP precursor recordings, we characterize the frequency dependence of PKP precursors at central frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 4 Hz. At greater frequencies, we observe more scattered energy (relative to the reference phase PKPdf), particularly at shorter ranges. We model this observation by invoking heterogeneity at length scales from 2 to 30 km. Amplitudes at 0.5 Hz, in particular, suggest the presence of more heterogeneity at scales >8 km than present in previously published models. Using a regional bootstrap approach, we identify large (>20°), spatially coherent regions of anomalously strong scattering beneath the West Pacific, Central/North America, and—to a lesser extent—East Africa. Finally, as proof of concept, we use array processing techniques to locate the origin of scattered energy observed in Southern California by the Anza and Southern California Seismic Networks. The energy appears to come primarily from out-of-plane scattering on the receiver side. We suggest that such improvised arrays can increase global coverage and may reveal whether a majority of precursor energy comes from localized heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle.

  4. The Hygiene Hypothesis: An Explanation for the Increased Frequency of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Jean-François; Chatenoud, Lucienne

    2012-01-01

    The steadily increasing frequency of insulin-dependent diabetes in several countries is best explained today by the decline of infections. Epidemiologic and animal data support this conclusion, which, however, requires confirmation by intervention trials in man. The mechanisms of the protective effect of infections on diabetes onset are diverse including competition for homeostatic factors and stimulation of regulatory T cells and of Toll-like receptors. These considerations might have interesting therapeutic applications for the prevention of the disease. PMID:22355800

  5. Evidence for Association Between Low Frequency Variants in CHRNA6/CHRNB3 and Antisocial Drug Dependence.

    PubMed

    Kamens, Helen M; Corley, Robin P; Richmond, Phillip A; Darlington, Todd M; Dowell, Robin; Hopfer, Christian J; Stallings, Michael C; Hewitt, John K; Brown, Sandra A; Ehringer, Marissa A

    2016-09-01

    Common SNPs in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor genes (CHRN genes) have been associated with drug behaviors and personality traits, but the influence of rare genetic variants is not well characterized. The goal of this project was to identify novel rare variants in CHRN genes in the Center for Antisocial Drug Dependence (CADD) and Genetics of Antisocial Drug Dependence (GADD) samples and to determine if low frequency variants are associated with antisocial drug dependence. Two samples of 114 and 200 individuals were selected using a case/control design including the tails of the phenotypic distribution of antisocial drug dependence. The capture, sequencing, and analysis of all variants in 16 CHRN genes (CHRNA1-7, 9, 10, CHRNB1-4, CHRND, CHRNG, CHRNE) were performed independently for each subject in each sample. Sequencing reads were aligned to the human reference sequence using BWA prior to variant calling with the Genome Analysis ToolKit (GATK). Low frequency variants (minor allele frequency < 0.05) were analyzed using SKAT-O and C-alpha to examine the distribution of rare variants among cases and controls. In our larger sample, the region containing the CHRNA6/CHRNB3 gene cluster was significantly associated with disease status using both SKAT-O and C-alpha (unadjusted p values <0.05). More low frequency variants in the CHRNA6/CHRNB3 gene region were observed in cases compared to controls. These data support a role for genetic variants in CHRN genes and antisocial drug behaviors.

  6. Frequency dependent optical conductivity of strained graphene at T=0 from an effective quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shi-Jiang; Pan, Hui; Wang, Hai-Long

    2017-04-01

    An effective quantum field theory (EQFT) graphene sheet with arbitrary one dimensional strain field is derived from a microscopic effective low energy Hamiltonian. The geometric meaning of the strain-induced complex gauge field is clarified. The optical conductivity is also investigated, and a frequency dependent optical conductivity is obtained. The actual value of interband optical conductivity along the deformed direction is C0 + C1/ω2 in spite of the particular strain fields at T=0.

  7. In vitro characterization of HCN channel kinetics and frequency dependence in myocytes predicts biological pacemaker functionality

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Bucchi, Annalisa; Oren, Ronit V; Kryukova, Yelena; Dun, Wen; Clancy, Colleen E; Robinson, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    The pacemaker current, mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, contributes to the initiation and regulation of cardiac rhythm. Previous experiments creating HCN-based biological pacemakers in vivo found that an engineered HCN2/HCN1 chimeric channel (HCN212) resulted in significantly faster rates than HCN2, interrupted by 1–5 s pauses. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the differences in HCN212 and HCN2 in vivo functionality as biological pacemakers, we studied newborn rat ventricular myocytes over-expressing either HCN2 or HCN212 channels. The HCN2- and HCN212-over-expressing myocytes manifest similar voltage dependence, current density and sensitivity to saturating cAMP concentrations, but HCN212 has faster activation/deactivation kinetics. Compared with HCN2, myocytes expressing HCN212 exhibit a faster spontaneous rate and greater incidence of irregular rhythms (i.e. periods of rapid spontaneous rate followed by pauses). To explore these rhythm differences further, we imposed consecutive pacing and found that activation kinetics of the two channels are slower at faster pacing frequencies. As a result, time-dependent HCN current flowing during diastole decreases for both constructs during a train of stimuli at a rapid frequency, with the effect more pronounced for HCN2. In addition, the slower deactivation kinetics of HCN2 contributes to more pronounced instantaneous current at a slower frequency. As a result of the frequency dependence of both instantaneous and time-dependent current, HCN2 exhibits more robust negative feedback than HCN212, contributing to the maintenance of a stable pacing rhythm. These results illustrate the benefit of screening HCN constructs in spontaneously active myocyte cultures and may provide the basis for future optimization of HCN-based biological pacemakers. PMID:19171659

  8. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  9. FORWARD MODELING OF PROPAGATING SLOW WAVES IN CORONAL LOOPS AND THEIR FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT DAMPING

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Sudip; Banerjee, Dipankar; Magyar, Norbert; Yuan, Ding; Doorsselaere, Tom Van

    2016-03-20

    Propagating slow waves in coronal loops exhibit a damping that depends upon the frequency of the waves. In this study we aim to investigate the relationship of the damping length (L{sub d}) with the frequency of the propagating wave. We present a 3D coronal loop model with uniform density and temperature and investigate the frequency-dependent damping mechanism for the four chosen wave periods. We include the thermal conduction to damp the waves as they propagate through the loop. The numerical model output has been forward modeled to generate synthetic images of SDO/AIA 171 and 193 Å channels. The use of forward modeling, which incorporates the atomic emission properties into the intensity images, allows us to directly compare our results with the real observations. The results show that the damping lengths vary linearly with the periods. We also measure the contributions of the emission properties on the damping lengths by using density values from the simulation. In addition to that we have also calculated the theoretical dependence of L{sub d} with wave periods and showed that it is consistent with the results we obtained from the numerical modeling and earlier observations.

  10. Temperature and frequency dependent conductivity of lithium doped bismuth zinc vanadate semiconducting glassy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiya, S.; Punia, R.; Murugavel, S.; Maan, A. S.

    2014-11-01

    The ac conductivity of bismuth zinc vanadate glasses of compositions x Li2O (100 - x) (50V2O5·20 Bi2O3·30 ZnO); x = 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 has been studied in the frequency range 10-1 Hzb-2 MHz and in temperature range 313-533 K. The temperature and frequency dependent conductivity is found to obey Almond-West universal power law for all the studied lithium doped bismuth zinc vanadate glassy systems. Various parameters such as dc conductivity ( σ dc ), crossover frequency ( ω H ) and frequency exponent ( s) have been estimated by fitting the experimental data of ac conductivity to Almond-West universal power law. It has been observed that the ac conductivity of bismuth zinc vanadate glass system decreases with the increase in Li2O content. The ac conductivity and its frequency exponent have been analyzed in the frame work of various theoretical models. The ac conduction seems to take place via tunneling of overlapping large polarons in all the compositions.

  11. Neural tuning matches frequency-dependent time differences between the ears

    PubMed Central

    Benichoux, Victor; Fontaine, Bertrand; Franken, Tom P; Karino, Shotaro; Joris, Philip X; Brette, Romain

    2015-01-01

    The time it takes a sound to travel from source to ear differs between the ears and creates an interaural delay. It varies systematically with spatial direction and is generally modeled as a pure time delay, independent of frequency. In acoustical recordings, we found that interaural delay varies with frequency at a fine scale. In physiological recordings of midbrain neurons sensitive to interaural delay, we found that preferred delay also varies with sound frequency. Similar observations reported earlier were not incorporated in a functional framework. We find that the frequency dependence of acoustical and physiological interaural delays are matched in key respects. This suggests that binaural neurons are tuned to acoustical features of ecological environments, rather than to fixed interaural delays. Using recordings from the nerve and brainstem we show that this tuning may emerge from neurons detecting coincidences between input fibers that are mistuned in frequency. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06072.001 PMID:25915620

  12. Warning signals are under positive frequency-dependent selection in nature

    PubMed Central

    Chouteau, Mathieu; Arias, Mónica; Joron, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Positive frequency-dependent selection (FDS) is a selection regime where the fitness of a phenotype increases with its frequency, and it is thought to underlie important adaptive strategies resting on signaling and communication. However, whether and how positive FDS truly operates in nature remains unknown, which hampers our understanding of signal diversity. Here, we test for positive FDS operating on the warning color patterns of chemically defended butterflies forming multiple coexisting mimicry assemblages in the Amazon. Using malleable prey models placed in localities showing differences in the relative frequencies of warningly colored prey, we demonstrate that the efficiency of a warning signal increases steadily with its local frequency in the natural community, up to a threshold where protection stabilizes. The shape of this relationship is consistent with the direct effect of the local abundance of each warning signal on the corresponding avoidance knowledge of the local predator community. This relationship, which differs from purifying selection acting on each mimetic pattern, indicates that predator knowledge, integrated over the entire community, is saturated only for the most common warning signals. In contrast, among the well-established warning signals present in local prey assemblages, most are incompletely known to local predators and enjoy incomplete protection. This incomplete predator knowledge should generate strong benefits to life history traits that enhance warning efficiency by increasing the effective frequency of prey visible to predators. Strategies such as gregariousness or niche convergence between comimics may therefore readily evolve through their effects on predator knowledge and warning efficiency. PMID:26858416

  13. Frequency dependent electrical properties of nano-CdS/Ag junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, D.; Choudhury, A.

    2005-05-01

    Polymer embedded cadmium sulfide nanoparticles/quantum dots were synthesized by a chemical route using polyvinyl alcohol (lmw) as the desired matrix. In an attempt to measure the electrical properties of nano-CdS/Ag samples, we propose that contribution from surface traps are mainly responsible in determining the I˜ V and C˜ V characteristics in high frequency ranges. To be specific, beyond 1.2 MHz, the carrier injection from the trap centers of the embedded quantum dots is ensured by large current establishment even at negative biasing condition of the junction. The unexpected nonlinear signature of C˜ V response is believed to be due to the fact that while trying to follow very high signal frequency (at least 10-3 of recombination frequency), there is complete abruptness in carrier trapping (charging) or/and detrapping (decay) in a given CdS nanoparticle assembly. The frequency dependent unique role of the trap carriers certainly find application in nanoelectronic devices at a desirable frequency of operation.

  14. Frequency dependence of electrical and magnetic properties of Li-Ni-Mn-Co ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisnam, Mamata; Phanjoubam, Sumitra

    2012-02-01

    Substituted Li-ferrites with compositional formula Li 0.45- x/2 Ni 0.1Mn 0.1Co xFe 2.35- x/2 O 4 with x ranging from 0 to 0.1 in steps of 0.02 were prepared by the conventional ceramic technique. The single-phase spinel structure of the samples was confirmed by XRD analysis. The lattice constant was observed to increase with the increase of the Co 2+ substitution. The dielectric constant, ɛ' and dielectric loss tangent, tan δ was studied as a function of frequency in the range 100 Hz to 1 MHz. A decrease is observed in the value of ɛ' with substitution at lower frequencies. ɛ' showed a dispersive behavior with frequency for all the samples. The frequency dependence of tan δ showed a resonance peak. The magnetic properties viz initial permeability and magnetic loss were also studied as a function of frequency. The possible mechanisms contributing to the results have been discussed.

  15. Warning signals are under positive frequency-dependent selection in nature.

    PubMed

    Chouteau, Mathieu; Arias, Mónica; Joron, Mathieu

    2016-02-23

    Positive frequency-dependent selection (FDS) is a selection regime where the fitness of a phenotype increases with its frequency, and it is thought to underlie important adaptive strategies resting on signaling and communication. However, whether and how positive FDS truly operates in nature remains unknown, which hampers our understanding of signal diversity. Here, we test for positive FDS operating on the warning color patterns of chemically defended butterflies forming multiple coexisting mimicry assemblages in the Amazon. Using malleable prey models placed in localities showing differences in the relative frequencies of warningly colored prey, we demonstrate that the efficiency of a warning signal increases steadily with its local frequency in the natural community, up to a threshold where protection stabilizes. The shape of this relationship is consistent with the direct effect of the local abundance of each warning signal on the corresponding avoidance knowledge of the local predator community. This relationship, which differs from purifying selection acting on each mimetic pattern, indicates that predator knowledge, integrated over the entire community, is saturated only for the most common warning signals. In contrast, among the well-established warning signals present in local prey assemblages, most are incompletely known to local predators and enjoy incomplete protection. This incomplete predator knowledge should generate strong benefits to life history traits that enhance warning efficiency by increasing the effective frequency of prey visible to predators. Strategies such as gregariousness or niche convergence between comimics may therefore readily evolve through their effects on predator knowledge and warning efficiency.

  16. Viscoelastic characterization of compacted pharmaceutical excipient materials by analysis of frequency-dependent mechanical relaxation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, K.; Mousavi, S.; Lundberg, B.; Strømme, M.

    2005-09-01

    A newly developed method for determining the frequency-dependent complex Young's modulus was employed to analyze the mechanical response of compacted microcrystalline cellulose, sorbitol, ethyl cellulose and starch for frequencies up to 20 kHz. A Debye-like relaxation was observed in all the studied pharmaceutical excipient materials and a comparison with corresponding dielectric spectroscopy data was made. The location in frequency of the relaxation peak was shown to correlate to the measured tensile strength of the tablets, and the relaxation was interpreted as the vibrational response of the interparticle hydrogen and van der Waals bindings in the tablets. Further, the measured relaxation strength, holding information about the energy loss involved in the relaxation processes, showed that the weakest material in terms of tensile strength, starch, is the material among the four tested ones that is able to absorb the most energy within its structure when exposed to external perturbations inducing vibrations in the studied frequency range. The results indicate that mechanical relaxation analysis performed over relatively broad frequency ranges should be useful for predicting material properties of importance for the functionality of a material in applications such as, e.g., drug delivery, drug storage and handling, and also for clarifying the origin of hitherto unexplained molecular processes.

  17. Frequency dependent attenuation characteristics of coda waves in the Northwestern Himalayan (India) region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sushil; Singh, Priyamvada; Singh, Pitam; Biswal, Shubhasmita; Parija, Mahesh Prasad

    2016-03-01

    Digital seismogram data of 82 earthquakes from the Northwestern Himalayan (India) region recorded at different stations during 2004-2006 were analyzed to study the seismic coda wave attenuation characteristics in this region. We used 132 seismic observations from local earthquakes with a hypocentral distance <240 km and a magnitude range of 1.2-4.9 to study the coda QC using the single isotropic scattering model. These earthquakes were recorded at 20 temporary seismic stations installed in the Northwestern Himalayas (India) by the Wadia institute of Himalayan Geology, Dehradun. The QC values were estimated at 10 central frequencies: 1.5, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24, and 28 Hz using starting lapse-times of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 s and coda window-lengths of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 s. The QC fits the frequency dependent power-law, QC =Q0fn . For a 10 s lapse time with a 10-s coda window length QC = 47.42f1.012 and for a 50 s lapse time with a 50 s coda window length, QC = 204.1f0.934 . Q0 (QC at 1 Hz) varied from ∼47 for a 10 s lapse time and a 10 s window length, to ∼204 for a 50 s lapse time and a 50 s window length. An average frequency dependent power law fit for the study region may be given as QC = 116.716f0.9943 . The exponent of the frequency dependence law n ranged from 1.08 to 0.9, which correlates well with values obtained in other seismically and tectonically active and heterogeneous regions of the world. In our study region, QC increases both with respect to lapse time and frequency, i.e., the attenuation decreases as the quality factor is inversely proportional to attenuation. The low QC values or high attenuation at lower frequencies and high QC values or low attenuation at higher frequencies suggest that the heterogeneity decreases with increasing depth in our study region.

  18. The Frequency-Dependent Neuronal Length Constant in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Mäki, Hanna; Saari, Jukka; Salvador, Ricardo; Miranda, Pedro C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The behavior of the dendritic or axonal membrane voltage due to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is often modeled with the one-dimensional cable equation. For the cable equation, a length constant λ0 is defined; λ0 describes the axial decay of the membrane voltage in the case of constant applied electric field. In TMS, however, the induced electric field waveform is typically a segment of a sinusoidal wave, with characteristic frequencies of the order of several kHz. Objective: To show that the high frequency content of the stimulation pulse causes deviations in the spatial profile of the membrane voltage as compared to the steady state. Methods: We derive the cable equation in complex form utilizing the complex frequency-dependent representation of the membrane conductivity. In addition, we define an effective length constant λeff, which governs the spatial decay of the membrane voltage. We model the behavior of a dendrite in an applied electric field oscillating at 3.9 kHz with the complex cable equation and by solving the traditional cable equation numerically. Results: The effective length constant decreases as a function of frequency. For a model dendrite or axon, for which λ0 = 1.5 mm, the effective length constant at 3.9 kHz is decreased by a factor 10 to 0.13 mm. Conclusion: The frequency dependency of the neuronal length constant has to be taken into account when predicting the spatial behavior of the membrane voltage as a response to TMS. PMID:27555808

  19. Sensitivity of seismic measurements to frequency-dependent attenuation and upper mantle structure: An initial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellis, C.; Holtzman, B.

    2014-07-01

    This study addresses the sensitivity of seismic attenuation measurements to dissipative mechanisms and structure in the Earth's upper mantle. The Andrade anelastic model fits experimental attenuation data with a mild power law frequency dependence and can be scaled from laboratory to Earth conditions. We incorporate this anelastic model into 400km 1-D thermal profiles of the upper mantle. These continuous-spectrum models are approximated by multiple relaxation mechanisms that are implemented within a finite-difference scheme to perform wave propagation simulations in 1-D domains. In two sets of numerical experiments, we evaluate the measurable signature of the intrinsic attenuation structure. The two sets are defined by thermal profiles with added step functions of temperature, varying in (i) amplitude and depth or (ii) amplitude and sharpness. The corresponding synthetic data are processed using both the conventional t* approach, i.e., a linear regression of the displacement frequency spectrum, and an alternative nonlinear fit to identify the integrated value of attenuation and its frequency dependence. The measured sensitivity patterns are analyzed to assess the effects of the anelastic model and its spatial distribution on seismic data (in the absence of scattering effects). We have two straightforward results: (1) the frequency dependence power law is recoverable from the measurements; (2) t* is sensitive to both the depth and the amplitude of the step, and it is insensitive to the sharpness of the step, in the 0.25 to 2 Hz band. There is much potential for gaining information about the upper mantle thermodynamic state from careful interpretation of attenuation.

  20. Size- and composition-dependent radio frequency magnetic permeability of iron oxide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hongseok; Liu, Xiyu; Paik, Taejong; Palanisamy, Duraivelan; Kim, Jungkwun; Vogel, William D; Viescas, Arthur J; Chen, Jun; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C; Kikkawa, James M; Allen, Mark G; Murray, Christopher B

    2014-12-23

    We investigate the size- and composition-dependent ac magnetic permeability of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals for radio frequency (RF) applications. The nanocrystals are obtained through high-temperature decomposition synthesis, and their stoichiometry is determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Two sets of oxides are studied: (a) as-synthesized magnetite-rich and (b) aged maghemite nanocrystals. All nanocrystalline samples are confirmed to be in the superparamagnetic state at room temperature by SQUID magnetometry. Through the one-turn inductor method, the ac magnetic properties of the nanocrystalline oxides are characterized. In magnetite-rich iron oxide nanocrystals, size-dependent magnetic permeability is not observed, while maghemite iron oxide nanocrystals show clear size dependence. The inductance, resistance, and quality factor of hand-wound inductors with a superparamagnetic composite core are measured. The superparamagnetic nanocrystals are successfully embedded into hand-wound inductors to function as inductor cores.

  1. Size- and Composition-Dependent Radio Frequency Magnetic Permeability of Iron Oxide Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, H; Liu, XY; Paik, T; Palanisamy, D; Kim, J; Vogel, WD; Viescas, AJ; Chen, J; Papaefthymiou, GC; Kikkawa, JM; Allen, MG; Murray, CB

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the size- and composition-dependent ac magnetic permeability of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals for radio frequency (RF) applications. The nanocrystals are obtained through high-temperature decomposition synthesis, and their stoichiometry is determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy. Two sets of oxides are studied: (a) as-synthesized magnetite-rich and (b) aged maghemite nanocrystals. All nanocrystalline samples are confirmed to be in the superparamagnetic state at room temperature by SQUID magnetometry. Through the one-turn inductor method, the ac magnetic properties of the nanocrystalline oxides are characterized. In magnetite-rich iron oxide nanocrystals, size-dependent magnetic permeability is not observed, while maghemite iron oxide nanocrystals show clear size dependence. The inductance, resistance, and quality factor of hand-wound inductors with a superparamagnetic composite core are measured. The superparamagnetic nanocrystals are successfully embedded into hand-wound inductors to function as inductor cores.

  2. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  3. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  4. Tuning of gravity-dependent and gravity-independent vertical angular VOR gain changes by frequency of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Yakushin, Sergei B

    2012-06-01

    The gain of the vertical angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) was adaptively increased and decreased in a side-down head orientation for 4 h in two cynomolgus monkeys. Adaptation was performed at 0.25, 1, 2, or 4 Hz. The gravity-dependent and -independent gain changes were determined over a range of head orientations from left-side-down to right-side-down at frequencies from 0.25 to 10 Hz, before and after adaptation. Gain changes vs. frequency data were fit with a Gaussian to determine the frequency at which the peak gain change occurred, as well as the tuning width. The frequency at which the peak gravity-dependent gain change occurred was approximately equal to the frequency of adaptation, and the width increased monotonically with increases in the frequency of adaptation. The gravity-independent component was tuned to the adaptive frequency of 0.25 Hz but was uniformly distributed over all frequencies when the adaptation frequency was 1-4 Hz. The amplitude of the gravity-independent gain changes was larger after the aVOR gain decrease than after the gain increase across all tested frequencies. For the aVOR gain decrease, the phase lagged about 4° for frequencies below the adaptation frequency and led for frequencies above the adaptation frequency. For gain increases, the phase relationship as a function of frequency was inverted. This study demonstrates that the previously described dependence of aVOR gain adaptation on frequency is a property of the gravity-dependent component of the aVOR only. The gravity-independent component of the aVOR had a substantial tuning curve only at an adaptation frequency of 0.25 Hz.

  5. Understanding frequency distributions of path-dependent processes with non-multinomial maximum entropy approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanel, Rudolf; Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Thurner, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Path-dependent stochastic processes are often non-ergodic and observables can no longer be computed within the ensemble picture. The resulting mathematical difficulties pose severe limits to the analytical understanding of path-dependent processes. Their statistics is typically non-multinomial in the sense that the multiplicities of the occurrence of states is not a multinomial factor. The maximum entropy principle is tightly related to multinomial processes, non-interacting systems, and to the ensemble picture; it loses its meaning for path-dependent processes. Here we show that an equivalent to the ensemble picture exists for path-dependent processes, such that the non-multinomial statistics of the underlying dynamical process, by construction, is captured correctly in a functional that plays the role of a relative entropy. We demonstrate this for self-reinforcing Pólya urn processes, which explicitly generalize multinomial statistics. We demonstrate the adequacy of this constructive approach towards non-multinomial entropies by computing frequency and rank distributions of Pólya urn processes. We show how microscopic update rules of a path-dependent process allow us to explicitly construct a non-multinomial entropy functional, that, when maximized, predicts the time-dependent distribution function.

  6. Meteorological Excitations of Polar Motion for an Earth Model with Frequency-dependent Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Ray, J.; Li, J.; Huang, C.; Shen, W.

    2013-12-01

    Polar motion excitation involves the mass redistributions and motions of the Earth system relative to the mantle, as well as the frequency-dependent rheology of the Earth, where the latter has recently been modeled in the form of complex and frequency-dependent Love numbers and polar motion excitation transfer functions. At seasonal and intra-seasonal time scales, polar motions are dominated by angular momentum fluctuations due to mass redistributions and relative motions in the atmosphere, oceans, and continental water, snow and ice. In this study, we compare the geophysical excitations derived from various global atmospheric, oceanic and hydrological models (NCEP, ECCO, ERA40, ERAinterim and ECMWF operational products), and construct two model sets LDC1 and LDC2 by combining the above models with a least difference method, which selects FFT coefficients of the above data series closest to those of the geodetic excitation at each frequency to build a new series. Comparisons between the geodetic excitation (derived from the polar motion series IERS EOP 08 C04) and the geophysical excitations (based on those meteorological models) imply that the atmospheric models are the most reliable while the hydrological ones suffer from significant uncertainties; that the ERAinterim is, in general, the best model set among the original ones, but the combined models LDC1 and LDC2 are much better than ERAinterim; and that applying the frequency-dependent transfer functions to LDC1 and LDC2 improves their agreements with the geodetic excitation. Thus, we conclude that the combined models LDC1 and LDC2 are reliable, and the complex and frequency-dependent Love numbers and polar motion excitation transfer functions are well modeled. This study is supported in parts by the National 973 Project of China (No. 2013CB733305), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41174011, 41128003 and 11073044), and the Open Fund of the State Key Laboratory of Geodesy and Earth

  7. Meteorological excitations of polar motion for an Earth model with frequency-dependent responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Ray, Jim; Li, JianCheng; Shen, WenBin; Huang, ChengLi

    2014-05-01

    Polar motion excitation involves the mass redistributions and motions of the Earth system relative to the mantle, as well as the frequency-dependent rheology of the Earth, where the latter has recently been modeled in the form of complex and frequency-dependent Love numbers and polar motion excitation transfer functions. At seasonal and intra-seasonal time scales, polar motions are dominated by angular momentum fluctuations due to mass redistributions and relative motions in the atmosphere, oceans, and continental water, snow and ice. In this study, we compare the geophysical excitations derived from various global atmospheric, oceanic and hydrological models (NCEP, ECCO, ERA40, ERAinterim and ECMWF operational products), and construct two model sets LDC1 and LDC2 by combining the above models with a least difference method, which selects FFT coefficients of the above data series closest to those of the geodetic excitation at each frequency to build a new series. Comparisons between the geodetic excitation (derived from the polar motion series IERS EOP 08 C04) and the geophysical excitations (based on those meteorological models) imply that the atmospheric models are the most reliable while the hydrological ones suffer from significant uncertainties; that the ERAinterim is, in general, the best model set among the original ones, but the combined models LDC1 and LDC2 are much better than ERAinterim; and that applying the frequency-dependent transfer functions to LDC1 and LDC2 improves their agreements with the geodetic excitation. Thus, we conclude that the combined models LDC1 and LDC2 are reliable, and the complex and frequency-dependent Love numbers and polar motion excitation transfer functions are well modeled. This study is supported in parts by the National 973 Project of China (No. 2013CB733301 and 2013CB733305), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41174011, 41128003 and 11073044), and the Open Fund of the State Key Laboratory of Geodesy

  8. Frequency-dependent scaling from mesoscale to macroscale in viscoelastic random composites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the scaling from a statistical volume element (SVE; i.e. mesoscale level) to representative volume element (RVE; i.e. macroscale level) of spatially random linear viscoelastic materials, focusing on the quasi-static properties in the frequency domain. Requiring the material statistics to be spatially homogeneous and ergodic, the mesoscale bounds on the RVE response are developed from the Hill–Mandel homogenization condition adapted to viscoelastic materials. The bounds are obtained from two stochastic initial-boundary value problems set up, respectively, under uniform kinematic and traction boundary conditions. The frequency and scale dependencies of mesoscale bounds are obtained through computational mechanics for composites with planar random chessboard microstructures. In general, the frequency-dependent scaling to RVE can be described through a complex-valued scaling function, which generalizes the concept originally developed for linear elastic random composites. This scaling function is shown to apply for all different phase combinations on random chessboards and, essentially, is only a function of the microstructure and mesoscale. PMID:27274689

  9. Mechanisms underlying intensity-dependent changes in cortical selectivity for frequency-modulated sweeps.

    PubMed

    Razak, K A

    2012-04-01

    Frequency-modulated (FM) sweeps are common components of species-specific vocalizations. The intensity of FM sweeps can cover a wide range in the natural environment, but whether intensity affects neural selectivity for FM sweeps is unclear. Bats, such as the pallid bat, which use FM sweeps for echolocation, are suited to address this issue, because the intensity of echoes will vary with target distance. In this study, FM sweep rate selectivity of pallid bat auditory cortex neurons was measured using downward sweeps at different intensities. Neurons became more selective for FM sweep rates present in the bat's echolocation calls as intensity increased. Increased selectivity resulted from stronger inhibition of responses to slower sweep rates. The timing and bandwidth of inhibition generated by frequencies on the high side of the excitatory tuning curve [sideband high-frequency inhibition (HFI)] shape rate selectivity in cortical neurons in the pallid bat. To determine whether intensity-dependent changes in FM rate selectivity were due to altered inhibition, the timing and bandwidth of HFI were quantified at multiple intensities using the two-tone inhibition paradigm. HFI arrived faster relative to excitation as sound intensity increased. The bandwidth of HFI also increased with intensity. The changes in HFI predicted intensity-dependent changes in FM rate selectivity. These data suggest that neural selectivity for a sweep parameter is not static but shifts with intensity due to changes in properties of sideband inhibition.

