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Sample records for absolute frequency dependence

  1. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    DOEpatents

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  2. Molecular iodine absolute frequencies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, C.J.

    1990-06-25

    Fifty specified lines of {sup 127}I{sub 2} were studied by Doppler-free frequency modulation spectroscopy. For each line the classification of the molecular transition was determined, hyperfine components were identified, and one well-resolved component was selected for precise determination of its absolute frequency. In 3 cases, a nearby alternate line was selected for measurement because no well-resolved component was found for the specified line. Absolute frequency determinations were made with an estimated uncertainty of 1.1 MHz by locking a dye laser to the selected hyperfine component and measuring its wave number with a high-precision Fabry-Perot wavemeter. For each line results of the absolute measurement, the line classification, and a Doppler-free spectrum are given.

  3. The absolute frequency of the 87Sr optical clock transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Gretchen K.; Ludlow, Andrew D.; Blatt, Sebastian; Thomsen, Jan W.; Martin, Michael J.; de Miranda, Marcio H. G.; Zelevinsky, Tanya; Boyd, Martin M.; Ye, Jun; Diddams, Scott A.; Heavner, Thomas P.; Parker, Thomas E.; Jefferts, Steven R.

    2008-10-01

    The absolute frequency of the 1S0-3P0 clock transition of 87Sr has been measured to be 429 228 004 229 873.65 (37) Hz using lattice-confined atoms, where the fractional uncertainty of 8.6 × 10-16 represents one of the most accurate measurements of an atomic transition frequency to date. After a detailed study of systematic effects, which reduced the total systematic uncertainty of the Sr lattice clock to 1.5 × 10-16, the clock frequency is measured against a hydrogen maser which is simultaneously calibrated to the US primary frequency standard, the NIST Cs fountain clock, NIST-F1. The comparison is made possible using a femtosecond laser based optical frequency comb to phase coherently connect the optical and microwave spectral regions and by a 3.5 km fibre transfer scheme to compare the remotely located clock signals.

  4. The correction of vibration in frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system for dynamic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cheng; Liu, Guodong; Liu, Bingguo; Chen, Fengdong; Zhuang, Zhitao; Xu, Xinke; Gan, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Absolute distance measurement systems are of significant interest in the field of metrology, which could improve the manufacturing efficiency and accuracy of large assemblies in fields such as aircraft construction, automotive engineering, and the production of modern windmill blades. Frequency scanning interferometry demonstrates noticeable advantages as an absolute distance measurement system which has a high precision and doesn't depend on a cooperative target. In this paper , the influence of inevitable vibration in the frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system is analyzed. The distance spectrum is broadened as the existence of Doppler effect caused by vibration, which will bring in a measurement error more than 103 times bigger than the changes of optical path difference. In order to decrease the influence of vibration, the changes of the optical path difference are monitored by a frequency stabilized laser, which runs parallel to the frequency scanning interferometry. The experiment has verified the effectiveness of this method.

  5. Low-pressure line-shape study in molecular oxygen with absolute frequency reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domysławska, J.; Wójtewicz, S.; Cygan, A.; Bielska, K.; Lisak, D.; Masłowski, P.; Trawiński, R. S.; Ciuryło, R.

    2013-11-01

    We present a line-shape analysis of the rovibronic R1 Q2 transition of the oxygen B band resolved by the Pound-Drever-Hall-locked frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy technique in the low pressure range. The frequency axis of the spectra is linked by the ultra-narrow diode laser to the optical frequency comb in order to measure the absolute frequency at each point of the recorded spectra. Experimental spectra are fitted with various line-shape models: the Voigt profile, the Galatry profile, the Nelkin-Ghatak profile, the speed-dependent Voigt profile, and the speed-dependent Nelkin-Ghatak profile with quadratic and hypergeometric approximations for the speed dependence of collisional broadening and shifting. The influences of Dicke narrowing, speed-dependent effects, and correlation between phase- and velocity-changing collisions on the line shape are investigated. Values of line-shape parameters, including the absolute frequency of the transition 435685.24828(46) GHz, are reported.

  6. Noninvasive absolute cerebral oximetry with frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallacoglu, Bertan

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements of absolute concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin in the human brain can provide critical information about cerebral physiology in terms of cerebral blood volume, blood flow, oxygen delivery, and metabolic rate of oxygen. We developed several frequency domain NIRS data acquisition and analysis methods aimed at absolute measurements of hemoglobin concentration and saturation in cerebral tissue of adult human subjects. Extensive experimental investigations were carried out in various homogenous and two-layered tissue-mimicking phantoms, and biological tissues. The advantages and limitations of commonly used homogenous models and inversion strategies were thoroughly investigated. Prior to human subjects, extensive studies were carried out in in vivo animal models. In rabbits, absolute hemoglobin oxygen desaturation was shown to depend strongly on surgically induced testicular torsion. Methods developed in this study were then adapted for measurements in the rat brain. Absolute values were demonstrated to discern cerebrovascular impairment in a rat model of diet-induced vascular cognitive impairment. These results facilitated the development of clinically useful optical measures of cerebrovascular health. In a large group of human subjects, employing a homogeneous model for absolute measurements was shown to be reliable and robust. However, it was also shown to be limited due to the relatively thick extracerebral tissue. The procedure we develop in this work and the thesis thereof performs a nonlinear inversion procedure with six unknown parameters with no other prior knowledge for the retrieval of the optical coefficients and top layer thickness with high accuracy on two-layered media. Our absolute measurements of cerebral hemoglobin concentration and saturation are based on the discrimination of extracerebral and cerebral tissue layers, and they can enhance the impact of NIRS for cerebral hemodynamics and

  7. Frequency dependent squeezed light at audio frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John

    2015-04-01

    Following successful implementation in the previous generation of instruments, squeezed states of light represent a proven technology for the reduction of quantum noise in ground-based interferometric gravitational-wave detectors. As a result of lower noise and increased circulating power, the current generation of detectors places one further demand on this technique - that the orientation of the squeezed ellipse be rotated as function of frequency. This extension allows previously negligible quantum radiation pressure noise to be mitigated in addition to quantum shot noise. I will present the results of an experiment which performs the appropriate rotation by reflecting the squeezed state from a detuned high-finesse optical cavity, demonstrating frequency dependent squeezing at audio frequencies for the first time and paving the way for broadband quantum noise reduction in Advanced LIGO. Further, I will indicate how a realistic implementation of this approach will impact Advanced LIGO both alone and in combination with other potential upgrades.

  8. Femtosecond frequency comb measurement of absolute frequencies and hyperfine coupling constants in cesium vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Stalnaker, Jason E.; Mbele, Vela; Gerginov, Vladislav; Fortier, Tara M.; Diddams, Scott A.; Hollberg, Leo; Tanner, Carol E.

    2010-04-15

    We report measurements of absolute transition frequencies and hyperfine coupling constants for the 8S{sub 1/2}, 9S{sub 1/2}, 7D{sub 3/2}, and 7D{sub 5/2} states in {sup 133}Cs vapor. The stepwise excitation through either the 6P{sub 1/2} or 6P{sub 3/2} intermediate state is performed directly with broadband laser light from a stabilized femtosecond laser optical-frequency comb. The laser beam is split, counterpropagated, and focused into a room-temperature Cs vapor cell. The repetition rate of the frequency comb is scanned and we detect the fluorescence on the 7P{sub 1/2,3/2{yields}}6S{sub 1/2} branches of the decay of the excited states. The excitations to the different states are isolated by the introduction of narrow-bandwidth interference filters in the laser beam paths. Using a nonlinear least-squares method we find measurements of transition frequencies and hyperfine coupling constants that are in agreement with other recent measurements for the 8S state and provide improvement by 2 orders of magnitude over previously published results for the 9S and 7D states.

  9. Absolute frequency of an atomic hydrogen maser clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Hall, R. G.; Percival, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    An accurate determination was made of the unperturbed atomic hydrogen ground state hyperfine transition frequency (F=1,m=0 - F=0,m=0) in reference to present world wide realizations of internationally defined time interval. In relation to the international atomic time system, the composite value is 1,420,405,751.7755 plus or minus 0.0031 HZ.

  10. Age Dependent Absolute Plate and Plume Motion Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, D. E.; Koppers, A. A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Current absolute plate motion (APM) models from 80 - 0 Ma are constrained by the location of mantle plume related hotspot seamounts, in particular those of the Hawaiian-Emperor and Louisville seamount trails. Originally the 'fixed' hotspot hypothesis was developed to explain past plate motion based on linear age progressive intra-plate volcanism. However, now that 'moving' hotspots are accepted, it is becoming clear that APM models need to be corrected for individual plume motion vectors. For older seamount trails that were active between roughly 50 and 80 Ma the APM models that use 'fixed' hotspots overestimate the measured age progression in those trails, while APM models corrected for 'moving' hotspots underestimate those age progressions. These mismatches are due to both a lack of reliable ages in the older portions of both the Hawaii and Louisville seamount trails and insufficient APM modeling constraints from other seamount trails in the Pacific Basin. Seamounts are difficult to sample and analyze because many are hydrothermally altered and have low potassium concentrations. New 40Ar/39Ar Age results from International Ocean Drilling Project (IODP) Expedition 330 Sites U1372 (n=18), U1375 (n=3), U1376 (n=15) and U1377 (n=7) aid in constraining the oldest end of the Louisville Seamount trail. A significant observation in this study is that the age range recovered in the drill cores match the range of ages that were acquired on dredging cruises at the same seamounts (e.g. Koppers et al., 2011). This is important for determining the inception age of a seamount. The sections recovered from IODP EXP 330 are in-situ volcanoclastic breccia and lava flows. Comparing the seismic interpretations of Louisville guyots (Contreras-Reyes et al., 2010), Holes U1372, U1373 and U1374 penetrated the extrusive and volcanoclastic sections of the seamount. The ages obtained are consistent over stratigraphic intervals >100-450 m thick, providing evidence that these seamounts

  11. Frequency-scanning interferometry for dynamic absolute distance measurement using Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Tao, Long; Liu, Zhigang; Zhang, Weibo; Zhou, Yangli

    2014-12-15

    We propose a frequency-scanning interferometry using the Kalman filtering technique for dynamic absolute distance measurement. Frequency-scanning interferometry only uses a single tunable laser driven by a triangle waveform signal for forward and backward optical frequency scanning. The absolute distance and moving speed of a target can be estimated by the present input measurement of frequency-scanning interferometry and the previously calculated state based on the Kalman filter algorithm. This method not only compensates for movement errors in conventional frequency-scanning interferometry, but also achieves high-precision and low-complexity dynamic measurements. Experimental results of dynamic measurements under static state, vibration and one-dimensional movement are presented. PMID:25503050

  12. Quantifying discipline practices using absolute versus relative frequencies: clinical and research implications for child welfare.

    PubMed

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Shaffer, Anne; Kolko, David J

    2014-01-01

    In the parent intervention outcome literatures, discipline practices are generally quantified as absolute frequencies or, less commonly, as relative frequencies. These differences in methodology warrant direct comparison as they have critical implications for study results and conclusions among treatments targeted at reducing parental aggression and harsh discipline. In this study, we directly compared the absolute frequency method and the relative frequency method for quantifying physically aggressive, psychologically aggressive, and nonaggressive discipline practices. Longitudinal data over a 3-year period came from an existing data set of a clinical trial examining the effectiveness of a psychosocial treatment in reducing parental physical and psychological aggression and improving child behavior (N = 139). Discipline practices (aggressive and nonaggressive) were assessed using the Conflict Tactics Scale. The two methods yielded different patterns of results, particularly for nonaggressive discipline strategies. We suggest that each method makes its own unique contribution to a more complete understanding of the association between parental aggression and intervention effects. PMID:24106146

  13. Absolute frequency measurement at 10-16 level based on the international atomic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, H.; Fujieda, M.; Kumagai, M.; Ido, T.

    2016-06-01

    Referring to International Atomic Time (TAI), we measured the absolute frequency of the 87Sr lattice clock with its uncertainty of 1.1 x 10-15. Unless an optical clock is continuously operated for the five days of the TAI grid, it is required to evaluate dead time uncertainty in order to use the available five-day average of the local frequency reference. We homogeneously distributed intermittent measurements over the five-day grid of TAI, by which the dead time uncertainty was reduced to low 10-16 level. Three campaigns of the five (or four)-day consecutive measurements have resulted in the absolute frequency of the 87Sr clock transition of 429 228 004 229 872.85 (47) Hz, where the systematic uncertainty of the 87Sr optical frequency standard amounts to 8.6 x 10-17.

  14. Absolute frequency measurements and hyperfine structures of the molecular iodine transitions at 578 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takumi; Akamatsu, Daisuke; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Inaba, Hajime; Okubo, Sho; Tanabe, Takehiko; Yasuda, Masami; Onae, Atsushi; Hong, Feng-Lei

    2016-04-01

    We report absolute frequency measurements of 81 hyperfine components of the rovibrational transitions of molecular iodine at 578 nm using the second harmonic generation of an 1156-nm external-cavity diode laser and a fiber-based optical frequency comb. The relative uncertainties of the measured absolute frequencies are typically $1.4\\times10^{-11}$. Accurate hyperfine constants of four rovibrational transitions are obtained by fitting the measured hyperfine splittings to a four-term effective Hamiltonian including the electric quadrupole, spin-rotation, tensor spin-spin, and scalar spin-spin interactions. The observed transitions can be good frequency references at 578 nm, and are especially useful for research using atomic ytterbium since the transitions are close to the $^{1}S_{0}-^{3}P_{0}$ clock transition of ytterbium.

  15. Absolute Frequency Measurements of the D1 and D2 Transitions in Aatomic Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheets, Donal; Almaguer, Jose; Baron, Jacob; Elgee, Peter; Rowan, Michael; Stalnaker, Jason

    2014-05-01

    We present preliminary results from our measurements of the D1 and D2 transitions in Li. The data were obtained from a collimated atomic beam excited by light from an extended cavity diode laser. The frequency of the diode laser was stabilized to an optical frequency comb, providing absolute frequency measurement and control of the excitation laser frequency. These measurements will provide a stringent test of atomic structure calculations and yield information about the nuclear structure. We also discuss plans to extend the technique to other high-lying states in lithium. Funded by the NIST Precision Measurements Grant and NSF Award #1305591.

  16. Radio frequency controlled synthetic wavelength sweep for absolute distance measurement by optical interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Le Floch, Sebastien; Salvade, Yves; Mitouassiwou, Rostand; Favre, Patrick

    2008-06-01

    We present a new technique applied to the variable optical synthetic wavelength generation in optical interferometry. It consists of a chain of optical injection locking among three lasers: first a distributed-feedback laser is used as a master to injection lock an intensity-modulated laser that is directly modulated around 15 GHz by a radio frequency generator on a sideband. A second distributed-feedback laser is injection locked on another sideband of the intensity-modulated laser. The variable synthetic wavelength for absolute distance measurement is simply generated by sweeping the radio frequency over a range of several hundred megahertz, which corresponds to the locking range of the two slave lasers. In this condition, the uncertainty of the variable synthetic wavelength is equivalent to the radio frequency uncertainty. This latter has a relative accuracy of 10{sup -7} or better, resulting in a resolution of {+-}25 {mu}m for distances exceeding tens of meters. The radio frequency generator produces a linear frequency sweep of 1 ms duration (i.e., exactly equal to one absolute distance measurement acquisition time), with frequency steps of about 1 MHz. Finally, results of absolute distance measurements for ranges up to 10 m are presented.

  17. Radio frequency controlled synthetic wavelength sweep for absolute distance measurement by optical interferometry.

    PubMed

    Le Floch, Sébastien; Salvadé, Yves; Mitouassiwou, Rostand; Favre, Patrick

    2008-06-01

    We present a new technique applied to the variable optical synthetic wavelength generation in optical interferometry. It consists of a chain of optical injection locking among three lasers: first a distributed-feedback laser is used as a master to injection lock an intensity-modulated laser that is directly modulated around 15 GHz by a radio frequency generator on a sideband. A second distributed-feedback laser is injection locked on another sideband of the intensity-modulated laser. The variable synthetic wavelength for absolute distance measurement is simply generated by sweeping the radio frequency over a range of several hundred megahertz, which corresponds to the locking range of the two slave lasers. In this condition, the uncertainty of the variable synthetic wavelength is equivalent to the radio frequency uncertainty. This latter has a relative accuracy of 10(-7) or better, resulting in a resolution of +/-25 microm for distances exceeding tens of meters. The radio frequency generator produces a linear frequency sweep of 1 ms duration (i.e., exactly equal to one absolute distance measurement acquisition time), with frequency steps of about 1 MHz. Finally, results of absolute distance measurements for ranges up to 10 m are presented. PMID:18516123

  18. Accurate determination of absolute carrier-envelope phase dependence using photo-ionization.

    PubMed

    Sayler, A M; Arbeiter, M; Fasold, S; Adolph, D; Möller, M; Hoff, D; Rathje, T; Fetić, B; Milošević, D B; Fennel, T; Paulus, G G

    2015-07-01

    The carrier-envelope phase (CEP) dependence of few-cycle above-threshold ionization (ATI) of Xe is calibrated for use as a reference measurement for determining and controlling the absolute CEP in other interactions. This is achieved by referencing the CEP-dependent ATI measurements of Xe to measurements of atomic H, which are in turn referenced to ab initio calculations for atomic H. This allows for the accurate determination of the absolute CEP dependence of Xe ATI, which enables relatively easy determination of the offset between the relative CEP measured and/or controlled by typical devices and the absolute CEP in the interaction. PMID:26125386

  19. Absolute frequency measurement of the neutral 40Ca optical frequency standard at 657 nm based on microkelvin atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilpers, G.; Oates, C. W.; Diddams, S. A.; Bartels, A.; Fortier, T. M.; Oskay, W. H.; Bergquist, J. C.; Jefferts, S. R.; Heavner, T. P.; Parker, T. E.; Hollberg, L.

    2007-04-01

    We report an absolute frequency measurement of the optical clock transition at 657 nm in 40Ca with a relative uncertainty of 7.5 × 10-15, one of the most accurate frequency measurements of a neutral atom optical transition to date. The frequency (455 986 240 494 135.8 ± 3.4) Hz was measured by stabilizing a diode laser system to a spectroscopic signal derived from an ensemble of 106 atoms cooled in two stages to a temperature of 10 µK. The measurement used a femtosecond-laser-based frequency comb to compare the Ca transition frequency with that of the single-ion 199Hg+ optical frequency standard at NIST. The Hg+ frequency was simultaneously calibrated relative to the NIST Cs fountain via the NIST time scale to yield an absolute value for the Ca transition frequency. The relative fractional instability between the two optical standards was 2 × 10-15 for 10 s of averaging time and 2 × 10-16 for 2000 s.

  20. Dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurements with high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Jidong; Liu, Shenggang; Ma, Heli; Tao, Tianjiong; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Hua

    2014-11-15

    A unique dynamic frequency-domain interferometer for absolute distance measurement has been developed recently. This paper presents the working principle of the new interferometric system, which uses a photonic crystal fiber to transmit the wide-spectrum light beams and a high-speed streak camera or frame camera to record the interference stripes. Preliminary measurements of harmonic vibrations of a speaker, driven by a radio, and the changes in the tip clearance of a rotating gear wheel show that this new type of interferometer has the ability to perform absolute distance measurements both with high time- and distance-resolution.

  1. Simplified absolute phase retrieval of dual-frequency fringe patterns in fringe projection profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jin; Mo, Rong; Sun, Huibin; Chang, Zhiyong; Zhao, Xiaxia

    2016-04-01

    In fringe projection profilometry, a simplified method is proposed to recover absolute phase maps of two-frequency fringe patterns by using a unique mapping rule. The mapping rule is designed from the rounded phase values to the fringe order of each pixel. Absolute phase can be recovered by the fringe order maps. Unlike the existing techniques, where the lowest frequency of dual- or multiple-frequency fringe patterns must be single, the presented method breaks the limitation and simplifies the procedure of phase unwrapping. Additionally, due to many issues including ambient light, shadow, sharp edges, step height boundaries and surface reflectivity variations, a novel framework of automatically identifying and removing invalid phase values is also proposed. Simulations and experiments have been carried out to validate the performances of the proposed method.

  2. A Laser Frequency Comb System for Absolute Calibration of the VTT Echelle Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, H.-P.; Steinmetz, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Kentischer, T.; Schmidt, W.

    2012-10-01

    A wavelength calibration system based on a laser frequency comb (LFC) was developed in a co-operation between the Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Freiburg, Germany and the Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Garching, Germany for permanent installation at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) on Tenerife, Canary Islands. The system was installed successfully in October 2011. By simultaneously recording the spectra from the Sun and the LFC, for each exposure a calibration curve can be derived from the known frequencies of the comb modes that is suitable for absolute calibration at the meters per second level. We briefly summarize some topics in solar physics that benefit from absolute spectroscopy and point out the advantages of LFC compared to traditional calibration techniques. We also sketch the basic setup of the VTT calibration system and its integration with the existing echelle spectrograph.

  3. Effects of relative and absolute frequency in the spectral weighting of loudness.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Suyash Narendra; Wróblewski, Marcin; Schmid, Kendra K; Jesteadt, Walt

    2016-01-01

    The loudness of broadband sound is often modeled as a linear sum of specific loudness across frequency bands. In contrast, recent studies using molecular psychophysical methods suggest that low and high frequency components contribute more to the overall loudness than mid frequencies. In a series of experiments, the contribution of individual components to the overall loudness of a tone complex was assessed using the molecular psychophysical method as well as a loudness matching task. The stimuli were two spectrally overlapping ten-tone complexes with two equivalent rectangular bandwidth spacing between the tones, making it possible to separate effects of relative and absolute frequency. The lowest frequency components of the "low-frequency" and the "high-frequency" complexes were 208 and 808 Hz, respectively. Perceptual-weights data showed emphasis on lowest and highest frequencies of both the complexes, suggesting spectral-edge related effects. Loudness matching data in the same listeners confirmed the greater contribution of low and high frequency components to the overall loudness of the ten-tone complexes. Masked detection thresholds of the individual components within the tone complex were not correlated with perceptual weights. The results show that perceptual weights provide reliable behavioral correlates of relative contributions of the individual frequency components to overall loudness of broadband sounds. PMID:26827032

  4. Absolute frequency stabilization of an injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Plusquellic, D.F.; Votava, O.; Nesbitt, D.J.

    1996-03-01

    A method is described that provides absolute frequency stabilization and calibration of the signal and idler waves generated by an injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The method makes use of a He{endash}Ne stabilized transfer cavity (TC) to control the frequencies of the cw sources used to seed both the pump laser and OPO cavity. The TC serves as a stable calibration source for the signal and idler waves by providing marker fringes as the seed laser is scanned. Additionally, an acoustic-optic modulator (AOM) is used to shift the OPO seed laser{close_quote}s frequency before locking it onto the TC. The sidebands of the AOM are tunable over more than one free spectral range of the TC, thereby permitting stabilization of the signal and idler waves at any frequency. A {plus_minus}25-MHz residual error in the absolute frequency stabilities of the pump, signal, and idler waves is experimentally demonstrated, which is roughly 30{percent} of the 160-MHz near-transform-limited linewidths of the signal and idler pulses. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  5. Comb-calibrated frequency-modulated continuous-wave ladar for absolute distance measurements.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Esther; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R; Coddington, Ian; Sinclair, Laura C; Knabe, Kevin; Swann, William C; Newbury, Nathan R

    2013-06-15

    We demonstrate a comb-calibrated frequency-modulated continuous-wave laser detection and ranging (FMCW ladar) system for absolute distance measurements. The FMCW ladar uses a compact external cavity laser that is swept quasi-sinusoidally over 1 THz at a 1 kHz rate. The system simultaneously records the heterodyne FMCW ladar signal and the instantaneous laser frequency at sweep rates up to 3400 THz/s, as measured against a free-running frequency comb (femtosecond fiber laser). Demodulation of the ladar signal against the instantaneous laser frequency yields the range to the target with 1 ms update rates, bandwidth-limited 130 μm resolution and a ~100 nm accuracy that is directly linked to the counted repetition rate of the comb. The precision is <100 nm at the 1 ms update rate and reaches ~6 nm for a 100 ms average. PMID:23938965

  6. Frequency-dependent viability in mutant strains of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Curtsinger, J W; Sheen, F M

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the effects of genotypic frequencies on egg-to-adult viabilities in pairwise combinations of four strains of Drosophila melanogaster. The experiments involved mixture of a total of 42,000 eggs in varying proportions under controlled densities and observation of surviving adults. Viabilities were found to depend on frequencies in several genotypic combinations. In the most extreme case, the absolute viability of cn;bw females increased monotonically from 54% when common to 70% when rare. The results illustrate several statistical and methodological problems that might explain why some experiments have failed to detect frequency-dependent viabilities. These problems include heterogeneity between replications, sex differences in susceptibility to competition, and strong dependence of the experimental outcome on the choice of competitor genotypes. PMID:1901577

  7. Quantifying Discipline Practices Using Absolute vs. Relative Frequencies: Clinical and Research Implications for Child Welfare

    PubMed Central

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Shaffer, Anne; Kolko, David J.

    2014-01-01

    In the parent intervention outcome literatures, discipline practices are generally quantified as absolute frequencies or, less commonly, as relative frequencies. These differences in methodology warrant direct comparison as they have critical implications for study results and conclusions among treatments targeted at reducing parental aggression and harsh discipline. In this study, we directly compared the absolute frequency method and the relative frequency method for quantifying physically aggressive, psychologically aggressive, and nonaggressive discipline practices. Longitudinal data over a 3-year period came from an existing data set of a clinical trial examining the effectiveness of a psychosocial treatment in reducing parental physical and psychological aggression and improving child behavior (N = 139; Kolko et al., 2009). Discipline practices (both aggressive and nonaggressive) were assessed using the Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS; Straus et al., 1998). The two methods yielded different patterns of results, particularly for nonaggressive discipline strategies. We suggest that each method makes its own unique contribution to a more complete understanding of the association between parental aggression and intervention effects. PMID:24106146

  8. Measuring absolute frequencies beyond the GPS limit via long-haul optical frequency dissemination.

    PubMed

    Clivati, Cecilia; Cappellini, Giacomo; Livi, Lorenzo F; Poggiali, Francesco; de Cumis, Mario Siciliani; Mancini, Marco; Pagano, Guido; Frittelli, Matteo; Mura, Alberto; Costanzo, Giovanni A; Levi, Filippo; Calonico, Davide; Fallani, Leonardo; Catani, Jacopo; Inguscio, Massimo

    2016-05-30

    Global Positioning System (GPS) dissemination of frequency standards is ubiquitous at present, providing the most widespread time and frequency reference for the majority of industrial and research applications worldwide. On the other hand, the ultimate limits of the GPS presently curb further advances in high-precision, scientific and industrial applications relying on this dissemination scheme. Here, we demonstrate that these limits can be reliably overcome even in laboratories without a local atomic clock by replacing the GPS with a 642-km-long optical fiber link to a remote primary caesium frequency standard. Through this configuration we stably address the 1S0-3P0 clock transition in an ultracold gas of 173Yb, with a precision that exceeds the possibilities of a GPS-based measurement, dismissing the need for a local clock infrastructure to perform beyond-GPS high-precision tasks. We also report an improvement of two orders of magnitude in the accuracy on the transition frequency reported in literature. PMID:27410109

  9. The dependency of timbre on fundamental frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marozeau, Jeremy; de Cheveigné, Alain; McAdams, Stephen; Winsberg, Suzanne

    2003-11-01

    The dependency of the timbre of musical sounds on their fundamental frequency (F0) was examined in three experiments. In experiment I subjects compared the timbres of stimuli produced by a set of 12 musical instruments with equal F0, duration, and loudness. There were three sessions, each at a different F0. In experiment II the same stimuli were rearranged in pairs, each with the same difference in F0, and subjects had to ignore the constant difference in pitch. In experiment III, instruments were paired both with and without an F0 difference within the same session, and subjects had to ignore the variable differences in pitch. Experiment I yielded dissimilarity matrices that were similar at different F0's, suggesting that instruments kept their relative positions within timbre space. Experiment II found that subjects were able to ignore the salient pitch difference while rating timbre dissimilarity. Dissimilarity matrices were symmetrical, suggesting further that the absolute displacement of the set of instruments within timbre space was small. Experiment III extended this result to the case where the pitch difference varied from trial to trial. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) of dissimilarity scores produced solutions (timbre spaces) that varied little across conditions and experiments. MDS solutions were used to test the validity of signal-based predictors of timbre, and in particular their stability as a function of F0. Taken together, the results suggest that timbre differences are perceived independently from differences of pitch, at least for F0 differences smaller than an octave. Timbre differences can be measured between stimuli with different F0's.

  10. Precision absolute frequency laser spectroscopy of argon II in parallel and antiparallel geometry using a frequency comb for calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioubimov, Vladimir

    A collinear fast ion beam laser apparatus was constructed and tested. It will be used on-line to the SLOW RI radioactive beam facility in RIKEN (Japan) and as in the present experiment for precision absolute frequency measurements of astrophysically important reference lines. In the current work we conducted absolute measurements of spectral lines of Ar+ ions using parallel and antiparallel geometries. To provide a reference for the laser wavelength iodine saturation spectroscopy was used. The precision of this reference was enhanced by simultaneously observing the beat node between the spectroscopy laser and the corresponding mode of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. When performing collinear and anticollinear measurements simultaneously for the laser induced fluorescence, the exact relativistic formula for the transition frequency n0=ncoll˙n anticoll can be applied. In this geometry ion source instabilities due to pressure and anode voltage fluctuation are minimized. The procedure of fluorescence lineshapes fitting is discussed and the errors in the measurements are estimated. The result is n0 = 485, 573, 619.7 +/- 0.3MHz corresponding to Dnn = 6 x 10-10 and is an improvement of two orders of magnitude over the NIST published value.

  11. Dual-frequency-moiré based absolute position sensing for lens focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Didi; Wang, Yahui; Di, Chengliang

    2015-10-01

    Micro motor, a typical equipment to adjust the zoom lens, together with a position feedback sensor constitute the closed position loop, which is the key factor to perform successfully accurate lens focusing. Traditionally, the incremental grating ruler tends to be adopted as the position sensor, which continues counting the number of grating pitches on a dynamic one-dimensional moving platform. Instead of incremental counting, this paper proposes a dual-frequency-moiré based absolute position sensing method for reading immediate position at static environment. According to the relative positions of two kind of moiré, the absolute position of the measurement point can be retrieve at nano-meters level through look-up table. By the way, the measurement range can be expanded to millimeters level satisfying the demands of lens focusing, and furthermore the measurement efficiency is improved greatly without dynamic moving. In order to verify the performances of proposed method, a model of dual-frequency-moiré is built, and theological principles are deduced. Finally, the simulation results indicate that, with established configurations, dual-frequency-moiré could measure position within 0~5000μm. At the same time, the measurement accuracy achieves nano-meters level.

  12. Use of the absolute phase in frequency modulated continuous wave plasma reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, G.

    2008-08-15

    In frequency modulated continuous wave reflectometry, used for density profile measurement in fusion plasmas, it is usual to measure the beat frequency between the launched wave and the reflected wave, and from this to calculate the position of the reflecting layer in the plasma. The absolute phase of the beat signal is usually neglected. The reason is that the phase shift between sweeps is usually comparable with or more than 2{pi}, leading to an ambiguity that is impossible to resolve. However, recent observations on the MAST tokamak have shown that, under quiet plasma conditions (this term has to be defined), the phase shift between sweeps is small compared with 2{pi} and the phase ambiguity can be readily resolved. The reflectometer signal is then being analyzed as an interferometer signal would normally be, and there is a substantial improvement in spatial resolution. The method is illustrated by application to small edge localized mode precursor and allows what is believed to be the first quantitative measurement of the displacement of the plasma boundary by such a precursor mode. The errors in both the absolute phase measurement and the more conventional frequency measurement are also estimated.

  13. A dedicated pistonphone for absolute calibration of infrasound sensors at very low frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wen; He, Longbiao; Zhang, Fan; Rong, Zuochao; Jia, Shushi

    2016-02-01

    Aimed at the absolute calibration of infrasound sensors at very low frequencies, an upgraded and improved infrasonic pistonphone has been developed. The pistonphone was designed such that a very narrow clearance between the piston and its guide was realized based on an automatically-centered clearance-sealing structure, and a large volume rigid-walled chamber was also adopted, which improved the leakage time-constant of the chamber. A composite feedback control system was applied to the electromagnetic vibrator to control the precise motion of the piston. Performance tests and uncertainty analysis show that the leakage time-constant is so large, and the distortion of the sound pressure is so small, that the pistonphone can be used as a standard infrasound source in the frequency range from 0.001 Hz to 20 Hz. The low frequency property of the pistonphone has been verified through calibrating low frequency microphones. Comparison tests with the reciprocity method have shown that the pressure sensitivities from the pistonphone are not only reliable at common frequencies but also have smaller uncertainties at low frequencies.

  14. Absolute frequency measurements of the lithium D lines using an optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simien, Clayton; Brewer, Samuel; Tan, Joseph; Gillaspy, John; Sansonetti, Craig

    2010-03-01

    High precision spectroscopic measurements of the isotope shift of low-lying lithium transitions can be combined with precise theory to probe the relative nuclear charge radii of various lithium isotopes. This technique is of particular interest for exotic isotopes for which scattering experiments are not feasible. But recently measured isotope shifts for the D1 and D2 lines of the stable isotopes ^6Li and ^7Li remain in strong disagreement with each other and with theory. Experimental values for the splitting isotope shift (SIS), believed to be the most reliable prediction, are not even consistent as to sign and disagree with theory by as much as 16 standard deviations. We will report results from a new experiment in progress at the NIST. We observe the D lines by crossing a highly collimated lithium beam with a very stable tunable laser. Unlike previous experiments, we directly measure the optical frequency of the laser at every data point by using an optical frequency comb referenced to a cesium clock. Initial results suggest that fully resolved lithium hyperfine components will be determined with an uncertainty of a few tens of kilohertz. We expect to obtain precise new values for the fine structure, hyperfine structure, and isotope shifts of the lithium D lines and a definitive test of the calculated SIS.

  15. Absolute molecular transition frequencies measured by three cavity-enhanced spectroscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Cygan, A; Wójtewicz, S; Kowzan, G; Zaborowski, M; Wcisło, P; Nawrocki, J; Krehlik, P; Śliwczyński, Ł; Lipiński, M; Masłowski, P; Ciuryło, R; Lisak, D

    2016-06-01

    Absolute frequencies of unperturbed (12)C(16)O transitions from the near-infrared (3-0) band were measured with uncertainties five-fold lower than previously available data. The frequency axis of spectra was linked to the primary frequency standard. Three different cavity enhanced absorption and dispersion spectroscopic methods and various approaches to data analysis were used to estimate potential systematic instrumental errors. Except for a well established frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy, we applied the cavity mode-width spectroscopy and the one-dimensional cavity mode-dispersion spectroscopy for measurement of absorption and dispersion spectra, respectively. We demonstrated the highest quality of the dispersion line shape measured in optical spectroscopy so far. We obtained line positions of the Doppler-broadened R24 and R28 transitions with relative uncertainties at the level of 10(-10). The pressure shifting coefficients were measured and the influence of the line asymmetry on unperturbed line positions was analyzed. Our dispersion spectra are the first demonstration of molecular spectroscopy with both axes of the spectra directly linked to the primary frequency standard, which is particularly desirable for the future reference-grade measurements of molecular spectra. PMID:27276950

  16. Absolute molecular transition frequencies measured by three cavity-enhanced spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cygan, A.; Wójtewicz, S.; Kowzan, G.; Zaborowski, M.; Wcisło, P.; Nawrocki, J.; Krehlik, P.; Śliwczyński, Ł.; Lipiński, M.; Masłowski, P.; Ciuryło, R.; Lisak, D.

    2016-06-01

    Absolute frequencies of unperturbed 12C16O transitions from the near-infrared (3-0) band were measured with uncertainties five-fold lower than previously available data. The frequency axis of spectra was linked to the primary frequency standard. Three different cavity enhanced absorption and dispersion spectroscopic methods and various approaches to data analysis were used to estimate potential systematic instrumental errors. Except for a well established frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy, we applied the cavity mode-width spectroscopy and the one-dimensional cavity mode-dispersion spectroscopy for measurement of absorption and dispersion spectra, respectively. We demonstrated the highest quality of the dispersion line shape measured in optical spectroscopy so far. We obtained line positions of the Doppler-broadened R24 and R28 transitions with relative uncertainties at the level of 10-10. The pressure shifting coefficients were measured and the influence of the line asymmetry on unperturbed line positions was analyzed. Our dispersion spectra are the first demonstration of molecular spectroscopy with both axes of the spectra directly linked to the primary frequency standard, which is particularly desirable for the future reference-grade measurements of molecular spectra.

  17. Two-frequency-dependent Gauss quadrature rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Joong

    2005-02-01

    We construct two-frequency-dependent Gauss quadrature rules which can be applied for approximating the integration of the product of two oscillatory functions with different frequencies [beta]1 and [beta]2 of the forms,yi(x)=fi,1(x) cos([beta]ix)+fi,2(x) sin([beta]ix), i=1,2,where the functions fi,j(x) are smooth. A regularization procedure is presented to avoid the singularity of the Jacobian matrix of nonlinear system of equations which is induced as one frequency approaches the other frequency. We provide numerical results to compare the accuracy of the classical Gauss rule and one- and two-frequency-dependent rules.

  18. Frequency-dependent force fields for QMMM calculations.

    PubMed

    Harczuk, Ignat; Vahtras, Olav; Ågren, Hans

    2015-03-28

    We outline the construction of frequency-dependent polarizable force fields. The force fields are derived from analytic response theory for different frequencies using a generalization of the LoProp algorithm giving a decomposition of a molecular dynamical polarizability to localized atomic dynamical polarizabilities. These force fields can enter in a variety of applications - we focus on two such applications in this work: firstly, they can be incorporated in a physical, straightforward, way for current existing methods that use polarizable embeddings, and we can show, for the first time, the effect of the frequency dispersion within the classical environment of a quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QMMM) method. Our methodology is here evaluated for some test cases comprising water clusters and organic residues. Secondly, together with a modified Silberstein-Applequist procedure for interacting inducible point-dipoles, these frequency-dependent polarizable force fields can be used for a classical determination of frequency-dependent cluster polarizabilities. We evaluate this methodology by comparing with the corresponding results obtained from quantum mechanics or QMMM where the absolute mean [small alpha, Greek, macron] is determined with respect to the size of the QM and MM parts of the total system. PMID:25714984

  19. Local frequency dependence in transcranial ultrasound transmission.

    PubMed

    White, P J; Clement, G T; Hynynen, K

    2006-05-01

    The development of large-aperture multiple-source transducer arrays for ultrasound transmission through the human skull has demonstrated the possibility of controlled and substantial acoustic energy delivery into the brain parenchyma without the necessitation of a craniotomy. The individual control of acoustic parameters from each ultrasound source allows for the correction of distortions arising from transmission through the skull bone and also opens up the possibility for electronic steering of the acoustic focus within the brain. In addition, the capability to adjust the frequency of insonation at different locations on the skull can have an effect on ultrasound transmission. To determine the efficacy and applicability of a multiple-frequency approach with such a device, this study examined the frequency dependence of ultrasound transmission in the range of 0.6-1.4 MHz through a series of 17 points on four ex vivo human skulls. Effects beyond those that are characteristic of frequency-dependent attenuation were examined. Using broadband pulses, it was shown that the reflected spectra from the skull revealed information regarding ultrasound transmission at specific frequencies. A multiple-frequency insonation with optimized frequencies over the entirety of five skull specimens was found to yield on average a temporally brief 230% increase in the transmitted intensity with an 88% decrease in time-averaged intensity transmission within the focal volume. This finding demonstrates a potential applicability of a multiple-frequency approach in transcranial ultrasound transmission. PMID:16625043

  20. Improved Absolute Frequency Measurement of the 171Yb Optical Lattice Clock towards a Candidate for the Redefinition of the Second

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Masami; Inaba, Hajime; Kohno, Takuya; Tanabe, Takehiko; Nakajima, Yoshiaki; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Akamatsu, Daisuke; Onae, Atsushi; Suzuyama, Tomonari; Amemiya, Masaki; Hong, Feng-Lei

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate an improved absolute frequency measurement of the 1S0–3P0 clock transition at 578 nm in 171Yb atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice. The clock laser linewidth is reduced to ≈2 Hz by phase-locking the laser to an ultrastable neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nm through an optical frequency comb with an intracavity electrooptic modulator to achieve a high servo bandwidth. The absolute frequency is determined as 518 295 836 590 863.1(2.0) Hz relative to the SI second, and will be reported to the International Committee for Weights and Measures.

  1. Correlation of symptom clusters of schizophrenia with absolute powers of main frequency bands in quantitative EEG

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Andres; Joutsiniemi, Sirkka-Liisa; Rimon, Ranan; Appelberg, Björn

    2006-01-01

    Background Research of QEEG activity power spectra has shown intriguing results in patients with schizophrenia. Different symptom clusters have been correlated to QEEG frequency bands. The findings have been to some extent inconsistent. Replication of the findings of previous research is thus an important task. In the current study we investigated the correlations between the absolute powers of delta, theta, alpha, and beta frequency bands over the fronto-central scalp area (FC) with the PANSS subscales and the Liddle's factors in 16 patients with schizophrenia. The authors hypothesised a priori the correlations reported by Harris et al (1999) of PANSS negative subscale with delta power, Liddle's psychomotor poverty with delta and beta powers, disorganisation with delta power and reality distortion with alpha power on the midline FC. Methods The sample consisted of 16 patients with chronic schizophrenia considered as having insufficient clinical response to conventional antipsychotic treatment and evidencing a relapse. The correlations between quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) absolute powers of delta (1.5–3.0 Hz), theta (3.0–7.5 Hz), alpha (7.5–12.5 Hz), and beta (12.5–20.0 Hz) frequency bands over the fronto-central scalp area (FC) with PANSS subscales and Liddle's factors (reality distortion, disorganisation, psychomotor poverty) were investigated. Results Significant positive correlations were found between the beta and psychomotor poverty (p < 0.05). Trends towards positive correlations (p < 0.1) were observed between delta and PANSS negative subscale and psychomotor poverty. Alpha did not correlate with reality distortion and delta did not correlate with disorganisation. Post hoc analysis revealed correlations of the same magnitude between beta and psychopathology generally over FC. Conclusion The a priori hypothesis was partly supported by the correlation of the beta and psychomotor poverty. Liddle's factors showed correlations of the same

  2. Absolute versus Relative Assessments of Individual Status in Status-Dependent Strategies in Stochastic Environments.

    PubMed

    Tachiki, Yuuya; Koizumi, Itsuro

    2016-07-01

    Status-dependent strategies represent one of the most remarkable adaptive phenotypic plasticities. A threshold value for individual status (e.g., body size) is assumed above and below which each individual should adopt alternative tactics to attain higher fitness. This implicitly assumes the existence of an "absolute" best threshold value, so each individual chooses a tactic only on the basis of its own status. However, animals may be able to assess their status on the basis of surrounding individuals. This "relative" assessment considers a threshold value to be changeable depending on individual situations, which may result in significant differences in ecological and evolutionary dynamics compared with absolute assessment. Here, we incorporated Bayesian decision-making and adaptive dynamics frameworks to explore the conditions necessary for each type of assessment to evolve. Our model demonstrates that absolute assessment is always an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) in a stable environment, whereas relative assessment can be an ESS in stochastic environments. The consequences of future environmental change differ considerably depending on the assessment chosen. Our results underscore the need to better understand how individuals assess their own status when choosing alternative tactics. PMID:27322126

  3. A system for measuring absolute frequencies of up to 4.25 THz using a Josephson point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mild, Yukinobu; Onae, Atsushi; Kurosawa, Tomizo; Sakuma, Eiichi

    1993-11-01

    A system for measuring the absolute frequency of a far-infrared (FIR) laser is described. Josephson point contacts have been utilized in the system as a frequency harmonic mixer connecting microwaves and optically pumped CH3OH laser lines. The Josephson point contacts are capable of generating beat signals of 90 GHz microwaves and FIR waves of up to 4.25 THz. To measure the frequency of the beat signals from the Josephson junction with a frequency counter, tracking oscillators have been developed, which tracks the beat signals by phase locking and regenerate clean signals for frequency counting. It is shown that the absolute frequency can be measured to an accuracy of about 100 Hz by using the tracking oscillators.

  4. Local Frequency Dependence in Transcranial Ultrasound Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, P. J.; Clement, G. T.; Hynynen, K.

    2006-05-01

    The development of large-aperture multiple-source transducer arrays for ultrasound transmission through the human skull has demonstrated the possibility of controlled and substantial acoustic energy delivery into the brain parenchyma without the necessitation of a craniotomy. The individual control of acoustic parameters from each ultrasound source allows for the correction of distortions arising from transmission through the skull bone and also opens up the possibility for electronic steering of the acoustic focus within the brain. In addition, the capability to adjust the frequency of sonication at different locations on the skull can have an effect on ultrasound transmission. To determine the efficacy and applicability of a multiple-frequency approach with such a device, this study examined the frequency dependence of ultrasound transmission in the range of 0.6-1.4 MHz through a series of seventeen points on four ex vivo human skulls. Effects beyond those that are characteristic of frequency-dependent attenuation were examined. Using broadband pulses, it was shown that the reflected spectra from the skull revealed information regarding ultrasound transmission at specific frequencies. This finding demonstrates a potential applicability of a multiple-frequency approach in transcranial ultrasound transmission.

  5. Frequency-dependent selection by predators.

    PubMed

    Allen, J A

    1988-07-01

    Sometimes predators tend to concentrate on common varieties of prey and overlook rare ones. Within prey species, this could result in the fitness of each variety being inversely related to its frequency in the population. Such frequency-dependent or 'apostatic' selection by predators hunting by sight could maintain polymorphism for colour pattern, and much of the supporting evidence for this idea has come from work on birds and artificial prey. These and other studies have shown that the strength of the observed selection is affected by prey density, palatability, coloration and conspicuousness. When the prey density is very high, selection becomes 'anti-apostatic': predators preferentially remove rare prey. There is still much to be learned about frequency-dependent selection by predators on artificial prey: work on natural polymorphic prey has hardly begun. PMID:2905488

  6. Kinship as a frequency dependent strategy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ting; Zheng, Xiu-Deng; He, Qiao-Qiao; Wu, Jia-Jia; Mace, Ruth; Tao, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Humans divide themselves up into separate cultures, which is a unique and ubiquitous characteristic of our species. Kinship norms are one of the defining features of such societies. Here we show how norms of marital residence can evolve as a frequency-dependent strategy, using real-world cases from southwestern China and an evolutionary game model. The process of kinship change has occurred in the past and is also occurring now in southwestern China. Our data and models show how transitions between residence types can occur both as response to changing costs and benefits of co-residence with kin, and also due to the initial frequency of the strategies adopted by others in the population: patrilocal societies can become matrilocal, and neolocal societies can become duolocal. This illustrates how frequency-dependent selection plays a role both in the maintenance of group-level cultural diversity and in cultural extinction. PMID:26998333

  7. Kinship as a frequency dependent strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Ting; Zheng, Xiu-Deng; He, Qiao-Qiao; Wu, Jia-Jia; Tao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Humans divide themselves up into separate cultures, which is a unique and ubiquitous characteristic of our species. Kinship norms are one of the defining features of such societies. Here we show how norms of marital residence can evolve as a frequency-dependent strategy, using real-world cases from southwestern China and an evolutionary game model. The process of kinship change has occurred in the past and is also occurring now in southwestern China. Our data and models show how transitions between residence types can occur both as response to changing costs and benefits of co-residence with kin, and also due to the initial frequency of the strategies adopted by others in the population: patrilocal societies can become matrilocal, and neolocal societies can become duolocal. This illustrates how frequency-dependent selection plays a role both in the maintenance of group-level cultural diversity and in cultural extinction. PMID:26998333

  8. Incorporating spatial dependence in regional frequency analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Xuebin

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of regional frequency analysis (RFA) is undermined by intersite dependence, which is usually ignored in parameter estimation. We propose a spatial index flood model where marginal generalized extreme value distributions are joined by an extreme-value copula characterized by a max-stable process for the spatial dependence. The parameters are estimated with a pairwise likelihood constructed from bivariate marginal generalized extreme value distributions. The estimators of model parameters and return levels can be more efficient than those from the traditional index flood model when the max-stable process fits the intersite dependence well. Through simulation, we compared the pairwise likelihood method with an L-moment method and an independence likelihood method under various spatial dependence models and dependence levels. The pairwise likelihood method was found to be the most efficient in mean squared error if the dependence model was correctly specified. When the dependence model was misspecified within the max-stable models, the pairwise likelihood method was still competitive relative to the other two methods. When the dependence model was not a max-stable model, the pairwise likelihood method led to serious bias in estimating the shape parameter and return levels, especially when the dependence was strong. In an illustration with annual maximum precipitation data from Switzerland, the pairwise likelihood method yielded remarkable reduction in the standard errors of return level estimates in comparison to the L-moment method. PMID:25745273

  9. Real-Time Determination of Absolute Frequency in Continuous-Wave Terahertz Radiation with a Photocarrier Terahertz Frequency Comb Induced by an Unstabilized Femtosecond Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Hayashi, Kenta; Mizuguchi, Tatsuya; Hsieh, Yi-Da; Abdelsalam, Dahi Ghareab; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Iwata, Tetsuo; Yasui, Takeshi

    2016-05-01

    A practical method for the absolute frequency measurement of continuous-wave terahertz (CW-THz) radiation uses a photocarrier terahertz frequency comb (PC-THz comb) because of its ability to realize real-time, precise measurement without the need for cryogenic cooling. However, the requirement for precise stabilization of the repetition frequency ( f rep) and/or use of dual femtosecond lasers hinders its practical use. In this article, based on the fact that an equal interval between PC-THz comb modes is always maintained regardless of the fluctuation in f rep, the PC-THz comb induced by an unstabilized laser was used to determine the absolute frequency f THz of CW-THz radiation. Using an f rep-free-running PC-THz comb, the f THz of the frequency-fixed or frequency-fluctuated active frequency multiplier chain CW-THz source was determined at a measurement rate of 10 Hz with a relative accuracy of 8.2 × 10-13 and a relative precision of 8.8 × 10-12 to a rubidium frequency standard. Furthermore, f THz was correctly determined even when fluctuating over a range of 20 GHz. The proposed method enables the use of any commercial femtosecond laser for the absolute frequency measurement of CW-THz radiation.

  10. Temperature-dependent Absolute Refractive Index Measurements of Synthetic Fused Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Frey, Bradley J.

    2006-01-01

    Using the Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, we have measured the absolute refractive index of five specimens taken from a very large boule of Corning 7980 fused silica from temperatures ranging from 30 to 310 K at wavelengths from 0.4 to 2.6 microns with an absolute uncertainty of plus or minus 1 x 10 (exp -5). Statistical variations in derived values of the thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) are at the plus or minus 2 x 10 (exp -8)/K level. Graphical and tabulated data for absolute refractive index, dispersion, and thermo-optic coefficient are presented for selected wavelengths and temperatures along with estimates of uncertainty in index. Coefficients for temperature-dependent Sellmeier fits of measured refractive index are also presented to allow accurate interpolation of index to other wavelengths and temperatures. We compare our results to those from an independent investigation (which used an interferometric technique for measuring index changes as a function of temperature) whose samples were prepared from the same slugs of material from which our prisms were prepared in support of the Kepler mission. We also compare our results with sparse cryogenic index data from measurements of this material from the literature.

  11. Analysis of frequency dependent pump light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlmuth, Matthias; Pflaum, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    Simulations have to accurately model thermal lensing in order to help improving resonator design of diode pumped solid state lasers. To this end, a precise description of the pump light absorption is an important prerequisite. In this paper, we discuss the frequency dependency of the pump light absorption in the laser crystal and its influence on the simulated laser performance. The results show that the pump light absorption has to include the spectral overlap of the emitting pump source and the absorbing laser material. This information can either be used for a fully frequency dependent absorption model or, at least in the shown examples, to compute an effective value for an exponential Beer-Lambert law of absorption. This is particularly significant at pump wavelengths coinciding with a peak of absorption. Consequences for laser stability and performance are analyzed for different pump wavelengths in a Nd:YAG laser.

  12. Anomalous frequency dependent diamagnetism in metal silicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Ashutosh; Gunasekera, Jagat; Harriger, Leland; Singh, David J.; Singh, Deepak K.; Leland Harriger Collaboration

    Discovery of superconductivity in PbO-type FeSe has generated a lot of interest. Among the samples we synthesize with similar structure, NiSi has showed anomalous but very interesting results. Nickel silicides are important electronic materials that have been used as contacts for field effect transistors, as interconnects and in nanoelectronic devices. The magnetic properties of NiSi are not well known, however. In this presentation, we report a highly unusual magnetic phenomenon in NiSi. The ac susceptibility measurements on NiSi reveal strong frequency dependence of static and dynamic susceptibilities that are primarily diamagnetic at room temperature. The static susceptibility is found to exhibit a strong frequency dependence of the diamagnetic response below 100K, while dynamic susceptibility showed peak type feature at 10KHz frequency around 50K. Detailed neutron scattering measurements on high quality powder sample of NiSi on SPINS cold spectrometer further revealed an inelastic peak around 1.5meV, even though no magnetic order is detected. The inelastic peak dissipates above 100K, which is where the static susceptibility starts to diverge with frequency. Research is supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Grant No. DE-SC0014461.

  13. Frequency dependent thermal expansion in binary viscoelasticcomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, James G.

    2007-12-01

    The effective thermal expansion coefficient beta* of abinary viscoelastic composite is shown to be frequency dependent even ifthe thermal expansion coefficients beta A and beta B of both constituentsare themselves frequency independent. Exact calculations for binaryviscoelastic systems show that beta* is related to constituent valuesbeta A, beta B, volume fractions, and bulk moduli KA, KB, as well as tothe overall bulk modulus K* of the composite system. Then, beta* isdetermined for isotropic systems by first bounding (or measuring) K* andtherefore beta*. For anisotropic systems with hexagonal symmetry, theprincipal values of the thermal expansion beta*perp and beta*para can bedetermined exactly when the constituents form a layered system. In allthe examples studied, it is shown explicitly that the eigenvectors of thethermoviscoelastic system possess non-negative dissipation -- despite thecomplicated analytical behavior of the frequency dependent thermalexpansivities themselves. Methods presented have a variety ofapplications from fluid-fluid mixtures to fluid-solid suspensions, andfrom fluid-saturated porous media to viscoelastic solid-solidcomposites.

  14. Time dependent corrections to absolute gravity determinations in the establishment of modern gravity control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykowski, Przemyslaw; Krynski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The establishment of modern gravity control with the use of exclusively absolute method of gravity determination has significant advantages as compared to the one established mostly with relative gravity measurements (e.g. accuracy, time efficiency). The newly modernized gravity control in Poland consists of 28 fundamental stations (laboratory) and 168 base stations (PBOG14 - located in the field). Gravity at the fundamental stations was surveyed with the FG5-230 gravimeter of the Warsaw University of Technology, and at the base stations - with the A10-020 gravimeter of the Institute of Geodesy and Cartography, Warsaw. This work concerns absolute gravity determinations at the base stations. Although free of common relative measurement errors (e.g. instrumental drift) and effects of network adjustment, absolute gravity determinations for the establishment of gravity control require advanced corrections due to time dependent factors, i.e. tidal and ocean loading corrections, atmospheric corrections and hydrological corrections that were not taken into account when establishing the previous gravity control in Poland. Currently available services and software allow to determine high accuracy and high temporal resolution corrections for atmospheric (based on digital weather models, e.g. ECMWF) and hydrological (based on hydrological models, e.g. GLDAS/Noah) gravitational and loading effects. These corrections are mostly used for processing observations with Superconducting Gravimeters in the Global Geodynamics Project. For the area of Poland the atmospheric correction based on weather models can differ from standard atmospheric correction by even ±2 µGal. The hydrological model shows the annual variability of ±8 µGal. In addition the standard tidal correction may differ from the one obtained from the local tidal model (based on tidal observations). Such difference at Borowa Gora Observatory reaches the level of ±1.5 µGal. Overall the sum of atmospheric and

  15. DPOAE generation dependence on primary frequencies ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botti, Teresa; Sisto, Renata; Moleti, Arturo; D'Amato, Luisa; Sanjust, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Two different mechanisms are responsible for the DPOAE generation. The nonlinear distortion wave-fixed mechanism generates the DPOAE Zero-Latency (ZL) component, as a backward traveling wave from the "overlap" region. Linear reflection of the forward DP wave (IDP) generates the DPOAE Long-Latency (LL) component through a place-fixed mechanism. ZL and LL components add up vectorially to generate the DPOAE recorded in the ear canal. The 2f1 - f2 and 2f2 - f1 DPOAE intensity depends on the stimulus level and on the primary frequency ratio r = f2/f1, where f1 and f2 are the primary stimuli frequencies. Here we study the behavior of the ZL and LL DPOAE components as a function of r by both numerical and laboratory experiments, measuring DPAOEs with an equal primary levels (L1 = L2) paradigm in the range [35, 75] dB SPL, with r ranging in [1.1, 1.45]. Numerical simulations of a nonlocal nonlinear model have been performed without cochlear roughness, to suppress the linear reflection mechanism. In this way the model solution at the base represents the DPOAE ZL component, and the solution at the corresponding DPOAE tonotopic place corresponds to the IDP. This technique has been not effectual to study the 2f2 - f1 DPOAE, as a consequence of its generation mechanism. While the 2f1 - f2 generation place is known to be the tonotopic place x(f2), the 2f2 - f1 DPOAE one has to be assumed basal to its corresponding reflection place. That is because ZL components generated in x(f2) cannot significantly pass through their resonant place. Moreover increasing the ratio r, 2f2 - f1 ZL and LL generation place approach each other, because the overlap region of primary tones decreases. Consequently, the distinction between the two places becomes complicated. DPOAEs have been measured in six young normal-hearing subjects. DPOAE ZL and LL components have been separated by a time-frequency filtering method based on the wavelet transform 1. due to their different phase gradient delay

  16. Near infrared frequency dependence of high-order sideband generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zaks, Benjamin; Banks, Hunter; Sherwin, Mark; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2013-12-04

    The near infrared frequency dependence of high order sideband generation in InGaAs quantum wells is discussed. The NIR frequency dependence of the sidebands indicates that the HSG phenomenon is excitonic in nature.