  10. Circularly polarized harmonic generation by intense bicircular laser pulses: electron recollision dynamics and frequency dependent helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Mauger, François; Yuan, Kai-Jun

    2016-12-01

    Numerical solutions of time-dependent Schrödinger equations for one and two electron cyclic molecules {{{H}}}nq+ exposed to intense bichromatic circularly polarized laser pulses of frequencies {ω }1 and {ω }2, such that {ω }1/{ω }2={n}1/{n}2 (integer) produce circularly polarized high order harmonics with a cut-off recollision maximum energy at and greater than the linear polarization law (in atomic units) {N}m{ω }1={I}p+3.17{U}p, where I p is the ionization potential and {U}p={(2{E}0)}2/4{ω }2 is the ponderomotive energy defined by the field E 0 (intensity I={{cE}}02/8π ) from each pulse and mean frequency ω =({ω }1+{ω }2)/2 . An electron recollision model in a rotating frame at rotating frequency {{Δ }}ω =({ω }1-{ω }2)/2 predicts this simple result as a result of recollision dynamics in a combination of bichromatic circularly polarized pulses. The harmonic helicities and their intensities are shown to depend on compatible symmetries of the net pulse electric fields with that of the molecules.

  11. Human Commercial Models' Eye Colour Shows Negative Frequency-Dependent Selection.

    PubMed

    Forti, Isabela Rodrigues Nogueira; Young, Robert John

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the eye colour of human commercial models registered in the UK (400 female and 400 male) and Brazil (400 female and 400 male) to test the hypothesis that model eye colour frequency was the result of negative frequency-dependent selection. The eye colours of the models were classified as: blue, brown or intermediate. Chi-square analyses of data for countries separated by sex showed that in the United Kingdom brown eyes and intermediate colours were significantly more frequent than expected in comparison to the general United Kingdom population (P<0.001). In Brazil, the most frequent eye colour brown was significantly less frequent than expected in comparison to the general Brazilian population. These results support the hypothesis that model eye colour is the result of negative frequency-dependent selection. This could be the result of people using eye colour as a marker of genetic diversity and finding rarer eye colours more attractive because of the potential advantage more genetically diverse offspring that could result from such a choice. Eye colour may be important because in comparison to many other physical traits (e.g., hair colour) it is hard to modify, hide or disguise, and it is highly polymorphic.

  12. Frequency-dependent fitness of hybrids between oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and weedy B. rapa (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Hauser, Thure P; Damgaard, Christian; Jørgensen, Rikke B

    2003-04-01

    Fitness of interspecific hybrids is sometimes high relative to their parents, despite the conventional belief that they are mostly unfit. F(1) hybrids between oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and weedy B. rapa can be significantly more fit than their weedy parents under some conditions; however, under other conditions they are less fit. To understand the reasons, we measured the seed production of B. napus, B. rapa, and different generations of hybrid plants at three different densities and in mixtures of different frequencies (including pure stands). Brassica napus, B. rapa, and backcross plants (F(1) ♀ × B. rapa) produced many more seeds per plant in pure plots than in mixtures and more seeds in plots when each was present at high frequency. The opposite was true for F(1) plants that produced many more seeds than B. rapa in mixtures, but fewer in pure stands. Both vegetative and reproductive interactions may be responsible for these effects. Our results show that the fitness of both parents and hybrids is strongly frequency-dependent and that the likelihood of introgression of genes between the species thus may depend on the numbers and densities of parents and their various hybrid offspring in the population.

  13. Frequency-dependent scaling from mesoscale to macroscale in viscoelastic random composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the scaling from a statistical volume element (SVE; i.e. mesoscale level) to representative volume element (RVE; i.e. macroscale level) of spatially random linear viscoelastic materials, focusing on the quasi-static properties in the frequency domain. Requiring the material statistics to be spatially homogeneous and ergodic, the mesoscale bounds on the RVE response are developed from the Hill-Mandel homogenization condition adapted to viscoelastic materials. The bounds are obtained from two stochastic initial-boundary value problems set up, respectively, under uniform kinematic and traction boundary conditions. The frequency and scale dependencies of mesoscale bounds are obtained through computational mechanics for composites with planar random chessboard microstructures. In general, the frequency-dependent scaling to RVE can be described through a complex-valued scaling function, which generalizes the concept originally developed for linear elastic random composites. This scaling function is shown to apply for all different phase combinations on random chessboards and, essentially, is only a function of the microstructure and mesoscale.

  14. Human Commercial Models’ Eye Colour Shows Negative Frequency-Dependent Selection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the eye colour of human commercial models registered in the UK (400 female and 400 male) and Brazil (400 female and 400 male) to test the hypothesis that model eye colour frequency was the result of negative frequency-dependent selection. The eye colours of the models were classified as: blue, brown or intermediate. Chi-square analyses of data for countries separated by sex showed that in the United Kingdom brown eyes and intermediate colours were significantly more frequent than expected in comparison to the general United Kingdom population (P<0.001). In Brazil, the most frequent eye colour brown was significantly less frequent than expected in comparison to the general Brazilian population. These results support the hypothesis that model eye colour is the result of negative frequency-dependent selection. This could be the result of people using eye colour as a marker of genetic diversity and finding rarer eye colours more attractive because of the potential advantage more genetically diverse offspring that could result from such a choice. Eye colour may be important because in comparison to many other physical traits (e.g., hair colour) it is hard to modify, hide or disguise, and it is highly polymorphic. PMID:28005995

  15. Tissue characterization by imaging the local frequency dependent relative backscatter coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenderka, Klaus V.; Gaertner, Tilio; Cobet, Ulrich; Zacharias, Mario; Heynemann, Hans

    2000-04-01

    Conventional B-scan systems only use the amplitude information of the backscattered signals for imaging. By imaging the local frequency dependent relative backscatter coefficient it is possible to improve the image contrast and to reduce system effects. Based on spectral analysis of rf echo signals, a procedure was developed to correct for system specific effects and to determine the relative backscatter coefficient. A new image with improved contrast results from grayscale or color coding of the frequency components of the relative backscatter coefficient. The method was applied to in vivo measurements of human prostate and transplanted kidney. For cancerous prostate tissue the relative backscatter coefficient is about 8 dB lower than for normal tissue regions. The results of the investigations on kidneys show no correlation to the current function of the organ. Certainly the different course of the frequency dependence of the relative backscatter coefficient of renal cortex and calices regions allows a contrast improvement. The method provides a system independent imaging procedure with improved image contrast for tissues with different scattering behavior and slightly reduced spatial resolution. Imaging the relative backscatter coefficient will not substitute the conventional B-mode image, but it is a useful tool providing additional information about the tissue state.

  16. Energy and frequency dependence of the alpha particle redistribution produced by internal kink modes

    SciTech Connect

    Farengo, R.; Ferrari, H. E.; Garcia-Martinez, P. L.; Firpo, M.-C.; Ettoumi, W.; Lifschitz, A. F.

    2014-08-15

    The redistribution of alpha particles due to internal kink modes is studied. The exact particle trajectories in the total fields, equilibrium plus perturbation, are calculated. The equilibrium has circular cross section and the plasma parameters are similar to those expected in ITER. The alpha particles are initially distributed according to a slowing down distribution function and have energies between 18 keV and 3.5 MeV. The (1, 1), (2, 2), and (2, 1) modes are included and the effect of changing their amplitude and frequency is studied. When only the (1, 1) mode is included, the spreading of high energy (E≳1 MeV) alpha particles increases slowly with the energy and mode frequency. At lower energies, the redistribution is more sensitive to the mode frequency and particle energy. When a (2, 1) mode is added, the spreading increases significantly and particles can reach the edge of the plasma. Trapped particles are the most affected and the redistribution parameter can have maxima above 1 MeV, depending on the mode frequency. These results can have important implications for ash removal.

  17. Model for radial dependence of frequency distributions for energy imparted in nanometer volumes from HZE particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Nikjoo, H.; Goodhead, D. T.; Decillo, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    This paper develops a deterministic model of frequency distributions for energy imparted (total energy deposition) in small volumes similar to DNA molecules from high-energy ions of interest for space radiation protection and cancer therapy. Frequency distributions for energy imparted are useful for considering radiation quality and for modeling biological damage produced by ionizing radiation. For high-energy ions, secondary electron (delta-ray) tracks originating from a primary ion track make dominant contributions to energy deposition events in small volumes. Our method uses the distribution of electrons produced about an ion's path and incorporates results from Monte Carlo simulation of electron tracks to predict frequency distributions for ions, including their dependence on radial distance. The contribution from primary ion events is treated using an impact parameter formalism of spatially restricted linear energy transfer (LET) and energy-transfer straggling. We validate our model by comparing it directly to results from Monte Carlo simulations for proton and alpha-particle tracks. We show for the first time frequency distributions of energy imparted in DNA structures by several high-energy ions such as cosmic-ray iron ions. Our comparison with results from Monte Carlo simulations at low energies indicates the accuracy of the method.

  18. FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF POLARIZATION OF ZEBRA PATTERN IN TYPE-IV SOLAR RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneda, Kazutaka; Misawa, H.; Tsuchiya, F.; Obara, T.; Iwai, K.

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the polarization characteristics of a zebra pattern (ZP) in a type-IV solar radio burst observed with AMATERAS on 2011 June 21 for the purpose of evaluating the generation processes of ZPs. Analyzing highly resolved spectral and polarization data revealed the frequency dependence of the degree of circular polarization and the delay between two polarized components for the first time. The degree of circular polarization was 50%–70% right-handed and it varied little as a function of frequency. Cross-correlation analysis determined that the left-handed circularly polarized component was delayed by 50–70 ms relative to the right-handed component over the entire frequency range of the ZP and this delay increased with the frequency. We examined the obtained polarization characteristics by using pre-existing ZP models and concluded that the ZP was generated by the double-plasma-resonance process. Our results suggest that the ZP emission was originally generated in a completely polarized state in the O-mode and was partly converted into the X-mode near the source. Subsequently, the difference between the group velocities of the O-mode and X-mode caused the temporal delay.

  19. Sensitivity to a frequency-dependent circular polarization in an isotropic stochastic gravitational wave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Tristan L.; Caldwell, Robert

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the sensitivity to a circular polarization of an isotropic stochastic gravitational wave background (ISGWB) as a function of frequency for ground- and space-based interferometers and observations of the cosmic microwave background. The origin of a circularly polarized ISGWB may be due to exotic primordial physics (i.e., parity violation in the early universe) and may be strongly frequency dependent. We present calculations within a coherent framework which clarifies the basic requirements for sensitivity to circular polarization, in distinction from previous work which focused on each of these techniques separately. We find that the addition of an interferometer with the sensitivity of the Einstein Telescope in the southern hemisphere improves the sensitivity of the ground-based network to circular polarization by about a factor of two. The sensitivity curves presented in this paper make clear that the wide range in frequencies of current and planned observations (10-18 Hz ≲f ≲100 Hz ) will be critical to determining the physics that underlies any positive detection of circular polarization in the ISGWB. We also identify a desert in circular polarization sensitivity for frequencies between 10-15 Hz ≲f ≲10-3 Hz , given the inability for pulsar timing arrays and indirect-detection methods to distinguish the gravitational wave polarization.

  20. Dependences of quantitative ultrasound parameters on frequency and porosity in water-saturated nickel foams.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Il

    2014-02-01

    The frequency-dependent phase velocity, attenuation coefficient, and backscatter coefficient were measured from 0.8 to 1.2 MHz in 24 water-saturated nickel foams as trabecular-bone-mimicking phantoms. The power law fits to the measurements showed that the phase velocity, the attenuation coefficient, and the backscatter coefficient were proportional to the frequency with exponents n of 0.95, 1.29, and 3.18, respectively. A significant linear correlation was found between the phase velocity at 1.0 MHz and the porosity. In contrast, the best regressions for the normalized broadband ultrasound attenuation and the backscatter coefficient at 1.0 MHz were obtained with the polynomial fits of second order.

  1. Frequency-dependent dielectric permittivity of salt-free charged lamellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenberg, B.; Dufrêche, J.-F.; Turq, P.

    2005-10-01

    We present a new model to analyze dielectric spectroscopy measurements on charged lamellar systems, with the following improvements with respect to the hitherto available models: (i) it does not rely on the hypothesis of local electro-neutrality, and allows to treat the salt-free case; (ii) the chemical exchange governing the partition between free and bound ions is properly taken into account; (iii) a fully analytical solution is provided. The variation of the frequency-dependent dielectric permittivity with both thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of the free-bound ion equilibrium is presented. In particular, the relative weights of both relaxation modes (exchange and transport), and their characteristic frequencies are discussed. This study opens the way to the analysis of systems for which the usual models are irrelevant, such as salt-free clay gels or membranes.

  2. Feasibility of controlling speed-dependent low-frequency brake vibration amplification by modulating actuation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Osman Taha; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2014-12-01

    In this article, a feasibility study of controlling the low frequency torque response of a disc brake system with modulated actuation pressure (in the open loop mode) is conducted. First, a quasi-linear model of the torsional system is introduced, and analytical solutions are proposed to incorporate the modulation effect. Tractable expressions for three different modulation schemes are obtained, and conditions that would lead to a reduction in the oscillatory amplitudes are identified. Second, these conditions are evaluated with a numerical model of the torsional system with clearance nonlinearity, and analytical solutions are verified in terms of the trends observed. Finally, a laboratory experiment with a solenoid valve is built to modulate actuation pressure with a constant duty cycle, and time-frequency domain data are acquired. Measurements are utilized to assess analytical observations, and all methods show that the speed-dependent brake torque amplitudes can be altered with an appropriate modulation of actuation pressure.

  3. Size and shape dependence of Debye temperature and Raman frequency of nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Raghuvesh; Bhatt, Sandhya; Kumar, Munish

    2015-02-01

    A simple theoretical model is developed to study the size and shape dependence of Debye temperature and Raman frequency of nanomaterial. We have studied the effect of size and shape on Debye temperature of nanocrystalline Fe, Co, Al and Ag. The model is extended to study the effect of size and shape on the Raman frequency of nanocrystalline SnO2, CeO2 and CdSe. The results obtained are compared with the available experimental data. A good agreement between the theory and experimental data supports the validity of the model developed. We also report the results for nanowire and nanofilm in the absence of experimental data, which may help the researchers engaged in the experimental studies.

  4. Single-lobed frequency-dependent beam shape in an echolocating false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens).

    PubMed

    Kloepper, Laura N; Nachtigall, Paul E; Quintos, Christopher; Vlachos, Stephanie A

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies indicate some odontocetes may produce echolocation beams with a dual-lobed vertical structure. The shape of the odontocete echolocation beam was further investigated in a false killer whale performing an echolocation discrimination task. Clicks were recorded with an array of 16 hydrophones and frequency-dependent amplitude plots were constructed to assess beam shape. The majority of the echolocation clicks were single-lobed in structure with most energy located between 20 and 80 kHz. These data indicate the false killer whale does not produce a dual-lobed structure, as has been shown in bottlenose dolphins, which may be a function of lowered frequencies in the emitted signal due to hearing loss.

  5. BOLD Responses to Stimuli: Dependence on Frequency, Stimulus form, Amplitude, and Repetition Rate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Peter; Drysdale, Peter; van der Merwe, Helena; Kyriakou, Elizabeth; Rigozzi, Michelle; Germanoska, Biljana; Rennie, Christopher

    2006-03-01

    A quantitative theory is developed for the relationship between stimulus and the resulting Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) functional MRI signal in the brain. The relationship of stimuli to neuronal activity during evoked responses is inferred from recent physiology-based modeling of evoked response potentials (ERPs). A hemodynamic model is then used to calculate the BOLD response to neuronal activity. The predicted response is analyzed vs. form, frequency, and amplitude of stimulus. The BOLD frequency response is very nearly linear in the parameter ranges of interest, with the form of a low-pass filter with a weak resonance at 0.07 Hz. For short stimuli, the response is closely proportional to the time-integrated stimulus-evoked activity, rather than the peak amplitude, as often assumed. There can thus be widely differing proportionalities between BOLD and peak activity, a likely reason for the weak expected correlation between ERPs and BOLD.

  6. Frequency Dependent Polarization Analysis of Ambient Seismic Noise Recorded at Broadband Seismometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koper, K.; Hawley, V.

    2010-12-01

    Hz), Rayleigh-type energy was again dominant, in the form of Rg waves created by nearby cultural activities. Analysis of the time dependence of noise power shows that a frequency range of at least 0.02-1.0 Hz (much larger than the microseism band) is sensitive to annual, meteorologically induced sources of noise. We are currently applying our technique to selected seismometers from USArray and the University of Utah Seismic Network.

  7. Frequency-dependent environmental fatigue crack propagation in the 7XXX alloy/aqueous chloride system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasem, Zuhair Mattoug

    The need to predict the fatigue performance of aging aerospace structures has focused interest on environmentally assisted cracking in thick-section damage-tolerant aluminum alloys (AA). The objective of this research is to characterize and understand the time-dependent processes that govern environmental fatigue crack propagation (EFCP) in 7XXX series aluminum alloys exposed to an aggressive environment. Results are utilized to identify the rate-controlling step in growth enhancement in order to develop a mechanistic model describing the time dependency of EFCP. Aluminum alloy 7075, tested in the sensitive (SL) orientation and exposed to aqueous chloride solution, is studied. Da/dNcrit for different D K levels depends on 1/√fcrit, as predicted by process zone hydrogen-diffusion-limited crack growth modeling. A model based on hydrogen diffusion controlled growth is modified to include a stress-dependent critical hydrogen concentration normalized with the crack tip hydrogen concentration (Ccrit/CS). It is proposed that da/dNcrit for a given D K and R corresponds to the distance ahead of the crack tip where the local tensile stress associated with Kmax is maximum. The reversed plasticity estimate of this location equals da/dNcrit for two aging conditions of 7075 (SL)/NaCl at R = 0.1. The EFCP dependencies on alloy microstructure (T6 vs. T7), crack orientation (SL vs. LT), and stress ratio are measured and interpreted based on their effect on da/dN crit and fcrit as well as environmental closure. Chromate addition to the chloride solution eliminates the environmental acceleration of crack growth and reduces corrosion-product induced closure. In chromate-inhibited solution, the frequency dependence of EFCP in 7075 (SL) is unique. Da/dN is reduced at moderate and low frequencies to a value similar to crack growth rate in moist air, probably due to formation of a passive film which inhibits hydrogen uptake. Inhibition is mitigated by increasing frequency or increasing

  8. Frequency dependence of loss tangent of thermally annealed undoped lead iodide crystals in the dark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Mahmoud A.; Abdul-Gader Jafar, Mousa M.

    2006-10-01

    The effect of isothermal annealing ( T⩽120 °C) on the frequency dependence of the loss tangent, tan δ, of undoped lead iodide (PbI 2) crystals in the dark has been investigated in the range 0.1-15 kHz at different ambient temperatures ( T=15-120 °C) without and with DC biasing ( V⩽2 V). Thermal annealing of as-grown PbI 2 crystals modified both the magnitude and frequency dependence of their tan δ. The tan δ-ƒ data ( T=17 °C) of unbiased as-grown crystals were found to fit a tan δ∝ƒ - m dependence, with m˜0.94 in the range 100 Hz <ƒ<10 kHz. After annealing these crystals at T=70 °C for 1 h, the tan δ∝ƒ - m relation was obeyed for unbiased samples at any T over most of the frequency range studied, with the exponent m being reduced to around 0.55; a behavior that was also found for isothermally annealed PbI 2 crystals when were DC biased, but at high ambient temperatures. The tan δ- T data (ƒ=1 kHz) of the unbiased prolonged annealed ( T=120 °C) PbI 2 crystals exhibited two different thermally activated regimes, with activation energies Ea˜0.23 and 0.087 eV in the ranges 75-120 °C and 15-75 °C, respectively, which were related to trapping cationic Pb +2-vacancies/hole-impurity levels in the crystal band gap. An interpolytypic phase transformation of the 2H-PbI 2 upon isothermal annealing may not, however, be entirely excluded.

  9. Temperature and frequency dependent conductivity of bismuth zinc vanadate semiconducting glassy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punia, R.; Kundu, R. S.; Dult, Meenakshi; Murugavel, S.; Kishore, N.

    2012-10-01

    The ac conductivity of bismuth zinc vanadate glasses with compositions 50V2O5. xBi2O3. (50-x) ZnO has been studied in the frequency range 10-1 Hz to 2 MHz and in temperature range 333.16 K to 533.16 K. The temperature and frequency dependent conductivity is found to obey Jonscher's universal power law for all the compositions of bismuth zinc vanadate glass system. The dc conductivity (σdc), crossover frequency (ωH), and frequency exponent (s) have been estimated from the fitting of experimental data of ac conductivity with Jonscher's universal power law. Enthalpy to dissociate the cation from its original site next to a charge compensating center (Hf) and enthalpy of migration (Hm) have also been estimated. It has been observed that mobility of charge carriers and ac conductivity in case of zinc vanadate glass system increases with increase in Bi2O3 content. In order to determine the conduction mechanism, the ac conductivity and its frequency exponent have been analyzed in the frame work of various theoretical models based on classical hopping over barriers and quantum mechanical tunneling. The ac conduction takes place via tunneling of overlapping large polarons in all the compositions of presently studied vanadate glasses. The fitting of experimental data of ac conductivity with overlapping large polarons tunneling model has also been done. The parameters; density of states at Fermi level (N(EF)), activation energy associated with charge transfer between the overlapping sites (WHO), inverse localization length (α) and polaron radius (rp) obtained from fitting of this model with experimental data are reasonable.

  10. Motion-direction specificity for adaptation-induced duration compression depends on temporal frequency

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Aurelio; Ng, Eugenie; Johnston, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Adapting to a 20 Hz oscillating grating reduces the apparent duration of a 10 Hz drifting grating displayed subsequently in the same location as the adaptor. The effect is orientation-independent as it remains once the adaptor is rotated 90° relative to the tests (Johnston, Arnold, & Nishida, 2006). However, it was shown that, for random dots moving at 3°/s, duration compression follows adaptation only when the adaptor and test drift in the same direction, and it disappears when they drift in opposite directions (Curran & Benton, 2012). Here, we explored the relationship between the relative motion direction of adaptor and test and the strength of duration compression for a wider range of speeds and for narrow-band stimuli (temporal frequencies between 3 and 18 Hz). We first measured perceived temporal frequency for the same stimuli after adaptation, and we used these estimates to match the apparent rate of the adapted and unadapted tests in the duration task. We found that, whereas at 3 Hz the effect of adaptation in the opposite direction on duration is marginal, at higher frequencies there is substantial duration compression in the opposite direction. These results indicate that there may be two contributions to apparent duration compression: a cortical contribution sensitive to orientation and motion direction at a wide range of temporal frequencies and a direction-independent subcortical contribution, which is revealed at higher frequencies. However, while direction specificity implies cortical involvement, subcortical orientation dependency and the influence of feedback to subcortical areas should not be ignored. PMID:24167162

  11. Investigating the frequency dependence of mantle Q by stacking P and PP spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Linda M.; Shearer, Peter M.

    2000-11-01

    Using seismograms from globally distributed, shallow earthquakes between 1988 and 1998, we compute spectra for P arrivals from epicentral distances of 40° to 80° and PP arrivals from 80° to 160°. Selecting records with estimated signal-to-noise ratios greater than 2, we find 17,836 P and 14,721 PP spectra. We correct each spectrum for the known instrument response and for an ω-2 source model that accounts for varying event sizes. Next, we stack the logarithms of the P and PP spectra in bins of similar source-receiver range. The stacked log spectra, denoted as log(DP') and log(DPP'), appear stable between about 0.16 and 0.86 Hz, with noise and/or bias affecting the results at higher frequencies. Assuming that source spectral differences are randomly distributed, then for shallow events, when the PP range is twice the P range, the average residual source spectrum may be estimated as 2 log(DP')-log(DPP'), and the average P wave attenuation spectrum may be estimated as log(DPP') - log(DP'). The residual source spectral estimates exhibit a smooth additional falloff as ω-0.15±0.05 between 0.16 and 0.86 Hz, indicating that ω-2.15±0.05 is an appropriate average source model for shallow events. The attenuation spectra show little distance dependence over this band and have a P wave t¯* value of ˜0.5 s. We use t¯* measurements from individual P and PP spectra to invert for a frequency-independent Q model and find that the upper mantle is nearly 5 times as attenuating as the lower mantle. Frequency dependence in Qα is difficult to resolve directly in these data but, as previous researchers have noted, is required to reconcile these values with long-period Q estimates. Using Q model QL6 [Durek and Ekström, 1996] as a long-period constraint, we experiment with fitting our stacked log spectra with an absorption band model. We find that the upper corner frequency f2 in the absorption band must be depth-dependent to account for the lack of a strong distance

  12. Polarization-dependent plasmonic coupling in dual-layer metallic structures at terahertz frequencies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong Xiang; Chan, Kam Tai

    2011-01-31

    Dual-layer metallic wire-hole structures were fabricated and their terahertz transmission properties were measured. They exhibit polarization-dependent transmittance with large extinction ratios. Simulation and experimental results on structures with different wire-to-hole orientations provide strong evidence that the resonance peaks are caused by plasmonic coupling between the two metallic layers. A simplified LC-circuit model is proposed to explain the coupling mechanism and to estimate the peak frequencies. Our results suggest that specific electromagnetic response can be achieved by appropriate design of the geometrical patterns on the two metallic layers and a suitable polarization of the incident wave.

  13. Test Temperature Dependence of Transesterification of Triolein under Low-Frequency Ultrasonic Irradiation Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanh, Hoang Duc; Dong, Nguyen The; Okitsu, Kenji; Maeda, Yasuaki; Nishimura, Rokuro

    2007-07-01

    The test temperature dependence of the transesterification of triolein with methanol and a base catalyst (NaOH and KOH) was investigated using a molar ratio of methanol to triolein of 6:1, a catalyst concentration of 1% and a temperature range of 3-50 °C under a low-frequency ultrasonic irradiation condition (40 kHz). It was found that the methyl ester concentration at an irradiation time of 5 min increased with increasing temperature, where it tended to level off at temperatures higher than 20 °C. Furthermore, apparent activation energy was estimated from the relationship between the rate and the reciprocal of temperature.

  14. Determination of ferroelectric contributions to electromechanical response by frequency dependent piezoresponse force microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Seol, Daehee; Park, Seongjae; Varenyk, Olexandr V.; ...

    2016-07-28

    Hysteresis loop analysis via piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is typically performed to probe the existence of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale. But, such an approach is rather complex in accurately determining the pure contribution of ferroelectricity to the PFM. We suggest a facile method to discriminate the ferroelectric effect from the electromechanical (EM) response through the use of frequency dependent ac amplitude sweep with combination of hysteresis loops in PFM. This combined study through experimental and theoretical approaches verifies that this method can be used as a new tool to differentiate the ferroelectric effect from the other factors that contribute tomore » the EM response.« less

  15. Determination of ferroelectric contributions to electromechanical response by frequency dependent piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, Daehee; Park, Seongjae; Varenyk, Olexandr V.; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lee, Ho Nyung; Morozovska, Anna N.; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-07-28

    Hysteresis loop analysis via piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is typically performed to probe the existence of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale. But, such an approach is rather complex in accurately determining the pure contribution of ferroelectricity to the PFM. We suggest a facile method to discriminate the ferroelectric effect from the electromechanical (EM) response through the use of frequency dependent ac amplitude sweep with combination of hysteresis loops in PFM. This combined study through experimental and theoretical approaches verifies that this method can be used as a new tool to differentiate the ferroelectric effect from the other factors that contribute to the EM response.

  16. Finite element modeling of truss structures with frequency-dependent material damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesieutre, George A.