  17. 3D absolute shape measurement of live rabbit hearts with a superfast two-frequency phase-shifting technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajun; Laughner, Jacob I; Efimov, Igor R; Zhang, Song

    2013-03-11

    This paper presents a two-frequency binary phase-shifting technique to measure three-dimensional (3D) absolute shape of beating rabbit hearts. Due to the low contrast of the cardiac surface, the projector and the camera must remain focused, which poses challenges for any existing binary method where the measurement accuracy is low. To conquer this challenge, this paper proposes to utilize the optimal pulse width modulation (OPWM) technique to generate high-frequency fringe patterns, and the error-diffusion dithering technique to produce low-frequency fringe patterns. Furthermore, this paper will show that fringe patterns produced with blue light provide the best quality measurements compared to fringe patterns generated with red or green light; and the minimum data acquisition speed for high quality measurements is around 800 Hz for a rabbit heart beating at 180 beats per minute. PMID:23482151

  18. High-resolution absolute frequency referenced fiber optic sensor for quasi-static strain sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Timothy T.-Y.; Chow, Jong H.; Shaddock, Daniel A.; Littler, Ian C. M.; Gagliardi, Gianluca; Gray, Malcolm B.; McClelland, David E.

    2010-07-20

    We present a quasi-static fiber optic strain sensing system capable of resolving signals below nanostrain from 20 mHz. A telecom-grade distributed feedback CW diode laser is locked to a fiber Fabry-Perot sensor, transferring the detected signals onto the laser. An H{sup 13}C{sup 14}N absorption line is then used as a frequency reference to extract accurate low-frequency strain signals from the locked system.

  19. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.20, respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ("Dee" voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result.

  20. Absolute distance measurement by multi-heterodyne interferometry using a frequency comb and a cavity-stabilized tunable laser.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanzhong; Zhang, Fumin; Liu, Tingyang; Balling, Petr; Qu, Xinghua

    2016-05-20

    In this paper, we develop a multi-heterodyne system capable of absolute distance measurement using a frequency comb and a tunable diode laser locked to a Fabry-Perot cavity. In a series of subsequent measurements, numerous beat components can be obtained by downconverting the optical frequency into the RF region with multi-heterodyne interferometry. The distances can be measured via the mode phases with a series of synthetic wavelengths. The comparison with the reference interferometer shows an agreement within 1.5 μm for the averages of five measurements and 2.5 μm for the single measurement, which is at the 10-8 relative precision level. PMID:27411152

  1. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata.

    PubMed

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-01

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and ±0.2(0), respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ("Dee" voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result. PMID:23464200

  2. Radio frequency cavity analysis, measurement, and calibration of absolute Dee voltage for K-500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC, Kolkata

    SciTech Connect

    Som, Sumit; Seth, Sudeshna; Mandal, Aditya; Paul, Saikat; Duttagupta, Anjan

    2013-02-15

    Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre has commissioned a K-500 superconducting cyclotron for various types of nuclear physics experiments. The 3-phase radio-frequency system of superconducting cyclotron has been developed in the frequency range 9-27 MHz with amplitude and phase stability of 100 ppm and {+-}0.2{sup 0}, respectively. The analysis of the RF cavity has been carried out using 3D Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio code and various RF parameters and accelerating voltages ('Dee' voltage) are calculated from simulation. During the RF system commissioning, measurement of different RF parameters has been done and absolute Dee voltage has been calibrated using a CdTe X-ray detector along with its accessories and known X-ray source. The present paper discusses about the measured data and the simulation result.

  3. Frequency-dependent fitness in gynodioecious Lobelia siphilitica.

    PubMed

    Rivkin, L Ruth; Case, Andrea L; Caruso, Christina M

    2015-05-01

    Selection is frequency dependent when an individual's fitness depends on the frequency of its phenotype. Frequency-dependent selection should be common in gynodioecious plants, where individuals are female or hermaphroditic; if the fitness of females is limited by the availability of pollen to fertilize their ovules, then they should have higher fitness when rare than when common. To test whether the fitness of females is frequency dependent, we manipulated the sex ratio in arrays of gynodioecious Lobelia siphilitica. To test whether fitness was frequency dependent because of variation in pollen availability, we compared open-pollinated and supplemental hand-pollinated plants. Open-pollinated females produced more seeds when they were rare than when they were common, as expected if fitness is negatively frequency dependent. However, hand-pollinated females also produced more seeds when they were rare, indicating that variation in pollen availability was not the cause of frequency-dependent fitness. Instead, fitness was frequency dependent because both hand- and open-pollinated females opened more flowers when they were rare than when they were common. This plasticity in the rate of anthesis could cause fitness to be frequency dependent even when reproduction is not pollen limited, and thus expand the conditions under which frequency-dependent selection operates in gynodioecious species. PMID:25824809

  4. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffrey D; Kelly, Thompson G; Urbatish, Todd J

    2010-11-17

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

  5. Stray-field-induced quadrupole shift and absolute frequency of the 688-THz {sup 171}Yb{sup +} single-ion optical frequency standard

    SciTech Connect

    Tamm, Chr.; Weyers, S.; Lipphardt, B.; Peik, E.

    2009-10-15

    We report experimental investigations of a single-ion optical frequency standard based on {sup 171}Yb{sup +}. The ion is confined in a cylindrically symmetric radiofrequency Paul trap. The reference transition is the {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}(F=0)-{sup 2}D{sub 3/2}(F{sup '}=2) electric quadrupole transition at 688 THz. Using a differential measurement scheme, we determine the shift of the reference transition frequency that occurs due to the interaction of the electric quadrupole moment of the {sup 2}D{sub 3/2} state with the gradient of the electrostatic stray field in the trap. We determine an upper limit for the instability of the quadrupole shift over times between 100 s to 20 h. We also observe the variations in the shift and in the applied stray-field compensation voltages that result from loading a new ion into the trap and during a subsequent storage period of 74 days. This information is utilized to measure the absolute frequency of the reference transition with an uncertainty that is a factor of 3 smaller than that of the previous measurement. Using a fiber laser based optical frequency comb generator and the cesium fountain clock CSF1 of PTB (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt), the frequency at 300 K temperature is determined as 688 358 979 309 306.62{+-}0.73 Hz.

  6. Drug Treated Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective and Bipolar Disorder Patients Evaluated by qEEG Absolute Spectral Power and Mean Frequency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wix-Ramos, Richard; Moreno, Xiomara; Capote, Eduardo; González, Gilbert; Uribe, Ezequiel

    2014-01-01

    Objective Research of electroencephalograph (EEG) power spectrum and mean frequency has shown inconsistent results in patients with schizophrenic, schizoaffective and bipolar disorders during medication when compared to normal subjects thus; the characterization of these parameters is an important task. Methods We applied quantitative EEG (qEEG) to investigate 38 control, 15 schizophrenic, 7 schizoaffective and 11 bipolar disorder subjects which remaine under the administration of psychotropic drugs (except control group). Absolute spectral power (ASP), mean frequency and hemispheric electrical asymmetry were measured by 19 derivation qEEG. Group mean values were compared with non parametrical Mann-Whitney test and spectral EEG maps with z-score method at p < 0.05. Results Most frequent drug treatments for schizophrenic patients were neuroleptic+antiepileptic (40% of cases) or 2 neuroleptics (33.3%). Schizoaffective patients received neuroleptic+benzodiazepine (71.4%) and for bipolar disorder patients neuroleptic+antiepileptic (81.8%). Schizophrenic (at all derivations except for Fp1, Fp2, F8 and T6) and schizoaffective (only at C3) show higher values of ASP (+57.7% and +86.1% respectively) compared to control group. ASP of bipolar disorder patients did not show differences against control group. The mean frequency was higher at Fp1 (+14.2%) and Fp2 (+17.4%) in bipolar disorder patients than control group, but no differences were found in frequencies between schizophrenic or schizoaffective patients against the control group. Majority of spectral differences were found at the left hemisphere in schizophrenic and schizoaffective but not in bipolar disorder subjects. Conclusion The present report contributes to characterize quantitatively the qEEG in drug treated schizophrenic, schizoaffective or bipolar disorder patients. PMID:24851121

  7. Frequency-dependent conductivity in bismuth-vanadate glassy semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aswini

    1990-01-01

    The first measurements are reported for the frequency-dependent (ac) conductivity (real as well as imaginary parts) for various compositions of the bismuth-vanadate glassy semiconductors in the frequency range 102-105 Hz and in the temperature range 77-420 K. The behavior of the ac conductivity is broadly similar to what has been observed previously in many other types of amorphous semiconductors, namely, nearly linear frequency dependence and weak temperature dependence. The experimental results are analyzed with reference to various theoretical models based on quantum-mechanical tunneling and classical hopping over barriers. The analysis shows that the temperature dependence of the ac conductivity is consistent with the simple quantum-mechanical tunneling model at low temperatures; however, this model completely fails to predict the observed temperature dependence of the frequency exponent. The overlapping-large-polaron tunneling model can explain the temperature dependence of the frequency exponent at low temperatures. Fitting of this model to the low-temperature data yields a reasonable value of the wave-function decay constant. However, this model predicts the temperature dependence of the ac conductivity much higher than what actual data showed. The correlated barrier hopping model is consistent with the temperature dependence of both the ac conductivity and its frequency exponent. This model provides reasonable values of the maximum barrier heights but higher values of characteristic relaxation times.

  8. FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT ABSORPTION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC ENERGY IN BIOLOGICAL TISSUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The frequency-dependent absorption of electromagnetic energy in biological tissue is illustrated by use of the Debye equations, model calculations for different irradiation conditions, and measured electrical properties (conductivity and permittivity) of different tissues. Four s...

  9. Frequency-dependent FDTD methods using Z transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Dennis M.

    1992-01-01

    While the frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain, or (FD)2TD, method can correctly calculate EM propagation through media whose dielectric properties are frequency-dependent, more elaborate applications lead to greater (FD)2TD complexity. Z-transform theory is presently used to develop the mathematical bases of the (FD)2TD method, simultaneously obtaining a clearer formulation and allowing researchers to draw on the existing literature of systems analysis and signal-processing.

  10. Absolute and relative emission spectroscopy study of 3 cm wide planar radio frequency atmospheric pressure bio-plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaolong; Nikiforov, Anton Yu; Ionita, Eusebiu-Rosini; Dinescu, Gheorghe; Leys, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    The dynamics of low power atmospheric pressure radio frequency discharge generated in Ar gas in long gap of 3 cm is investigated. This plasma source is characterized and analyzed for possible large scale biomedical applications where low gas temperature and potential-less effluent are required. The discharge forms a homogenous glow-like afterglow in ambient air at input power of 30 W with low gas temperature of 330 K, which is desirable in biomedical applications. With absolute calibrated spectroscopy of the discharge, electron density of 0.4 × 1018 m-3 and electron temperature of 1.5 eV are obtained from continuum Bremsstrahlung radiation of the source. Time and spatial resolved emission spectroscopy is used to analyze discharge generation mechanism and active species formation. It is found that discharge dynamics strongly correlates with the discharge current waveform. Strong Ar(2p) excited states emission is observed nearby the electrodes surface on a distance up to 200 μm in the plasma sheath region at 10 ns after the current peak, whereas OH(A) emission is uniform along of the interelectrode gap.

  11. Absolute pitch memory: its prevalence among musicians and dependence on the testing context.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yetta Kwailing; Wong, Alan C-N

    2014-04-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is widely believed to be a rare ability possessed by only a small group of gifted and special individuals (AP possessors). While AP has fascinated psychologists, neuroscientists, and musicians for more than a century, no theory can satisfactorily explain why this ability is so rare and difficult to learn. Here, we show that AP ability appears rare because of the methodological issues of the standard pitch-naming test. Specifically, the standard test unnecessarily poses a high decisional demand on AP judgments and uses a testing context that is highly inconsistent with one's musical training. These extra cognitive challenges are not central to AP memory per se and have thus led to consistent underestimation of AP ability in the population. Using the standard test, we replicated the typical findings that the accuracy for general violinists was low (12.38 %; chance level = 0 %). With identical stimuli, scoring criteria, and participants, violinists attained 25 % accuracy in a pitch verification test in which the decisional demand of AP judgment was reduced. When the testing context was increasingly similar to their musical experience, verification accuracy improved further and reached 39 %, three times higher than that for the standard test. Results were replicated with a separate group of pianists. Our findings challenge current theories about AP and suggest that the prevalence of AP among musicians has been highly underestimated in prior work. A multimodal framework is proposed to better explain AP memory. PMID:23943554

  12. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  13. Frequency dependent elastic impedance inversion for interstratified dispersive elastic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Zhaoyun; Yin, Xingyao; Wu, Guochen

    2016-08-01

    The elastic impedance equation is extended to frequency dependent elastic impedance equation by taking partial derivative to frequency. With this equation as the forward solver, a practical frequency dependent elastic impedance inversion approach is presented to implement the estimation of the interstratified dispersive elastic parameters which makes full use of the frequency information of elastic impedances. Three main steps are included in this approach. Firstly, the elastic Bayesian inversion is implemented for the estimation of elastic impedances from different incident angle. Secondly, with those estimated elastic impedances, their variations are used to estimate P-wave velocity and S-wave velocity. Finally, with the prior elastic impedance and P-wave and S-wave velocity information, the frequency dependent elastic variation with incident angle inversion is presented for the estimation of the interstratified elastic parameters. With this approach, the interstratified elastic parameters rather than the interface information can be estimated, making easier the interpretation of frequency dependent seismic attributes. The model examples illustrate the feasibility and stability of the proposed method in P-wave velocity dispersion and S-wave velocity dispersion estimation. The field data example validates the possibility and efficiency in hydrocarbon indication of the estimated P-wave velocity dispersion and S-wave velocity dispersion.

  14. AC Magnetic Field Frequency Dependence of Magnetoacoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Wincheski, B.; Fulton, J. P.; DeNale, R.

    1992-01-01

    Our recent study has proved a strong correlation between the low-frequency AC applied magnetic field amplitude dependence of the asymmetry of the magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) burst and the strength of the domain wall-defect interaction in iron-base ferromagnets. For the present study the AC magnetic field frequency dependence of the asymmetry has been investigated in the range of 1 to 200 Hz. When represented by the third moment of the rectified acoustic emission pulses, the asymmetry becomes a bell-shaped function of frequency with its center located around 25 Hz. This experiment has been performed with low carbon, high yield stress steel specimens of three different levels of domain wall-defect interaction strength. The results show that the increase in the interaction strength causes a vertical down shift of the asymmetry in the entire frequency range investigated.

  15. Frequency Dependent Microwave Impedance Microscopy of Ferroelectric Domain Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Scott; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    ABO3 ferroelectrics are known to exhibit domain wall conductivity which is of great fundamental and technological interest. Microwave Impedance Microscopy is a near field measurement technique which allows local, non-contact measurement of AC conductivity and permittivity. In this work, Microwave Impedance Microscopy over a wide frequency range is used to probe the electrical properties of domain walls in ABO3 ferroelectrics. An unexpected, strong frequency dependence in the microwave dissipation near domain walls is observed.

  16. Absolute optical frequency measurements of the cesium D1 transitions and their effect on alpha, the fine-structured constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, Keith Gordon

    The fine-structure constant or electromagnetic coupling constant, alpha e, is a dimensionless ratio which unites many physics subfields. Although known precisely via experiments in each subfield, there is disagreement within and between subfields. In particular, precise values obtained via electron ge - 2 experiments which depend heavily on QED calculations have not always been in agreement with those obtained via muon g mu - 2 experiments. Also, solid state measurements (quantum hall effect and AC Josephson effect) often disagree with neutronic hmn measurements. alphae is often said to vary with energy but the question remains as to whether or not its low energy value is stable now or has been stable over the history of the universe. Improved precision helps resolve these issues as they relate to physics, possibly beyond the standard model. The Optical Frequency Measurements group in the Time and Frequency Division at the National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST, Boulder, CO) developed and maintains a femtosecond laser frequency comb which is calibrated with respect to the cesium fountain clock implementation of the second. A single frequency component of the femtosecond laser comb is used together with a solid state diode laser and cesium thermal beam to precisely measure the cesium D1 F ∈ {3,4} transition frequencies. The value of fD1centroid = 335 116 048 748.1(2.4) kHz obtained for the transition centroid is over fifteen times more precise than the most recent previous measurement. A precise value for the cesium D1 hyperfine splitting fHFe = 1 167 723.6(4.7) kHz is reported as well. This value is also over fifteen times more precise than the most recent previous measurement. These new neutral 133Cs 6s 2 S½ → 6p 2 P½ transition (D1) frequencies, when combined with the 2002 CODATA values of the Rydberg, proton/electron mass ratio, cesium atomic mass, and cesium recoil frequency, provide an almost QED-free value of alpha: alphae = 1/137.036 0000

  17. Frequency-dependent effective hydraulic conductivity of strongly heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Caspari, E; Gurevich, B; Müller, T M

    2013-10-01

    The determination of the transport properties of heterogeneous porous rocks, such as an effective hydraulic conductivity, arises in a range of geoscience problems, from groundwater flow analysis to hydrocarbon reservoir modeling. In the presence of formation-scale heterogeneities, nonstationary flows, induced by pumping tests or propagating elastic waves, entail localized pressure diffusion processes with a characteristic frequency depending on the pressure diffusivity and size of the heterogeneity. Then, on a macroscale, a homogeneous equivalent medium exists, which has a frequency-dependent effective conductivity. The frequency dependence of the conductivity can be analyzed with Biot's equations of poroelasticity. In the quasistatic frequency regime of this framework, the slow compressional wave is a proxy for pressure diffusion processes. This slow compressional wave is associated with the out-of-phase motion of the fluid and solid phase, thereby creating a relative fluid-solid displacement vector field. Decoupling of the poroelasticity equations gives a diffusion equation for the fluid-solid displacement field valid in a poroelastic medium with spatial fluctuations in hydraulic conductivity. Then, an effective conductivity is found by a Green's function approach followed by a strong-contrast perturbation theory suggested earlier in the context of random dielectrics. This theory leads to closed-form expressions for the frequency-dependent effective conductivity as a function of the one- and two-point probability functions of the conductivity fluctuations. In one dimension, these expressions are consistent with exact solutions in both low- and high-frequency limits for arbitrary conductivity contrast. In 3D, the low-frequency limit depends on the details of the microstructure. However, the derived approximation for the effective conductivity is consistent with the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds. PMID:24229128

  18. Spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance in amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, MiYoung; Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C.; Bex, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    While amblyopia involves both binocular imbalance and deficits in processing high spatial frequency information, little is known about the spatial-frequency dependence of binocular imbalance. Here we examined binocular imbalance as a function of spatial frequency in amblyopia using a novel computer-based method. Binocular imbalance at four spatial frequencies was measured with a novel dichoptic letter chart in individuals with amblyopia, or normal vision. Our dichoptic letter chart was composed of band-pass filtered letters arranged in a layout similar to the ETDRS acuity chart. A different chart was presented to each eye of the observer via stereo-shutter glasses. The relative contrast of the corresponding letter in each eye was adjusted by a computer staircase to determine a binocular Balance Point at which the observer reports the letter presented to either eye with equal probability. Amblyopes showed pronounced binocular imbalance across all spatial frequencies, with greater imbalance at high compared to low spatial frequencies (an average increase of 19%, p < 0.01). Good test-retest reliability of the method was demonstrated by the Bland-Altman plot. Our findings suggest that spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance may be useful for diagnosing amblyopia and as an outcome measure for recovery of binocular vision following therapy. PMID:26603125

  19. Spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance in amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Kwon, MiYoung; Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C; Bex, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    While amblyopia involves both binocular imbalance and deficits in processing high spatial frequency information, little is known about the spatial-frequency dependence of binocular imbalance. Here we examined binocular imbalance as a function of spatial frequency in amblyopia using a novel computer-based method. Binocular imbalance at four spatial frequencies was measured with a novel dichoptic letter chart in individuals with amblyopia, or normal vision. Our dichoptic letter chart was composed of band-pass filtered letters arranged in a layout similar to the ETDRS acuity chart. A different chart was presented to each eye of the observer via stereo-shutter glasses. The relative contrast of the corresponding letter in each eye was adjusted by a computer staircase to determine a binocular Balance Point at which the observer reports the letter presented to either eye with equal probability. Amblyopes showed pronounced binocular imbalance across all spatial frequencies, with greater imbalance at high compared to low spatial frequencies (an average increase of 19%, p < 0.01). Good test-retest reliability of the method was demonstrated by the Bland-Altman plot. Our findings suggest that spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance may be useful for diagnosing amblyopia and as an outcome measure for recovery of binocular vision following therapy. PMID:26603125

  20. Divergences in the vacuum energy for frequency-dependent interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilevich, D. V.

    2009-03-15

    We propose a method for determining ultraviolet divergences in the vacuum energy for systems whose spectrum of perturbations is defined through a nonlinear spectrum problem, i.e., when the fluctuation operator itself depends on the frequency. The method is applied to the plasma shell model, which describes some properties of the interaction of electromagnetic field with fullerenes. We formulate a scalar model, which simplifies the matrix structure, but keeps the frequency dependence of the plasma shell, and calculate the ultraviolet divergences in the case when the plasma sheet is slightly curved. The divergent terms are expressed in terms of surface integrals of corresponding invariants.

  1. Absolute frequency measurement of the 7s2 1S0-7s7p 1P1 transition in Ra225

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, B.; Dammalapati, U.; Groot, A.; Jungmann, K.; Willmann, L.

    2014-10-01

    Transition frequencies were determined for transitions in Ra in an atomic beam and for reference lines in Te2 molecules in a vapor cell. The absolute frequencies were calibrated against a GPS stabilized Rb clock by means of an optical frequency comb. The 7s21S0(F=1/2)-7s7p1P1(F =3/2) transition in Ra225 was determined to be 621042124(2)MHz. The measurements provide input for designing efficient and robust laser cooling of Ra atoms in preparation of a search for a permanent electric dipole moment in Ra isotopes.

  2. Measurement of absolute transition frequencies of {sup 87}Rb to nS and nD Rydberg states by means of electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Markus; Karlewski, Florian; Hattermann, Helge; Hoeckh, Simone; Jessen, Florian; Cano, Daniel; Fortagh, Jozsef

    2011-05-15

    We report the measurement of absolute excitation frequencies of {sup 87}Rb to nS and nD Rydberg states. The Rydberg transition frequencies are obtained by observing electromagnetically induced transparency on a rubidium vapor cell. The accuracy of the measurement of each state is < or approx. 1 MHz, which is achieved by frequency stabilizing the two diode lasers employed for the spectroscopy to a frequency comb and a frequency comb calibrated wavelength meter, respectively. Based on the spectroscopic data we determine the quantum defects of {sup 87}Rb, and compare it with previous measurements on {sup 85}Rb. We determine the ionization frequency from the 5S{sub 1/2}(F=1) ground state of {sup 87}Rb to 1010.029 164 6(3)THz, providing the binding energy of the ground state with an accuracy improved by two orders of magnitude.

  3. Frequency-dependent Lg Q within the continental United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, D.; McNamara, D.E.; Benz, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Frequency-dependent crustal attenuation (1/Q) is determined for seven distinct physiographic/tectonic regions of the continental United States using high-quality Lg waveforms recorded on broadband stations in the frequency band 0.5 to 16 Hz. Lg attenuation is determined from time-domain amplitude measurements in one-octave frequency bands centered on the frequencies 0.75, 1.0, 3.0, 6.0, and 12.0 Hz. Modeling errors are determined using a delete-j jackknife resampling technique. The frequency-dependent quality factor is modeled in the form of Q = Q0f??. Regions were initially selected based on tectonic provinces but were eventually limited and adjusted to maximize ray path coverage in each area. Earthquake data was recorded on several different networks and constrained to events occurring within the crust (<40 km depth) and at least mb 3.5 in size. A singular value decomposition inversion technique was applied to the data to simultaneously solve for source and receiver terms along with Q for each region at specific frequencies. The lowest crustal Q was observed in northern and southern California where Q is described by the functions Q = 152(?? 37)f0.72(??0.16) and Q = 105(??26) f0.67(??0.16), respectively. The Basin and Range Province, Pacific Northwest, and Rocky Mountain states also display lower Q and a strong frequency dependence characterized by the functions Q = 200(??40)f0.68(??0.12), Q = 152(??49) f0.76(??0.18), and Q = 166(??37) f0.61(??0.14), respectively. In contrast, in the central and northeast United States Q functions are Q = 640(?? 225) f0.344(??0.22) and Q = 650(??143) f0.36(??0.14), respectively, show a high crustal Q and a weaker frequency dependence. These results improve upon previous Lg modeling by subdividing the United States into smaller, distinct tectonic regions and using significantly more data that provide improved constraints on frequency-dependent attenuation and errors. A detailed attenuation map of the continental United States can

  4. Multi-port frequency dependent network equivalents for the EMTP

    SciTech Connect

    Morched, A.S.; Ottevangers, J.H.; Marti, L. )

    1993-07-01

    A method is developed to reduce large power systems to single and multi-port frequency dependent equivalents. These equivalents consist of simple RLC modules that faithfully reproduce the frequency characteristics of the network. The method is implemented in the EMTP and has been extensively tested at Ontario Hydro. The implementation involves a pre-processor program to generate the model: the Frequency Dependent Equivalent (FDNE), and a EMTP time step loop module to calculate the transient response. The use of the FDNE results in major reductions in computer time and is especially beneficial for multi-case statistical EMTP studies. An example showing the accuracy and efficiency of the FDNE when used to reduce a large 500 kV network is presented.

  5. Dependency of slab geometry on absolute velocities and conditions for cyclicity: insights from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, G.; Gerbault, M.; Hassani, R.; Tric, E.

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the relationship between the kinematics of subduction, deformation in the overriding plate and the evolution of slab geometry. A 2-D finite element numerical code is used, and a first objective consists in benchmarking previously published analogue models. Far-field plate velocities are applied, and once the subducting plate reaches the 660 km discontinuity, modelled as a rigid base, we obtain two different forms or styles of subduction that depend on the overriding plate velocity vop: if vop > 0, the slab lies forwards on the 660 km discontinuity (style 1), and if vop≤ 0, the slab lies backwards on the discontinuity (style 2). We also obtain a cyclic pattern with the slab folding on itself repeatedly when vsp > 0 and 2vop+vsp > 0 (where vsp is the subducting plate velocity). These conditions result from the analysis of several simulations in which the subduction velocities and plate viscosities are varied. When the slab periodically folds on the 660 km discontinuity, periods of shallow slab dip and compression in the overriding plate are followed by periods of slab steepening and relative extension in the overriding plate. Folding periodicity is controlled by the slab viscosity and subduction velocity. When a low-viscosity zone is included in the overriding plate, the trench motion is effectively decoupled from the overriding plate velocity, therefore allowing it to be directly controlled by the deep dynamics of the slab. For the cyclic style 2 corresponding to forward folding of the slab, the low-viscosity region in the overriding plate increases the stress amplitudes oscillations, the trench motion and the folding periodicity with time. Therefore the strength of the entire overriding plate is shown to directly control the dynamics of subduction. Using the Nazca and South American plate velocities we produce models of cyclic folding with a period of ca. 22 Ma and a minimal dip angle of ca. 10°. Episodic folding of the slab

  6. Frequency-dependent Dispersion Measures and Implications for Pulsar Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J. M.; Shannon, R. M.; Stinebring, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, is shown to be frequency dependent because of multipath scattering from small-scale electron-density fluctuations. DMs vary between propagation paths whose transverse extent varies strongly with frequency, yielding arrival times that deviate from the high-frequency scaling expected for a cold, uniform, unmagnetized plasma (1/frequency2). Scaling laws for thin phase screens are verified with simulations; extended media are also analyzed. The rms DM difference across an octave band near 1.5 GHz is ˜ 4 × 10-5 pc cm-3 for pulsars at ˜1 kpc distance. The corresponding arrival-time variations are a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for DM ≲ 30 pc cm-3 but increase rapidly to microseconds or more for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges. Chromatic DMs introduce correlated noise into timing residuals with a power spectrum of “low pass” form. The correlation time is roughly the geometric mean of the refraction times for the highest and lowest radio frequencies used, ranging from days to years, depending on the pulsar. We discuss implications for methodologies that use large frequency separations or wide bandwidth receivers for timing measurements. Chromatic DMs are partially mitigable by including an additional chromatic term in arrival time models. Without mitigation, an additional term in the noise model for pulsar timing is implied. In combination with measurement errors from radiometer noise, an arbitrarily large increase in total frequency range (or bandwidth) will yield diminishing benefits and may be detrimental to overall timing precision.

  7. Determining the frequency dependence of elastic properties of fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, Benedikt; Renner, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    In the brittle crust, rocks often contain joints or faults on various length scales that have a profound effect on fluid flow and heat transport, as well as on the elastic properties of rocks. Improving the understanding of the effect of fractures and the role of stress state and heterogeneity along the fractures on elastic properties of rocks is potentially important for the characterization of deep geothermal reservoirs. Seismic surveys, typically covering a frequency range of about 1 to 1000 Hz, are a valuable tool to investigate fractured rocks but the extraction of fracture properties remains difficult. The elementary frequency-dependent interaction between fractured rock matrix and viscous pore fluids and the resulting effects on wave propagation require well-founded dispersion analyses of heterogeneous rocks. In this laboratory study, we investigate the stress dependence of the effective elastic properties of fractured reservoir rocks over a broad frequency range. To assess the effect of faults on the effective elastic properties, we performed cyclic axial loading tests on intact and fractured samples of Solnhofen limestone and Padang granodiorite. The samples contained an idealized fault, which was created by stacking two sample discs on top of each other that experienced various surface treatments to vary their roughness. The dynamic loading tests were conducted with frequencies up to 10 Hz and amplitudes reaching 10% of the statically applied stress. Simultaneously, P- and S-wave measurements were performed in the ultrasonic frequency range (above 100 kHz) with a total of 16 sensors, whose positioning above and below the samples guarantees a wide range of transmission and reflection angles. Preliminary results of static and dynamic elastic properties of intact Padang granodiorite show a pronounced increase in Young's moduli and Poisson's ratio with increasing axial stress. Stress relaxation is accompanied by a decrease of the modulus and the Poisson

  8. Improving Planck calibration by including frequency-dependent relativistic corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartin, Miguel; Notari, Alessio

    2015-09-01

    The Planck satellite detectors are calibrated in the 2015 release using the "orbital dipole", which is the time-dependent dipole generated by the Doppler effect due to the motion of the satellite around the Sun. Such an effect has also relativistic time-dependent corrections of relative magnitude 10-3, due to coupling with the "solar dipole" (the motion of the Sun compared to the CMB rest frame), which are included in the data calibration by the Planck collaboration. We point out that such corrections are subject to a frequency-dependent multiplicative factor. This factor differs from unity especially at the highest frequencies, relevant for the HFI instrument. Since currently Planck calibration errors are dominated by systematics, to the point that polarization data is currently unreliable at large scales, such a correction can in principle be highly relevant for future data releases.

  9. Input-Dependent Frequency Modulation of Cortical Gamma Oscillations Shapes Spatial Synchronization and Enables Phase Coding

    PubMed Central

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark; Hadjipapas, Avgis; Peter, Alina; van der Eerden, Jan; De Weerd, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Fine-scale temporal organization of cortical activity in the gamma range (∼25–80Hz) may play a significant role in information processing, for example by neural grouping (‘binding’) and phase coding. Recent experimental studies have shown that the precise frequency of gamma oscillations varies with input drive (e.g. visual contrast) and that it can differ among nearby cortical locations. This has challenged theories assuming widespread gamma synchronization at a fixed common frequency. In the present study, we investigated which principles govern gamma synchronization in the presence of input-dependent frequency modulations and whether they are detrimental for meaningful input-dependent gamma-mediated temporal organization. To this aim, we constructed a biophysically realistic excitatory-inhibitory network able to express different oscillation frequencies at nearby spatial locations. Similarly to cortical networks, the model was topographically organized with spatially local connectivity and spatially-varying input drive. We analyzed gamma synchronization with respect to phase-locking, phase-relations and frequency differences, and quantified the stimulus-related information represented by gamma phase and frequency. By stepwise simplification of our models, we found that the gamma-mediated temporal organization could be reduced to basic synchronization principles of weakly coupled oscillators, where input drive determines the intrinsic (natural) frequency of oscillators. The gamma phase-locking, the precise phase relation and the emergent (measurable) frequencies were determined by two principal factors: the detuning (intrinsic frequency difference, i.e. local input difference) and the coupling strength. In addition to frequency coding, gamma phase contained complementary stimulus information. Crucially, the phase code reflected input differences, but not the absolute input level. This property of relative input-to-phase conversion, contrasting with latency

  10. Species coexistence and pathogens with frequency-dependent transmission.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Volker H W; Antonovics, Janis

    2005-07-01

    Pathogens that infect multiple hosts are commonly transmitted by vectors, and their transmission rate is often thought to depend on the proportion of hosts or vectors infected (i.e., frequency dependence). A model of a two-host, one-pathogen system with frequency-dependent transmission is used to investigate how sharing a pathogen with an alternative host influences pathogen-mediated extinction. The results show that if there is frequency-dependent transmission, a host can be rescued from pathogen-mediated extinction by the presence of a second host with which it shares a pathogen. The study provides an important conceptual counterexample to the idea that shared pathogens necessarily result in apparent competition by showing that shared pathogens can mediate apparent mutualism. We distinguish two types of dilution effect (pathogen reduction with increasing host diversity), each resulting from different underlying pathogen transmission processes and host density effects. These results have important consequences for understanding the role of pathogens in species interactions and in maintaining host species diversity. PMID:15937794

  11. Frequency Dependent Topological Patterns of Resting-State Brain Networks

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Long; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Li; Shang, Yuqing; Gao, Jia-Hong; Liu, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    The topological organization underlying brain networks has been extensively investigated using resting-state fMRI, focusing on the low frequency band from 0.01 to 0.1 Hz. However, the frequency specificities regarding the corresponding brain networks remain largely unclear. In the current study, a data-driven method named complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition (CEEMD) was introduced to separate the time series of each voxel into several intrinsic oscillation rhythms with distinct frequency bands. Our data indicated that the whole brain BOLD signals could be automatically divided into five specific frequency bands. After applying the CEEMD method, the topological patterns of these five temporally correlated networks were analyzed. The results showed that global topological properties, including the network weighted degree, network efficiency, mean characteristic path length and clustering coefficient, were observed to be most prominent in the ultra-low frequency bands from 0 to 0.015 Hz. Moreover, the saliency of small-world architecture demonstrated frequency-density dependency. Compared to the empirical mode decomposition method (EMD), CEEMD could effectively eliminate the mode-mixing effects. Additionally, the robustness of CEEMD was validated by the similar results derived from a split-half analysis and a conventional frequency division method using the rectangular window band-pass filter. Our findings suggest that CEEMD is a more effective method for extracting the intrinsic oscillation rhythms embedded in the BOLD signals than EMD. The application of CEEMD in fMRI data analysis will provide in-depth insight in investigations of frequency specific topological patterns of the dynamic brain networks. PMID:25927525

  12. Neural correlates of stimulus spatial frequency-dependent contrast detection

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jianjun; Liu, Ruilong; Wang, Ke; Hua, Tianmiao; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Xi, Minmin

    2016-01-01

    Psychophysical studies on human and non-human vertebrate species have shown that visual contrast sensitivity function (CSF) peaks at a certain stimulus spatial frequency and declines in both lower and higher spatial frequencies. The underlying neural substrate and mechanisms remain in debate. Here, we investigated the role of primary visual cortex (V1: area 17) in spatial frequency-dependent contrast detection in cats. Perceptual CSFs of three cats were measured using a two-alternative forced choice task. The responses of V1 neurons to their optimal visual stimuli in a range of luminance contrast levels (from 0 to 1.0) were recorded subsequently using in vivo extracellular single-unit recording techniques. The contrast sensitivity of each neuron was determined. The neuronal CSF for each cat was constructed from the mean contrast sensitivity of neurons with different preferred stimulus spatial frequencies. Results (1) The perceptual and neuronal CSFs of each of the three cats exhibited a similar shape with peak amplitude near 0.4 c/deg. (2) The neuronal CSF of each cat was highly correlated with its perceptual CSF. (3) V1 neurons with different preferred stimulus spatial frequencies had different contrast gains. Conclusion (1) Contrast detection of visual stimuli with different spatial frequencies may likely involve population coding of V1 neurons with different preferred stimulus spatial frequencies. (2) Difference in contrast-gain may underlie the observed contrast sensitivity variation of V1 neurons with different preferred stimulus spatial frequencies, possibly from either evolution or postnatal visual experiences. PMID:23314692

  13. Frequency-dependent complex modulus of the uterus: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Miklos Z.; Hobson, Maritza A.; Varghese, Tomy; Harter, Josephine; Kliewer, Mark A.; Hartenbach, Ellen M.; Zagzebski, James A.

    2006-08-01

    The frequency-dependent complex moduli of human uterine tissue have been characterized. Quantification of the modulus is required for developing uterine ultrasound elastography as a viable imaging modality for diagnosing and monitoring causes for abnormal uterine bleeding and enlargement, as well assessing the integrity of uterine and cervical tissue. The complex modulus was measured in samples from hysterectomies of 24 patients ranging in age from 31 to 79 years. Measurements were done under small compressions of either 1 or 2%, at low pre-compression values (either 1 or 2%), and over a frequency range of 0.1-100 Hz. Modulus values of cervical tissue monotonically increased from approximately 30-90 kPa over the frequency range. Normal uterine tissue possessed modulus values over the same range, while leiomyomas, or uterine fibroids, exhibited values ranging from approximately 60-220 kPa.

  14. Frequency-dependent Lg-wave attenuation in northern Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, Raquel; Ugalde, Arantza; Villaseñor, Antonio; Harnafi, Mimoun

    2015-11-01

    Frequency-dependent attenuation (Q- 1) in the crust of northern Morocco is estimated from Lg-wave spectral amplitude measurements every quarter octave in the frequency band 0.8 to 8 Hz. This study takes advantage of the improved broadband data coverage in the region provided by the deployment of the IberArray seismic network. Earthquake data consist of 71 crustal events with magnitudes 4 ≤ mb ≤ 5.5 recorded on 110 permanent and temporary seismic stations between January 2008 and December 2013 with hypocentral distances between 100 and 900 km. 1274 high-quality Lg waveforms provide dense path coverage of northern Morocco, crossing a region with a complex structure and heterogeneous tectonic setting as a result of continuous interactions between the African and Eurasian plates. We use two different methods: the coda normalization (CN) analysis, that allows removal of the source and site effects from the Lg spectra, and the spectral amplitude decay (SAD) method, that simultaneously inverts for source, site, and path attenuation terms. The CN and SAD methods return similar results, indicating that the Lg Q models are robust to differences in the methodologies. Larger errors and no significant frequency dependence are observed for frequencies lower than 1.5 Hz. For distances up to 400 km and the frequency band 1.5 ≤ ƒ (Hz) ≤ 4.5, the model functions Q(f) = (529- 22+ 23)(f/1.5)0.23 ± 0.06 and Q(f) = (457- 7+ 7)(f/1.5)0.44 ± 0.02 are obtained using the CN and SAD methods, respectively. A change in the frequency dependence is observed above 4.5 Hz for both methods which may be related to the influence of the Sn energy on the Lg window. The frequency-dependent Q- 1 estimates represent an average attenuation beneath a broad region including the Rif and Tell mountains, the Moroccan and Algerian mesetas, the Atlas Mountains and the Sahara Platform structural domains, and correlate well with areas of moderate seismicity where intermediate Q values have been obtained.

  15. Frequency dependence and partitioning of respiratory impedance in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kappos, A D; Rodarte, J R; Lai-Fook, S J

    1981-09-01

    Total pulmonary resistance (Rt) and reactance (Xt) from 1 to 30 Hz were determined by time series analysis in open-chest vagotomized dogs. Rt and Xt were partitioned by retrograde catheter into central airway resistance (Rc) and reactance (Xc) and peripheral resistance (Rp) and reactance (Xp). Rt, Rc, or Rp did not change with transpulmonary pressure (Pst) from 5 to 15 cmH2O, although Rc tended to decrease and Rp to increase. Vagal stimulation (Vs) and intravenous histamine (H) increased all resistances (R) at all lung volumes (V) and produced an inverse relationship between R and V. The increases in Rt produced by H and Vs were not significantly different at any volume, but H predominantly increased Rp and Vs predominantly increased Rc. In the control (vagotomized) dogs at Pst of 5 cmH2O, Rp/Rt was 0.41 +/- 0.03 (SE). Rp/Rt was significantly increased by H but not by Vs. Control Rt decreased slightly from 5 to 10 Hz and increased from 15 to 30 Hz. The increase of Rt at higher frequencies caused by the frequency dependence of Rc was not changed by H but was augmented by Vs. The slope of Xt and Xc vs. frequency was increased by Vs but not by H. The frequency dependence of Rt and Xt above 10 Hz appears to be caused by inertial losses proximal to the 2-mm airways. Thus central and peripheral bronchoconstriction caused by Vs and H, respectively, could be differentiated by increased frequency dependence of Rt and Xt above 15 Hz. PMID:7327963

  16. FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF PULSE WIDTH FOR 150 RADIO NORMAL PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J. L.; Wang, H. G.

    2014-11-01

    The frequency dependence of the pulse width is studied for 150 normal pulsars, mostly selected from the European Pulsar Network, for which the 10% multifrequency pulse widths can be well fit with the Thorsett relationship W {sub 10} = Aν{sup μ} + W {sub 10,} {sub min}. The relative fraction of pulse width change between 0.4 GHz and 4.85 GHz, η = (W {sub 4.85} – W {sub 0.4})/W {sub 0.4}, is calculated in terms of the best-fit relationship for each pulsar. It is found that 81 pulsars (54%) have η < –10% (group A), showing considerable profile narrowing at high frequencies, 40 pulsars (27%) have –10% ≤η ≤ 10% (group B), meaning a marginal change in pulse width, and 29 pulsars (19%) have η > 10% (group C), showing a remarkable profile broadening at high frequencies. The fractions of the group-A and group-C pulsars suggest that the profile narrowing phenomenon at high frequencies is more common than the profile broadening phenomenon, but a large fraction of the group-B and group-C pulsars (a total of 46%) is also revealed. The group-C pulsars, together with a portion of group-B pulsars with slight pulse broadening, can hardly be explained using the conventional radius-to-frequency mapping, which only applies to the profile narrowing phenomenon. Based on a recent version of the fan beam model, a type of broadband emission model, we propose that the diverse frequency dependence of pulse width is a consequence of different types of distribution of emission spectra across the emission region. The geometrical effect predicting a link between the emission beam shrinkage and spectrum steepening is tested but disfavored.

  17. Drive frequency dependent phase imaging in piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bo Huifeng; Kan Yi; Lu Xiaomei; Liu Yunfei; Peng Song; Wang Xiaofei; Cai Wei; Xue Ruoshi; Zhu Jinsong

    2010-08-15

    The drive frequency dependent piezoresponse (PR) phase signal in near-stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals is studied by piezoresponse force microscopy. It is clearly shown that the local and nonlocal electrostatic forces have a great contribution to the PR phase signal. The significant PR phase difference of the antiparallel domains are observed at the contact resonances, which is related to the electrostatic dominated electromechanical interactions of the cantilever and tip-sample system. Moreover, the modulation voltage induced frequency shift at higher eigenmodes could be attributed to the change of indention force depending on the modulation amplitude with a piezoelectric origin. The PR phase of the silicon wafer is also measured for comparison. It is certificated that the electrostatic interactions are universal in voltage modulated scanning probe microscopy and could be extended to other phase imaging techniques.

  18. Frequency dependence of microparticle charge in a radio frequency discharge with Margenau electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Cheng-Ran; Khrapak, Sergey A.; Antonova, Tetyana; Steffes, Bernd; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2011-01-15

    rf discharges are widely used in complex plasma experiments. In this paper, we theoretically investigate the dependence of the particle floating potential on the discharge frequency, assuming the model Margenau expression for the electron velocity distribution function. In doing so we use the orbital motion limited cross section to calculate the electron flux to the particle and collision enhanced collection approximation for the ion flux to the particle. The floating potential is then obtained from the flux balance condition. It is shown that for typical plasma conditions in laboratory rf discharges, normalized floating potential grows with increase of the discharge frequency in collisionless regime and decreases in weakly collisional regime. However, variations in the floating potential are usually small when plasma parameters do not depend on the rf frequency.

  19. Frequency-dependent alterations in regional homogeneity in major depression.

    PubMed

    Xue, Song; Wang, Xu; Wang, Wanqian; Liu, Jia; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have found abnormal spontaneous neural activity in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Yet, the frequency-dependent neural activity in MDD is largely unknown. Here, we used resting-state fMRI and regional homogeneity (ReHo) methods to investigate spontaneous neural activity in specific frequency bands of 31 MDD patients and 31 age-, gender- and education-matched healthy controls. We examined spontaneous neural activity in three frequency bands: slow-4 (0.027-0.073Hz), slow-5 (0.010-0.027Hz), and the typical band (0.01-0.08Hz). Compared to controls, MDD patients showed increased ReHo in the middle frontal gyrus (MFG) and decreased ReHo in the fusiform and postcentral gyrus at the typical band. Importantly, MDD patients showed increased ReHo in the middle occipital gyrus (MOG) and decreased ReHo in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), superior frontal gyrus (SFG) and the bilateral thalamus in the slow-4 band, while they showed increased ReHo in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in the slow-5 band. Our results suggest that the abnormality of ReHo in MDD is associated with the frequency band and that future studies should take frequency band effect into account when examining spontaneous neural activity. PMID:26968135

  20. Frequency-Dependent Gating of Hippocampal-Neocortical Interactions.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Andrea; Morris, Richard G M; Canals, Santiago

    2016-05-01

    How and where hippocampal-neocortical interactions required for memory formation take place is a major issue of current research. Using a combined in vivo functional magnetic resonance imaging/electrophysiology approach, we have investigated whether specific frequencies of CA3 neuronal activation, inducing different forms of short-term plasticity at CA1 synapses, contribute to differential activity propagation in brain-wide networks connected to the hippocampus. We report that localized activation of CA3 neurons in dorsal hippocampus produced activity propagation within the hippocampal formation, including the subiculum and entorhinal cortex, which increased monotonically with frequency to a maximum at 20-40 Hz. However, robust extrahippocampal propagation was seen specifically at theta-beta frequencies (10-20 Hz), reaching a network of midline neocortical and mesolimbic structures. Activation in those regions correlated with a frequency-dependent facilitation of spiking activity recorded in CA1. These results provide a mechanistic link between the dynamic properties of short-term plasticity in the efferent synapses of CA3 neurons in CA1 and activity propagation in brain-wide networks, and identify polysynaptic information channels segregated in the frequency domain. PMID:25761637

  1. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-01

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ1(r) cos(kz) cos(ωt-lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ωR, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ vr/ωT, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  2. Ultrasonic Backscattering from Suspended Erythrocytes: Dependence on Frequency and Size.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ihyuan

    The ultrasonic scattering properties of blood have been intensively investigated since the echo signal from red blood cells carries abundant diagnostic information for the study of blood flow and blood properties in the vessels. Recently, ultrasound of frequency higher than 20 MHz has been implemented in intravascular imaging to obtain better images of the vessel wall. In this research measurements were extended to 30 MHz to better understand the effect of blood on the operation of these intravascular devices. The experimentally measured backscatter of saline suspended porcine erythrocytes for frequency up to 30 MHz agrees very well with the theoretical analysis which indicate that Rayleigh scattering is still valid below this frequency. The analysis utilize the T-matrix method to calculate the backscattering cross section of an erythrocyte modeled as a fluid sphere, disk, and biconcave disk. Measurements on the backscattering coefficients of porcine, bovine, and lamb erythrocytes reveal that the backscatter has a square dependence on cell volume. The cell size dependent backscatter is also analyzed via a continuum approach. It is found that the echo intensity of high frequency ultrasound suffers greatly from the attenuation. The dilemma may be solved by using a spherically focused transducer. An analysis of the focused beam reflected from a perfect planar reflector leads to the modification of the standard substitution method for the backscatter measurement since the "image source" theory is found to be inappropriate for the focused beam. Reflection of the focused beam near the focal point is described based on Huygens' principle. Experimental and theoretical results indicate that the backscatter is dependent upon the position of the scatterer and the geometry of the transducer if a focused beam is used. Since ultrasound velocity information is needed for scattering measurements, an innovative method for measuring the acoustic speed and the attenuation coefficient

  3. Absolute frequency measurement of the ^1S0<->^3P0 clock transition at 578.4 nm in ytterbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, Chad; Barber, Zeb; Oates, Chris; Fortier, Tara; Diddams, Scott

    2005-05-01

    We report the first precision absolute frequency measurements of the highly forbidden (6s^2)^1S0<->(6s6p)^3P0 optical clock transition at 578.4 nm in two odd isotopes of ytterbium. Atoms are cooled to tens of microkelvins in two successive stages of laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping that use transitions at 398.9 nm and 555.8 nm, respectively. The resulting trapped atomic cloud is irradiated with excitation light at 578.4 nm and absorption is detected by monitoring trapped atom depletion. With the laser on resonance, we demonstrate trap depletions of more than 80 % relative to the off-resonance case. Absolute frequency measurements are made for ^171Yb (I=1/2) and ^173Yb (I=5/2) with an uncertainty of 4.4 kHz using a femtosecond-laser frequency comb calibrated by the NIST cesium fountain clock. The natural linewidth of these J=0 to J=0 transitions is ˜10 mHz, making them well-suited to support a new generation of optical atomic clocks based on confinement in an optical lattice. Lattice-based optical clocks have the potential to surpass the performance of the best current atomic clocks by orders of magnitude. The accurate ytterbium frequency knowledge presented here (nearly a million-fold reduction in uncertainty) will greatly expedite Doppler- and recoil-free lattice spectroscopy.

  4. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction OH + C2H2 from 228 to 413K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Borokowski, R. P.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure dependence of absolute rate constants for the reaction of OH + C2H2 yields products has been examined at five temperatures ranging from 228 to 413 K. The experimental techniques which was used is flash photolysis-resonance fluoresence. OH was produced by water photolysis and hydroxyl resonance fluorescent photons were measured by multiscaling techniques. The results indicate that the low pressure bimolecular rate constant is 4 x 10 the the minus 13th power cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1) over the temperature range studied. A substantial increase in the bimolecular rate constant with an increase in pressure was observed at all temperatures except 228 K. This indicates the importance of initial adduct formation and subsequent stablization. The high pressure results are well represented by the Arrhenius expression (k sub bi) sub infinity = (6.83 + or - 1.19) x 10 to the minus 12th power exp(-646 + or - 47/T)cu cm molecule (-1) s(-1). The results are compared to previous investigated and are theoretically discussed. The implications of these results on modeling of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and also in combustion chemistry are discussed.

  5. Probing the Crystal Structure, Composition-Dependent Absolute Energy Levels, and Electrocatalytic Properties of Silver Indium Sulfide Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Saji, Pintu; Ganguli, Ashok K; Bhat, Mohsin A; Ingole, Pravin P

    2016-04-18

    The absolute electronic energy levels in silver indium sulfide (AIS) nanocrystals (NCs) with varying compositions and crystallographic phases have been determined by using cyclic voltammetry. Different crystallographic phases, that is, metastable cubic, orthorhombic, monoclinic, and a mixture of cubic and orthorhombic AIS NCs, were studied. The band gap values estimated from the cyclic voltammetry measurements match well with the band gap values calculated from the diffuse reflectance spectra measurements. The AIS nanostructures were found to show good electrocatalytic activity towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Our results clearly establish that the electronic and electrocatalytic properties of AIS NCs are strongly sensitive to the composition and crystal structure of AIS NCs. Monoclinic AIS was found to be the most active HER electrocatalyst, with electrocatalytic activity that is almost comparable to the MoS2 -based nanostructures reported in the literature, whereas cubic AIS was observed to be the least active of the studied crystallographic phases and compositions. In view of the HER activity and electronic band structure parameters observed herein, we hypothesize that the Fermi energy level of AIS NCs is an important factor that decides the electrocatalytic efficiency of these nanocomposites. The work presented herein, in addition to being the first of its kind regarding the composition and phase-dependence of electrochemical aspects of AIS NCs, also presents a simple solvothermal method for the synthesis of different crystallographic phases with various Ag/In molar ratios. PMID:26812447

  6. Absolute frequency and isotope shift of the magnesium (3 s2) 1S0→(3 s 3 d ) 1D2 two-photon transition by direct frequency-comb spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, E.; Reinhardt, S.; Hänsch, Th. W.; Udem, Th.

    2015-12-01

    We use a picosecond frequency-doubled mode-locked titanium sapphire laser to generate a frequency comb at 431 nm in order to probe the (3 s2) 1S0 →(3 s 3 d ) 1D2 transition in atomic magnesium. Using a second, self-referenced femtosecond frequency comb, the absolute transition frequency and the 24Mg and 26Mg isotope shift is determined relative to a global-positioning-system-referenced hydrogen maser. Our result for the transition frequency of the main isotope 24Mg of 1 391 128 606.14 (12 ) MHz agrees with previous measurements and reduces its uncertainty by four orders of magnitude. For the isotope shift we find δ ν26 ,24=3915.13 (39 ) MHz. Accurate values for transition frequencies in Mg are relevant in astrophysics and to test atomic structure calculations.

  7. Frequency-dependent micromechanics of cellularized biopolymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Chris; Kim, Jihan; McIntyre, David; Sun, Bo

    Mechanical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) influence many cellular behaviors such as growth, differentiation, and migration. These are dynamic processes in which the cells actively remodel the ECM. Reconstituted collagen gel is a common model ECM for studying cell-ECM interactions in vitro because collagen is the most abundant component of mammalian ECM and gives the ECM its material stiffness. We embed micron-sized particles in collagen and use holographic optical tweezers to apply forces to the particles in multiple directions and over a range of frequencies up to 10 Hz. We calculate the local compliance and show that it is dependent on both the direction and frequency of the applied force. Performing the same measurement on many particles allows us to characterize the spatial inhomogeneity of the mechanical properties and shows that the compliance decreases at higher frequencies. Performing these measurements on cell-populated collagen gels shows that cellular remodeling of the ECM changes the mechanical properties of the collagen and we investigate whether this change is dependent on the local strain and distance from nearby cells.

  8. Size-dependent dielectrophoretic crossover frequency of spherical particles.

    PubMed

    Weng, Ping-You; Chen, I-An; Yeh, Che-Kai; Chen, Pin-Yi; Juang, Jia-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been extensively used in lab-on-a-chip systems for trapping, separating, and manipulating of micro particles suspended in a liquid medium. The most widely used analytic model, the dipole model, provides an accurate prediction on the crossover frequency of submicron particles, but cannot explain the significant drop in crossover frequency of larger particles. Here, we present numerical simulations using the Maxwell stress tensor (MST) and finite element method to study the size effect of the DEP crossover frequency of spherical polystyrene particles suspended in de-ionized water. Our results show that the surface conductance due to the electrical double layer plays a key role, and the size dependency of crossover frequency obtained by the MST method agrees reasonably well with published experimental data. The exponents of the power law are approximately -1.0 and -4.3 for smaller (diameter < 4.6 μm) and larger particles (diameter  > 4.6 μm), respectively. The free surface charge distribution reveals that the charge begins accumulating on the particle equator for particle diameters larger than a critical diameter of 4.6 μm, a result not captured by the dipolar approximation. This method may be extended to analyze bioparticles with complex shapes and composition, and provides new insights into the interpretation of dielectrophoresis applications using lab-on-a-chip systems. PMID:26909121

  9. Measurements of absolute absorption cross sections of ozone in the 185- to 254-nm wavelength region and the temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Freeman, D. E.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of the relative absorption cross sections of ozone at temperatures 195, 228, and 295 K have been made throughout the 185 to 254 nm wavelength region. The absolute absorption cross sections at the same temperatures have been measured at several discrete wavelengths in the 185 to 250 nm region. The absolute cross sections of ozone have been used to put the relative cross sections on a firm absolute basis throughout the 185 to 255 nm region. These recalibrated cross sections are slightly lower than those of Molina and Molina (1986), but the differences are within a few percent and would not be significant in atmospheric applications.

  10. Size-dependent word frequencies and translational invariance of books

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardsson, Sebastian; da Rocha, Luis Enrique Correa; Minnhagen, Petter

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that a real novel shares many characteristic features with a null model in which the words are randomly distributed throughout the text. Such a common feature is a certain translational invariance of the text. Another is that the functional form of the word-frequency distribution of a novel depends on the length of the text in the same way as the null model. This means that an approximate power-law tail ascribed to the data will have an exponent which changes with the size of the text-section which is analyzed. A further consequence is that a novel cannot be described by text-evolution models such as the Simon model. The size-transformation of a novel is found to be well described by a specific Random Book Transformation. This size transformation in addition enables a more precise determination of the functional form of the word-frequency distribution. The implications of the results are discussed.

  11. Neptune high-latitude emission: Dependence of angle on frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, Constance

    1993-01-01

    Smooth broadband radio emission reached a maximum and then cut off as Voyager approached the north magnetic pole of Neptune. The time of each event depends on frequency, yielding information on radio source location, and emission angle. In a preliminary analysis L-shell and magnetic longitude define radio-source locations in a dipole field. The emission angle at each frequency is identified with the angle between the magnetic-field direction at the source and the line of sight to Voyager 2 at the time of emission maximum. At each value of L in the range 6 less than L less than 9, there is one source longitude for which emission angle varies smoothly from greater or equal to 90 deg at 40 kHz to as low as 20 deg at 462 kHz. A more complex magnetic-field model can give a qualitatively different result.