    1991-01-01

    A physically motivated modelling technique for structural dynamic analysis that accommodates frequency dependent material damping was developed. Key features of the technique are the introduction of augmenting thermodynamic fields (AFT) to interact with the usual mechanical displacement field, and the treatment of the resulting coupled governing equations using finite element analysis methods. The AFT method is fully compatible with current structural finite element analysis techniques. The method is demonstrated in the dynamic analysis of a 10-bay planar truss structure, a structure representative of those contemplated for use in future space systems.

  17. Determination of ferroelectric contributions to electromechanical response by frequency dependent piezoresponse force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Seol, Daehee; Park, Seongjae; Varenyk, Olexandr V.; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lee, Ho Nyung; Morozovska, Anna N.; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-01-01

    Hysteresis loop analysis via piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is typically performed to probe the existence of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale. However, such an approach is rather complex in accurately determining the pure contribution of ferroelectricity to the PFM. Here, we suggest a facile method to discriminate the ferroelectric effect from the electromechanical (EM) response through the use of frequency dependent ac amplitude sweep with combination of hysteresis loops in PFM. Our combined study through experimental and theoretical approaches verifies that this method can be used as a new tool to differentiate the ferroelectric effect from the other factors that contribute to the EM response. PMID:27466086

  18. Frequency-dependent action potential prolongation in Aplysia pleural sensory neurones.

    PubMed

    Edstrom, J P; Lukowiak, K D

    1985-10-01

    The effects of repetitive activity on action-potential shape in Aplysia californica pleural sensory cells are described. Action potentials were evoked by intracellular current injection at frequencies between 7.41 and 0.2 Hz. In contrast to other molluscan neurons having brief action potentials, it was found that at these firing rates the normally brief action potential develops a prominent shoulder or plateau during the repolarization phase. Higher stimulus rates broaden the action potential more rapidly and to a greater extent than lower stimulus rates. Inactivation is slow relative to activation; effects of 3-s 6-Hz trains are detectable after 1 min rest. The amplitude of the plateau voltage reaches a maximum of 50-70 mV at the highest stimulus rates tested. Frequency-dependent increases in action-potential duration measured at half-amplitude normally range between 6 and 15 ms. Cadmium, at concentrations between 0.05 and 0.5 mM, antagonizes frequency-dependent broadening. The increases in duration induced by repetitive activity are more sensitive to cadmium than are the increases in plateau amplitude. Tetraethylammonium, at concentrations between 0.5 and 10 mM, slightly increases the duration and amplitude of single action potentials. During repetitive activity at high stimulus rates the maximum duration and rate of broadening are both increased but the amplitude of the plateau potential is not affected by these tetraethylammonium concentrations. Above 10 mM, tetraethylammonium greatly increases the duration and amplitude of single action potentials as well as the rates of action-potential duration and amplitude increase during repetitive activity. These high tetraethylammonium concentrations also cause the normally smoothly increasing duration and amplitude to reach a maximum value early in a train and then decline slowly during the remainder of the train. The consequences of frequency-dependent spike broadening in these neurons have not yet been investigated

  19. Pulse width dependence of Brillouin frequency in single mode optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok-Beom; Kim, Young-Gyu; Heo, Jin-Seok; Lee, Jung-Ju

    2005-11-14

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering in optical fibers can be used to measure strain or temperature in a distributed manner. Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA) is the most common sensor system based on the Brillouin scattering. This paper presents the experimental analysis of the characteristics of Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) influenced by the width of launched pulse. Brillouin strain coefficient is also examined for the different pulse widths, which is important to apply a Brillouin scattering-based sensor to a structural health monitoring. Experimental results showed that not only the Brillouin linewidth and gain but also the Brillouin frequency were dependent on the pulse widths.

  20. Dependence of a microresonator Kerr frequency comb on the pump linewidth.

    PubMed

    Liao, Peicheng; Bao, Changjing; Kordts, Arne; Karpov, Maxim; Pfeiffer, Martin H P; Zhang, Lin; Mohajerin-Ariaei, Amirhossein; Cao, Yinwen; Almaiman, Ahmed; Ziyadi, Morteza; Wilkinson, Steven R; Tur, Moshe; Kippenberg, Tobias J; Willner, Alan E

    2017-02-15

    We experimentally investigate the dependence of Kerr comb generation, comb linewidth, and coherent system performance on the pump linewidth in a microresonator. We find that the generation of the primary comb can have a larger tolerance to the pump linewidth compared with that of the low-phase-noise comb. In addition, the linewidths of the generated combs are almost linearly dependent on the pump linewidth in the primary and low-phase-noise states. Furthermore, the optical signal-to-noise ratio penalty between the pump and generated Kerr combs in a coherent communication system is less than 0.2 dB in both the primary and low-phase-noise states, showing that Kerr frequency combs in these two states can have similar coherent system performance to the pump.

  1. Bards, poets, and cliques: frequency-dependent selection and the evolution of language genes.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Reed A

    2011-09-01

    The ability of humans to communicate via language is a complex, adapted phenotype, which undoubtedly has a recently evolved genetic component. However, the evolutionary dynamics of language-associated alleles are poorly understood. To improve our knowledge of such systems, a population-genetics model for language-associated genes is developed. (The model is general and applicable to social interactions other than communication.) When an allele arises that potentially improves the ability of individuals to communicate, it will experience positive frequency-dependent selection because its fitness will depend on how many other individuals communicate the same way. Consequently, new and rare alleles are selected against, posing a problem for the evolutionary origin of language. However, the model shows that if individuals form language-based cliques, then novel language-associated alleles can sweep through a population. Thus, the origin of language ability can be sufficiently explained by Darwinian processes operating on genetic diversity in a finite population of human ancestors.

  2. RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF THE FREQUENCY BREAK BETWEEN FLUID AND KINETIC SCALES IN THE SOLAR WIND FLUCTUATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, R.; Trenchi, L.

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the radial dependence of the spectral break separating the inertial from the dissipation range in power density spectra of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations, between 0.42 and 5.3 AU, during radial alignments between MESSENGER and WIND for the inner heliosphere and between WIND and ULYSSES for the outer heliosphere. We found that the spectral break moves to higher and higher frequencies as the heliocentric distance decreases. The radial dependence of the corresponding wavenumber is of the kind κ {sub b} ∼ R {sup –1.08}, in good agreement with that of the wavenumber derived from the linear resonance condition for proton cyclotron damping. These results support conclusions from previous studies which suggest that a cyclotron-resonant dissipation mechanism must participate in the spectral cascade together with other possible kinetic noncyclotron-resonant mechanisms.

  3. Fractional Laplacian time-space models for linear and nonlinear lossy media exhibiting arbitrary frequency power-law dependency.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Holm, S

    2004-04-01

    Frequency-dependent attenuation typically obeys an empirical power law with an exponent ranging from 0 to 2. The standard time-domain partial differential equation models can describe merely two extreme cases of frequency-independent and frequency-squared dependent attenuations. The otherwise nonzero and nonsquare frequency dependency occurring in many cases of practical interest is thus often called the anomalous attenuation. In this study, a linear integro-differential equation wave model was developed for the anomalous attenuation by using the space-fractional Laplacian operation, and the strategy is then extended to the nonlinear Burgers equation. A new definition of the fractional Laplacian is also introduced which naturally includes the boundary conditions and has inherent regularization to ease the hypersingularity in the conventional fractional Laplacian. Under the Szabo's smallness approximation, where attenuation is assumed to be much smaller than the wave number, the linear model is found consistent with arbitrary frequency power-law dependency.

  4. Frequency-dependent streaming potential of porous media: Experimental approaches and apparatus design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Paul W. J.; Ruel, Jean; Tardif, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Electro-kinetic phenomena link fluid flow and electrical flow in porous and fractured media such that a hydraulic flow will generate an electrical current and vice versa. Although such a link is likely to be extremely useful, especially in the development of the electro-seismic method, surprisingly few experimental measurements have been carried out, particularly as a function of frequency because of their difficulty. We have carried out a study that considers six different approaches to making laboratory determinations of the frequency-dependent streaming potential coefficient of geomaterials. These are (i) motor and scotch yoke, (ii) motor and cam, (iii) pneumatic drive, (iv) hydraulic drive, (v) electro-magnetic drive, and (vi) piezo-electric drive. In each case, we have analysed the mechanical, electrical, and other technical difficulties involved. We conclude that the electro-magnetic drive is currently the only approach that is practicable, while the piezo-electric drive may be useful for low permeability samples and at specified high frequencies. We have used the electro-magnetic drive approach to design, build, and test an apparatus for measuring the streaming potential coefficient of unconsolidated and disaggregated samples such as sands, gravels, and soils with a diameter of 25.4 mm and lengths between 50 mm and 300 mm.

  5. Attenuation measurements of ultrasound in a kaolin-water slurry. A linear dependence upon frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, M.S.; Mai, J.L.; Good, M.S. )

    1993-08-01

    The attenuation of ultrasound through a kaolin-water slurry was measured for frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 MHz. The maximum concentration of the slurry was for a weight percentage of 44% (or a volume fraction of 0.24). The goal of these measurements was to assess the feasibility of using ultrasonic attenuation to determine the concentration of a slurry of known composition. The measurements were obtained by consecutively adding kaolin to the slurry and measuring the attenuation at each concentration. After reaching a maximum concentration a dilution technique was used, in which an amount of slurry was removed and water was added, to obtain the attenuation as a function of the concentration. The dilution technique was the more effective method to obtain calibration data. These measurements were carried out using two transducers, having a center frequency of 2.25 MHz, separated by 0.1016m (4.0 in.). The maximum attenuation measured in these experiments was about 100Np/m, but the experimental apparatus has the capability of measuring a larger attenuation if the distance between the two transducers is decreased. For a given frequency, the data show that ln V/V[sub 0] depends linearly upon the volume fraction (V is the received voltage for the slurry and V[sub 0] is that obtained for water). This indicated that each particle acts independently in attenuating ultrasound. 12 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Stress-dependent normal-mode frequencies from the effective mass of granular matter.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanqing; Johnson, David L; Valenza, John J; Santibanez, Francisco; Makse, Hernán A

    2014-06-01

    A zero-temperature critical point has been invoked to control the anomalous behavior of granular matter as it approaches jamming or mechanical arrest. Criticality manifests itself in an anomalous spectrum of low-frequency normal modes and scaling behavior near the jamming transition. The critical point may explain the peculiar mechanical properties of dissimilar systems such as glasses and granular materials. Here we study the critical scenario via an experimental measurement of the normal modes frequencies of granular matter under stress from a pole decomposition analysis of the effective mass. We extract a complex-valued characteristic frequency which displays scaling |ω (σ)| ∼ σΩ' with vanishing stress σ for a variety of granular systems. The critical exponent is smaller than that predicted by mean-field theory opening new challenges to explain the exponent for frictional and dissipative granular matter. Our results shed light on the anomalous behavior of stress-dependent acoustics and attenuation in granular materials near the jamming transition.

  7. Direction of information flow in large-scale resting-state networks is frequency-dependent.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Arjan; Tewarie, Prejaas; van Dellen, Edwin; Yu, Meichen; Carbo, Ellen W S; Douw, Linda; Gouw, Alida A; van Straaten, Elisabeth C W; Stam, Cornelis J

    2016-04-05

    Normal brain function requires interactions between spatially separated, and functionally specialized, macroscopic regions, yet the directionality of these interactions in large-scale functional networks is unknown. Magnetoencephalography was used to determine the directionality of these interactions, where directionality was inferred from time series of beamformer-reconstructed estimates of neuronal activation, using a recently proposed measure of phase transfer entropy. We observed well-organized posterior-to-anterior patterns of information flow in the higher-frequency bands (alpha1, alpha2, and beta band), dominated by regions in the visual cortex and posterior default mode network. Opposite patterns of anterior-to-posterior flow were found in the theta band, involving mainly regions in the frontal lobe that were sending information to a more distributed network. Many strong information senders in the theta band were also frequent receivers in the alpha2 band, and vice versa. Our results provide evidence that large-scale resting-state patterns of information flow in the human brain form frequency-dependent reentry loops that are dominated by flow from parieto-occipital cortex to integrative frontal areas in the higher-frequency bands, which is mirrored by a theta band anterior-to-posterior flow.

  8. Visual evoked potentials in migraine patients: alterations depend on pattern spatial frequency.

    PubMed

    Oelkers, R; Grosser, K; Lang, E; Geisslinger, G; Kobal, G; Brune, K; Lötsch, J

    1999-06-01

    Visual information is conducted by two parallel pathways (luminance- and contour-processing pathways) which are thought to be differentially affected in migraine and can be investigated by means of pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Components and habituation of VEPs at four spatial frequencies were compared between 26 migraineurs (13 without aura, MO; 13 with aura, MA) and 28 healthy volunteers. Migraineurs were recorded in the headache-free interval (at least 72 h before and after an attack). Five blocks of 50 responses to chequerboards of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 cycles per degree (c.p.d.) were sequentially averaged and analysed for latency and amplitude. Differences in VEPs were dependent on spatial frequency. Only when small checks were presented, i.e. at high spatial frequency (2 and 4 c.p.d.), was the latency of N2 significantly prolonged in MA and did it tend to be delayed in MO subjects. Habituation behaviour was not significantly different between groups under the stimulating conditions employed. Prolonged N2 latency might be explained by the lack or attenuation of a contour-specific component N130 in migraineurs, indicating an imbalance of the two visual pathways with relative predominance of the luminance-processing Y system. These results reflect an interictally persisting dysfunction of precortical visual processing which might be relevant in the pathophysiology of migraine.

  9. A General Model of Negative Frequency Dependent Selection Explains Global Patterns of Human ABO Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Villanea, Fernando A; Safi, Kristin N; Busch, Jeremiah W

    2015-01-01

    The ABO locus in humans is characterized by elevated heterozygosity and very similar allele frequencies among populations scattered across the globe. Using knowledge of ABO protein function, we generated a simple model of asymmetric negative frequency dependent selection and genetic drift to explain the maintenance of ABO polymorphism and its loss in human populations. In our models, regardless of the strength of selection, models with large effective population sizes result in ABO allele frequencies that closely match those observed in most continental populations. Populations must be moderately small to fall out of equilibrium and lose either the A or B allele (N(e) ≤ 50) and much smaller (N(e) ≤ 25) for the complete loss of diversity, which nearly always involved the fixation of the O allele. A pattern of low heterozygosity at the ABO locus where loss of polymorphism occurs in our model is consistent with small populations, such as Native American populations. This study provides a general evolutionary model to explain the observed global patterns of polymorphism at the ABO locus and the pattern of allele loss in small populations. Moreover, these results inform the range of population sizes associated with the recent human colonization of the Americas.

  10. Direction of information flow in large-scale resting-state networks is frequency-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Hillebrand, Arjan; Tewarie, Prejaas; van Dellen, Edwin; Yu, Meichen; Carbo, Ellen W. S.; Douw, Linda; Gouw, Alida A.; van Straaten, Elisabeth C. W.; Stam, Cornelis J.

    2016-01-01

    Normal brain function requires interactions between spatially separated, and functionally specialized, macroscopic regions, yet the directionality of these interactions in large-scale functional networks is unknown. Magnetoencephalography was used to determine the directionality of these interactions, where directionality was inferred from time series of beamformer-reconstructed estimates of neuronal activation, using a recently proposed measure of phase transfer entropy. We observed well-organized posterior-to-anterior patterns of information flow in the higher-frequency bands (alpha1, alpha2, and beta band), dominated by regions in the visual cortex and posterior default mode network. Opposite patterns of anterior-to-posterior flow were found in the theta band, involving mainly regions in the frontal lobe that were sending information to a more distributed network. Many strong information senders in the theta band were also frequent receivers in the alpha2 band, and vice versa. Our results provide evidence that large-scale resting-state patterns of information flow in the human brain form frequency-dependent reentry loops that are dominated by flow from parieto-occipital cortex to integrative frontal areas in the higher-frequency bands, which is mirrored by a theta band anterior-to-posterior flow. PMID:27001844

  11. Electromagnetic millimeter wave induced hypoalgesia: frequency dependence and involvement of endogenous opioids.

    PubMed

    Radzievsky, A A; Gordiienko, O V; Alekseev, S; Szabo, I; Cowan, A; Ziskin, M C

    2008-05-01

    Millimeter wave treatment (MMWT) is based on the systemic biological effects that develop following local skin exposure to low power electromagnetic waves in the millimeter range. In the present set of experiments, the hypoalgesic effect of this treatment was analyzed in mice. The murine nose area was exposed to MMW of "therapeutic" frequencies: 42.25, 53.57, and 61.22 GHz. MMWT-induced hypoalgesia was shown to be frequency dependent in two experimental models: (1) the cold water tail-flick test (chronic non-neuropathic pain), and (2) the wire surface test (chronic neuropathic pain following unilateral constriction injury to the sciatic nerve). Maximum hypoalgesic effect was obtained when the frequency was 61.22 GHz. Other exposure parameters were: incident power density = 13.3 mW/cm(2), duration of each exposure = 15 min. Involvement of delta and kappa endogenous opioids in the MMWT-induced hypoalgesia was demonstrated using selective blockers of delta- and kappa-opioid receptors and the direct ELISA measurement of endogenous opioids in CNS tissue. Possible mechanisms of the effect and the perspectives of the clinical application of MMWT are discussed.

  12. Planck intermediate results. XXII. Frequency dependence of thermal emission from Galactic dust in intensity and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Alves, M. I. R.; Aniano, G.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Magalhães, A. M.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wandelt, B. D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2015-04-01

    Planck has mapped the intensity and polarization of the sky at microwave frequencies with unprecedented sensitivity. We use these data to characterize the frequency dependence of dust emission. We make use of the Planck 353 GHz I, Q, and U Stokes maps as dust templates, and cross-correlate them with the Planck and WMAP data at 12 frequencies from 23 to 353 GHz, over circular patches with 10° radius. The cross-correlation analysis is performed for both intensity and polarization data in a consistent manner. The results are corrected for the chance correlation between the templates and the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background. We use a mask that focuses our analysis on the diffuse interstellar medium at intermediate Galactic latitudes. We determine the spectral indices of dust emission in intensity and polarization between 100 and 353 GHz, for each sky patch. Both indices are found to be remarkably constant over the sky. The mean values, 1.59 ± 0.02 for polarization and 1.51 ± 0.01 for intensity, for a mean dust temperature of 19.6 K, are close, but significantly different (3.6σ). We determine the mean spectral energy distribution (SED) of the microwave emission, correlated with the 353 GHz dust templates, by averaging the results of the correlation over all sky patches. We find that the mean SED increases for decreasing frequencies at ν< 60 GHz for both intensity and polarization. The rise of the polarization SED towards low frequencies may be accounted for by a synchrotron component correlated with dust, with no need for any polarization of the anomalous microwave emission. We use a spectral model to separate the synchrotron and dust polarization and to characterize the spectral dependence of the dust polarization fraction. The polarization fraction (p) of the dust emission decreases by (21 ± 6)% from 353 to 70 GHz. We discuss this result within the context of existing dust models. The decrease in p could indicate differences in polarization

  13. Finite Element Prediction of Loss Factors for Structures with Frequency-dependent Damping Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, G. C.; Marcus, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element procedure is described for calculating the loss factors for elastic structures to which frequency-dependent viscoelastic damping treatments were applied. The frequency dependence of the viscoelastic damping material is treated by approximating its shear modulus with a second-order polynomial so that the stiffnesses associated with the constant, linear, and quadratic terms can be combined, respectively, with the stiffness, damping, and mass matrices assembled for the rest of the structure. A single complex eigenvalue analysis is then performed in which the eigenvalues are purely imaginary. The loss factor is computed by the modal strain energy (MSE) approach. In the the MSE approach, the loss factor of a composite structure vibrating in one of its natural modes may be visualized as a weighted average of the loss factors of the component parts, with the relative stored energies as weighting constants. The finite element procedure, which can treat very general geometries, is illustrated for the case of a vibrating constrained-layer damped plate.

  14. Frequency-dependent social dominance in a color polymorphic cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Peter D; Lindström, Jan; Metcalfe, Neil B; Hemelrijk, Charlotte K; Brendel, Mischa; Seehausen, Ole; Groothuis, Ton G G

    2010-10-01

    A mechanism commonly suggested to explain the persistence of color polymorphisms in animals is negative frequency-dependent selection. It could result from a social dominance advantage to rare morphs. We tested for this in males of red and blue color morphs of the Lake Victoria cichlid, Pundamilia. Earlier work has shown that males preferentially attack the males of their own morph, while red males are more likely to win dyadic contests with blue males. In order to study the potential contribution of both factors to the morph co-existence, we manipulated the proportion of red and blue males in experimental assemblages and studied its effect on social dominance. We then tried to disentangle the effects of the own-morph attack bias and social dominance of red using simulations. In the experiment, we found that red males were indeed socially dominant to the blue ones, but only when rare. However, blue males were not socially dominant when rare. The simulation results suggest that an own-morph attack bias reduces the social dominance of red males when they are more abundant. Thus, there is no evidence of symmetric negative frequency-dependent selection acting on social dominance, suggesting that additional fitness costs to the red morph must explain their co-existence.

  15. Frequency-dependent attenuation of the Hispaniola Island region of the Caribbean Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, D.; Meremonte, M.; Maharrey, J.Z.; Mildor, S-L.; Altidore, J.R.; Anglade, D.; Hough, S.E.; Given, D.; Benz, H.; Gee, L.; Frankel, A.

    2012-01-01

    We determine frequency-dependent attenuation 1/Q(f) for the Hispaniola region using direct S and Lg waves over five distinct passbands from 0.5 to 16 Hz. Data consist of 832 high-quality vertical and horizontal component waveforms recorded on short-period and broadband seismometers from the devastating 12 January 2010 M 7.0 Haiti earthquake and the rich sequence of aftershocks. For the distance range 250–700 km, we estimate an average frequency-dependent Q(f)=224(±27)f0.64(±0.073) using horizontal components of motion and note that Q(f) estimated with Lg at regional distances is very consistent across vertical and horizontal components. We also determine a Q(f)=142(±21)f0.71(±0.11) for direct S waves at local distances, ≤100 km. The strong attenuation observed on both vertical and horizontal components of motion is consistent with expectations for a tectonically active region.

  16. Frequency-dependent shear wave splitting and heterogeneous anisotropic structure beneath the Gulf of California region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Maureen D.

    2010-09-01

    The Gulf of California region has undergone a major evolution over the past ˜15 Ma, since subduction of the now-extinct Farallon plate ceased and transform motion began, leading to the initiation of rifting and the opening of the Gulf of California ˜5 Ma ago. The character of dynamic processes in the upper mantle beneath the region remains poorly understood, but constraints on seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle can shed light on contemporary mantle flow processes. In order to characterize more fully the anisotropic structure of the upper mantle beneath the region, I present measurements of SKS splitting at 14 broadband stations of the NARS-Baja array at periods between ˜8 and 50 s. The measured splitting parameters ( ϕ, δt) at NARS-Baja stations exhibit a high degree of complexity, with dramatic lateral variations, significant backazimuthal variations at individual stations, and a large number of well-constrained null measurements over a range of backazimuths. The dependence of splitting parameters on frequency is evaluated by applying a series of bandpass filters to high signal-to-noise SKS arrivals. I find that while fast directions are generally insensitive to the SKS frequency content, delay times are frequency dependent at several stations. The measurements presented in this study indicate that the anisotropic structure of the upper mantle beneath the Gulf of California region is complex and exhibits a high degree of both lateral and vertical heterogeneity. The observed splitting is consistent with a scenario in which a large-scale reorganization of the mantle flow field has been inhibited by the presence of a stalled fragment of oceanic lithosphere associated with Farallon subduction. The pattern of mantle flow appears to be controlled by more localized processes, likely including small-scale buoyant upwelling associated with partial melting beneath the central part of the Gulf of California rift.

  17. Geometrical attenuation, frequency dependence of Q, and the absorption band problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Igor B.

    2008-10-01

    A geometrical attenuation model is proposed as an alternative to the conventional frequency-dependent attenuation law Q(f) = Q0(f/f0)η. The new model provides a straightforward differentiation between the geometrical and effective attenuation (Qe) which incorporates the intrinsic attenuation and small-scale scattering. Unlike the (Q0, η) description, the inversion procedure uses only the spectral amplitude data and does not rely on elaborate theoretical models or restrictive assumptions. Data from over 40 reported studies were transformed to the new parametrization. The levels of geometrical attenuation strongly correlate with crustal tectonic types and decrease with tectonic age. The corrected values of Qe are frequency-independent and generally significantly higher than Q0 and show no significant correlation with tectonic age. Several case studies were revisited in detail, with significant changes in the interpretations. The absorption-band and the `10-Hz transition' are not found in the corrected Qe data, and therefore, these phenomena are interpreted as related to geometrical attenuation. The absorption band could correspond to changes in the dominant mode content of the wavefield as the frequency changes from about 0.1 to 100 Hz. Alternatively, it could also be a pure artefact related to the power-law Q(f) paradigm above. The explicit separation of the geometrical and intrinsic attenuation achieves three goals: (1) it provides an unambiguous, assumption- and model-free description of attenuation, (2) it allows relating the observations to the basic physics and geology and (3) it simplifies the interpretation because of reduced emphasis on the apparent Q(f) dependence. The model also agrees remarkably well with the initial attempts for finite-difference short-period coda waveform modelling. Because of its consistency and direct link to the observations, the approach should also help in building robust and transportable coda magnitudes and in seismic

  18. The evolution of social learning rules: payoff-biased and frequency-dependent biased transmission.

    PubMed

    Kendal, Jeremy; Giraldeau, Luc-Alain; Laland, Kevin

    2009-09-21

    Humans and other animals do not use social learning indiscriminately, rather, natural selection has favoured the evolution of social learning rules that make selective use of social learning to acquire relevant information in a changing environment. We present a gene-culture coevolutionary analysis of a small selection of such rules (unbiased social learning, payoff-biased social learning and frequency-dependent biased social learning, including conformism and anti-conformism) in a population of asocial learners where the environment is subject to a constant probability of change to a novel state. We define conditions under which each rule evolves to a genetically polymorphic equilibrium. We find that payoff-biased social learning may evolve under high levels of environmental variation if the fitness benefit associated with the acquired behaviour is either high or low but not of intermediate value. In contrast, both conformist and anti-conformist biases can become fixed when environment variation is low, whereupon the mean fitness in the population is higher than for a population of asocial learners. Our examination of the population dynamics reveals stable limit cycles under conformist and anti-conformist biases and some highly complex dynamics including chaos. Anti-conformists can out-compete conformists when conditions favour a low equilibrium frequency of the learned behaviour. We conclude that evolution, punctuated by the repeated successful invasion of different social learning rules, should continuously favour a reduction in the equilibrium frequency of asocial learning, and propose that, among competing social learning rules, the dominant rule will be the one that can persist with the lowest frequency of asocial learning.

  19. Frequency dependence of sound propagation in superfluid-filled porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Kevin; Beamish, J. R.

    1994-12-01

    We have studied the acoustics of fluid-filled porous media by measuring the velocity and attenuation of ultrasonic (4 to 31 MHz) shear waves in several different ceramic materials. We used liquid helium as the pore fluid and made measurements down to low temperatures where the helium was superfluid. This allowed us to completely eliminate the effects of viscosity and thus to unambiguously determine the velocity changes and attenuation due to the Biot mechanism (fluid ``sloshing'' in the pores). By using ceramics with different pore sizes and a corresponding wide range of permeabilities (from 2.6×10-14 to 3.5×10-11 cm2) we were able to make measurements in both the low-frequency regime (where the fluid is viscously locked to the porous frame) and in the high-frequency regime (where most of the fluid is decoupled from the frame). One of the samples had an extremely high porosity (92%), allowing us to study the fluid motion in a very open geometry. In all cases, we found that the Biot model could quantitatively describe the temperature and frequency dependence of our results. This allowed us to determine the structural parameters of the porous media (pore tortuosity c, permeability κa and effective pore size Λ), something which has previously required measurements of the Biot slow wave (fourth sound and second sound in superfluid helium). The acoustically determined parameters were compared to the independently measured static permeability, κ0, and to previous experimental and theoretical work on model porous media. Our results indicate that, even in materials with irregular pores and a range of length scales, acoustic measurements made in either the low- or high-frequency regime can be used to estimate the permeability.