  12. Tunable cw UV laser with <35 kHz absolute frequency instability for precision spectroscopy of Sr Rydberg states.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Elizabeth M; Keegan, Niamh C; Bounds, Alistair D; Boddy, Danielle; Sadler, Daniel P; Jones, Matthew P A

    2016-02-01

    We present a solid-state laser system that generates over 200 mW of continuous-wave, narrowband light, tunable from 316.3 nm - 317.7 nm and 318.0 nm - 319.3 nm. The laser is based on commercially available fiber amplifiers and optical frequency doubling technology, along with sum frequency generation in a periodically poled stoichiometric lithium tantalate crystal. The laser frequency is stabilized to an atomic-referenced high finesse optical transfer cavity. Using a GPS-referenced optical frequency comb we measure a long term frequency instability of < 35 kHz for timescales between 10(-3) s and 10(3) s. As an application we perform spectroscopy of Sr Rydberg states from n = 37 - 81, demonstrating mode-hop-free scans of 24 GHz. In a cold atomic sample we measure Doppler-limited linewidths of 350 kHz. PMID:26906804

  13. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-15

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ{sub 1}(r) cos(kz) cos(ωt−lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ω{sub R}, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ v{sub r}/ω{sub T}, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  14. In-situ Frequency Dependent Dielectric Sensing of Cure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, David E.

    1996-01-01

    With the expanding use of polymeric materials as composite matrices, adhesives, coatings and films, the need to develop low cost, automated fabrication processes to produce consistently high quality parts is critical. Essential to the development of reliable, automated, intelligent processing is the ability to continuously monitor the changing state of the polymeric resin in-situ in the fabrication tool. This final report discusses work done on developing dielectric sensing to monitor polymeric material cure and which provides a fundamental understanding of the underlying science for the use of frequency dependent dielectri sensors to monitor the cure process.

  15. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  16. Absolute absorption cross-section measurements of ozone in the wavelength region 238-335 nm and the temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Freeman, D. E.; Esmond, J. R.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1988-01-01

    The absolute absorption cross-section of ozone has been experimentally determined at the temperatures 195, 228, and 295 K at several discrete wavelengths in the 238-335-nm region. The present results for ozone at 295 K are found to be in agreement with those of Hearn (1961). Absolute cross-section measurements of ozone at 195 K have confirmed previous (Freeman et al., 1984) relative cross-section measurements throughout the 240-335-nm region.

  17. Frequency dependence of viscoelastic properties of medical grade silicones.

    PubMed

    Mahomed, A; Chidi, N M; Hukins, D W L; Kukureka, S N; Shepherd, D E T

    2009-04-01

    Cylinders of medical grade silicone elastomers, (29 mm in diameter and 13 mm thick), immersed in physiological saline solution at 37 degrees C, were investigated by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). A sinusoidal cyclic compression of 40 +/- 5 N was applied over a frequency range, f, of 0.02-100 Hz. Values of the storage, E', and loss, E'', moduli for the cylinders were found to depend on f; the dependence of E' or E'' on the logarithm (base 10) of f was represented by a third-order polynomial. Above about 0.3 Hz, the cylindrical specimens appeared to be undergoing the onset of a transition from the rubbery to the glassy state. There was no significant difference between results obtained at 37 and 23 degrees C; pretreatment of specimens in physiological saline at 37 degrees C for 24 h and 29 days had no appreciable effect on the results. PMID:18823017

  18. Accurate absolute frequencies of the {nu}{sub 1}+{nu}{sub 3} band of {sup 13}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} determined using an infrared mode-locked Cr:YAG laser frequency comb

    SciTech Connect

    Madej, Alan A.; Bernard, John E.; John Alcock, A.; Czajkowski, Andrzej; Chepurov, Sergei

    2006-04-15

    Absolute frequency measurements, with up to 1x10{sup -11} level accuracies, are presented for 60 lines of the P and R branches for the {nu}{sub 1}+{nu}{sub 3} band of {sup 13}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} at 1.5 {mu}m (194 THz). The measurements were made using cavity-enhanced, diode-laser-based saturation spectroscopy. With one laser system stabilized to the P(16) line and a second laser system stabilized to the line whose frequency was to be determined, a Cr:YAG frequency comb was employed to accurately measure the tetrahertz level frequency intervals. The results are compared with recent work from other groups and indicate that these lines would form a basis for a high-quality atlas of reference frequencies for this region of the spectrum.

  19. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Patrick A.; Siegmund, Gunter P.; Schouten, Alfred C.; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular information is relevant to postural control, while in neck muscles they are maintained regardless of the requirement to maintain head on trunk balance. Recent investigations have also shown that the bandwidth of vestibular input on neck muscles is much broader than appendicular muscles (up to a factor of 3). This result challenges the notion that vestibular reflexes only contribute to postural control across the behavioral and physiological frequency range of the vestibular organ (i.e., 0–20 Hz). In this review, we explore and integrate these task-, muscle- and frequency-related differences in the vestibular system’s contribution to posture, and propose that the human nervous system has adapted vestibular signals to match the mechanical properties of the system that each group of muscles controls. PMID:25620919

  20. Spatial frequency dependence of target signature for infrared performance modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Bosq, Todd; Olson, Jeffrey

    2011-05-01

    The standard model used to describe the performance of infrared imagers is the U.S. Army imaging system target acquisition model, based on the targeting task performance metric. The model is characterized by the resolution and sensitivity of the sensor as well as the contrast and task difficulty of the target set. The contrast of the target is defined as a spatial average contrast. The model treats the contrast of the target set as spatially white, or constant, over the bandlimit of the sensor. Previous experiments have shown that this assumption is valid under normal conditions and typical target sets. However, outside of these conditions, the treatment of target signature can become the limiting factor affecting model performance accuracy. This paper examines target signature more carefully. The spatial frequency dependence of the standard U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision 12 and 8 tracked vehicle target sets is described. The results of human perception experiments are modeled and evaluated using both frequency dependent and independent target signature definitions. Finally the function of task difficulty and its relationship to a target set is discussed.

  1. Reversible frequency-dependent switches in male mate choice.

    PubMed

    van Gossum, H; Stoks, R; De Bruyn, L

    2001-01-01

    Current sexual-selection theories predict that mating should occur preferentially with the highest-quality partner, and assume that for distinguishing among potential mates the choosy sex applies an internal representation of the characteristics of the desired mate, i.e. a template. Binary choice experiments were performed to test male mate choice between two different female colour morphs in the damselfly Ischnura elegans. Choice experiments were conducted before and after an habituation period, during which males were exposed to only one female colour morph. Given the choice between the two female morphs, males did exhibit a choice for the most recently experienced female morph. This is the first evidence for a reversible switch in mate choice in a frequency-dependent way. In contrast with previous studies on mate choice, template formation in male I. elegans seems not to be based on quality. Switching mate choice in a frequency-dependent manner, choosing the most common morph, probably allows males to minimize their search efforts and to maximize fitness. PMID:12123302

  2. Frequency and field dependent susceptibility of magnetite at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Özden; Dunlop, David J.; Jackson, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We report the temperature dependence of in-phase and quadrature susceptibilities, k' and k″, between 20 K and 300 K for a stoichiometric natural single crystal of magnetite. Measurements were made for amplitudes of the AC driving field ranging from H = 30 A/m to 2 kA/m and frequencies ranging from f = 40 Hz to 4 kHz. In cubic magnetite above the Verwey transition, TV = 120 K, k' is limited by self-demagnetization and does not vary greatly with T, H or f. As the crystal cools through TV and transforms to monoclinic structure, k' decreases by about a factor 2, with a further more gradual decrease of 10-20% in cooling from 40 to 20 K. Saturation remanence also drops sharply at T V but shows no further change in cooling below 40 K. Thus it appears that domain walls remain pinned throughout the 20-40 K range but small segments undergo reversible oscillations in an AC field, the amplitude of oscillation decreasing steadily with cooling below 40 K. In this same range, k″ reaches a peak, while the temperature at which k' decreases most rapidly changes with frequency. Both observations indicate that domain wall oscillations lag appreciably behind the driving field at very low temperature. Both k' and k″ increase markedly with increasing AC field amplitude below TV. The field dependence is particularly strong below 40 K. Analysis of the k'( f) data between 20 and 40 K based on an Arrhenius thermal activation equation gives a pre-exponential frequency factor f o ≈ 2.5 × 108 s-1 and an activation energy ΔE = 0.035 eV. The ΔE is appropriate for electron hopping but f o suggests an indirect mechanism for wall mobility related to changes in electron ordering within walls.

  3. Autobiographical Memory Performance in Alzheimer's Disease Depends on Retrieval Frequency.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stephan; Mychajliw, Christian; Reichert, Carolin; Melcher, Tobias; Leyhe, Thomas

    2016-04-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by memory disturbances primarily caused by pathogenic mechanisms affecting medial temporal lobe structures. As proposed by current theories of memory formation, this decrease is mediated by the age of the acquired knowledge. However, they cannot fully explain specific patterns of retrograde amnesia in AD. In the current study we examined an alternative approach and investigated whether the extent and severity of retrograde amnesia in AD is mediated by the frequency of memory retrieval or whether it depends on the mere age of knowledge. We compared recall of autobiographical incidents from three life periods in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), patients with early dementia of Alzheimer type (eDAT), and healthy control (HC) individuals using the Autobiographical Memory Interview. Retrieval frequency was operationalized by a paired comparison analysis. In contrast to HC individuals, recall of autobiographical incidents was impaired in patients with aMCI and eDAT following Ribot's gradient, with a reduced memory loss for remote compared to more recent life events. However, there was a strong effect of retrieval frequency on memory performance with frequently retrieved incidents memorized in more detail than less frequently retrieved episodes. Remote memories were recalled more often than recent ones. These findings suggest that more frequently retrieved autobiographical memories generally become more independent of the hippocampal complex and might thus be better protected against early hippocampal damage related to AD. Hence, the extent of retrograde amnesia in AD appears mainly mediated by the frequency of memory retrieval, which could plausibly explain why cognitive activity can effectively delay the onset of memory decline in AD. PMID:27104895

  4. Observation and absolute frequency measurements of the 1S0-3P0 optical clock transition in neutral ytterbium.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, C W; Barber, Z W; Oates, C W; Fortier, T M; Diddams, S A; Hollberg, L

    2005-08-19

    We report the direct excitation of the highly forbidden (6s2) 1S0 <--> (6s6p) 3P0 optical transition in two odd isotopes of neutral ytterbium. As the excitation laser frequency is scanned, absorption is detected by monitoring the depletion from an atomic cloud at approximately 70 microK in a magneto-optical trap. The measured frequency in 171Yb (F=1/2) is 518,295,836,591.6 +/- 4.4 kHz. The measured frequency in 173Yb (F=5/2) is 518,294,576,847.6 +/- 4.4 kHz. Measurements are made with a femtosecond-laser frequency comb calibrated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology cesium fountain clock and represent nearly a 10(6)-fold reduction in uncertainty. The natural linewidth of these J=0 to J=0 transitions is calculated to be approximately 10 mHz, making them well suited to support a new generation of optical atomic clocks based on confinement in an optical lattice. PMID:16196856

  5. Accurate absolute reference frequencies from 1511 to 1545 nm of the {nu}{sub 1}+{nu}{sub 3} band of {sup 12}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} determined with laser frequency comb interval measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Madej, Alan A.; Alcock, A. John; Czajkowski, Andrzej; Bernard, John E.; Chepurov, Sergei

    2006-10-15

    Absolute frequency measurements, with uncertainties as low as 2 kHz (1x10{sup -11}), are presented for the {nu}{sub 1}+{nu}{sub 3} band of {sup 12}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} at 1.5 {mu}m (194-198 THz). The measurements were made using cavity-enhanced, diode-laser-based saturation spectroscopy. With one laser system stabilized to the P(16) line of {sup 13}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and a system stabilized to the line in {sup 12}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} whose frequency was to be determined, a Cr:YAG laser-based frequency comb was employed to measure the frequency intervals. The systematic uncertainty is notably reduced relative to that of previous studies, and the region of measured lines has been extended. Improved molecular constants are obtained.

  6. Fixation probabilities of random mutants under frequency dependent selection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weini; Traulsen, Arne

    2010-03-21

    Evolutionary game dynamics describes frequency dependent selection in asexual, haploid populations. It typically considers predefined strategies and fixed payoff matrices. Mutations occur between these known types only. Here, we consider a situation in which a mutation has produced an entirely new type which is characterized by a random payoff matrix that does not change during the fixation or extinction of the mutant. Based on the probability distribution underlying the payoff values, we address the fixation probability of the new mutant. It turns out that for weak selection, only the first moments of the distribution matter. For strong selection, the probability that a new payoff entry is larger than the wild type's payoff against itself is the crucial quantity. PMID:19995564

  7. A frequency dependent preconditioned wavelet method for atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudytskiy, Mykhaylo; Helin, Tapio; Ramlau, Ronny

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric tomography, i.e. the reconstruction of the turbulence in the atmosphere, is a main task for the adaptive optics systems of the next generation telescopes. For extremely large telescopes, such as the European Extremely Large Telescope, this problem becomes overly complex and an efficient algorithm is needed to reduce numerical costs. Recently, a conjugate gradient method based on wavelet parametrization of turbulence layers was introduced [5]. An iterative algorithm can only be numerically efficient when the number of iterations required for a sufficient reconstruction is low. A way to achieve this is to design an efficient preconditioner. In this paper we propose a new frequency-dependent preconditioner for the wavelet method. In the context of a multi conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) system simulated on the official end-to-end simulation tool OCTOPUS of the European Southern Observatory we demonstrate robustness and speed of the preconditioned algorithm. We show that three iterations are sufficient for a good reconstruction.

  8. Frequency-dependent loudness balancing in bimodal cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Veugen, Lidwien C E; Chalupper, Josef; Snik, Ad F M; van Opstal, A John; Mens, Lucas H M

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion In users of a cochlear implant (CI) and a hearing aid (HA) in contralateral ears, frequency-dependent loudness balancing between devices did, on average, not lead to improved speech understanding as compared to broadband balancing. However, nine out of 15 bimodal subjects showed significantly better speech understanding with either one of the fittings. Objectives Sub-optimal fittings and mismatches in loudness are possible explanations for the large individual differences seen in listeners using bimodal stimulation. Methods HA gain was adjusted for soft and loud input sounds in three frequency bands (0-548, 548-1000, and >1000 Hz) to match loudness with the CI. This procedure was compared to a simple broadband balancing procedure that reflected current clinical practice. In a three-visit cross-over design with 4 weeks between sessions, speech understanding was tested in quiet and in noise and questionnaires were administered to assess benefit in real world. Results Both procedures resulted in comparable HA gains. For speech in noise, a marginal bimodal benefit of 0.3 ± 4 dB was found, with large differences between subjects and spatial configurations. Speech understanding in quiet and in noise did not differ between the two loudness balancing procedures. PMID:26986743

  9. Frequency-dependent energy harvesting via magnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayyaadi, Hassan; Askari Farsangi, Mohammad Amin

    2015-11-01

    This paper is focused on presenting an accurate framework to describe frequency-dependent energy harvesting via magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs). Modeling strategy incorporates the phenomenological constitutive model developed formerly together with the magnetic diffusion equation. A hyperbolic hardening function is employed to define reorientation-induced strain hardening in the material, and the diffusion equation is used to add dynamic effects to the model. The MSMA prismatic specimen is surrounded by a pickup coil, and the induced voltage during martensite-variant reorientation is investigated with the help of Faraday’s law of magnetic field induction. It has been shown that, in order to harvest the maximum RMS voltage in the MSMA-based energy harvester, an optimum value of bias magnetic field exists, which is the corresponding magnetic field for the start of pseudoelasticity behavior. In addition, to achieve a more compact energy harvester with higher energy density, a specimen with a lower aspect ratio can be chosen. As the main novelty of the paper, it is found that the dynamic effects play a major role in determining the harvested voltage and power, especially for high excitation frequency or specimen thickness.

  10. Frequency-dependent selection at rough expanding fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhr, Jan-Timm; Stark, Holger

    2015-10-01

    Microbial colonies are experimental model systems for studying the colonization of new territory by biological species through range expansion. We study a generalization of the two-species Eden model, which incorporates local frequency-dependent selection, in order to analyze how social interactions between two species influence surface roughness of growing microbial colonies. The model includes several classical scenarios from game theory. We then concentrate on an expanding public goods game, where either cooperators or defectors take over the front depending on the system parameters. We analyze in detail the critical behavior of the nonequilibrium phase transition between global cooperation and defection and thereby identify a new universality class of phase transitions dealing with absorbing states. At the transition, the number of boundaries separating sectors decays with a novel power law in time and their superdiffusive motion crosses over from Eden scaling to a nearly ballistic regime. In parallel, the width of the front initially obeys Eden roughening and, at later times, passes over to selective roughening.

  11. A new AC susceptibility instrument for detecting frequency dependence over a wide range of frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, K.

    2008-12-01

    A unique equipment was developed for measuring low-field AC susceptibility over a frequency spectrum ranging from 10 Hz to 4 kHz. The coil system consists of a primary coil for applying an excitation field, and a set of pickup coils linked in series and wound oppositely for compensation. The number of turns for the primary coil is 6,000 and that for the pickup coils is 4,400, using 0.1 mm thick copper wire, wound around a quartz-glass tube of 36 mm in diameter, allowing to measure conventional 10cc samples. The excitation field is produced by a commercial function generator with two independent outputs, capable of generating sinusoidal current with frequencies of 0 to 10 MHz. A mutual inductor coil is connected in series, to which the wave generator supplies, through the second output, a small current that can be adjusted in phase and magnitude to compensate the out-of-balance of the pickup coils. The resulting signal output voltage is fed to a digital rock-in amplifier. The AC frequency spans practically from 10 Hz to 4 kHz due to the limitation of the lock-in amplifier, but can be swept over the entire range with a constant amplitude of the applied field, which is changeable from 0.4 to 1.0 Oe. The outputs from the lock-in amplifier, in both magnitude and phase, are transferred to a PC to obtain the frequency dependence spectrum of both real and imaginary parts of AC susceptibility. The system calibration was made using a paramagnetic Gd2O3 powder as well as several natural samples that have ever been used for inter-laboratory calibrations.

  12. Low-frequency rTMS over the Parieto-frontal network during a sensorimotor task: The role of absolute beta power in the sensorimotor integration.

    PubMed

    Gongora, Mariana; Bittencourt, Juliana; Teixeira, Silmar; Basile, Luis F; Pompeu, Fernando; Droguett, Enrique López; Arias-Carrion, Oscar; Budde, Henning; Cagy, Mauricio; Velasques, Bruna; Nardi, Antonio Egídio; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2016-01-12

    Several studies have demonstrated that Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) promotes alterations in the Central Nervous System circuits and networks. The focus of the present study is to examine the absolute beta power patterns in the Parieto-frontal network. We hypothesize that rTMS alters the mechanisms of the sensorimotor integration process during a visuomotor task. Twelve young healthy volunteers performed a visuomotor task involving decision making recorded (Catch a ball in a free fall) by Electroencephalography. rTMS was applied on the Superior Parietal Cortex (SPC; Brodmann area [BA] 7) with low-frequency (1 Hz - 15 min - 80% Resting Motor Threshold). For each Frontal and Parietal region, a two-way ANOVA was used to compare the absolute beta power before and after TMS for each condition of the study (Rest 1, Task and Rest 2). The results demonstrated interactions (TMS vs. Condition) for the Frontal electrodes: Fp1, Fp2 and F7 and an effect of TMS (before and after) for F4.The results for the Parietal region showed a main effect of Condition for the P3, PZ and P4 electrodes. Thus, our paradigm was useful to better understand the reorganization and neural plasticity mechanisms in the parieto-frontal network during the sensorimotor integration process. PMID:26608023

  13. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses. PMID:23586876

  14. Dependence of Brillouin frequency shift on water absorption ratio in polymer optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakawa, Kazunari; Koike, Kotaro; Hayashi, Neisei; Koike, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-06-01

    We studied the dependence of the Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) on the water-absorption ratio in poly(methyl methacrylate)-based polymer optical fibers (POFs) to clarify the effect of the humidity on POF-based Brillouin sensors. The BFS, deduced indirectly using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique, decreased monotonically as the water absorption ratio increased, mainly because of the decrease in the Young's modulus. For the same water absorption ratio, the BFS change was larger at a higher temperature. The maximal BFS changes (absolute values) at 40, 60, and 80 °C were 158, 285, and 510 MHz, respectively (corresponding to the temperature changes of ˜9 °C, ˜16 °C, and ˜30 °C). Thus, some countermeasure against the humidity is indispensable in implementing strain/temperature sensors based on Brillouin scattering in POFs, especially at a higher temperature. On the other hand, Brillouin-based distributed humidity sensors might be developed by exploiting the BFS dependence on water absorption in POFs.

  15. Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.

    2013-07-15

    Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at 0.1 vol. %.

  16. Advanced Reservoir Imaging Using Frequency-Dependent Seismic Attributes

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Hilterman; Tad Patzek; Gennady Goloshubin; Dmitriy Silin; Charlotte Sullivan; Valeri Korneev

    2007-12-31

    Our report concerning advanced imaging and interpretation technology includes the development of theory, the implementation of laboratory experiments and the verification of results using field data. We investigated a reflectivity model for porous fluid-saturated reservoirs and demonstrated that the frequency-dependent component of the reflection coefficient is asymptotically proportional to the reservoir fluid mobility. We also analyzed seismic data using different azimuths and offsets over physical models of fractures filled with air and water. By comparing our physical model synthetics to numerical data we have identified several diagnostic indicators for quantifying the fractures. Finally, we developed reflectivity transforms for predicting pore fluid and lithology using rock-property statistics from 500 reservoirs in both the shelf and deep-water Gulf of Mexico. With these transforms and seismic AVO gathers across the prospect and its down-dip water-equivalent reservoir, fluid saturation can be estimated without a calibration well that ties the seismic. Our research provides the important additional mechanisms to recognize, delineate, and validate new hydrocarbon reserves and assist in the development of producing fields.

  17. Female elk contacts are neither frequency nor density dependent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, Paul C.; Creech, Tyler G.; Ebinger, Michael R.; Manlove, Kezia R.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Henningsen, John C.; Rogerson, Jared D.; Scurlock, Brandon M.; Creely, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Identifying drivers of contact rates among individuals is critical to understanding disease dynamics and implementing targeted control measures. We studied the interaction patterns of 149 female elk (Cervus canadensis) distributed across five different regions of western Wyoming over three years, defining a contact as an approach within one body length (∼2 m). Using hierarchical models that account for correlations within individuals, pairs, and groups, we found that pairwise contact rates within a group declined by a factor of three as group sizes increased 33-fold. Per capita contact rates, however, increased with group size according to a power function, such that female elk contact rates fell in between the predictions of density- or frequency-dependent disease models. We found similar patterns for the duration of contacts. Our results suggest that larger elk groups are likely to play a disproportionate role in the disease dynamics of directly transmitted infections in elk. Supplemental feeding of elk had a limited impact on pairwise interaction rates and durations, but per capita rates were more than two times higher on feeding grounds. Our statistical approach decomposes the variation in contact rate into individual, dyadic, and environmental effects, and provides insight into factors that may be targeted by disease control programs. In particular, female elk contact patterns were driven more by environmental factors such as group size than by either individual or dyad effects.

  18. Female elk contacts are neither frequency nor density dependent.

    PubMed

    Cross, P C; Creech, T G; Ebinger, M R; Manlove, K; Irvine, K; Henningsen, J; Rogerson, J; Scurlock, B M; Creel, S

    2013-09-01

    Identifying drivers of contact rates among individuals is critical to understanding disease dynamics and implementing targeted control measures. We studied the interaction patterns of 149 female elk (Cervus canadensis) distributed across five different regions of western Wyoming over three years, defining a contact as an approach within one body length (-2 min). Using hierarchical models that account for correlations within individuals, pairs, and groups, we found that pairwise contact rates within a group declined by a factor of three as group sizes increased 33-fold. Per capita contact rates, however, increased with group size according to a power function, such that female elk contact rates fell in between the predictions of density- or frequency-dependent disease models. We found similar patterns for the duration of contacts. Our results suggest that larger elk groups are likely to play a disproportionate role in the disease dynamics of directly transmitted infections in elk. Supplemental feeding of elk had a limited impact on pairwise interaction rates and durations, but per capita rates were more than two times higher on feeding grounds. Our statistical approach decomposes the variation in contact rate into individual, dyadic, and environmental effects, and provides insight into factors that may be targeted by disease control programs. In particular, female elk contact patterns were driven more by environmental factors such as group size than by either individual or dyad effects. PMID:24279278

  19. A Miniaturized Plasma Impedance Probe For Ionospheric Absolute Electron Density and Electron-Neutral Collision Frequency Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, S.; Rao, A. J.; Jayaram, M.; Hamoui, M. E.; Spencer, E. A.; Winstead, C.

    2008-12-01

    A fully integrated, low power, miniaturized Plasma Impedance Probe (PIP) is developed for small satellite constellation missions to create a map of electron density in the ionosphere. Two alternative methods for deriving plasma parameters from impedance measurements are discussed. The first method employs a frequency sweep technique, while the second employs a pulse based technique. The pulse based technique is a new method that leads to faster measurements. The two techniques necessitate different specifications for the front end analog circuit design. Unlike previous PIP designs, the integrated PIP performs direct voltage/current sampling at the probe's terminal. The signal processing tasks are performed by an off-chip FPGA to compute the impedance of the probe in the surrounding plasma. The new design includes self- calibration algorithms in order to increase the accuracy and reliability of the probe for small satellite constellation missions. A new feature included in this instrument is that the plasma parameters are derived from impedance measurements directly on the FPGA, significantly reducing the bandwith of telemetered data down to ground.

  20. Frequency Dependence of Ultrasound Neurostimulation in the Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Ye, Patrick Peiyong; Brown, Julian R; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound neuromodulation holds promise as a non-invasive technique for neuromodulation of the central nervous system. However, much remains to be determined about how the technique can be transformed into a useful technology, including the effect of ultrasound frequency. Previous studies have demonstrated neuromodulation in vivo using frequencies <1 MHz, with a trend toward improved efficacy with lower frequency. However, using higher frequencies could offer improved ultrasound spatial resolution. We investigate the ultrasound neuromodulation effects in mice at various frequencies both below and above 1 MHz. We find that frequencies up to 2.9 MHz can still be effective for generating motor responses, but we also confirm that as frequency increases, sonications require significantly more intensity to achieve equivalent efficacy. We argue that our results provide evidence that favors either a particle displacement or a cavitation-based mechanism for the phenomenon of ultrasound neuromodulation. PMID:27090861

  1. Controlled oscillator system with a time dependent output frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkelstein, R. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A controlled oscillator system is presented for providing an output with a frequency which changes with respect to time and with a phase which is within established phase error limits. The system includes a frequency synthesizer with a symmetrical search oscillator, capable of tuning the output with a range of + or - 100 Hz about any fixed frequency to which the synthesizer is set. For a tuning range of 200 Hz (+ or - 100 Hz) an expanded search oscillator output of a frequency range of 4 MHz (from 1 MHz to 5 MHz) is provided. A counter counts continuously the expanded output cycles and at each of fixed sampling intervals, for every 0.1 second, the count or number accumulated in the counter is read out. The sample number is compared with a theoretical number which should be present in the counter at the particular sampling instant for proper synthesizer's output frequency and phase.

  2. The nest site lottery: how selectively neutral density dependent growth suppression induces frequency dependent selection.

    PubMed

    Argasinski, K; Broom, M

    2013-12-01

    Modern developments in population dynamics emphasize the role of the turnover of individuals. In the new approaches stable population size is a dynamic equilibrium between different mortality and fecundity factors instead of an arbitrary fixed carrying capacity. The latest replicator dynamics models assume that regulation of the population size acts through feedback driven by density dependent juvenile mortality. Here, we consider a simplified model to extract the properties of this approach. We show that at the stable population size, the structure of the frequency dependent evolutionary game emerges. Turnover of individuals induces a lottery mechanism where for each nest site released by a dead adult individual a single newborn is drawn from the pool of newborn candidates. This frequency dependent selection leads towards the strategy maximizing the number of newborns per adult death. However, multiple strategies can maximize this value. Among them, the strategy with the greatest mortality (which implies the greatest instantaneous growth rate) is selected. This result is important for the discussion about universal fitness measures and which parameters are maximized by natural selection. This is related to the fitness measures R0 and r, because the number of newborns per single dead individual equals the lifetime production of newborn R0 in models without aging. We thus have a two-stage procedure, instead of a single fitness measure, which is a combination of R0 and r. According to the nest site lottery mechanism, at stable population size, selection favors strategies with the greatest r, i.e. those with the highest turnover, from those with the greatest R0. PMID:24071631

  3. The frequency dependence of demagnetizing factor of a Fe-based amorphous ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhmetko, D. N.; Troschenkov, Yu. N.; Matsura, A. V.

    2012-08-01

    The frequency dependence of total and internal demagnetizing factors has been investigated. A minimum of the demagnetizing factor at optimal frequency of magnetization reversal is revealed. The influence of the demagnetizing factor on the frequency dependence of magnetic properties of amorphous ribbon is studied.

  4. Size Dependence of Ferromagnetic Resonance Frequency in Submicron Patterned Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manago, Takashi; Yamanoi, Kazuto; Yakata, Satoshi; Kimura, Takashi

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the size effect on ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in a submicron-wide single permalloy bar. The resonant frequency markedly increased with decreasing bar width to less than 1 µm, since the demagnetizing field is effectively modified by changing the bar width even in thin films. The resonant frequency difference between 100- and 1000-nm-wide bars was over 4 GHz in the absence of a magnetic field. This characteristic is promising for practical microwave devices because the desired resonant frequency can be obtained simply by varying the width of narrow ferromagnetic bars so that it is not necessary to change the material or magnetic field.

  5. Frequency-Dependent Viscosity of Xenon Near the Critical Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    1999-01-01

    We used a novel, overdamped oscillator aboard the Space Shuttle to measure the viscosity eta of xenon near its critical density rho(sub c), and temperature T(sub c). In microgravity, useful data were obtained within 0.1 mK of T(sub c), corresponding to a reduced temperature t = (T -T(sub c))/T(sub c) = 3 x 10(exp -7). The data extend two decades closer to T(sub c) than the best ground measurements, and they directly reveal the expected power-law behavior eta proportional to t(sup -(nu)z(sub eta)). Here nu is the correlation length exponent, and our result for the small viscosity exponent is z(sub eta) = 0.0690 +/- 0.0006. (All uncertainties are one standard uncertainty.) Our value for z(sub eta) depends only weakly on the form of the viscosity crossover function, and it agrees with the value 0.067 +/- 0.002 obtained from a recent two-loop perturbation expansion. The measurements spanned the frequency range 2 Hz less than or equal to f less than or equal to 12 Hz and revealed viscoelasticity when t less than or equal to 10(exp -1), further from T(sub c) than predicted. The viscoelasticity scales as Af(tau), where tau is the fluctuation-decay time. The fitted value of the viscoelastic time-scale parameter A is 2.0 +/- 0.3 times the result of a one-loop perturbation calculation. Near T(sub c), the xenon's calculated time constant for thermal diffusion exceeded days. Nevertheless, the viscosity results were independent of the xenon's temperature history, indicating that the density was kept near rho(sub c), by judicious choices of the temperature vs. time program. Deliberately bad choices led to large density inhomogeneities. At t greater than 10(exp -5), the xenon approached equilibrium much faster than expected, suggesting that convection driven by microgravity and by electric fields slowly stirred the sample.

  6. Describing the Frequency of Marijuana Use: Fuzziness and Context-Dependent Interpretation of Frequency Expressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matt, Georg E.; Wilson, Sandra Jo

    1994-01-01

    A fuzzy set model is offered for interpreting vague frequency expressions, such as "rarely" and "sometimes." Results with 152 undergraduates reporting marijuana use reflect different frequency expressions for the same level of use and suggest that self-report validity may be enhanced by analyzing frequency expressions as fuzzy sets. (SLD)

  7. Temperature and frequency dependence of ultrasonic attenuation in selected tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.; Croissette, D. H. L.; Heyser, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation over the frequency range of 1.5-10 MHz has been measured as a function of temperature for porcine liver, backfat, kidney and spleen as well as for a single specimen of human liver. The attenuation in these excised specimens increases nearly linearly with frequency. Over the temperature range of approximately 4-37 C the attenuation decreases with increasing temperature for most soft tissue studied.

  8. Frequency-Dependent Blanking with Digital Linear Chirp Waveform Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter; Andrews, John M.

    2014-07-01

    Wideband radar systems, especially those that operate at lower frequencies such as VHF and UHF, are often restricted from transmitting within or across specific frequency bands in order to prevent interference to other spectrum users. Herein we describe techniques for notching the transmitted spectrum of a generated and transmitted radar waveform. The notches are fully programmable as to their location, and techniques are given that control the characteristics of the notches.

  9. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  10. Temperature and pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reactions of NH2 radicals with acetylene and ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Nava, D. F.; Brobst, W. D.; Stief, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute rate constants for the reaction between the NH2 free radical and acetylene and ethylene is measured experimentally using a flash photolysis technique. The constant is considered to be a function of temperature and pressure. At each temperature level of the experiment, the observed pseudo-first-order rate constants were assumed to be independent of flash intensity. The results of the experiment indicate that the bimolecular rate constant for the NH2 + C2H2 reaction increases with pressure at 373 K and 459 K but not at lower temperatures. Results near the pressure limit conform to an Arrhenius expression of 1.11 (+ or -) 0.36 x 10 to the -13th over the temperature range from 241 to 459 K. For the reaction NH2 + C2H4, a smaller rate of increase in the bimolecular rate constant was observed over the temperature range 250-465 K. The implications of these results for current theoretical models of NH2 + C2H2 (or H4) reactions in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are discussed.

  11. A frequency-dependent decoding mechanism for axonal length sensing

    PubMed Central

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Karamched, Bhargav R.

    2015-01-01

    We have recently developed a mathematical model of axonal length sensing in which a system of delay differential equations describe a chemical signaling network. We showed that chemical oscillations emerge due to delayed negative feedback via a Hopf bifurcation, resulting in a frequency that is a monotonically decreasing function of axonal length. In this paper, we explore how frequency-encoding of axonal length can be decoded by a frequency-modulated gene network. If the protein output were thresholded, then this could provide a mechanism for axonal length control. We analyze the robustness of such a mechanism in the presence of intrinsic noise due to finite copy numbers within the gene network. PMID:26257607

  12. Pressure dependent resonant frequency of micromechanical drumhead resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, D. R.; Craighead, H. G.; Parpia, J. M.

    2009-05-25

    We examine the relationship between squeeze film effects and resonance frequency in drum-type resonators. We find that the resonance frequency increases linearly with pressure as a result of the additional restoring force contribution from compression of gas within the drum cavity. We demonstrate trapping of the gas by squeeze film effects and geometry. The pressure sensitivity is shown to scale inversely with cavity height and sound radiation is found to be the predominant loss mechanism near and above atmospheric pressure. Drum resonators exhibit linearity and sensitivity suitable to barometry from below 10 Torr up to several atmospheres.

  13. The effect of frequency-dependent electron swarm parameters on fluid modeling of high-frequency CCP discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Rochan; Mahadevan, Shankar; Sawada, Ikuo; Vukovic, Mirko; Ventzek, Peter; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2012-10-01

    Fluid models are computationally the most feasible approach for the multidimensional simulation of reactive CCPs. Fluid models require the specification of species reaction-rate and transport coefficients. For electrons, these closure terms are dependent on the assumed/computed EEDF that depend on the excitation frequency. However the excitation frequency dependence of these electron properties for fluid models are rarely discussed. Here we explore the significance of frequency-dependent electron transport and reaction rate coefficients for high-frequency CCP discharges. We use pre-computed electron properties from a zero-dimensional electron Boltzmann solver which are used in the simulation of an argon CCP at 60MHz and pressures of 15 mTorr and 100 mTorr. A high-resolution computational mesh is developed and used to overcome any uncertainty associated with numerical discretization. We report significant differences in the pre-computed electron reaction-rate and transport coefficients for a 60 MHz EEDF compared to direct-current EEDF or assumed Maxwellian EEDF. The effects of these differences on the discharge structure are found to be significant; clearly emphasizing the importance of using frequency-dependent electron properties in high-frequency CCP models.

  14. Absolute and relative emission spectroscopy study of 3 cm wide planar radio frequency atmospheric pressure bio-plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xiaolong; Nikiforov, Anton Yu Leys, Christophe; Ionita, Eusebiu-Rosini; Dinescu, Gheorghe

    2015-08-03

    The dynamics of low power atmospheric pressure radio frequency discharge generated in Ar gas in long gap of 3 cm is investigated. This plasma source is characterized and analyzed for possible large scale biomedical applications where low gas temperature and potential-less effluent are required. The discharge forms a homogenous glow-like afterglow in ambient air at input power of 30 W with low gas temperature of 330 K, which is desirable in biomedical applications. With absolute calibrated spectroscopy of the discharge, electron density of 0.4 × 10{sup 18} m{sup −3} and electron temperature of 1.5 eV are obtained from continuum Bremsstrahlung radiation of the source. Time and spatial resolved emission spectroscopy is used to analyze discharge generation mechanism and active species formation. It is found that discharge dynamics strongly correlates with the discharge current waveform. Strong Ar(2p) excited states emission is observed nearby the electrodes surface on a distance up to 200 μm in the plasma sheath region at 10 ns after the current peak, whereas OH(A) emission is uniform along of the interelectrode gap.

  15. Frequency dependence of PMN-PT ceramics under electrical bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Harold C.; McLaughlin, Elizabeth A.

    2002-07-01

    It is a well-known fact that electrostrictive materials, such as lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) ceramics, exhibit significant frequency dispersion in their small signal dielectric constant below their dielectric maximum temperature Tm. The frequency dispersion in several PMN-PT compositions will be examined in this study using two independent measurement methods: dc biased resonance and large signal quasistatic measurements conducted on NUWC Division Newport's SDECS. From these measurements, the coupling factor, piezoelectric constant and Young's modulus are compared as a function of the applied bias and frequency. Both the DC biased and SDECS measurements were performed on the same 3:1 aspect ratio samples. Finite element calculations will show that the error in determining the Young's modulus and piezoelectric constant from resonance using these samples is less than 5 percent. It will be shown that when frequency dispersion exists it remains even with the application of dc bias, and that the degree of deviation between these quantities increases the further below Tm the temperature drops. It will also be shown that, like the dielectric constant, the coupling factor, piezoelectric constant and Young's modulus in PMN-PT ceramics above Tm are non-dispersive.

  16. Frequency-dependent shear impedance of the tectorial membrane.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jianwen Wendy; Hemmert, Werner; Freeman, Dennis M; Aranyosi, A J

    2008-09-01

    Microscale mechanical probes were designed and bulk-fabricated for applying shearing forces to biological tissues. These probes were used to measure shear impedance of the tectorial membrane (TM) in two dimensions. Forces were applied in the radial and longitudinal directions at frequencies ranging from 0.01-9 kHz and amplitudes from 0.02-4 microN. The force applied was determined by measuring the deflection of the probes' cantilever arms. TM impedance in the radial direction had a magnitude of 63 +/- 28 mN x s/m at 10 Hz and fell with frequency by 16 +/- 0.4 dB/decade, with a constant phase of -72 +/- 6 degrees . In the longitudinal direction, impedance was 36 +/- 9 mN x s/m at 10 Hz and fell by 19 +/- 0.4 dB/decade, with a constant phase of -78 +/- 4 degrees . Impedance was nearly constant as a function of force except at the highest forces, for which it fell slightly. These results show that the viscoelastic properties of the TM extend over a significant range of audio frequencies, consistent with a poroelastic interpretation of TM mechanics. The shear modulus G' determined from these measurements was 17-50 kPa, which is larger than in species with a lower auditory frequency range. This value suggests that hair bundles cannot globally shear the TM, but most likely cause bulk TM motion. PMID:18515382

  17. Frequency-dependent electrostatic actuation in microfluidic MEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.

    2003-09-01

    Electrostatic actuators exhibit fast response times and are easily integrated into microsystems because they can be fabricated with standard IC micromachining processes and materials. Although electrostatic actuators have been used extensively in 'dry' MEMS, they have received less attention in microfluidic systems probably because of challenges such as electrolysis, anodization, and electrode polarization. Here we demonstrate that ac drive signals can be used to prevent electrode polarization, and thus enable electrostatic actuation in many liquids, at potentials low enough to avoid electrochemistry. We measure the frequency response of an interdigitated silicon comb-drive actuator in liquids spanning a decade of dielectric permittivities and four decades of conductivity, and present a simple theory that predicts the characteristic actuation frequency. The analysis demonstrates the importance of the native oxide on silicon actuator response, and suggests that the actuation frequency can be shifted by controlling the thickness of the oxide. For native silicon devices, actuation is predicted at frequencies less than 10 MHz, in electrolytes of ionic strength up to 100 mmol/L, and thus electrostatic actuation may be feasible in many bioMEMS and other microfluidic applications.

  18. Frequency-Dependent Shear Impedance of the Tectorial Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jianwen Wendy; Hemmert, Werner; Freeman, Dennis M.; Aranyosi, A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Microscale mechanical probes were designed and bulk-fabricated for applying shearing forces to biological tissues. These probes were used to measure shear impedance of the tectorial membrane (TM) in two dimensions. Forces were applied in the radial and longitudinal directions at frequencies ranging from 0.01–9 kHz and amplitudes from 0.02–4 μN. The force applied was determined by measuring the deflection of the probes' cantilever arms. TM impedance in the radial direction had a magnitude of 63 ± 28 mN · s/m at 10 Hz and fell with frequency by 16 ± 0.4 dB/decade, with a constant phase of −72 ± 6°. In the longitudinal direction, impedance was 36 ± 9 mN · s/m at 10 Hz and fell by 19 ± 0.4 dB/decade, with a constant phase of −78 ± 4°. Impedance was nearly constant as a function of force except at the highest forces, for which it fell slightly. These results show that the viscoelastic properties of the TM extend over a significant range of audio frequencies, consistent with a poroelastic interpretation of TM mechanics. The shear modulus G′ determined from these measurements was 17–50 kPa, which is larger than in species with a lower auditory frequency range. This value suggests that hair bundles cannot globally shear the TM, but most likely cause bulk TM motion. PMID:18515382

  19. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  20. Muscle-related differences in mechanomyography frequency-force relationships are model dependent.

    PubMed

    Herda, Trent J; Cooper, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the surface mechanomyographic mean power frequency (MMG MPF)-force relationships with linear regression models applied to the absolute and log-transformed values for the first dorsal interosseous (FDI), vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles. Thirteen healthy males performed isometric ramp contractions of the leg extensors and index finger from 10 to 80% of their maximal voluntary contraction with MMG sensors positioned on the VL, RF, and FDI. Simple linear regression models were fit to the absolute and log-transformed MMG MPF-force relationships. Skinfold thickness measurements were taken at each sensor site. There were significant differences for the slopes from the log-transformed MMG MPF-force relationships between the FDI and the leg extensors (P < 0.001) but not the absolute model (P = 0.168). The Y-intercepts were greater for the FDI than the leg extensors for the absolute (P < 0.001) and log-transformed models (P < 0.001), which reflected similar muscle-related differences (P < 0.001) for skinfold thickness. However, there were no significant correlations between Y-intercepts and skinfold thicknesses. Differences in the patterns of response between the FDI and leg extensors were only quantified with the log-transformed model. PMID:25805064

  1. Frequency dependence of behavioral modulation by hippocampal electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    La Corte, Giorgio; Wei, Yina; Chernyy, Nick; Gluckman, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Electrical stimulation offers the potential to develop novel strategies for the treatment of refractory medial temporal lobe epilepsy. In particular, direct electrical stimulation of the hippocampus presents the opportunity to modulate pathological dynamics at the ictal focus, although the neuroanatomical substrate of this region renders it susceptible to altering cognition and affective processing as a side effect. We investigated the effects of three electrical stimulation paradigms on separate groups of freely moving rats (sham, 8-Hz and 40-Hz sine-wave stimulation of the ventral/intermediate hippocampus, where 8- and 40-Hz stimulation were chosen to mimic naturally occurring hippocampal oscillations). Animals exhibited attenuated locomotor and exploratory activity upon stimulation at 40 Hz, but not at sham or 8-Hz stimulation. Such behavioral modifications were characterized by a significant reduction in rearing frequency, together with increased freezing behavior. Logistic regression analysis linked the observed changes in animal locomotion to 40-Hz electrical stimulation independently of time-related variables occurring during testing. Spectral analysis, conducted to monitor the electrophysiological profile in the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus, showed a significant reduction in peak theta frequency, together with reduced theta power in the 40-Hz vs. the sham stimulation animal group, independent of locomotion speed (theta range: 4–12 Hz). These findings contribute to the development of novel and safe medical protocols by indicating a strategy to constrain or optimize parameters in direct hippocampal electrical stimulation. PMID:24198322

  2. Sensitivity in frequency dependent angular rotation of optical vortices.

    PubMed

    Rumala, Yisa S

    2016-03-10

    This paper presents robust strategies to enhance the rotation sensitivity (and resolution) of a coherent superposition of optical vortices emerging from a single spiral phase plate (SPP) device when light's optical frequency (or wavelength) going into the SPP device is varied. The paper discusses the generation and measurement of ultrasmall rotation. Factors that affect the ability to perform precision rotation measurements include the linewidth and stability of the input light source, the number of photon counts making position rotation measurements on the CCD detector, SPP reflectivity, the length of SPP device, and the angular modulation frequency of the intensity pattern due to a coherent superposition of optical vortices in a single SPP device. This paper also discusses parameters to obtain a high-sensitivity single shot measurement and multiple measurements. Furthermore, it presents what I believe is a new scaling showing the enhancement in sensitivity (and resolution) in the standard quantum limit and Heisenberg limit. With experimentally realizable parameters, there is an enhancement of rotation sensitivity by at least one order of magnitude compared to previous rotation measurements with optical vortices. Understanding robust strategies to enhance the rotation sensitivity in an SPP device is important to metrology in general and for building compact SPP sensors such as gyroscopes, molecular sensors, and thermal sensors. PMID:26974798

  3. Interface resistance in copper coated carbon determined by frequency dependent photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijamnajsuk, P.; Giuliani, F.; Chirtoc, M.; Horny, N.; Gibkes, J.; Chotikaprakhan, S.; Bein, B. K.; Pelzl, J.

    2010-03-01

    The heat transfer in copper-carbon flat model systems was studied by frequency dependent photothermal radiometry. A novel approach which relies on the frequency dependence of the photothermal signal phase and amplitude at intermediate frequencies was introduced to determine the thermal interface resistance between the Cu-film and the substrate. The frequency dependent amplitude and phase of the photothermal signals were analyzed in the frame of a model of a one- dimensional heat flow perpendicular to the film plane. The interface resistance of the investigated CuC-sample with a Ti-bonding layer was found to increase by a factor two on heat treatment.

  4. Sound frequency-invariant neural coding of a frequency-dependent cue to sound source location.

    PubMed

    Jones, Heath G; Brown, Andrew D; Koka, Kanthaiah; Thornton, Jennifer L; Tollin, Daniel J

    2015-07-01

    The century-old duplex theory of sound localization posits that low- and high-frequency sounds are localized with two different acoustical cues, interaural time and level differences (ITDs and ILDs), respectively. While behavioral studies in humans and behavioral and neurophysiological studies in a variety of animal models have largely supported the duplex theory, behavioral sensitivity to ILD is curiously invariant across the audible spectrum. Here we demonstrate that auditory midbrain neurons in the chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) also encode ILDs in a frequency-invariant manner, efficiently representing the full range of acoustical ILDs experienced as a joint function of sound source frequency, azimuth, and distance. We further show, using Fisher information, that nominal "low-frequency" and "high-frequency" ILD-sensitive neural populations can discriminate ILD with similar acuity, yielding neural ILD discrimination thresholds for near-midline sources comparable to behavioral discrimination thresholds estimated for chinchillas. These findings thus suggest a revision to the duplex theory and reinforce ecological and efficiency principles that hold that neural systems have evolved to encode the spectrum of biologically relevant sensory signals to which they are naturally exposed. PMID:25972580

  5. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction Cl + C2H2 from 210-361 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunning, J.; Stief, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been given to the role of chlorine compounds in the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone. However, while some reactions have been studied extensively, the kinetic data for the reaction of Cl with C2H2 is sparse with only three known determinations of the rate constant k3. The reactions involved are Cl + C2H2 yields reversibly ClC2H2(asterisk) (3a) and ClC2H2(asterisk) + M yields ClC2H2 + M (3b). In the present study, flash photolysis coupled with chlorine atomic resonance fluorescence have been employed to determine the pressure and temperature dependence of k3 with the third body M = Ar. Room temperature values are also reported for M = N2. The pressure dependence observed in the experiments confirms the expectation that the reaction involves addition of Cl to the unsaturated C2H2 molecule followed by collisional stabilization of the resulting adduct radical.

  6. Frequency Dependence of Single-Event Upset in Highly Advanced PowerPC Microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Farokh; Farmanesh, Farhad; White, Mark; Kouba, Coy K.

    2006-01-01

    Single-event upset effects from heavy ions were measured for Motorola silicon-on-insulator (SOI) microprocessor with 90 nm feature sizes at three frequencies of 500, 1066 and 1600 MHz. Frequency dependence of single-event upsets is discussed. The results of our studies suggest the single-event upset in registers and D-Cache tend to increase with frequency. This might have important implications for the overall single-event upset trend as technology moves toward higher frequencies.

  7. Frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in internet gaming disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiao; Jia, Xize; Zang, Yu-Feng; Dong, Guangheng

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have revealed that the task-related functional brain activities are impaired in internet gaming disorder (IGD) subjects. However, little is known about the alternations in spontaneous brain activities about them. Recent studies have proposed that the brain activities of different frequency ranges are generated by different nervous activities and have different physiological and psychological functions. Thus, in this study, we set to explore the spontaneous brain activities in IGD subjects by measuring the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF), to investigate band-specific changes of resting-state fALFF. We subdivided the frequency range into five bands based on literatures. Comparing to healthy controls, the IGD group showed decreased fALFF values in the cerebellum posterior lobe and increased fALFF values in superior temporal gyrus. Significant interactions between frequency bands and groups were found in the cerebellum, the anterior cingulate, the lingual gyrus, the middle temporal gyrus, and the middle frontal gyrus. Those brain regions are proved related to the executive function and decision-making. These results revealed the changed spontaneous brain activity of IGD, which contributed to understanding the underlying pathophysiology of IGD. PMID:26441815

  8. A Meteorological Model's Dependence on Radiation Update Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, Joseph L.; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Kumar, Sujay; Tian, Yudong; Lang, Stephen E.; Zeng, Xiping

    2004-01-01

    Numerical weather models are used to simulate circulations in the atmosphere including clouds and precipitation by applying a set of mathematical equations over a three-dimensional grid. The grid is composed of discrete points at which the meteorological variables are defined. As computing power continues to rise these models are being used at finer grid spacing, but they must still cover a wide range of scales. Some of the physics that must be accounted for in the model cannot be explicitly resolved, and their effects, therefore, must be estimated or "parameterized". Some of these parameterizations are computationally expensive. To alleviate the problem, they are not always updated at the time resolution of the model with the assumption being that the impact will be small. In this study, a coupled land-atmosphere model is used to assess the impact of less frequent updates of the computationally expensive radiation physics for a case on June 6, 2002, that occurred during a field experiment over the central plains known as International H20 Project (IHOP). The model was tested using both the original conditions, which were dry, and with modified conditions wherein moisture was added to the lower part of the atmosphere to produce clouds and precipitation (i.e., a wet case). For each of the conditions (i.e., dry and wet), four set of experiments were conducted wherein the model was run for a period of 24 hours and the radiation fields (including both incoming solar and outgoing longwave) were updated every 1, 3, 10, and 100 time steps. Statistical tests indicated that average quantities of surface variables for both the dry and wet cases were the same for the various update frequencies. However, spatially the results could be quite different especially in the wet case after it began to rain. The near-surface wind field was found to be different most of the time even for the dry case. In the wet case, rain intensities and average vertical profiles of heating associated

  9. Frequency and Density-Dependent Selection on Life-History Strategies – A Field Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Mappes, Tapio; Koivula, Minna; Koskela, Esa; Oksanen, Tuula A.; Savolainen, Tiina; Sinervo, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Negative frequency-dependence, which favors rare genotypes, promotes the maintenance of genetic variability and is of interest as a potential explanation for genetic differentiation. Density-dependent selection may also promote cyclic changes in frequencies of genotypes. Here we show evidence for both density-dependent and negative frequency-dependent selection on opposite life-history tactics (low or high reproductive effort, RE) in the bank vole (Myodes glareolus). Density-dependent selection was evident among the females with low RE, which were especially favored in low densities. Instead, both negative frequency-dependent and density-dependent selection were shown in females with high RE, which were most successful when they were rare in high densities. Furthermore, selection at the individual level affected the frequencies of tactics at the population level, so that the frequency of the rare high RE tactic increased significantly at high densities. We hypothesize that these two selection mechanisms (density- and negative frequency-dependent selection) may promote genetic variability in cyclic mammal populations. Nevertheless, it remains to be determined whether the origin of genetic variance in life-history traits is causally related to density variation (e.g. population cycles). PMID:18301764

  10. Velocity form of the Kohn-Sham frequency-dependent polarizability equations

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolotti, L.J.

    1987-11-01

    A single equation is derived for the determination of the first-order correction to the frequency-dependent density, due to the perturbation of a time-varying electric field. This new expression for the first-order correction to the frequency-dependent Kohn-Sham amplitudes depends explicitly upon the velocity form of the dipole-moment operator and the square of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian.

  11. Absolute frequency spectroscopy of CO2 lines at around 2.09 μm by combined use of an Er:fiber comb and a Ho:YLF amplifier.

    PubMed

    Gatti, D; Coluccelli, N; Gambetta, A; Di Lieto, A; Tonelli, M; Galzerano, G; Laporta, P; Marangoni, M

    2011-10-01

    The low-frequency tail of an octave-spanning supercontinuum (SC) generated by an Er:fiber comb is enhanced by a multipass Ho:YLF amplifier and used in a sum-frequency-generation scheme to obtain absolute referencing of a single-mode Tm-Ho:YAG laser tunable around 2.09 μm. By tuning the comb repetition frequency, the probing laser is scanned across the absorption lines of a CO(2) gas sample and highly accurate absorption profiles are measured. This approach can be readily scaled to any wavelength above ~2 μm. PMID:21964142

  12. Frequency-dependent learning achieved using semiconducting polymer/electrolyte composite cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W. S.; Zeng, F.; Lu, S. H.; Liu, A.; Li, X. J.; Pan, F.

    2015-10-01

    Frequency-dependent learning has been achieved using semiconducting polymer/electrolyte composite cells. The cells composed of polymer/electrolyte double layers realized the conventional spike-rate-dependent plasticity (SRDP) learning model. These cells responded to depression upon low-frequency stimulation and to potentiation upon high-frequency stimulation and presented long-term memory. The transition threshold θm from depression to potentiation varied depending on the previous stimulations. A nanostructure resembling a bio-synapse in its transport passages was demonstrated and a random channel model was proposed to describe the ionic kinetics at the polymer/electrolyte interface during and after stimulations with various frequencies, accounting for the observed SRDP.Frequency-dependent learning has been achieved using semiconducting polymer/electrolyte composite cells. The cells composed of polymer/electrolyte double layers realized the conventional spike-rate-dependent plasticity (SRDP) learning model. These cells responded to depression upon low-frequency stimulation and to potentiation upon high-frequency stimulation and presented long-term memory. The transition threshold θm from depression to potentiation varied depending on the previous stimulations. A nanostructure resembling a bio-synapse in its transport passages was demonstrated and a random channel model was proposed to describe the ionic kinetics at the polymer/electrolyte interface during and after stimulations with various frequencies, accounting for the observed SRDP. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02891d

  13. Flicker-light induced visual phenomena: frequency dependence and specificity of whole percepts and percept features.

    PubMed

    Allefeld, Carsten; Pütz, Peter; Kastner, Kristina; Wackermann, Jiří

    2011-12-01

    Flickering light induces visual hallucinations in human observers. Despite a long history of the phenomenon, little is known about the dependence of flicker-induced subjective impressions on the flicker frequency. We investigate this question using Ganzfeld stimulation and an experimental paradigm combining a continuous frequency scan (1-50 Hz) with a focus on re-occurring, whole percepts. On the single-subject level, we find a high degree of frequency stability of percepts. To generalize across subjects, we apply two rating systems, (1) a set of complex percept classes derived from subjects' reports and (2) an enumeration of elementary percept features, and determine distributions of occurrences over flicker frequency. We observe a stronger frequency specificity for complex percept classes than elementary percept features. Comparing the similarity relations among percept categories to those among frequency profiles, we observe that though percepts are preferentially induced by particular frequencies, the frequency does not unambiguously determine the experienced percept. PMID:21123084

  14. Bidirectional frequency-dependent effect of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field on E. coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Varsik; Baghdasaryan, Naira; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2013-09-01

    In the present work, the frequency-dependent effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF) on Escherichia coli K-12 growth have been studied. The frequency-dependent effects of ELF EMF have shown that it can either stimulate or inhibit the growth of microbes. However, the mechanism by which the ELF EMF affects the bacterial cells is not clear yet. It was suggested that the aqua medium can serve as a target through which the biological effect of ELF EMF on microbes may be realized. To check this hypothesis, the frequency-dependent effects (2, 4, 6, 8, 10 Hz, B = 0.4 mT, 30 min) of ELF EMF on the bacterial growth were studied in both cases where the microbes were in the culture media during the exposure and where culture media was preliminarily exposed to the ELF EMF before the addition of bacteria. For investigating the cell proliferation, the radioactive [(3)H]-thymidine assay was carried out. It has been shown that EMF at 4 Hz exposure has pronounced stimulation while at 8 Hz it has inhibited cell proliferation. PMID:23046211

  15. Seismic dynamic monitoring in CO2 flooding based on characterization of frequency-dependent velocity factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun-Hua; Li, Jun; Xiao, Wen; Tan, Ming-You; Zhang, Yun-Ying; Cui, Shi-Ling; Qu, Zhi-Peng

    2016-06-01

    The phase velocity of seismic waves varies with the propagation frequency, and thus frequency-dependent phenomena appear when CO2 gas is injected into a reservoir. By dynamically considering these phenomena with reservoir conditions it is thus feasible to extract the frequency-dependent velocity factor with the aim of monitoring changes in the reservoir both before and after CO2 injection. In the paper, we derive a quantitative expression for the frequency-dependent factor based on the Robinson seismic convolution model. In addition, an inversion equation with a frequency-dependent velocity factor is constructed, and a procedure is implemented using the following four processing steps: decomposition of the spectrum by generalized S transform, wavelet extraction of cross-well seismic traces, spectrum equalization processing, and an extraction method for frequency-dependent velocity factor based on the damped least-square algorithm. An attenuation layered model is then established based on changes in the Q value of the viscoelastic medium, and spectra of migration profiles from forward modeling are obtained and analyzed. Frequency-dependent factors are extracted and compared, and the effectiveness of the method is then verified using a synthetic data. The frequency-dependent velocity factor is finally applied to target processing and oil displacement monitoring based on real seismic data obtained before and after CO2 injection in the G89 well block within Shengli oilfield. Profiles and slices of the frequency-dependent factor determine its ability to indicate differences in CO2 flooding, and the predicting results are highly consistent with those of practical investigations within the well block.