  20. Phase and Frequency-Dependent Effects of Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation on Motor Cortical Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Tsuyoshi; Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) can entrain ongoing brain oscillations and modulate the motor system in a frequency-dependent manner. Recent animal studies have demonstrated that the phase of a sinusoidal current also has an important role in modulation of neuronal activity. However, the phase effects of tACS on the human motor system are largely unknown. Here, we systematically investigated the effects of tACS phase and frequency on the primary motor cortex (M1) by using motor evoked potentials (MEPs) with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). First, we compared the phase effects (90°, 180°, 270° or 360°) of 10 and 20 Hz tACS on MEPs. The 20 Hz tACS significantly increased M1 excitability compared with the 10 Hz tACS at 90° phase only. Second, we studied the 90° phase effect on MEPs at different tACS frequencies (5, 10, 20 or 40 Hz). The 20 vs. 10 Hz difference was again observed, but the 90° phase in 5 and 40 Hz tACS did not influence M1 excitability. Third, the 90° phase effects of 10 and 20 Hz tACS were compared with sham stimulation. The 90° phase of 20 Hz tACS enhanced MEP amplitudes compared with sham stimulation, but there was no significant effect of 10 Hz tACS. Taken together, we assume that the differential 90° phase effects on 20 Hz and 10 Hz tACS can be attributed to the neural synchronization modulated by tACS. Our results further underline that phase and frequency are the important factors in the effects of tACS on M1 excitability. PMID:27607431

  1. Method of frequency dependent correlations: investigating the variability of total solar irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelt, J.; Käpylä, M. J.; Olspert, N.

    2017-03-01

    Context. This paper contributes to the field of modeling and hindcasting of the total solar irradiance (TSI) based on different proxy data that extend further back in time than the TSI that is measured from satellites. Aims: We introduce a simple method to analyze persistent frequency-dependent correlations (FDCs) between the time series and use these correlations to hindcast missing historical TSI values. We try to avoid arbitrary choices of the free parameters of the model by computing them using an optimization procedure. The method can be regarded as a general tool for pairs of data sets, where correlating and anticorrelating components can be separated into non-overlapping regions in frequency domain. Methods: Our method is based on low-pass and band-pass filtering with a Gaussian transfer function combined with de-trending and computation of envelope curves. Results: We find a major controversy between the historical proxies and satellite-measured targets: a large variance is detected between the low-frequency parts of targets, while the low-frequency proxy behavior of different measurement series is consistent with high precision. We also show that even though the rotational signal is not strongly manifested in the targets and proxies, it becomes clearly visible in FDC spectrum. A significant part of the variability can be explained by a very simple model consisting of two components: the original proxy describing blanketing by sunspots, and the low-pass-filtered curve describing the overall activity level. The models with the full library of the different building blocks can be applied to hindcasting with a high level of confidence, Rc ≈ 0.90. The usefulness of these models is limited by the major target controversy. Conclusions: The application of the new method to solar data allows us to obtain important insights into the different TSI modeling procedures and their capabilities for hindcasting based on the directly observed time intervals.

  2. Time-dependent wave packet averaged vibrational frequencies from femtosecond stimulated Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue-Chao; Zhao, Bin; Lee, Soo-Y.

    2016-02-01

    Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) on the Stokes side arises from a third order polarization, P(3)(t), which is given by an overlap of a first order wave packet, |" separators=" Ψ2 ( 1 ) ( p u , t ) > , prepared by a narrow band (ps) Raman pump pulse, Epu(t), on the upper electronic e2 potential energy surface (PES), with a second order wave packet, <" separators=" Ψ1 ( 2 ) ( p r ∗ , p u , t ) | , that is prepared on the lower electronic e1 PES by a broadband (fs) probe pulse, Epr(t), acting on the first-order wave packet. In off-resonant FSRS, |" separators=" Ψ2 ( 1 ) ( p u , t ) > resembles the zeroth order wave packet |" separators=" Ψ1 ( 0 ) ( t ) > on the lower PES spatially, but with a force on |" separators=" Ψ2 ( 1 ) ( p u , t ) > along the coordinates of the reporter modes due to displacements in the equilibrium position, so that <" separators=" Ψ1 ( 2 ) ( p r ∗ , p u , t ) | will oscillate along those coordinates thus giving rise to similar oscillations in P(3)(t) with the frequencies of the reporter modes. So, by recovering P(3)(t) from the FSRS spectrum, we are able to deduce information on the time-dependent quantum-mechanical wave packet averaged frequencies, ω ¯ j ( t ) , of the reporter modes j along the trajectory of |" separators=" Ψ1 ( 0 ) ( t ) > . The observable FSRS Raman gain is related to the imaginary part of P(3)(ω). The imaginary and real parts of P(3)(ω) are related by the Kramers-Kronig relation. Hence, from the FSRS Raman gain, we can obtain the complex P(3)(ω), whose Fourier transform then gives us the complex P(3)(t) to analyze for ω ¯ j ( t ) . We apply the theory, first, to a two-dimensional model system with one conformational mode of low frequency and one reporter vibrational mode of higher frequency with good results, and then we apply it to the time-resolved FSRS spectra of the cis-trans isomerization of retinal in rhodopsin [P. Kukura et al., Science 310, 1006 (2005)]. We obtain the vibrational

  3. Time-dependent wave packet averaged vibrational frequencies from femtosecond stimulated Raman spectra.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue-Chao; Zhao, Bin; Lee, Soo-Y

    2016-02-07

    Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) on the Stokes side arises from a third order polarization, P(3)(t), which is given by an overlap of a first order wave packet, |Ψ2(1)(pu,t)>, prepared by a narrow band (ps) Raman pump pulse, Epu(t), on the upper electronic e2 potential energy surface (PES), with a second order wave packet, <Ψ1(2)(pr(∗),pu,t)|, that is prepared on the lower electronic e1 PES by a broadband (fs) probe pulse, Epr(t), acting on the first-order wave packet. In off-resonant |FSRS, Ψ2(1)(pu,t)> resembles the zeroth order wave packet |Ψ1(0)(t)> on the lower PES spatially, but with a force on |Ψ2(1)(pu,t)> along the coordinates of the reporter modes due to displacements in the equilibrium position, so that <Ψ1(2)(pr(∗),pu,t)| will oscillate along those coordinates thus giving rise to similar oscillations in P(3)(t) with the frequencies of the reporter modes. So, by recovering P(3)(t) from the FSRS spectrum, we are able to deduce information on the time-dependent quantum-mechanical wave packet averaged frequencies, ω̄j(t), of the reporter modes j along the trajectory of |Ψ1 (0)(t)>. The observable FSRS Raman gain is related to the imaginary part of P(3)(ω). The imaginary and real parts of P(3)(ω) are related by the Kramers-Kronig relation. Hence, from the FSRS Raman gain, we can obtain the complex P(3)(ω), whose Fourier transform then gives us the complex P(3)(t) to analyze for ω̄j(t). We apply the theory, first, to a two-dimensional model system with one conformational mode of low frequency and one reporter vibrational mode of higher frequency with good results, and then we apply it to the time-resolved FSRS spectra of the cis-trans isomerization of retinal in rhodopsin [P. Kukura et al., Science 310, 1006 (2005)]. We obtain the vibrational frequency up-shift time constants for the C12-H wagging mode at 216 fs and for the C10-H wagging mode at 161 fs which are larger than for the C11-H wagging mode at 127 fs, i.e., the C11-H

  4. Hubbard interactions in iron-based pnictides and chalcogenides: Slater parametrization, screening channels, and frequency dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Roekeghem, Ambroise; Vaugier, Loïg; Jiang, Hong; Biermann, Silke

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the strength of the frequency-dependent on-site electronic interactions in the iron pnictides LaFeAsO, BaFe2As2 , BaRu2As2 , and LiFeAs and the chalcogenide FeSe from first principles within the constrained random phase approximation. We discuss the accuracy of an atomiclike parametrization of the two-index density-density interaction matrices based on the calculation of an optimal set of three independent Slater integrals, assuming that the angular part of the Fe d localized orbitals can be described within spherical harmonics as for isolated Fe atoms. We show that its quality depends on the ligand-metal bonding character rather than on the dimensionality of the lattice: it is excellent for ionic-like Fe-Se (FeSe) chalcogenides and a more severe approximation for more covalent Fe-As (LaFeAsO, BaFe2As2 ) pnictides. We furthermore analyze the relative importance of different screening channels, with similar conclusions for the different pnictides but a somewhat different picture for the benchmark oxide SrVO3: the ligand channel does not appear to be dominant in the pnictides, while oxygen screening is the most important process in the oxide. Finally, we analyze the frequency dependence of the interaction. In contrast to simple oxides, in iron pnictides its functional form cannot be simply modeled by a single plasmon, and the actual density of modes enters the construction of an effective Hamiltonian determining the low-energy properties.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of time-dependent, transport-limited fluorescent boundary measurements in frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tianshu; Rasmussen, John C; Lee, Jae Hoon; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2007-04-01

    Recently, we have presented and experimentally validated a unique numerical solver of the coupled radiative transfer equations (RTEs) for rapidly computing time-dependent excitation and fluorescent light propagation in small animal tomography. Herein, we present a time-dependent Monte Carlo algorithm to validate the forward RTE solver and investigate the impact of physical parameters upon transport-limited measurements in order to best direct the development of the RTE solver for optical tomography. Experimentally, the Monte Carlo simulations for both transport-limited and diffusion-limited propagations are validated using frequency domain photon migration measurements for 1.0%, 0.5%, and 0.2% intralipid solutions containing 1 microM indocyanine green in a 49 cm3 cylindrical phantom corresponding to the small volume employed in small animal tomography. The comparisons between Monte Carlo simulations and the numerical solutions result in mean percent error in amplitude and the phase shift less than 5.0% and 0.7 degrees, respectively, at excitation and emission wavelengths for varying anisotropic factors, lifetimes, and modulation frequencies. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the accuracy of the forward model is enhanced using (i) suitable source models of photon delivery, (ii) accurate anisotropic factors, and (iii) accurate acceptance angles of collected photons. Monte Carlo simulations also show that the accuracy of the diffusion approximation in the small phantom depends upon (i) the ratio d(phantom)/l(tr), where d(phantom) is the phantom diameter and l(tr) is the transport mean free path; and (ii) the anisotropic factor of the medium. The Monte Carlo simulations validates and guides the future development of an appropriate RTE solver for deployment in small animal optical tomography.

  6. Neocortical pathological high-frequency oscillations are associated with frequency-dependent alterations in functional network topology.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, George M; Anderson, Ryan; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Ochi, Ayako; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Singh-Cadieux, Gabrielle; Donner, Elizabeth; Rutka, James T; Snead, O Carter; Doesburg, Sam M

    2013-11-01

    Synchronization of neural oscillations is thought to integrate distributed neural populations into functional cell assemblies. Epilepsy is widely regarded as a disorder of neural synchrony. Knowledge is scant, however, regarding whether ictal changes in synchrony involving epileptogenic cortex are expressed similarly across various frequency ranges. Cortical regions involved in epileptic networks also exhibit pathological high-frequency oscillations (pHFOs, >80 Hz), which are increasingly utilized as biomarkers of epileptogenic tissue. It is uncertain how pHFO amplitudes are related to epileptic network connectivity. By calculating phase-locking values among intracranial electrodes implanted in children with intractable epilepsy, we constructed ictal connectivity networks and performed graph theoretical analysis to characterize their network properties at distinct frequency bands. Ictal data from 17 children were analyzed with a hierarchical mixed-effects model adjusting for patient-level covariates. Epileptogenic cortex was defined in two ways: 1) a hypothesis-driven method using the visually defined seizure-onset zone and 2) a data-agnostic method using the high-frequency amplitude of each electrode. Epileptogenic cortex exhibited a logarithmic decrease in interregional functional connectivity at high frequencies (>30 Hz) during seizure initiation and propagation but not at termination. At slower frequencies, conversely, epileptogenic cortex expressed a relative increase in functional connectivity. Our findings suggest that pHFOs reflect epileptogenic network interactions, yielding theoretical support for their utility in the presurgical evaluation of intractable epilepsy. The view that abnormal network synchronization plays a critical role in ictogenesis and seizure dynamics is supported by the observation that functional isolation of epileptogenic cortex at high frequencies is absent at seizure termination.

  7. Dynamic blocked transfer stiffness method of characterizing the magnetic field and frequency dependent dynamic viscoelastic properties of MRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poojary, Umanath R.; Hegde, Sriharsha; Gangadharan, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    Magneto rheological elastomer (MRE) is a potential resilient element for the semi active vibration isolator. MRE based isolators adapt to different frequency of vibrations arising from the source to isolate the structure over wider frequency range. The performance of MRE isolator depends on the magnetic field and frequency dependent characteristics of MRE. Present study is focused on experimentally evaluating the dynamic stiffness and loss factor of MRE through dynamic blocked transfer stiffness method. The dynamic stiffness variations of MRE exhibit strong magnetic field and mild frequency dependency. Enhancements in dynamic stiffness saturate with the increase in magnetic field and the frequency. The inconsistent variations of loss factor with the magnetic field substantiate the inability of MRE to have independent control over its damping characteristics.

  8. Algebraic processing technique for extracting frequency-dependent shear-wave splitting parameters in an anisotropic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kai-Feng; Zeng, Xin-Wu

    2011-06-01

    Based on the dual source cumulative rotation technique in the time-domain proposed by Zeng and MacBeth (1993), a new algebraic processing technique for extracting shear-wave splitting parameters from multi-component VSP data in frequency-dependent medium has been developed. By using this dual source cumulative rotation technique in the frequency-domain (DCTF), anisotropic parameters, including polarization direction of the shear-waves and timedelay between the fast and slow shear-waves, can be estimated for each frequency component in the frequency domain. It avoids the possible error which comes from using a narrow-band filter in the current commonly used method. By using synthetic seismograms, the feasibility and validity of the technique was tested and a comparison with the currently used method was also given. The results demonstrate that the shear-wave splitting parameters frequency dependence can be extracted directly from four-component seismic data using the DCTF. In the presence of larger scale fractures, substantial frequency dependence would be found in the seismic frequency range, which implies that dispersion would occur at seismic frequencies. Our study shows that shear-wave anisotropy decreases as frequency increases.

  9. Frequency-dependent dielectric analysis - Monitoring the chemistry and rheology of thermosets during cure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D.; Delos, S.; Hoff, M.; Weller, L.; Haverty, P.

    1988-01-01

    Frequency-dependent dielectric measurements in a curing resin sample were performed using an impedance analyzer and a permittivity sensor, to separate and measure the ionic (sigma) and dipolar (tau) mobilities, used as molecular probes of the cure reaction in the resin. The resin samples were tetraglycidyl 4,4-prime-diaminodiphenylmethane epoxy resins which included catalyzed (Hercules 3501-6) and uncatalyzed l3502 resin samples. The values of sigma and tau were used to quantitatively determine the viscosity, the degree of cure, and the T(g) of the resin. It is shown that the values of the Arrhenius and WLF constants during the cure process reflect the buildup of the crosslink network.

  10. Frequency-dependent polarizabilities and shielding factors for confined one-electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, H. E., Jr.; Pupyshev, Vladimir I.

    2017-01-01

    Frequency-dependent dipole polarizabilities and shielding factors are calculated for the ground state of spherically symmetric screened one-electron systems embedded in an impenetrable spherical cavity. Coulomb, Yukawa, Hulthén and exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials are considered. In contrast to free systems, Dirichlet boundary conditions introduce a contribution to the shielding factor that results from an integral over the surface of the confining boundary. This is a fundamental difference between free and confined systems and results in unexpected modifications to some of the classic relations for free systems. The methods derived also give a simple expression for the polarizability of the confined harmonic oscillator as an example of extending the methods of this work to potentials beyond the four studied.

  11. Picosecond laser-induced breakdown at 5321 and 5347 A - Observation of frequency-dependent behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1977-01-01

    A study is presented of picosecond laser-induced breakdown at 3547 and 5321 A of several materials. The thresholds obtained for breakdown at 5321 A are compared to previous results obtained at 1.064 microns using the same laser system. This comparison illustrates the transition of bulk laser-induced breakdown as it becomes increasingly frequency dependent. UV picosecond pulses are obtained by mixing 5321 A and 1.064 micron pulses in a KH2PO4 crystal. Upper and lower bounds on the 3547 A breakdown threshold are defined, although some effects of walk-off distortion and self-focusing are observed. The results are discussed with reference to models for the intrinsic processes involved in the breakdown, i.e., avalanche and multiphoton ionization.

  12. Sibling genes as environment: Sibling dopamine genotypes and adolescent health support frequency dependent selection.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Emily; Conley, Dalton; Siegal, Mark L

    2015-11-01

    While research consistently suggests siblings matter for individual outcomes, it remains unclear why. At the same time, studies of genetic effects on health typically correlate variants of a gene with the average level of behavioral or health measures, ignoring more complicated genetic dynamics. Using National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health data, we investigate whether sibling genes moderate individual genetic expression. We compare twin variation in health-related absences and self-rated health by genetic differences at three locations related to dopamine regulation and transport to test sibship-level cross-person gene-gene interactions. Results suggest effects of variation at these genetic locations are moderated by sibling genes. Although the mechanism remains unclear, this evidence is consistent with frequency dependent selection and suggests much genetic research may violate the stable unit treatment value assumption.

  13. Dependence of the lateral ion transport on the driving frequency in nematic liquid crystal displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojmenovik, G.; Vermael, S.; Neyts, K.; Asselt, R. van; Verschueren, A. R. M.

    2004-10-01

    The presence of ions in a liquid crystal (LC) influences the transmission characteristics of LC displays. These ions follow the electric field perpendicular to the electrodes and move back and forth under the influence of the ac field. Because of their charge, they can distort the electric field, which leads to transmission changes. Recently it was discovered that due to the LC anisotropy, ion motion parallel with the plane of the electrodes (perpendicular to the electric field) is also possible, even without lateral fields. After driving a pixel for a long time, the ions will accumulate at one pixel edge, which leads to unwanted image artifacts. In this paper, we investigate the frequency dependence of the lateral ion transport in twisted nematic liquid crystal displays at high and low ion concentrations, different ion mobilities, and LC rotational viscosities, for a fixed voltage just above the LC threshold.

  14. Frequency dependence and fuel effect on optical properties of nano TiO2-based structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemifard, Mahdi; Ghamari, Misagh; Iziy, Meysam

    2016-06-01

    TiO2-(Ti0.5Si0.5)O2 nanopowders (TS-NPs) with average particle size around 90 nm were successfully synthesized by controlled auto-combustion method by using citric acid/nitric acid (AC:NA) and urea/metal cation (U:MC). The structure of powders was studied based on their X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns. The XRD of TS-NPs shows that rutile and anatase are the main phases of TS-NPs for AC:NA and U:MC, respectively. Particle size and histogram of nanopowders were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Optical properties of TS-NPs were calculated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Kramers-Kroning (KK) relation. Plasma frequencies of TS-NPs obtained from energy loss functions depend on fuels as a result of changes in crystal structure, particle size distribution, and morphology.

  15. Frequency thermal response and cooling performance in a microscopic system with a time-dependent perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraha, N.; Soba, A.; Carusela, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    Following the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism we study the thermal transport in a composite chain subject to a time-dependent perturbation. The system is formed by two finite linear asymmetric harmonic chains subject to an on-site potential connected together by a time-modulated coupling. The ends of the chains are coupled to two phononic reservoirs at different temperatures. We present the relevant equations used to calculate the heat current along each segment. We find that the system presents different transport regimes according the driving frequency and temperature gradients. One of the regimes corresponds to a heat pump against thermal gradient, thus a characterization of the cooling performance of the device is presented.

  16. Improved fluid simulations of radio-frequency plasmas using energy dependent ion mobilities

    SciTech Connect

    Greb, Arthur; Niemi, Kari; O'Connell, Deborah; Gans, Timo; Ennis, Gerard J.; MacGearailt, Niall

    2013-05-15

    Symmetric and asymmetric capacitively coupled radio-frequency plasmas in oxygen at 40 Pa, 300 V voltage amplitude and a discharge gap of 40 mm are investigated by means of one-dimensional numerical semi-kinetic fluid modeling on the basis of a simplified reaction scheme including the dominant positive and negative ions, background gas, and electrons. An improved treatment, by accounting for the dependence of ion mobilities on E/N, is compared to the standard approach, based on using zero-field mobility values only. The charged particle dynamics as a result of direct electron impact ionization of oxygen, secondary electron release from the electrodes, the spatial distribution of all involved particles as well as impact of geometry and model modification on ion energies is analyzed and compared to independent simulations and experiments.

  17. Dependence of ultrasonic scattering on frequency and microarchitecture in trabecular bone: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wear, Keith A.

    2002-05-01

    Measurements of ultrasonic properties of calcaneus (heel bone) have been shown to be effective for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. However, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between ultrasound and bone are currently not well understood. A model that predicts backscatter from trabecular bone has been developed. Scattering is assumed to originate from the surfaces of trabeculae, which are modeled as long, thin, elastic cylinders with radii small compared with the ultrasonic wavelength. Experimental measurements of backscatter using broadband ultrasound centered at 500 kHz from 43 trabecular bone samples (from human calcaneus) in vitro have been performed. Microcomputed tomography has been performed on all 43 samples in order to measure microarchitectural features. The theory correctly predicts the measured dependences of backscatter on ultrasonic frequency and trabecular thickness. [Funding from the FDA Office of Womens Health is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Ultrasound-enhanced penetration through sclera depends on frequency of sonication and size of macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Chau, Ying; Suen, Wai Leung Langston; Tse, Ho Yan; Wong, Hoi Sang

    2017-03-30

    We previously employed ultrasound as a needleless approach to deliver macromolecules via the transscleral route to the back of the eye in live animals (Suen et al., 2013). Here, we investigated the nature of the ultrasound-enhanced transport through sclera, the outermost barrier in the transscleral route. Thus, the possible role of cavitation from ultrasound was explored; its effect during and after sonication on scleral penetration was measured; and the dependence on the size of macromolecules was determined. We applied ultrasound frequency from 40kHz to 3MHz at ISATA (spatial-average-temporal-average intensity) of 0.05W/cm(2) to fresh rabbit sclera ex vivo. Fluorescent dextran of size 20kDa to 150kDa was used as macromolecular probes. We measured the distance of penetration of the probes through the sclera over 30s during sonication and over 15min after sonication from cryosectioned tissue images. Deeper penetration in the sclera was observed with decreasing frequency. The presence of stable cavitation was further verified by passive acoustic detection. The effect during sonication increased penetration distance up to 20 fold and was limited to macromolecular probes ≤70kDa. The effect post sonication increased penetration distance up to 3 fold and attributed to the improved intrasscleral transport of macromolecules ≥70kDa. Post-sonication enhancement diminished gradually in 3h. As the extent of cavitation increased with decreasing frequency, the trend observed supports the contribution of (stable) cavitation to enhancing transport through sclera. Effect during sonication was attributed to flow associated with acoustic microstreaming. Effect post sonication was attributed to the temporary increase in scleral permeability. Flow-associated effect was more pronounced but only applied to smaller macromolecules.

  19. Acoustic characterization of echogenic liposomes: Frequency-dependent attenuation and backscatter

    PubMed Central

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Haworth, Kevin J.; Raymond, Jason L.; Douglas Mast, T.; Perrin, Stephen R.; Klegerman, Melvin E.; Huang, Shaoling; Porter, Tyrone M.; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are used clinically to aid detection and diagnosis of abnormal blood flow or perfusion. Characterization of UCAs can aid in the optimization of ultrasound parameters for enhanced image contrast. In this study echogenic liposomes (ELIPs) were characterized acoustically by measuring the frequency-dependent attenuation and backscatter coefficients at frequencies between 3 and 30 MHz using a broadband pulse-echo technique. The experimental methods were initially validated by comparing the attenuation and backscatter coefficients measured from 50-μm and 100-μm polystyrene microspheres with theoretical values. The size distribution of the ELIPs was measured and found to be polydisperse, ranging in size from 40 nm to 6 μm in diameter, with the highest number observed at 65 nm. The ELIP attenuation coefficients ranged from 3.7 ± 1.0 to 8.0 ± 3.3 dB/cm between 3 and 25 MHz. The backscatter coefficients were 0.011 ± 0.006 (cm str)−1 between 6 and 9 MHz and 0.023 ± 0.006 (cm str)−1 between 13 and 30 MHz. The measured scattering-to-attenuation ratio ranged from 8% to 22% between 6 and 25 MHz. Thus ELIPs can provide enhanced contrast over a broad range of frequencies and the scattering properties are suitable for various ultrasound imaging applications including diagnostic and intravascular ultrasound. PMID:22088022

  20. Frequency-Dependent Scattering Observed in P- and Surface-Wave Arrivals From South India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    Anomalies in polarization angles of teleseismic waves have been used to understand effect of scattered arrivals from subsurface heterogeneities. Seismological data recorded in southern India show polarization anomalies up to 5° for several stations. These anomalies are most pronounced for earthquakes from western and southern azimuths. Furthermore, stations located near the boundary of Dharwar craton and southern Granulites are more affected by scattered waves. Considering that many of the nearby stations show similar patterns of polarization anomalies, it is likely that the source of scattered energy is located at shallower depths. The non-stationary nature of seismic arrivals warrants determination of frequency-dependent polarization. Result obtained using multi-taper spectral analysis method indicates that data are contaminated at frequencies greater than 2 Hz for most of the stations. Furthermore, surface-wave records also indicate off-azimuth arrivals, and quasi-Love waves indicating heterogeneities or anisotropy in the subsurface. These small-scale heterogeneities that may be located in crust may be important for studies using converted phases and ground motion prediction studies.

  1. Frequency-Dependent Scattering Observed in P- and Surface-Wave Arrivals From South India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, A. K.

    2017-03-01

    Anomalies in polarization angles of teleseismic waves have been used to understand effect of scattered arrivals from subsurface heterogeneities. Seismological data recorded in southern India show polarization anomalies up to 5° for several stations. These anomalies are most pronounced for earthquakes from western and southern azimuths. Furthermore, stations located near the boundary of Dharwar craton and southern Granulites are more affected by scattered waves. Considering that many of the nearby stations show similar patterns of polarization anomalies, it is likely that the source of scattered energy is located at shallower depths. The non-stationary nature of seismic arrivals warrants determination of frequency-dependent polarization. Result obtained using multi-taper spectral analysis method indicates that data are contaminated at frequencies greater than 2 Hz for most of the stations. Furthermore, surface-wave records also indicate off-azimuth arrivals, and quasi-Love waves indicating heterogeneities or anisotropy in the subsurface. These small-scale heterogeneities that may be located in crust may be important for studies using converted phases and ground motion prediction studies.

  2. Unmyelinated visceral afferents exhibit frequency dependent action potential broadening while myelinated visceral afferents do not.

    PubMed

    Li, Bai-Yan; Feng, Bin; Tsu, Hwa Y; Schild, John H

    2007-06-21

    Sensory information arising from visceral organ systems is encoded into action potential trains that propagate along afferent fibers to target nuclei in the central nervous system. These information streams range from tight patterns of action potentials that are well synchronized with the sensory transduction event to irregular, patternless discharge with no clear correlation to the sensory input. In general terms these afferent pathways can be divided into unmyelinated and myelinated fiber types. Our laboratory has a long standing interest in the functional differences between these two types of afferents in terms of the preprocessing of sensory information into action potential trains (synchrony, frequency, duration, etc.), the reflexogenic consequences of this sensory input to the central nervous system and the ionic channels that give rise to the electrophysiological properties of these unique cell types. The aim of this study was to determine whether there were any functional differences in the somatic action potential characteristics of unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents in response to different rates of sensory nerve stimulation. Our results showed that activity and frequency-dependent widening of the somatic action potential was quite prominent in unmyelinated but not myelinated vagal afferents. Spike broadening often leads to increased influx of Ca(2+) ions that has been associated with a diverse range of modulatory mechanisms both at the cell body and central synaptic terminations (e.g. increased neurotransmitter release.) We conclude that our observations are indicative of fundamentally different mechanisms for neural integration of sensory information arising from unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents.

  3. Design Dependent Cutoff Frequency of Nanotransistors Near the Ultimate Performance Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordrostami, Zoheir; Sheikhi, M. Hossein; Zarifkar, Abbas

    2012-12-01

    We have studied the effect of different structural designs of double gate MOSFETs (DG-MOSFETs) and carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs) on the cutoff frequency (fT). The effects of metallic contacts with Schottky barriers, gate work function, dual material gate (DMG), halo doped channel and lightly doped drain and source (LDDS) architectures on the fT have been investigated for DG-MOSFETs and CNTFETs and the design dependent fT for both types of transistors has been studied for the first time. The simulations are based on the Schrödinger-Poisson solvers developed for each nanotransistor separately. The ballistic limit has been studied as the ultimate performance limit of the DG-MOSFETs and CNTFETs. The results of this paper, for the first time, show how some designations used for modification of short channel effects or current-voltage characteristics affect the fT. The results revealed that the cutoff frequencies of both types of the transistors exhibit the same behavior with changing design parameters. We have shown that the Schottky barriers, parasitic capacitances and halo doping reduce the fT and have proposed the DMG and LDDS artchitectures as ways to increase the fT for DG-MOSFETs and CNTFETs for the first time.