  16. Absolute CF{sub 2} density and gas temperature measurements by absorption spectroscopy in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF{sub 4}/Ar plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wen-Yao; Xu, Yong Peng, Fei; Gong, Fa-Ping; Li, Xiao-Song; Zhu, Ai-Min; Liu, Yong-Xin; Wang, You-Nian

    2014-10-15

    Broadband ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the CF{sub 2} radical density in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF{sub 4}/Ar plasmas, using the CF{sub 2} A{sup ~1}B{sub 1}←X{sup ~1}A{sub 1} system of absorption spectrum. The rotational temperature of ground state CF{sub 2} and excited state CF was also estimated by using A{sup ~1}B{sub 1}←X{sup ~1}A{sub 1} system and B{sup 2}Δ−X{sup 2}Π system, respectively. The translational gas temperature was deduced from the Doppler width of the Ar{sup *}({sup 3}P{sub 2}) and Ar{sup *}({sup 3}P{sub 0}) metastable atoms absorption line by using the tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The rotational temperatures of the excited state CF are about 100 K higher than those of ground state CF{sub 2}, and about 200 K higher than the translational gas temperatures. The dependences of the radical CF{sub 2} density, electron density, electron temperature, rotational temperature, and gas temperature on the high frequency power and pressure have been analyzed. Furthermore, the production and loss mechanisms of CF{sub 2} radical and the gas heating mechanisms have also been discussed.

  17. An asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme for frequency-dependent radiative transfer equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenjun; Jiang, Song; Xu, Kun; Li, Shu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an extension of previous work (Sun et al., 2015 [22]) of the unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) for the gray radiative transfer equations to the frequency-dependent (multi-group) radiative transfer system. Different from the gray radiative transfer equations, where the optical opacity is only a function of local material temperature, the simulation of frequency-dependent radiative transfer is associated with additional difficulties from the frequency-dependent opacity. For the multiple frequency radiation, the opacity depends on both the spatial location and the frequency. For example, the opacity is typically a decreasing function of frequency. At the same spatial region the transport physics can be optically thick for the low frequency photons, and optically thin for high frequency ones. Therefore, the optical thickness is not a simple function of space location. In this paper, the UGKS for frequency-dependent radiative system is developed. The UGKS is a finite volume method and the transport physics is modeled according to the ratio of the cell size to the photon's frequency-dependent mean free path. When the cell size is much larger than the photon's mean free path, a diffusion solution for such a frequency radiation will be obtained. On the other hand, when the cell size is much smaller than the photon's mean free path, a free transport mechanism will be recovered. In the regime between the above two limits, with the variation of the ratio between the local cell size and photon's mean free path, the UGKS provides a smooth transition in the physical and frequency space to capture the corresponding transport physics accurately. The seemingly straightforward extension of the UGKS from the gray to multiple frequency radiation system is due to its intrinsic consistent multiple scale transport modeling, but it still involves lots of work to properly discretize the multiple groups in order to design an asymptotic preserving (AP) scheme in all

  18. Assessing the utility of frequency dependent nudging for reducing biases in biogeochemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagman, Karl B.; Fennel, Katja; Thompson, Keith R.; Bianucci, Laura

    2014-09-01

    Bias errors, resulting from inaccurate boundary and forcing conditions, incorrect model parameterization, etc. are a common problem in environmental models including biogeochemical ocean models. While it is important to correct bias errors wherever possible, it is unlikely that any environmental model will ever be entirely free of such errors. Hence, methods for bias reduction are necessary. A widely used technique for online bias reduction is nudging, where simulated fields are continuously forced toward observations or a climatology. Nudging is robust and easy to implement, but suppresses high-frequency variability and introduces artificial phase shifts. As a solution to this problem Thompson et al. (2006) introduced frequency dependent nudging where nudging occurs only in prescribed frequency bands, typically centered on the mean and the annual cycle. They showed this method to be effective for eddy resolving ocean circulation models. Here we add a stability term to the previous form of frequency dependent nudging which makes the method more robust for non-linear biological models. Then we assess the utility of frequency dependent nudging for biological models by first applying the method to a simple predator-prey model and then to a 1D ocean biogeochemical model. In both cases we only nudge in two frequency bands centered on the mean and the annual cycle, and then assess how well the variability in higher frequency bands is recovered. We evaluate the effectiveness of frequency dependent nudging in comparison to conventional nudging and find significant improvements with the former.

  19. [Modulation of Ca(2+)-Dependent Proteiolysis under the Action of Weak Low-Frequency Magnetic Fields].

    PubMed

    Kantserova, N P; Lysenko, L A; Ushakova, N V; Krylov, V V; Nemova, N N

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to determine the molecular targets of magnetic fields in living objects. Time-dependent effects of weak low-frequency magnetic field tuned to the parametric resonance for calcium ions were studied on model organisms (fish, whelk). The dynamics of Ca(2+)-dependent proteinase activity under the exposure to magnetic fields with given parameters was determined and minimal time of exposure in order to achieve inactivation of these proteinases was find out as well. As hyperactivation of Ca(2+)-dependent proteinases is a basis of degenerative pathology development the therapeutic potential of weak low-frequency magnetic fields enabling to modulate Ca(2+)-dependent proteinase activity is supported. PMID:27125027

  20. Frequency-dependent polarization-angle-phase-shift in the microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Han-Chun; Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2015-02-14

    Linear polarization angle, θ, dependent measurements of the microwave radiation-induced oscillatory magnetoresistance, R{sub xx}, in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron devices have shown a θ dependence in the oscillatory amplitude along with magnetic field, frequency, and extrema-dependent phase shifts, θ{sub 0}. Here, we suggest a microwave frequency dependence of θ{sub 0}(f) using an analysis that averages over other smaller contributions, when those contributions are smaller than estimates of the experimental uncertainty.

  1. Frequency-dependent moment release of very low frequency earthquakes in the Cascadia subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeo, A.; Houston, H.

    2014-12-01

    Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) has been observed in Cascadia subduction zone at two different time scales: tremor at a high-frequency range of 2-8 Hz and slow slip events at a geodetic time-scale of days-months. The intermediate time scale is needed to understand the source spectrum of slow earthquakes. Ghosh et al. (2014, IRIS abs) recently reported the presence of very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) in Cascadia. In southwest Japan, VLFEs are usually observed at a period range around 20-50 s, and coincide with tremors (e.g., Ito et al. 2007). In this study, we analyzed VLFEs in and around the Olympic Peninsula to confirm their presence and estimate their moment release. We first detected VLFE events by using broadband seismograms with a band-pass filter of 20-50 s. The preliminary result shows that there are at least 16 VLFE events with moment magnitudes of 3.2-3.7 during the M6.8 2010 ETS. The focal mechanisms are consistent with the thrust earthquakes at the subducting plate interface. To detect signals of VLFEs below noise level, we further stacked long-period waveforms at the peak timings of tremor amplitudes for tremors within a 10-15 km radius by using tremor catalogs in 2006-2010, and estimated the focal mechanisms for each tremor source region as done in southwest Japan (Takeo et al. 2010 GRL). As a result, VLFEs could be detected for almost the entire tremor source region at a period range of 20-50 s with average moment magnitudes in each 5-min tremor window of 2.4-2.8. Although the region is limited, we could also detect VLFEs at a period range of 50-100 s with average moment magnitudes of 3.0-3.2. The moment release at 50-100 s is 4-8 times larger than that at 20-50 s, roughly consistent with an omega-squared spectral model. Further study including tremor, slow slip events and characteristic activities, such as rapid tremor reversal and tremor streaks, will reveal the source spectrum of slow earthquakes in a broader time scale from 0.1 s to days.

  2. Plant neighborhood effects on herbivory: damage is both density and frequency dependent.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tania N; Underwood, Nora

    2015-05-01

    Neighboring plants can affect the likelihood that a focal plant is attacked by herbivores. Both the density of conspecific neighbors (resource concentration or dilution effects) and the relative density of heterospecific neighbors (associational effects or effects of neighbor frequency) within the local neighborhood can affect herbivore load and plant damage. Understanding how these neighborhood effects influence processes such as plant competition or natural selection on plant resistance traits will require knowing how both plant density and frequency affect damage, but previous studies have generally confounded density and frequency effects. In this study, we independently manipulated the absolute density and frequency (i.e., relative density) of two plant species (Solanum carolinense and Solidago altissima) to characterize neighborhood composition effects on S. carolinense damage by herbivores, providing the first picture of how both density and frequency of neighbors influence damage in a single system. We found both a positive effect of S. carolinense density on S. carolinense damage (a resource concentration effect) and a nonlinear effect of S. altissima frequency on S. carolinense damage (associational susceptibility). If these types of patterns are common in nature, future studies seeking to understand neighborhood effects on damage need to incorporate both density and frequency effects and capture any nonlinear effects by selecting a range of values rather than focusing on only a pair of densities or frequencies. This type of data on neighborhood effects will allow us to understand the contribution of neighborhood effects to population-level processes such as competition, the evolution of plant resistance to herbivores, and yield gains in agricultural crop mixtures. PMID:26236855

  3. Recognition of speech in noise after application of time-frequency masks: Dependence on frequency and threshold parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sinex, Donal G.

    2013-01-01

    Binary time-frequency (TF) masks can be applied to separate speech from noise. Previous studies have shown that with appropriate parameters, ideal TF masks can extract highly intelligible speech even at very low speech-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Two psychophysical experiments provided additional information about the dependence of intelligibility on the frequency resolution and threshold criteria that define the ideal TF mask. Listeners identified AzBio Sentences in noise, before and after application of TF masks. Masks generated with 8 or 16 frequency bands per octave supported nearly-perfect identification. Word recognition accuracy was slightly lower and more variable with 4 bands per octave. When TF masks were generated with a local threshold criterion of 0 dB SNR, the mean speech reception threshold was −9.5 dB SNR, compared to −5.7 dB for unprocessed sentences in noise. Speech reception thresholds decreased by about 1 dB per dB of additional decrease in the local threshold criterion. Information reported here about the dependence of speech intelligibility on frequency and level parameters has relevance for the development of non-ideal TF masks for clinical applications such as speech processing for hearing aids. PMID:23556604

  4. A kinetic model for the frequency dependence of cholinergic modulation at hippocampal GABAergic synapses.

    PubMed

    Stone, Emily; Haario, Heikki; Lawrence, J Josh

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we use a simple model of presynaptic neuromodulation of GABA signaling to decipher paired whole-cell recordings of frequency dependent cholinergic neuromodulation at CA1 parvalbumin-containing basket cell (PV BC)-pyramidal cell synapses. Variance-mean analysis is employed to normalize the data, which is then used to estimate parameters in the mathematical model. Various parameterizations and hidden parameter dependencies are investigated using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) parameter estimation techniques. This analysis reveals that frequency dependence of cholinergic modulation requires both calcium-dependent recovery from depression and mAChR-induced inhibition of presynaptic calcium entry. A reduction in calcium entry into the presynaptic terminal in the kinetic model accounted for the frequency-dependent effects of mAChR activation. PMID:25445738

  5. A kinetic model for the frequency dependence of cholinergic modulation at hippocampal GABAergic synapses

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Emily; Haario, Heikki; Lawrence, J. Josh

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we use a simple model of presynaptic neuromodulation of GABA signalling to decipher paired whole-cell recordings of frequency dependent cholinergic neuromodulation at CA1 parvalbumin-containing basket cell (PV BC)-pyramidal cell synapses. Variance-mean analysis is employed to normalize the data, which is then used to estimate parameters in the mathematical model. Various parameterizations and hidden parameter dependencies are investigated using Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) parameter estimation techniques. This analysis reveals that frequency dependence of cholinergic modulation requires both calcium-dependent recovery from depression and mAChR-induced inhibition of presynaptic calcium entry. A reduction in calcium entry into the presynaptic terminal in the kinetic model accounted for the frequency-dependent effects of mAChR activation. PMID:25445738

  6. ac Dynamics of Ferroelectric Domains from an Investigation of the Frequency Dependence of Hysteresis Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Sang Mo; Jo, Ji Young; Kim, T. H.; Yoon, J. -G.; Song, T. K.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Marton, Zsolt; Park, S.; Jo, Y.; Noh, Tae Won

    2010-01-01

    We investigated nonequilibrium domain wall dynamics under an ac field by measuring the hystere- sis loops of epitaxial ferroelectric capacitors at various frequencies and temperatures. Polarization switching is induced mostly by thermally activated creep motion at lower frequencies, and by vis- cous ow motion at higher frequencies. The dynamic crossover between the creep and ow regimes unveils two frequency-dependent scaling regions of hysteresis loops. Based on these findings, we constructed a dynamic phase diagram for hysteretic ferroelectric domain dynamics in the presence of ac fields.

  7. Negative frequency-dependent preferences and variation in male facial hair

    PubMed Central

    Janif, Zinnia J.; Brooks, Robert C.; Dixson, Barnaby J.

    2014-01-01

    Negative frequency-dependent sexual selection maintains striking polymorphisms in secondary sexual traits in several animal species. Here, we test whether frequency of beardedness modulates perceived attractiveness of men's facial hair, a secondary sexual trait subject to considerable cultural variation. We first showed participants a suite of faces, within which we manipulated the frequency of beard thicknesses and then measured preferences for four standard levels of beardedness. Women and men judged heavy stubble and full beards more attractive when presented in treatments where beards were rare than when they were common, with intermediate preferences when intermediate frequencies of beardedness were presented. Likewise, clean-shaven faces were least attractive when clean-shaven faces were most common and more attractive when rare. This pattern in preferences is consistent with negative frequency-dependent selection. PMID:24740903

  8. Negative frequency-dependent preferences and variation in male facial hair.

    PubMed

    Janif, Zinnia J; Brooks, Robert C; Dixson, Barnaby J

    2014-01-01

    Negative frequency-dependent sexual selection maintains striking polymorphisms in secondary sexual traits in several animal species. Here, we test whether frequency of beardedness modulates perceived attractiveness of men's facial hair, a secondary sexual trait subject to considerable cultural variation. We first showed participants a suite of faces, within which we manipulated the frequency of beard thicknesses and then measured preferences for four standard levels of beardedness. Women and men judged heavy stubble and full beards more attractive when presented in treatments where beards were rare than when they were common, with intermediate preferences when intermediate frequencies of beardedness were presented. Likewise, clean-shaven faces were least attractive when clean-shaven faces were most common and more attractive when rare. This pattern in preferences is consistent with negative frequency-dependent selection. PMID:24740903

  9. A hybrid transport-diffusion Monte Carlo method for frequency-dependent radiative-transfer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Thompson, Kelly G.; Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2012-08-15

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations in optically thick media. In DDMC, particles take discrete steps between spatial cells according to a discretized diffusion equation. Each discrete step replaces many smaller Monte Carlo steps, thus improving the efficiency of the simulation. In this paper, we present an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold, as optical thickness is typically a decreasing function of frequency. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo, which results in a hybrid transport-diffusion scheme. With a set of frequency-dependent test problems, we confirm the accuracy and increased efficiency of our new DDMC method.

  10. Implementation of the CCSD-PCM linear response function for frequency dependent properties in solution: Application to polarizability and specific rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricato, Marco

    2013-09-01

    This work reports the first implementation of the frequency dependent linear response (LR) function for the coupled cluster singles and doubles method (CCSD) combined with the polarizable continuum model of solvation for the calculation of frequency dependent properties in solution. In particular, values of static and dynamic polarizability as well as specific rotation are presented for various test molecules. Model calculations of polarizability show that a common approximation used in the definition of the LR function with solvation models recovers over 70% of the full response while maintaining a computational cost comparable to gas phase LR-CCSD. Calculations of specific rotation for three compounds for which gas phase methods predict the wrong sign of the rotation show that accounting for the electronic response of the solvent may be essential to assign the correct absolute configuration of chiral molecules.

  11. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Characterization of frequency-dependent glass transition temperature by Vogel-Fulcher relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yu; Jin, Li

    2008-08-01

    The complex mechanical modulus of polymer and polymer based composite materials showed a frequency-dependent behaviour during glass transition relaxation, which was historically modelled by the Arrhenius equation. However, this might not be true in a broad frequency domain based on the experience from the frequency dependence of the complex dielectric permittivity, which resulted from the same glass transition relaxation as for the complex mechanical modulus. Considering a good correspondence between dielectric and mechanical relaxation during glass transition, the Vogel-Fulcher relationship, previously proposed for the frequency dependence of dielectric permittivity, is introduced for that of the mechanical modulus; and the corresponding static glass transition temperature (Tf) was first determined for polymer and polymer based composite materials.

  12. On the modal decoupling of linear mechanical systems with frequency-dependent viscoelastic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastroddi, Franco; Calore, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    Linear Multi-Degree of Freedom (MDOF) mechanical systems having frequency-dependent viscoelastic behaviors are often studied and modelled in frequency or Laplace domains. Indeed, once this modelling process is carried out, it is not generally possible to reduce the obtained MDOF damped mechanical system to a set of uncoupled damped modal oscillators apart from some special cases. In this paper a general procedure has been proposed to transform a coupled linear mechanical system having frequency-dependent viscoelastic characteristics to a set of independent damped modal oscillators. The procedure is based on a linear co-ordinate transformation procedure using matrices in real field only. The approach is exact and based on the solution of one associated eigenproblem for the case of linearly viscous damping. In the general case of frequency-dependent viscoelastic materials, the approach includes an iterative procedure solving local eigenproblems.Some numerical results are reported to show the capabilities of the proposed approach.

  13. Investigating the frequency-dependent amplification of a tapered amplifier in atom interferometers.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Su; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Zhou, Min-Kang; Yao, Hui-Bin; Xu, Wen-Jie; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2015-01-01

    We present the investigation on the frequency-dependent amplification (FDA) of a tapered amplifier (TA) and the corresponding influence on Raman-type atom interferometers. In our interferometer, the output of two phase-locked diode lasers is injected into a TA to generate Raman beams. The frequency of one laser is chirped during the interfering process, which induces a variance of the Raman lasers power as a result of the FDA of the TA. The corresponding power ratio variation of the Raman lasers is measured by beat note method, which shows a linear dependence with a slope of -0.087(4)/GHz when the laser frequency changes over 2 GHz at 780 nm. The corresponding error related to AC Stark effect due to this frequency-dependent variation is estimated for our atom interferometer. The investigation presented here may provide hints for other experiments involving TAs. PMID:25531600

  14. Absolute frequency measurement of 1S0(F = 1/2)-3P0(F = 1/2) transition of 171Yb atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice at KRISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang Yong; Yu, Dai-Hyuk; Lee, Won-Kyu; Eon Park, Sang; Kim, Eok Bong; Lee, Sun Kyung; Cho, Jun Woo; Yoon, Tai Hyun; Mun, Jongchul; Jong Park, Sung; Kwon, Taeg Yong; Lee, Sang-Bum

    2013-04-01

    We measured the absolute frequency of the optical clock transition 1S0(F = 1/2)-3P0(F = 1/2) of 171Yb atoms confined in a one-dimensional optical lattice and it was determined to be 518 295 836 590 863.5(8.1) Hz. The frequency was measured against Terrestrial Time (TT; the SI second on the geoid) using an optical frequency comb of which the frequency was phase-locked to an H-maser as a flywheel oscillator traceable to TT. The magic wavelength was also measured as 394 798.48(79) GHz. The results are in good agreement with two previous measurements of other institutes within the specified uncertainty of this work.

  15. Temperature dependence of vibrational frequency fluctuation of N3- in D2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayama, Jumpei; Ishihara, Akane; Banno, Motohiro; Ohta, Kaoru; Saito, Shinji; Tominaga, Keisuke

    2010-07-01

    We have studied the temperature dependence of the vibrational frequency fluctuation of the antisymmetric stretching mode of N3- in D2O by three-pulse infrared (IR) photon echo experiments. IR pump-probe measurements were also carried out to investigate the population relaxation and the orientational relaxation of the same band. It was found that the time-correlation function (TCF) of the frequency fluctuation of this mode is well described by a biexponential function with a quasistatic term. The faster decay component has a time constant of about 0.1 ps, and the slower component varies from 1.4 to 1.1 ps in the temperature range from 283 to 353 K. This result indicates that liquid dynamics related to the frequency fluctuation are not highly sensitive to temperature. We discuss the relationship between the temperature dependence of the vibrational frequency fluctuation and that of the molecular motion of the system to investigate the molecular origin of the frequency fluctuation of the solute. We compare the temperature dependence of the frequency fluctuation with that of other dynamics such as dielectric relaxation of water. In contrast to the Debye dielectric relaxation time of D2O, the two time constants of the TCF of the frequency fluctuation do not exhibit strong temperature dependence. We propose a simple theoretical model for the frequency fluctuation in solutions based on perturbation theory and the dipole-dipole interaction between the vibrational mode of the solute and the solvent molecules. This model suggests that the neighboring solvent molecules in the vicinity of the solute play an important role in the frequency fluctuation. We suggest that the picosecond component of the frequency fluctuation results from structural fluctuation of the hydrogen-bonding network in water.

  16. Intensity and frequency dependence of laryngeal afferent inputs to respiratory hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, S W

    1997-12-01

    Inspiratory hypoglossal motoneurons (IHMs) mediate contraction of the genioglossus muscle and contribute to the regulation of upper airway patency. Intracellular recordings were obtained from antidromically identified IHMs in anesthetized, vagotomized cats, and IHM responses to electrical activation of superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) afferent fibers at various frequencies and intensities were examined. SLN stimulus frequencies <2 Hz evoked an excitatory-inhibitory postsynaptic potential (EPSP-IPSP) sequence or only an IPSP in most IHMs that did not change in amplitude as the stimulus was maintained. During sustained stimulus frequencies of 5-10 Hz, there was a reduction in the amplitude of SLN-evoked IPSPs with time with variable changes in the EPSP. At stimulus frequencies >25 Hz, the amplitude of EPSPs and IPSPs was reduced over time. At a given stimulus frequency, increasing stimulus intensity enhanced the decay of the SLN-evoked postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). Frequency-dependent attenuation of SLN inputs to IHMs also occurred in newborn kittens. These results suggest that activation of SLN afferents evokes different PSP responses in IHMs depending on the stimulus frequency. At intermediate frequencies, inhibitory inputs are selectively filtered so that excitatory inputs predominate. At higher frequencies there was no discernible SLN-evoked PSP temporally locked to the SLN stimuli. Alterations in SLN-evoked PSPs could play a role in the coordination of genioglossal contraction during respiration, swallowing, and other complex motor acts where laryngeal afferents are activated. PMID:9390960

  17. A full-dimensional model of ozone forming reaction: the absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies.

    PubMed

    Teplukhin, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2016-07-28

    Rigorous calculations of scattering resonances in ozone are carried out for a broad range of rotational excitations. The accurate potential energy surface of Dawes is adopted, and a new efficient method for calculations of ro-vibrational energies, wave functions and resonance lifetimes is employed (which uses hyper-spherical coordinates, the sequential diagonalization/truncation approach, grid optimization and complex absorbing potential). A detailed analysis is carried out to characterize distributions of resonance energies and lifetimes, their rotational/vibrational content and their positions with respect to the centrifugal barrier. Emphasis is on the contribution of these resonances to the recombination process that forms ozone. It is found that major contributions come from localized resonances at energies near the top of the barrier. Delocalized resonances at higher energies should also be taken into account, while very narrow resonances at low energies (trapped far behind the centrifugal barrier) should be treated as bound states. The absolute value of the recombination rate coefficient, its pressure and temperature dependencies are obtained using the energy-transfer model developed in the earlier work. Good agreement with experimental data is obtained if one follows the suggestion of Troe, who argued that the energy transfer mechanism of recombination is responsible only for 55% of the recombination rate (with the remaining 45% coming from the competing chaperon mechanism). PMID:27364351

  18. Resonant Frequency Dependence on Outer Diameter of High Tc rf-SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashizuka, Takuya; Sakai, Akira; Miyato, Yuji; Itozaki, Hideo

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) have been applied to various magnetic sensing. An rf-SQUID can measure magnetic signals by applying external rf-magnetic field whose frequency is tuned to its resonance. Our rf-SQUID having the outer diameter of 3.5 mm needed a substrate resonator to operate it within the operation frequency range of our using FLL electronics. The designs of the rf-SQUID and the resonator were critical to the resonant frequency and the effective area. In this paper, the outer diameter dependence of the resonant frequency and the effective area were investigated by both the electromagnetic simulations and the experiments. The results showed that the rf-SQUID having the larger outer diameter has the smaller resonant frequency and the larger effective area. The rf-SQUIDs having the larger outer diameter were fabricated according to the simulation results. They could be operated within the operation frequency range even though a resonator was omitted.

  19. Estimating cochlear tuning dependence on stimulus level and frequency from the delay of otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Moleti, Arturo; Sisto, Renata

    2016-08-01

    An objective technique based on the time-frequency analysis of otoacoustic emissions is proposed to get fast and stable estimates of cochlear tuning. Time-frequency analysis allows one to get stable measurements of the delay/frequency function, which is theoretically expected to be a function of cochlear tuning. Theoretical considerations and numerical solutions of a nonlinear cochlear model suggest that the average phase-gradient delay of the otoacoustic emission single-reflection components, weighted, for each frequency, by the amplitude of the corresponding wavelet coefficients, approximately scales as the square root of the cochlear quality factor. The application of the method to human stimulus-frequency and transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions shows that tuning decreases approximately by a factor of 2, as the stimulus level increases by 30 dB in a moderate stimulus level range. The results also show a steady increase of tuning with increasing frequency, by a factor of 2 between 1 and 5 kHz. This last result is model-dependent, because it relies on the assumption that cochlear scale-invariance breaking is only due to the frequency dependence of tuning. The application of the method to the reflection component of distortion product otoacoustic emissions, separated using time-frequency filtering, is complicated by the necessity of effectively canceling the distortion component. PMID:27586727

  20. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Faqi; Zeng, Deping; He, Min; Wang, Zhibiao E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn; Song, Dan; Lei, Guangrong; Lin, Zhou; Zhang, Dong E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn; Wu, Junru

    2015-12-15

    Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102). This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results.

  1. Shear Wave Splitting Analysis to Estimate Fracture Orientation and Frequency Dependent Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Raoof; Moradzadeh, Ali; Rasouli, Vamegh; Hanachi, Javid

    2016-02-01

    Shear wave splitting is a well-known method for indication of orientation, radius, and length of fractures in subsurface layers. In this paper, a three component near offset VSP data acquired from a fractured sandstone reservoir in southern part of Iran was used to analyse shear wave splitting and frequency-dependent anisotropy assessment. Polarization angle obtained by performing rotation on radial and transverse components of VSP data was used to determine the direction of polarization of fast shear wave which corresponds to direction of fractures. It was shown that correct implementation of shear wave splitting analysis can be used for determination of fracture direction. During frequency-dependent anisotropy analysis, it was found that the time delays in shear-waves decrease as the frequency increases. It was clearly demonstrated throughout this study that anisotropy may have an inverse relationship with frequency. The analysis presented in this paper complements the studied conducted by other researchers in this field of research.

  2. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Faqi; Song, Dan; Zeng, Deping; Lin, Zhou; He, Min; Lei, Guangrong; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Zhibiao

    2015-12-01

    Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102). This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results.

  3. Frequency, pressure, and strain dependence of nonlinear elasticity in Berea Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, Jacques; Pimienta, Lucas; Scuderi, Marco; Candela, Thibault; Shokouhi, Parisa; Fortin, Jérôme; Schubnel, Alexandre; Marone, Chris; Johnson, Paul A.

    2016-04-01

    Acoustoelasticity measurements in a sample of room dry Berea sandstone are conducted at various loading frequencies to explore the transition between the quasi-static (f→0) and dynamic (few kilohertz) nonlinear elastic response. We carry out these measurements at multiple confining pressures and perform a multivariate regression analysis to quantify the dependence of the harmonic content on strain amplitude, frequency, and pressure. The modulus softening (equivalent to the harmonic at 0f) increases by a factor 2-3 over 3 orders of magnitude increase in frequency. Harmonics at 2f, 4f, and 6f exhibit similar behaviors. In contrast, the harmonic at 1f appears frequency independent. This result corroborates previous studies showing that the nonlinear elasticity of rocks can be described with a minimum of two physical mechanisms. This study provides quantitative data that describes the rate dependency of nonlinear elasticity. These findings can be used to improve theories relating the macroscopic elastic response to microstructural features.

  4. Frequency and temperature dependence of complex strontium titanate electrorheological fluids under an alternating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong; Zhang, Yuling; Lu, Kunquan

    1998-05-01

    The electrorheological (ER) behavior of suspensions of water-free complex strontium titanate particles, synthesized by means of a modified sol-gel technique, in silicone oil have been investigated under an ac electric field. The frequency and temperature dependence of the shear stress show that the shear stress decreases monotonically with frequency and reaches a maximum value when the temperature is around 70 °C. The ER behavior has been explained on the basis of dielectric measurements.

  5. Context dependence in complex adaptive landscapes: frequency and trait-dependent selection surfaces within an adaptive radiation of Caribbean pupfishes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christopher H

    2016-06-01

    The adaptive landscape provides the foundational bridge between micro- and macroevolution. One well-known caveat to this perspective is that fitness surfaces depend on ecological context, including competitor frequency, traits measured, and resource abundance. However, this view is based largely on intraspecific studies. It is still unknown how context-dependence affects the larger features of peaks and valleys on the landscape which ultimately drive speciation and adaptive radiation. Here, I explore this question using one of the most complex fitness landscapes measured in the wild in a sympatric pupfish radiation endemic to San Salvador Island, Bahamas by tracking survival and growth of laboratory-reared F2 hybrids. I present new analyses of the effects of competitor frequency, dietary isotopes, and trait subsets on this fitness landscape. Contrary to expectations, decreasing competitor frequency increased survival only among very common phenotypes, whereas less common phenotypes rarely survived despite few competitors, suggesting that performance, not competitor frequency, shapes large-scale features of the fitness landscape. Dietary isotopes were weakly correlated with phenotype and growth, but did not explain additional survival variation. Nonlinear fitness surfaces varied substantially among trait subsets, revealing one-, two-, and three-peak landscapes, demonstrating the complexity of selection in the wild, even among similar functional traits. PMID:27130447

  6. Positively Frequency-Dependent Interference Competition Maintains Diversity and Pervades a Natural Population of Cooperative Microbes.

    PubMed

    Rendueles, Olaya; Amherd, Michaela; Velicer, Gregory J

    2015-06-29

    Positively frequency-dependent selection is predicted from theory to promote diversity in patchily structured populations and communities, but empirical support for this prediction has been lacking. Here, we investigate frequency-dependent selection among isolates from a local natural population of the highly social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. Upon starvation, closely related cells of M. xanthus cooperate to construct multicellular fruiting bodies, yet recently diverged genotypes co-residing in a local soil population often antagonize one another during fruiting-body development in mixed groups. In the experiments reported here, both fitness per se and strong forms of interference competition exhibit pervasive and strong positive frequency dependence (PFD) among many isolates from a centimeter-scale soil population of M. xanthus. All strains that compete poorly at intermediate frequency are shown to be competitively dominant at high frequency in most genotype pairings during both growth and development, and strongly so. Interference competition is often lethal and appears to be contact dependent rather than mediated by diffusible compounds. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate that positively frequency-dependent selection maintains diversity when genotype frequencies vary patchily in structured populations. These results suggest that PFD contributes to the high levels of local diversity found among M. xanthus social groups in natural soil populations by reinforcing social barriers to cross-territory invasion and thereby also promotes high within-group relatedness. More broadly, our results suggest that potential roles of PFD in maintaining patchily distributed diversity should be investigated more extensively in other species. PMID:26051889

  7. Stabilizing soliton-based multichannel transmission with frequency dependent linear gain-loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debananda; Peleg, Avner; Nguyen, Quan M.

    2016-07-01

    We report several major theoretical steps towards realizing stable long-distance multichannel soliton transmission in Kerr nonlinear waveguide loops. We find that transmission destabilization in a single waveguide is caused by resonant formation of radiative sidebands and investigate the possibility to increase transmission stability by optimization with respect to the Kerr nonlinearity coefficient γ. Moreover, we develop a general method for transmission stabilization, based on frequency dependent linear gain-loss in Kerr nonlinear waveguide couplers, and implement it in two-channel and three-channel transmission. We show that the introduction of frequency dependent loss leads to significant enhancement of transmission stability even for non-optimal γ values via decay of radiative sidebands, which takes place as a dynamic phase transition. For waveguide couplers with frequency dependent linear gain-loss, we observe stable oscillations of soliton amplitudes due to decay and regeneration of the radiative sidebands.

  8. Non-Markovian electron transfer reactions with frequency-dependent friction

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.

    1993-12-31

    A modified non-Markovian Zusman equation for electron transfer reactions with frequency-dependent friction is presented. The derivation is based on the spin-boson model with a two-level system coupled to a non-Debye polar solvent bath with frequency-dependent friction. The diffusion constant in the Smoluchowski diffusion operator of the ordinary Zusman equation should be replaced by a convolution of a retarded time-dependent diffusion constant. An analytical expression for the electron transfer rate constant was derived using the Green`s function method. In the adiabatic regime, electron transfer process is generally nonexponential. Because of the time-retardation, initial electron transfer reaction is influenced more by the higher frequency components in the solvent relaxation.

  9. Polymorphic Foraging Behavior Among Caenorhabditis elegans: Frequency- and Density-Dependent Selection

    PubMed Central

    Dennehy, John J.; Livdahl, Todd P.

    2004-01-01

    Strains of Caenorhabditis elegans obtained from their natural soil environment exhibit one of two forms of foraging behavior. Some strains forage solitarily and disperse evenly on a bacterial lawn. Other strains move rapidly until they encounter groups of conspecifics, and then slow their movement and join the group. Strains expressing these behaviors are globally widespread and have been isolated from the same location, suggesting a foraging polymorphism. We hypothesized that density-dependent selection maintains both foraging alleles in populations. Alternatively, both foraging alleles could be retained in populations through frequency-dependent selection. We tested both of these hypotheses by manipulating strain density and frequency, and observing changes in population density over time. Our results indicated that neither density- nor frequency-dependent selection appears to be responsible for the observed polymorphism. The clumping strain consistently out-competed the solitary strain over all treatment levels. We suggest other potential factors that may maintain both alleles in populations. PMID:19262816

  10. Effect of Frequency-Dependent Attenuation on Predicted Histotripsy Waveforms in Tissue-Mimicking Phantoms.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Crowe, Michael J; Raymond, Jason L; Holland, Christy K

    2016-07-01

    Tissue-mimicking phantoms are employed for the assessment of shocked histotripsy pulses in vitro. These broadband shock waves are critical for tissue ablation and are influenced by the frequency-dependent attenuation of the medium. The density, sound speed and attenuation spectra (2-25 MHz) were measured for phantoms that mimic key histotripsy targets. The influence of non-linear propagation relative to the attenuation was described in terms of Gol'dberg number. An expression was derived to estimate the bandwidth of shocked histotripsy pulses for power law-dependent attenuation. The expression is independent of the fundamental frequency of the histotripsy pulse for linear frequency-dependent attenuation. PMID:27108036

  11. Frequency dependence of sensitivities in second-order RC active filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunieda, T.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Fukui, A.

    1980-02-01

    This paper presents that gain and phase sensitivities to some element in biquadratic filters approximately constitute a circle on the complex sensitivity plane, provided that the quality factor Q of the circuit is appreciably larger than unity. Moreover, the group delay sensitivity is represented by the imaginary part of a cardioid. Using these results, bounds of maximum values of gain, phase, and group delay sensitivities are obtained. Further, it is proved that the maximum values of these sensitivities can be simultaneously minimized by minimizing the absolute value of the transfer function sensitivity at the center frequency provided that w(0)-sensitivities are constant and do not contain design parameters. Next, a statistical variability measure for the optimal-filter design is proposed. Finally, the relation between some variability measures proposed to the present time is made clear.

  12. Neural tuning matches frequency-dependent time differences between the ears.

    PubMed

    Benichoux, Victor; Fontaine, Bertrand; Franken, Tom P; Karino, Shotaro; Joris, Philip X; Brette, Romain

    2015-01-01

    The time it takes a sound to travel from source to ear differs between the ears and creates an interaural delay. It varies systematically with spatial direction and is generally modeled as a pure time delay, independent of frequency. In acoustical recordings, we found that interaural delay varies with frequency at a fine scale. In physiological recordings of midbrain neurons sensitive to interaural delay, we found that preferred delay also varies with sound frequency. Similar observations reported earlier were not incorporated in a functional framework. We find that the frequency dependence of acoustical and physiological interaural delays are matched in key respects. This suggests that binaural neurons are tuned to acoustical features of ecological environments, rather than to fixed interaural delays. Using recordings from the nerve and brainstem we show that this tuning may emerge from neurons detecting coincidences between input fibers that are mistuned in frequency. PMID:25915620

  13. Frequency dependence of electron spin-lattice relaxation for semiquinones in alcohol solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elajaili, Hanan B.; Biller, Joshua R.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2014-10-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation rates at 293 K for three anionic semiquinones (2,5-di-t-butyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, 2,6-di-t-butyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, and 2,3,5,6-tetramethoxy-1,4-benzosemiquinone) were studied at up to 8 frequencies between 250 MHz and 34 GHz in ethanol or methanol solution containing high concentrations of OH-. The relaxation rates are about a factor of 2 faster at lower frequencies than at 9 or 34 GHz. However, in perdeuterated alcohols the relaxation rates exhibit little frequency dependence, which demonstrates that the dominant frequency-dependent contribution to relaxation is modulation of dipolar interactions with solvent nuclei. The relaxation rates were modeled as the sum of two frequency-independent contributions (spin rotation and a local mode) and two frequency-dependent contributions (modulation of dipolar interaction with solvent nuclei and a much smaller contribution from modulation of g anisotropy). The correlation time for modulation of the interaction with solvent nuclei is longer than the tumbling correlation time of the semiquinone and is consistent with hydrogen bonding of the alcohol to the oxygen atoms of the semiquinones.

  14. Tailored voltage waveform capacitively coupled plasmas in electronegative gases: frequency dependence of asymmetry effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüngel, E.; Korolov, I.; Bruneau, B.; Derzsi, A.; Johnson, E.; O’Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Booth, J.-P.; Donkó, Z.; Schulze, J.

    2016-07-01

    Capacitively coupled radio frequency plasmas operated in an electronegative gas (CF4) and driven by voltage waveforms composed of four consecutive harmonics are investigated for different fundamental driving frequencies using PIC/MCC simulations and an analytical model. As has been observed previously for electropositive gases, the application of peak-shaped waveforms (that are characterized by a strong amplitude asymmetry) results in the development of a DC self-bias due to the electrical asymmetry effect (EAE), which increases the energy of ions arriving at the powered electrode. In contrast to the electropositive case (Korolov et al 2012 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45 465202) the absolute value of the DC self-bias is found to increase as the fundamental frequency is reduced in this electronegative discharge, providing an increased range over which the DC self-bias can be controlled. The analytical model reveals that this increased DC self-bias is caused by changes in the spatial profile and the mean value of the net charge density in the grounded electrode sheath. The spatio-temporally resolved simulation data show that as the frequency is reduced the grounded electrode sheath region becomes electronegative. The presence of negative ions in this sheath leads to very different dynamics of the power absorption of electrons, which in turn enhances the local electronegativity and plasma density via ionization and attachment processes. The ion flux to the grounded electrode (where the ion energy is lowest) can be up to twice that to the powered electrode. At the same time, while the mean ion energies at both electrodes are quite different, their ratio remains approximately constant for all base frequencies studied here.

  15. Resolution and Dynamical Core Dependence of Atmospheric River Frequency in Global Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Qing; Zhao, Chun; Lu, Jian

    2015-04-01

    This study examines the sensitivity of atmospheric river (AR) frequency simulated by a global model with different grid resolutions and dynamical cores. Analysis is performed on aquaplanet simulations using version 4 of Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) at 240, 120, 60 and 30 km model resolutions each with the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) and High-Order Methods Modeling Environment (HOMME) dynamical cores. The frequency of AR events decreases with model resolution and the HOMME dynamical core produces more AR events than MPAS. Comparing the frequencies determined using absolute and percentile thresholds of large-scale conditions used to define an AR, model sensitivity is found to be related to the overall sensitivity of sub-tropical westerlies, atmospheric precipitable water content and profile and to a lesser extent on extra-tropical Rossby wave activity to model resolution and dynamical core. Real world simulations using MPAS at 120 km and 30 km grid resolutions also exhibit a decrease of AR frequency with increasing resolution over southern East Pacific, but there difference is smaller over northern East Pacific. This inter-hemispheric difference is related to the enhancement of convection in over the tropics with increased resolution. This anomalous convection sets off Rossby wave patterns that weaken the subtropical westerlies over southern East Pacific but have relatively little effect on those over northern East Pacific. In comparison to NCEP2 reanalysis, MPAS real world simulations are found to underestimate AR frequencies at both resolutions likely because of their climatologically drier sub-tropics and poleward shifted jets. This study highlights the important links between model climatology of large-scale conditions and extremes.

  16. Signatures of the Berry curvature in the frequency dependent interlayer magnetoresistance in tilted magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Wright, Anthony R; McKenzie, Ross H

    2014-02-26

    We show that in a layered metal, the angle dependent, finite frequency, interlayer magnetoresistance is altered due to the presence of a non-zero Berry curvature at the Fermi surface. At zero frequency, we find a conservation law which demands that the 'magic angle' condition for interlayer magnetoresistance extrema as a function of magnetic field tilt angle is essentially both field and Berry curvature independent. In the finite frequency case, however, we find that surprisingly large signatures of a finite Berry curvature occur in the periodic orbit resonances. We outline a method whereby the presence and magnitude of the Berry curvature at the Fermi surface can be extracted. PMID:24501195

  17. Colour polymorphism torn apart by opposing positive frequency-dependent selection, yet maintained in space.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Swanne P; Kokko, Hanna; Rojas, Bibiana; Nokelainen, Ossi; Mappes, Johanna

    2015-11-01

    Polymorphic warning signals in aposematic species are enigmatic because predator learning and discrimination should select for the most common coloration, resulting in positive frequency-dependent survival selection. Here, we investigated whether differential mating success could create sufficiently strong negative frequency-dependent selection for rare morphs to explain polymorphic (white and yellow) warning coloration in male wood tiger moths (Parasemia plantaginis). We conducted an experiment in semi-natural conditions where we estimated mating success for both white and yellow male moths under three different morph frequencies. Contrary to expectations, mating success was positively frequency-dependent: white morph males had high relative fitness when common, likewise yellow morph males had high relative fitness when instead they were common. We hence built a model parameterized with our data to examine whether polymorphism can be maintained despite two sources of positive frequency dependence. The model includes known spatial variation in the survival advantage enjoyed by the yellow morph and assumes that relative mating success follows our experimentally derived values. It predicts that polymorphism is possible under migration for up to approximately 20% exchange of individuals between subpopulations in each generation. Our results suggest that differential mating success combined with spatial variation in predator communities may operate as a selection mosaic that prevents complete fixation of either morph. PMID:26114930

  18. Temperature dependence of acoustic harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound wave propagation in water at various frequencies.

    PubMed

    Maraghechi, Borna; Hasani, Mojtaba H; Kolios, Michael C; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound-based thermometry requires a temperature-sensitive acoustic parameter that can be used to estimate the temperature by tracking changes in that parameter during heating. The objective of this study is to investigate the temperature dependence of acoustic harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound wave propagation in water at various pulse transmit frequencies from 1 to 20 MHz. Simulations were conducted using an expanded form of the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov nonlinear acoustic wave propagation model in which temperature dependence of the medium parameters was included. Measurements were performed using single-element transducers at two different transmit frequencies of 3.3 and 13 MHz which are within the range of frequencies simulated. The acoustic pressure signals were measured by a calibrated needle hydrophone along the axes of the transducers. The water temperature was uniformly increased from 26 °C to 46 °C in increments of 5 °C. The results show that the temperature dependence of the harmonic generation is different at various frequencies which is due to the interplay between the mechanisms of absorption, nonlinearity, and focusing gain. At the transmit frequencies of 1 and 3.3 MHz, the harmonic amplitudes decrease with increasing the temperature, while the opposite temperature dependence is observed at 13 and 20 MHz. PMID:27250143

  19. Frequency dependence of the onset voltage of electroconvection in the nematic liquid crystal N4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaochao; Bowers, Steve; Bajaj, Kapil; Ahlers, Guenter

    2003-03-01

    Onset voltages Vc of electroconvection in a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cell were measured as a function of the drive frequency ω/ 2 π. The cell (from E.H.C Co, Ltd Japan) had a nominal spacing of 25 μm and planar alignment. It was filled with the NLC Merck phase IV (N4). The NLC was doped with 0.1% by weight of tetra butylammonium bromide(TBAB) and the conductivity was near 1.0 × 10-6 (Ω m)-1 at 30^oC. At low frequencies (15 to 80Hz) the onset voltage dropped as the frequency increased. This is contrary to the usual interpretation of the standard model which yields Vc (1+ω^2 τ^2)/[ξ^2-(1+ω^2 τ^2)] (ξ is related to NLC material properities), with the charge relaxation time τ=ɛ/ ( 4π σ) assumed to be independent of ω. Measurements at higher frequencies agreed reasonably with the standard model prediction. Further measurements using an AC bridge revealed that the dielectric constant ɛ is strongly frequency dependent at low frequencies, whereas the conductivity σ was roughly constant. Taking into account the frequency dependence of ɛ (and thus of τ), the onset-voltage measurements agreed fairly well with the standard-model prediction.

  20. An angular frequency dependence on the Aharonov–Casher geometric phase

    SciTech Connect

    Barboza, P.M.T.; Bakke, K.

    2015-10-15

    A quantum effect characterized by a dependence of the angular frequency associated with the confinement of a neutral particle to a quantum ring on the quantum numbers of the system and the Aharonov–Casher geometric phase is discussed. Then, it is shown that persistent spin currents can arise in a two-dimensional quantum ring in the presence of a Coulomb-type potential. A particular contribution to the persistent spin currents arises from the dependence of the angular frequency on the geometric quantum phase.

  1. Modelling the vibration of sandwich beams using frequency-dependent parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backström, D.; Nilsson, A. C.

    2007-03-01

    Various types of sandwich beams with foam or honeycomb cores are currently used in the industry, indicating the need for simple methods describing the dynamics of these complex structures. By implementing frequency-dependent parameters, the vibration of sandwich composite beams can be approximated using simple fourth-order beam theory. A higher-order sandwich beam model is utilized in order to obtain estimates of the frequency-dependent bending stiffness and shear modulus of the equivalent Bernoulli-Euler and Timoshenko models. The resulting predicted eigenfrequencies and transfer accellerance functions are compared to the data obtained from the higher-order model and from measurements.

  2. Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography for near-surface seismic refraction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelt, Colin A.; Chen, Jianxiong

    2016-07-01

    Traveltime tomography is the main method by which the Earth's seismic velocity is determined on all scales, from the near-surface (< 100 m) to the core. Usually traveltime tomography uses ray theory, an infinite-frequency approximation of wave propagation. A theory developed in global seismology to account for the finite-frequency nature of seismic data, known as finite-frequency traveltime tomography (FFTT), can theoretically provide a more accurate estimation of velocity. But the FFTT theory is generally not applicable to near-surface data because there is no reference velocity model known in advance that is capable of yielding synthetic waveforms that are close enough to the recorded seismograms to yield a reliable delay time. Also, there is usually no reference model for which the unknown velocity model represents a small (linear) perturbation from the reference model. This paper presents a frequency dependent form of nonlinear traveltime tomography specifically designed for near-surface seismic data in which a starting model, iterative approach with recalculated travel paths at each iteration, and the calculation of a frequency-dependent total traveltime, as opposed to a delay time, are used. Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography (FDTT) involves two modifications to conventional traveltime tomography: (1) the calculation of frequency-dependent traveltimes using wavelength-dependent velocity smoothing (WDVS), and (2) the corresponding sensitivity kernels that arise from using WDVS. Results show that the former modification is essential to achieve significant benefits from FDTT, whereas the latter is optional in that similar results can be achieved using infinite-frequency kernels. The long seismic wavelengths relative to the total path lengths and the size of subsurface heterogeneities of typical near-surface data means the improvements over ray theory tomography are significant. The benefits of FDTT are demonstrated using conventional minimum

  3. Frequency-dependent signal processing in apical dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, H; Tsubokawa, H; Tsukada, M; Aihara, T

    2014-10-10

    Depending on an animal's behavioral state, hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells receive distinct patterns of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. The time-dependent changes in the frequencies of these inputs and the nonuniform distribution of voltage-gated channels lead to dynamic fluctuations in membrane conductance. In this study, using a whole-cell patch-clamp method, we attempted to record and analyze the frequency dependencies of membrane responsiveness in Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells following noise current injection directly into dendrites and somata under pharmacological blockade of all synaptic inputs. To estimate the frequency-dependent properties of membrane potential, membrane impedance was determined from the voltage response divided by the input current in the frequency domain. The cell membrane of most neurons showed low-pass filtering properties in all regions. In particular, the properties were strongly expressed in the somata or proximal dendrites. Moreover, the data revealed nonuniform distribution of dendritic impedance, which was high in the intermediate segment of the apical dendritic shaft (∼220-260μm from the soma). The low-pass filtering properties in the apical dendrites were more enhanced by membrane depolarization than those in the somata. Coherence spectral analysis revealed high coherence between the input signal and the output voltage response in the theta-gamma frequency range, and large lags emerged in the distal dendrites in the gamma frequency range. Our results suggest that apical dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells integrate synaptic inputs according to the frequency components of the input signal along the dendritic segments receiving the inputs. PMID:25135353

  4. Characterization of the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and its frequency dependence in a polymer gel dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Crescenti, Remo A; Bamber, Jeffrey C; Partridge, Mike; Bush, Nigel L; Webb, Steve

    2007-11-21

    Research on polymer-gel dosimetry has been driven by the need for three-dimensional dosimetry, and because alternative dosimeters are unsatisfactory or too slow for that task. Magnetic resonance tomography is currently the most well-developed technique for determining radiation-induced changes in polymer structure, but quick low-cost alternatives remain of significant interest. In previous work, ultrasound attenuation and speed of sound were found to change as a function of absorbed radiation dose in polymer-gel dosimeters, although the investigations were restricted to one ultrasound frequency. Here, the ultrasound attenuation coefficient mu in one polymer gel (MAGIC) was investigated as a function of radiation dose D and as a function of ultrasonic frequency f in a frequency range relevant for imaging dose distributions. The nonlinearity of the frequency dependence was characterized, fitting a power-law model mu = af(b); the fitting parameters were examined for potential use as additional dose readout parameters. In the observed relationship between the attenuation coefficient and dose, the slopes in a quasi-linear dose range from 0 to 30 Gy were found to vary with the gel batch but lie between 0.0222 and 0.0348 dB cm(-1) Gy(-1) at 2.3 MHz, between 0.0447 and 0.0608 dB cm(-1) Gy(-1) at 4.1 MHz and between 0.0663 and 0.0880 dB cm(-1) Gy(-1) at 6.0 MHz. The mean standard deviation of the slope for all samples and frequencies was 15.8%. The slope was greater at higher frequencies, but so were the intra-batch fluctuations and intra-sample standard deviations. Further investigations are required to overcome the observed variability, which was largely associated with the sample preparation technique, before it can be determined whether any frequency is superior to others in terms of accuracy and precision in dose determination. Nevertheless, lower frequencies will allow measurements through larger samples. The fit parameter a of the frequency dependence, describing the

  5. Dependence of the colored frequency noise in spin torque oscillators on current and magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Eklund, Anders Sani, Sohrab R.; Chung, Sunjae; Amir Hossein Banuazizi, S.; Östling, Mikael; Gunnar Malm, B.; Bonetti, Stefano; Majid Mohseni, S.; Persson, Johan; Iacocca, Ezio; Åkerman, Johan

    2014-03-03

    The nano-scale spin torque oscillator (STO) is a compelling device for on-chip, highly tunable microwave frequency signal generation. Currently, one of the most important challenges for the STO is to increase its longer-time frequency stability by decreasing the 1/f frequency noise, but its high level makes even its measurement impossible using the phase noise mode of spectrum analyzers. Here, we present a custom made time-domain measurement system with 150 MHz measurement bandwidth making possible the investigation of the variation of the 1/f as well as the white frequency noise in a STO over a large set of operating points covering 18–25 GHz. The 1/f level is found to be highly dependent on the oscillation amplitude-frequency non-linearity and the vicinity of unexcited oscillation modes. These findings elucidate the need for a quantitative theoretical treatment of the low-frequency, colored frequency noise in STOs. Based on the results, we suggest that the 1/f frequency noise possibly can be decreased by improving the microstructural quality of the metallic thin films.

  6. Self-consistent modeling of terahertz waveguide and cavity with frequency-dependent conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y. J.; Chu, K. R.; Thumm, M.

    2015-01-15

    The surface resistance of metals, and hence the Ohmic dissipation per unit area, scales with the square root of the frequency of an incident electromagnetic wave. As is well recognized, this can lead to excessive wall losses at terahertz (THz) frequencies. On the other hand, high-frequency oscillatory motion of conduction electrons tends to mitigate the collisional damping. As a result, the classical theory predicts that metals behave more like a transparent medium at frequencies above the ultraviolet. Such a behavior difference is inherent in the AC conductivity, a frequency-dependent complex quantity commonly used to treat electromagnetics of metals at optical frequencies. The THz region falls in the gap between microwave and optical frequencies. However, metals are still commonly modeled by the DC conductivity in currently active vacuum electronics research aimed at the development of high-power THz sources (notably the gyrotron), although a small reduction of the DC conductivity due to surface roughness is sometimes included. In this study, we present a self-consistent modeling of the gyrotron interaction structures (a metallic waveguide or cavity) with the AC conductivity. The resulting waveguide attenuation constants and cavity quality factors are compared with those of the DC-conductivity model. The reduction in Ohmic losses under the AC-conductivity model is shown to be increasingly significant as the frequency reaches deeper into the THz region. Such effects are of considerable importance to THz gyrotrons for which the minimization of Ohmic losses constitutes a major design consideration.

  7. Dependence structure of the Korean stock market in high frequency data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min Jae; Kwak, Young Bin; Kim, Soo Yong

    2011-03-01

    This paper analyzes the evolution of the dependence structure for various time window intervals, known as Epps effect, using the Trade and Quote data of 663 actively traded stocks in Korean stock market. It is found that the random matrix theory analysis could not represent the dependence structure of the stock market in the microstructure regime. The Cook-Johnson copula is introduced as a parsimonious alternative method to handle this problem, and the existence of the Epps effect is confirmed for the 663 stocks using high frequency data. It was also found that large capitalization companies tend to have a stronger dependence structure, except for the largest capitalization group, since the phenomenon of price level resistance leads to the weak dependence structure in the largest capitalization group. In addition, grouping the industry as a sub-portfolio is an appropriate approach for hour interval traders, whereas this approach is not a strategy recommended for high frequency traders.

  8. Phase-Shifted Based Numerical Method for Modeling Frequency-Dependent Effects on Seismic Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuehua; Qi, Yingkai; He, Xilei; He, Zhenhua; Chen, Hui

    2016-04-01

    The significant velocity dispersion and attenuation has often been observed when seismic waves propagate in fluid-saturated porous rocks. Both the magnitude and variation features of the velocity dispersion and attenuation are frequency-dependent and related closely to the physical properties of the fluid-saturated porous rocks. To explore the effects of frequency-dependent dispersion and attenuation on the seismic responses, in this work, we present a numerical method for seismic data modeling based on the diffusive and viscous wave equation (DVWE), which introduces the poroelastic theory and takes into account diffusive and viscous attenuation in diffusive-viscous-theory. We derive a phase-shift wave extrapolation algorithm in frequencywavenumber domain for implementing the DVWE-based simulation method that can handle the simultaneous lateral variations in velocity, diffusive coefficient and viscosity. Then, we design a distributary channels model in which a hydrocarbon-saturated sand reservoir is embedded in one of the channels. Next, we calculated the synthetic seismic data to analytically and comparatively illustrate the seismic frequency-dependent behaviors related to the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoir, by employing DVWE-based and conventional acoustic wave equation (AWE) based method, respectively. The results of the synthetic seismic data delineate the intrinsic energy loss, phase delay, lower instantaneous dominant frequency and narrower bandwidth due to the frequency-dependent dispersion and attenuation when seismic wave travels through the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoir. The numerical modeling method is expected to contribute to improve the understanding of the features and mechanism of the seismic frequency-dependent effects resulted from the hydrocarbon-saturated porous rocks.

  9. Phase-Shifted Based Numerical Method for Modeling Frequency-Dependent Effects on Seismic Reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuehua; Qi, Yingkai; He, Xilei; He, Zhenhua; Chen, Hui

    2016-08-01

    The significant velocity dispersion and attenuation has often been observed when seismic waves propagate in fluid-saturated porous rocks. Both the magnitude and variation features of the velocity dispersion and attenuation are frequency-dependent and related closely to the physical properties of the fluid-saturated porous rocks. To explore the effects of frequency-dependent dispersion and attenuation on the seismic responses, in this work, we present a numerical method for seismic data modeling based on the diffusive and viscous wave equation (DVWE), which introduces the poroelastic theory and takes into account diffusive and viscous attenuation in diffusive-viscous-theory. We derive a phase-shift wave extrapolation algorithm in frequencywavenumber domain for implementing the DVWE-based simulation method that can handle the simultaneous lateral variations in velocity, diffusive coefficient and viscosity. Then, we design a distributary channels model in which a hydrocarbon-saturated sand reservoir is embedded in one of the channels. Next, we calculated the synthetic seismic data to analytically and comparatively illustrate the seismic frequency-dependent behaviors related to the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoir, by employing DVWE-based and conventional acoustic wave equation (AWE) based method, respectively. The results of the synthetic seismic data delineate the intrinsic energy loss, phase delay, lower instantaneous dominant frequency and narrower bandwidth due to the frequency-dependent dispersion and attenuation when seismic wave travels through the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoir. The numerical modeling method is expected to contribute to improve the understanding of the features and mechanism of the seismic frequency-dependent effects resulted from the hydrocarbon-saturated porous rocks.