  4. Frequency-dependent photothermal measurement of transverse thermal diffusivity of organic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, J. W.; Shahi, Maryam; Yao, Y.; Payne, Marcia M.; Anthony, J. E.; Edberg, Jesper; Crispin, Xavier

    2015-12-21

    We have used a photothermal technique, in which chopped light heats the front surface of a small (∼1 mm{sup 2}) sample and the chopping frequency dependence of thermal radiation from the back surface is measured with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled infrared detector. In our system, the sample is placed directly in front of the detector within its dewar. Because the detector is also sensitive to some of the incident light, which leaks around or through the sample, measurements are made for the detector signal that is in quadrature with the chopped light. Results are presented for layered crystals of semiconducting 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-pn) and for papers of cellulose nanofibrils coated with semiconducting poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) (NFC-PEDOT). For NFC-PEDOT, we have found that the transverse diffusivity, smaller than the in-plane value, varies inversely with thickness, suggesting that texturing of the papers varies with thickness. For TIPS-pn, we have found that the interlayer diffusivity is an order of magnitude larger than the in-plane value, consistent with previous estimates, suggesting that low-frequency optical phonons, presumably associated with librations in the TIPS side groups, carry most of the heat.

  5. Frequency dependent changes in mechanosensitivity of rat knee joint afferents after antidromic saphenous nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Just, S; Heppelmann, B

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of electrical saphenous nerve stimulation (14 V, 1-10 Hz) on the mechanosensitivity of rat knee joint afferents. The responses to passive joint rotations at defined torque were recorded from slowly conducting knee joint afferent nerve fibres (0.6-20.0 m/s). After repeated nerve stimulation with 1 Hz, the mechanosensitivity of about 79% of the units was significantly affected. The effects were most prominent at a torque close to the mechanical threshold. In about 46% of the examined nerve fibres a significant increase was obtained, whereas about 33% reduced their mechanosensitivity. The sensitisation was prevented by an application of 5 microM phentolamine, an alpha-adrenergic receptor blocker, together with a neuropeptide Y receptor blocker. An inhibition of N-type Ca(2+) channels by an application of 1 microM omega-conotoxin GVIA caused comparable changes of the mechanosensitivity during the electrical stimulation. Electrical nerve stimulation with higher frequencies resulted in a further reduction of the mean response to joint rotations. After stimulation with 10 Hz, there was a nearly complete loss of mechanosensitivity.In conclusion, antidromic electrical nerve stimulation leads to a frequency dependent transient decrease of the mechanosensitivity. A sensitisation was only obtained at 1 Hz, but this effect may be based on the influence of sympathetic nerve fibres.

  6. Long range dependence in the high frequency USD/INR exchange rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dilip

    2014-02-01

    Using high frequency data, this paper examines the long memory property in the unconditional and conditional volatility of the USD/INR exchange rate at different time scales using the Local Whittle (LW), the Exact Local Whittle (ELW) and the FIAPARCH models. Results indicate that the long memory property remains quite stable across different time scales for both unconditional and conditional volatility measures. Results from the non-overlapping moving window approach indicate that the extreme events (such as the subprime crisis and the European debt crisis) resulted in highly persistent behavior of the USD/INR exchange rate and thus lead to market inefficiency. This paper also examines the long memory property in the realized volatility based on different time scale data. Results indicate that the realized volatility measures based on different scales of the high frequency data exhibit a consistent and stable long memory property. However, the realized volatility measures based on daily data exhibit lower degree of long-range dependence. This study has implications for traders and investors (with different trading horizons) and can be helpful in predicting expected future volatility and in designing and implementing trading strategies at different time scales.

  7. Curvature dependence of relativistic epicyclic frequencies in static, axially symmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Ronaldo S. S.; Kluźniak, Włodek; Abramowicz, Marek

    2017-02-01

    The sum of squared epicyclic frequencies of nearly circular motion (ωr2+ωθ2 ) in axially symmetric configurations of Newtonian gravity is known to depend both on the matter density and on the angular velocity profile of circular orbits. It was recently found that this sum goes to zero at the photon orbits of Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetimes. However, these are the only relativistic configurations for which such a result exists in the literature. Here, we extend the above formalism in order to describe the analogous relation for geodesic motion in arbitrary static, axially symmetric, asymptotically flat solutions of general relativity. The sum of squared epicyclic frequencies is found to vanish at photon radii of vacuum solutions. In the presence of matter, we obtain that ωr2+ωθ2>0 for perturbed timelike circular geodesics on the equatorial plane if the strong energy condition holds for the matter-energy fluid of spacetime; in vacuum, the allowed region for timelike circular geodesic motion is characterized by the inequality above. The results presented here may be of use to shed light on general issues concerning the stability of circular orbits once they approach photon radii, mainly the ones corresponding to stable photon motion.

  8. Frequency-dependent photothermal measurement of transverse thermal diffusivity of organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, J. W.; Shahi, Maryam; Payne, Marcia M.; Edberg, Jesper; Yao, Y.; Crispin, Xavier; Anthony, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    We have used a photothermal technique, in which chopped light heats the front surface of a small (˜1 mm2) sample and the chopping frequency dependence of thermal radiation from the back surface is measured with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled infrared detector. In our system, the sample is placed directly in front of the detector within its dewar. Because the detector is also sensitive to some of the incident light, which leaks around or through the sample, measurements are made for the detector signal that is in quadrature with the chopped light. Results are presented for layered crystals of semiconducting 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-pn) and for papers of cellulose nanofibrils coated with semiconducting poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) (NFC-PEDOT). For NFC-PEDOT, we have found that the transverse diffusivity, smaller than the in-plane value, varies inversely with thickness, suggesting that texturing of the papers varies with thickness. For TIPS-pn, we have found that the interlayer diffusivity is an order of magnitude larger than the in-plane value, consistent with previous estimates, suggesting that low-frequency optical phonons, presumably associated with librations in the TIPS side groups, carry most of the heat.

  9. The Multifractal Flood Frequency Analysis to Account Long Range Dependencies and the Clustering of Extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Schertzer, D. J.; Lovejoy, S.

    2012-12-01

    The classical quantile distributions in existing flood studies often rely on two hypotheses that are questionable: stationarity and independency of the components of the time series. We discuss how to better (statistically) predict the floods by using a physically based approach that accounts long range dependencies and the clustering of extremes often resulting in fat tailed (i.e., an algebraic type) probability distributions. It established on systems that respect a scale symmetry over a wide range of space-time scales to determine the relationship between flood magnitude and return period for a wide range of aggregation periods. The results were obtained during the CEATI Project "Multifractals and physically based estimates of extreme floods". The ambition of this project was to investigate very large data sets of reasonable quality (e.g., daily stream flow data recorded for at least 20 years for several thousands of gages distributed all over Canada and the USA). The multifractal parameters such as the mean intermittency parameter and the multifractality index were estimated on 8332 time series. Obtained results demonstrate that beyond the classical sampling of the extremes and its limitations, there is the possibility to eliminate long-range dependency by uncovering a stochastic process whose fractional integration would generate the observed long-range dependent process. The results confirm the dependence of parameter estimates on the length of available data. Then developing a metric for parameter estimation error became a principal step in uncertainty evaluation with respect to the multifractal estimates. A technique for estimating confidence intervals with the help of a Bayesian approach was developed. A detailed comparison of multifractal quantile plots and paleoflood data validates the forthcoming use of the multifractal flood frequency analysis.

  10. Structure, frequency dependent dielectric properties and domain configuration of PMN-PFN-PT single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Nengneng; Li, Qiang; Yan, Qingfeng; Zhang, Yiling; Xia, Zhiguo; Chu, Xiangcheng

    2014-09-01

    Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-Pb(Fe1/2Nb1/2)O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PFN-PT) single crystal was grown successfully from high temperature solution by slow cooling method. Structure, frequency dependent dielectric properties and domain configuration of [0 0 1]-oriented single crystal have been investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the as-grown single crystal had a pure perovskite structure with tetragonal symmetry at room temperature. The temperature dependent dielectric permittivity showed only one dielectric anomaly, indicating the ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition. According to the modified Curie-Weiss relationship, as-grown PMN-PFN-PT single crystal was in an intermediate state between normal and relaxor ferroelectrics. Dielectric permittivity and loss of [0 0 1]-oriented PMN-PFN-PT single crystal at room temperature decreased sharply with increasing frequency, which were different from those of PMN-PT65/35 single crystal. Domain configuration of [0 0 1]-oriented PMN-PFN-PT single crystal was observed for the first time by using a polarized light microscopy (PLM). The extinction of 90° domains at P/A:0° revealed a tetragonal structure. Domains along (0 0 1) face exhibited a straight stripe-like morphology with domain size on the scale of 10 μm in average, combining with some much smaller domains about 3-5 μm in width at the intersection of domain blocks which helps to minimize its total energy.

  11. Frequency and potential dependence of reversible electrocatalytic hydrogen interconversion by [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Kavita; Islam, Shams T A; Happe, Thomas; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2017-04-11

    The kinetics of hydrogen oxidation and evolution by [FeFe]-hydrogenases have been investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy-resolving factors that determine the exceptional activity of these enzymes, and introducing an unusual and powerful way of analyzing their catalytic electron transport properties. Attached to an electrode, hydrogenases display reversible electrocatalytic behavior close to the 2H(+)/H2 potential, making them paradigms for efficiency: the electrocatalytic "exchange" rate (measured around zero driving force) is therefore an unusual parameter with theoretical and practical significance. Experiments were carried out on two [FeFe]-hydrogenases, CrHydA1 from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which contains only the active-site "H cluster," and CpI from the fermentative anaerobe Clostridium pasteurianum, which contains four low-potential FeS clusters that serve as an electron relay in addition to the H cluster. Data analysis yields catalytic exchange rates (at the formal 2H(+)/H2 potential, at 0 °C) of 157 electrons (78 molecules H2) per second for CpI and 25 electrons (12 molecules H2) per second for CrHydA1. The experiments show how the potential dependence of catalytic electron flow comprises frequency-dependent and frequency-independent terms that reflect the proficiencies of the catalytic site and the electron transfer pathway in each enzyme. The results highlight the "wire-like" behavior of the Fe-S electron relay in CpI and a low reorganization energy for electron transfer on/off the H cluster.

  12. Temperature dependence of the low frequency dynamics of myoglobin. Measurement of the vibrational frequency distribution by inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed Central

    Cusack, S; Doster, W

    1990-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering spectra of myoglobin hydrated to 0.33 g water (D2O)/g protein have been measured in the low frequency range (1-150 cm-1) at various temperatures between 100 and 350 K. The spectra at low temperatures show a well-resolved maximum in the incoherent dynamic structure factor Sinc(q, omega) at approximately 25 cm-1 and no elastic broadening. This maximum becomes gradually less distinct above 180 K due to the increasing amplitude of quasielastic scattering which extends out to 30 cm-1. The vibrational frequency distribution derived independently at 100 and 180 K are very similar, suggesting harmonic behavior at these temperatures. This result has been used to separate the vibrational motion from the quasielastic motion at temperatures above 180 K. The form of the density of states of myoglobin is discussed in relation to that of other amorphous systems, to theoretical calculations of low frequency modes in proteins, and to previous observations by electron-spin relaxation of fractal-like spectral properties of proteins. The onset of quasielastic scattering above 180 K is indicative of a dynamic transition of the system and correlates with an anomalous increase in the atomic mean-squared displacements observed by Mössbauer spectroscopy (Parak, F., E. W. Knapp, and D. Kucheida. 1982. J. Mol. Biol. 161: 177-194.) and inelastic neutron scattering (Doster, W., S. Cusack, and W. Petry, 1989. Nature [Lond.]. 337: 754-756.) Similar behavior is observed for a hydrated powder of lysozyme suggesting that the low frequency dynamics of globular proteins have common features. PMID:2166599

  13. Learning to identify crowded letters: Does the learning depend on the frequency of training?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Susana T. L.; Truong, Sandy R.

    2012-01-01

    Performance for many visual tasks improves with training. The magnitude of improvement following training depends on the training task, number of trials per training session and the total amount of training. Does the magnitude of improvement also depend on the frequency of training sessions? In this study, we compared the learning effect for three groups of normally sighted observers who repeatedly practiced the task of identifying crowded letters in the periphery for six sessions (1000 trials per session), according to three different training schedules — one group received one session of training everyday, the second group received a training session once a week and the third group once every two weeks. Following six sessions of training, all observers improved in their performance of identifying crowded letters in the periphery. Most importantly, the magnitudes of improvement were similar across the three training groups. The improvement was accompanied by a reduction in the spatial extent of crowding, an increase in the size of visual span and a reduction in letter-size threshold. The magnitudes of these accompanied improvements were also similar across the three training groups. Our finding that the effectiveness of visual perceptual learning is similar for daily, weekly and biweekly training has significant implication for adopting perceptual learning as an option to improve visual functions for clinical patients. PMID:23206551

  14. Absolute and relative blindsight.

    PubMed

    Balsdon, Tarryn; Azzopardi, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The concept of relative blindsight, referring to a difference in conscious awareness between conditions otherwise matched for performance, was introduced by Lau and Passingham (2006) as a way of identifying the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) in fMRI experiments. By analogy, absolute blindsight refers to a difference between performance and awareness regardless of whether it is possible to match performance across conditions. Here, we address the question of whether relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers can be accounted for by response bias. In our replication of Lau and Passingham's experiment, the relative blindsight effect was abolished when performance was assessed by means of a bias-free 2AFC task or when the criterion for awareness was varied. Furthermore, there was no evidence of either relative or absolute blindsight when both performance and awareness were assessed with bias-free measures derived from confidence ratings using signal detection theory. This suggests that both relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers amount to no more than variations in response bias in the assessment of performance and awareness. Consideration of the properties of psychometric functions reveals a number of ways in which relative and absolute blindsight could arise trivially and elucidates a basis for the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 blindsight.

  15. The Frequency Spectral Properties of Electrode-Skin Contact Impedance on Human Head and Its Frequency-Dependent Effects on Frequency-Difference EIT in Stroke Detection from 10Hz to 1MHz

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ge; Li, Weichen; Fu, Feng; Shi, Xuetao; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2017-01-01

    Frequency-difference electrical impedance tomography (fdEIT) reconstructs frequency-dependent changes of a complex impedance distribution. It has a potential application in acute stroke detection because there are significant differences in impedance spectra between stroke lesions and normal brain tissues. However, fdEIT suffers from the influences of electrode-skin contact impedance since contact impedance varies greatly with frequency. When using fdEIT to detect stroke, it is critical to know the degree of measurement errors or image artifacts caused by contact impedance. To our knowledge, no study has systematically investigated the frequency spectral properties of electrode-skin contact impedance on human head and its frequency-dependent effects on fdEIT used in stroke detection within a wide frequency band (10 Hz-1 MHz). In this study, we first measured and analyzed the frequency spectral properties of electrode-skin contact impedance on 47 human subjects’ heads within 10 Hz-1 MHz. Then, we quantified the frequency-dependent effects of contact impedance on fdEIT in stroke detection in terms of the current distribution beneath the electrodes and the contact impedance imbalance between two measuring electrodes. The results showed that the contact impedance at high frequencies (>100 kHz) significantly changed the current distribution beneath the electrode, leading to nonnegligible errors in boundary voltages and artifacts in reconstructed images. The contact impedance imbalance at low frequencies (<1 kHz) also caused significant measurement errors. We conclude that the contact impedance has critical frequency-dependent influences on fdEIT and further studies on reducing such influences are necessary to improve the application of fdEIT in stroke detection. PMID:28107524

  16. Temperature and frequency dependence of AC conductivity of new quaternary Se-Te-Bi-Pb chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Preeti; Sharma, Ambika

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the temperature and frequency dependence of ac conductivity of new quaternary Se84-xTe15Bi1.0Pbx chalcogenide glasses. The Se84-xTe15Bi1.0Pbx (x = 2, 6) glassy alloys are prepared by using melt quenching technique. The temperature and frequency dependent behavior of ac conductivity σac(ω) has been carried out in the frequency range 42 Hz to 5 MHz and in the temperature range of 298-323 K below glass transition temperature. The behavior of ac conductivity is described in terms of the power law ωs. The obtained temperature dependence behavior of ac conductivity and frequency component (s) are explained by means of correlated barrier hopping model recommended by Elliot.

  17. 38 CFR 3.30 - Frequency of payment of improved pension and parents' dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... improved pension and parents' dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC). 3.30 Section 3.30 Pensions... Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.30 Frequency of payment of improved pension and parents... less than $72. (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 1508) (e) Parents' DIC—Semiannually. Benefits shall be paid...

  18. 38 CFR 3.30 - Frequency of payment of improved pension and parents' dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... improved pension and parents' dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC). 3.30 Section 3.30 Pensions... Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.30 Frequency of payment of improved pension and parents... less than $72. (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 1508) (e) Parents' DIC—Semiannually. Benefits shall be paid...

  19. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2008-10-21

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  20. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-03

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  1. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-10-02

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  2. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    SciTech Connect

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2009-09-01

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  3. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-17

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  4. Absolute neutrino mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Silvia; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2013-04-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments firmly established non-vanishing neutrino masses, a result that can be regarded as a strong motivation to extend the Standard Model. In spite of being the lightest massive particles, neutrinos likely represent an important bridge to new physics at very high energies and offer new opportunities to address some of the current cosmological puzzles, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter. In this context, the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale is a key issue within modern High Energy Physics. The talks in this parallel session well describe the current exciting experimental activity aiming to determining the absolute neutrino mass scale and offer an overview of a few models beyond the Standard Model that have been proposed in order to explain the neutrino masses giving a prediction for the absolute neutrino mass scale and solving the cosmological puzzles.

  5. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  6. Cav1.1 controls frequency-dependent events regulating adult skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Buvinic, Sonja; Jacquemond, Vincent; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-03-01

    An important pending question in neuromuscular biology is how skeletal muscle cells decipher the stimulation pattern coming from motoneurons to define their phenotype as slow or fast twitch muscle fibers. We have previously shown that voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1) acts as a voltage sensor for activation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P₃]-dependent Ca(2+) signals that regulates gene expression. ATP released by muscle cells after electrical stimulation through pannexin-1 channels plays a key role in this process. We show now that stimulation frequency determines both ATP release and Ins(1,4,5)P₃ production in adult skeletal muscle and that Cav1.1 and pannexin-1 colocalize in the transverse tubules. Both ATP release and increased Ins(1,4,5)P₃ was seen in flexor digitorum brevis fibers stimulated with 270 pulses at 20 Hz, but not at 90 Hz. 20 Hz stimulation induced transcriptional changes related to fast-to-slow muscle fiber phenotype transition that required ATP release. Addition of 30 µM ATP to fibers induced the same transcriptional changes observed after 20 Hz stimulation. Myotubes lacking the Cav1.1-α1 subunit released almost no ATP after electrical stimulation, showing that Cav1.1 has a central role in this process. In adult muscle fibers, ATP release and the transcriptional changes produced by 20 Hz stimulation were blocked by both the Cav1.1 antagonist nifedipine (25 µM) and by the Cav1.1 agonist (-)S-BayK 8644 (10 µM). We propose a new role for Cav1.1, independent of its calcium channel activity, in the activation of signaling pathways allowing muscle fibers to decipher the frequency of electrical stimulation and to activate specific transcriptional programs that define their phenotype.

  7. Fundamental x-ray interaction limits in diagnostic imaging detectors: Frequency-dependent Swank noise

    SciTech Connect

    Hajdok, G.; Battista, J. J.; Cunningham, I. A.

    2008-07-15

    A frequency-dependent x-ray Swank factor based on the ''x-ray interaction'' modulation transfer function and normalized noise power spectrum is determined from a Monte Carlo analysis. This factor was calculated in four converter materials: amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium (a-Se), cesium iodide (CsI), and lead iodide (PbI{sub 2}) for incident photon energies between 10 and 150 keV and various converter thicknesses. When scaled by the quantum efficiency, the x-ray Swank factor describes the best possible detective quantum efficiency (DQE) a detector can have. As such, this x-ray interaction DQE provides a target performance benchmark. It is expressed as a function of (Fourier-based) spatial frequency and takes into consideration signal and noise correlations introduced by reabsorption of Compton scatter and photoelectric characteristic emissions. It is shown that the x-ray Swank factor is largely insensitive to converter thickness for quantum efficiency values greater than 0.5. Thus, while most of the tabulated values correspond to thick converters with a quantum efficiency of 0.99, they are appropriate to use for many detectors in current use. A simple expression for the x-ray interaction DQE of digital detectors (including noise aliasing) is derived in terms of the quantum efficiency, x-ray Swank factor, detector element size, and fill factor. Good agreement is shown with DQE curves published by other investigators for each converter material, and the conditions required to achieve this ideal performance are discussed. For high-resolution imaging applications, the x-ray Swank factor indicates: (i) a-Si should only be used at low-energy (e.g., mammography); (ii) a-Se has the most promise for any application below 100 keV; and (iii) while quantum efficiency may be increased at energies just above the K edge in CsI and PbI{sub 2}, this benefit is offset by a substantial drop in the x-ray Swank factor, particularly at high spatial frequencies.

  8. Fundamental x-ray interaction limits in diagnostic imaging detectors: frequency-dependent Swank noise.

    PubMed

    Hajdok, G; Battista, J J; Cunningham, I A

    2008-07-01

    A frequency-dependent x-ray Swank factor based on the "x-ray interaction" modulation transfer function and normalized noise power spectrum is determined from a Monte Carlo analysis. This factor was calculated in four converter materials: amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium (a-Se), cesium iodide (CsI), and lead iodide (PbI2) for incident photon energies between 10 and 150 keV and various converter thicknesses. When scaled by the quantum efficiency, the x-ray Swank factor describes the best possible detective quantum efficiency (DQE) a detector can have. As such, this x-ray interaction DQE provides a target performance benchmark. It is expressed as a function of (Fourier-based) spatial frequency and takes into consideration signal and noise correlations introduced by reabsorption of Compton scatter and photoelectric characteristic emissions. It is shown that the x-ray Swank factor is largely insensitive to converter thickness for quantum efficiency values greater than 0.5. Thus, while most of the tabulated values correspond to thick converters with a quantum efficiency of 0.99, they are appropriate to use for many detectors in current use. A simple expression for the x-ray interaction DQE of digital detectors (including noise aliasing) is derived in terms of the quantum efficiency, x-ray Swank factor, detector element size, and fill factor. Good agreement is shown with DQE curves published by other investigators for each converter material, and the conditions required to achieve this ideal performance are discussed. For high-resolution imaging applications, the x-ray Swank factor indicates: (i) a-Si should only be used at low-energy (e.g., mammography); (ii) a-Se has the most promise for any application below 100 keV; and (iii) while quantum efficiency may be increased at energies just above the K edge in CsI and PbI2, this benefit is offset by a substantial drop in the x-ray Swank factor, particularly at high spatial frequencies.

  9. Spatial heterogeneity, frequency-dependent selection and polymorphism in host-parasite interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genomic and pathology analysis has revealed enormous diversity in genes involved in disease, including those encoding host resistance and parasite effectors (also known in plant pathology as avirulence genes). It has been proposed that such variation may persist when an organism exists in a spatially structured metapopulation, following the geographic mosaic of coevolution. Here, we study gene-for-gene relationships governing the outcome of plant-parasite interactions in a spatially structured system and, in particular, investigate the population genetic processes which maintain balanced polymorphism in both species. Results Following previous theory on the effect of heterogeneous environments on maintenance of polymorphism, we analysed a model with two demes in which the demes have different environments and are coupled by gene flow. Environmental variation is manifested by different coefficients of natural selection, the costs to the host of resistance and to the parasite of virulence, the cost to the host of being diseased and the cost to an avirulent parasite of unsuccessfully attacking a resistant host. We show that migration generates negative direct frequency-dependent selection, a condition for maintenance of stable polymorphism in each deme. Balanced polymorphism occurs preferentially if there is heterogeneity for costs of resistance and virulence alleles among populations and to a lesser extent if there is variation in the cost to the host of being diseased. We show that the four fitness costs control the natural frequency of oscillation of host resistance and parasite avirulence alleles. If demes have different costs, their frequencies of oscillation differ and when coupled by gene flow, there is amplitude death of the oscillations in each deme. Numerical simulations show that for a multiple deme island model, costs of resistance and virulence need not to be present in each deme for stable polymorphism to occur. Conclusions Our theoretical

  10. Temperature dependence for the absolute rate constant for the reaction CH/sub 2/OH + O/sub 2/. -->. HO/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/CO from 215 to 300 K

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, F.L.; Payne, W.A.; Stief, L.J.

    1988-07-14

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction CH/sub 2/OH + O/sub 2/ ..-->.. HO/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/CO has been determined from 215 to 300 K in a discharge flow system at 1-Torr pressure. The decay of CH/sub 2/OH was monitored in excess O/sub 2/ by collision-free sampling mass spectrometry. The temperature dependence observed is quite different from the usual Arrhenius form. For the 215-250 K interval, an activation energy of 3.4 kcal/mol is obtained. Above 250 K, the rate constant increases at a slower rate; previous high-temperature studies (1000-2000 K) again show a faster increase in the rate constant. A possible explanation for these observations is that the reaction mechanism changes from addition at low temperature to direct abstraction at high temperatures.

  11. Mathematical modelling of frequency-dependent hysteresis and energy loss of FeBSiC amorphous alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprivica, Branko; Milovanovic, Alenka; Mitrovic, Nebojsa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a novel mathematical model of frequency-dependent magnetic hysteresis. The major hysteresis loop in this model is represented by the ascending and descending curve over an arctangent function. The parameters of the hysteresis model have been calculated from a measured hysteresis loop of the FeBSiC amorphous alloy sample. A number of measurements have been performed with this sample at different frequencies of the sinusoidal excitation magnetic field. A variation of the coercive magnetic field with the frequency has been observed and used in the modelling of frequency-dependent hysteresis with the proposed model. A comparison between measured and modelled hysteresis loops has been presented. Additionally, the areas of the obtained hysteresis loops, representing the energy loss per unit volume, have been calculated and the dependence of the energy loss on the frequency is shown. Furthermore, two models of the frequency dependence of the coercivity and two models of the energy loss separation have been used for fitting the experimental and simulation results. The relations between these models and their parameters have been observed and analysed. Also, the relations between parameters of the hysteresis model and the parameters of the energy loss separation models have been analysed and discussed.

  12. An expert system to analyze high frequency dependent data for the space shuttle main engine turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Raul C., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The prototype expert system ADDAMX identifies selected sinusoid frequencies from spectral data graphs as speed frequencies and harmonics from each turbopump, frequency feed through from one turbopump to another, frequencies generated by turbopump bearings, pseudo 3N for the phase 2 high pressure fuel turbopump, and electrical noise. ADDAMX does the analysis in an interactive or batch mode and the results can be displayed on the screen or hardcopy.

  13. Investigation of the Moessbauer Spectrum Quality as a Dependence on the Frequency of the Velocity Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Pechousek, J.

    2010-07-13

    This paper is focused on a quality characterizing the Moessbauer spectra measured for various frequencies of the velocity signal. Standard electromechanical double-loudspeaker drive and digital PID velocity controller were used for calibration spectra measurement in the frequency interval from 4 up to 100 Hz. Several parameters were evaluated for recommendation of the suitable velocity signal frequency.

  14. A frequency-dependent switch from inhibition to excitation in a hippocampal unitary circuit.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiro; Abegg, Mathias H; Gähwiler, Beat H; Gerber, Urs

    2004-09-23

    The hippocampus, a brain structure essential for memory and cognition, is classically represented as a trisynaptic excitatory circuit. Recent findings challenge this view, particularly with regard to the mossy fibre input to CA3, the second synapse in the trisynaptic pathway. Thus, the powerful mossy fibre input to CA3 pyramidal cells might mediate both synaptic excitation and inhibition. Here we show, by recording from connected cell pairs in rat entorhinal-hippocampal slice cultures, that single action potentials in a dentate granule cell evoke a net inhibitory signal in a pyramidal cell. The hyperpolarization is due to disynaptic feedforward inhibition, which overwhelms monosynaptic excitation. Interestingly, this net inhibitory synaptic response changes to an excitatory signal when the frequency of presynaptic action potentials increases. The process responsible for this switch involves the facilitation of monosynaptic excitatory transmission coupled with rapid depression of inhibitory circuits. This ability to immediately switch the polarity of synaptic responses constitutes a novel synaptic mechanism, which might be crucial to the state-dependent processing of information in associative hippocampal networks.

  15. Simulation of frequency dependence of dielectric susceptibility for description of director reorientation dynamics of nematic LC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakulin, D. A.; Ivanov, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    Simulation of the liquid crystal behavior in an external electric field allows to determine the characteristics of the LC device for specific control signal. The reorientation of director tilt angles is described by the Frank-Oseen elasticity theory, by the Leslie-Ericksen hydrodynamics theory and also by Maxwell system of electromagnetic equations. Due to the fact that it is difficult to obtain analytical solution of dependencies polar and azimuthal angles on time it is necessary to use numerical methods. The numerical solution allows to determine the characteristics of the LC device for specific control signal, but it does not allow to solve the inverse problem. It is determining the necessary parameters of the control signal. To solve this problem, we obtained an approximate analytical solution of the dynamics equations of the director reorientation under the electric field for arbitrary values of the elastic constants and boundary conditions. The results of numerical simulation of the director reorientation under the electric field in hybrid-oriented structure of a dual-frequency nematic liquid crystal were obtained. It is shown that results of analytical solution are in good agreement with the results of computer simulation and experiment in case of small deformations of the LC layer and used approximations.

  16. Positive frequency-dependent selection on warning color in Alpine leaf beetles.

    PubMed

    Borer, Matthias; Van Noort, Tom; Rahier, Martine; Naisbit, Russell E

    2010-12-01

    Müller's theory of warning color and mimicry, despite forming a textbook example of frequency-dependent selection, has rarely been demonstrated in the wild. This may be largely due to the practical and statistical difficulties of measuring natural selection on mobile prey species. Here we demonstrate that this selection acts in alpine beetle communities by using tethered beetles exposed to natural predators. Oreina gloriosa leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) possess chemical defense in the form of cardenolides, accompanied by what appears to be warning color in bright metallic blues and greens. Individuals that match the locally predominant color morph have increased survival, with odds of week-long survival increased by a factor of 1.67 over those that do not match. This corresponds to selection of 13% against foreign morphs. Such selection, acting in concert with variation in community composition, could be responsible for geographic variation in warning color. However, in the face of this purifying selection, the within-population polymorphism seen in many Oreina species remains paradoxical.

  17. QUADRICEPS LOW FREQUENCY FATIGUE AND MUSCLE PAIN ARE CONTRACTION TYPE DEPENDENT

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi, Masaki; Shields, Richard K.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Eccentric contractions are thought to induce greater low frequency fatigue (LFF) and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) than concentric contractions. This study induced a similar amount of eccentric quadriceps muscle fatigue during either a concentric or eccentric fatigue task to compare LFF and DOMS. Methods Subjects (n=22) performed concentric or eccentric fatigue tasks using 75% of the pre-fatigue maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque, and both tasks ended when the MVC eccentric torque decreased by 25% pre-fatigue. Results When subjects reached the failure criterion during the eccentric and concentric tasks, the concentric MVC was 78 ± 9.8% and 64 ± 8.4% of initial, respectively. LFF was greater after the concentric than the eccentric protocols (22 ± 12.4% and 15 ± 7.6% increase, respectively; p < 0.01). DOMS was over 100% greater for the eccentric protocol. Discussion These results indicate that DOMS is not dependent on the events that contribute to LFF. PMID:20544933

  18. Plant-soil feedbacks promote negative frequency dependence in the coexistence of two aridland grasses.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y Anny; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2016-07-27

    Understanding the mechanisms of species coexistence is key to predicting patterns of species diversity. Historically, the ecological paradigm has been that species coexist by partitioning resources: as a species increases in abundance, self-limitation kicks in, because species-specific resources decline. However, determining coexistence mechanisms has been a particular puzzle for sedentary organisms with high overlap in their resource requirements, such as plants. Recent evidence suggests that plant-associated microbes could generate the stabilizing self-limitation (negative frequency dependence) that is required for species coexistence. Here, we test the key assumption that plant-microbe feedbacks cause such self-limitation. We used competition experiments and modelling to evaluate how two common groups of soil microbes (rhizospheric microbes and biological soil crusts) influenced the self-limitation of two competing desert grass species. Negative feedbacks between the dominant plant competitor and its rhizospheric microbes magnified self-limitation, whereas beneficial interactions between both plant species and biological soil crusts partly counteracted this stabilizing effect. Plant-microbe interactions have received relatively little attention as drivers of vegetation dynamics in dry land ecosystems. Our results suggest that microbial mechanisms can contribute to patterns of plant coexistence in arid grasslands.

  19. Temperature Dependent Low Frequency Optical and DC Transport Near a Metal Insulator Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlman, R. S.; Epstein, A. J.; Tanner, D. B.; Ihas, G. G.; Ishiguro, T.; Kaneko, H.; Min, Y. G.; MacDiarmid, A. G.

    1996-03-01

    We report measurements of the temperature dependent far infrared (10-100 cm-1) reflectance and milliKelvin transport of highly conducting polyaniline doped with d,1-camphorsulfonic acid (PAN-CSA) and polypyrrole doped with hexafluorophosphate (PPy-PF_6). With decreasing T (to ~ 200 K), the reflectance initially increases for ω > 20 cm-1 and decreases at lower frequencies. As T is further decreased, there is a continuous reduction in the reflection. There is no indication of a gap opening at low temperatures in contrast to earlier reports for PPy-PF_6.^1 These results will be discussed along with mK magnetotransport measurements for ``metallic'' PAN-CSA samples that have a negative magnetoresistance similar to metallic PPy-PF6 ^2 and other nonmetallic samples, indicating the importance of weak localization channels for transport in highly conducting polymers. ^*Supported in part by NIST ATP 1993-01-0149 and NSF DMR-9403894. ^1K. Lee, et al., Synth. Met. 68, 287 (1995). ^2J. C. Clark, et al., Synth. Met. 69, 215 (1995).

  20. The frequency dependence and locations of short-period microseisms generated in the Southern Ocean and West Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, M.; Reading, A. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gualtieri, L.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, R.; Tkalčić, H.; Hemer, M. A.

    2015-08-01

    The origin of the microseismic wavefield is associated with deep ocean and coastal regions where, under certain conditions, ocean waves can excite seismic waves that propagate as surface and body waves. Given that the characteristics of seismic signals generally vary with frequency, here we explore the frequency- and azimuth-dependent properties of microseisms recorded at a medium aperture (25 km) array in Australia. We examine the frequency-dependent properties of the wavefield, and its temporal variation, over two decades (1991-2012), with a focus on relatively high-frequency microseisms (0.325-0.725 Hz) recorded at the Warramunga Array, which has good slowness resolution capabilities in this frequency range. The analysis is carried out using the incoherently averaged signal Capon beamforming, which gives robust estimates of slowness and back azimuth and is able to resolve multiple wave arrivals within a single time window. For surface waves, we find that fundamental mode Rayleigh waves (Rg) dominate for lower frequencies (<0.55 Hz) while higher frequencies (>0.55 Hz) show a transition to higher mode surface waves (Lg). For body waves, source locations are identified in deep ocean regions for lower frequencies and in shallow waters for higher frequencies. We further examine the association between surface wave arrivals and a WAVEWATCH III ocean wave hindcast. Correlations with the ocean wave hindcast show that secondary microseisms in the lower-frequency band are generated mainly by ocean swell, while higher-frequency bands are generated by the wind sea, i.e., local wind conditions.

  1. Development of low-frequency kernel-function aerodynamics for comparison with time-dependent finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    Finite difference methods for unsteady transonic flow frequency use simplified equations in which certain of the time dependent terms are omitted from the governing equations. Kernel functions are derived for two dimensional subsonic flow, and provide accurate solutions of the linearized potential equation with the same time dependent terms omitted. These solutions make possible a direct evaluation of the finite difference codes for the linear problem. Calculations with two of these low frequency kernel functions verify the accuracy of the LTRAN2 and HYTRAN2 finite difference codes. Comparisons of the low frequency kernel function results with the Possio kernel function solution of the complete linear equations indicate the adequacy of the HYTRAN approximation for frequencies in the range of interest for flutter calculations.

  2. Frequency dependent capacitance studies of the CdS/Cu2S thin-film solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmurcik, L. V.; Serway, R. A.

    1982-05-01

    The dark capacitance of CdS cells has been measured as a function of both bias voltage and operating signal frequency. Results indicate a frequency dependence of the dark current capacitance which can be attributed to deep trapping states in the bulk CdS and at the interface; these states can be characterized by a time constant in the simple relaxation model. Photocapacitance measurements indicate that hole trapping takes place in a narrow region of the i layer near the Cu2S/CdS junction. The results are interpreted in terms of a frequency-dependent model proposed by Schibli and Milnes (1968). It is shown that the simple planar junction model commonly used to describe the CdS cell is accurate at high frequencies.

  3. Measurement of Frequency, Temperature, RF Field Dependence of Surface Resistance of Superconductors Using a Half Wave Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyekyoung; Delayen, Jean

    2017-01-01

    A theory of surface resistance of superconductor was rigorously formulated by Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer more than 50 years ago. Since then the accelerator community has been used the theory as a guideline to improve the surface resistance of the superconducting cavity. It has been observed that the surface resistance is dependent on frequency, temperature and rf field strength, and surface preparation. To verify these dependences, a well-controlled study is required. Although many different types of cavities have been tested, the typical superconducting cavities are built for specific frequencies of their application. They do not provide data other than at its own frequency. A superconducting half wave cavity is a cavity that enables us to collect the surface resistance data across frequencies of interest for particle accelerators and evaluate preparation techniques. This paper will present the design of the half wave cavity, its electromagnetic mode characteristics and experimental results. Research supported by NSF Award PHY-1416051.

  4. Dependence of microwave-excitation signal parameters on frequency stability of caesium atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, A. A.; Davydov, V. V.; Vologdin, V. A.; Zalyotov, D. V.

    2015-11-01

    New scheme of the microwave - excitation signal for the caesium atomic clock is based on method of direct digital synthesis. The theoretical calculations and experimental research showed decrease step frequency tuning by several orders and improvement the spectral characteristics of the output signal of frequency synthesizer. A range of generated output frequencies is expanded, and the possibility of detuning the frequency of the neighboring resonance of spectral line that makes it possible to adjust the C-field in quantum frequency standard is implemented. Experimental research of the metrological characteristics of the quantum frequency standard on the atoms of caesium - 133 with new design scheme of the microwave - excitation signal showed improvement in daily frequency stability on 1.2*10-14.

  5. Influence of Gaussian white noise on the frequency-dependent first nonlinear polarizability of doped quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Ghosh, Manas

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the profiles of diagonal components of frequency-dependent first nonlinear (βxxx and βyyy) optical response of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots. We have assumed a Gaussian function to represent the dopant impurity potential. This study primarily addresses the role of noise on the polarizability components. We have invoked Gaussian white noise consisting of additive and multiplicative characteristics (in Stratonovich sense). The doped system has been subjected to an oscillating electric field of given intensity, and the frequency-dependent first nonlinear polarizabilities are computed. The noise characteristics are manifested in an interesting way in the nonlinear polarizability components. In case of additive noise, the noise strength remains practically ineffective in influencing the optical responses. The situation completely changes with the replacement of additive noise by its multiplicative analog. The replacement enhances the nonlinear optical response dramatically and also causes their maximization at some typical value of noise strength that depends on oscillation frequency.

  6. Influence of Gaussian white noise on the frequency-dependent first nonlinear polarizability of doped quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Ghosh, Manas

    2014-05-07

    We investigate the profiles of diagonal components of frequency-dependent first nonlinear (β{sub xxx} and β{sub yyy}) optical response of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots. We have assumed a Gaussian function to represent the dopant impurity potential. This study primarily addresses the role of noise on the polarizability components. We have invoked Gaussian white noise consisting of additive and multiplicative characteristics (in Stratonovich sense). The doped system has been subjected to an oscillating electric field of given intensity, and the frequency-dependent first nonlinear polarizabilities are computed. The noise characteristics are manifested in an interesting way in the nonlinear polarizability components. In case of additive noise, the noise strength remains practically ineffective in influencing the optical responses. The situation completely changes with the replacement of additive noise by its multiplicative analog. The replacement enhances the nonlinear optical response dramatically and also causes their maximization at some typical value of noise strength that depends on oscillation frequency.

  7. State dependent model predictive control for orbital rendezvous using pulse-width pulse-frequency modulated thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zhu, Zheng H.; Meguid, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation based trajectory planning for orbital rendezvous and proximity maneuvering near a non-cooperative spacecraft in an elliptical orbit. The problem is formulated by converting the continuous control input, output from the state dependent model predictive control, into a sequence of pulses of constant magnitude by controlling firing frequency and duration of constant-magnitude thrusters. The state dependent model predictive control is derived by minimizing the control error of states and control roughness of control input for a safe, smooth and fuel efficient approaching trajectory. The resulting nonlinear programming problem is converted into a series of quadratic programming problem and solved by numerical iteration using the receding horizon strategy. The numerical results show that the proposed state dependent model predictive control with the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation is able to effectively generate optimized trajectories using equivalent control pulses for the proximity maneuvering with less energy consumption.

  8. Absolute realization of low BRDF value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zilong; Liao, Ningfang; Li, Ping; Wang, Yu

    2010-10-01

    Low BRDF value is widespread used in many critical domains such as space and military fairs. These values below 0.1 Sr-1 . So the Absolute realization of these value is the most critical issue in the absolute measurement of BRDF. To develop the Absolute value realization theory of BRDF , defining an arithmetic operators of BRDF , achieving an absolute measurement Eq. of BRDF based on radiance. This is a new theory method to solve the realization problem of low BRDF value. This theory method is realized on a self-designed common double orientation structure in space. By designing an adding structure to extend the range of the measurement system and a control and processing software, Absolute realization of low BRDF value is achieved. A material of low BRDF value is measured in this measurement system and the spectral BRDF value are showed within different angles allover the space. All these values are below 0.4 Sr-1 . This process is a representative procedure about the measurement of low BRDF value. A corresponding uncertainty analysis of this measurement data is given depend on the new theory of absolute realization and the performance of the measurement system. The relative expand uncertainty of the measurement data is 0.078. This uncertainty analysis is suitable for all measurements using the new theory of absolute realization and the corresponding measurement system.

  9. Frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in patients with Wilson's disease: a resting-state fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaopeng; Chen, Siyi; Huang, Chang-Bing; Qian, Yinfeng; Yu, Yongqiang

    2017-01-24

    To investigate the frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) in patients with Wilson's disease (WD). Resting-state function magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) were employed to measure the amplitude of ALFF in 28 patients with WD and 27 matched normal controls. Slow-5 (0.01-0.027 Hz) and slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz) frequency bands were analyzed. Apart from the observation of atrophy in the cerebellum, basal ganglia, occipital gyrus, frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, and paracentral lobule, we also found widespread differences in ALFF of the two bands in the medial frontal gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, insula, basal ganglia, hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus, and thalamus bilaterally. Compared to normal controls, WD patients had increased ALFF in the posterior lobe of the cerebellum, inferior temporal gyrus, brain stem, basal ganglia, and decreased ALFF in the anterior lobe of the cerebellum and medial frontal gyrus. Specifically, we observed that the ALFF abnormalities in the cerebellum and middle frontal gyrus were greater in the slow-5 than in the slow-4 band. Correlation analysis showed consistently positive correlations between urinary copper excretion (Cu), serum ceruloplasmin (CP) and ALFFs in the cerebellum. Our study suggests the accumulation of copper profoundly impaired intrinsic brain activity and the impairments seem to be frequency-dependent. These results provide further insights into the understanding of the pathophysiology of WD.

  10. Functional MRI reveals frequency-dependent responses during deep brain stimulation at the subthalamic nucleus or internal globus pallidus.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hsin-Yi; Younce, John R; Albaugh, Daniel L; Kao, Yu-Chieh Jill; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) represents a widely used therapeutic tool for the symptomatic treatment of movement disorders, most commonly Parkinson's disease (PD). High frequency stimulation at both the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and internal globus pallidus (GPi) has been used with great success for the symptomatic treatment of PD, although the therapeutic mechanisms of action remain elusive. To better understand how DBS at these target sites modulates neural circuitry, the present study used functional blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to map global brain responses to DBS at the STN and GPi of the rat. Robust activation centered in the ipsilateral motor cortex was observed during high frequency stimulation at either target site, with peak responses observed at a stimulation frequency of 100Hz. Of note, frequency tuning curves were generated, demonstrating that cortical activation was maximal at clinically-relevant stimulation frequencies. Divergent responses to stimulation were noted in the contralateral hemisphere, with strong cortical and striatal negative BOLD signal during stimulation of the GPi, but not STN. The frequency-dependence of the observed motor cortex activation at both targets suggests a relationship with the therapeutic effects of STN and GPi DBS, with both DBS targets being functionally connected with motor cortex at therapeutic stimulation frequencies.

  11. Conditioned frequency-dependent hearing sensitivity reduction in the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Nachtigall, Paul E; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2015-04-01

    The frequency specificity of conditioned dampening of hearing, when a loud sound is preceded by a warning sound, was investigated in a bottlenose dolphin. The loud sounds were 5 s tones of 16, 22.5 or 32 kHz, sound pressure level of 165 dB root mean square (RMS) re. 1 µPa. Hearing sensitivity was tested at the same three frequencies. Hearing sensitivity was measured using pip-train test stimuli and auditory evoked potential recording. The test sound stimuli served also as warning sounds. The durations of the warning sounds were varied randomly to avoid locking a conditioning effect to the timing immediately before the loud sound. Hearing thresholds before the loud sound increased, relative to the baseline, at test frequencies equal to or higher than the loud sound frequency. The highest threshold increase appeared at test frequencies of 0.5 octaves above the loud sound frequencies.

  12. Deterministic High-Frequency Ground Motion Using Dynamic Rupture Along Rough Faults, Small-Scale Media Heterogeneities, and Frequency-Dependent Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, K.; Olsen, K. B.; Day, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    was used in our simulations described above. At higher frequencies, however, ground motion data indicates that anelastic attenuation falls off as frequency increases. Here, we implement frequency-dependent Q in AWP via a power-law function, Q=Q0*f^n, where Q is the quality factor and f is frequency, and Q0 and n are constants that may vary with the region of interest. We modify the coarse-grained approach, using least squares to optimize the weighting of the anelastic functions to fit a target Q(f) function. To validate our method, we compare the finite difference synthetics seismograms computed with AWP with those from a frequency-wavenumber code to account for dispersion.

  13. Frequency-dependent pollinator discrimination acts against female plants in the gynodioecious Geranium maculatum

    PubMed Central

    Van Etten, Megan L.; Chang, Shu-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Gynodioecy, the co-occurrence of female and hermaphroditic individuals, is thought to be an intermediate step between hermaphroditism and separate sexes, a major transition in flowering plants. Because retaining females in a population requires that they have increased seed fitness (to compensate for the lack of pollen fitness), factors that affect seed fitness are of great importance to the evolution of this mating system and have often been studied. However, factors negatively affecting female fitness are equally important and have been largely neglected. One such factor stems from female flowers being less attractive to insects than hermaphrodite flowers, thereby decreasing their relative fitness. Methods To test the severity and consequences of this type of pollinator discrimination in Geranium maculatum, experimental populations with the range of sex ratios observed in nature were created, ranging from 13 % to 42 % females. Pollinators were observed in order to measure the strength of discrimination, and pollen deposition and seed production of both sexes were measured to determine the fitness consequences of this discrimination. Additionally a comparison was made across the sex ratios to determine whether discrimination was frequency-dependent. Key Results It was found that female flowers, on average, were visited at half of the rate of hermaphrodite flowers, which decreased their pollen receipt and seed production. Additionally, females were most discriminated against when rare, due to both changes in the pollinators' behaviour and a shift in pollinator composition. Conclusions The results suggest that pollinator discrimination negatively affects females' relative fitness when they are rare. Thus, the initial spread of females in a population, the first step in the evolution of gynodioecy, may be made more difficult due to pollinator discrimination. PMID:25326647

  14. ac dynamics of ferroelectric domains from an investigation of the frequency dependence of hysteresis loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. M.; Jo, J. Y.; Kim, T. H.; Yoon, J.-G.; Song, T. K.; Lee, H. N.; Marton, Z.; Park, S.; Jo, Y.; Noh, T. W.

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the pinning dominated domain-wall dynamics under an ac field by studying the frequency (f) dependence of hysteresis loops of a uniaxial ferroelectric (FE) system. We measured the fully saturated polarization-electric field (P-E) hysteresis loops of high-quality epitaxial 100-nm-thick PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3 capacitors at various f (5-2000 Hz) and temperatures T (10-300 K). We observed that the coercive field EC is proportional to fβ with two scaling regions, which was also reported earlier in magnetic systems [T. A. Moore and J. A. C. Bland, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 16, R1369 (2004), 10.1088/0953-8984/16/46/R03and references therein]. In addition, we observed that the two scaling regions of EC vs f exist at all measured T . We found that the existence of the two scaling regions should come from a dynamic crossover between the creep and flow regimes of the FE domain-wall motions. By extending the theory of Nattermann , which was originally proposed for impure magnet systems [T. Nattermann, V. Pokrovsky, and V. M. Vinokur, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 197005 (2001)10.1103/PhysRevLett.87.197005], to the disordered FE systems, we obtained analytical expressions for the dynamic crossovers between the relaxation and creep, and between the creep and flow regimes. By comparing with the experimental data from our fully saturated P-E hysteresis loop measurements, we could construct a T-E dynamic phase diagram with f as a parameter for hysteretic FE domain dynamics in the presence of an ac field.

  15. Frequency of pulmonary mineralization and hypoxemia in 21 dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism.

    PubMed

    Berry, C R; Hawkins, E C; Hurley, K J; Monce, K

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of hypoxemia and pulmonary mineralization using 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH). Twenty-one dogs with PDH were prospectively evaluated using thoracic radiography, arterial blood gas analysis, and bone phase and pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy (using 99mTc-macro-aggregated albumin [99mTc-MAA]). The radiographs and bone and perfusion studies were evaluated subjectively. An averaged quantitative count density ratio was calculated between the thorax and cranial thoraco-lumbar vertebrae from lateral thoracic 99mTc-MDP images. Thoracic:vertebral ratios were calculated using 99mTc-MDP studies from 21 control dogs. The thoracic:vertebral ratios were compared between the 2 groups (PDH and control). The mean age (+/-SD) of the 21 PDH dogs was 10.2 (+/-3) years, whereas the mean age of the control group was 9.8 (+/-3) years. Seven of the 21 dogs with PDH were hypoxemic (defined as an arterial partial pressure of oxygen [PaO2] < 80 mm Hg) with an average PaO2 (+/-SD) of 62 (+/-15) mm Hg. Of the 7 hypoxemic dogs, 2 were found to have pulmonary mineralization based on bone scintigraphic images. Pulmonary perfusion abnormalities were not identified using 99mTc-MAA in any of the 21 PDH dogs. Six PDH dogs had an abnormal interstitial pulmonary pattern and 5 of these dogs were hypoxemic. The average quantitative thoracic:vertebral ratio was not significantly different between the PDH and control dogs (0.5 +/- 0.4 versus 0.4 +/- 0.1, P = .16). Causes of hypoxemia other than pulmonary thromboembolism should be considered in dogs with PDH. Pulmonary mineralization may contribute to hypoxemia in dogs with PDH.

  16. Power dependence of terahertz carrier frequency in a plasma-based two-color generation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ji; Zhang, Liang-Liang; Luo, Yi-Man; Wu, Tong; Zhang, Cun-Lin; Zhao, Yue-Jin

    2014-12-01

    We conduct a frequency spectrum experiment to investigate terahertz (THz) emissions from laser-induced air plasma under different laser incident powers. The frequency spectra are measured using both air-biased-coherent detection and a Michelson interferometer. The red-shift of the THz pulse carrier frequency is observed as a response to increased pump power. These phenomena are related to plasma collisions and can be explained by the plasma collision model. Based on these findings, it is apparent that the tuning of the THz carrier frequency can be achieved through regulation of the pump beam.

  17. Rupture and frequency-dependent seismic radiation of the 2012 Mw 8.6 Sumatra strike-slip earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiuxun; Yao, Huajian

    2016-06-01

    On 2012 April 11, a great strike-slip earthquake (moment magnitude of Mw 8.6) occurred off the west coast of northern Sumatra area followed by an Mw 8.2 aftershock 2 hr later. Different geophysical data and methods have been used to investigate the mechanism, faulting, seismic radiation and slip propagation of this event, but frequency-dependent features of its rupture process have not been discussed much. In this study, we use a compressive sensing method based on sparsity inversion in the frequency domain to study the frequency-dependent seismic radiation and rupture process of this event. Our results indicate a very complex rupture process concerning at least three different rupture stages on multiple subfaults with nearly conjugate geometries. The main shock has triggered seismicity on a series of ridge-perpendicular or ridge-parallel conjugate strike-slip faults around the Nighty East Ridge. Obvious frequency-dependent rupture process has been presented and discussed. Combining results from slip inversion based on the finite-fault model, we observe that in the beginning stage of the rupture lower frequency radiation appears to originate from the areas with large slip, while the high-frequency radiation is located at the boundary of large-slip region or rupture front. Some radiation probably originates from the repeating slip on the main faults or triggered events on some nearby faults in the rupture area. The complex frequency-dependent seismic radiation patterns observed in this study provide important information for future investigation of rupture physics of this complex strike-slip event.

  18. Frequency-dependent recruitment of V2a interneurons during fictive locomotion in the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guisheng; Sharma, Kamal; Harris-Warrick, Ronald M

    2011-01-01

    The principles governing the recruitment of interneurons during acceleration in vertebrate locomotion are unknown. In the mouse, the V2a spinal interneurons are dispensable for left-right coordination at low locomotor frequencies, but their function is essential for maintaining left-right coordination at high frequencies. Here we explore the mechanisms driving this frequency-dependent role using four methods to determine how V2a interneurons are recruited at different locomotor frequencies. We show that half of the V2a interneurons receive rhythmic locomotor synaptic drive, which increases with cycle frequency, recruiting more of the neurons to fire at higher frequencies. The other V2a interneurons do not receive locomotion-related synaptic drive and are not recruited into the locomotor network at any frequency. The increased role of V2a interneurons at higher locomotor frequencies arises from increased synaptic drive to recruit subthreshold oscillating V2a neurons, and not from recruitment of a second set of silent V2a interneurons.

  19. A method to estimate the absolute ultrasonic nonlinearity parameter from relative measurements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongbeom; Song, Dong-Gi; Jhang, Kyung-Young

    2017-02-17

    The ultrasonic nonlinearity parameter, β, is determined from the displacement amplitude of the second-order harmonic frequency component generated during the propagation of ultrasonic waves through a material. This parameter is generally referred to as the absolute parameter. Meanwhile, it is difficult to measure the small displacement amplitude of the second-order harmonic component; therefore, most studies measure the relative parameter determined from the detected signal amplitude. However, for quantitative assessment of material degradation, the absolute parameter is still required. This study proposes a method to estimate the absolute parameter for damaged material by measuring the relative parameter. This method is based on the fact that the fractional ratio of the relative parameters between different materials is identical to that of the absolute parameters after compensation for material dependent differences such as the wavenumber and detection-sensitivity. In order to experimentally verify the method, the relative parameters of heat-treated Al6061-T6 alloy specimens with different aging times were measured to compare with absolute parameters directly measured by piezo-electric detection. The results show that the fluctuations of both parameters with respect to aging time were very similar to each other, and that the absolute parameters estimated by the proposed method were in good agreement with those measured directly.

  20. The study of absolute distance measurement based on the self-mixing interference in laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ting-ting; Zhang, Chuang

    2009-07-01

    In this work, an absolute distance measurement method based on the self-mixing interference is presented. The principles of the method used three-mirror cavity equivalent model are studied in this paper, and the mathematical model is given. Wavelength modulation of the laser beam is obtained by saw-tooth modulating the infection current of the laser diode. Absolute distance of the external target is determined by Fourier analysis method. The frequency of signal from PD is linearly dependent on absolute distance, but also affected by temperature and fluctuation of current source. A dual-path method which uses the reference technique for absolute distance measurement has been proposed. The theoretical analysis shows that the method can eliminate errors resulting from distance-independent variations in the setup. Accuracy and stability can be improved. Simulated results show that a resolution of +/-0.2mm can be achieved for absolute distance ranging from 250mm to 500mm. In the same measurement range, the resolution we obtained is better than other absolute distance measurement system proposed base on self-mixing interference.

  1. Evolutionary time-series analysis reveals the signature of frequency-dependent selection on a female mating polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Le Rouzic, Arnaud; Hansen, Thomas F; Gosden, Thomas P; Svensson, Erik I

    2015-06-01

    A major challenge in evolutionary biology is understanding how stochastic and deterministic factors interact and influence macroevolutionary dynamics in natural populations. One classical approach is to record frequency changes of heritable and visible genetic polymorphisms over multiple generations. Here, we combined this approach with a maximum likelihood-based population-genetic model with the aim of understanding and quantifying the evolutionary processes operating on a female mating polymorphism in the blue-tailed damselfly Ischnura elegans. Previous studies on this color-polymorphic species have suggested that males form a search image for females, which leads to excessive mating harassment of common female morphs. We analyzed a large temporally and spatially replicated data set of between-generation morph frequency changes in I. elegans. Morph frequencies were more stable than expected from genetic drift alone, suggesting the presence of selection toward a stable equilibrium that prevents local loss or fixation of morphs. This can be interpreted as the signature of negative frequency-dependent selection maintaining the phenotypic stasis and genetic diversity in these populations. Our novel analytical approach allows the estimation of the strength of frequency-dependent selection from the morph frequency fluctuations around their inferred long-term equilibria. This approach can be extended and applied to other polymorphic organisms for which time-series data across multiple generations are available.