  10. Frequency dependence in seismoacoustic imaging of shallow free gas due to gas bubble resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Zsuzsanna; Spiess, Volkhard; Keil, Hanno

    2015-12-01

    Shallow free gas is investigated in seismoacoustic data in 10 frequency bands covering a frequency range between 0.2 and 43 kHz. At the edge of a gassy patch in the Bornholm Basin (Baltic Sea), compressional wave attenuation caused by free gas is estimated from reflection amplitudes beneath the gassy sediment layer. Imaging of shallow free gas is considerably influenced by gas bubble resonance, because in the resonance frequency range attenuation is significantly increased. At the resonance frequency of the largest bubbles between 3 and 5 kHz, high scattering causes complete acoustic blanking beneath the top of the gassy sediment layer. In the wider resonance frequency range between 3 and 15 kHz, the effect of smaller bubbles becomes dominant and the attenuation slightly decreases. This allows acoustic waves to be transmitted and reflections can be observed beneath the gassy sediment layer for higher frequencies. Above resonance beginning at ˜19 kHz, attenuation is low and the presence of free gas can be inferred from the decreased reflection amplitudes beneath the gassy layer. Below the resonance frequency range (<1 kHz), attenuation is generally very low and not dependent on frequency. Using the geoacoustic model of Anderson and Hampton, the observed frequency boundaries suggest gas bubble sizes between 1 and 4-6 mm, and gas volume fractions up to 0.02% in a ˜2 m thick sediment layer, whose upper boundary is the gas front. With the multifrequency acoustic approach and the Anderson and Hampton model, quantification of free gas in shallow marine environments is possible if the measurement frequency range allows the identification of the resonance frequency peak. The method presented is limited to places with only moderate attenuation, where the amplitudes of a reflection can be analyzed beneath the gassy sediment layer.

  11. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  12. Dependence of kHz quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies on accretion-related parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakan Erkut, M.; Catmabacak, Onur; Duran, Sivan; Çatmabacak, Önder

    2016-07-01

    To study the possible dependence of kHz QPO frequencies on the parameters such as the mass accretion rate, the surface magnetic field strength, mass, and radius of the neutron star, we consider the up-to-date distribution of neutron star LMXBs in the kHz QPO frequency versus X-ray luminosity plane. We confirm the absence of any correlation between QPO frequencies and luminosity in the ensemble of LMXBs. Searching for the dependence of QPO data on accretion-related parameters, we find a correlation between the lower kHz QPO frequency and the parameter combining mass accretion rate with magnetic field strength. The correlation cannot be adequately described by a simple power law due to observed scattering of individual source data in the ensemble of Z and atoll sources. Based on disk-magnetosphere boundary region, the model function for QPO frequency can delineate the correlation taking into account the scattering of individual sources. In addition to mass accretion rate and magnetic field strength, the model function also depends on the radial width of the boundary region near the magnetopause. Modelling the variation of the width with mass accretion rate, we also provide an explanation for the parallel tracks phenomenon observed in the case of individual sources.

  13. Frequency Dependence of Petechial Hemorrhage and Cardiomyocyte Injury Induced during Myocardial Contrast Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Lu, Xiaofang; Fabiilli, Mario; Fields, Kristina; Dou, Chunyan

    2016-08-01

    Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) for perfusion imaging can induce microscale bio-effects during intermittent high-Mechanical Index scans. The dependence of MCE-induced bio-effects on the ultrasonic frequency was examined in rats at 1.6, 2.5 and 3.5 MHz. Premature complexes were counted in the electrocardiogram, petechial hemorrhages with microvascular leakage on the heart surface were observed at the time of exposure, plasma troponin elevation was measured after 4 h and cardiomyocyte injury was detected at 24 h. Increasing response to exposure above an apparent threshold was observed for all endpoints at each frequency. The effects decreased with increasing ultrasonic frequency, and the thresholds increased. Linear regressions for frequency-dependent thresholds indicated coefficients and exponents of 0.6 and 1.07 for petechial hemorrhages, respectively, and 1.02 and 0.8 for cardiomyocyte death, compared with 1.9 and 0.5 (square root) for the guideline limit of the mechanical index. The results clarify the dependence of cardiac bio-effects on frequency, and should allow development of theoretical descriptions of the phenomena and improved safety guidance for MCE. PMID:27126240

  14. Dynamic Acousto-Elasticity: Pressure and Frequency Dependences in Berea Sandstone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviere, J. V.; Pimienta, L.; Latour, S.; Fortin, J.; Schubnel, A.; Johnson, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Nonlinear elasticity is studied at the laboratory scale with the goal of understanding observations at earth scales, for instance during strong ground motion, tidal forcing and earthquake slip processes. Here we report frequency and pressure dependences on elasticity when applying dynamic acousto-elasticity (DAE) of rock samples, analogous to quasi-static acousto-elasticity. DAE allows one to obtain the elastic behavior over the entire dynamic cycle, detailing the full nonlinear behavior under tension and compression, including hysteresis and memory effects. We perform DAE on a sample of Berea sandstone subject to 0.5MPa uniaxial load, with sinusoidal oscillating strain amplitudes ranging from 10-6 to 10-5 and at frequencies from 0.1 to 260Hz. In addition, the confining pressure is increased stepwise from 0 to 30MPa. We compare results to previous measurements made at lower (mHz) and higher (kHz) frequencies. Nonlinear elastic parameters corresponding to conditioning effects, third order elastic constants and fourth order elastic constants are quantitatively compared over the pressure and frequency ranges. We observe that the decrease in modulus due to conditioning increases with frequency, suggesting a frequency and/or strain-rate dependence that should be included in nonlinear elastic models of rocks. In agreement with previous measurements, nonlinear elastic effects also decrease with confining pressure, suggesting that nonlinear elastic sources such as micro-cracks, soft bonds and dislocations are turned off as the pressure increases.

  15. Frequency dependence of the nonlinear response in YBa2Cu3O7-x transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateu, Jordi; Booth, James C.; Moeckly, Brian H.

    2007-01-01

    The authors evaluate the frequency dependence of the nonlinear response in high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-x thin films by simultaneously measuring the nonlinear intermodulation products and harmonic generation in broadband superconducting transmission lines at 76K. The frequencies of the two-tone incident signal are set to produce spurious signals from 1to21GHz. They extract a nonlinear term ∣ΔR2+jωΔL2∣ by applying a model of spurious signal generation in superconducting transmission lines to their measurement results. They found that this nonlinear term follows a linear dependence on frequency, indicating a dominant contribution of the nonlinear inductance ΔL2 over the nonlinear resistance ΔR2, (ωΔL2≫ΔR2), for the superconducting nonlinear response.

  16. Audio-Band Frequency-Dependent Squeezing for Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    PubMed

    Oelker, Eric; Isogai, Tomoki; Miller, John; Tse, Maggie; Barsotti, Lisa; Mavalvala, Nergis; Evans, Matthew

    2016-01-29

    Quantum vacuum fluctuations impose strict limits on precision displacement measurements, those of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors among them. Introducing squeezed states into an interferometer's readout port can improve the sensitivity of the instrument, leading to richer astrophysical observations. However, optomechanical interactions dictate that the vacuum's squeezed quadrature must rotate by 90° around 50 Hz. Here we use a 2-m-long, high-finesse optical resonator to produce frequency-dependent rotation around 1.2 kHz. This demonstration of audio-band frequency-dependent squeezing uses technology and methods that are scalable to the required rotation frequency and validates previously developed theoretical models, heralding application of the technique in future gravitational-wave detectors. PMID:26871318

  17. Influence of damping on the frequency-dependent polarizabilities of doped quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Suvajit; Ghosh, Manas

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the profiles of diagonal components of frequency-dependent linear (αxx and αyy), and first nonlinear (βxxx and βyyy) optical response of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots. The dopant impurity potential chosen assumes Gaussian form. The study principally focuses on investigating the role of damping on the polarizability components. In view of this the dopant is considered to be propagating under damped condition which is otherwise linear inherently. The frequency-dependent polarizabilities are then analyzed by placing the doped dot to a periodically oscillating external electric field of given intensity. The damping strength, in conjunction with external oscillation frequency and confinement potentials, fabricate the polarizability components in a fascinating manner which is adorned with emergence of maximization, minimization, and saturation. The discrimination in the values of the polarizability components in x and y-directions has also been addressed in the present context.

  18. Audio-Band Frequency-Dependent Squeezing for Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelker, Eric; Isogai, Tomoki; Miller, John; Tse, Maggie; Barsotti, Lisa; Mavalvala, Nergis; Evans, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Quantum vacuum fluctuations impose strict limits on precision displacement measurements, those of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors among them. Introducing squeezed states into an interferometer's readout port can improve the sensitivity of the instrument, leading to richer astrophysical observations. However, optomechanical interactions dictate that the vacuum's squeezed quadrature must rotate by 90° around 50 Hz. Here we use a 2-m-long, high-finesse optical resonator to produce frequency-dependent rotation around 1.2 kHz. This demonstration of audio-band frequency-dependent squeezing uses technology and methods that are scalable to the required rotation frequency and validates previously developed theoretical models, heralding application of the technique in future gravitational-wave detectors.

  19. Frequency dependence of thermal noise in gram-scale cantilever flexures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thanh T.-H.; Mow-Lowry, Conor M.; Slagmolen, Bram J. J.; Miller, John; Mullavey, Adam J.; Goßler, Stefan; Altin, Paul A.; Shaddock, Daniel A.; McClelland, David E.

    2015-12-01

    We present measurements of the frequency dependence of thermal noise in aluminum and niobium flexures. Our measurements cover the audio-frequency band from 10 Hz to 10 kHz, which is of particular relevance to ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors, and span up to an order of magnitude above and below the fundamental flexure resonances. Results from two flexures are well explained by a simple model in which both structural and thermoelastic loss play a role. The ability of such a model to explain this interplay is important for investigations of quantum-radiation-pressure noise and the standard quantum limit. Furthermore, measurements on a third flexure provide evidence that surface damage can affect the frequency dependence of thermal noise in addition to reducing the quality factor, a result which will aid the understanding of how aging effects impact on thermal noise behavior.

  20. Charged particle behavior in low-frequency geomagnetic pulsations. 3. Spin phase dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Kivelson, M.G.; Southwood, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Low-frequency modulations of the fluxes of magnetospheric charged particles are often observed in conjunction with geomagnetic pulsations. In some cases, the flux modulations depend on detector look direction even after effects arising from pitch angle anisotropy have been removed. For a detector on a spinning spacecraft, the look direction dependence creates flux modulations ordered by the spin phase angle, so the term 'spin phase dependence' provides a convenient description of the phenomenon considered in this paper. Spin phase dependence occurs only when the gyroradius of the detected particles (charge q; energy, W) is comparable with some other characteristic length of the problem. In particular, spin phase dependence occurs when the particle gyroradius a/sub L/ is comparable with lambda/sub perpendicular/, the wavelength transverse to B. ATS 6 and GEOS have provided examples of this type of 'finite gyroradius' effect. Wave-related spin phase dependence may also arise with a/sub L/<

  1. Negative frequency-dependent selection between Pasteuria penetrans and its host Meloidogyne arenaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In negative frequency-dependant selection (NFDS), parasite genotypes capable of infecting the numerically dominant host genotype are favored, while host genotypes resistant to the dominant parasite genotype are favored, creating a cyclical pattern of resistant genotypes in the host population and, a...

  2. FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION IN PRIMARY HEPATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN GAP JUNCTION FUNCTION IN PRIMARY HEPATOCYTES. X. Wang1 *, D.E. Housel *, J. Page2, C.F. Blackmanl. 1 National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711 USA, 2Oakland, California USA
    ...

  3. Negative frequency-dependent selection or alternative reproductive tactics: maintenance of female polymorphism in natural populations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sex-limited polymorphisms have long intrigued evolutionary biologists and have been the subject of long-standing debates. The coexistence of multiple male and/or female morphs is widely believed to be maintained through negative frequency-dependent selection imposed by social interactions. However, remarkably few empirical studies have evaluated how social interactions, morph frequencies and fitness parameters relate to one another under natural conditions. Here, we test two hypotheses proposed to explain the maintenance of a female polymorphism in a species with extreme geographical variation in morph frequencies. We first elucidate how fecundity traits of the morphs vary in relation to the frequencies and densities of males and female morphs in multiple sites over multiple years. Second, we evaluate whether the two female morphs differ in resource allocation among fecundity traits, indicating alternative tactics to maximize reproductive output. Results We present some of the first empirical evidence collected under natural conditions that egg number and clutch mass was higher in the rarer female morph. This morph-specific fecundity advantage gradually switched with the population morph frequency. Our results further indicate that all investigated fecundity traits are negatively affected by relative male density (i.e. operational sex ratio), which confirms male harassment as selective agent. Finally, we show a clear trade-off between qualitative (egg mass) and quantitative (egg number) fecundity traits. This trade-off, however, is not morph-specific. Conclusion Our reported frequency- and density-dependent fecundity patterns are consistent with the hypothesis that the polymorphism is driven by a conflict between sexes over optimal mating rate, with costly male sexual harassment driving negative frequency-dependent selection on morph fecundity. PMID:23822745

  4. On the statistical dependence of hits in frequency-hop multiple access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Colin D.; Pursley, Michael B.

    1990-09-01

    The statistical dependence of hits due to multiple-access interference in an asynchronous slow-frequency-hop packet radio network in which the radios employ memoryless hopping patterns is described. Models in which hits are conditionally independent given the number of interfering packets are investigated. It is shown that, if the conditional probability of a hit is chosen appropriately, the distribution function for the number of hits in a packet for these models can be used to compute upper and lower bounds on the true distribution function for the number of hits. Conditions are described for which these models can be used to compute upper and lower bounds on the codeword and packet error probabilities. If the ratio of the number of interfering packets to the number of frequency slots is held constant, hits in the asynchronous frequency-hop network are asymptotically independent in the limit as the number of frequency slots increases.

  5. Frequency and regularity effects in reading are task dependent: Evidence from ERPs

    PubMed Central

    Fischer-Baum, Simon; Dickson, Danielle S.; Federmeier, Kara D.

    2014-01-01

    Many theories of visual word processing assume obligatory semantic access and phonological recoding whenever a written word is encountered. However, the relative importance of different reading processes depends on task. The current study uses event related potentials (ERPs) to investigate whether – and, if so, when and how – effects of task modulate how visually-presented words are processed. Participants were presented written words in the context of two tasks, delayed reading aloud and proper name detection. Stimuli varied factorially on lexical frequency and on spellingto-sound regularity, while controlling for other lexical variables. Effects of both lexical frequency and regularity were modulated by task. Lexical frequency modulated N400 amplitude, but only in the reading aloud task, whereas spellingto-sound regularity interacted with frequency to modulate the LPC, again only in the reading aloud task. Taken together, these results demonstrate that task demands affect how meaning and sound are generated from written words. PMID:25436218

  6. Differential frequency-dependent antidromic resonance of the Schaffer collaterals and mossy fibers.

    PubMed

    Franco, Luis M; Beltrán, Jesús Q; Tapia, Jesús A; Ortiz, Franco; Manjarrez, Elías; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2016-05-01

    To better understand information transfer along the hippocampal pathways and its plasticity, here we studied the antidromic responses of the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 to activation of the mossy fibers and Schaffer collaterals, respectively, in hippocampal slices from naïve and epileptic rats. We applied trains of 600 electrical stimuli at functionally meaningful frequencies (θ, β/γ and γ). The responses of the DG to θ frequency trains underwent rapid potentiation that lasted about 400 stimuli, after which they progressively returned to control value. At β/γ and γ frequencies, however, the initial potentiation was followed by a strong frequency-dependent depression within the first 50 stimuli. In kindled animals, the initial potentiation was stronger than in control preparations and the resonant phase at θ frequency lasted longer. In contrast, CA3 responses were exponentially depressed at all frequencies, but depression was significantly less intense at θ frequency in epileptic preparations. Failure of fibers to fire action potentials could account for some of the aforementioned characteristics, but waveforms of the intracellular action potentials also changed as the field responses did, i.e., half-duration and time-to-peak increased in both structures along the stimulation trains. Noteworthy, block of glutamate and GABA ionotropic receptors prevented resonance and reduced the depression of antidromic responses to β/γ and γ stimulation recorded in the DG, but not in CA3. We show that the different behavior in the information transfer along these pathways depends on the frequency at which action potentials are generated, excitability history and anatomical features, including myelination and tortuosity. In addition, the mossy fibers are endowed with ionotropic receptors and terminal active properties conferring them their sui generis non-passive antidromic responses. PMID:25665800

  7. Frequency-dependent effects of rupture for the 2004 Parkfield main shock, results from UPSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Jon B.

    2014-09-01

    The frequency-dependent effects of rupture propagation of the Parkfield, California, earthquake (28 September 2004, M6) to the northwest along the San Andreas Fault can be seen in acceleration records at UPSAR (USGS Parkfield Seismic Array) in at least two ways. First, we can see the effects of directivity in the acceleration traces at UPSAR, which is about 11.5 km from the epicenter. Directivity or the seismic equivalent of a Doppler shift has been documented in many cases by comparing short-duration, high-amplitude pulses (P or S) in the forward direction with longer-duration body waves in the backward direction. In this case we detect a change from a relatively large amplitude, coherent, high-frequency signal at the start of rupture to a low-amplitude, low-coherent, low-frequency signal at about the time the rupture front transfers from the forward azimuth to the back azimuth at about 34-36 s (time is UTC and is the seconds after day 272 and 17 h and 15 min. S arrival is just after 30 s) for rays leaving the fault and propagating to UPSAR. The frequency change is obvious in the band about 5 to 30 Hz, which is significantly above the corner frequency of the earthquake (about 0.11 Hz). From kinematic source models, the duration of faulting is about 9.2 s, and the change in frequency is during faulting as the rupture extends to the northwest. Understanding the systematic change in frequency and amplitude of seismic waves in relation to the propagation of the rupture front is important for predicting strong ground motion. Second, we can filter the acceleration records from the array to determine if the low-frequency energy emerges from the same part of the fault as the high-frequency signal (e.g., has the same back azimuth and apparent velocity at UPSAR), an important clue to the dynamics of rupture. Analysis of sources of strong motion (characterized by relatively high frequencies) compared to kinematic slip models (relatively low frequency) for the 11 March 2011

  8. Frequency-dependent effects of rupture for the 2004 Parkfield mainshock, results from UPSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fletcher, Jon B.

    2014-01-01

    The frequency-dependent effects of rupture propagation of the Parkfield, California earthquake (Sept. 28, 2004, M6) to the northwest along the San Andreas fault can be seen in acceleration records at UPSAR (USGS Parkfield Seismic Array) in at least two ways. First, we can see the effects of directivity in the acceleration traces at UPSAR, which is about 11.5 km from the epicenter. Directivity or the seismic equivalent of a Doppler shift has been documented in many cases by comparing short duration, high-amplitude pulses (P or S) in the forward direction with longer duration body waves in the backward direction. In this case we detect a change from a relatively large amplitude, coherent, high-frequency signal at the start of rupture to a low-amplitude, low-coherent, low-frequency signal at about the time the rupture front transfers from the forward azimuth to the back azimuth at about 34-36 s (time is UTC and are the seconds after day 272 and 17 hours and 15 minutes. S arrival is just after 30s) for rays leaving the fault and propagating to UPSAR. The frequency change is obvious in the band about 5 to 30 Hz, which is significantly above the corner frequency of the earthquake (about 0.11Hz). From kinematic source models, the duration of faulting is about 9.2 s and the change in frequency is during faulting as the rupture extends to the northwest. Understanding the systematic change in frequency and amplitude of seismic waves in relation to the propagation of the rupture front is important for predicting strong ground motion. Second, we can filter the acceleration records from the array to determine if the low frequency energy emerges from the same part of the fault as the high frequency signal (e.g. has the same back azimuth and apparent velocity at UPSAR) an important clue to the dynamics of rupture. Analysis of sources of strong motion (characterized by relatively high frequencies) compared to kinematic slip models (relatively low frequency) for the

  9. Demonstrating frequency-dependent transmission of sarcoptic mange in red foxes

    PubMed Central

    Devenish-Nelson, Eleanor S.; Richards, Shane A.; Harris, Stephen; Soulsbury, Carl; Stephens, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between disease transmission and host density is essential for predicting disease spread and control. Using long-term data on sarcoptic mange in a red fox Vulpes vulpes population, we tested long-held assumptions of density- and frequency-dependent direct disease transmission. We also assessed the role of indirect transmission. Contrary to assumptions typical of epidemiological models, mange dynamics are better explained by frequency-dependent disease transmission than by density-dependent transmission in this canid. We found no support for indirect transmission. We present the first estimates of R0 and age-specific transmission coefficients for mange in foxes. These parameters are important for managing this poorly understood but highly contagious and economically damaging disease. PMID:25296930

  10. Demonstrating frequency-dependent transmission of sarcoptic mange in red foxes.

    PubMed

    Devenish-Nelson, Eleanor S; Richards, Shane A; Harris, Stephen; Soulsbury, Carl; Stephens, Philip A

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the relationship between disease transmission and host density is essential for predicting disease spread and control. Using long-term data on sarcoptic mange in a red fox Vulpes vulpes population, we tested long-held assumptions of density- and frequency-dependent direct disease transmission. We also assessed the role of indirect transmission. Contrary to assumptions typical of epidemiological models, mange dynamics are better explained by frequency-dependent disease transmission than by density-dependent transmission in this canid. We found no support for indirect transmission. We present the first estimates of R0 and age-specific transmission coefficients for mange in foxes. These parameters are important for managing this poorly understood but highly contagious and economically damaging disease. PMID:25296930

  11. Frequency dependence 3.0: an attempt at codifying the evolutionary ecology perspective.

    PubMed

    Metz, Johan A J; Geritz, Stefan A H

    2016-03-01

    The fitness concept and perforce the definition of frequency independent fitnesses from population genetics is closely tied to discrete time population models with non-overlapping generations. Evolutionary ecologists generally focus on trait evolution through repeated mutant substitutions in populations with complicated life histories. This goes with using the per capita invasion speed of mutants as their fitness. In this paper we develop a concept of frequency independence that attempts to capture the practical use of the term by ecologists, which although inspired by population genetics rarely fits its strict definition. We propose to call the invasion fitnesses of an eco-evolutionary model frequency independent when the phenotypes can be ranked by competitive strength, measured by who can invade whom. This is equivalent to the absence of weak priority effects, protected dimorphisms and rock-scissor-paper configurations. Our concept differs from that of Heino et al. (TREE 13:367-370, 1998) in that it is based only on the signs of the invasion fitnesses, whereas Heino et al. based their definitions on the structure of the feedback environment, summarising the effect of all direct and indirect interactions between individuals on fitness. As it turns out, according to our new definition an eco-evolutionary model has frequency independent fitnesses if and only if the effect of the feedback environment on the fitness signs can be summarised by a single scalar with monotonic effect. This may be compared with Heino et al.'s concept of trivial frequency dependence defined by the environmental feedback influencing fitness, and not just its sign, in a scalar manner, without any monotonicity restriction. As it turns out, absence of the latter restriction leaves room for rock-scissor-paper configurations. Since in 'realistic' (as opposed to toy) models frequency independence is exceedingly rare, we also define a concept of weak frequency dependence, which can be interpreted

  12. Permeability and Frequency Dependence of the Seismoelectric Effect Associated with Compressional Waves in Unconsolidated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, M.; Dupuis, C.; Butler, K. E.

    2009-05-01

    The propagation of seismic waves through saturated poroelastic media can generate electric fields, known as seismoelectric effects, as a consequence of electrokinetic coupling associated with movement of pore fluid relative to solid matrix. There has, as a result, been a longstanding interest in using the seismoelectric effect to estimate permeability. Indeed, recent analyses and borehole logging experiments indicate that the amplitudes of seismoelectric signals induced by Stoneley waves may be used to estimate permeability. Curiously, however, theoretical models for the co-seismic electric fields that travel with compressional waves in homogeneous poroelastic media indicate that there is no explicit dependence on permeability at low frequencies. Rather, it would appear that the estimation of permeability from such co-seismic seismoelectric effects may require broadband measurements and the identification of a critical frequency above which the frequency dependence changes. Theoretical seismoelectric transfer functions for the case of compressional waves, and equations for the above-mentioned critical frequency (expressed in terms of permeability and other physical properties) have been derived independently by at least two groups. These equations have not been fully reconciled with each other and have not yet been extensively tested by comparison to field or lab measurements. We have analysed the frequency response of co-seismic seismoelectric effects induced by compressional seismic waves during vertical seismoelectric profiling experiments in a borehole penetrating glaciofluvial sediments. The measurements were made using electrodes and a clamped geophone in the borehole, and a special seismic source at surface that produced pulses with a bandwidth of several hundred Hz. Measurements within a sand layer confirmed that seismoelectric amplitudes scaled approximately linearly with the product of frequency and seismic particle velocity as predicted by theoretical

  13. Observation and Absolute Frequency Measurements of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} Optical Clock Transition in Neutral Ytterbium

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, C.W.; Barber, Z.W.; Oates, C.W.; Fortier, T.M.; Diddams, S.A.; Hollberg, L.

    2005-08-19

    We report the direct excitation of the highly forbidden (6s{sup 2}){sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible}(6s6p){sup 3}P{sub 0} optical transition in two odd isotopes of neutral ytterbium. As the excitation laser frequency is scanned, absorption is detected by monitoring the depletion from an atomic cloud at {approx}70 {mu}K in a magneto-optical trap. The measured frequency in {sup 171}Yb (F=1/2) is 518 295 836 591.6{+-}4.4 kHz. The measured frequency in {sup 173}Yb (F=5/2) is 518 294 576 847.6{+-}4.4 kHz. Measurements are made with a femtosecond-laser frequency comb calibrated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology cesium fountain clock and represent nearly a 10{sup 6}-fold reduction in uncertainty. The natural linewidth of these J=0 to J=0 transitions is calculated to be {approx}10 mHz, making them well suited to support a new generation of optical atomic clocks based on confinement in an optical lattice.

  14. Frequency dependence of optical third-harmonic generation from doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, Vl. A.; Muryumin, E. E.; Gaiduk, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    In connection with the controversial question about the frequency dependence of the optical third-harmonic generation (THG) from doped graphene, which has recently been discussed in the literature, we develop an analytical theory for the THG susceptibility of doped graphene by using the original Genkin-Mednis nonlinear-conductivity-theory formalism including mixed intra- and interband terms. The theory is free of any nonphysical divergences at zero frequency, and it predicts the main resonant peak in the THG spectrum to be located at the photon energy ħω equal to two thirds of the Fermi energy EF of charge carriers in doped graphene.

  15. The Effect of Temperature Dependent Frequency Factor on the Evaluated Trapping Parameters of TSL Glow Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazici, A. N.; Öztürk, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of temperature dependency on frequency factor and its relationship to trapping parameters is discussed by using the peak shape method. The coefficients appearing in the peak shape formula for the calculation of the activation energy have been determined and tabulated for the symmetry factor mg(X) for x=0.50 and 0.75 of the peak intensity. It is found that significant errors occur in the value of the trapping parameters if the temperature dependecy of the frequency factor is not consider.

  16. Frequency-Dependent Amplitude Alterations of Resting-State Spontaneous Fluctuations in Late-Onset Depression

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yingying; Jia, Xize; Hou, Zhenghua; Zang, Yufeng; Yuan, Yonggui

    2015-01-01

    There is limited amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies in late-onset depression (LOD) but reported different results. This may be due to the impact of different frequency bands. In this study, we examined the ALFF in five different frequency bands (slow-6: 0–0.01 Hz; slow-5: 0.01–0.027 Hz; slow-4: 0.027–0.073 Hz; slow-3: 0.073–0.167 Hz, and slow-2: 0.167–0.25 Hz) within the whole brain during resting-state fMRI in 16 LOD patients and 16 normal control (NC) subjects. The ALFF of primary effect of disease was widely distributed over left cerebellum anterior lobe, left cerebellum posterior lobe, left middle orbitofrontal gyrus, left superior occipital, and right superior parietal, while the interaction effect of disease and frequency was distributed over right superior frontal gyrus. Further relationship analysis findings suggest these abnormal ALFF may relate to cognitive dysfunction of LOD. Therefore, our data show that LOD patients have widespread abnormalities in intrinsic brain activity, which is dependent on the frequency band, and suggest that future studies should take the frequency bands into account when measuring intrinsic brain activity. PMID:25705666

  17. Compressive sensing of frequency-dependent seismic radiation from subduction zone megathrust ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huajian; Shearer, Peter M.; Gerstoft, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Megathrust earthquakes rupture a broad zone of the subducting plate interface in both along-strike and along-dip directions. The along-dip rupture characteristics of megathrust events, e.g., their slip and energy radiation distribution, reflect depth-varying frictional properties of the slab interface. Here, we report high-resolution frequency-dependent seismic radiation of the four largest megathrust earthquakes in the past 10 y using a compressive-sensing (sparse source recovery) technique, resolving generally low-frequency radiation closer to the trench at shallower depths and high-frequency radiation farther from the trench at greater depths. Together with coseismic slip models and early aftershock locations, our results suggest depth-varying frictional properties at the subducting plate interfaces. The shallower portion of the slab interface (above ∼15 km) is frictionally stable or conditionally stable and is the source region for tsunami earthquakes with large coseismic slip, deficient high-frequency radiation, and few early aftershocks. The slab interface at intermediate depths (∼15–35 km) is the main unstable seismogenic zone for the nucleation of megathrust quakes, typically with large coseismic slip, abundant early aftershocks, and intermediate- to high-frequency radiation. The deeper portion of the slab interface (∼35–45 km) is seismically unstable, however with small coseismic slip, dominant high-frequency radiation, and relatively fewer aftershocks.

  18. On the frequency dependence of the otoacoustic emission latency in hypoacoustic and normal ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisto, R.; Moleti, A.

    2002-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the otoacoustic emission (OAE) latency of adult subjects have been obtained, as a function of frequency, by means of wavelet time-frequency analysis based on the iterative application of filter banks. The results are in agreement with previous OAE latency measurements by Tognola et al. [Hear. Res. 106, 112-122 (1997)], as regards both the latency values and the frequency dependence, and seem to be incompatible with the steep 1/f law that is predicted by scale-invariant full cochlear models. The latency-frequency relationship has been best fitted to a linear function of the cochlear physical distance, using the Greenwood map, and to an exponential function of the cochlear distance, for comparison with derived band ABR latency measurements. Two sets of ears [94 audiometrically normal and 42 impaired with high-frequency (f>3 kHz) hearing loss] have been separately analyzed. Significantly larger average latencies were found in the impaired ears in the mid-frequency range. Theoretical implications of these findings on the transmission of the traveling wave are discussed.

  19. Frequency-dependent damping in propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S. Krishna; Banerjee, D.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2014-07-10

    Propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves are often observed in polar plumes and active region fan loops. The observed periodicities of these waves range from a few minutes to a few tens of minutes and their amplitudes were found to decay rapidly as they travel along the supporting structure. Previously, thermal conduction, compressive viscosity, radiation, density stratification, and area divergence were identified to be some of the causes for change in the slow wave amplitude. Our recent studies indicate that the observed damping in these waves is frequency-dependent. We used imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly to study this dependence in detail and for the first time via observations we attempted to deduce a quantitative relation between the damping length and frequency of these oscillations. We developed a new analysis method to obtain this relation. The observed frequency dependence does not seem to agree with the current linear wave theory and it was found that the waves observed in the polar regions show a different dependence from those observed in the on-disk loop structures despite the similarity in their properties.

  20. A Model for Rate-Dependent Hysteresis in Piezoceramic Materials Operating at Low Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ralph C.; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Wieman, Robert

    2001-01-01

    This paper addresses the modeling of certain rate-dependent mechanisms which contribute to hysteresis inherent to piezoelectric materials operating at low frequencies. While quasistatic models are suitable for initial material characterization in some applications, the reduction in coercive field and polarization values which occur as frequencies increase must be accommodated to achieve the full capabilities of the materials. The model employed here quantifies the hysteresis in two steps. In the first, anhysteretic polarization switching is modeled through the application of Boltzmann principles to balance the electrostatic and thermal energy. Hysteresis is then incorporated through the quantification of energy required to translate and bend domain walls pinned at inclusions inherent to the materials. The performance of the model is illustrated through a fit to low frequency data (0.1 Hz - 1 Hz) from a PZT5A wafer.

  1. Constraints on frequency-dependent violations of Shapiro delay from GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahya, Emre O.; Desai, Shantanu

    2016-05-01

    On 14th September 2015, a transient gravitational wave (GW150914) was detected by the two LIGO detectors at Hanford and Livingston from the coalescence of a binary black hole system located at a distance of about 400 Mpc. We point out that GW150914 experienced a Shapiro delay due to the gravitational potential of the mass distribution along the line of sight of about 1800 days. Also, the near-simultaneous arrival of gravitons over a frequency range of about 200 Hz within a 0.2 s window allows us to constrain any violations of Shapiro delay and Einstein's equivalence principle between the gravitons at different frequencies. From the calculated Shapiro delay and the observed duration of the signal, frequency-dependent violations of the equivalence principle for gravitons are constrained to an accuracy of O (10-9).

  2. The frequency-dependent directivity of a planar fabry-perot polymer film ultrasound sensor.

    PubMed

    Cox, Benjamin T; Beard, Paul C

    2007-02-01

    A model of the frequency-dependent directivity of a planar, optically-addressed, Fabry-Perot (FP), polymer film ultrasound sensor is described and validated against experimental directivity measurements made over a frequency range of 1 to 15 MHz and angles from normal incidence to 80 degrees. The model may be used, for example, as a predictive tool to improve sensor design, or to provide a noise-free response function that could be deconvolved from sound-field measurements in order to improve accuracy in high-frequency metrology and imaging applications. The specific question of whether effective element sizes as small as the optical-diffraction limit can be achieved was investigated. For a polymer film sensor with a FP cavity of thickness d, the minimum effective element radius was found to be about 0.9 d, and that an illumination spot radius of less than d/4 is required to achieve it. PMID:17328336

  3. Fundamental resonance frequency dependence of the proximity effect of quartz crystal resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao

    2015-11-01

    The fundamental frequency dependence of the proximity effect of a quartz crystal resonator (QCR) has been experimentally observed. By an impedance analysis method, the response mechanism underlying this effect has been examined. It is found that the disturbance of the fringing electric field of QCR due to adjacent metal is the main reason. Moreover, this experiment demonstrates that the proximity effect of QCR is strongly associated with the fundamental resonance frequency. Also, the effect of the size of the adjacent copper disk on the proximity effect of QCR has also been studied. The accurate understanding and prediction of this effect, on one hand, can help us distinguish abnormal frequency fluctuation especially in the presence of the adjacent metal. On the other hand, this effect can also be used for sensing applications.

  4. Temperature dependence of shear wave attenuation in partially molten gabbronorite at seismic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Fabrice R.; Ildefonse, Benoit; Bagdassarov, Nickolai S.

    2005-12-01

    Torsion oscillatory deformation experiments have been performed at high temperatures (600-1170°C) and over a wide range of low frequencies (20-2.10-3 Hz) on fine-grained gabbronorite samples from the Oman ophiolite in order to determine the shear wave attenuation as a function of temperature and melt fraction. The specimens have a small and uniform grain size (0.25-0.3 mm) and do not contain secondary, hydrated minerals. Measurements of internal friction (Q-1) were performed using a forced oscillatory torsion apparatus at small strains (~10-7), and with increasing small temperature steps to reduce thermal microcracking. The general dependence of Q-1 to frequency is Q-1~ω-α, where ω is the angular velocity of forced oscillations and α is an empirical exponent. Below the melting temperature (~1050°C), α has average values of ~0.15 at low frequency (<=0.5 Hz) and 0.06 at higher frequency. Above the melting temperature, α has average values of ~0.22 at low frequency and -0.02 at higher frequency. This frequency dependence of Q-1 is attributed to a viscoelastic behaviour due to the diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding, and partially to the squirt flow of the melt-phase wetting grain boundaries. The onset of melting is associated with a markedly higher Q-1 and a stronger dependence of Q-1 on temperature. The melt-related mechanical dissipation process could be a melt squirt flow. The characteristic frequency for the melt squirt flow is ωm~ 0.15-300 Hz when the melt pocket aspect ratio is ~10-3-10-2. Around the melting temperature the internal friction can be approximated by an experimental power law Q-1=A.[ω-1.d-1. exp(-Ea/RT)]α with α~ 0.08, A= 34.72s-αμm-α and Ea~ 873 kJmol-1.

  5. Temperature dependence of internal friction of partially molten gabbronorite at seismic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, F.; Ildefonse, B.; Bagdassarov, N.

    2003-04-01

    Torsion deformation experiments have been realized at temperatures 600-1170C and over a range of frequencies 20-2\\cdot10-3 Hz on small-grained gabbronorite samples with uniform grain size ˜ 200-250μ from the Oman ophiolite. Measurements of internal friction Q-1 were performed using oscillatory force torsion apparatus at small strains (˜ 10-7), small torque ˜10-4 N\\cdot m and with increasing small temperature steps to prevent crystallization of the melt and thermal microcracking. During the experiments the furnace was purged with argon gas to reduce the oxidation of samples. The general dependence of internal friction with frequency is Q-1∝ω-α, where ω is the angular velocity of forced oscillations and α is an empirical exponent. Below the melting temperature (˜1050C), α˜-0.15 at low frequency (<= 0.5 Hz) and α˜-0.06 at higher frequency. Above the melting temperature, α˜-0.22 at low frequency and α˜0 at higher frequency. This frequency dependence is attributed to the viscoelastic behaviour due to the intrinsic diffusional mechanism and to the presence of melt phase on grain boundaries. The first order effect of melt on internal friction above the melting temperature is supported by i) the observation in thin sections, after experiments, of phases resulting from partial melting of the rock, ii) the onset of melting is associated with markedly stronger Q-1. The melt-related dissipation could be melt squirt flow because the characteristic frequency for the fluid flow is ωm˜0.2-200 Hz when the melt pocket aspect ratio is ˜10-3-10-2. Temperature and grain size (d) dependences of internal friction can be approximated by the power law Q-1=A\\cdot[omega;-1\\cdot d-1\\cdot exp{-E/RT}]α with α˜-0.09, E˜860 kJ/mol.

  6. ABSOLUTE POLARIMETRY AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    OKADA; BRAVAR, A.; BUNCE, G.; GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; MAKDISI, Y.; NASS, A.; WOOD, J.; ZELENSKI, Z.; ET AL.

    2007-09-10

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy Of {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} < 5%. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power A{sub N} of this process has allowed us to achieve {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} = 4.2% in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of AN in the CNI region (four-momentum transfer squared 0.001 < -t < 0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2}) are also discussed. We point out the current issues and expected optimum accuracy in 2006 and the future.

  7. Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography using fat rays: application to near-surface seismic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordi, Claudio; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2016-08-01

    Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography does not rely on the high frequency assumption made in classical ray-based tomography. By incorporating the effects of velocity structures in the first Fresnel volume around the central ray, it offers a more realistic and accurate representation of the actual physics of seismic wave propagation and thus, enhanced imaging of near-surface structures is expected. The objective of this work was to apply frequency-dependent first arrival traveltime tomography to surface seismic data that were acquired for exploration scale and near-surface seismic imaging. We adapted a fat ray tomography algorithm from global-earth seismology that calculates the Fresnel volumes based on source and receiver (adjoint source) traveltime fields. The fat ray tomography algorithm was tested on synthetic model data that mimics the dimensions of two field data sets. The field data sets are presented as two case studies where fat ray tomography was applied for near-surface seismic imaging. The data set of the first case study was recorded for high-resolution near-surface imaging of a Quaternary valley (profile length < 1 km); the second data set was acquired for hydrocarbon search (profile length > 10 km). All results of fat ray tomography are compared against the results of classical ray-based tomography. We show that fat ray tomography can provide enhanced tomograms and that it is possible to recover more information on the subsurface when compared to ray tomography. However, model assessment based on the column sum of the Jacobian matrix revealed that especially the deep parts of the structure in the fat ray tomograms might not be adequately covered by fat rays. Furthermore, the performance of the fat ray tomography depends on the chosen input frequency in relation to the scale of the seismic survey. Synthetic data testing revealed that the best results were obtained when the frequency was chosen to correspond to an approximate wavelength

  8. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  9. Frequency dependence of viscous and viscoelastic dissipation in coated micro-cantilevers from noise measurement.

    PubMed

    Paolino, P; Bellon, L

    2009-10-01

    We measure the mechanical thermal noise of soft silicon atomic force microscope cantilevers. Using an interferometric setup, we obtain a resolution down to 10(-14) m Hz(-1/2) on a wide spectral range (3-10(5) Hz). The low frequency behavior depends dramatically on the presence of a reflective coating: almost flat spectra for uncoated cantilevers versus a 1/f like trend for coated ones. The addition of a viscoelastic term in models of the mechanical system can account for this observation. Use of Kramers-Kronig relations validate this approach with a complete determination of the response of the cantilever: a power law with a small coefficient is found for the frequency dependence of viscoelasticity due to the coating, whereas the viscous damping due to the surrounding atmosphere is accurately described by the Sader model. PMID:19738311

  10. [On peculiarities of temperature dependences of water spectra in the terahertz frequency domain].

    PubMed

    Penkov, N V; Yashin, V A; Shvirst, N E; Fesenko, E E; Fesenko, E E

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed spectra of light and heavy water at temperatures from 4 up to 50 degrees C in a frequency range of 0.15 to 6.5 THz. It was shown that the amplitude of high-frequency relaxation absorption band with its maximum at 0.5 THz extends with increasing, temperature and this temperature dependence for light water has a marked feature at 35-40 degrees C as a sharp growth. This fact is noteworthy because this range corresponds to physiological values of a body temperature of the warm-blooded organisms. At the same time, the analogous temperature dependence for heavy water in the considered temperature range lacks this particular feature. Thus, the water with its properties differs significantly not only from other fluids, but also from its own isotopologues. PMID:25702478

  11. Time-domain representation of frequency-dependent foundation impedance functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.

    2006-01-01

    Foundation impedance functions provide a simple means to account for soil-structure interaction (SSI) when studying seismic response of structures. Impedance functions represent the dynamic stiffness of the soil media surrounding the foundation. The fact that impedance functions are frequency dependent makes it difficult to incorporate SSI in standard time-history analysis software. This paper introduces a simple method to convert frequency-dependent impedance functions into time-domain filters. The method is based on the least-squares approximation of impedance functions by ratios of two complex polynomials. Such ratios are equivalent, in the time-domain, to discrete-time recursive filters, which are simple finite-difference equations giving the relationship between foundation forces and displacements. These filters can easily be incorporated into standard time-history analysis programs. Three examples are presented to show the applications of the method.

  12. Frequency-dependent success of aggressive mimics in a cleaning symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Cheney, Karen L; Côté, Isabelle M

    2005-01-01

    Batesian mimics—palatable organisms that resemble unpalatable ones—are usually maintained in populations by frequency-dependent selection. We tested whether this mechanism was also responsible for the maintenance of aggressive mimicry in natural populations of coral reef fishes. The attack success of bluestriped fangblennies (Plagiotremus rhinorhynchos), which mimic juvenile bluestreaked cleaner wrasses (Labroides dimidiatus) in colour but tear flesh and scales from fishes instead of removing ectoparasites, was frequency-dependent, increasing as mimics became rarer relative to their model. However, cleaner mimics were also more successful on reefs with higher densities of potential victims, perhaps because a dilution-like effect creates few opportunities for potential victims to learn to avoid mimics. Further studies should reveal whether this second mechanism is specific to aggressive mimicry. PMID:16321786

  13. Pulsed arrays: A new method of flaw detection by generating a frequency dependent angle of propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, S. J.; Dixon, S. M.

    2012-05-01

    A new method of using an array of generation sources, pulsed simultaneously to generate a wavefront with a frequency dependant angle of propagation, has been developed. If pulsed arrays are used to generate a wave with a frequency dependent angle of propagation, the angle at which the wave was launched can be identified by measuring the frequency of the detected wave. In an isotropic material this means that it is possible use a second transducer to locate the position of the scatterer, whereas with a conventional single element generator method, it can only be located onto an ellipse. In addition to an increased scan speed, the resolution of detection should also be improved. A theoretical framework is put forward to explain how the wavefront is created from the superposition of the waves from the individual elements, and how the frequency varies along the wavefront. Finite element models and experimental measurements were also carried out, and both agreed with the analytic model. This method will have applications within NDE, but could also extend to sonar and radar techniques.

  14. Frequency, pressure and strain dependence of nonlinear elasticity in Berea Sandstone

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Riviere, Jacques; Johnson, Paul Allan; Marone, Chris; Pimienta, Lucas; Scuderi, Marco; Candela, Thibault; Shokouhi, Parisa; Schubnel, Alexandre; Fortin, Jerome

    2016-04-14

    Acoustoelasticity measurements in a sample of room dry Berea sandstone are conducted at various loading frequencies to explore the transition between the quasi-static ( f → 0) and dynamic (few kilohertz) nonlinear elastic response. We carry out these measurements at multiple confining pressures and perform a multivariate regression analysis to quantify the dependence of the harmonic content on strain amplitude, frequency, and pressure. The modulus softening (equivalent to the harmonic at 0f) increases by a factor 2–3 over 3 orders of magnitude increase in frequency. Harmonics at 2f, 4f, and 6f exhibit similar behaviors. In contrast, the harmonic at 1fmore » appears frequency independent. This result corroborates previous studies showing that the nonlinear elasticity of rocks can be described with a minimum of two physical mechanisms. This study provides quantitative data that describes the rate dependency of nonlinear elasticity. Furthermore, these findings can be used to improve theories relating the macroscopic elastic response to microstructural features.« less

  15. The spatial frequency tuning of optic-flow-dependent behaviors in the bumblebee Bombus impatiens

    PubMed Central

    Dyhr, Jonathan P.; Higgins, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    Insects use visual estimates of flight speed for a variety of behaviors, including visual navigation, odometry, grazing landings and flight speed control, but the neuronal mechanisms underlying speed detection remain unknown. Although many models and theories have been proposed for how the brain extracts the angular speed of the retinal image, termed optic flow, we lack the detailed electrophysiological and behavioral data necessary to conclusively support any one model. One key property by which different models of motion detection can be differentiated is their spatiotemporal frequency tuning. Numerous studies have suggested that optic-flow-dependent behaviors are largely insensitive to the spatial frequency of a visual stimulus, but they have sampled only a narrow range of spatial frequencies, have not always used narrowband stimuli, and have yielded slightly different results between studies based on the behaviors being investigated. In this study, we present a detailed analysis of the spatial frequency dependence of the centering response in the bumblebee Bombus impatiens using sinusoidal and square wave patterns. PMID:20435814

  16. On the frequency dependence and spatial coherence of PKP precursor amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancinelli, Nicholas; Shearer, Peter; Thomas, Christine

    2016-03-01

    Studies now agree that small-scale (˜10 km) weak (˜0.1%) velocity perturbations throughout the lowermost mantle generate the globally averaged amplitudes of 1 Hz precursors to the core phase, . The possible frequency dependence and spatial coherence of this scattered phase, however, has been given less attention. Using a large global data set of ˜150,000 PKP precursor recordings, we characterize the frequency dependence of PKP precursors at central frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 4 Hz. At greater frequencies, we observe more scattered energy (relative to the reference phase PKPdf), particularly at shorter ranges. We model this observation by invoking heterogeneity at length scales from 2 to 30 km. Amplitudes at 0.5 Hz, in particular, suggest the presence of more heterogeneity at scales >8 km than present in previously published models. Using a regional bootstrap approach, we identify large (>20°), spatially coherent regions of anomalously strong scattering beneath the West Pacific, Central/North America, and—to a lesser extent—East Africa. Finally, as proof of concept, we use array processing techniques to locate the origin of scattered energy observed in Southern California by the Anza and Southern California Seismic Networks. The energy appears to come primarily from out-of-plane scattering on the receiver side. We suggest that such improvised arrays can increase global coverage and may reveal whether a majority of precursor energy comes from localized heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle.

  17. Energetic radiation influence on temperature dependency of Brillouin frequency in optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Pheron, X.; Ouerdane, Y.; Delepine-Lesoille, S.; Boukenter, A.; Bertrand, J.

    2011-07-01

    We present a post mortem study of the influence of energetic radiation on optical fiber Brillouin sensors, both Brillouin spectrum and its temperature dependency in two different fibers, a photosensitive optical fiber and a SMF28. The target application is nuclear wastes repository monitoring where optical fiber Brillouin sensors might be exposed to energetic radiation. UV exposure induced optical losses, Brillouin frequency shifts up to 28 MHz and even a variation of the temperature dependency. The photosensitive optical fiber resulted more sensitive than SMF28{sup TM}. (authors)

  18. Sensitivity of frequency-dependent traveltimes to laterally heterogeneous, anisotropic Earth structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li; Jordan, Thomas H.

    1998-06-01

    We investigate the effect of lateral heterogeneity on the frequency-dependent traveltime residuals of various seismic arrivals, for example P, S, SS, SS, SSS, SSS, Love and Rayleigh waves. These residuals, which are examples of generalized seismological data functionals (GSDFs), are measured from narrow-band cross-correlagrams between observed seismograms and isolated waveforms (isolation filters) synthesized by weighted (partial) normal-mode summations. The effect of lateral heterogeneity is incorporated through the coupling between normal-mode multiplets with the help of first-order perturbation theory. Based upon the normal-mode coupling matrix for the eigenfrequency shifts, the sensitivity kernels of the frequency-dependent traveltime residuals to the model parameter perturbations are derived by an application of the Born approximation. In order to reduce the computational labour so that tomographic inversions can practically be conducted, 2-D sensitivity kernels of the traveltime residuals to the lateral structure within the source-receiver great-circle plane are obtained with a stationary-phase integration. In addition, a normal-mode coupling scheme is adopted to increase further the computational efficiency in which a pair of modes are coupled only when the differences between their eigenfrequencies and group velocities are small. We present numerical examples for the 2-D Fréchet kernels of frequency-dependent traveltime residuals for various model parameters in a transversely isotropic model, namely the velocities of vertically and horizontally polarized and/or propagating shear and compressional waves and the topographies of the 410 and 660 km discontinuities. Wherever possible, physical explanations are also provided on the different aspects of the 2-D Fréchet kernels with emphasis on the complex phenomenon of interference among multiple seismic waves. We also demonstrate, both algebraically and numerically, that when the waveforms used in the

  19. In vitro characterization of HCN channel kinetics and frequency dependence in myocytes predicts biological pacemaker functionality.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Bucchi, Annalisa; Oren, Ronit V; Kryukova, Yelena; Dun, Wen; Clancy, Colleen E; Robinson, Richard B

    2009-04-01

    The pacemaker current, mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, contributes to the initiation and regulation of cardiac rhythm. Previous experiments creating HCN-based biological pacemakers in vivo found that an engineered HCN2/HCN1 chimeric channel (HCN212) resulted in significantly faster rates than HCN2, interrupted by 1-5 s pauses. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the differences in HCN212 and HCN2 in vivo functionality as biological pacemakers, we studied newborn rat ventricular myocytes over-expressing either HCN2 or HCN212 channels. The HCN2- and HCN212-over-expressing myocytes manifest similar voltage dependence, current density and sensitivity to saturating cAMP concentrations, but HCN212 has faster activation/deactivation kinetics. Compared with HCN2, myocytes expressing HCN212 exhibit a faster spontaneous rate and greater incidence of irregular rhythms (i.e. periods of rapid spontaneous rate followed by pauses). To explore these rhythm differences further, we imposed consecutive pacing and found that activation kinetics of the two channels are slower at faster pacing frequencies. As a result, time-dependent HCN current flowing during diastole decreases for both constructs during a train of stimuli at a rapid frequency, with the effect more pronounced for HCN2. In addition, the slower deactivation kinetics of HCN2 contributes to more pronounced instantaneous current at a slower frequency. As a result of the frequency dependence of both instantaneous and time-dependent current, HCN2 exhibits more robust negative feedback than HCN212, contributing to the maintenance of a stable pacing rhythm. These results illustrate the benefit of screening HCN constructs in spontaneously active myocyte cultures and may provide the basis for future optimization of HCN-based biological pacemakers. PMID:19171659

  20. Rolling estimations of long range dependence volatility for high frequency S&P500 index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Chin Wen; Pei, Tan Pei

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluates the time-varying long range dependence behaviors of the S&P500 volatility index using the modified rescaled adjusted range (R/S) statistic. For better computational result, a high frequency rolling bipower variation realized volatility estimates are used to avoid possible abrupt jump. The empirical analysis findings allow us to understand better the informationally market efficiency before and after the subprime mortgage crisis.

  1. The Hygiene Hypothesis: An Explanation for the Increased Frequency of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Jean-François; Chatenoud, Lucienne

    2012-01-01

    The steadily increasing frequency of insulin-dependent diabetes in several countries is best explained today by the decline of infections. Epidemiologic and animal data support this conclusion, which, however, requires confirmation by intervention trials in man. The mechanisms of the protective effect of infections on diabetes onset are diverse including competition for homeostatic factors and stimulation of regulatory T cells and of Toll-like receptors. These considerations might have interesting therapeutic applications for the prevention of the disease. PMID:22355800

  2. Electrical properties of lunar soil dependence on frequency, temperature and moisture.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangway, D. W.; Chapman, W. B.; Olhoeft, G. R.; Carnes, J.

    1972-01-01

    It was found that the dielectric constant and loss tangent of lunar soil samples in the range from 100 Hz to 1 MHz are not strongly dependent on frequency provided care is taken to avoid exposure of the sample to atmospheric air containing moisture. The loss tangent value obtained is lower by nearly a factor 10 than any previously reported value. The measurement data imply that the surface layers of the moon are probably extremely transparent to radiowaves.

  3. Optimal SNR exposure time for speckle imaging: experimental results with frequency-dependent detector noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, David W.; Suzuki, Andrew H.; von Bokern, Mark A.; Keating, Donna D.; Roggemann, Michael C.

    1994-06-01

    We review recent arguments for using increased spectral bandwidth and exposure times to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio of speckle imaging estimators and discuss the tradeoff between camera exposure time and the number of data frames collected when observing time is fixed. We compare experimental results with a previously-derived expression for optimal exposure time and find reasonable agreement after accounting for frequency-dependent camera noise.

  4. Robust H∞ Control for Time-Varying Delay Systems with Frequency-Dependent Performance Weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahara, Masanori; Arai, Shingo; Uchimura, Yutaka

    This paper proposes a control design that enables us to shape the frequency-dependent performance using a modified Lyapunov-Krasovskii-based stabilizing condition. A stabilizing controller can be obtained by solving the condition formulated in Linear Matrix Inequality (LMI). The designed controller is evaluated using numerical simulations, and it is employed to realize the velocity control of a DC motor. Experimental results verified that the proposed controller achieved better performance with less conservativeness and that it is applicable to real plants.

  5. Evidence for Association Between Low Frequency Variants in CHRNA6/CHRNB3 and Antisocial Drug Dependence.

    PubMed

    Kamens, Helen M; Corley, Robin P; Richmond, Phillip A; Darlington, Todd M; Dowell, Robin; Hopfer, Christian J; Stallings, Michael C; Hewitt, John K; Brown, Sandra A; Ehringer, Marissa A

    2016-09-01

    Common SNPs in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor genes (CHRN genes) have been associated with drug behaviors and personality traits, but the influence of rare genetic variants is not well characterized. The goal of this project was to identify novel rare variants in CHRN genes in the Center for Antisocial Drug Dependence (CADD) and Genetics of Antisocial Drug Dependence (GADD) samples and to determine if low frequency variants are associated with antisocial drug dependence. Two samples of 114 and 200 individuals were selected using a case/control design including the tails of the phenotypic distribution of antisocial drug dependence. The capture, sequencing, and analysis of all variants in 16 CHRN genes (CHRNA1-7, 9, 10, CHRNB1-4, CHRND, CHRNG, CHRNE) were performed independently for each subject in each sample. Sequencing reads were aligned to the human reference sequence using BWA prior to variant calling with the Genome Analysis ToolKit (GATK). Low frequency variants (minor allele frequency < 0.05) were analyzed using SKAT-O and C-alpha to examine the distribution of rare variants among cases and controls. In our larger sample, the region containing the CHRNA6/CHRNB3 gene cluster was significantly associated with disease status using both SKAT-O and C-alpha (unadjusted p values <0.05). More low frequency variants in the CHRNA6/CHRNB3 gene region were observed in cases compared to controls. These data support a role for genetic variants in CHRN genes and antisocial drug behaviors. PMID:27085880

  6. Spin-dependent transport mechanisms in CoFe/MgO/n+-Si junctions investigated by frequency response of signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inokuchi, Tomoaki; Ishikawa, Mizue; Sugiyama, Hideyuki; Saito, Yoshiaki

    2016-07-01

    We investigated spin-dependent transport properties in CoFe/MgO/n+-Si junctions by measuring Hanle signals and their dependence on the measurement frequency. The CoFe/MgO/n+-Si junctions exhibited two types of Hanle curves with different half-widths. Hanle signals with a broad half-width were observed mainly in the low-bias region, and these signals exhibited apparent frequency dependence and disappeared in the high-frequency region though Hanle signals with narrow half-widths were almost independent of the measurement frequency used in this study. This frequency dependence is explained by the mechanism of two-step tunneling. These results show that investigating the frequency response signals gives clear information on spin-dependent transport mechanisms.