  2. Absolute Distance Measurement with the MSTAR Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Peters, Robert; Burger, Johan; Ahn, Seh-Won; Steier, William H.; Fetterman, Harrold R.; Chang, Yian

    2003-01-01

    The MSTAR sensor (Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging) is a new system for measuring absolute distance, capable of resolving the integer cycle ambiguity of standard interferometers, and making it possible to measure distance with sub-nanometer accuracy. The sensor uses a single laser in conjunction with fast phase modulators and low frequency detectors. We describe the design of the system - the principle of operation, the metrology source, beamlaunching optics, and signal processing - and show results for target distances up to 1 meter. We then demonstrate how the system can be scaled to kilometer-scale distances.

  3. Positioning, alignment and absolute pointing of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, F.; Distefano, C.; Antares Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    A precise detector alignment and absolute pointing is crucial for point-source searches. The ANTARES neutrino telescope utilises an array of hydrophones, tiltmeters and compasses for the relative positioning of the optical sensors. The absolute calibration is accomplished by long-baseline low-frequency triangulation of the acoustic reference devices in the deep-sea with a differential GPS system at the sea surface. The absolute pointing can be independently verified by detecting the shadow of the Moon in cosmic rays.

  4. Polar motion excitations for an Earth model with frequency-dependent responses: 2. Numerical tests of the meteorological excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Ray, Jim; Shen, WenBin; Huang, ChengLi

    2013-09-01

    motion excitation involves mass redistributions and motions of the Earth system relative to the mantle, as well as the frequency-dependent rheology of the Earth, where the latter has recently been modeled in the form of frequency-dependent Love numbers and polar motion transfer functions. At seasonal and intraseasonal time scales, polar motions are dominated by angular momentum fluctuations due to mass redistributions and relative motions in the atmosphere, oceans, and continental water, snow, and ice. In this study, we compare the geophysical excitations derived from various global atmospheric, oceanic, and hydrological models (NCEP, ECCO, ERA40, ERAinterim, and ECMWF operational products), and construct two model sets LDC1 and LDC2 by combining the above models with a least difference method. Comparisons between the geodetic excitation (derived from the polar motion series IERS EOP 08 C04) and the geophysical excitations (based on those meteorological models) imply that the atmospheric models are the most reliable while the hydrological ones are the most inaccurate; that the ERAinterim is, in general, the best model set among the original ones, but the combined models LDC1 and LDC2 are much better than ERAinterim; and that applying the frequency-dependent transfer functions to LDC1 and LDC2 improves their agreements with the geodetic excitation. Thus, we conclude that the combined models LDC1 and LDC2 are reliable, and the frequency-dependent Love numbers and polar motion transfer functions are well modeled.

  5. Searching for narrow-band oscillations in solar flares in the presence of frequency-dependent noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglis, Andrew; Ireland, Jack

    2014-06-01

    A common feature of solar flare emission is the appearance of short timescale fluctuations, often interpreted in terms of oscillatory signatures, and often referred to as quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) or quasi-periodic oscilations (QPOs). These fluctuations are an important diagnostic of solar plasma, as they are linked to the flare reconnection and particle acceleration sites. However, it has recently become clear that solar flare time series, like many astrophysical objects, are often dominated by frequency-dependent 'red' noise, rather than white noise. This frequency-dependent red-noise is commonly not taken into account when analyzing flare time-series for narrow-band oscillations. We demonstrate the application of a Bayesian method of searching for narrow-band oscillations in flares (based on Vaughan 2010) that fully accounts for frequency-dependent noise. We apply this method to the recent flares of 2011 February 15 and 2011 June 7, utilizing high-cadence EUV and X-ray data from the Proba-2/LYRA and Fermi/GBM instruments. While emphasizing that the observed fluctuations are a very real effect, we show that the emission from the selected events can be well described by a frequency-dependent noise model, without the need to invoke an explicit oscillatory mechanism. This presents a challenge to our current understanding of flare fluctuations, and suggests that narrow-band oscillations in flare emission may be much less prevalent than previously believed.

  6. Frequency-dependent study of solid 4He contained in a rigid double-torus torsional oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaewon; Shin, Jaeho; Kim, Eunseong

    2015-10-01

    The rigid double-torus torsional oscillator (TO) is constructed to reduce any elastic effects inherent to complicated TO structures, allowing explicit probing for a genuine supersolid signature. We investigated the frequency- and temperature-dependent response of the rigid double-torus TO containing solid 4He with 0.6-ppb 3He and 300-ppb 3He . We did not find evidence to support the frequency-independent contribution proposed to be a property of supersolid helium. The frequency-dependent contribution which comes from the simple elastic effect of solid helium coupled to the TO is essentially responsible for the entire response. The magnitude of the period drop is linearly proportional to f2, indicating that the responses observed in this TO are mostly caused by the overshoot of "soft" solid helium against the wall of the torus. Dissipation of the rigid TO is vastly suppressed compared to that of nonrigid TOs.

  7. Frequency-Dependent Activation of Glucose Utilization in the Superior Cervical Ganglion by Electrical Stimulation of Cervical Sympathetic Trunk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarowsky, Paul; Kadekaro, Massako; Sokoloff, Louis

    1983-07-01

    Electrical stimulation of the distal stump of the transected cervical sympathetic trunk produces a frequency-dependent activation of glucose utilization, measured by the deoxy[14C]glucose method, in the superior cervical ganglion of the urethane-anesthetized rat. The frequency dependence falls between 0-15 Hz; at 20 Hz the activation of glucose utilization is no greater than at 15 Hz. Deafferentation of the superior cervical ganglion by transection of the cervical sympathetic trunk does not diminish the rate of glucose utilization in the ganglion in the urethane-anesthetized rat. These results indicate that the rate of energy metabolism in an innervated neural structure is, at least in part, regulated by the impulse frequency of the electrical input to the structure, and this regulation may be an essential component of the mechanism of the coupling of metabolic activity to functional activity in the nervous system.

  8. Dependence of in-situ Bose condensate size on final frequency of RF-field in evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. R.; Ram, S. P.; Tiwari, S. K.; Rawat, H. S.

    2017-04-01

    We report the results of in-situ characterization of 87Rb atom cloud in a quadrupole Ioffe configuration (QUIC) magnetic trap after a radio-frequency (RF) evaporative cooling of the trapped atom cloud. The in-situ absorption images of the atom cloud have shown clear bimodal optical density (OD) profiles which indicate the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) phase transition in the trapped gas. Also, we report here, for the first time, the measured variation in the sizes of the condensate and thermal clouds with the final frequency selected in the frequency scan of the RF-field for evaporative cooling. These results on frequency-dependent sizes of the clouds are consistent with the theoretical understanding of the BEC phenomenon in the trap.

  9. Frequency-Dependent Modulation of Regional Synchrony in the Human Brain by Eyes Open and Eyes Closed Resting-States

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Shuqin; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Yijun; Zhu, Huaiqiu; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The eyes-open (EO) and eyes-closed (EC) states have differential effects on BOLD-fMRI signal dynamics, affecting both the BOLD oscillation frequency of a single voxel and the regional homogeneity (ReHo) of several neighboring voxels. To explore how the two resting-states modulate the local synchrony through different frequency bands, we decomposed the time series of each voxel into several components that fell into distinct frequency bands. The ReHo in each of the bands was calculated and compared between the EO and EC conditions. The cross-voxel correlations between the mean frequency and the overall ReHo of each voxel’s original BOLD series in different brain areas were also calculated and compared between the two states. Compared with the EC state, ReHo decreased with EO in a wide frequency band of 0.01–0.25 Hz in the bilateral thalamus, sensorimotor network, and superior temporal gyrus, while ReHo increased significantly in the band of 0–0.01 Hz in the primary visual cortex, and in a higher frequency band of 0.02–0.1 Hz in the higher order visual areas. The cross-voxel correlations between the frequency and overall ReHo were negative in all the brain areas but varied from region to region. These correlations were stronger with EO in the visual network and the default mode network. Our results suggested that different frequency bands of ReHo showed different sensitivity to the modulation of EO-EC states. The better spatial consistency between the frequency and overall ReHo maps indicated that the brain might adopt a stricter frequency-dependent configuration with EO than with EC. PMID:26545233

  10. Frequency dependent electrical measurements of amorphous GeSbSe chalcogenide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Mirsaneh, M.; Furman, E.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Lanagan, M. T.; Pantano, C. G.

    2010-03-22

    A commercial bulk chalcogenide glass (Ge28Sb12Se60) was used as a source to fabricate amorphous thin films via thermal evaporation technique. At low frequencies (1 MHz) impedance spectroscopy was performed to measure electrical properties. To measure ac conductivity at microwave frequencies, a split resonance cavity technique was applied for which a model based on parallel arrangement of substrate and film capacitors was developed. This model was used to extract tan8 and ac conductivity of the films. Microwave ac conductivity was correlated with the extrapolated low frequency conductivity data confirming applicability of the universal law commonly observed in amorphous semiconductors.

  11. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed.

  12. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  13. Dependence of local sound vibration on time frequency in a monolithic array transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Saiga, N.; Suzuki, T.

    1982-02-01

    An approach of increasing spatial resolution in a monolithic array transducer was carried out which utilized the thickness vibration at frequencies slightly lower than the resonance band. At those frequencies, the optical probing manifested that an usual spatial impulse response shifted into a more sharp and monotonously damping one with a peak amplitude comparable to those in resonance. An actual imaging as a receiving array demonstrated the improvement of spatial resolution and the high uniformity of image contrast.

  14. Frequency-dependent linewidth enhancement factor of optical injection-locked quantum dot/dash lasers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Chaibi, Mohamed E; Huang, Heming; Erasme, Didier; Poole, Philip; Even, Jacky; Grillot, Frédéric

    2015-08-24

    Combining theoretical and experimental studies show that optical injection strongly changes the behavior of the linewidth enhancement factor (α(H)-factor) and the FM-to-AM indices ratio (FAIR) in quantum dash/dot semiconductor lasers. In contrast to solitary lasers, both the α(H)-factor and the FAIR at low-frequency modulation are reduced by optical injection. At high modulation frequency, however, the phase-amplitude coupling characteristics are little influenced by optical injection.

  15. Frequency-dependent solvent friction and torsional damping in liquid 1,2-difluoroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPhail, Richard A.; Monroe, Frances C.

    1991-04-01

    We have used Raman spectroscopy to study the torsional dynamics, rotational dynamics, and conformational solvation energy of liquid 1,2-difluoroethane. From the Raman intensities, we obtain Δ H(g-t) = -2.4±0.1 kcal/mol, indicating strong dipolar solvation of the gauche conformer. We analyze the Raman linewidths of the CCF bending bands to obtain the zero-frequency torsional damping coefficient or well friction for the gauche conformer, and from the linewidth of the torsion band we obtain the friction evaluated at the torsional frequency. The zero-frequency well friction shows deviations from hydrodynamic behavior reminiscent of those observed for barrier friction, whereas the high-frequency friction is considerably smaller in magnitude and independent of temperature and viscosity. The zero-frequency torsional friction correlates linearly with the rotational friction. It is argued that the small amplitude of the torsional fluctuations emphasizes the short distance, or high wavevector components of the solvent friction. Dielectric friction apparently does not contribute to the torsional friction at the observed frequencies.

  16. Voltage dependence of subthreshold resonance frequency in layer II of medial entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Shay, Christopher F; Boardman, Ian S; James, Nicholas M; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2012-08-01

    The resonance properties of individual neurons in entorhinal cortex (EC) may contribute to their functional properties in awake, behaving rats. Models propose that entorhinal grid cells could arise from shifts in the intrinsic frequency of neurons caused by changes in membrane potential owing to depolarizing input from neurons coding velocity. To test for potential changes in intrinsic frequency, we measured the resonance properties of neurons at different membrane potentials in neurons in medial and lateral EC. In medial entorhinal neurons, the resonant frequency of individual neurons decreased in a linear manner as the membrane potential was depolarized between -70 and -55 mV. At more hyperpolarized membrane potentials, cells asymptotically approached a maximum resonance frequency. Consistent with the previous studies, near resting potential, the cells of the medial EC possessed a decreasing gradient of resonance frequency along the dorsal to ventral axis, and cells of the lateral EC lacked resonant properties, regardless of membrane potential or position along the medial to lateral axis within lateral EC. Application of 10 μM ZD7288, the H-channel blocker, abolished all resonant properties in MEC cells, and resulted in physiological properties very similar to lateral EC cells. These results on resonant properties show a clear change in frequency response with depolarization that could contribute to the generation of grid cell firing properties in the medial EC.

  17. Investigation into angular and frequency dependence of scattering matrices of elastodynamic scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Felice, Maria; Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The scattering behaviour of a finite-sized elastodynamic scatterer in a homogeneous isotropic medium can be encapsulated in a scattering matrix (S-matrix) for each wave mode combination. Each S-matrix is a continuous complex function of 3 variables: incident wave angle, scattered wave angle and frequency. In the paper, the S-matrices for various scatterers (circular holes, straight smooth cracks, rough cracks and 4 circular holes in an area of interest) are investigated. It is shown that, for a given scatterer, the continuous data in the angular dimensions of an S-matrix can be represented to a prescribed level of accuracy by a finite number of complex Fourier coefficients. The finding is that the number of angular orders required to characterise a scatterer is a function of scatterer size and is related to the Nyquist theorem. The variation of scattering behaviour with frequency is examined next and is found to show periodic oscillation with a period which is a function of scatterer size and its geometry. The shortest period of these oscillations indicates the maximum frequency increment required to accurately describe the scattering behaviour in a specific frequency range. Finally, the maximum angular order and frequency increments for the chosen scatterers in a specific frequency range are suggested.

  18. Sustained Exocytosis after Action Potential-Like Stimulation at Low Frequencies in Mouse Chromaffin Cells Depends on a Dynamin-Dependent Fast Endocytotic Process

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Díaz, José; Álvarez, Yanina D.; Montenegro, Mauricio; Bayonés, Lucas; Belingheri, Ana V.; González-Jamett, Arlek M.; Cárdenas, Ana M.; Marengo, Fernando D.

    2016-01-01

    Under basal conditions the action potential firing rate of adrenal chromaffin cells is lower than 0.5 Hz. The maintenance of the secretory response at such frequencies requires a continuous replenishment of releasable vesicles. However, the mechanism that allows such vesicle replenishment remains unclear. Here, using membrane capacitance measurements on mouse chromaffin cells, we studied the mechanism of replenishment of a group of vesicles released by a single action potential-like stimulus (APls). The exocytosis triggered by APls (ETAP) represents a fraction (40%) of the immediately releasable pool, a group of vesicles highly coupled to voltage dependent calcium channels. ETAP was replenished with a time constant of 0.73 ± 0.11 s, fast enough to maintain synchronous exocytosis at 0.2–0.5 Hz stimulation. Regarding the mechanism involved in rapid ETAP replenishment, we found that it depends on the ready releasable pool; indeed depletion of this vesicle pool significantly delays ETAP replenishment. On the other hand, ETAP replenishment also correlates with a dynamin-dependent fast endocytosis process (τ = 0.53 ± 0.01 s). In this regard, disruption of dynamin function markedly inhibits the fast endocytosis and delays ETAP replenishment, but also significantly decreases the synchronous exocytosis during repetitive APls stimulation at low frequencies (0.2 and 0.5 Hz). Considering these findings, we propose a model in where both the transfer of vesicles from ready releasable pool and fast endocytosis allow rapid ETAP replenishment during low stimulation frequencies. PMID:27507935

  19. Absolute-structure reports.

    PubMed

    Flack, Howard D

    2013-08-01

    All the 139 noncentrosymmetric crystal structures published in Acta Crystallographica Section C between January 2011 and November 2012 inclusive have been used as the basis of a detailed study of the reporting of absolute structure. These structure determinations cover a wide range of space groups, chemical composition and resonant-scattering contribution. Defining A and D as the average and difference of the intensities of Friedel opposites, their level of fit has been examined using 2AD and selected-D plots. It was found, regardless of the expected resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, that the Friedel-difference intensities are often dominated by random uncertainty and systematic error. An analysis of data collection strategy is provided. It is found that crystal-structure determinations resulting in a Flack parameter close to 0.5 may not necessarily be from crystals twinned by inversion. Friedifstat is shown to be a robust estimator of the resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, very little affected by the particular space group of a structure nor by the occupation of special positions. There is considerable confusion in the text of papers presenting achiral noncentrosymmetric crystal structures. Recommendations are provided for the optimal way of treating noncentrosymmetric crystal structures for which the experimenter has no interest in determining the absolute structure.

  20. The forces applied by cilia depend linearly on their frequency due to constant geometry of the effective stroke.

    PubMed

    Teff, Zvi; Priel, Zvi; Gheber, Levi A

    2008-01-01

    Mucus propelling cilia are excitable by many stimulants, and have been shown to increase their beating frequency up to threefold, by physiological extracellular stimulants, such as adenosine-triphosphate, acetylcholine, and others. This is thought to represent the evolutionary adaptation of mucociliary systems to the need of rapid and efficient cleansing the airways of foreign particles. However, the mucus transport velocity depends not only on the beat frequency of the cilia, but on their beat pattern as well, especially in the case of mucus bearing cilia that beat in a complex, three-dimensional fashion. In this study, we directly measured the force applied by live ciliary tissues with an atomic force microscope, and found that it increases linearly with the beating frequency. This implies that the arc swept by the cilia during their effective stroke remains unchanged during frequency increase, thus leading to a linear dependence of transport velocity on the beat frequency. Combining the atomic force microscope measurements with optical measurements, we have indications that the recovery stroke is performed on a less inclined plane, leading to an effective shortening of the overall path traveled by the cilia tip during this nontransporting phase of their beat pattern. This effect is observed to be independent of the type of stimulant (temperature or chemical), chemical (adenosine-triphosphate or acetylcholine), or concentration (1 microM-100 microM), indicating that this behavior may result from internal details of the cilium mechanical structure.

  1. Ultrasonic estimate of the modulus of rupture and quantification of the frequency dependent dynamic modulus in Norway Spruce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmi, Ari; Karppinen, Timo; Montonen, Risto; Saranpää, Pekka; Hæggström, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic measurements allow non-destructive evaluation of mechanical properties of wood. However, it is unclear how these ultrasonically determined properties relate to comparable values obtained by traditional mechanical experiments, e.g., three point bending performed at different probing frequencies. In addition, although a link between the modulus of rupture (MOR) and the modulus of elasticity (MOE) obtained with static methods is established, little research exists on the correlation between the ultrasonically determined dynamic elastic modulus and MOR. Therefore, we set out to link the modulus values obtained by three-point bending to those obtained by ultrasonic measurements at different frequencies. We compared the modalities using a fractional derivative model that theoretically predicts a frequency dependency of the dynamic elastic modulus. We determined MOE and MOR in 102 Norway Spruce samples (340 to 510 kg/m3 density) by three-point bending followed by ultrasonic through-transmission measurements that quantified the dynamic modulus at 500 kHz, 4 MHz, and 8 MHz. This is the first report on such a frequency series for Norway Spruce. Our results provide a conversion factor that permits comparing ultrasonically and statically measured MOE values. Depending on the ultrasonic frequency, correlations ranging from 0.3 to 0.53 between the ultrasonic dynamic modulus and MOR were found.

  2. The effects of frequency-dependent amplitude on the time-reversed Lamb wave based baseline-free damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Liang; Lin, Jing; Luo, Zhi; Gao, Fei

    2017-02-01

    Time reversal is the process that a response signal recorded at a receiver location is reversed in time and emitted back to the original source transducer. In the absence of any damage, theoretically the main wave packet of the reconstructed signal could exactly resemble the original input wave form. However, since the amplitude response of Lamb wave mode is generally frequency dependent, the reconstruction is not perfect. In this study, the influences of the frequency-dependent amplitude to the spectrum of the reconstructed signal is investigated. The results show that the peak frequency shifts and the bandwidth varies due to the frequency dependency of amplitude. This spectrum distortion affects the wave form of the main wave packet of the reconstructed signal significantly. Since the baseline-free damage detection is accomplished by comparing the wave form of the TR reconstructed signal with that of the original input signal, these effects would be captured by the damage index and be attributed to the presence of damage. Thus a false alarm may arise. To mitigate these effects, an amplitude modification strategy is established. With the application of this strategy, the modified baseline-free damage detection method is then employed for monitoring the growth of damage.

  3. High-order harmonic generation from silver clusters: Laser-frequency dependence and the screening effect of d electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Nobusada, Katsuyuki; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2004-10-01

    We present time-dependent density functional studies of harmonic generation from Ag{sub 2} and Ag{sub 8} in pulsed laser fields. The harmonic generation is strongly dependent on the laser frequency. The harmonics are emitted from the clusters much more efficiently when the applied laser field is in tune with the dipole resonance frequency of the system. Such resonance frequency dependence is substantially equal to a resonance phenomenon in a forced oscillator in a sense that the valence s-electrons are shaken effectively at the tuned laser frequency and the induced dipole moment continues to oscillate even though the laser field is switched off. Furthermore, we have found that the polarizable core d-electrons significantly screen the valence s-electrons such that the electron density of the s electrons induced in the laser field is canceled out. The screening effect of the d electrons becomes more important in the system of Ag{sub 8} than Ag{sub 2}.

  4. Similar patterns of frequency-dependent selection on animal personalities emerge in three species of social spiders.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, J L L; Pruitt, J N

    2015-06-01

    Frequency-dependent selection is thought to be a major contributor to the maintenance of phenotypic variation. We tested for frequency-dependent selection on contrasting behavioural strategies, termed here 'personalities', in three species of social spiders, each thought to represent an independent evolutionary origin of sociality. The evolution of sociality in the spider genus Anelosimus is consistently met with the emergence of two temporally stable discrete personality types: an 'aggressive' or 'docile' form. We assessed how the foraging success of each phenotype changes as a function of its representation within a colony. We did this by creating experimental colonies of various compositions (six aggressives, three aggressives and three dociles, one aggressive and five dociles, six dociles), maintaining them in a common garden for 3 weeks, and tracking the mass gained by individuals of either phenotype. We found that both the docile and aggressive phenotypes experienced their greatest mass gain in mixed colonies of mostly docile individuals. However, the performance of both phenotypes decreased as the frequency of the aggressive phenotype increased. Nearly identical patterns of phenotype-specific frequency dependence were recovered in all three species. Naturally occurring colonies of these spiders exhibit mixtures dominated by the docile phenotype, suggesting that these spiders may have evolved mechanisms to maintain the compositions that maximize the success of the colony without compromising the expected reproductive output of either phenotype.

  5. Cerebral Correlates of Emotional and Action Appraisals During Visual Processing of Emotional Scenes Depending on Spatial Frequency: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Campagne, Aurélie; Fradcourt, Benoit; Pichat, Cédric; Baciu, Monica; Kauffmann, Louise; Peyrin, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Visual processing of emotional stimuli critically depends on the type of cognitive appraisal involved. The present fMRI pilot study aimed to investigate the cerebral correlates involved in the visual processing of emotional scenes in two tasks, one emotional, based on the appraisal of personal emotional experience, and the other motivational, based on the appraisal of the tendency to action. Given that the use of spatial frequency information is relatively flexible during the visual processing of emotional stimuli depending on the task's demands, we also explored the effect of the type of spatial frequency in visual stimuli in each task by using emotional scenes filtered in low spatial frequency (LSF) and high spatial frequencies (HSF). Activation was observed in the visual areas of the fusiform gyrus for all emotional scenes in both tasks, and in the amygdala for unpleasant scenes only. The motivational task induced additional activation in frontal motor-related areas (e.g. premotor cortex, SMA) and parietal regions (e.g. superior and inferior parietal lobules). Parietal regions were recruited particularly during the motivational appraisal of approach in response to pleasant scenes. These frontal and parietal activations, respectively, suggest that motor and navigation processes play a specific role in the identification of the tendency to action in the motivational task. Furthermore, activity observed in the motivational task, in response to both pleasant and unpleasant scenes, was significantly greater for HSF than for LSF scenes, suggesting that the tendency to action is driven mainly by the detailed information contained in scenes. Results for the emotional task suggest that spatial frequencies play only a small role in the evaluation of unpleasant and pleasant emotions. Our preliminary study revealed a partial distinction between visual processing of emotional scenes during identification of the tendency to action, and during identification of personal

  6. Cerebral Correlates of Emotional and Action Appraisals During Visual Processing of Emotional Scenes Depending on Spatial Frequency: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Campagne, Aurélie; Fradcourt, Benoit; Pichat, Cédric; Baciu, Monica; Kauffmann, Louise; Peyrin, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Visual processing of emotional stimuli critically depends on the type of cognitive appraisal involved. The present fMRI pilot study aimed to investigate the cerebral correlates involved in the visual processing of emotional scenes in two tasks, one emotional, based on the appraisal of personal emotional experience, and the other motivational, based on the appraisal of the tendency to action. Given that the use of spatial frequency information is relatively flexible during the visual processing of emotional stimuli depending on the task’s demands, we also explored the effect of the type of spatial frequency in visual stimuli in each task by using emotional scenes filtered in low spatial frequency (LSF) and high spatial frequencies (HSF). Activation was observed in the visual areas of the fusiform gyrus for all emotional scenes in both tasks, and in the amygdala for unpleasant scenes only. The motivational task induced additional activation in frontal motor-related areas (e.g. premotor cortex, SMA) and parietal regions (e.g. superior and inferior parietal lobules). Parietal regions were recruited particularly during the motivational appraisal of approach in response to pleasant scenes. These frontal and parietal activations, respectively, suggest that motor and navigation processes play a specific role in the identification of the tendency to action in the motivational task. Furthermore, activity observed in the motivational task, in response to both pleasant and unpleasant scenes, was significantly greater for HSF than for LSF scenes, suggesting that the tendency to action is driven mainly by the detailed information contained in scenes. Results for the emotional task suggest that spatial frequencies play only a small role in the evaluation of unpleasant and pleasant emotions. Our preliminary study revealed a partial distinction between visual processing of emotional scenes during identification of the tendency to action, and during identification of personal

  7. GABAergic Activities Control Spike Timing- and Frequency-Dependent Long-Term Depression at Hippocampal Excitatory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Makoto; Togashi, Kazunobu; Aihara, Takeshi; Hong, Kyonsoo

    2010-01-01

    GABAergic interneuronal network activities in the hippocampus control a variety of neural functions, including learning and memory, by regulating θ and γ oscillations. How these GABAergic activities at pre- and postsynaptic sites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells differentially contribute to synaptic function and plasticity during their repetitive pre- and postsynaptic spiking at θ and γ oscillations is largely unknown. We show here that activities mediated by postsynaptic GABAARs and presynaptic GABABRs determine, respectively, the spike timing- and frequency-dependence of activity-induced synaptic modifications at Schaffer collateral-CA1 excitatory synapses. We demonstrate that both feedforward and feedback GABAAR-mediated inhibition in the postsynaptic cell controls the spike timing-dependent long-term depression of excitatory inputs (“e-LTD”) at the θ frequency. We also show that feedback postsynaptic inhibition specifically causes e-LTD of inputs that induce small postsynaptic currents (<70 pA) with LTP-timing, thus enforcing the requirement of cooperativity for induction of long-term potentiation at excitatory inputs (“e-LTP”). Furthermore, under spike-timing protocols that induce e-LTP and e-LTD at excitatory synapses, we observed parallel induction of LTP and LTD at inhibitory inputs (“i-LTP” and “i-LTD”) to the same postsynaptic cells. Finally, we show that presynaptic GABABR-mediated inhibition plays a major role in the induction of frequency-dependent e-LTD at α and β frequencies. These observations demonstrate the critical influence of GABAergic interneuronal network activities in regulating the spike timing- and frequency-dependences of long-term synaptic modifications in the hippocampus. PMID:21423508

  8. Frequency-dependence of the Love Numbers due to the Earth's Quasi-Rheology, Mantle Anelasticity and Ocean Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Shen, W.; Huang, C.