  7. Modeling CO2 vertical migration based on seismic frequency-dependent AVO responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bonan; Liu, Cai; Lu, Qi; Pang, Shuo

    2016-04-01

    Injection of CO2 into a geological subsurface will cause seismic dispersion and attenuation, which will change with the migration of the CO2 plume. Therefore, temporal attenuation changes from the seismic section with the CO2 plume can provide additional information about CO2 storage, migration, and possible leakage. The frequency-dependent amplitude variation with offset (FDAVO) attribute, as a seismic characteristic, which quantifies frequency-dependent anomalies from various kinds of sources, is widely applied in fields of hydrocarbon indication and fluid identification. In this work we aim to investigate the potential of the FDAVO attribute as a monitoring tool during the process of CO2 migration. We combine the Buckley-Leverett equation and the patchy-saturation model to simulate the substitution process. We then apply a novel tool, the FDAVO inversion method, to estimate the dispersion level at the target interface. What is more, the characteristic of the frequency-dependent attribute versus time is studied for the first time. The result of the numerical simulation reveals that: (1) caused by CO2 injection, there is significant dispersion and attenuation within the seismic band; (2) the level of dispersion reflects the migration of CO2 plume; (3) dispersion anomalies are well quantified by the inverted FDAVO attributes, which can be utilized to characterize the vertical distribution of the CO2 plume.

  8. Real-time seismic intensity prediction using frequency-dependent site amplification factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiso, Masashi; Aoki, Shigeki; Hoshiba, Mitsuyuki

    2016-05-01

    A promising approach for the next generation of earthquake early warning system is based on predicting ground motion directly from observed ground motion, without any information of hypocenter. In this study, we predicted seismic intensity at the target stations from the observed ground motion at adjacent stations, employing two different methods of correction for site amplification factors. The first method was frequency-dependent correction prediction, in which we used a digital causal filter to correct the site amplification for the observed waveform in the time domain. The second method was scalar correction, in which we used average differences in seismic intensity between two stations for the site amplification correction. Results from thousands of station pairs that covered almost all of Japan showed that seismic intensity prediction with frequency-dependent correction prediction was more accurate than prediction with scalar correction. Frequency-dependent correction for site amplification in the time domain may lead to more accurate prediction of ground motion in real time.

  9. Warning signals are under positive frequency-dependent selection in nature.

    PubMed

    Chouteau, Mathieu; Arias, Mónica; Joron, Mathieu

    2016-02-23

    Positive frequency-dependent selection (FDS) is a selection regime where the fitness of a phenotype increases with its frequency, and it is thought to underlie important adaptive strategies resting on signaling and communication. However, whether and how positive FDS truly operates in nature remains unknown, which hampers our understanding of signal diversity. Here, we test for positive FDS operating on the warning color patterns of chemically defended butterflies forming multiple coexisting mimicry assemblages in the Amazon. Using malleable prey models placed in localities showing differences in the relative frequencies of warningly colored prey, we demonstrate that the efficiency of a warning signal increases steadily with its local frequency in the natural community, up to a threshold where protection stabilizes. The shape of this relationship is consistent with the direct effect of the local abundance of each warning signal on the corresponding avoidance knowledge of the local predator community. This relationship, which differs from purifying selection acting on each mimetic pattern, indicates that predator knowledge, integrated over the entire community, is saturated only for the most common warning signals. In contrast, among the well-established warning signals present in local prey assemblages, most are incompletely known to local predators and enjoy incomplete protection. This incomplete predator knowledge should generate strong benefits to life history traits that enhance warning efficiency by increasing the effective frequency of prey visible to predators. Strategies such as gregariousness or niche convergence between comimics may therefore readily evolve through their effects on predator knowledge and warning efficiency. PMID:26858416

  10. Viscoelastic characterization of compacted pharmaceutical excipient materials by analysis of frequency-dependent mechanical relaxation processes.

    PubMed

    Welch, K; Mousavi, S; Lundberg, B; Strømme, M

    2005-09-01

    A newly developed method for determining the frequency-dependent complex Young's modulus was employed to analyze the mechanical response of compacted microcrystalline cellulose, sorbitol, ethyl cellulose and starch for frequencies up to 20 kHz. A Debye-like relaxation was observed in all the studied pharmaceutical excipient materials and a comparison with corresponding dielectric spectroscopy data was made. The location in frequency of the relaxation peak was shown to correlate to the measured tensile strength of the tablets, and the relaxation was interpreted as the vibrational response of the interparticle hydrogen and van der Waals bindings in the tablets. Further, the measured relaxation strength, holding information about the energy loss involved in the relaxation processes, showed that the weakest material in terms of tensile strength, starch, is the material among the four tested ones that is able to absorb the most energy within its structure when exposed to external perturbations inducing vibrations in the studied frequency range. The results indicate that mechanical relaxation analysis performed over relatively broad frequency ranges should be useful for predicting material properties of importance for the functionality of a material in applications such as, e.g., drug delivery, drug storage and handling, and also for clarifying the origin of hitherto unexplained molecular processes. PMID:16184321

  11. Viscoelastic characterization of compacted pharmaceutical excipient materials by analysis of frequency-dependent mechanical relaxation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, K.; Mousavi, S.; Lundberg, B.; Strømme, M.

    2005-09-01

    A newly developed method for determining the frequency-dependent complex Young's modulus was employed to analyze the mechanical response of compacted microcrystalline cellulose, sorbitol, ethyl cellulose and starch for frequencies up to 20 kHz. A Debye-like relaxation was observed in all the studied pharmaceutical excipient materials and a comparison with corresponding dielectric spectroscopy data was made. The location in frequency of the relaxation peak was shown to correlate to the measured tensile strength of the tablets, and the relaxation was interpreted as the vibrational response of the interparticle hydrogen and van der Waals bindings in the tablets. Further, the measured relaxation strength, holding information about the energy loss involved in the relaxation processes, showed that the weakest material in terms of tensile strength, starch, is the material among the four tested ones that is able to absorb the most energy within its structure when exposed to external perturbations inducing vibrations in the studied frequency range. The results indicate that mechanical relaxation analysis performed over relatively broad frequency ranges should be useful for predicting material properties of importance for the functionality of a material in applications such as, e.g., drug delivery, drug storage and handling, and also for clarifying the origin of hitherto unexplained molecular processes.

  12. Frequency dependent electrical properties of nano-CdS/Ag junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, D.; Choudhury, A.

    2005-05-01

    Polymer embedded cadmium sulfide nanoparticles/quantum dots were synthesized by a chemical route using polyvinyl alcohol (lmw) as the desired matrix. In an attempt to measure the electrical properties of nano-CdS/Ag samples, we propose that contribution from surface traps are mainly responsible in determining the I˜ V and C˜ V characteristics in high frequency ranges. To be specific, beyond 1.2 MHz, the carrier injection from the trap centers of the embedded quantum dots is ensured by large current establishment even at negative biasing condition of the junction. The unexpected nonlinear signature of C˜ V response is believed to be due to the fact that while trying to follow very high signal frequency (at least 10-3 of recombination frequency), there is complete abruptness in carrier trapping (charging) or/and detrapping (decay) in a given CdS nanoparticle assembly. The frequency dependent unique role of the trap carriers certainly find application in nanoelectronic devices at a desirable frequency of operation.

  13. Warning signals are under positive frequency-dependent selection in nature

    PubMed Central

    Chouteau, Mathieu; Arias, Mónica; Joron, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Positive frequency-dependent selection (FDS) is a selection regime where the fitness of a phenotype increases with its frequency, and it is thought to underlie important adaptive strategies resting on signaling and communication. However, whether and how positive FDS truly operates in nature remains unknown, which hampers our understanding of signal diversity. Here, we test for positive FDS operating on the warning color patterns of chemically defended butterflies forming multiple coexisting mimicry assemblages in the Amazon. Using malleable prey models placed in localities showing differences in the relative frequencies of warningly colored prey, we demonstrate that the efficiency of a warning signal increases steadily with its local frequency in the natural community, up to a threshold where protection stabilizes. The shape of this relationship is consistent with the direct effect of the local abundance of each warning signal on the corresponding avoidance knowledge of the local predator community. This relationship, which differs from purifying selection acting on each mimetic pattern, indicates that predator knowledge, integrated over the entire community, is saturated only for the most common warning signals. In contrast, among the well-established warning signals present in local prey assemblages, most are incompletely known to local predators and enjoy incomplete protection. This incomplete predator knowledge should generate strong benefits to life history traits that enhance warning efficiency by increasing the effective frequency of prey visible to predators. Strategies such as gregariousness or niche convergence between comimics may therefore readily evolve through their effects on predator knowledge and warning efficiency. PMID:26858416

  14. Methods to calibrate the absolute receive sensitivity of single-element, focused transducers

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Kyle T.; Mast, T. Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Absolute pressure measurements of acoustic emissions by single-element, focused passive cavitation detectors would be facilitated by improved wideband receive calibration techniques. Here, calibration methods were developed to characterize the absolute, frequency-dependent receive sensitivity of a spherically focused, single-element transducer using pulse-echo and pitch-catch techniques. Validation of these calibration methods on a focused receiver were made by generating a pulse from a small diameter source at the focus of the transducer and comparing the absolute pressure measured by a calibrated hydrophone to that of the focused transducer using the receive sensitivities determined here. PMID:26428812

  15. Methods to calibrate the absolute receive sensitivity of single-element, focused transducers.

    PubMed

    Rich, Kyle T; Mast, T Douglas

    2015-09-01

    Absolute pressure measurements of acoustic emissions by single-element, focused passive cavitation detectors would be facilitated by improved wideband receive calibration techniques. Here, calibration methods were developed to characterize the absolute, frequency-dependent receive sensitivity of a spherically focused, single-element transducer using pulse-echo and pitch-catch techniques. Validation of these calibration methods on a focused receiver were made by generating a pulse from a small diameter source at the focus of the transducer and comparing the absolute pressure measured by a calibrated hydrophone to that of the focused transducer using the receive sensitivities determined here. PMID:26428812

  16. Frequency dependent attenuation characteristics of coda waves in the Northwestern Himalayan (India) region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sushil; Singh, Priyamvada; Singh, Pitam; Biswal, Shubhasmita; Parija, Mahesh Prasad

    2016-03-01

    Digital seismogram data of 82 earthquakes from the Northwestern Himalayan (India) region recorded at different stations during 2004-2006 were analyzed to study the seismic coda wave attenuation characteristics in this region. We used 132 seismic observations from local earthquakes with a hypocentral distance <240 km and a magnitude range of 1.2-4.9 to study the coda QC using the single isotropic scattering model. These earthquakes were recorded at 20 temporary seismic stations installed in the Northwestern Himalayas (India) by the Wadia institute of Himalayan Geology, Dehradun. The QC values were estimated at 10 central frequencies: 1.5, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24, and 28 Hz using starting lapse-times of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 s and coda window-lengths of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 s. The QC fits the frequency dependent power-law, QC =Q0fn . For a 10 s lapse time with a 10-s coda window length QC = 47.42f1.012 and for a 50 s lapse time with a 50 s coda window length, QC = 204.1f0.934 . Q0 (QC at 1 Hz) varied from ∼47 for a 10 s lapse time and a 10 s window length, to ∼204 for a 50 s lapse time and a 50 s window length. An average frequency dependent power law fit for the study region may be given as QC = 116.716f0.9943 . The exponent of the frequency dependence law n ranged from 1.08 to 0.9, which correlates well with values obtained in other seismically and tectonically active and heterogeneous regions of the world. In our study region, QC increases both with respect to lapse time and frequency, i.e., the attenuation decreases as the quality factor is inversely proportional to attenuation. The low QC values or high attenuation at lower frequencies and high QC values or low attenuation at higher frequencies suggest that the heterogeneity decreases with increasing depth in our study region.

  17. KARAT-LAMBDA - frequency dependent ray-traced troposphere delays for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobiger, Thomas; Baron, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Space-geodetic microwave techniques work under the assumption that the only dispersive, i.e. frequency dependent delay contribution is caused by the ionosphere. In general, the refractivity, even for the troposphere, is a complex quantity which can be denoted as N = N0 + (N'(f) + i N''(f)) where N0 is a frequency independent term, and N'(f) and N''(f) represent the complex frequency dependence. Thereby, the imaginary part can be used to derive the loss of energy (absorption) and the real part can be assigned to the changes in the propagation velocity (refraction) and thus describes the delay of an electromagnetic wave which propagates through that medium. Although the frequency dependent delay contribution appears to be of small order, one has to consider that signals are propagating through few kilometers of troposphere at high elevations to hundredths of kilometers at low elevations. Therefore, the Kashima Ray-Tracing package (Hobiger et al., 2008) has been modified (and named KARAT-LAMBDA) to enable the consideration of a frequency dependent refractivity. By using this tool, it was studied if and to which extent future space geodetic instruments are affected from dispersive troposphere delays. Moreover, a semi-empirical correction model for the microwave link of the Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) has been developed, based on ray-tracing calculations with KARAT-LAMBDA. The proposed model (Hobiger et al., 2013) has been tested with simulated ISS overflights at different potential ACES ground station sites and it could be demonstrated that this model is capable to remove biases and elevation dependent features caused by the dispersive troposphere delay difference between the up-link and down-link. References: T. Hobiger, R. Ichikawa, T. Kondo, and Y. Koyama (2008), Fast and accurate ray-tracing algorithms for real-time space geodetic applications using numerical weather models, Journal of Geophysical Research, vol. 113, iss. D203027, pp. 1-14. T. Hobiger, D

  18. The Frequency-Dependent Neuronal Length Constant in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Mäki, Hanna; Saari, Jukka; Salvador, Ricardo; Miranda, Pedro C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The behavior of the dendritic or axonal membrane voltage due to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is often modeled with the one-dimensional cable equation. For the cable equation, a length constant λ0 is defined; λ0 describes the axial decay of the membrane voltage in the case of constant applied electric field. In TMS, however, the induced electric field waveform is typically a segment of a sinusoidal wave, with characteristic frequencies of the order of several kHz. Objective: To show that the high frequency content of the stimulation pulse causes deviations in the spatial profile of the membrane voltage as compared to the steady state. Methods: We derive the cable equation in complex form utilizing the complex frequency-dependent representation of the membrane conductivity. In addition, we define an effective length constant λeff, which governs the spatial decay of the membrane voltage. We model the behavior of a dendrite in an applied electric field oscillating at 3.9 kHz with the complex cable equation and by solving the traditional cable equation numerically. Results: The effective length constant decreases as a function of frequency. For a model dendrite or axon, for which λ0 = 1.5 mm, the effective length constant at 3.9 kHz is decreased by a factor 10 to 0.13 mm. Conclusion: The frequency dependency of the neuronal length constant has to be taken into account when predicting the spatial behavior of the membrane voltage as a response to TMS. PMID:27555808

  19. Frequency and temperature dependence in electromagnetic properties of Martian analog minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillman, David; Olhoeft, Gary

    2008-09-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) has the potential to image the Martian subsurface to give geological context to drilling targets, investigate stratigraphy, and locate subsurface water. GPR depth of penetration depends strongly on the electromagnetic (EM) properties (complex dielectric permittivity, complex magnetic permeability, and DC resistivity) of the subsurface. These EM properties in turn depend on the mineralogical composition of the subsurface and are sensitive to temperature. In this study, the EM properties of Martian analog samples were measured versus frequency (1 MHz-1 GHz) and at Martian temperatures (180-300 K). Results from the study found the following: gray hematite has a large temperature-dependent dielectric relaxation, magnetite has a temperature-independent magnetic relaxation, and JSC Mars-1 has a broad temperature-dependent dielectric relaxation most likely caused by absorbed water. Two orbital radars, MARSIS and SHARAD, are currently investigating the subsurface of Mars. On the basis of the results of our measurements, the attenuation rate of gray hematite is 0.03 and 0.9 dB/m, magnetite is 0.04 and 1.1 dB/m, and JSC Mars-1 is 0.015 and 0.09 dB/m at MARSIS and SHARAD frequencies, respectively, and at the average Martian temperature of 213 K. With respect to using GPR for subsurface investigation on Mars, absorbed water will be a larger attenuator of radar energy as high concentrations of magnetite and gray hematite are not found globally on Mars.

  20. Trade-Off between Toxicity and Signal Detection Orchestrated by Frequency- and Density-Dependent Genes

    PubMed Central

    Arthaud, Laury; Rokia-Mille, Selim Ben; Raad, Hussein; Dombrovsky, Aviv; Prevost, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Behaviors in insects are partly highly efficient Bayesian processes that fulfill exploratory tasks ending with the colonization of new ecological niches. The foraging (for) gene in Drosophila encodes a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). It has been extensively described as a frequency-dependent gene and its transcripts are differentially expressed between individuals, reflecting the population density context. Some for transcripts, when expressed in a population at high density for many generations, concomitantly trigger strong dispersive behavior associated with foraging activity. Moreover, genotype-by-environment interaction (GEI) analysis has highlighted a dormant role of for in energetic metabolism in a food deprivation context. In our current report, we show that alleles of for encoding different cGMP-dependent kinase isoforms influence the oxidation of aldehyde groups of aromatic molecules emitted by plants via Aldh-III and a phosphorylatable adaptor. The enhanced efficiency of oxidation of aldehyde odorants into carboxyl groups by the action of for lessens their action and toxicity, which should facilitate exploration and guidance in a complex odor environment. Our present data provide evidence that optimal foraging performance requires the fast metabolism of volatile compounds emitted by plants to avoid neurosensory saturation and that the frequency-dependent genes that trigger dispersion influence these processes. PMID:21625551

  1. Frequency dependence of quantum path interference in non-collinear high-order harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Yang, Zhong; Xin-Kui, He; Hao, Teng; Peng, Ye; Li-Feng, Wang; Peng, He; Zhi-Yi, Wei

    2016-02-01

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) driven by two non-collinear beams including a fundamental and its weak second harmonic is numerically studied. The interference of harmonics from adjacent electron quantum paths is found to be dependent on the relative delay of the driving pulse, and the dependences are different for different harmonic orders. This frequency dependence of the interference is attributed to the spatial frequency chirp in the HHG beam resulting from the harmonic dipole phase, which in turn provides a potential way to gain an insight into the generation of high-order harmonics. As an example, the intensity dependent dipole phase coefficient α is retrieved from the interference fringe. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013CB922401 and 2013CB922402), the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Projects, China (Grant No. 2012YQ12004704), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374356), and the International Joint Research Program of National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61210017).

  2. Sensitivity of seismic measurements to frequency-dependent attenuation and upper mantle structure: An initial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellis, C.; Holtzman, B.

    2014-07-01

    This study addresses the sensitivity of seismic attenuation measurements to dissipative mechanisms and structure in the Earth's upper mantle. The Andrade anelastic model fits experimental attenuation data with a mild power law frequency dependence and can be scaled from laboratory to Earth conditions. We incorporate this anelastic model into 400km 1-D thermal profiles of the upper mantle. These continuous-spectrum models are approximated by multiple relaxation mechanisms that are implemented within a finite-difference scheme to perform wave propagation simulations in 1-D domains. In two sets of numerical experiments, we evaluate the measurable signature of the intrinsic attenuation structure. The two sets are defined by thermal profiles with added step functions of temperature, varying in (i) amplitude and depth or (ii) amplitude and sharpness. The corresponding synthetic data are processed using both the conventional t* approach, i.e., a linear regression of the displacement frequency spectrum, and an alternative nonlinear fit to identify the integrated value of attenuation and its frequency dependence. The measured sensitivity patterns are analyzed to assess the effects of the anelastic model and its spatial distribution on seismic data (in the absence of scattering effects). We have two straightforward results: (1) the frequency dependence power law is recoverable from the measurements; (2) t* is sensitive to both the depth and the amplitude of the step, and it is insensitive to the sharpness of the step, in the 0.25 to 2 Hz band. There is much potential for gaining information about the upper mantle thermodynamic state from careful interpretation of attenuation.

  3. Frequency Dependent Effects of Ethanol on Dopamine Release in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Yorgason, Jordan T.; Ferris, Mark J.; Steffensen, Scott C.; Jones, Sara R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Ethanol is known to have excitatory effects on dopamine (DA) release, with moderate to high doses (0.5–2.5 g/kg) of acute ethanol enhancing DA neuron firing rates in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and DA levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Ethanol has also been shown to reduce DA activity, with moderate doses (1–2 g/kg) attenuating electrically evoked release, and higher doses (5 g/kg) decreasing NAc DA levels, demonstrating a biphasic effect of ethanol on DA release. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate ethanol’s inhibitory effects on NAc DA terminal release under low- and high-frequency stimulation conditions. Methods Using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in NAc slices from C57BL/6J mice, we examined ethanol’s (40–160 mM) effects on DA release under several different stimulation parameters, varying frequency (5–125 Hz), number of pulses (1–10), and stimulation intensity (50–350 µA). Additionally, calcium concentrations were manipulated under high-frequency stimulation conditions (20 Hz, 10 pulses, 350 µA) in order to determine if ethanol’s effects were dependent upon calcium concentration, and by extension, the amount of DA release. Results Acute ethanol (40–160 mM) inhibited DA release to a greater extent under high-frequency, multiple-pulse stimulation conditions, with increased sensitivity at 5 and 10 pulses and frequencies of 20 Hz or higher. High-frequency, multiple-pulse stimulations also resulted in greater DA release compared to single-pulse release, which was controlled by reducing stimulation intensity. Under reduced DA conditions, high-frequency stimulations still showed increased ethanol sensitivity. Reducing calcium levels also decreased DA release at high-frequency stimulations, but did not affect ethanol sensitivity. Conclusions Ethanol appears to inhibit DA release at NAc terminals under high-frequency stimulation conditions that are similar to release events observed during phasic burst firing in

  4. Size- and Composition-Dependent Radio Frequency Magnetic Permeability of Iron Oxide Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, H; Liu, XY; Paik, T; Palanisamy, D; Kim, J; Vogel, WD; Viescas, AJ; Chen, J; Papaefthymiou, GC; Kikkawa, JM; Allen, MG; Murray, CB

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the size- and composition-dependent ac magnetic permeability of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals for radio frequency (RF) applications. The nanocrystals are obtained through high-temperature decomposition synthesis, and their stoichiometry is determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy. Two sets of oxides are studied: (a) as-synthesized magnetite-rich and (b) aged maghemite nanocrystals. All nanocrystalline samples are confirmed to be in the superparamagnetic state at room temperature by SQUID magnetometry. Through the one-turn inductor method, the ac magnetic properties of the nanocrystalline oxides are characterized. In magnetite-rich iron oxide nanocrystals, size-dependent magnetic permeability is not observed, while maghemite iron oxide nanocrystals show clear size dependence. The inductance, resistance, and quality factor of hand-wound inductors with a superparamagnetic composite core are measured. The superparamagnetic nanocrystals are successfully embedded into hand-wound inductors to function as inductor cores.

  5. [Relation between variance and the arithmetic mean in frequency distributions under conditions of stochastic dependence].

    PubMed

    Mitolo, V; Saccia, M

    1984-06-30

    While the average value of the mitotic index in a primordium is determined by genetic and epigenetic factors, the spatial location of the single mitotic events is stochastic; consequently mitotic density is uneven even in homogeneous areas of the primordium. The statistical frequency distribution of the mitotic events has been studied under three different conditions: (a) no stochastic dependence between adjoining events (random distribution); (b) positive stochastic dependence (facilitation) between adjoining events; (c) negative stochastic dependence (inhibition) between adjoining events. It is concluded that in the first case the variance of the distribution equals the arithmetic mean; in the second case the variance is higher than mean; in the third case variance is lower than mean. PMID:6477729

  6. Size- and composition-dependent radio frequency magnetic permeability of iron oxide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hongseok; Liu, Xiyu; Paik, Taejong; Palanisamy, Duraivelan; Kim, Jungkwun; Vogel, William D; Viescas, Arthur J; Chen, Jun; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C; Kikkawa, James M; Allen, Mark G; Murray, Christopher B

    2014-12-23

    We investigate the size- and composition-dependent ac magnetic permeability of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals for radio frequency (RF) applications. The nanocrystals are obtained through high-temperature decomposition synthesis, and their stoichiometry is determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Two sets of oxides are studied: (a) as-synthesized magnetite-rich and (b) aged maghemite nanocrystals. All nanocrystalline samples are confirmed to be in the superparamagnetic state at room temperature by SQUID magnetometry. Through the one-turn inductor method, the ac magnetic properties of the nanocrystalline oxides are characterized. In magnetite-rich iron oxide nanocrystals, size-dependent magnetic permeability is not observed, while maghemite iron oxide nanocrystals show clear size dependence. The inductance, resistance, and quality factor of hand-wound inductors with a superparamagnetic composite core are measured. The superparamagnetic nanocrystals are successfully embedded into hand-wound inductors to function as inductor cores. PMID:25390073

  7. Occurrence of fatigue induced by a whole-body vibration session is not frequency dependent.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Zory F; Wesley, Aulbrook; Daniel, Keir A; Olivier, Serresse

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether neuromuscular adaptations (magnitude and location) induced by isometric exercise performed on an oscillating platform are dependent on whole-body vibration (WBV) frequency. Eleven young men performed 4 separate fatigue sessions of static squatting exercise at 3 frequencies of WBV (V20, V40, and V60) and 1 session without vibration (V0). Isometric torque and electromyographic activity of the vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, and biceps femoris were recorded during maximal voluntary and evoked contractions of the knee extensor muscles before and after each fatigue session to examine both peripheral and central adaptations. Isometric torque decreased significantly after each of the 4 frequency sessions (V0: -9.4 ± 6.1%, p = 0.003; V20: -8.1 ± 9.9%, p = 0.010; V40: -11.9 ± 12.7%, p = 0.011; and V60: -7.8 ± 9.2%, p = 0.001, respectively), but this reduction was not significantly different between frequencies. The torque produced by evoked contraction significantly decreased from pre-exercise values after each session (V0: -14.9 ± 15.6%, p = 0.012; V20: -15.8 ± 16.4%, p = 0.010; V40: -21.0 ± 14.3%, p = 0.004; and V60: -17.3 ± 11.6%, p = 0.005, respectively); however, there was no effect of vibration frequency. In both conditions, the maximal voluntary contraction torque reduction observed was mainly attributable to peripheral fatigue and was not because of central modifications of the neuromuscular system. The present study demonstrates that the frequency of vibration does not significantly influence the magnitude and location of neuromuscular fatigue, suggesting that adding WBV to static squat exercise (on a vertically oscillating platform) does not provide an additional training stimulus. PMID:23249822

  8. Cross-terms and weak frequency-dependent signals in the cosmic microwave background sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we study the amplification of weak frequency-dependent signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky due to their cross-correlation to intrinsic anisotropies. In particular, we centre our attention on mechanisms generating a weak signal, of peculiar spectral behaviour, such as resonant scattering in ionic, atomic or molecular lines, the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect or extragalactic foreground emissions, whose typical amplitude (denoted by ɛ) is significantly smaller than the intrinsic CMB fluctuations. We find that all these effects involve either the autocorrelation of anisotropies generated during recombination (zrec) or the cross-correlation of those anisotropies with fluctuations arising at redshift zi. The former case accounts for the slight blurring of original anisotropies generated in the last scattering surface, and shows up in the small angular scale (high multipole) range. The latter term describes, instead, the generation of new anisotropies, and is non-zero only if fluctuations generated at redshifts zrec, zi, are correlated. The degree of this correlation can be computed under the assumption that density fluctuations were generated as standard inflationary models dictate and that they evolved in time according to linear theory. When the weak signal is frequency dependent (i.e. the spectral dependence of the secondary anisotropies is distinct from that of the CMB), we show that, by subtracting power spectra at different frequencies, it is possible to avoid the limit associated with cosmic variance and unveil weaker terms linear in ɛ. We find that the correlation term shows a different spectral dependence than the squared (~ɛ2) term usually considered, making its extraction particularly straightforward for the tSZ effect. Furthermore, we find that in most cases the correlation terms are particularly relevant at low multipoles due to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect and must be taken into account when characterizing

  9. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  10. Combining Acceleration and Displacement Dependent Modal Frequency Responses Using an MSC/NASTRAN DMAP Alter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Alan R.; Widrick, Timothy W.; Ludwiczak, Damian R.

    1996-01-01

    Solving for dynamic responses of free-free launch vehicle/spacecraft systems acted upon by buffeting winds is commonly performed throughout the aerospace industry. Due to the unpredictable nature of this wind loading event, these problems are typically solved using frequency response random analysis techniques. To generate dynamic responses for spacecraft with statically-indeterminate interfaces, spacecraft contractors prefer to develop models which have response transformation matrices developed for mode acceleration data recovery. This method transforms spacecraft boundary accelerations and displacements into internal responses. Unfortunately, standard MSC/NASTRAN modal frequency response solution sequences cannot be used to combine acceleration- and displacement-dependent responses required for spacecraft mode acceleration data recovery. External user-written computer codes can be used with MSC/NASTRAN output to perform such combinations, but these methods can be labor and computer resource intensive. Taking advantage of the analytical and computer resource efficiencies inherent within MS C/NASTRAN, a DMAP Alter has been developed to combine acceleration- and displacement-dependent modal frequency responses for performing spacecraft mode acceleration data recovery. The Alter has been used successfully to efficiently solve a common aerospace buffeting wind analysis.

  11. Dielectrophoresis of DNA: time- and frequency-dependent collections on microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Bakewell, David J; Morgan, Hywel

    2006-06-01

    This paper reports measurements that characterize the collection of DNA onto interdigitated microelectrodes by high-frequency dielectrophoresis. Measurements of time-dependent collection of 12 kilobase pair plasmid DNA onto microelectrodes by dielectrophoresis show significant reduction in the response as the frequency increases from 100 kHz to 20 MHz. Collection time profiles are quantitatively measured using fluorescence microscopy over the range 100 kHz to 5 MHz and are represented in terms of two parameters: the initial dielectrophoretic collection rate, and the initial to steady-state collection transition. Measured values for both parameters are consistent with trends in the frequency-dependent real part of the effective polarizability measured for the same plasmid DNA using dielectric spectroscopy. The experimentally measured parameters are qualitatively compared with trends predicted by theory that takes into account dielectrophoretic particle movement and diffusion. The differences between experiment and theory are discussed with suggested improvements to theoretical models, for example, including the effects of electrohydrodynamically driven fluid motion. PMID:16805110

  12. Dielectrophoresis of DNA: time- and frequency-dependent collections on microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Bakewell, David J; Morgan, Hywel

    2006-03-01

    This paper reports measurements that characterize the collection of DNA onto interdigitated microelectrodes by high-frequency dielectrophoresis. Measurements of time-dependent collection of 12 kilobase pair plasmid DNA onto microelectrodes by dielectrophoresis show significant reduction in the response as the frequency increases from 100 kHz to 20 MHz. Collection time profiles are quantitatively measured using fluorescence microscopy over the range 100 kHz to 5 MHz and are represented in terms of two parameters: the initial dielectrophoretic collection rate, and the initial to steady-state collection transition. Measured values for both parameters are consistent with trends in the frequency-dependent real part of the effective polarizability measured for the same plasmid DNA using dielectric spectroscopy. The experimentally measured parameters are qualitatively compared with trends predicted by theory that takes into account dielectrophoretic particle movement and diffusion. The differences between experiment and theory are discussed with suggested improvements to theoretical models, for example, including the effects of electrohydrodynamically driven fluid motion. PMID:16570867

  13. Frequency-dependent seismic attenuation in shales: experimental results and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Piane, Claudio; Sarout, Joel; Madonna, Claudio; Saenger, Erik H.; Dewhurst, David N.; Raven, Mark

    2014-07-01

    Samples of shales from the Ordovician Bongabinni and Goldwyer source rock formations were recovered from the Canning Basin (Western Australia). Attenuation was experimentally measured on preserved plugs from these formations in the frequency range between 10-2 and 102 Hz. Samples cored with different orientations with respect to the sedimentary bedding were prepared and tested in their native saturated state and after drying in the oven at 105 °C for 24 hr to assess the effect of fluids and of the sediment anisotropy on attenuation. To aid the interpretation of the experimental results, the clay-rich samples were characterized in terms of mineralogy, water content, porosity, permeability and microstructure. The two shales have significantly different quality factors; and this is seen to be dependent on both the saturation state of the samples and the propagation direction of the oscillatory signal. The attenuation coefficient for compression/extension parallel to bedding is less than that vertical to bedding in both the preserved and partially dehydrated situations. No frequency dependency is observed in the preserved samples within the range of frequencies explored in this study. On the other hand partially saturated samples show peaks in attenuation at around 40 Hz when the stress perturbation is transmitted normal to the macroscopic bedding. The interpretation of the attenuation measurements in terms of well-established theoretical models is discussed in view of the physical characteristics and microstructure of the tested rocks.

  14. Frequency and temperature dependence of skin bioimpedance during a contralateral cold test.

    PubMed

    Podtaev, S; Nikolaev, D; Samartsev, V; Gavrilov, V; Tsiberkin, K

    2015-03-01

    A study of the α- and β-dispersion of skin bioimpedance dependence on temperature and micro-hemodynamics is presented. The vascular tone changes during the cold test are verified by the wavelet-analysis of skin temperature signals obtained simultaneously with impedance measurements. Thirty three normal healthy subjects of 28  ±  7 years old were entered into the study. The tetra-polar electrode system was used to record the resistance and reactance; measurements were carried out at 67 frequencies, in a frequency range from 2 Hz to 50 kHz. It has been found that the impedance decreases with vasodilation and increases with vasoconstriction. The high values of correlation among thermal oscillation amplitudes and Nyquist diagram parameters prove the impedance dependence on blood flow in three frequency bands corresponding to the myogenic, neurogenic and endothelial vascular tone regulation mechanisms. Using an equivalent RC circuit, we obtained the changes in the Nyquist diagram matching the experimental data. The proposed descriptive α-dispersion model can be used to study mechanisms responsible for intercellular interaction. PMID:25690397

  15. Positive frequency dependence undermines the success of restoration using historical disturbance regimes.

    PubMed

    Crandall, Raelene; Knight, Tiffany M

    2015-09-01

    Anthropogenic alterations of historical disturbance regimes (e.g. suppressing floods and wildfires) is a primary mechanism by which exotic species can come to dominate native communities. Unfortunately, reinstating historical disturbance regimes to restore native communities has achieved mixed success. The presence of positive frequency dependence (PFD) is commonly invoked to explain why exotic plant invasions are so difficult to eradicate. However, models examining PFD have not considered the effect of reintroducing disturbances. Using a spatially explicit individual-based model, we consider how magnitude and direction of frequency dependence of native and exotic species affects the success of reintroducing disturbances that favour fitness of natives over exotics. Our model illustrates why restoration is difficult; there is a narrow range of parameters that allows for native species to eliminate or coexist with exotics once they have established. Dominance by exotic invaders occurs with moderate initial frequencies of exotic individuals, aggregation of these individuals, or an exotic propagule production advantage. Reintroducing disturbances allows native dominance only when PFD of the exotic is weaker than that of the native species, disturbance intervals are short, and/or exotics are not initially frequent. Our framework provides guidelines for conditions in which the reintroduction of disturbances will effectively restore invaded habitats. PMID:26147188

  16. Energy and frequency dependence of the alpha particle redistribution produced by internal kink modes

    SciTech Connect

    Farengo, R.; Ferrari, H. E.; Garcia-Martinez, P. L.; Firpo, M.-C.; Ettoumi, W.; Lifschitz, A. F.

    2014-08-15

    The redistribution of alpha particles due to internal kink modes is studied. The exact particle trajectories in the total fields, equilibrium plus perturbation, are calculated. The equilibrium has circular cross section and the plasma parameters are similar to those expected in ITER. The alpha particles are initially distributed according to a slowing down distribution function and have energies between 18 keV and 3.5 MeV. The (1, 1), (2, 2), and (2, 1) modes are included and the effect of changing their amplitude and frequency is studied. When only the (1, 1) mode is included, the spreading of high energy (E≳1 MeV) alpha particles increases slowly with the energy and mode frequency. At lower energies, the redistribution is more sensitive to the mode frequency and particle energy. When a (2, 1) mode is added, the spreading increases significantly and particles can reach the edge of the plasma. Trapped particles are the most affected and the redistribution parameter can have maxima above 1 MeV, depending on the mode frequency. These results can have important implications for ash removal.

  17. Model for radial dependence of frequency distributions for energy imparted in nanometer volumes from HZE particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Nikjoo, H.; Goodhead, D. T.; Decillo, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    This paper develops a deterministic model of frequency distributions for energy imparted (total energy deposition) in small volumes similar to DNA molecules from high-energy ions of interest for space radiation protection and cancer therapy. Frequency distributions for energy imparted are useful for considering radiation quality and for modeling biological damage produced by ionizing radiation. For high-energy ions, secondary electron (delta-ray) tracks originating from a primary ion track make dominant contributions to energy deposition events in small volumes. Our method uses the distribution of electrons produced about an ion's path and incorporates results from Monte Carlo simulation of electron tracks to predict frequency distributions for ions, including their dependence on radial distance. The contribution from primary ion events is treated using an impact parameter formalism of spatially restricted linear energy transfer (LET) and energy-transfer straggling. We validate our model by comparing it directly to results from Monte Carlo simulations for proton and alpha-particle tracks. We show for the first time frequency distributions of energy imparted in DNA structures by several high-energy ions such as cosmic-ray iron ions. Our comparison with results from Monte Carlo simulations at low energies indicates the accuracy of the method.

  18. Relationship between Frequency Dependence of Lung Compliance and Distribution of Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Adam; Zarzecki, Stephen; Atkins, Neal; Zapata, Angel; Sackner, Marvin A.

    1974-01-01

    The previously demonstrated empirical association between frequency dependence of lung compliance and distribution of ventilation, the latter determined by the N2 washout technique, was confirmed by establishing a mathematical link between the two tests. By assuming a two-compartment system with known compliances and making corrections for Pendelluft and common dead space mixing effects, the ratio of dynamic to static compliance (Cdyn/Cst) for any respiratory frequency can be calculated from the compartmental analysis of the N2 washout at a single respiratory frequency. By using these equations, a good correlation was found between calculated and measured Cdyn/Cst in dogs with artificially induced bronchial obstruction and in young smokers or young nonsmokers after carbachol inhalation. A two-compartment N2 washout was demonstrated in 10 young healthy smokers at one or two respiratory frequencies whereas all 10 normal controls showed a single exponential curve. These findings indicate that the non-invasive N2 washout test is capable of predicting Cdyn/Cst and at the same time gives a direct measure of gas distribution. Further, it appears to be a highly sensitive method for the detection of “small airway disease.” PMID:4424721

  19. Frequency Dependence of Polarization of Zebra Pattern in Type-IV Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Kazutaka; Misawa, H.; Iwai, K.; Tsuchiya, F.; Obara, T.

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the polarization characteristics of a zebra pattern (ZP) in a type-IV solar radio burst observed with AMATERAS on 2011 June 21 for the purpose of evaluating the generation processes of ZPs. Analyzing highly resolved spectral and polarization data revealed the frequency dependence of the degree of circular polarization and the delay between two polarized components for the first time. The degree of circular polarization was 50%-70% right-handed and it varied little as a function of frequency. Cross-correlation analysis determined that the left-handed circularly polarized component was delayed by 50-70 ms relative to the right-handed component over the entire frequency range of the ZP and this delay increased with the frequency. We examined the obtained polarization characteristics by using pre-existing ZP models and concluded that the ZP was generated by the double-plasma-resonance process. Our results suggest that the ZP emission was originally generated in a completely polarized state in the O-mode and was partly converted into the X-mode near the source. Subsequently, the difference between the group velocities of the O-mode and X-mode caused the temporal delay.

  20. Model for radial dependence of frequency distributions for energy imparted in nanometer volumes from HZE particles.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, F A; Nikjoo, H; Goodhead, D T

    2000-04-01

    This paper develops a deterministic model of frequency distributions for energy imparted (total energy deposition) in small volumes similar to DNA molecules from high-energy ions of interest for space radiation protection and cancer therapy. Frequency distributions for energy imparted are useful for considering radiation quality and for modeling biological damage produced by ionizing radiation. For high-energy ions, secondary electron (delta-ray) tracks originating from a primary ion track make dominant contributions to energy deposition events in small volumes. Our method uses the distribution of electrons produced about an ion's path and incorporates results from Monte Carlo simulation of electron tracks to predict frequency distributions for ions, including their dependence on radial distance. The contribution from primary ion events is treated using an impact parameter formalism of spatially restricted linear energy transfer (LET) and energy-transfer straggling. We validate our model by comparing it directly to results from Monte Carlo simulations for proton and alpha-particle tracks. We show for the first time frequency distributions of energy imparted in DNA structures by several high-energy ions such as cosmic-ray iron ions. Our comparison with results from Monte Carlo simulations at low energies indicates the accuracy of the method. PMID:10761008

  1. Negative frequency-dependent selection is intensified at higher population densities in protist populations.

    PubMed

    Minter, Ewan J A; Watts, Phillip C; Lowe, Chris D; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    Natural populations of free-living protists often exhibit high-levels of intraspecific diversity, yet this is puzzling as classic evolutionary theory predicts dominance by genotypes with high fitness, particularly in large populations where selection is efficient. Here, we test whether negative frequency-dependent selection (NFDS) plays a role in the maintenance of diversity in the marine flagellate Oxyrrhis marina using competition experiments between multiple pairs of strains. We observed strain-specific responses to frequency and density, but an overall signature of NFDS that was intensified at higher population densities. Because our strains were not selected a priori on the basis of particular traits expected to exhibit NFDS, these data represent a relatively unbiased estimate of the role for NFDS in maintaining diversity in protist populations. These findings could help to explain how bloom-forming plankton, which periodically achieve exceptionally high population densities, maintain substantial intraspecific diversity. PMID:26063750

  2. Mechanism of voltage production and frequency dependence of the ultrasonic vibration potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Cuong K.; Wang, Shougang; Diebold, Gerald

    2009-05-01

    Imaging with the ultrasonic vibration potential is based on voltage generation by a colloidal or ionic suspension in response to the passage of ultrasound. The polarization within a body arising from the oscillatory displacement in the ultrasonic field produces a current in a pair of external electrodes that is measured as a function of time or frequency. Existing theory gives the current in the electrodes as arising from both a time varying polarization and ionic conduction. Here, experiments are reported that show the production of the polarization current is the dominant mechanism for current generation in soft tissue. Experiments are also reported giving the frequency dependence of the ultrasonic vibration current in canine blood and in several dilutions of aqueous silica suspensions.

  3. Frequency spectrum and scale dependence of a propulsive self-excited vortex generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittlesey, Robert; Dabiri, John

    2012-11-01

    We describe the development and characterization of a passive device that creates a train of vortex rings from a steady incoming flow. The device consists of a collapsible tube enclosed in an air-tight chamber which undergoes self-excited oscillations under specific conditions of flow rate and transmural pressure. An experimental parameter study was conducted in order to determine the oscillation frequency spectrum of the device, and its dependence on the nozzle diameter. For certain combinations of flow rate and transmural pressure, the frequency of self-excited oscillations, and hence vortex formation, is independent of device size over an order of magnitude range of device volume. These results have a particular interest for the development of vehicles utilizing vortex-enhanced propulsion (Ruiz et al., JFM, 2011). Continued work in this area has focused on the implementation of this device to a self-propelled submarine. Support is greatly appreciated from ONR Awards N000140810918 and N000141010137.

  4. Feasibility of controlling speed-dependent low-frequency brake vibration amplification by modulating actuation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Osman Taha; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2014-12-01

    In this article, a feasibility study of controlling the low frequency torque response of a disc brake system with modulated actuation pressure (in the open loop mode) is conducted. First, a quasi-linear model of the torsional system is introduced, and analytical solutions are proposed to incorporate the modulation effect. Tractable expressions for three different modulation schemes are obtained, and conditions that would lead to a reduction in the oscillatory amplitudes are identified. Second, these conditions are evaluated with a numerical model of the torsional system with clearance nonlinearity, and analytical solutions are verified in terms of the trends observed. Finally, a laboratory experiment with a solenoid valve is built to modulate actuation pressure with a constant duty cycle, and time-frequency domain data are acquired. Measurements are utilized to assess analytical observations, and all methods show that the speed-dependent brake torque amplitudes can be altered with an appropriate modulation of actuation pressure.

  5. Overtone frequency spectra for x3-dependent modes in AT-cut quartz resonators.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Chen, Weiqiu; Yang, Jiashi

    2013-04-01

    We study straight-crested waves and vibration modes with spatial variations along the x3 direction only in an AT-cut quartz plate resonator. The equations of anisotropic elasticity are used. Dispersion relations for face-shear and thickness-twist waves in unbounded plates are plotted. Frequency spectra are obtained for face-shear and thickness-twist vibrations of finite plates in which these modes are coupled by boundary conditions. Most importantly, our analysis produces the frequency spectra for overtone modes which do not seem to have been obtained before for x3-dependent modes. Numerical results for third- and fifth-overtone AT-cut quartz resonators are presented, showing that higher-order overtone modes are associated with more mode couplings. PMID:23549548

  6. Negative frequency-dependent selection is intensified at higher population densities in protist populations

    PubMed Central

    Minter, Ewan J. A.; Watts, Phillip C.; Lowe, Chris D.; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Natural populations of free-living protists often exhibit high-levels of intraspecific diversity, yet this is puzzling as classic evolutionary theory predicts dominance by genotypes with high fitness, particularly in large populations where selection is efficient. Here, we test whether negative frequency-dependent selection (NFDS) plays a role in the maintenance of diversity in the marine flagellate Oxyrrhis marina using competition experiments between multiple pairs of strains. We observed strain-specific responses to frequency and density, but an overall signature of NFDS that was intensified at higher population densities. Because our strains were not selected a priori on the basis of particular traits expected to exhibit NFDS, these data represent a relatively unbiased estimate of the role for NFDS in maintaining diversity in protist populations. These findings could help to explain how bloom-forming plankton, which periodically achieve exceptionally high population densities, maintain substantial intraspecific diversity. PMID:26063750

  7. Wideband Power Amplifier Modeling Incorporating Carrier Frequency Dependent AM/AM and AM/PM Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkacenko, A.

    2013-05-01

    In this article, we present a complex baseband model for a wideband power amplifier that incorporates carrier frequency dependent amplitude modulation (AM) and phase modulation (PM) (i.e., AM/AM and AM/PM) characteristics in the design process. The structure used to implement the amplifier model is a Wiener system which accounts for memory effects caused by the frequency selective nature of the amplifier, in addition to the nonlinearities caused by gain compression and saturation. By utilizing piecewise polynomial nonlinearities in the structure, it is shown how to construct the Wiener model to exactly accommodate all given AM/AM and AM/PM measurement constraints. Simulation results using data from a 50 W 32-way Ka-band solid-state power amplifier (SSPA) are provided, highlighting the differences in degradation incurred for a wideband input signal as compared with a narrowband input.

  8. Dynamics of structural systems with various frequency-dependent damping models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Hu, Yujin; Deng, Weiming; Lü, Lei; Ding, Zhe

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the dynamic analyses of the system involving various damping models. The assumed frequency-dependent damping forces depend on the past history of motion via convolution integrals over some damping kernel functions. By choosing suitable damping kernel functions of frequency-dependent damping model, it may be derived from the familiar viscoelastic materials. A brief review of literature on the choice of available damping models is presented. Both the mode superposition method and Fourier transform method are developed for calculating the dynamic response of the structural systems with various damping models. It is shown that in the case of non-deficient systems with various damping models, the modal analysis with repeated eigenvalues are very similar to the traditional modal analysis used in undamped or viscously damped systems. Also, based on the pseudo-force approach, we transform the original equations of motion with nonzero initial conditions into an equivalent one with zero initial conditions and therefore present a Fourier transform method for the dynamics of structural systems with various damping models. Finally, some case studies are used to show the application and effectiveness of the derived formulas.

  9. Frequency dependence of specific heat in supercooled liquid water and emergence of correlated dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shinji; Ohmine, Iwao; Bagchi, Biman

    2013-03-01

    Molecular origin of the well-known specific heat anomaly in supercooled liquid water is investigated here by using extensive computer simulations and theoretical analyses. A rather sharp increase in the values of isobaric specific heat with lowering temperature and the weak temperature dependence of isochoric specific heat in the same range are reproduced in simulations. We calculated the spatio-temporal correlation among temperature fluctuations and examined the frequency dependent specific heat. The latter shows a rapid growth in the low frequency regime as temperature is cooled below 270 K. In order to understand the microscopic basis of this increase, we have performed a shellwise decomposition of contributions of distant molecules to the temperature fluctuations in a central molecule. This decomposition reveals the emergence, at low temperatures, of temporally slow, spatially long ranged large temperature fluctuations. The temperature fluctuation time correlation function (TFCF) can be fitted to a William-Watts stretched exponential form with the stretching parameter close to 0.6 at low temperatures, indicating highly non-exponential relaxation. Temperature dependence of the relaxation time of the correlation function can be fitted to Vogel-Fulcher-Tamermann expression which provides a quantitative measure of the fragility of the liquid. Interestingly, we find that the rapid growth in the relaxation time of TFCF with lowering temperature undergoes a sharp crossover from a markedly fragile state to a weakly fragile state around 220 K.

  10. The Dependence of Thresholds for Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage on Diagnostic Ultrasound Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L.; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary ultrasound examination has become routine for diagnosis in many clinical and point-of-care medical settings. However, the phenomenon of pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) induction during diagnostic ultrasound imaging presents a poorly understood risk factor. PCH was observed for 1.5 MHz, 4.5 MHz and 12.0 MHz diagnostic ultrasound of anesthetized rats to investigate the frequency dependence of PCH thresholds. PCH was detected in the ultrasound images as growing comet tail artifacts, and assessed using photographs of the surface of excised lungs. Previous photographs acquired with 7.6 MHz diagnostic ultrasound were also included for analysis. In addition, dosimetric parameters were measured at each frequency, including peak rarefactional pressure amplitudes (PRPA) and spatial peak pulse-average (SPPA) intensities attenuated by rat chest-wall samples. PRPA thresholds were determined at each frequency, based on the proportion of PCH occurrence in groups of 5 rats, and were 1.03 ± 0.02 MPa, 1.28 ± 0.14 MPa, 1.18 ± 0.12 MPa and 1.36 ± 0.15 MPa at 1.5, 4.5, 7.6 and 12.0 MHz, respectively. Although the PCH lesions decreased in size with increasing ultrasonic frequency, owing to the smaller beam widths and scan lengths, the PRPA thresholds remained approximately constant. This dependence was different from that of the Mechanical Index, which indicates a need for a specific dosimetric parameter for safety guidance in pulmonary ultrasound. PMID:25746909

  11. Temporal dissociation of frequency-dependent acceleration of relaxation and protein phosphorylation by CaMKII.

    PubMed

    Huke, Sabine; Bers, Donald M

    2007-03-01

    Frequency-dependent acceleration of relaxation (FDAR) is an important intrinsic mechanism that allows for diastolic filling of the ventricle at higher heart rates, yet its molecular mechanism is still not understood. Previous studies showed that FDAR is dependent on functional sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and can be abolished by phosphatase or by Ca/CaM kinase (CaMKII) inhibition. Additionally, CaMKII activity/autophosphorylation has been shown to be frequency-dependent. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that CaMKII phosphorylation of SR Ca(2+)-handling proteins (Phospholamban (PLB), Ca(2+) release channel (RyR)) mediates FDAR. Here we show that FDAR occurs abruptly in fluo-4 loaded isolated rat ventricular myocytes when frequency is raised from 0.1 to 2 Hz. The effect is essentially complete within four beats (2 s) with the tau of [Ca(2+)](i) decline decreasing by 42+/-3%. While there is a detectable increase in PLB Thr-17 and RyR Ser-2814 phosphorylation, the increase is quantitatively small (PLB<5%, RyR approximately 8%) and the time-course is clearly delayed with regard to FDAR. The low substrate phosphorylation indicates that pacing of myocytes only mildly activates CaMKII and consistent with this CaMKIIdelta autophosphorylation did not increase with pacing alone. However, in the presence of phosphatase 1 inhibition pacing triggered a net-increase in autophosphorylated CaMKII and also greatly enhanced PLB and RyR phosphorylation. We conclude that FDAR does not rely on phosphorylation of PLB or RyR. Even though CaMKII does become activated when myocytes are paced, phosphatases immediately antagonize CaMKII action, limit substrate phosphorylation and also prevent sustained CaMKII autophosphorylation (thereby suppressing global CaMKII effects). PMID:17239900

  12. Time and Frequency-Dependent Modulation of Local Field Potential Synchronization by Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Clinton B.; Kiss, Zelma H. T.

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency electrical stimulation of specific brain structures, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS), is an effective treatment for movement disorders, but mechanisms of action remain unclear. We examined the time-dependent effects of DBS applied to the entopeduncular nucleus (EP), the rat homolog of the internal globus pallidus, a target used for treatment of both dystonia and Parkinson’s disease (PD). We performed simultaneous multi-site local field potential (LFP) recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats to assess the effects of high-frequency (HF, 130 Hz; clinically effective), low-frequency (LF, 15 Hz; ineffective) and sham DBS delivered to EP. LFP activity was recorded from dorsal striatum (STR), ventroanterior thalamus (VA), primary motor cortex (M1), and the stimulation site in EP. Spontaneous and acute stimulation-induced LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed at baseline, and after 30, 60, and 90 minutes of stimulation. HF EP DBS produced widespread alterations in spontaneous and stimulus-induced LFP oscillations, with some effects similar across regions and others occurring in a region- and frequency band-specific manner. Many of these changes evolved over time. HF EP DBS produced an initial transient reduction in power in the low beta band in M1 and STR; however, phase synchronization between these regions in the low beta band was markedly suppressed at all time points. DBS also enhanced low gamma synchronization throughout the circuit. With sustained stimulation, there were significant reductions in low beta synchronization between M1-VA and STR-VA, and increases in power within regions in the faster frequency bands. HF DBS also suppressed the ability of acute EP stimulation to induce beta oscillations in all regions along the circuit. This dynamic pattern of synchronizing and desynchronizing effects of EP DBS suggests a complex modulation of activity along cortico-BG-thalamic circuits underlying the therapeutic effects

  13. Temperature and frequency dependent conductivity of bismuth zinc vanadate semiconducting glassy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punia, R.; Kundu, R. S.; Dult, Meenakshi; Murugavel, S.; Kishore, N.

    2012-10-01

    The ac conductivity of bismuth zinc vanadate glasses with compositions 50V2O5. xBi2O3. (50-x) ZnO has been studied in the frequency range 10-1 Hz to 2 MHz and in temperature range 333.16 K to 533.16 K. The temperature and frequency dependent conductivity is found to obey Jonscher's universal power law for all the compositions of bismuth zinc vanadate glass system. The dc conductivity (σdc), crossover frequency (ωH), and frequency exponent (s) have been estimated from the fitting of experimental data of ac conductivity with Jonscher's universal power law. Enthalpy to dissociate the cation from its original site next to a charge compensating center (Hf) and enthalpy of migration (Hm) have also been estimated. It has been observed that mobility of charge carriers and ac conductivity in case of zinc vanadate glass system increases with increase in Bi2O3 content. In order to determine the conduction mechanism, the ac conductivity and its frequency exponent have been analyzed in the frame work of various theoretical models based on classical hopping over barriers and quantum mechanical tunneling. The ac conduction takes place via tunneling of overlapping large polarons in all the compositions of presently studied vanadate glasses. The fitting of experimental data of ac conductivity with overlapping large polarons tunneling model has also been done. The parameters; density of states at Fermi level (N(EF)), activation energy associated with charge transfer between the overlapping sites (WHO), inverse localization length (α) and polaron radius (rp) obtained from fitting of this model with experimental data are reasonable.

  14. Determination of ferroelectric contributions to electromechanical response by frequency dependent piezoresponse force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Seol, Daehee; Park, Seongjae; Varenyk, Olexandr V; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lee, Ho Nyung; Morozovska, Anna N; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-01-01

    Hysteresis loop analysis via piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is typically performed to probe the existence of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale. However, such an approach is rather complex in accurately determining the pure contribution of ferroelectricity to the PFM. Here, we suggest a facile method to discriminate the ferroelectric effect from the electromechanical (EM) response through the use of frequency dependent ac amplitude sweep with combination of hysteresis loops in PFM. Our combined study through experimental and theoretical approaches verifies that this method can be used as a new tool to differentiate the ferroelectric effect from the other factors that contribute to the EM response. PMID:27466086

  15. Monitoring cure of composite resins using frequency dependent electromagnetic sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D. E.; Hoff, M. S.; Loos, A. C.; Freeman, W. T., Jr.; Eichinger, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    A nondestructive in situ measurement technique has been developed for monitoring and measuring the cure processing properties of composite resins. Frequency dependent electromagnetic sensors (FDEMS) were used to directly measure resin viscosity during cure. The effects of the cure cycle and resin aging on the viscosity during cure were investigated using the sensor. Viscosity measurements obtained using the sensor are compared with the viscosities calculated by the Loos-Springer cure process model. Good overall agreement was obtained except for the aged resin samples.

  16. Determination of ferroelectric contributions to electromechanical response by frequency dependent piezoresponse force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, Daehee; Park, Seongjae; Varenyk, Olexandr V.; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lee, Ho Nyung; Morozovska, Anna N.; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-07-01

    Hysteresis loop analysis via piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is typically performed to probe the existence of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale. However, such an approach is rather complex in accurately determining the pure contribution of ferroelectricity to the PFM. Here, we suggest a facile method to discriminate the ferroelectric effect from the electromechanical (EM) response through the use of frequency dependent ac amplitude sweep with combination of hysteresis loops in PFM. Our combined study through experimental and theoretical approaches verifies that this method can be used as a new tool to differentiate the ferroelectric effect from the other factors that contribute to the EM response.

  17. Finite element modeling of truss structures with frequency-dependent material damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesieutre, George A.

    1991-01-01

    A physically motivated modelling technique for structural dynamic analysis that accommodates frequency dependent material damping was developed. Key features of the technique are the introduction of augmenting thermodynamic fields (AFT) to interact with the usual mechanical displacement field, and the treatment of the resulting coupled governing equations using finite element analysis methods. The AFT method is fully compatible with current structural finite element analysis techniques. The method is demonstrated in the dynamic analysis of a 10-bay planar truss structure, a structure representative of those contemplated for use in future space systems.

  18. Determination of ferroelectric contributions to electromechanical response by frequency dependent piezoresponse force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Seol, Daehee; Park, Seongjae; Varenyk, Olexandr V.; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lee, Ho Nyung; Morozovska, Anna N.; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-01-01

    Hysteresis loop analysis via piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is typically performed to probe the existence of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale. However, such an approach is rather complex in accurately determining the pure contribution of ferroelectricity to the PFM. Here, we suggest a facile method to discriminate the ferroelectric effect from the electromechanical (EM) response through the use of frequency dependent ac amplitude sweep with combination of hysteresis loops in PFM. Our combined study through experimental and theoretical approaches verifies that this method can be used as a new tool to differentiate the ferroelectric effect from the other factors that contribute to the EM response. PMID:27466086

  19. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  20. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  1. RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF THE FREQUENCY BREAK BETWEEN FLUID AND KINETIC SCALES IN THE SOLAR WIND FLUCTUATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, R.; Trenchi, L.

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the radial dependence of the spectral break separating the inertial from the dissipation range in power density spectra of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations, between 0.42 and 5.3 AU, during radial alignments between MESSENGER and WIND for the inner heliosphere and between WIND and ULYSSES for the outer heliosphere. We found that the spectral break moves to higher and higher frequencies as the heliocentric distance decreases. The radial dependence of the corresponding wavenumber is of the kind κ {sub b} ∼ R {sup –1.08}, in good agreement with that of the wavenumber derived from the linear resonance condition for proton cyclotron damping. These results support conclusions from previous studies which suggest that a cyclotron-resonant dissipation mechanism must participate in the spectral cascade together with other possible kinetic noncyclotron-resonant mechanisms.

  2. Absolute distance measurements by variable wavelength interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bien, F.; Camac, M.; Caulfield, H. J.; Ezekiel, S.

    1981-02-01

    This paper describes a laser interferometer which provides absolute distance measurements using tunable lasers. An active feedback loop system, in which the laser frequency is locked to the optical path length difference of the interferometer, is used to tune the laser wavelengths. If the two wavelengths are very close, electronic frequency counters can be used to measure the beat frequency between the two laser frequencies and thus to determine the optical path difference between the two legs of the interferometer.

  3. A General Model of Negative Frequency Dependent Selection Explains Global Patterns of Human ABO Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Villanea, Fernando A; Safi, Kristin N; Busch, Jeremiah W

    2015-01-01

    The ABO locus in humans is characterized by elevated heterozygosity and very similar allele frequencies among populations scattered across the globe. Using knowledge of ABO protein function, we generated a simple model of asymmetric negative frequency dependent selection and genetic drift to explain the maintenance of ABO polymorphism and its loss in human populations. In our models, regardless of the strength of selection, models with large effective population sizes result in ABO allele frequencies that closely match those observed in most continental populations. Populations must be moderately small to fall out of equilibrium and lose either the A or B allele (N(e) ≤ 50) and much smaller (N(e) ≤ 25) for the complete loss of diversity, which nearly always involved the fixation of the O allele. A pattern of low heterozygosity at the ABO locus where loss of polymorphism occurs in our model is consistent with small populations, such as Native American populations. This study provides a general evolutionary model to explain the observed global patterns of polymorphism at the ABO locus and the pattern of allele loss in small populations. Moreover, these results inform the range of population sizes associated with the recent human colonization of the Americas. PMID:25946124

  4. Experience-dependent overrepresentation of ultrasonic vocalization frequencies in the rat primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heesoo

    2013-01-01

    Cortical sensory representation is highly adaptive to the environment, and prevalent or behaviorally important stimuli are often overrepresented. One class of such stimuli is species-specific vocalizations. Rats vocalize in the ultrasonic range >30 kHz, but cortical representation of this frequency range has not been systematically examined. We recorded in vivo cortical electrophysiological responses to ultrasonic pure-tone pips, natural ultrasonic vocalizations, and pitch-shifted vocalizations to assess how rats represent this ethologically relevant frequency range. We find that nearly 40% of the primary auditory cortex (AI) represents an octave-wide band of ultrasonic vocalization frequencies (UVFs; 32–64 kHz) compared with <20% for other octave bands <32 kHz. These UVF neurons respond preferentially and reliably to ultrasonic vocalizations. The UVF overrepresentation matures in the cortex before it develops in the central nucleus of inferior colliculus, suggesting a cortical origin and corticofugal influences. Furthermore, the development of cortical UVF overrepresentation depends on early acoustic experience. These results indicate that natural sensory experience causes large-scale cortical map reorganization and improves representations of species-specific vocalizations. PMID:23741037

  5. Shear wave anisotropy from aligned inclusions: ultrasonic frequency dependence of velocity and attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Figueiredo, J. J. S.; Schleicher, J.; Stewart, R. R.; Dayur, N.; Omoboya, B.; Wiley, R.; William, A.

    2013-04-01

    To understand their influence on elastic wave propagation, anisotropic cracked media have been widely investigated in many theoretical and experimental studies. In this work, we report on laboratory ultrasound measurements carried out to investigate the effect of source frequency on the elastic parameters (wave velocities and the Thomsen parameter γ) and shear wave attenuation) of fractured anisotropic media. Under controlled conditions, we prepared anisotropic model samples containing penny-shaped rubber inclusions in a solid epoxy resin matrix with crack densities ranging from 0 to 6.2 per cent. Two of the three cracked samples have 10 layers and one has 17 layers. The number of uniform rubber inclusions per layer ranges from 0 to 100. S-wave splitting measurements have shown that scattering effects are more prominent in samples where the seismic wavelength to crack aperture ratio ranges from 1.6 to 1.64 than in others where the ratio varied from 2.72 to 2.85. The sample with the largest cracks showed a magnitude of scattering attenuation three times higher compared with another sample that had small inclusions. Our S-wave ultrasound results demonstrate that elastic scattering, scattering and anelastic attenuation, velocity dispersion and crack size interfere directly in shear wave splitting in a source-frequency dependent manner, resulting in an increase of scattering attenuation and a reduction of shear wave anisotropy with increasing frequency.

  6. On the geometrical dependence of low-frequency noise in SiGe HBTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Enhai; Cressler, John D.; El-Diwany, Monir; Krakowski, Tracey L.; Sadovnikov, Alexei; Kocoski, Dimitar

    2006-11-01

    We present an investigation of the dependence of low-frequency noise on device geometry in advanced npn silicon-germanium (SiGe) heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs). The devices examined in this work have fixed emitter width ( WE = 0.4 μm), but varying emitter length (0.5 μm ⩽ LE ⩽ 20.0 μm), and thus the ratio of the emitter perimeter ( PE) to the emitter area ( AE) varies widely, making it ideal for examining geometrical effects. The SPICE noise parameter AF extracted from these devices decreases with increasing LE. Furthermore, the low-frequency noise measured on SiGe HBTs with significantly different PE/ AE ratios suggests a possibility that the fundamental noise source for the diffusion base current may be located at the emitter periphery. Transistors with different distances between the emitter edge and the shallow trench edge (XEC), and shallow trench edge to deep trench edge (XTC), are also investigated. The SiGe HBTs with a smaller value of XEC have higher low-frequency noise, but no significant difference is found in devices with varying XTC. Explanations of the observed noise behavior are suggested.

  7. Direction of information flow in large-scale resting-state networks is frequency-dependent.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Arjan; Tewarie, Prejaas; van Dellen, Edwin; Yu, Meichen; Carbo, Ellen W S; Douw, Linda; Gouw, Alida A; van Straaten, Elisabeth C W; Stam, Cornelis J

    2016-04-01

    Normal brain function requires interactions between spatially separated, and functionally specialized, macroscopic regions, yet the directionality of these interactions in large-scale functional networks is unknown. Magnetoencephalography was used to determine the directionality of these interactions, where directionality was inferred from time series of beamformer-reconstructed estimates of neuronal activation, using a recently proposed measure of phase transfer entropy. We observed well-organized posterior-to-anterior patterns of information flow in the higher-frequency bands (alpha1, alpha2, and beta band), dominated by regions in the visual cortex and posterior default mode network. Opposite patterns of anterior-to-posterior flow were found in the theta band, involving mainly regions in the frontal lobe that were sending information to a more distributed network. Many strong information senders in the theta band were also frequent receivers in the alpha2 band, and vice versa. Our results provide evidence that large-scale resting-state patterns of information flow in the human brain form frequency-dependent reentry loops that are dominated by flow from parieto-occipital cortex to integrative frontal areas in the higher-frequency bands, which is mirrored by a theta band anterior-to-posterior flow. PMID:27001844

  8. Frequency-dependent electrodeformation of giant phospholipid vesicles in AC electric field

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A model of vesicle electrodeformation is described which obtains a parametrized vesicle shape by minimizing the sum of the membrane bending energy and the energy due to the electric field. Both the vesicle membrane and the aqueous media inside and outside the vesicle are treated as leaky dielectrics, and the vesicle itself is modeled as a nearly spherical shape enclosed within a thin membrane. It is demonstrated (a) that the model achieves a good quantitative agreement with the experimentally determined prolate-to-oblate transition frequencies in the kilohertz range and (b) that the model can explain a phase diagram of shapes of giant phospholipid vesicles with respect to two parameters: the frequency of the applied alternating current electric field and the ratio of the electrical conductivities of the aqueous media inside and outside the vesicle, explored in a recent paper (S. Aranda et al., Biophys J 95:L19–L21, 2008). A possible use of the frequency-dependent shape transitions of phospholipid vesicles in conductometry of microliter samples is discussed. PMID:21886342

  9. Planck intermediate results. XXII. Frequency dependence of thermal emission from Galactic dust in intensity and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Alves, M. I. R.; Aniano, G.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Magalhães, A. M.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wandelt, B. D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2015-04-01

    Planck has mapped the intensity and polarization of the sky at microwave frequencies with unprecedented sensitivity. We use these data to characterize the frequency dependence of dust emission. We make use of the Planck 353 GHz I, Q, and U Stokes maps as dust templates, and cross-correlate them with the Planck and WMAP data at 12 frequencies from 23 to 353 GHz, over circular patches with 10° radius. The cross-correlation analysis is performed for both intensity and polarization data in a consistent manner. The results are corrected for the chance correlation between the templates and the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background. We use a mask that focuses our analysis on the diffuse interstellar medium at intermediate Galactic latitudes. We determine the spectral indices of dust emission in intensity and polarization between 100 and 353 GHz, for each sky patch. Both indices are found to be remarkably constant over the sky. The mean values, 1.59 ± 0.02 for polarization and 1.51 ± 0.01 for intensity, for a mean dust temperature of 19.6 K, are close, but significantly different (3.6σ). We determine the mean spectral energy distribution (SED) of the microwave emission, correlated with the 353 GHz dust templates, by averaging the results of the correlation over all sky patches. We find that the mean SED increases for decreasing frequencies at ν< 60 GHz for both intensity and polarization. The rise of the polarization SED towards low frequencies may be accounted for by a synchrotron component correlated with dust, with no need for any polarization of the anomalous microwave emission. We use a spectral model to separate the synchrotron and dust polarization and to characterize the spectral dependence of the dust polarization fraction. The polarization fraction (p) of the dust emission decreases by (21 ± 6)% from 353 to 70 GHz. We discuss this result within the context of existing dust models. The decrease in p could indicate differences in polarization

  10. Tidal dissipation in the Moon. Learning from the "incorrect" frequency dependence measured by the LLR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efroimsky, M.

    2012-09-01

    It was demonstrated back in 2001 that fitting of the LLR data results in the quality factor Q of the Moon scaling as the frequency ξ to a negative power [8]: Q ˜ ξp , where p = -0.19 . (1) At the same time, numerous measurements by various seismological teams agree on the exponent being positive, not negative [4]. The positive sign of the exponent stems also from geodetic measurements [1], and it finds its explanation within the theory of friction in minerals [5]. On all these grounds, the aforementioned finding by the LLR team appears to be implausible and to disagree with the conventional wisdom of solid state mechanics and seismology. A later reexamination in [9] rendered a less upsetting value, p = -0.09 , which was still negative and still seemed to contradict our knowledge of microphysical processes in solids. The authors later wrote [10]: "There is a weak dependence of tidal specific dissipation Q on period. The Q increases from ˜ 30 at a month to ˜ 35 at one year. Q for rock is expected to have a weak dependence on tidal period, but it is expected to decrease with period rather than increase. The frequency dependence of Q deserves further attention and should be improved." A possible explanation of this paradox comes from the observation that the LLR measurements provided information on the tidal and not seismic dissipation. The difference between these two processes comes from self-gravitation of the celestial body. To address the problem accurately, one has to calculate the tidal factors kl sin ɛl showing up in the Darwin-Kaula expansion for the tidal torque or force. Here kl is the degree-l Love number, while ɛl is the appropriate tidal lag. Sometimes sin ɛl is denoted with 1/Q , which is not recommended, because this notation does not distinguish between the tidal reaction appropriate to harmonics of different degree. This notation also puts one at risk of confusing the tidal damping with the seismic damping, two process that have much in common

  11. Negative frequency-dependent interactions can underlie phenotypic heterogeneity in a clonal microbial population.

    PubMed

    Healey, David; Axelrod, Kevin; Gore, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Genetically identical cells in microbial populations often exhibit a remarkable degree of phenotypic heterogeneity even in homogenous environments. Such heterogeneity is commonly thought to represent a bet-hedging strategy against environmental uncertainty. However, evolutionary game theory predicts that phenotypic heterogeneity may also be a response to negative frequency-dependent interactions that favor rare phenotypes over common ones. Here we provide experimental evidence for this alternative explanation in the context of the well-studied yeast GAL network. In an environment containing the two sugars glucose and galactose, the yeast GAL network displays stochastic bimodal activation. We show that in this mixed sugar environment, GAL-ON and GAL-OFF phenotypes can each invade the opposite phenotype when rare and that there exists a resulting stable mix of phenotypes. Consistent with theoretical predictions, the resulting stable mix of phenotypes is not necessarily optimal for population growth. We find that the wild-type mixed strategist GAL network can invade populations of both pure strategists while remaining uninvasible by either. Lastly, using laboratory evolution we show that this mixed resource environment can directly drive the de novo evolution of clonal phenotypic heterogeneity from a pure strategist population. Taken together, our results provide experimental evidence that negative frequency-dependent interactions can underlie the phenotypic heterogeneity found in clonal microbial populations. PMID:27487817

  12. In situ evidence for frequency dependence of near-surface Q

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guofa; Sacchi, Mauricio D.; Zheng, Hao

    2016-02-01

    The frequency dependence of the quality factor Q has long been predicted by mathematical modelling and laboratory measurements; however, in situ evidence from seismic surveys is still lacking. We have conducted the cross-hole seismic surveys to investigate the near-surface seismic attenuation in the Daqing oilfield in northeastern China. The seismic waves were fired in a source hole of 40 m from the bottom to the surface at an interval of 1 m and were recorded in a receiver hole of 40 m by two geophones with one at the surface and the other one at the bottom. The direct waves were extracted to avoid the noise disturbance and the reflection interference, and the attenuations without the effects of the source signature and the receiver coupling were estimated by a method we proposed. The nonlinear attenuations were observed and fitted using the power-law-based Q. The reliability of Q estimate was verified by the high similarity between the real and the simulated attenuations. Therefore, the experiment we have conducted can be treated as a reliable evidence for the frequency dependence of near-surface Q.

  13. Frequency-dependent social dominance in a color polymorphic cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Peter D; Lindström, Jan; Metcalfe, Neil B; Hemelrijk, Charlotte K; Brendel, Mischa; Seehausen, Ole; Groothuis, Ton G G

    2010-10-01

    A mechanism commonly suggested to explain the persistence of color polymorphisms in animals is negative frequency-dependent selection. It could result from a social dominance advantage to rare morphs. We tested for this in males of red and blue color morphs of the Lake Victoria cichlid, Pundamilia. Earlier work has shown that males preferentially attack the males of their own morph, while red males are more likely to win dyadic contests with blue males. In order to study the potential contribution of both factors to the morph co-existence, we manipulated the proportion of red and blue males in experimental assemblages and studied its effect on social dominance. We then tried to disentangle the effects of the own-morph attack bias and social dominance of red using simulations. In the experiment, we found that red males were indeed socially dominant to the blue ones, but only when rare. However, blue males were not socially dominant when rare. The simulation results suggest that an own-morph attack bias reduces the social dominance of red males when they are more abundant. Thus, there is no evidence of symmetric negative frequency-dependent selection acting on social dominance, suggesting that additional fitness costs to the red morph must explain their co-existence. PMID:20500213

  14. Fracture characterization using frequency-dependent shear wave anisotropy analysis of microseismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Harrasi, O. H.; Kendall, J.-M.; Chapman, M.

    2011-05-01

    The presence of fractures in hydrocarbon reservoirs can enhance porosity and permeability, and consequently increase production. The use of seismic anisotropy to characterize fracture systems has gained much interest in the last two decades. However, estimating fracture sizes from observations of seismic anisotropy has not been possible. Recent work has shown that frequency-dependent anisotropy (FDA) is very sensitive to the length-scale of the causative mechanism for the anisotropy. In this study, we observe FDA in a microseismic data set acquired from a carbonate gas field in Oman. The frequency-dependent shear wave anisotropy observations are modelled using a poroelastic model, which considers fluid communication between grain size pore spaces and larger scale fractures. A grid search is performed over fracture parameters (radius, density and strike) to find the model that best fits the real data. The results show that fracture size varies from the microscale within the shale cap rocks, to the metre-scale within the gas reservoir, to the centimetre-scale within the non-producing part of the carbonate formation. The lateral variation in fracture density agrees with previous conclusions from ordinary shear wave splitting (SWS) analysis. Cumulatively, the results show the potential for characterizing fracture systems using observations of FDA.

  15. Frequency-dependent attenuation of the Hispaniola Island region of the Caribbean Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, D.; Meremonte, M.; Maharrey, J.Z.; Mildore, S-L.; Altidore, J.R.; Anglade, D.; Hough, S.E.; Given, D.; Benz, H.; Gee, L.; Frankel, A.

    2012-01-01

    We determine frequency-dependent attenuation 1/Q(f) for the Hispaniola region using direct S and Lg waves over five distinct passbands from 0.5 to 16 Hz. Data consist of 832 high-quality vertical and horizontal component waveforms recorded on short-period and broadband seismometers from the devastating 12 January 2010 M 7.0 Haiti earthquake and the rich sequence of aftershocks. For the distance range 250–700 km, we estimate an average frequency-dependent Q(f)=224(±27)f0.64(±0.073) using horizontal components of motion and note that Q(f) estimated with Lg at regional distances is very consistent across vertical and horizontal components. We also determine a Q(f)=142(±21)f0.71(±0.11) for direct S waves at local distances, ≤100 km. The strong attenuation observed on both vertical and horizontal components of motion is consistent with expectations for a tectonically active region.

  16. Effects of frequency- and direction-dependent elastic materials on linearly elastic MRE image reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Perreard, I M; Pattison, A J; Doyley, M; McGarry, M D J; Barani, Z; Van Houten, E E; Weaver, J B; Paulsen, K D

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical model commonly used in magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is linear elasticity. However, soft tissue may exhibit frequency-and direction-dependent (FDD) shear moduli in response to an induced excitation causing a purely linear elastic model to provide an inaccurate image reconstruction of its mechanical properties. The goal of this study was to characterize the effects of reconstructing FDD data using a linear elastic inversion (LEI) algorithm. Linear and FDD phantoms were manufactured and LEI images were obtained from time-harmonic MRE acquisitions with variations in frequency and driving signal amplitude. LEI responses to artificially imposed uniform phase shifts in the displacement data from both purely linear elastic and FDD phantoms were also evaluated. Of the variety of FDD phantoms considered, LEI appeared to tolerate viscoelastic data-model mismatch better than deviations caused by poroelastic and anisotropic mechanical properties in terms of visual image contrast. However, the estimated shear modulus values were substantially incorrect relative to independent mechanical measurements even in the successful viscoelastic cases and the variations in mean values with changes in experimental conditions associated with uniform phase shifts, driving signal frequency and amplitude were unpredictable. Overall, use of LEI to reconstruct data acquired in phantoms with FDD material properties provided biased results under the best conditions and significant artifacts in the worst cases. These findings suggest that the success with which LEI is applied to MRE data in tissue will depend on the underlying mechanical characteristics of the tissues and/or organs systems of clinical interest. PMID:21030746

  17. Angular and Frequency-Dependent Wave Velocity and Attenuation in Fractured Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcione, José M.; Gurevich, Boris; Santos, Juan E.; Picotti, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    Wave-induced fluid flow generates a dominant attenuation mechanism in porous media. It consists of energy loss due to P-wave conversion to Biot (diffusive) modes at mesoscopic-scale inhomogeneities. Fractured poroelastic media show significant attenuation and velocity dispersion due to this mechanism. The theory has first been developed for the symmetry axis of the equivalent transversely isotropic (TI) medium corresponding to a poroelastic medium containing planar fractures. In this work, we consider the theory for all propagation angles by obtaining the five complex and frequency-dependent stiffnesses of the equivalent TI medium as a function of frequency. We assume that the flow direction is perpendicular to the layering plane and is independent of the loading direction. As a consequence, the behaviour of the medium can be described by a single relaxation function. We first consider the limiting case of an open (highly permeable) fracture of negligible thickness. We then compute the associated wave velocities and quality factors as a function of the propagation direction (phase and ray angles) and frequency. The location of the relaxation peak depends on the distance between fractures (the mesoscopic distance), viscosity, permeability and fractures compliances. The flow induced by wave propagation affects the quasi-shear (qS) wave with levels of attenuation similar to those of the quasi-compressional (qP) wave. On the other hand, a general fracture can be modeled as a sequence of poroelastic layers, where one of the layers is very thin. Modeling fractures of different thickness filled with CO2 embedded in a background medium saturated with a stiffer fluid also shows considerable attenuation and velocity dispersion. If the fracture and background frames are the same, the equivalent medium is isotropic, but strong wave anisotropy occurs in the case of a frameless and highly permeable fracture material, for instance a suspension of solid particles in the fluid.

  18. Frequency-dependent seismic attenuation in shales: Experimental results and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Piane, C.; Madonna, C.; Sarout, J.; Saenger, E. H.; Dewhurst, D.

    2012-12-01

    Shale samples of from the Ordovician Bongabinni and Goldwyer source rock formations (Canning Basin, Western Australia) were characterized in terms of mineralogy, water content, porosity, permeability and microstructure. Additionally attenuation was experimentally measured in the frequency range between 10-2-102 Hz. Preserved samples cored with different orientation with respect to the bedding were prepared and tested in their native saturated state and after drying at 105°C for 24 hours to assess the effect of fluids and of the sediment anisotropy on attenuation. The two shales have significantly different quality factors; and this is seen to be dependent on both the saturation state of the samples and the propagation direction of the oscillatory signal. The attenuation coefficient parallel to bedding is less than that vertical to bedding in both the saturated and partially dehydrated situations. No frequency dependency is observed in the fully saturated samples within the range of frequencies explored in this study. On the other hand partially saturated samples show peaks in attenuation at around 40 Hz when the stress perturbation is transmitted normal to the macroscopic bedding. Through theroetical models we interpret this behavior to be due to fluid motion at the meso- and microscale; i.e. a combination of squirt flow between compliant pores (aspect ratio ≈ 10-3) and fluid motion within saturated portions of the samples with characteristic size ≈ 10-4m . This interpretation is compatible with microstructural investigation by SEM, mercury injection porosimetry and synchrotron micro-tomographic images revealing both quantitative and qualitative information on the pore geometry and size within the two shales.

  19. Phase and Frequency-Dependent Effects of Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation on Motor Cortical Excitability.

    PubMed

    Nakazono, Hisato; Ogata, Katsuya; Kuroda, Tsuyoshi; Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) can entrain ongoing brain oscillations and modulate the motor system in a frequency-dependent manner. Recent animal studies have demonstrated that the phase of a sinusoidal current also has an important role in modulation of neuronal activity. However, the phase effects of tACS on the human motor system are largely unknown. Here, we systematically investigated the effects of tACS phase and frequency on the primary motor cortex (M1) by using motor evoked potentials (MEPs) with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). First, we compared the phase effects (90°, 180°, 270° or 360°) of 10 and 20 Hz tACS on MEPs. The 20 Hz tACS significantly increased M1 excitability compared with the 10 Hz tACS at 90° phase only. Second, we studied the 90° phase effect on MEPs at different tACS frequencies (5, 10, 20 or 40 Hz). The 20 vs. 10 Hz difference was again observed, but the 90° phase in 5 and 40 Hz tACS did not influence M1 excitability. Third, the 90° phase effects of 10 and 20 Hz tACS were compared with sham stimulation. The 90° phase of 20 Hz tACS enhanced MEP amplitudes compared with sham stimulation, but there was no significant effect of 10 Hz tACS. Taken together, we assume that the differential 90° phase effects on 20 Hz and 10 Hz tACS can be attributed to the neural synchronization modulated by tACS. Our results further underline that phase and frequency are the important factors in the effects of tACS on M1 excitability. PMID:27607431

  20. Frequency-dependent PSP depression contributes to low-pass temporal filtering in Eigenmannia.

    PubMed

    Rose, G J; Fortune, E S

    1999-09-01

    This study examined the contribution of frequency-dependent short-term depression of PSP amplitude to low-pass temporal filtering in the weakly electric fish Eigenmannia. Behavioral and neurophysiological methods were used. Decelerations of the electric organ discharge frequency were measured in response to continuous and discontinuous electrosensory stimuli. Decelerations were strongest (median = 4.7 Hz; range, 3.5-5.9 Hz) at continuous beat rates of approximately 5 Hz and weakest (median = 0.4 Hz; range, 0.0-0.8 Hz) at beat rates of 30 Hz. Gating 20 or 30 Hz stimuli at a rate of 5 Hz, however, elicited decelerations that were sixfold greater than that of continuous stimuli at these beat rates (median = 2.6 Hz; range, 2.0-4.7 Hz for 30 Hz). These results support the hypothesis that short-term processes enhance low-pass filtering by reducing responses to fast beat rates. This hypothesis was tested by recording intracellularly the responses of 33 midbrain neurons to continuous and discontinuous stimuli. Results indicate that short-term depression of PSP amplitude primarily accounts for the steady-state low-pass filtering of these neurons beyond that contributed by their passive and active membrane properties. Previous results demonstrate that passive properties can contribute up to 7 dB of low-pass filtering; PSP depression can add up to an additional 12.5 dB (median = 4.5). PSP depression increased in magnitude with stimulus frequency and showed a prominent short-term component (t(1) = 66 msec at 30 Hz). Initial PSP amplitude recovered fully after a gap of 150 msec for most neurons. Remarkably, recovery of PSP amplitude could be produced by inserting a brief low-temporal frequency component in the stimulus. PMID:10460268

  1. The evolution of social learning rules: payoff-biased and frequency-dependent biased transmission.

    PubMed

    Kendal, Jeremy; Giraldeau, Luc-Alain; Laland, Kevin

    2009-09-21

    Humans and other animals do not use social learning indiscriminately, rather, natural selection has favoured the evolution of social learning rules that make selective use of social learning to acquire relevant information in a changing environment. We present a gene-culture coevolutionary analysis of a small selection of such rules (unbiased social learning, payoff-biased social learning and frequency-dependent biased social learning, including conformism and anti-conformism) in a population of asocial learners where the environment is subject to a constant probability of change to a novel state. We define conditions under which each rule evolves to a genetically polymorphic equilibrium. We find that payoff-biased social learning may evolve under high levels of environmental variation if the fitness benefit associated with the acquired behaviour is either high or low but not of intermediate value. In contrast, both conformist and anti-conformist biases can become fixed when environment variation is low, whereupon the mean fitness in the population is higher than for a population of asocial learners. Our examination of the population dynamics reveals stable limit cycles under conformist and anti-conformist biases and some highly complex dynamics including chaos. Anti-conformists can out-compete conformists when conditions favour a low equilibrium frequency of the learned behaviour. We conclude that evolution, punctuated by the repeated successful invasion of different social learning rules, should continuously favour a reduction in the equilibrium frequency of asocial learning, and propose that, among competing social learning rules, the dominant rule will be the one that can persist with the lowest frequency of asocial learning. PMID:19501102

  2. Time-dependent wave packet averaged vibrational frequencies from femtosecond stimulated Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue-Chao; Zhao, Bin; Lee, Soo-Y.

    2016-02-01

    Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) on the Stokes side arises from a third order polarization, P(3)(t), which is given by an overlap of a first order wave packet, |" separators=" Ψ2 ( 1 ) ( p u , t ) > , prepared by a narrow band (ps) Raman pump pulse, Epu(t), on the upper electronic e2 potential energy surface (PES), with a second order wave packet, <" separators=" Ψ1 ( 2 ) ( p r ∗ , p u , t ) | , that is prepared on the lower electronic e1 PES by a broadband (fs) probe pulse, Epr(t), acting on the first-order wave packet. In off-resonant FSRS, |" separators=" Ψ2 ( 1 ) ( p u , t ) > resembles the zeroth order wave packet |" separators=" Ψ1 ( 0 ) ( t ) > on the lower PES spatially, but with a force on |" separators=" Ψ2 ( 1 ) ( p u , t ) > along the coordinates of the reporter modes due to displacements in the equilibrium position, so that <" separators=" Ψ1 ( 2 ) ( p r ∗ , p u , t ) | will oscillate along those coordinates thus giving rise to similar oscillations in P(3)(t) with the frequencies of the reporter modes. So, by recovering P(3)(t) from the FSRS spectrum, we are able to deduce information on the time-dependent quantum-mechanical wave packet averaged frequencies, ω ¯ j ( t ) , of the reporter modes j along the trajectory of |" separators=" Ψ1 ( 0 ) ( t ) > . The observable FSRS Raman gain is related to the imaginary part of P(3)(ω). The imaginary and real parts of P(3)(ω) are related by the Kramers-Kronig relation. Hence, from the FSRS Raman gain, we can obtain the complex P(3)(ω), whose Fourier transform then gives us the complex P(3)(t) to analyze for ω ¯ j ( t ) . We apply the theory, first, to a two-dimensional model system with one conformational mode of low frequency and one reporter vibrational mode of higher frequency with good results, and then we apply it to the time-resolved FSRS spectra of the cis-trans isomerization of retinal in rhodopsin [P. Kukura et al., Science 310, 1006 (2005)]. We obtain the vibrational

  3. Frequency-dependent AMS of rocks: A tool for the investigation of the fabric of ultrafine magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrouda, František; Ježek, Josef

    2014-08-01

    In some geological processes, new very fine-grained magnetic minerals may originate. The variation in content of these minerals is routinely investigated by frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility, which is traditionally interpreted in terms of the presence of viscous superparamagnetic (SP) particles in addition to stable single domain (SSD) and multidomain (MD) magnetic particles. In addition, the fabric of these grains can be investigated through the frequency-dependent AMS. Through standard AMS measurement at different frequencies, one can evaluate the contribution of SP particles to the whole-rock AMS; appropriate methods were developed. Various rocks, soils and ceramics, showing frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility, were investigated. Measurable changes of AMS with operating frequency were revealed and attempts are made of their fabric interpretation.

  4. Modeling intersite dependence for regional frequency analysis of extreme marine events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jérôme; Bernardara, Pietro; Benoit, Michel

    2014-07-01

    The duration of observation at a site of interest is generally too low to reliably estimate marine extremes. Regional frequency analysis (RFA), by exploiting the similarity between sites, can help to reduce uncertainties inherent to local analyses. Extreme observations in a homogeneous region are especially assumed to follow a common regional distribution, up to a local index. The regional pooling method, by gathering observations from different sites into a regional sample, can be employed to estimate the regional distribution. However, such a procedure may be highly affected by intersite dependence in the regional sample. This paper derives a theoretical model of intersite dependence, dedicated to the regional pooling method in a "peaks over threshold" framework. This model expresses the tendency of sites to display a similar behavior during a storm generating extreme observations, by describing both the storm propagation in the region and the storm intensity. The proposed model allows the assessment of (i) the regional effective duration of the regional sample and (ii) different regional hazards, e.g., return periods of storms. An application to the estimation of extreme significant wave heights from the numerical sea-state database ANEMOC-2 is provided, where different patterns of regional dependence are highlighted.

  5. Study on Frequency Dependency of ON-Resistance and Pulse-Loss Calculation of MOSFETs for Switch Mode Power Supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, Hideho; Sato, Ryohei; Iwata, Yoshiharu

    Global efforts toward energy conservation, increasing data centers, and the increasing use of IT equipments are leading to a demand in reduced power consumption of equipments, and power efficiency improvement of power supply units is becoming a necessity. MOSFETs are widely used for their low ON-resistances. Power efficiency is designed using time-domain circuit simulators, except for transformer copper-loss, which has frequency dependency which is calculated separately using methods based on skin and proximity effects. As semiconductor technology reduces the ON-resistance of MOSFETs, frequency dependency due to the skin effect or proximity effect is anticipated. In this study, ON-resistance of MOSFETs are measured and frequency dependency is confirmed. Power loss against rectangular current pulse is calculated. The calculation method for transformer copper-loss is expanded to MOSFETs. A frequency function for the resistance model is newly developed and parametric calculation is enabled. Acceleration of calculation is enabled by eliminating summation terms. Using this method, it is shown that the frequency dependent component of the measured MOSFETs increases the dissipation from 11% to 32% at a switching frequency of 100kHz. From above, this paper points out the importance of the frequency dependency of MOSFETs' ON-resistance, provides means of calculating its pulse losses, and improves loss calculation accuracy of SMPSs.

  6. Algebraic processing technique for extracting frequency-dependent shear-wave splitting parameters in an anisotropic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kai-Feng; Zeng, Xin-Wu

    2011-06-01

    Based on the dual source cumulative rotation technique in the time-domain proposed by Zeng and MacBeth (1993), a new algebraic processing technique for extracting shear-wave splitting parameters from multi-component VSP data in frequency-dependent medium has been developed. By using this dual source cumulative rotation technique in the frequency-domain (DCTF), anisotropic parameters, including polarization direction of the shear-waves and timedelay between the fast and slow shear-waves, can be estimated for each frequency component in the frequency domain. It avoids the possible error which comes from using a narrow-band filter in the current commonly used method. By using synthetic seismograms, the feasibility and validity of the technique was tested and a comparison with the currently used method was also given. The results demonstrate that the shear-wave splitting parameters frequency dependence can be extracted directly from four-component seismic data using the DCTF. In the presence of larger scale fractures, substantial frequency dependence would be found in the seismic frequency range, which implies that dispersion would occur at seismic frequencies. Our study shows that shear-wave anisotropy decreases as frequency increases.

  7. The Dependence of High-Frequency Characteristics of Ground Motion on Rupture-Model Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, B. A.; Shi, Z.; Day, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Recent 3-D numerical simulations reveal that high-frequency ground motion generated from rupture propagation on rough faults is influenced by the properties of fault roughness, frictional parameters, and off-fault plastic response. In particular, the predicted Fourier spectra of ground acceleration from rupture along faults with self-similar roughness are roughly flat between a few tenths of a Hz and a source-controlled upper cutoff frequency. Fourier spectra of recorded ground motion exhibit a similar upper cutoff frequency, conventionally called f_max, which appears to be principally controlled by path and site attenuation. An open question is the extent to which the path and site effects overprint a source-controlled contribution to f_max such as that found in the numerical simulations. As a step toward addressing that question, we refine the theoretical predictions by further examining the sensitivity of source f_max to rupture model parameters. Initial findings from our earlier 3-D simulations (Shi and Day, 2013) have identified three key sensitivities: a downward shift of source f_max occurs when (i) the off-fault material undergoes plastic deformation (relative to the corresponding elastic simulations); (ii) the minimum roughness wavelength of the fault profile is increased; and/or (iii) the state evolution distance in the friction law is increased. These effects are both nonlinear and strongly coupled to each other. In this work, we perform a more extensive parametric study with 2-D rough-fault simulations to examine the aforementioned f_max sensitivity factors, their scaling with event magnitude and roughness amplitude, and their dependence on the plastic yielding parameters.

  8. Dependence of ultrasonic scattering on frequency and microarchitecture in trabecular bone: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wear, Keith A.

    2002-05-01

    Measurements of ultrasonic properties of calcaneus (heel bone) have been shown to be effective for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. However, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between ultrasound and bone are currently not well understood. A model that predicts backscatter from trabecular bone has been developed. Scattering is assumed to originate from the surfaces of trabeculae, which are modeled as long, thin, elastic cylinders with radii small compared with the ultrasonic wavelength. Experimental measurements of backscatter using broadband ultrasound centered at 500 kHz from 43 trabecular bone samples (from human calcaneus) in vitro have been performed. Microcomputed tomography has been performed on all 43 samples in order to measure microarchitectural features. The theory correctly predicts the measured dependences of backscatter on ultrasonic frequency and trabecular thickness. [Funding from the FDA Office of Womens Health is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Picosecond laser-induced breakdown at 5321 and 5347 A - Observation of frequency-dependent behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1977-01-01

    A study is presented of picosecond laser-induced breakdown at 3547 and 5321 A of several materials. The thresholds obtained for breakdown at 5321 A are compared to previous results obtained at 1.064 microns using the same laser system. This comparison illustrates the transition of bulk laser-induced breakdown as it becomes increasingly frequency dependent. UV picosecond pulses are obtained by mixing 5321 A and 1.064 micron pulses in a KH2PO4 crystal. Upper and lower bounds on the 3547 A breakdown threshold are defined, although some effects of walk-off distortion and self-focusing are observed. The results are discussed with reference to models for the intrinsic processes involved in the breakdown, i.e., avalanche and multiphoton ionization.

  10. A novel theory to explain species diversity in landscapes: positive frequency dependence and habitat suitability.

    PubMed Central

    Molofsky, Jane; Bever, James D

    2002-01-01

    Theories to explain the diversity of species have required that individual species occupy unique niches and/or vary in their response to environmental factors. Positive interactions within a species, although common in communities, have not been thought to maintain species diversity because in non-spatial models the more abundant species always outcompetes the rarer species. Here, we show, using a stochastic spatial model, that positive intraspecific interactions such as those caused by positive frequency dependence and/or priority effects, can maintain species diversity if interactions between individuals are primarily local and the habitat contains areas that cannot be colonized by any species, such as boulders or other physical obstructions. When intraspecific interactions are primarily neutral, species diversity will eventually erode to a single species. When the landscape is homogeneous (i.e. does not contain areas that cannot be colonized by any species), the presence of strong intraspecific interactions will not maintain diversity. PMID:12495479

  11. Improved fluid simulations of radio-frequency plasmas using energy dependent ion mobilities

    SciTech Connect

    Greb, Arthur; Niemi, Kari; O'Connell, Deborah; Gans, Timo; Ennis, Gerard J.; MacGearailt, Niall

    2013-05-15

    Symmetric and asymmetric capacitively coupled radio-frequency plasmas in oxygen at 40 Pa, 300 V voltage amplitude and a discharge gap of 40 mm are investigated by means of one-dimensional numerical semi-kinetic fluid modeling on the basis of a simplified reaction scheme including the dominant positive and negative ions, background gas, and electrons. An improved treatment, by accounting for the dependence of ion mobilities on E/N, is compared to the standard approach, based on using zero-field mobility values only. The charged particle dynamics as a result of direct electron impact ionization of oxygen, secondary electron release from the electrodes, the spatial distribution of all involved particles as well as impact of geometry and model modification on ion energies is analyzed and compared to independent simulations and experiments.

  12. Frequency-dependent photothermal measurement of transverse thermal diffusivity of organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, J. W.; Shahi, Maryam; Payne, Marcia M.; Edberg, Jesper; Yao, Y.; Crispin, Xavier; Anthony, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    We have used a photothermal technique, in which chopped light heats the front surface of a small (˜1 mm2) sample and the chopping frequency dependence of thermal radiation from the back surface is measured with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled infrared detector. In our system, the sample is placed directly in front of the detector within its dewar. Because the detector is also sensitive to some of the incident light, which leaks around or through the sample, measurements are made for the detector signal that is in quadrature with the chopped light. Results are presented for layered crystals of semiconducting 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-pn) and for papers of cellulose nanofibrils coated with semiconducting poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) (NFC-PEDOT). For NFC-PEDOT, we have found that the transverse diffusivity, smaller than the in-plane value, varies inversely with thickness, suggesting that texturing of the papers varies with thickness. For TIPS-pn, we have found that the interlayer diffusivity is an order of magnitude larger than the in-plane value, consistent with previous estimates, suggesting that low-frequency optical phonons, presumably associated with librations in the TIPS side groups, carry most of the heat.

  13. Depth dependence of earthquake frequency-magnitude distributions in California: Implications for rupture initiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mori, J.; Abercrombie, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    Statistics of earthquakes in California show linear frequency-magnitude relationships in the range of M2.0 to M5.5 for various data sets. Assuming Gutenberg-Richter distributions, there is a systematic decrease in b value with increasing depth of earthquakes. We find consistent results for various data sets from northern and southern California that both include and exclude the larger aftershock sequences. We suggest that at shallow depth (???0 to 6 km) conditions with more heterogeneous material properties and lower lithospheric stress prevail. Rupture initiations are more likely to stop before growing into large earthquakes, producing relatively more smaller earthquakes and consequently higher b values. These ideas help to explain the depth-dependent observations of foreshocks in the western United States. The higher occurrence rate of foreshocks preceding shallow earthquakes can be interpreted in terms of rupture initiations that are stopped before growing into the mainshock. At greater depth (9-15 km), any rupture initiation is more likely to continue growing into a larger event, so there are fewer foreshocks. If one assumes that frequency-magnitude statistics can be used to estimate probabilities of a small rupture initiation growing into a larger earthquake, then a small (M2) rupture initiation at 9 to 12 km depth is 18 times more likely to grow into a M5.5 or larger event, compared to the same small rupture initiation at 0 to 3 km. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Frequency-dependent photothermal measurement of transverse thermal diffusivity of organic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, J. W.; Shahi, Maryam; Yao, Y.; Payne, Marcia M.; Anthony, J. E.; Edberg, Jesper; Crispin, Xavier

    2015-12-21

    We have used a photothermal technique, in which chopped light heats the front surface of a small (∼1 mm{sup 2}) sample and the chopping frequency dependence of thermal radiation from the back surface is measured with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled infrared detector. In our system, the sample is placed directly in front of the detector within its dewar. Because the detector is also sensitive to some of the incident light, which leaks around or through the sample, measurements are made for the detector signal that is in quadrature with the chopped light. Results are presented for layered crystals of semiconducting 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-pn) and for papers of cellulose nanofibrils coated with semiconducting poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) (NFC-PEDOT). For NFC-PEDOT, we have found that the transverse diffusivity, smaller than the in-plane value, varies inversely with thickness, suggesting that texturing of the papers varies with thickness. For TIPS-pn, we have found that the interlayer diffusivity is an order of magnitude larger than the in-plane value, consistent with previous estimates, suggesting that low-frequency optical phonons, presumably associated with librations in the TIPS side groups, carry most of the heat.

  15. Global examination of the wind-dependence of very low frequency underwater ambient noise.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Stephen M; Bradley, David L

    2016-03-01

    Ocean surface winds play a key role in underwater ambient noise generation. One particular frequency band of interest is the infrasonic or very low frequency (VLF) band from 1 to 20 Hz. In this spectral band, wind generated ocean surface waves interact non-linearly to produce acoustic waves, which couple into the seafloor to generate microseisms, as explained by the theory developed by Longuet-Higgins. This study examines long term data sets in the VLF portion of the ambient noise spectrum, collected by the hydroacoustic systems of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty Organization in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. Three properties of the noise field were examined: (a) the behavior of the acoustic spectrum slope from 1 to 5 Hz, (b) correlation of noise levels and wind speeds, and (c) the autocorrelation behavior of both the noise field and the wind. Analysis results indicate the spectrum slope is site dependent, and for both correlation methods, a high correlation between wind and the noise field in the 1-5 Hz band. PMID:27036248

  16. Long range dependence in the high frequency USD/INR exchange rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dilip

    2014-02-01

    Using high frequency data, this paper examines the long memory property in the unconditional and conditional volatility of the USD/INR exchange rate at different time scales using the Local Whittle (LW), the Exact Local Whittle (ELW) and the FIAPARCH models. Results indicate that the long memory property remains quite stable across different time scales for both unconditional and conditional volatility measures. Results from the non-overlapping moving window approach indicate that the extreme events (such as the subprime crisis and the European debt crisis) resulted in highly persistent behavior of the USD/INR exchange rate and thus lead to market inefficiency. This paper also examines the long memory property in the realized volatility based on different time scale data. Results indicate that the realized volatility measures based on different scales of the high frequency data exhibit a consistent and stable long memory property. However, the realized volatility measures based on daily data exhibit lower degree of long-range dependence. This study has implications for traders and investors (with different trading horizons) and can be helpful in predicting expected future volatility and in designing and implementing trading strategies at different time scales.

  17. Estimation of size and number density of microbubbles based on analysis of frequency-dependent attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kenji; Tamura, Kazuki; Yamaguchi, Tadashi

    2016-07-01

    A method of estimating the size and number density of microbubbles in suspension is proposed, which matches the theoretically calculated frequency dependent attenuation coefficient with the experimental data. Assuming that the size distribution of bubbles is given by a log-normal function, three parameters (expected value and standard deviation of radius and the number density of bubbles) of Sonazoid® in the steady flow were estimated. Bubbles are exposed to ultrasound with a center frequency of 5 MHz and mechanical indices of 0.4, 0.5, 0.7, and 1.1. The expected value and standard deviation for the size distribution were estimated to be 70–85 and 45–60% of the reference values in the case of a lower mechanical index, respectively. The number density was estimated to be 20–30 times smaller than the reference values. This fundamental examination indicates that the number density of bubbles can be qualitatively evaluated by the proposed method.

  18. Modeling soil magnetic susceptibility and frequency-dependent susceptibility to aid landmine clearance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannam, Jacqueline A.; Dearing, John A.

    2006-05-01

    Information on the electromagnetic properties of soils and their effects on metal detectors is increasingly necessary for effective demining due to limited detector efficacy in highly magnetic soils and the difficulty of detecting minimummetal mines. Magnetic measurements of soils, such as magnetic susceptibility and frequency dependent susceptibility can aid the detection of problem soils, but are not part of standard soil analyses. Consequently, little information about soil magnetism exists within the soil, environmental science and environmental geophysics communities. Lack of empirical data may be compensated through the estimation of soil magnetic characteristics by predictive modeling approaches. Initial modeling of soil types in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) was attempted by expert and analogue approaches, using only coarse scale soil type information, which resulted in the production of national soil maps for low field and frequency-dependent susceptibility. Validation of the maps was achieved by comparison of empirical magnetic data from soil samples in the National Bosnian soil archive in Sarajevo. Discrepancies between the model and empirical data are explained in part by the differences in soil parent material within each soil type, which controls the amount of Fe released into the soil system available for in situ conversion to magnetic Fe oxides. The integration of soil information (type and parent material), expert knowledge and empirical data refines the predictive modeling of soil magnetic characteristics in temperate-Mediterranean environments such as BiH. Further spatial separation of soil types in the landscape can be achieved by digital terrain modeling. Preliminary fine-scale, landscape-soil modeling indicates improved spatial resolution of soil types compared with the original coarsely-mapped soil units, and the potential to synthesize local scale soil magnetic maps.

  19. Effects of Menstrual Phase-Dependent Resistance Training Frequency on Muscular Hypertrophy and Strength.

    PubMed

    Sakamaki-Sunaga, Mikako; Min, Seokki; Kamemoto, Kayoko; Okamoto, Takanobu

    2016-06-01

    Sakamaki-Sunaga, M, Min, S, Kamemoto, K, and Okamoto, T. Effects of menstrual phase-dependent resistance training frequency on muscular hypertrophy and strength. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1727-1734, 2016-The present study investigated how different training frequencies during menstrual phases affect muscle hypertrophy and strength. Fourteen eumenorrheic women performed 3 sets of arm curls (8-15 repetitions) until failure for 12 weeks. Depending on the menstrual cycle phase, each subject trained each arm separately after either a 3- or a 1-d·wk training protocol during the follicular phase (FP-T) and a 3- or 1-d·wk training protocol during the luteal phase (LP-T). Cross-sectional area (CSA), 1 repetition maximum, and maximum voluntary contraction significantly increased 6.2 ± 4.4, 36.4 ± 11.9, and 16.7 ± 5.6%, respectively (p ≤ 0.05 vs. before training), in the FP-T group and 7.8 ± 4.2, 31.8 ± 14.1, and 14.9 ± 12.7%, respectively (p ≤ 0.05 vs. before training), in the LP-T group. Changes in CSA between the FP-T and the LP-T groups significantly and positively correlated (r = 0.54, p ≤ 0.05). There were no major differences among the different training protocols with regard to muscle hypertrophy and strength. Therefore, we suggest that variations in female hormones induced by the menstrual cycle phases do not significantly contribute to muscle hypertrophy and strength gains during 12 weeks of resistance training. PMID:26554551

  20. Ultrabroadband chirped pulse second-harmonic spectroscopy: measuring the frequency-dependent second-order response of different metal films.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Bernd; Gui, Lili; Giessen, Harald

    2014-09-15

    We introduce a spectroscopic method for measuring the frequency-dependent second-order response using ultrabroadband strongly chirped laser pulses. The dispersion suppresses nonlinear frequency mixing, hence the second-order response of a material can be unambiguously retrieved. We demonstrate this method by measuring the frequency-dependent second-harmonic (SH) response of the metals gold, aluminium, silver, and copper in the wavelength range of about 900-1150 nm and compare the results to classical SH spectroscopy. The SH spectra indicate that interband transitions in the metals influence the overall nonlinear optical response. PMID:26466254

  1. Firing-rate, symbolic dynamics and frequency dependence in periodically driven spiking models: a piecewise-smooth approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados, Albert; Krupa, Maciej

    2015-05-01

    In this work we consider a periodically forced generic integrate-and-fire model with a unique attracting equilibrium in the subthreshold dynamics and study the dependence of the firing-rate on the frequency of the drive. In an earlier study we have obtained rigorous results on the bifurcation structure in such systems, with emphasis on the relation between the firing-rate and the rotation number of the existing periodic orbits. In this work we study how these bifurcation structures behave upon variation of the frequency of the input. This allows us to show that the dependence of the firing-rate on frequency of the drive follows a devil's staircase with non-monotonic steps and that there is an optimal response in the whole frequency domain. We also characterize certain bounded frequency windows in which the firing-rate exhibits a bell-shaped envelope with a global maximum.

  2. Temperature and frequency dependence of AC conductivity of new quaternary Se-Te-Bi-Pb chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Preeti; Sharma, Ambika

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the temperature and frequency dependence of ac conductivity of new quaternary Se84-xTe15Bi1.0Pbx chalcogenide glasses. The Se84-xTe15Bi1.0Pbx (x = 2, 6) glassy alloys are prepared by using melt quenching technique. The temperature and frequency dependent behavior of ac conductivity σac(ω) has been carried out in the frequency range 42 Hz to 5 MHz and in the temperature range of 298-323 K below glass transition temperature. The behavior of ac conductivity is described in terms of the power law ωs. The obtained temperature dependence behavior of ac conductivity and frequency component (s) are explained by means of correlated barrier hopping model recommended by Elliot.

  3. Cav1.1 controls frequency-dependent events regulating adult skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Buvinic, Sonja; Jacquemond, Vincent; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-03-01

    An important pending question in neuromuscular biology is how skeletal muscle cells decipher the stimulation pattern coming from motoneurons to define their phenotype as slow or fast twitch muscle fibers. We have previously shown that voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1) acts as a voltage sensor for activation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P₃]-dependent Ca(2+) signals that regulates gene expression. ATP released by muscle cells after electrical stimulation through pannexin-1 channels plays a key role in this process. We show now that stimulation frequency determines both ATP release and Ins(1,4,5)P₃ production in adult skeletal muscle and that Cav1.1 and pannexin-1 colocalize in the transverse tubules. Both ATP release and increased Ins(1,4,5)P₃ was seen in flexor digitorum brevis fibers stimulated with 270 pulses at 20 Hz, but not at 90 Hz. 20 Hz stimulation induced transcriptional changes related to fast-to-slow muscle fiber phenotype transition that required ATP release. Addition of 30 µM ATP to fibers induced the same transcriptional changes observed after 20 Hz stimulation. Myotubes lacking the Cav1.1-α1 subunit released almost no ATP after electrical stimulation, showing that Cav1.1 has a central role in this process. In adult muscle fibers, ATP release and the transcriptional changes produced by 20 Hz stimulation were blocked by both the Cav1.1 antagonist nifedipine (25 µM) and by the Cav1.1 agonist (-)S-BayK 8644 (10 µM). We propose a new role for Cav1.1, independent of its calcium channel activity, in the activation of signaling pathways allowing muscle fibers to decipher the frequency of electrical stimulation and to activate specific transcriptional programs that define their phenotype. PMID:23321639

  4. Fundamental x-ray interaction limits in diagnostic imaging detectors: frequency-dependent Swank noise.

    PubMed

    Hajdok, G; Battista, J J; Cunningham, I A

    2008-07-01

    A frequency-dependent x-ray Swank factor based on the "x-ray interaction" modulation transfer function and normalized noise power spectrum is determined from a Monte Carlo analysis. This factor was calculated in four converter materials: amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium (a-Se), cesium iodide (CsI), and lead iodide (PbI2) for incident photon energies between 10 and 150 keV and various converter thicknesses. When scaled by the quantum efficiency, the x-ray Swank factor describes the best possible detective quantum efficiency (DQE) a detector can have. As such, this x-ray interaction DQE provides a target performance benchmark. It is expressed as a function of (Fourier-based) spatial frequency and takes into consideration signal and noise correlations introduced by reabsorption of Compton scatter and photoelectric characteristic emissions. It is shown that the x-ray Swank factor is largely insensitive to converter thickness for quantum efficiency values greater than 0.5. Thus, while most of the tabulated values correspond to thick converters with a quantum efficiency of 0.99, they are appropriate to use for many detectors in current use. A simple expression for the x-ray interaction DQE of digital detectors (including noise aliasing) is derived in terms of the quantum efficiency, x-ray Swank factor, detector element size, and fill factor. Good agreement is shown with DQE curves published by other investigators for each converter material, and the conditions required to achieve this ideal performance are discussed. For high-resolution imaging applications, the x-ray Swank factor indicates: (i) a-Si should only be used at low-energy (e.g., mammography); (ii) a-Se has the most promise for any application below 100 keV; and (iii) while quantum efficiency may be increased at energies just above the K edge in CsI and PbI2, this benefit is offset by a substantial drop in the x-ray Swank factor, particularly at high spatial frequencies. PMID:18697544

  5. Fundamental x-ray interaction limits in diagnostic imaging detectors: Frequency-dependent Swank noise

    SciTech Connect

    Hajdok, G.; Battista, J. J.; Cunningham, I. A.

    2008-07-15

    A frequency-dependent x-ray Swank factor based on the ''x-ray interaction'' modulation transfer function and normalized noise power spectrum is determined from a Monte Carlo analysis. This factor was calculated in four converter materials: amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium (a-Se), cesium iodide (CsI), and lead iodide (PbI{sub 2}) for incident photon energies between 10 and 150 keV and various converter thicknesses. When scaled by the quantum efficiency, the x-ray Swank factor describes the best possible detective quantum efficiency (DQE) a detector can have. As such, this x-ray interaction DQE provides a target performance benchmark. It is expressed as a function of (Fourier-based) spatial frequency and takes into consideration signal and noise correlations introduced by reabsorption of Compton scatter and photoelectric characteristic emissions. It is shown that the x-ray Swank factor is largely insensitive to converter thickness for quantum efficiency values greater than 0.5. Thus, while most of the tabulated values correspond to thick converters with a quantum efficiency of 0.99, they are appropriate to use for many detectors in current use. A simple expression for the x-ray interaction DQE of digital detectors (including noise aliasing) is derived in terms of the quantum efficiency, x-ray Swank factor, detector element size, and fill factor. Good agreement is shown with DQE curves published by other investigators for each converter material, and the conditions required to achieve this ideal performance are discussed. For high-resolution imaging applications, the x-ray Swank factor indicates: (i) a-Si should only be used at low-energy (e.g., mammography); (ii) a-Se has the most promise for any application below 100 keV; and (iii) while quantum efficiency may be increased at energies just above the K edge in CsI and PbI{sub 2}, this benefit is offset by a substantial drop in the x-ray Swank factor, particularly at high spatial frequencies.

  6. The neuropsychological correlates of cannabis use in schizophrenia: lifetime abuse/dependence, frequency of use, and recency of use.

    PubMed

    Coulston, Carissa M; Perdices, Michael; Tennant, Christopher C

    2007-11-01

    This study examined the relationship between neuropsychological performance and three different indices of cannabis use in schizophrenia. These indices were DSM-IV lifetime abuse/dependence, frequency of use, and recency of use. Sixty males with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder and 17 healthy males were recruited. The two groups were matched for age, years of education, and premorbid IQ. Medical history, substance use, and psychiatric symptoms were assessed. A neuropsychological battery was also administered to assess attention/processing speed, executive functions, memory, and perceptual organisation. Substance use within 24 hours of cognitive assessment was screened by urine analysis, and a range of confounds were controlled. In the schizophrenia group, 44 participants met DSM-IV criteria for lifetime cannabis abuse/dependence. In addition, there were three mutually exclusive frequency-of-cannabis-use subgroups comprising "high" frequency users (n=11), "medium" frequency users (n=7), and "low" frequency users (n=34) over the preceding year. There were also four mutually exclusive recency-of-cannabis-use categories comprising "cannabis abuse/dependence in the past week" (n=11 users), "non-dependent cannabis use in the past week" (n=7 users), "non-dependent cannabis use in the past month, but prior to the past week" (n=7 users), and "non-dependent cannabis use prior to the past month" (n=9 users). The control group performed better than the schizophrenia group in all cognitive domains. Within the schizophrenia group, a larger proportion of participants with lifetime cannabis abuse/dependence demonstrated better performance than those without lifetime abuse/dependence on a component of psychomotor speed. Frequency and recency of cannabis use were also associated with better neuropsychological performance, predominantly in the domains of attention/processing speed and executive functions. In conclusion, cannabis use is associated with enhanced cognitive

  7. Influence of pressure, temperature, and pore fluid on the frequency-dependent attenuation of elastic waves in Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'hara, Stephen G.