    2012-12-01

    Love numbers are defined as dimensionless coefficients to characterize the deformations caused by an applied volume potential. For the complex Earth system, Love numbers are not constants but vary with frequency due to the following three factors: 1. the resonance behavior of the wobble motions near its eigen-frequencies, such as the well-known free core nutation resonance in the diurnal tides; 2. the mantle anelasticity of which the role becomes more significant as the frequency gets lower; and 3. the quasi-fluid rheology describing the Earth's fluid-like deformations at geological time scales. In this study, we present a power law for mantle anelasticity constrained by Chandler wobble parameters (the period TC and the quality factor QC) and an empirical quasi-fluid rheology model with a linear dependence on frequency for a period as long as 18.6 years. The models of mantle anelasticity and quasi-fluid rheology can provide good estimates of oceanless Love numbers at arbitrary frequencies with periods ranging from ~1 day to ~18.6 years, when comparing to the observed values for some frequencies. To account for the effects of dynamic oceans on the Love numbers, the diurnal ocean tides from the IERS Conventions (2010), the long-period ocean model of Dickman & Gross (2010) and the equilibrium ocean pole tide model of Desai (2002) are adopted to calculate the oceanic corrections to the Love numbers. We find due to the mantle anelasticity, the equilibrium ocean pole tides will cause imaginary parts to the Love numbers and have notable influence on the geophysical estimate of the QC value, which was disregarded before. In addition, we show that the Chandler wobble parameters derived from our Love number model are consistent with the observations. Thus, we conclude that our model of frequency-dependent Love numbers should be reliable. This study is supported partly by the National Natural Science Foundation China (Grant Numbers 41174011, 41128003, 41021061 and 40974015).

  9. Frequency dependent dielectric properties of Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Ca2(Cu3-yMy)O10-δ superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumtaz, M.; Khan, Nawazish A.; Khan, Sajid

    2012-01-01

    The frequency dependent dielectric properties such as dielectric constants (ɛ/r, ɛ//r), absolute dielectric loss |tanδ|, and ac-conductivity (σac) of Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Ca2(Cu3-yMy)O10-δ (M = Si, Ge, Sn, y = 0, 1) superconductor have been investigated by means of capacitance (C) and conductance (G) measurements with the test frequency (f) in the range of 10 KHz to 10 MHz at various temperatures from superconducting state to normal conducting state. The negative capacitance has been observed in all Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Ca2(Cu3-yMy)O10-δ samples. The large values of negative dielectric constant (ɛ/r) at lower frequencies and temperatures are linked with reduced thermal vibrations of the atoms due to which polarizability has been enhanced. The decreased value of dielectric constant observed in the Ge-doped samples may possibly be linked with its greater electronegativity (EN) and less polarization. The electronegativity of Si and Sn has approximately the same values as that of Cu, so almost all the dielectric properties do not vary significantly in Si-doped Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2 Ca2(Cu2Si1)O10-δ and Sn-doped Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Ca2(Cu2Sn1)O10-δ samples. These experimental investigations on dielectric properties of Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Ca2(Cu3-yMy)O10-δ superconductor have shown lower dielectric loss and higher ac-conductivity at all frequencies and temperatures as compared to that of other high Tc superconductor families. The decreased dielectric loss in Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Ca2(Cu3-yMy)O10-δ samples suggests that the polarization is most likely arising from the charge carriers between Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2O4-δ charge reservoir layer and conducting CuO2/MO2 planes; since the charge reservoir layer has localized charge carriers at Ba+2, Tl+3, and Cu+2 sites, whereas CuO2/MO2 planes contain mobile charge carriers, which are displaced from their equilibrium position by external applied ac-field.

  10. Categorical and coordinate processing in object recognition depends on different spatial frequencies.

    PubMed

    Saneyoshi, Ayako; Michimata, Chikashi

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested that processing categorical spatial relations requires high spatial frequency (HSF) information, while coordinate spatial relations require low spatial frequency (LSF) information. The aim of the present study was to determine whether spatial frequency influences categorical and coordinate processing in object recognition. Participants performed two object-matching tasks for novel, non-nameable objects consisting of "geons" (c.f. Brain Cogn 71:181-186, 2009). For each original stimulus, categorical and coordinate transformations were applied to create comparison stimuli. These stimuli were high-pass/low-cut-filtered or low-pass/high-cut-filtered by a filter with a 2D Gaussian envelope. The categorical task consisted of the original and categorical-transformed objects. The coordinate task consisted of the original and coordinate-transformed objects. The non-filtered object image was presented on a CRT monitor, followed by a comparison object (non-filtered, high-pass-filtered, and low-pass-filtered stimuli). The results showed that the removal of HSF information from the object image produced longer reaction times (RTs) in the categorical task, while removal of LSF information produced longer RTs in the coordinate task. These results support spatial frequency processing theory, specifically Kosslyn's hypothesis and the double filtering frequency model.

  11. Intratympanic manganese administration revealed sound intensity and frequency dependent functional activity in rat auditory pathway.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seong-Uk; Lee, Jae-Jun; Hong, Kwan Soo; Han, Mun; Park, Jang-Woo; Lee, Hui Joong; Lee, Sangheun; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Shin, Kyung Min; Cho, Jin Ho; Cheong, Chaejoon; Chang, Yongmin

    2013-09-01

    The cochlear plays a vital role in the sense and sensitivity of hearing; however, there is currently a lack of knowledge regarding the relationships between mechanical transduction of sound at different intensities and frequencies in the cochlear and the neurochemical processes that lead to neuronal responses in the central auditory system. In the current study, we introduced manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI), a convenient in vivo imaging method, for investigation of how sound, at different intensities and frequencies, is propagated from the cochlear to the central auditory system. Using MEMRI with intratympanic administration, we demonstrated differential manganese signal enhancements according to sound intensity and frequencies in the ascending auditory pathway of the rat after administration of intratympanic MnCl2.Compared to signal enhancement without explicit sound stimuli, auditory structures in the ascending auditory pathway showed stronger signal enhancement in rats who received sound stimuli of 10 and 40 kHz. In addition, signal enhancement with a stimulation frequency of 40 kHz was stronger than that with 10 kHz. Therefore, the results of this study seem to suggest that, in order to achieve an effective response to high sound intensity or frequency, more firing of auditory neurons, or firing of many auditory neurons together for the pooled neural activity is needed.

  12. Classical and quantum harmonic oscillators with time dependent mass and frequency: A new class of exactly solvable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Swapan

    2017-03-01

    The classical harmonic oscillator with time dependent mass and frequency is investigated to obtain a closed form exact analytical solution. It is found that the closed form analytical solutions are indeed possible if the time dependent mass of the oscillator is inversely proportional to the time dependent frequency. The scaled wronskian obtained from the linearly independent solutions of the equation of motion of the classical oscillator is used to obtain the solution corresponding to its quantum mechanical counterpart. The analytical solution of the present oscillator is used to obtain the squeezing effects of the input coherent light. In addition to the possibilities of getting the squeezed states, the present solution will be of use for investigating various quantum statistical properties of the radiation fields. As an example, we investigate the antibunching of the input thermal (chaotic) light coupled to the oscillator. Therefore, the appearance of the photon antibunching does not warrant the squeezing and vice-versa. The exact solution is obtained at the cost of the stringent condition where the product of time dependent mass and frequency of the oscillator is time invariant.

  13. Signature of magnetic-dependent gapless odd frequency states at superconductor/ferromagnet interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Di Bernardo, A.; Diesch, S.; Gu, Y.; Linder, J.; Divitini, G.; Ducati, C.; Scheer, E.; Blamire, M.G.; Robinson, J.W.A.

    2015-01-01

    The theory of superconductivity developed by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS) explains the stabilization of electron pairs into a spin-singlet, even frequency, state by the formation of an energy gap within which the density of states is zero. At a superconductor interface with an inhomogeneous ferromagnet, a gapless odd frequency superconducting state is predicted, in which the Cooper pairs are in a spin-triplet state. Although indirect evidence for such a state has been obtained, the gap structure and pairing symmetry have not so far been determined. Here we report scanning tunnelling spectroscopy of Nb superconducting films proximity coupled to epitaxial Ho. These measurements reveal pronounced changes to the Nb subgap superconducting density of states on driving the Ho through a metamagnetic transition from a helical antiferromagnetic to a homogeneous ferromagnetic state for which a BCS-like gap is recovered. The results prove odd frequency spin-triplet superconductivity at superconductor/inhomogeneous magnet interfaces. PMID:26329811

  14. Signature of magnetic-dependent gapless odd frequency states at superconductor/ferromagnet interfaces.

    PubMed

    Di Bernardo, A; Diesch, S; Gu, Y; Linder, J; Divitini, G; Ducati, C; Scheer, E; Blamire, M G; Robinson, J W A

    2015-09-02

    The theory of superconductivity developed by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS) explains the stabilization of electron pairs into a spin-singlet, even frequency, state by the formation of an energy gap within which the density of states is zero. At a superconductor interface with an inhomogeneous ferromagnet, a gapless odd frequency superconducting state is predicted, in which the Cooper pairs are in a spin-triplet state. Although indirect evidence for such a state has been obtained, the gap structure and pairing symmetry have not so far been determined. Here we report scanning tunnelling spectroscopy of Nb superconducting films proximity coupled to epitaxial Ho. These measurements reveal pronounced changes to the Nb subgap superconducting density of states on driving the Ho through a metamagnetic transition from a helical antiferromagnetic to a homogeneous ferromagnetic state for which a BCS-like gap is recovered. The results prove odd frequency spin-triplet superconductivity at superconductor/inhomogeneous magnet interfaces.

  15. Short term synaptic depression imposes a frequency dependent filter on synaptic information transfer.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Robert; Rubin, Jonathan; Doiron, Brent

    2012-01-01

    Depletion of synaptic neurotransmitter vesicles induces a form of short term depression in synapses throughout the nervous system. This plasticity affects how synapses filter presynaptic spike trains. The filtering properties of short term depression are often studied using a deterministic synapse model that predicts the mean synaptic response to a presynaptic spike train, but ignores variability introduced by the probabilistic nature of vesicle release and stochasticity in synaptic recovery time. We show that this additional variability has important consequences for the synaptic filtering of presynaptic information. In particular, a synapse model with stochastic vesicle dynamics suppresses information encoded at lower frequencies more than information encoded at higher frequencies, while a model that ignores this stochasticity transfers information encoded at any frequency equally well. This distinction between the two models persists even when large numbers of synaptic contacts are considered. Our study provides strong evidence that the stochastic nature neurotransmitter vesicle dynamics must be considered when analyzing the information flow across a synapse.

  16. Finite-frequency-dependent noise of a quantum dot in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moca, C. P.; Simon, P.; Chung, Chung-Hou; Zaránd, G.

    2014-04-01

    We present a detailed study for the finite-frequency current noise of a Kondo quantum dot in the presence of a magnetic field by using a recently developed real-time functional renormalization group approach [C. P. Moca, P. Simon, C. H. Chung, and G. Zaránd, Phys. Rev. B 83, 201303(R) (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevB.83.201303]. The scaling equations are modified in an external magnetic field; the couplings and nonlocal current vertices become strongly anisotropic, and develop new singularities. Consequently, in addition to the natural emission threshold frequency, ℏω =|eV|, a corresponding singular behavior is found to emerge in the noise spectrum at frequencies ℏω ≈|eV±B|. The predicted singularities are measurable with present-day experimental techniques.

  17. Comparative vs. Absolute Judgments of Trait Desirability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstee, Willem K. B.

    1970-01-01

    Reversals of trait desirability are studied. Terms indicating conservativw behavior appeared to be judged relatively desirable in comparative judgement, while traits indicating dynamic and expansive behavior benefited from absolute judgement. The reversal effect was shown to be a general one, i.e. reversals were not dependent upon the specific…

  18. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  19. Multiple-Station Observation of Frequency Dependence and Polarization Characteristics of ELF/VLF waves generated via Ionospheric Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxworth, A. S.; Golkowski, M.; Cohen, M.; Moore, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Generation of Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) signals through ionospheric modification has been practiced for many years. Heating the lower ionosphere with high power HF waves allows for modulation of natural current systems. Our experiments were carried out at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. In this experiment, the ionosphere was heated with a vertical amplitude modulating signal and the modulation frequency was changed sequentially within an array of 40 frequencies followed by a frequency ramp. The observed magnetic field amplitude and polarization of the generated ELF/VLF signals were analyzed for multiple sites and as a function of modulation frequency. Our three observation sites: Chistochina, Paxson and Paradise are located within 36km (azimuth 47.7°), 50.2km (azimuth -20°) and 99km (azimuth 80.3°) respectively. We show that the peak amplitudes observed as a function of frequency result from vertical resonance in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and can be used to diagnose the D-region profile. Polarization analysis showed that out of the three sites Paxson shows the highest circularity in the magnetic field polarization, compared to Chistochina and Paradise which show highly linear polarizations. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical simulation model results and it was clear that in both cases, the modulated Hall current dominates the observed signals at Chistochina and Paradise sites and at Paxson there is an equal contribution from Hall and Pedersen currents. The Chistochina site shows the highest magnetic field amplitudes in both experimental and simulation environments. Depending upon the experimental and simulation observations at the three sites, a radiation pattern for the HAARP ionospheric heater can be mapped

  20. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m‑1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  1. A Computation of the Frequency Dependent Dielectric Function for Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwitter, D. E.; Kuklja, M. M.; Kunz, A. B.

    1999-06-01

    The imaginary part of the dielectric function as a function of frequency is calculated for the solids RDX, TATB, ADN, and PETN. Calculations have been performed including the effects of isotropic and uniaxial pressure. Simple lattice defects are included in some of the calculations.

  2. The Frequency-Predictability Interaction in Reading: It Depends Where You're Coming from

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Christopher J.; Miellet, Sebastien; O'Donnell, Patrick J.; Sereno, Sara C.

    2010-01-01

    A word's frequency of occurrence and its predictability from a prior context are key factors determining how long the eyes remain on that word in normal reading. Past reaction-time and eye movement research can be distinguished by whether these variables, when combined, produce interactive or additive results, respectively. Our study addressed…

  3. Frequency dependence of electromagnetic bias in radar altimeter sea surface range measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Jackson, F. C.; Hines, D. E.; Piazza, C.; Hevizi, L. G.; Mclaughlin, D. J.; Mcintosh, R. E.; Swift, R. N.; Scott, J. F.; Yungel, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    Range measurements made by satellite radar altimeters experience a bias toward the troughs of ocean waves. A series of aircraft flights during February-April 1989 measured this electromagnetic (EM) bias at three radar frequencies and the UV under a variety of wind and wave conditions, and provided the first airborne open-ocean measurements at the 13.6-GHz and 5.3-GHz operating frequencies of the NASA altimeter on the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite. The data suggest that the mean EM bias decreases linearly with increasing radar frequency between 5.3 and 36 GHz, according to the expression: EM bias (percent of significant wave height) = (3.0-0.0617 F)(1 +/-0.5), where F is in gigahertz. EM bias is fairly constant over a mesoscale region on a given day but can fluctuate significantly from one day to another. It shows a strong increase at all radar frequencies with increasing wind speed, although other sea state conditions, such as the wind direction relative to the wave direction, are also factors.

  4. Compensating Level-Dependent Frequency Representation in Auditory Cortex by Synaptic Integration of Corticocortical Input

    PubMed Central

    Happel, Max F. K.; Ohl, Frank W.

    2017-01-01

    Robust perception of auditory objects over a large range of sound intensities is a fundamental feature of the auditory system. However, firing characteristics of single neurons across the entire auditory system, like the frequency tuning, can change significantly with stimulus intensity. Physiological correlates of level-constancy of auditory representations hence should be manifested on the level of larger neuronal assemblies or population patterns. In this study we have investigated how information of frequency and sound level is integrated on the circuit-level in the primary auditory cortex (AI) of the Mongolian gerbil. We used a combination of pharmacological silencing of corticocortically relayed activity and laminar current source density (CSD) analysis. Our data demonstrate that with increasing stimulus intensities progressively lower frequencies lead to the maximal impulse response within cortical input layers at a given cortical site inherited from thalamocortical synaptic inputs. We further identified a temporally precise intercolumnar synaptic convergence of early thalamocortical and horizontal corticocortical inputs. Later tone-evoked activity in upper layers showed a preservation of broad tonotopic tuning across sound levels without shifts towards lower frequencies. Synaptic integration within corticocortical circuits may hence contribute to a level-robust representation of auditory information on a neuronal population level in the auditory cortex. PMID:28046062

  5. Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity Depends on Stimuli Frequency in the Rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, Ma C.; Cruz, Elizabeth; Caudillo, Cipriana; Sosa, Modesto; Gamiño, Sergio M.

    2003-09-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of frequency and duration of stimuli on motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) in the rat. MNCV was evaluated in two separate series of records. In the first the frequency of stimuli was varied between 1.0 and 10.0 Hz, by 1 Hz steps, keeping the duration of the pulses constant at 0.1 ms. In a second experimental trial, the frequency of the stimuli was kept at 10.0 Hz, while duration increased from 0.05 to 1.00 ms, at customized steps. Supramaximal stimulation pulses were always used. Measures were performed in the right pelvic limb of 12 anesthetized rats. The active needle electrode was inserted in the second interosseus space of the paw, while a subcutaneous reference electrode was inserted in the third toe. The ground electrode was placed on dorsal surface of the limb. The proximal stimuli site was identified at the sciatic notch and the distal one at the ankle. Surface stimulation was used. Latency, duration, area under the curve and amplitude of the muscular action potential were also measured. MNCV was estimated by dividing distal to proximal latency difference by the distance between stimuli sites. MNCV exhibited an increase to a plateu with stimulus frequency growth. Duration also showed the same behavior.

  6. Frequency analysis of temperature-dependent interferometric signal for the measurement of the temperature coefficient of refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianqin; Shen, Jun; Neill, W. Stuart

    2016-07-01

    A method of frequency analysis for the measurement of the temperature coefficient of refractive index (dn/dT) using a Fabry-Perot interferometer was developed and tested against ethanol and water. The temperature-dependent interferometric signal described by Airy's formula was analyzed in both the temperature and frequency domains. By fast Fourier transform, a low-pass filter was designed and employed to eliminate the noise superimposed on the signal. dn/dT was determined accurately from the noise-removed signal by peak analysis. Furthermore, the signal frequency parameters may be utilized for the material thermophysical property characterization. This method lays the foundation for an online dn/dT instrument for monitoring chemical processes.

  7. Increased excitability of spinal pain reflexes and altered frequency-dependent modulation in the dopamine D3-receptor knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Benjamin E; Baran, Christine A; Brewer, Kori L; Clemens, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    Frequency-dependent modulation and dopamine (DA) receptors strongly modulate neural circuits in the spinal cord. Of the five known DA receptor subtypes, the D3 receptor has the highest affinity to DA, and D3-mediated actions are mainly inhibitory. Using an animal model of spinal sensorimotor dysfunction, the D3 receptor knockout mouse (D3KO), we investigated the physiological consequences of D3 receptor dysfunction on pain-associated signaling pathways in the spinal cord, the initial integration site for the processing of pain signaling. In the D3KO spinal cord, inhibitory actions of DA on the proprioceptive monosynaptic stretch reflex are converted from depression to facilitation, but its effects on longer-latency and pain-associated reflex responses and the effects of FM have not been studied. Using behavioral approaches in vivo, we found that D3KO animals exhibit reduced paw withdrawal latencies to thermal pain stimulation (Hargreaves' test) over wild type (WT) controls. Electrophysiological and pharmacological approaches in the isolated spinal cord in vitro showed that constant current stimulation of dorsal roots at a pain-associated frequency was associated with a significant reduction in the frequency-dependent modulation of longer-latency reflex (LLRs) responses but not monosynaptic stretch reflexes (MSRs) in D3KO. Application of the D1 and D2 receptor agonists and the voltage-gated calcium-channel ligand, pregabalin, but not DA, was able to restore the frequency-dependent modulation of the LLR in D3KO to WT levels. Thus we demonstrate that nociception-associated LLRs and proprioceptive MSRs are differentially modulated by frequency, dopaminergics and the Ca(2+) channel ligand, pregabalin. Our data suggest a role for the DA D3 receptor in pain modulation and identify the D3KO as a possible model for increased nociception.

  8. Evolutionary suicide through a non-catastrophic bifurcation: adaptive dynamics of pathogens with frequency-dependent transmission.

    PubMed

    Boldin, Barbara; Kisdi, Éva

    2016-03-01

    Evolutionary suicide is a riveting phenomenon in which adaptive evolution drives a viable population to extinction. Gyllenberg and Parvinen (Bull Math Biol 63(5):981-993, 2001) showed that, in a wide class of deterministic population models, a discontinuous transition to extinction is a necessary condition for evolutionary suicide. An implicit assumption of their proof is that the invasion fitness of a rare strategy is well-defined also in the extinction state of the population. Epidemic models with frequency-dependent incidence, which are often used to model the spread of sexually transmitted infections or the dynamics of infectious diseases within herds, violate this assumption. In these models, evolutionary suicide can occur through a non-catastrophic bifurcation whereby pathogen adaptation leads to a continuous decline of host (and consequently pathogen) population size to zero. Evolutionary suicide of pathogens with frequency-dependent transmission can occur in two ways, with pathogen strains evolving either higher or lower virulence.

  9. Frequency dependence of the absorption component of the magnetic susceptibility in superconducting Y1Ba2Cu3O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducharme, S.; Durny, R.; Hautala, J.; Symko, O. G.; Taylor, P. C.

    Measurements of an apparent magnetic-field-dependent absorption (imaginary part of the a.c. magnetic susceptibility) in superconducting Y1Ba2Cu3O7 ceramics and crystals are reported. The absorption, which is observed over a wide range of frequencies but only when the material is below the superconducting transition temperature, is characterized by a narrow (about 30 Gauss FWHM at 6 MHz) peak and a wide (greater than 10 kG) feature, both of which are maximum at zero magnetic field. The absorption strength varies approximately as one over the square root of the frequency. The unusual magnetic-field-dependent peaks in the magnetic susceptibility are inherent in single grains and therefore do not originate from intergrain Josephson currents or multigrain (i.e., percolative) loops. The susceptibility peaks must be due to bulk behavior, interactions at grain surfaces, intragrain current loops, or intragrain Josephson junctions.

  10. The Neural Code for Auditory Space Depends on Sound Frequency and Head Size in an Optimal Manner

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Nicol S.; Scott, Brian H.; Semple, Malcolm N.; McAlpine, David

    2014-01-01

    A major cue to the location of a sound source is the interaural time difference (ITD)–the difference in sound arrival time at the two ears. The neural representation of this auditory cue is unresolved. The classic model of ITD coding, dominant for a half-century, posits that the distribution of best ITDs (the ITD evoking a neuron’s maximal response) is unimodal and largely within the range of ITDs permitted by head-size. This is often interpreted as a place code for source location. An alternative model, based on neurophysiology in small mammals, posits a bimodal distribution of best ITDs with exquisite sensitivity to ITDs generated by means of relative firing rates between the distributions. Recently, an optimal-coding model was proposed, unifying the disparate features of these two models under the framework of efficient coding by neural populations. The optimal-coding model predicts that distributions of best ITDs depend on head size and sound frequency: for high frequencies and large heads it resembles the classic model, for low frequencies and small head sizes it resembles the bimodal model. The optimal-coding model makes key, yet unobserved, predictions: for many species, including humans, both forms of neural representation are employed, depending on sound frequency. Furthermore, novel representations are predicted for intermediate frequencies. Here, we examine these predictions in neurophysiological data from five mammalian species: macaque, guinea pig, cat, gerbil and kangaroo rat. We present the first evidence supporting these untested predictions, and demonstrate that different representations appear to be employed at different sound frequencies in the same species. PMID:25372405

  11. Modulation of epileptic activity by deep brain stimulation: a model-based study of frequency-dependent effects

    PubMed Central

    Mina, Faten; Benquet, Pascal; Pasnicu, Anca; Biraben, Arnaud; Wendling, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies showed that deep brain stimulation (DBS) can modulate the activity in the epileptic brain and that a decrease of seizures can be achieved in “responding” patients. In most of these studies, the choice of stimulation parameters is critical to obtain desired clinical effects. In particular, the stimulation frequency is a key parameter that is difficult to tune. A reason is that our knowledge about the frequency-dependant mechanisms according to which DBS indirectly impacts the dynamics of pathological neuronal systems located in the neocortex is still limited. We address this issue using both computational modeling and intracerebral EEG (iEEG) data. We developed a macroscopic (neural mass) model of the thalamocortical network. In line with already-existing models, it includes interconnected neocortical pyramidal cells and interneurons, thalamocortical cells and reticular neurons. The novelty was to introduce, in the thalamic compartment, the biophysical effects of direct stimulation. Regarding clinical data, we used a quite unique data set recorded in a patient (drug-resistant epilepsy) with a focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). In this patient, DBS strongly reduced the sustained epileptic activity of the FCD for low-frequency (LFS, < 2 Hz) and high-frequency stimulation (HFS, > 70 Hz) while intermediate-frequency stimulation (IFS, around 50 Hz) had no effect. Signal processing, clustering, and optimization techniques allowed us to identify the necessary conditions for reproducing, in the model, the observed frequency-dependent stimulation effects. Key elements which explain the suppression of epileptic activity in the FCD include: (a) feed-forward inhibition and synaptic short-term depression of thalamocortical connections at LFS, and (b) inhibition of the thalamic output at HFS. Conversely, modeling results indicate that IFS favors thalamic oscillations and entrains epileptic dynamics. PMID:23882212

  12. Strong frequency dependence of vibrational relaxation in bulk and surface water reveals sub-picosecond structural heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    van der Post, Sietse T.; Hsieh, Cho-Shuen; Okuno, Masanari; Nagata, Yuki; Bakker, Huib J.; Bonn, Mischa; Hunger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Because of strong hydrogen bonding in liquid water, intermolecular interactions between water molecules are highly delocalized. Previous two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy experiments have indicated that this delocalization smears out the structural heterogeneity of neat H2O. Here we report on a systematic investigation of the ultrafast vibrational relaxation of bulk and interfacial water using time-resolved infrared and sum-frequency generation spectroscopies. These experiments reveal a remarkably strong dependence of the vibrational relaxation time on the frequency of the OH stretching vibration of liquid water in the bulk and at the air/water interface. For bulk water, the vibrational relaxation time increases continuously from 250 to 550 fs when the frequency is increased from 3,100 to 3,700 cm−1. For hydrogen-bonded water at the air/water interface, the frequency dependence is even stronger. These results directly demonstrate that liquid water possesses substantial structural heterogeneity, both in the bulk and at the surface. PMID:26382651

  13. Layer-number dependent high-frequency vibration modes in few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides induced by interlayer couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qing-Hai; Zhang, Xin; Luo, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Jun; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2017-03-01

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have attracted extensive attention due to their many novel properties. The atoms within each layer in two-dimensional TMDs are joined together by covalent bonds, while van der Waals interactions combine the layers together. This makes its lattice dynamics layer-number dependent. The evolutions of ultralow frequency (< 50 cm‑1) modes, such as shear and layer-breathing modes have been well-established. Here, we review the layer-number dependent high-frequency (> 50 cm‑1) vibration modes in few-layer TMDs and demonstrate how the interlayer coupling leads to the splitting of high-frequency vibration modes, known as Davydov splitting. Such Davydov splitting can be well described by a van der Waals model, which directly links the splitting with the interlayer coupling. Our review expands the understanding on the effect of interlayer coupling on the high-frequency vibration modes in TMDs and other two-dimensional materials. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2016YFA0301200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11225421, 11474277, 11434010, 61474067, 11604326, 11574305 and 51527901), and the National Young 1000 Talent Plan of China.

  14. Frequency-dependent local field factors in dielectric liquids by a polarizable force field and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Davari, Nazanin; Haghdani, Shokouh; Åstrand, Per-Olof

    2015-12-31

    A force field model for calculating local field factors, i.e. the linear response of the local electric field for example at a nucleus in a molecule with respect to an applied electric field, is discussed. It is based on a combined charge-transfer and point-dipole interaction model for the polarizability, and thereby it includes two physically distinct terms for describing electronic polarization: changes in atomic charges arising from transfer of charge between the atoms and atomic induced dipole moments. A time dependence is included both for the atomic charges and the atomic dipole moments and if they are assumed to oscillate with the same frequency as the applied electric field, a model for frequency-dependent properties are obtained. Furthermore, if a life-time of excited states are included, a model for the complex frequency-dependent polariability is obtained including also information about excited states and the absorption spectrum. We thus present a model for the frequency-dependent local field factors through the first molecular excitation energy. It is combined with molecular dynamics simulations of liquids where a large set of configurations are sampled and for which local field factors are calculated. We are normally not interested in the average of the local field factor but rather in configurations where it is as high as possible. In electrical insulation, we would like to avoid high local field factors to reduce the risk for electrical breakdown, whereas for example in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, high local field factors are desired to give dramatically increased intensities.

  15. Calculation of Frequency-Dependent Polarizabilities and Hyperpolarizabilities Based on the Quasienergy Derivative Method (Is the Numerical Approach Impossible?)

    SciTech Connect

    Sasagane, Kotoku

    2008-09-17

    The essence of the quasienergy derivative (QED) method and calculations of the frequency-dependent hyperpolarizabilities based on the QED method will be presented in the first half. Our recent and up-to-date development and some possibilities concerning the QED method will be explained later. At the end of the lecture whether the extension of the QED method to the numerical approach is possible or not will be investigated.

  16. Dielectric Function for Gold in Plasmonics Applications: Size Dependence of Plasmon Resonance Frequencies and Damping Rates for Nanospheres.