    1985-07-01

    The effects of pore fluid, effective stress, pore fluid pressure, and temperature on the frequency dependence of elastic wave attenuation in Berea sandstone are interrelated in a series of systematic experiments. The attenuation of both the extensional and torsional modes of cylindrical samples of the sandstone is measured on the frequency range 3-30 kHz. To simulate conditions within the earth, the sandstone is subjected to confining stress to 70.0 MPa and temperature from 24.0 °C to 120.0 °C. Confining pressure and pore fluid pressure are varied independently. Data for two different pore fluids, brine and n-heptane, suggest that a scaling law exists for the pressure and temperature dependence of the attenuation in terms of the pore fluid. The logarithmic decrement of the sandstone is almost frequency independent in a vacuum evacuated sample, but shows a linear frequency dependence, once the sample is saturated. Extrapolation of this linear trend to low frequencies suggests that the decrement in fluid-filled sandstone is effectively frequency independent at seismic frequencies (<100 Hz). The frequency dependence becomes more pronounced as either the effective stress or the temperature is decreased. When the difference between the external stress on the sandstone and the pore fluid pressure is large, the attenuation depends only on the effective stress and is relatively temperature independent. But at low effective stress, the attenuation increases linearly with increasing pore fluid pressure and decreases linearly with increasing temperature. While a specific model is lacking, the attenuation process is apparently influenced most strongly by chemical processes at the pore fluid-matrix interface accompanied by subtle changes in the sandstone matrix dimensions.

  8. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-03

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  9. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2008-10-21

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  10. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-17

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  11. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-10-02

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  12. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2009-09-01

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  13. Investigation of the Moessbauer Spectrum Quality as a Dependence on the Frequency of the Velocity Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Pechousek, J.

    2010-07-13

    This paper is focused on a quality characterizing the Moessbauer spectra measured for various frequencies of the velocity signal. Standard electromechanical double-loudspeaker drive and digital PID velocity controller were used for calibration spectra measurement in the frequency interval from 4 up to 100 Hz. Several parameters were evaluated for recommendation of the suitable velocity signal frequency.

  14. Finite element analysis of the dynamic behavior of a laminated windscreen with frequency dependent viscoelastic core.

    PubMed

    Bouayed, Kaïss; Hamdi, Mohamed-Ali

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents numerical and experimental validation of results obtained by a shell finite element, which has been developed for modeling of the dynamic behavior of sandwich multilayered structures with a viscoelastic core. The proposed shell finite element is very easy to implement in existing finite element solvers, since it uses only the displacements as degrees of freedom at external faces and at inter-layer interfaces. The displacement field is linearly interpolated in the thickness direction of each layer, and analytical integration is made in the thickness direction in order to avoid meshing of each sandwich layer by solid elements. Only the two dimensional mid-surface of reference is meshed, facilitating the mesh generation task. A simplified modal approach using a real modal basis is also proposed to efficiently calculate the dynamic response of the sandwich structure. The proposed method reduces the memory size and computing time and takes into account the frequency-dependence of the polymer core mechanical properties. Results obtained by the proposed element in conjunction with the simplified modal method have been numerically and experimentally validated by comparison to results obtained by commercial software codes (MSC/NASTRAN and ESI/RAYON-VTM), and to measurements done on automobile windscreens. PMID:22894198

  15. Modeling ballistic effects in frequency-dependent transient thermal transport using diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maassen, Jesse; Lundstrom, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Understanding ballistic phonon transport effects in transient thermoreflectance experiments and explaining the observed deviations from classical theory remains a challenge. Diffusion equations are simple and computationally efficient but are widely believed to break down when the characteristic length scale is similar or less than the phonon mean-free-path. Building on our prior work, we demonstrate how well-known diffusion equations, namely, the hyperbolic heat equation and the Cattaneo equation, can be used to model ballistic phonon effects in frequency-dependent periodic steady-state thermal transport. Our analytical solutions are found to compare excellently to rigorous numerical results of the phonon Boltzmann transport equation. The correct physical boundary conditions can be different from those traditionally used and are paramount for accurately capturing ballistic effects. To illustrate the technique, we consider a simple model problem using two different, commonly used heating conditions. We demonstrate how this framework can easily handle detailed material properties, by considering the case of bulk silicon using a full phonon dispersion and mean-free-path distribution. This physically transparent approach provides clear insights into the nonequilibrium physics of quasi-ballistic phonon transport and its impact on thermal transport properties.

  16. Frequency-dependent performance and handedness in professional baseball players (Homo sapiens).

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D

    2008-02-01

    I used data on handedness and pitching and hitting performance in annual cohorts of professional baseball players (1957-2005) to test the hypothesis that handedness among pitchers was subject to negative frequency-dependent selection. As predicted by this hypothesis, right-handed pitchers were more successful (i.e., opposing batters hit more poorly against them) when they were relatively rare in the population. Contrary to the predictions of this hypothesis, however, left-handed pitchers were more successful when they were relatively common. Both right- and left-handed batters performed better in years dominated by right-handed pitchers, despite the fact that right-handed batters perform relatively poorly against right-handed pitchers. I suggest that batters form cognitive representations based on pitcher handedness, and that these representations are strengthened by repeated exposure or priming. When the pitcher handedness polymorphism is more balanced (e.g., 67% right-handed, 33% left-handed), these cognitive representations are less effective, which leads to decreased batting averages and improved performance by all pitchers. Furthermore, these cognitive representations are likely to be more critical to the success of right-handed hitters, who have reduced visuomotor skills relative to left-handed hitters. PMID:18298283

  17. Dose dependence of acetylcholinesterase activity in neuroblastoma cells exposed to modulated radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Dutta, S K; Das, K; Ghosh, B; Blackman, C F

    1992-01-01

    Radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation (RFR) at 915 and 147 MHz, when sinusoidally amplitude modulated (AM) at 16 Hz, has been shown to enhance release of calcium ions from neuroblastoma cells in culture. The dose-response relation is unusual, consisting of two power-density "windows" in which enhanced efflux occurs, separated by power-density regions in which no effect is observed. To explore the physiological importance of these findings, we have examined the impact of RFR exposure on a membrane-bound enzyme, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), which is intimately involved with the acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmitter system. Neuroblastoma cells (NG108), exposed for 30 min to 147-MHz radiation, AM at 16 Hz, demonstrated enhanced AChE activity, as assayed by a procedure using 14C-labeled ACh. Enhanced activity was observed within a time window between 7.0 and 7.5 h after the cells were plated and only when the exposure occurred at power densities identified in a previous report as being effective for altering the release of calcium ions. Thus RFR affects both calcium-ion release and AChE activity in nervous system-derived cells in culture in a common dose-dependent manner. PMID:1510740

  18. Plant-soil feedbacks promote negative frequency dependence in the coexistence of two aridland grasses.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y Anny; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2016-07-27

    Understanding the mechanisms of species coexistence is key to predicting patterns of species diversity. Historically, the ecological paradigm has been that species coexist by partitioning resources: as a species increases in abundance, self-limitation kicks in, because species-specific resources decline. However, determining coexistence mechanisms has been a particular puzzle for sedentary organisms with high overlap in their resource requirements, such as plants. Recent evidence suggests that plant-associated microbes could generate the stabilizing self-limitation (negative frequency dependence) that is required for species coexistence. Here, we test the key assumption that plant-microbe feedbacks cause such self-limitation. We used competition experiments and modelling to evaluate how two common groups of soil microbes (rhizospheric microbes and biological soil crusts) influenced the self-limitation of two competing desert grass species. Negative feedbacks between the dominant plant competitor and its rhizospheric microbes magnified self-limitation, whereas beneficial interactions between both plant species and biological soil crusts partly counteracted this stabilizing effect. Plant-microbe interactions have received relatively little attention as drivers of vegetation dynamics in dry land ecosystems. Our results suggest that microbial mechanisms can contribute to patterns of plant coexistence in arid grasslands. PMID:27466448

  19. The absolute path command

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it canmore » provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.« less

  20. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  1. Influence of Gaussian white noise on the frequency-dependent first nonlinear polarizability of doped quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Ghosh, Manas

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the profiles of diagonal components of frequency-dependent first nonlinear (βxxx and βyyy) optical response of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots. We have assumed a Gaussian function to represent the dopant impurity potential. This study primarily addresses the role of noise on the polarizability components. We have invoked Gaussian white noise consisting of additive and multiplicative characteristics (in Stratonovich sense). The doped system has been subjected to an oscillating electric field of given intensity, and the frequency-dependent first nonlinear polarizabilities are computed. The noise characteristics are manifested in an interesting way in the nonlinear polarizability components. In case of additive noise, the noise strength remains practically ineffective in influencing the optical responses. The situation completely changes with the replacement of additive noise by its multiplicative analog. The replacement enhances the nonlinear optical response dramatically and also causes their maximization at some typical value of noise strength that depends on oscillation frequency.

  2. Influence of Gaussian white noise on the frequency-dependent first nonlinear polarizability of doped quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Ghosh, Manas

    2014-05-07

    We investigate the profiles of diagonal components of frequency-dependent first nonlinear (β{sub xxx} and β{sub yyy}) optical response of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots. We have assumed a Gaussian function to represent the dopant impurity potential. This study primarily addresses the role of noise on the polarizability components. We have invoked Gaussian white noise consisting of additive and multiplicative characteristics (in Stratonovich sense). The doped system has been subjected to an oscillating electric field of given intensity, and the frequency-dependent first nonlinear polarizabilities are computed. The noise characteristics are manifested in an interesting way in the nonlinear polarizability components. In case of additive noise, the noise strength remains practically ineffective in influencing the optical responses. The situation completely changes with the replacement of additive noise by its multiplicative analog. The replacement enhances the nonlinear optical response dramatically and also causes their maximization at some typical value of noise strength that depends on oscillation frequency.

  3. State dependent model predictive control for orbital rendezvous using pulse-width pulse-frequency modulated thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zhu, Zheng H.; Meguid, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation based trajectory planning for orbital rendezvous and proximity maneuvering near a non-cooperative spacecraft in an elliptical orbit. The problem is formulated by converting the continuous control input, output from the state dependent model predictive control, into a sequence of pulses of constant magnitude by controlling firing frequency and duration of constant-magnitude thrusters. The state dependent model predictive control is derived by minimizing the control error of states and control roughness of control input for a safe, smooth and fuel efficient approaching trajectory. The resulting nonlinear programming problem is converted into a series of quadratic programming problem and solved by numerical iteration using the receding horizon strategy. The numerical results show that the proposed state dependent model predictive control with the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation is able to effectively generate optimized trajectories using equivalent control pulses for the proximity maneuvering with less energy consumption.

  4. Influence of damped propagation of dopant on the static and frequency-dependent third nonlinear polarizability of quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Suvajit; Ghosh, Manas

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the profiles of diagonal components of static and frequency-dependent third nonlinear (γxxxx and γyyyy) polarizability of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots. The dopant impurity potential takes a GAUSSIAN form. We have considered propagation of the dopant within an environment that damps the motion. The study focuses on role of damping strength on the diagonal components of both static and frequency-dependent third nonlinear polarizability of the doped system. The doped system is further exposed to an external electric field of given intensity. Damping subtly modulates the dot-impurity interaction and fabricates the polarizability components in a noticeable manner.

  5. Ca2+-dependent regulation of beat frequency of cilia in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Nakaoka, Y; Tanaka, H; Oosawa, F

    1984-01-01

    Triton-extracted models of Paramecium cells prepared in the presence of Mg2+ and EGTA showed Ca2+ sensitivity not only in the direction of beat but also in the beat frequency of cilia. The beat frequency increased over a range of concentration of Ca2+ from 2 X 10(-7) to 4 X 10(-7) M, in which the model swam forwards. The frequency increased also above 10(-6)M-Ca2+, in which the model swam backwards. The increase in frequency was inhibited by calmodulin antagonists. Intracellular injection of a Ca2+ buffer giving a free Ca2+ concentration of 2 X 10(-7) to 5 X 10(-7) M in intact cells induced an increase in the beat frequency. Therefore, it is very likely that the beat frequency of cilia is regulated by the intracellular concentration of Ca2+. PMID:6715425

  6. Conditioned frequency-dependent hearing sensitivity reduction in the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Nachtigall, Paul E; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2015-04-01

    The frequency specificity of conditioned dampening of hearing, when a loud sound is preceded by a warning sound, was investigated in a bottlenose dolphin. The loud sounds were 5 s tones of 16, 22.5 or 32 kHz, sound pressure level of 165 dB root mean square (RMS) re. 1 µPa. Hearing sensitivity was tested at the same three frequencies. Hearing sensitivity was measured using pip-train test stimuli and auditory evoked potential recording. The test sound stimuli served also as warning sounds. The durations of the warning sounds were varied randomly to avoid locking a conditioning effect to the timing immediately before the loud sound. Hearing thresholds before the loud sound increased, relative to the baseline, at test frequencies equal to or higher than the loud sound frequency. The highest threshold increase appeared at test frequencies of 0.5 octaves above the loud sound frequencies. PMID:25657210

  7. Deterministic High-Frequency Ground Motion Using Dynamic Rupture Along Rough Faults, Small-Scale Media Heterogeneities, and Frequency-Dependent Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, K.; Olsen, K. B.; Day, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    was used in our simulations described above. At higher frequencies, however, ground motion data indicates that anelastic attenuation falls off as frequency increases. Here, we implement frequency-dependent Q in AWP via a power-law function, Q=Q0*f^n, where Q is the quality factor and f is frequency, and Q0 and n are constants that may vary with the region of interest. We modify the coarse-grained approach, using least squares to optimize the weighting of the anelastic functions to fit a target Q(f) function. To validate our method, we compare the finite difference synthetics seismograms computed with AWP with those from a frequency-wavenumber code to account for dispersion.

  8. Subunit and frequency-dependent inhibition of Acid Sensing Ion Channels by local anesthetic tetracaine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracellular acidosis is a prominent feature of multiple pathological conditions, correlating with pain sensation. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), a family of proton-gated cation channels, are distributed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. Activation of ASICs, particularly ASIC3 and ASIC1a channels, by acidic pH and the resultant depolarization of nociceptive primary sensory neurons, participates in nociception. Agents that inhibit the activation of ASICs are thus expected to be analgesic. Here, we studied the effect of local anesthetic tetracaine on ASIC currents. Results Tetracaine inhibited the peak ASIC3 current in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 of 9.96 ± 1.88 mM. The degree of inhibition by tetracaine was dependent on the extracellular pH but independent of the membrane potential. Furthermore, 3 mM tetracaine also inhibited 29.83% of the sustained ASIC3 current. In addition to ASIC3, tetracaine inhibited the ASIC1a and ASIC1β currents. The inhibition of the ASIC1a current was influenced by the frequency of channel activation. In contrast to ASIC3, ASIC1a, and ASIC1β currents, ASIC2a current was not inhibited by tetracaine. In cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, 1–3 mM tetracaine inhibited both the transient and sustained ASIC currents. At pH4.5, 3 mM tetracaine reduced the peak ASIC current to 60.06 ± 4.51%, and the sustained current to 48.24 ± 7.02% of the control values in dorsal root ganglion neurons. In contrast to ASICs, voltage-gated sodium channels were inhibited by acid, with 55.15% inhibition at pH6.0 and complete inhibition at pH5.0. Conclusions These findings disclose a potential new mechanism underlying the analgesic effects of local anesthetics, particularly in acidic conditions where their primary target (i.e. voltage-gated Na+ channel) has been suppressed by protons. PMID:23758830

  9. Respiratory response to toluene diisocyanate depends on prior frequency and concentration of dermal sensitization in mice.

    PubMed

    Vanoirbeek, Jeroen A J; Tarkowski, Maciej; Ceuppens, Jan L; Verbeken, Erik K; Nemery, Benoit; Hoet, Peter H M

    2004-08-01

    Occupational asthma is the principal cause of work-related respiratory disease in the industrial world. In the absence of satisfactory models for predicting the potential of low molecular weight chemicals to cause asthma, we verified that dermal sensitization prior to intranasal challenge influences the respiratory response using toluene diisocyanate (TDI), a known respiratory sensitizer. BALB/c mice received TDI or vehicle (acetone/olive oil) on each ear on three consecutive days (days 1, 2, and 3; 0.3 or 3% TDI) or only once (day 1, 1% TDI). On day 7, the mice received similar dermal applications of vehicle or the same concentration of TDI as before ("boost"). On day 10, they received an intranasal dose of TDI (0.1%) or vehicle. Ventilatory function was monitored by whole body plethysmography for 40 min after intranasal application, and reactivity to inhaled methacholine was assessed 24 h later. Pulmonary inflammation was assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage and histology. Mice that received an intranasal dose of TDI without having received a prior dermal application of TDI did not exhibit any ventilatory response or inflammatory changes compared to vehicle controls. In contrast, mice that had received prior application(s) of TDI, even if only on day 7, exhibited the following: ventilatory responses, compatible with bronchoconstriction, immediately after intranasal application with TDI; enhanced methacholine responsiveness 24 h later; and pulmonary inflammation characterized by neutrophils. This was, however, not the case in mice that received the highest dermal amount of TDI (3% on days 1, 2, and 3). These findings suggest that respiratory response to TDI depends on prior frequency and concentration of dermal sensitization in mice. PMID:15129019

  10. Frequency-dependent pollinator discrimination acts against female plants in the gynodioecious Geranium maculatum

    PubMed Central

    Van Etten, Megan L.; Chang, Shu-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Gynodioecy, the co-occurrence of female and hermaphroditic individuals, is thought to be an intermediate step between hermaphroditism and separate sexes, a major transition in flowering plants. Because retaining females in a population requires that they have increased seed fitness (to compensate for the lack of pollen fitness), factors that affect seed fitness are of great importance to the evolution of this mating system and have often been studied. However, factors negatively affecting female fitness are equally important and have been largely neglected. One such factor stems from female flowers being less attractive to insects than hermaphrodite flowers, thereby decreasing their relative fitness. Methods To test the severity and consequences of this type of pollinator discrimination in Geranium maculatum, experimental populations with the range of sex ratios observed in nature were created, ranging from 13 % to 42 % females. Pollinators were observed in order to measure the strength of discrimination, and pollen deposition and seed production of both sexes were measured to determine the fitness consequences of this discrimination. Additionally a comparison was made across the sex ratios to determine whether discrimination was frequency-dependent. Key Results It was found that female flowers, on average, were visited at half of the rate of hermaphrodite flowers, which decreased their pollen receipt and seed production. Additionally, females were most discriminated against when rare, due to both changes in the pollinators' behaviour and a shift in pollinator composition. Conclusions The results suggest that pollinator discrimination negatively affects females' relative fitness when they are rare. Thus, the initial spread of females in a population, the first step in the evolution of gynodioecy, may be made more difficult due to pollinator discrimination. PMID:25326647

  11. Rupture and frequency-dependent seismic radiation of the 2012 Mw 8.6 Sumatra strike-slip earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiuxun; Yao, Huajian

    2016-06-01

    On 2012 April 11, a great strike-slip earthquake (moment magnitude of Mw 8.6) occurred off the west coast of northern Sumatra area followed by an Mw 8.2 aftershock 2 hr later. Different geophysical data and methods have been used to investigate the mechanism, faulting, seismic radiation and slip propagation of this event, but frequency-dependent features of its rupture process have not been discussed much. In this study, we use a compressive sensing method based on sparsity inversion in the frequency domain to study the frequency-dependent seismic radiation and rupture process of this event. Our results indicate a very complex rupture process concerning at least three different rupture stages on multiple subfaults with nearly conjugate geometries. The main shock has triggered seismicity on a series of ridge-perpendicular or ridge-parallel conjugate strike-slip faults around the Nighty East Ridge. Obvious frequency-dependent rupture process has been presented and discussed. Combining results from slip inversion based on the finite-fault model, we observe that in the beginning stage of the rupture lower frequency radiation appears to originate from the areas with large slip, while the high-frequency radiation is located at the boundary of large-slip region or rupture front. Some radiation probably originates from the repeating slip on the main faults or triggered events on some nearby faults in the rupture area. The complex frequency-dependent seismic radiation patterns observed in this study provide important information for future investigation of rupture physics of this complex strike-slip event.

  12. Frequency of greatest temporary hearing threshold shift in harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) depends on the noise level.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Schop, Jessica; Gransier, Robin; Hoek, Lean

    2014-09-01

    Harbor porpoises may suffer hearing loss when they are exposed to high level sounds. After exposure for 60 min to a 6.5 kHz continuous tone at average received sound pressure levels (SPLav.re.) ranging from 118 to 154 dB re 1μPa, the temporary hearing threshold shifts (TTSs) of a harbor porpoise were quantified at the center frequency (6.5 kHz), at 0.5, 1.0, and 1.3 octaves above the center frequency (9.2, 13.0, and 16.0 kHz), and at a frequency assumed to be ecologically important for harbor porpoises (125 kHz, the center frequency of their echolocation signals) by means of a psychoacoustic technique. The hearing frequency at which the maximum TTS occurred depended on the SPLav.re. The higher the SPLav.re., the higher the TTS induced at frequencies higher than the exposure frequency; below 148 dB re 1 μPa, the maximum TTS was at 6.5 kHz, whereas above 148 dB re 1 μPa, the maximum TTS was at 9.2 kHz. The hearing threshold of the harbor porpoise for the center frequency of its echolocation signals (125 kHz) was not affected at the highest SPLav.re. to which the animal was exposed. PMID:25190414

  13. Stay tuned: active amplification tunes tree cricket ears to track temperature-dependent song frequency.

    PubMed

    Mhatre, Natasha; Pollack, Gerald; Mason, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Tree cricket males produce tonal songs, used for mate attraction and male-male interactions. Active mechanics tunes hearing to conspecific song frequency. However, tree cricket song frequency increases with temperature, presenting a problem for tuned listeners. We show that the actively amplified frequency increases with temperature, thus shifting mechanical and neuronal auditory tuning to maintain a match with conspecific song frequency. Active auditory processes are known from several taxa, but their adaptive function has rarely been demonstrated. We show that tree crickets harness active processes to ensure that auditory tuning remains matched to conspecific song frequency, despite changing environmental conditions and signal characteristics. Adaptive tuning allows tree crickets to selectively detect potential mates or rivals over large distances and is likely to bestow a strong selective advantage by reducing mate-finding effort and facilitating intermale interactions. PMID:27122007

  14. Frequency-Dependent Activation of Glucose Utilization in the Superior Cervical Ganglion by Electrical Stimulation of Cervical Sympathetic Trunk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarowsky, Paul; Kadekaro, Massako; Sokoloff, Louis

    1983-07-01

    Electrical stimulation of the distal stump of the transected cervical sympathetic trunk produces a frequency-dependent activation of glucose utilization, measured by the deoxy[14C]glucose method, in the superior cervical ganglion of the urethane-anesthetized rat. The frequency dependence falls between 0-15 Hz; at 20 Hz the activation of glucose utilization is no greater than at 15 Hz. Deafferentation of the superior cervical ganglion by transection of the cervical sympathetic trunk does not diminish the rate of glucose utilization in the ganglion in the urethane-anesthetized rat. These results indicate that the rate of energy metabolism in an innervated neural structure is, at least in part, regulated by the impulse frequency of the electrical input to the structure, and this regulation may be an essential component of the mechanism of the coupling of metabolic activity to functional activity in the nervous system.

  15. Frequency-dependent study of solid 4He contained in a rigid double-torus torsional oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaewon; Shin, Jaeho; Kim, Eunseong

    2015-10-01

    The rigid double-torus torsional oscillator (TO) is constructed to reduce any elastic effects inherent to complicated TO structures, allowing explicit probing for a genuine supersolid signature. We investigated the frequency- and temperature-dependent response of the rigid double-torus TO containing solid 4He with 0.6-ppb 3He and 300-ppb 3He . We did not find evidence to support the frequency-independent contribution proposed to be a property of supersolid helium. The frequency-dependent contribution which comes from the simple elastic effect of solid helium coupled to the TO is essentially responsible for the entire response. The magnitude of the period drop is linearly proportional to f2, indicating that the responses observed in this TO are mostly caused by the overshoot of "soft" solid helium against the wall of the torus. Dissipation of the rigid TO is vastly suppressed compared to that of nonrigid TOs.

  16. 38 CFR 3.30 - Frequency of payment of improved pension and parents' dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Frequency of payment of improved pension and parents' dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC). 3.30 Section 3.30 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation,...

  17. 38 CFR 3.30 - Frequency of payment of improved pension and parents' dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Frequency of payment of improved pension and parents' dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC). 3.30 Section 3.30 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation,...

  18. Spinning-frequency-dependent linewidths in 1H-decoupled 13C magic-angle spinning NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Toshihito; McDowell, Charles A.

    1994-09-01

    The broadenings observed in 13C MAS NMR spectra, which depend on the sample-spinning speed, were studied, using polycrystalline adamantane. Not only was a monotonic increase of the linewidths with the increase of the spinning frequency observed, but also a novel resonant feature was found. The phenomena were interpreted as originating from rotary-resonance 13C 1H recoupling.

  19. Frequency-Dependent Modulation of Regional Synchrony in the Human Brain by Eyes Open and Eyes Closed Resting-States

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Shuqin; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Yijun; Zhu, Huaiqiu; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The eyes-open (EO) and eyes-closed (EC) states have differential effects on BOLD-fMRI signal dynamics, affecting both the BOLD oscillation frequency of a single voxel and the regional homogeneity (ReHo) of several neighboring voxels. To explore how the two resting-states modulate the local synchrony through different frequency bands, we decomposed the time series of each voxel into several components that fell into distinct frequency bands. The ReHo in each of the bands was calculated and compared between the EO and EC conditions. The cross-voxel correlations between the mean frequency and the overall ReHo of each voxel’s original BOLD series in different brain areas were also calculated and compared between the two states. Compared with the EC state, ReHo decreased with EO in a wide frequency band of 0.01–0.25 Hz in the bilateral thalamus, sensorimotor network, and superior temporal gyrus, while ReHo increased significantly in the band of 0–0.01 Hz in the primary visual cortex, and in a higher frequency band of 0.02–0.1 Hz in the higher order visual areas. The cross-voxel correlations between the frequency and overall ReHo were negative in all the brain areas but varied from region to region. These correlations were stronger with EO in the visual network and the default mode network. Our results suggested that different frequency bands of ReHo showed different sensitivity to the modulation of EO-EC states. The better spatial consistency between the frequency and overall ReHo maps indicated that the brain might adopt a stricter frequency-dependent configuration with EO than with EC. PMID:26545233

  20. Determination of acoustic properties of thin polymer films utilizing the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient of ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohmyoh, Hironori; Sakamoto, Yuhei

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports on a technique to measure the acoustic properties of a thin polymer film utilizing the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient of ultrasound reflected back from a system comprising a reflection plate, the film, and a material that covers the film. The frequency components of the echo reflected from the back of the plate, where the film is attached, take their minimum values at the resonant frequency, and from these frequency characteristics, the acoustic impedance, sound velocity, and the density of the film can be determined. We applied this technique to characterize an ion exchange membrane, which has high water absorbability, and successfully determined the acoustic properties of the membrane without getting it wet.

  1. Comparison of papaverine and verapamil on frequency-dependent changes in Vmax of K-depolarized ventricular tissue.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, M C; West, T C

    1982-01-01

    The maximum upstroke velocity (Vmax) of K-depolarized guinea pig ventricular strips was used to indirectly measure frequency-dependent changes in slow inward current (Isi) caused by papaverine, verapamil, Ba2+, and isoproterenol. The effects of verapamil were studied after pretreatment with 0.8 mM Ba2+ to restore excitability of the K-depolarized tissue. Similar steady-state, frequency-dependent (0.1--4.0 Hz) changes in Vmax were observed in tissues exposed to papaverine (10(-5), Ba2+ (0.2 mM, 0.8 mM), or isoproterenol (5 x 10(-7) M). Verapamil (10(-7) M) caused a marked frequency-dependent inhibition of Vmax relative to the Ba2+-treated condition. Step increases in stimulation frequency resulted in a new steady state after only one to three depolarizations under all conditions except during exposure to verapamil. Vmax decreased exponentially after an increase in stimulation frequency during verapamil exposure, and therefore required many stimuli before a new quasi-steady-state was attained. The time constant for the recovery from inactivation of Isi determined by a paired pulse protocol was 169 +/- 16 ms for 10(-5) M papaverine, 185 +/- 14 ms for 0.8 mM Ba2+, and about 390 ms for 10(-7) M verapamil. The time required for half-recovery of Vmax after a train of 1-Hz stimuli (preceded by a rest period) was 2.5--3 s for papaverine or Ba2+ but 30--38 s for verapamil-treated preparations. The results show that papaverine is not a Ca antagonist like verapamil. The results also suggest that Ba2+ may be useful for restoring excitability in K-depolarized tissues to study the frequency-dependent changes in Vmax caused by drugs that alter Isi. PMID:6182411

  2. Frequency dependent electrical measurements of amorphous GeSbSe chalcogenide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Mirsaneh, M.; Furman, E.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Lanagan, M. T.; Pantano, C. G.

    2010-03-22

    A commercial bulk chalcogenide glass (Ge28Sb12Se60) was used as a source to fabricate amorphous thin films via thermal evaporation technique. At low frequencies (1 MHz) impedance spectroscopy was performed to measure electrical properties. To measure ac conductivity at microwave frequencies, a split resonance cavity technique was applied for which a model based on parallel arrangement of substrate and film capacitors was developed. This model was used to extract tan8 and ac conductivity of the films. Microwave ac conductivity was correlated with the extrapolated low frequency conductivity data confirming applicability of the universal law commonly observed in amorphous semiconductors.

  3. Temperature and frequency-dependent dielectric properties of Zn substituted Li-Mg ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, A. M.; Bellad, S. S.; Chougule, B. K.

    1999-05-01

    The DC and AC resistivity ( ρ DC, ρ AC), dielectric constant ( ɛ') and dielectric loss tangent (tan δ) of Zn substituted Li-Mg ferrites having the general formula Li xMg 0.4 Zn 0.6-2 xFe 2+ xO 4 (where x=0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2, 0.25 and 0.3) have been investigated as a function of composition, temperature and frequency. The compositional variation of DC resistivity and dielectric constant show the inverse trend with each other. The sample with x=0.15 (Zn=0.3) shows lowest DC resistivity and highest dielectric constant. The dielectric constant increases slowly with temperature in the beginning and then abruptly at about 473 K and above. The AC resistivity and dielectric constant of all the samples decrease with increase in frequency exhibiting normal ferrimagnetic behaviour. The variation of dielectric loss tangent with frequency showed maxima in the 2-40 kHz frequency range. These maxima are also found to shift towards low-frequency region as the content of Zn increases. All the variations are explained on the basis of Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ concentrations on octahedral sites and electronic hopping frequency between Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ ions.

  4. Sustained Exocytosis after Action Potential-Like Stimulation at Low Frequencies in Mouse Chromaffin Cells Depends on a Dynamin-Dependent Fast Endocytotic Process

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Díaz, José; Álvarez, Yanina D.; Montenegro, Mauricio; Bayonés, Lucas; Belingheri, Ana V.; González-Jamett, Arlek M.; Cárdenas, Ana M.; Marengo, Fernando D.

    2016-01-01

    Under basal conditions the action potential firing rate of adrenal chromaffin cells is lower than 0.5 Hz. The maintenance of the secretory response at such frequencies requires a continuous replenishment of releasable vesicles. However, the mechanism that allows such vesicle replenishment remains unclear. Here, using membrane capacitance measurements on mouse chromaffin cells, we studied the mechanism of replenishment of a group of vesicles released by a single action potential-like stimulus (APls). The exocytosis triggered by APls (ETAP) represents a fraction (40%) of the immediately releasable pool, a group of vesicles highly coupled to voltage dependent calcium channels. ETAP was replenished with a time constant of 0.73 ± 0.11 s, fast enough to maintain synchronous exocytosis at 0.2–0.5 Hz stimulation. Regarding the mechanism involved in rapid ETAP replenishment, we found that it depends on the ready releasable pool; indeed depletion of this vesicle pool significantly delays ETAP replenishment. On the other hand, ETAP replenishment also correlates with a dynamin-dependent fast endocytosis process (τ = 0.53 ± 0.01 s). In this regard, disruption of dynamin function markedly inhibits the fast endocytosis and delays ETAP replenishment, but also significantly decreases the synchronous exocytosis during repetitive APls stimulation at low frequencies (0.2 and 0.5 Hz). Considering these findings, we propose a model in where both the transfer of vesicles from ready releasable pool and fast endocytosis allow rapid ETAP replenishment during low stimulation frequencies. PMID:27507935

  5. Sustained Exocytosis after Action Potential-Like Stimulation at Low Frequencies in Mouse Chromaffin Cells Depends on a Dynamin-Dependent Fast Endocytotic Process.

    PubMed

    Moya-Díaz, José; Álvarez, Yanina D; Montenegro, Mauricio; Bayonés, Lucas; Belingheri, Ana V; González-Jamett, Arlek M; Cárdenas, Ana M; Marengo, Fernando D

    2016-01-01

    Under basal conditions the action potential firing rate of adrenal chromaffin cells is lower than 0.5 Hz. The maintenance of the secretory response at such frequencies requires a continuous replenishment of releasable vesicles. However, the mechanism that allows such vesicle replenishment remains unclear. Here, using membrane capacitance measurements on mouse chromaffin cells, we studied the mechanism of replenishment of a group of vesicles released by a single action potential-like stimulus (APls). The exocytosis triggered by APls (ETAP) represents a fraction (40%) of the immediately releasable pool, a group of vesicles highly coupled to voltage dependent calcium channels. ETAP was replenished with a time constant of 0.73 ± 0.11 s, fast enough to maintain synchronous exocytosis at 0.2-0.5 Hz stimulation. Regarding the mechanism involved in rapid ETAP replenishment, we found that it depends on the ready releasable pool; indeed depletion of this vesicle pool significantly delays ETAP replenishment. On the other hand, ETAP replenishment also correlates with a dynamin-dependent fast endocytosis process (τ = 0.53 ± 0.01 s). In this regard, disruption of dynamin function markedly inhibits the fast endocytosis and delays ETAP replenishment, but also significantly decreases the synchronous exocytosis during repetitive APls stimulation at low frequencies (0.2 and 0.5 Hz). Considering these findings, we propose a model in where both the transfer of vesicles from ready releasable pool and fast endocytosis allow rapid ETAP replenishment during low stimulation frequencies. PMID:27507935

  6. Similar patterns of frequency-dependent selection on animal personalities emerge in three species of social spiders.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, J L L; Pruitt, J N

    2015-06-01

    Frequency-dependent selection is thought to be a major contributor to the maintenance of phenotypic variation. We tested for frequency-dependent selection on contrasting behavioural strategies, termed here 'personalities', in three species of social spiders, each thought to represent an independent evolutionary origin of sociality. The evolution of sociality in the spider genus Anelosimus is consistently met with the emergence of two temporally stable discrete personality types: an 'aggressive' or 'docile' form. We assessed how the foraging success of each phenotype changes as a function of its representation within a colony. We did this by creating experimental colonies of various compositions (six aggressives, three aggressives and three dociles, one aggressive and five dociles, six dociles), maintaining them in a common garden for 3 weeks, and tracking the mass gained by individuals of either phenotype. We found that both the docile and aggressive phenotypes experienced their greatest mass gain in mixed colonies of mostly docile individuals. However, the performance of both phenotypes decreased as the frequency of the aggressive phenotype increased. Nearly identical patterns of phenotype-specific frequency dependence were recovered in all three species. Naturally occurring colonies of these spiders exhibit mixtures dominated by the docile phenotype, suggesting that these spiders may have evolved mechanisms to maintain the compositions that maximize the success of the colony without compromising the expected reproductive output of either phenotype. PMID:25940218

  7. A damage assessment model of slender bridge members based on 1D linear member theory with frequency dependent parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chih-Peng; Cheng, Chia-Chi; Lai, Jiunnren; Chiang, Chih-Hung

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a linear model with frequency dependent structural property was used to generate the corresponding frequency response function and dynamic stiffness for selected dynamic problems where certain nonlinearity can be resulted from time/space varying characteristics of the bridge vibrations. Derivation of the proposed formula is based on the vibration theory of the elementary member with frequency dependent elastic properties, in which Modulus of Elasticity can be interpreted as serial and parallel connections of springs and dashpots. This paper first describes the use of the proposed formulation to reasonably depict the nonlinear cable vibration associated with the varying tension forces over time. The proposed formulation can also be used to simulate flexural vibration of damage beams in which the elastic property involves certain space varying or time varying characteristics. Simple numerical/experimental data were next used to demonstrate and confirm the potential application of such simulation idea. Consequently, it is concluded that such assessment model with frequency dependent parameters can be practically feasible and serve as a useful tool in the spectral analysis regarding dynamic problems of slender bridge members.

  8. Cerebral Correlates of Emotional and Action Appraisals During Visual Processing of Emotional Scenes Depending on Spatial Frequency: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Campagne, Aurélie; Fradcourt, Benoit; Pichat, Cédric; Baciu, Monica; Kauffmann, Louise; Peyrin, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Visual processing of emotional stimuli critically depends on the type of cognitive appraisal involved. The present fMRI pilot study aimed to investigate the cerebral correlates involved in the visual processing of emotional scenes in two tasks, one emotional, based on the appraisal of personal emotional experience, and the other motivational, based on the appraisal of the tendency to action. Given that the use of spatial frequency information is relatively flexible during the visual processing of emotional stimuli depending on the task’s demands, we also explored the effect of the type of spatial frequency in visual stimuli in each task by using emotional scenes filtered in low spatial frequency (LSF) and high spatial frequencies (HSF). Activation was observed in the visual areas of the fusiform gyrus for all emotional scenes in both tasks, and in the amygdala for unpleasant scenes only. The motivational task induced additional activation in frontal motor-related areas (e.g. premotor cortex, SMA) and parietal regions (e.g. superior and inferior parietal lobules). Parietal regions were recruited particularly during the motivational appraisal of approach in response to pleasant scenes. These frontal and parietal activations, respectively, suggest that motor and navigation processes play a specific role in the identification of the tendency to action in the motivational task. Furthermore, activity observed in the motivational task, in response to both pleasant and unpleasant scenes, was significantly greater for HSF than for LSF scenes, suggesting that the tendency to action is driven mainly by the detailed information contained in scenes. Results for the emotional task suggest that spatial frequencies play only a small role in the evaluation of unpleasant and pleasant emotions. Our preliminary study revealed a partial distinction between visual processing of emotional scenes during identification of the tendency to action, and during identification of personal

  9. Temperature and frequency dependent dielectric properties of Ni-Mg-Zn-Co ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, S. B.; Patil, R. P.; Ghodake, J. S.; Chougule, B. K.

    2014-01-01

    The ferrites having general formula Ni0.5-xMgx-0.01Zn0.5-yCoy+0.01Fe2O4 (x=0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and y=0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) were prepared by ceramic method. The X-ray diffraction studies of compositions reveal formation of single-phase cubic spinal structure. Dielectric properties such as dielectric constant ɛ', dielectric loss tangent (tan δ), and ac resistivity were measured at room temperature as a function of frequency in the range from 1 kHz to 1 MHz. The plots of dielectric constant ɛ' vs frequency show a normal dielectric behavior of spinel ferrites. The variation of loss tangent (tan δ) as a function of frequency shows a decreasing trend for all the samples except for the composition with x=0.3 and y=0.1, and y=0.2. The variation of ac resistivity with frequency of all the samples shows a decreasing trend with increase in frequency, a normal behavior of ferrites. All the variations are explained on the basis of Fe2+/Fe3+ ion concentration on octahedral sites as well as the electronic hopping between Fe2+↔Fe3+ ions.

  10. Signature of magnetic-dependent gapless odd frequency states at superconductor/ferromagnet interfaces.

    PubMed

    Di Bernardo, A; Diesch, S; Gu, Y; Linder, J; Divitini, G; Ducati, C; Scheer, E; Blamire, M G; Robinson, J W A

    2015-01-01

    The theory of superconductivity developed by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS) explains the stabilization of electron pairs into a spin-singlet, even frequency, state by the formation of an energy gap within which the density of states is zero. At a superconductor interface with an inhomogeneous ferromagnet, a gapless odd frequency superconducting state is predicted, in which the Cooper pairs are in a spin-triplet state. Although indirect evidence for such a state has been obtained, the gap structure and pairing symmetry have not so far been determined. Here we report scanning tunnelling spectroscopy of Nb superconducting films proximity coupled to epitaxial Ho. These measurements reveal pronounced changes to the Nb subgap superconducting density of states on driving the Ho through a metamagnetic transition from a helical antiferromagnetic to a homogeneous ferromagnetic state for which a BCS-like gap is recovered. The results prove odd frequency spin-triplet superconductivity at superconductor/inhomogeneous magnet interfaces. PMID:26329811

  11. Signature of magnetic-dependent gapless odd frequency states at superconductor/ferromagnet interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Di Bernardo, A.; Diesch, S.; Gu, Y.; Linder, J.; Divitini, G.; Ducati, C.; Scheer, E.; Blamire, M.G.; Robinson, J.W.A.

    2015-01-01

    The theory of superconductivity developed by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS) explains the stabilization of electron pairs into a spin-singlet, even frequency, state by the formation of an energy gap within which the density of states is zero. At a superconductor interface with an inhomogeneous ferromagnet, a gapless odd frequency superconducting state is predicted, in which the Cooper pairs are in a spin-triplet state. Although indirect evidence for such a state has been obtained, the gap structure and pairing symmetry have not so far been determined. Here we report scanning tunnelling spectroscopy of Nb superconducting films proximity coupled to epitaxial Ho. These measurements reveal pronounced changes to the Nb subgap superconducting density of states on driving the Ho through a metamagnetic transition from a helical antiferromagnetic to a homogeneous ferromagnetic state for which a BCS-like gap is recovered. The results prove odd frequency spin-triplet superconductivity at superconductor/inhomogeneous magnet interfaces. PMID:26329811

  12. Frequency dependence and assembly characteristics of silver nanomaterials trapped by dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, R.; Tokita, H.; Uchida, S.; Sano, R.; Nishikawa, H.

    2015-10-01

    For rapid and accurate fabrication of industrial products, the development of effective technique to manipulate and assemble nanomaterials is essential. In the present work, we investigated the dielectrophoretic behavior of silver nanoparticles and nanowires at various driving frequencies and voltage amplitudes, and examined three-dimensional assembly of the nanomaterials using dielectrophoretic devices with microstructures. The collectable range in frequency for nanoparticles and nanowires was from 10 kHz to 1 MHz. In particular, the aggregation shape of nanowires was changed against driving frequency. The bunch of nanowires was bridged between pillars of dielectrophoretic device. When the applied voltage was turned off, the trapped nanowires were entirely released. In pit type device, trapping of nanoparticles was observed in outermost pits of array. The aggregates of nanoparticles were directly fixed to the bottom electrode.

  13. Temperature-dependent vibrational dephasing: Comparison of liquid and glassy solvents using frequency-selected vibrational echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qing-Hua; Fayer, M. D.

    2002-08-01

    Frequency-selected vibrational echo experiments were used to investigate the temperature dependences of vibrational dephasing associated with the 0-1 transition of the CO stretching mode of RuTPPCOPy (TPP=5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin, Py=pyridine) in two solvents: polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF). In PMMA, a glass, the echo decay is exponential at all the temperatures studied, and the dephasing rate increases linearly with increasing temperature. In 2-MTHF, there is a change in the functional form of the temperature dependence when the solvent goes through the glass transition temperature (Tg). Below Tg, the dephasing rate increases linearly with temperature, while above Tg, it rises very steeply in a nonlinear manner. In the liquid at higher temperatures, the vibrational echo decays are nonexponential. A model frequency-frequency correlation function (FFCF) is proposed in which the FFCF differs for a glass and a liquid because of the intrinsic differences in the nature of the dynamics. At least two motions, inertial and diffusive, contribute to the vibrational dephasing in the liquids. The different temperature dependences of inertial and diffusive motions are discussed. Comparison of the model calculations of the vibrational echo temperature dependence and the data show reasonable, but not quantitative agreement.

  14. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed. PMID:26022836

  15. Five-mode frequency spectra of x3-dependent modes in AT-cut quartz resonators.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guijia; Wu, Rongxing; Wang, Ji; Du, Jianke; Yang, Jiashi

    2012-04-01

    We study straight-crested waves and vibration modes with variations along the x(3) direction only in an AT-cut quartz plate resonator near the operating frequency of the fundamental thickness-shear mode. Mindlin's two-dimensional equations for anisotropic crystal plates are used. Dispersion relations and frequency spectra of the five relevant waves are obtained. It is found that, to avoid unwanted couplings between the resonator operating mode and other undesirable modes, in addition to certain known values of the plate length/thickness ratio that need to be avoided, an additional series of discrete values of the plate length/thickness ratio also must be excluded. PMID:22547292

  16. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  17. Multiple-Station Observation of Frequency Dependence and Polarization Characteristics of ELF/VLF waves generated via Ionospheric Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxworth, A. S.; Golkowski, M.; Cohen, M.; Moore, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Generation of Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) signals through ionospheric modification has been practiced for many years. Heating the lower ionosphere with high power HF waves allows for modulation of natural current systems. Our experiments were carried out at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. In this experiment, the ionosphere was heated with a vertical amplitude modulating signal and the modulation frequency was changed sequentially within an array of 40 frequencies followed by a frequency ramp. The observed magnetic field amplitude and polarization of the generated ELF/VLF signals were analyzed for multiple sites and as a function of modulation frequency. Our three observation sites: Chistochina, Paxson and Paradise are located within 36km (azimuth 47.7°), 50.2km (azimuth -20°) and 99km (azimuth 80.3°) respectively. We show that the peak amplitudes observed as a function of frequency result from vertical resonance in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and can be used to diagnose the D-region profile. Polarization analysis showed that out of the three sites Paxson shows the highest circularity in the magnetic field polarization, compared to Chistochina and Paradise which show highly linear polarizations. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical simulation model results and it was clear that in both cases, the modulated Hall current dominates the observed signals at Chistochina and Paradise sites and at Paxson there is an equal contribution from Hall and Pedersen currents. The Chistochina site shows the highest magnetic field amplitudes in both experimental and simulation environments. Depending upon the experimental and simulation observations at the three sites, a radiation pattern for the HAARP ionospheric heater can be mapped

  18. Absolute isotopic abundances of TI in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederer, F. R.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1985-03-01

    The absolute isotope abundance of Ti has been determined in Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende and Leoville meteorites and in samples of whole meteorites. The absolute Ti isotope abundances differ by a significant mass dependent isotope fractionation transformation from the previously reported abundances, which were normalized for fractionation using 46Ti/48Ti. Therefore, the absolute compositions define distinct nucleosynthetic components from those previously identified or reflect the existence of significant mass dependent isotope fractionation in nature. The authors provide a general formalism for determining the possible isotope compositions of the exotic Ti from the measured composition, for different values of isotope fractionation in nature and for different mixing ratios of the exotic and normal components.

  19. Productivity depends more on the rate than the frequency of N addition in a temperate grassland

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunhai; Feng, Jinchao; Isbell, Forest; Lü, Xiaotao; Han, Xingguo

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a key limiting resource for aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) in diverse terrestrial ecosystems. The relative roles of the rate and frequency (additions yr−1) of N application in stimulating ANPP at both the community- and species-levels are largely unknown. By independently manipulating the rate and frequency of N input, with nine rates (from 0 to 50 g N m−2 year−1) crossed with two frequencies (twice year−1 or monthly) in a temperate steppe of northern China across 2008–2013, we found that N addition increased community ANPP, and had positive, negative, or neutral effects for individual species. There were similar ANPP responses at the community- or species-level when a particular annual amount of N was added either twice year−1 or monthly. The community ANPP was less sensitive to soil ammonium at lower frequency of N addition. ANPP responses to N addition were positively correlated with annual precipitation. Our results suggest that, over a five-year period, there will be similar ANPP responses to a given annual N input that occurs either frequently in small amounts, as from N deposition, or that occur infrequently in larger amounts, as from application of N fertilizers. PMID:26218675

  20. Frequency-dependent response of the vascular endothelium to pulsatile shear stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most cells of the circulatory system are exposed to shear forces that occur at the frequency of the heartbeat. However, as a result of the complicated blood flow patterns that occur at arterial branches, small regions of the arterial wall experience fluctuations in shear stress that are dominated by...

  1. The Frequency-Predictability Interaction in Reading: It Depends Where You're Coming from

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Christopher J.; Miellet, Sebastien; O'Donnell, Patrick J.; Sereno, Sara C.

    2010-01-01

    A word's frequency of occurrence and its predictability from a prior context are key factors determining how long the eyes remain on that word in normal reading. Past reaction-time and eye movement research can be distinguished by whether these variables, when combined, produce interactive or additive results, respectively. Our study addressed…

  2. Microstructure, frequency and temperature-dependent dielectric properties of cobalt-substituted lithium ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watawe, S. C.; Sarwade, B. D.; Bellad, S. S.; Sutar, B. D.; Chougule, B. K.

    2000-05-01

    Ferrites with the general formula Li 0.5- x/2 Co xFe 2.5- x/2 O 4 (where x=0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7) were prepared by the standard ceramic method. AC resistivity ( ρAC), dielectric constant ( ɛ') and dielectric loss tangent (tan δ) were measured as a function of frequency and temperature. The compositional variations of ρDC and ɛ' with x show inverse trends with each other. The dielectric constant increases slowly from 0 to 450 with temperature in the beginning and sharply after 200°C. The ɛ' and ρDC show a decrease with increase in frequency for all the samples. The variation of tan δ with frequency shows cusps for all the samples except for x=0.5. These variations have been explained on the basis of Koop's phenomenological theory, concentration of Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ ions on octahedral site and hopping frequency of electrons between Fe 2+ and Fe 3+.

  3. A Computation of the Frequency Dependent Dielectric Function for Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwitter, D. E.; Kuklja, M. M.; Kunz, A. B.

    1999-06-01

    The imaginary part of the dielectric function as a function of frequency is calculated for the solids RDX, TATB, ADN, and PETN. Calculations have been performed including the effects of isotropic and uniaxial pressure. Simple lattice defects are included in some of the calculations.

  4. Frequency analysis of temperature-dependent interferometric signal for the measurement of the temperature coefficient of refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianqin; Shen, Jun; Neill, W. Stuart

    2016-07-01

    A method of frequency analysis for the measurement of the temperature coefficient of refractive index (dn/dT) using a Fabry-Perot interferometer was developed and tested against ethanol and water. The temperature-dependent interferometric signal described by Airy's formula was analyzed in both the temperature and frequency domains. By fast Fourier transform, a low-pass filter was designed and employed to eliminate the noise superimposed on the signal. dn/dT was determined accurately from the noise-removed signal by peak analysis. Furthermore, the signal frequency parameters may be utilized for the material thermophysical property characterization. This method lays the foundation for an online dn/dT instrument for monitoring chemical processes.

  5. Frequency analysis of temperature-dependent interferometric signal for the measurement of the temperature coefficient of refractive index.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianqin; Shen, Jun; Neill, W Stuart

    2016-07-01

    A method of frequency analysis for the measurement of the temperature coefficient of refractive index (dn/dT) using a Fabry-Perot interferometer was developed and tested against ethanol and water. The temperature-dependent interferometric signal described by Airy's formula was analyzed in both the temperature and frequency domains. By fast Fourier transform, a low-pass filter was designed and employed to eliminate the noise superimposed on the signal. dn/dT was determined accurately from the noise-removed signal by peak analysis. Furthermore, the signal frequency parameters may be utilized for the material thermophysical property characterization. This method lays the foundation for an online dn/dT instrument for monitoring chemical processes. PMID:27475545

  6. Frequency- and stress-dependent changes in shear-wave velocity dispersion in water-saturated, unconsolidated sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, R.

    2009-04-01

    Anelastic processes in the earth causes dissipation of seismic energy. Because of the fundamental laws of causality, the dissipation effects demand a frequency-dependent change of elastic moduli, and therefore, dispersion in elastic wave velocities. Assessing the dispersion of seismic shear waves in the unconsolidated subsoil is important for at least 3 reasons: 1) shear-wave velocity (Vs) is a key parameter in all dynamic loading problems; the frequency of the observed shear waves in field, downhole and laboratory measurements varies widely (20 Hz - 10 kHz), and consequently an uncertainty resulting from an unknown or poorly known estimate of dispersion may translate into erroneous evaluation and potential risks, 2) generally Vs-dispersion is considered negligible for the frequency range of practical interest; it is important to check this assumption and modify the site evaluation results, if necessary, and 3) the underlying soil-physics of any observed dispersion can be useful in estimating an unknown soil physical parameter. In the present research, we have concentrated on Vs dispersion in saturated sand in laboratory, under varying vertical and horizontal stress levels that are realistic in the context of shallow subsoil investigations. We explored theoretical models to obtain insight from our experimental findings. Laboratory experiments involving array seismic measurements and accurate stress control present clear evidence of dispersive shear-wave velocity in saturated sand in the frequency range 2-16 kHz. The change of Vs as a function of frequency is clearly nonlinear. For low frequencies, as observed in the field data, our result indicates significant dispersion and, therefore, nonlinear variation of attenuation. This has important implication on site evaluation using Vs. Significantly, the data allows us to distinguish a frequency-dependence of the velocity dispersion. The relative importance of fluid motion relative to the skeleton frame (Biot theory

  7. The neural code for auditory space depends on sound frequency and head size in an optimal manner.

    PubMed

    Harper, Nicol S; Scott, Brian H; Semple, Malcolm N; McAlpine, David

    2014-01-01

    A major cue to the location of a sound source is the interaural time difference (ITD)-the difference in sound arrival time at the two ears. The neural representation of this auditory cue is unresolved. The classic model of ITD coding, dominant for a half-century, posits that the distribution of best ITDs (the ITD evoking a neuron's maximal response) is unimodal and largely within the range of ITDs permitted by head-size. This is often interpreted as a place code for source location. An alternative model, based on neurophysiology in small mammals, posits a bimodal distribution of best ITDs with exquisite sensitivity to ITDs generated by means of relative firing rates between the distributions. Recently, an optimal-coding model was proposed, unifying the disparate features of these two models under the framework of efficient coding by neural populations. The optimal-coding model predicts that distributions of best ITDs depend on head size and sound frequency: for high frequencies and large heads it resembles the classic model, for low frequencies and small head sizes it resembles the bimodal model. The optimal-coding model makes key, yet unobserved, predictions: for many species, including humans, both forms of neural representation are employed, depending on sound frequency. Furthermore, novel representations are predicted for intermediate frequencies. Here, we examine these predictions in neurophysiological data from five mammalian species: macaque, guinea pig, cat, gerbil and kangaroo rat. We present the first evidence supporting these untested predictions, and demonstrate that different representations appear to be employed at different sound frequencies in the same species. PMID:25372405

  8. Frequency dependence of the magnetostrictive phenomenon in Metglas 2605SA1 ribbon: A minor-loop case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, S. U.; Liu, C. C.; Lin, H. R.; Chou, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Frequency dependence of magnetostrictive phenomenon of as-cast 2605SA1 ribbon was studied. We applied a sinusoidal sweeping field (H), with a fixed frequency (f), along length (L) of the ribbon, and simultaneously recorded the longitudinal magnetostriction (λ∥) and the transverse magnetostriction (λ⊥) as a function of time (t), respectively. f was varied from 0.07 to 122 Hz. In the low-f case (f =0.07 Hz), we observed the frequency-doubling (FD) feature in λ∥(t) and λ⊥(t) curves; i.e., only even harmonic magnetostrictive signals showed up. In the high-f case (f = 122 Hz), we observed the no-frequency-doubling (NFD) feature; i.e., both odd and even harmonic magnetostrictive signals showed up. A theory, based on the balance among various torques acting on magnetization, is developed to explain the f dependence of the magnetostriction phenomenon observed. From this theory, we conclude that only when the reflection symmetry of the system is reserved, i.e., when the equivalent easy axis (EEA) is perpendicular to L, will λ∥(t) and λ⊥(t) have the true-frequency-doubling (TFD) feature. However, for the as-cast 2605SA1 ribbon, EEA is not perpendicular to L. Thus, strictly speaking, we should observe the NFD feature only. Nevertheless, in the low-f limit, we can show that the FD feature is somewhat allowed under the condition, b/α being close to 1, where b and α are the two parameters used in the theory. From experimental data, this condition is met for as-cast 2605SA1. To make a distinction from TFD, this low-f feature is called close-frequency-doubling (CFD) in this paper. In general, the theory explains all the experimental results fairly well.

  9. The Neural Code for Auditory Space Depends on Sound Frequency and Head Size in an Optimal Manner

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Nicol S.; Scott, Brian H.; Semple, Malcolm N.; McAlpine, David

    2014-01-01

    A major cue to the location of a sound source is the interaural time difference (ITD)–the difference in sound arrival time at the two ears. The neural representation of this auditory cue is unresolved. The classic model of ITD coding, dominant for a half-century, posits that the distribution of best ITDs (the ITD evoking a neuron’s maximal response) is unimodal and largely within the range of ITDs permitted by head-size. This is often interpreted as a place code for source location. An alternative model, based on neurophysiology in small mammals, posits a bimodal distribution of best ITDs with exquisite sensitivity to ITDs generated by means of relative firing rates between the distributions. Recently, an optimal-coding model was proposed, unifying the disparate features of these two models under the framework of efficient coding by neural populations. The optimal-coding model predicts that distributions of best ITDs depend on head size and sound frequency: for high frequencies and large heads it resembles the classic model, for low frequencies and small head sizes it resembles the bimodal model. The optimal-coding model makes key, yet unobserved, predictions: for many species, including humans, both forms of neural representation are employed, depending on sound frequency. Furthermore, novel representations are predicted for intermediate frequencies. Here, we examine these predictions in neurophysiological data from five mammalian species: macaque, guinea pig, cat, gerbil and kangaroo rat. We present the first evidence supporting these untested predictions, and demonstrate that different representations appear to be employed at different sound frequencies in the same species. PMID:25372405

  10. Theoretical study of frequency and temperature dependence of dipole-quadrupole polarizability of P4 and adamantane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shedge, Sapana V.; Pal, Sourav; Köster, Andreas M.

    2012-11-01

    The frequency and temperature dependence of dipole-quadrupole polarizability of tetrahedral P4 and adamantane molecules have been studied using first-principle all-electron density functional theory calculation. The recently developed time-dependent auxiliary density functional theory is extended for the calculation of dynamic dipole-quadrupole polarizabilities. Temperature effects are incorporated by Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) simulations recorded up to 100 ps. The dynamic dipole-quadrupole polarizabilities are calculated along these trajectories. The frequency and temperature effects can be significant for the accurate calculation of dipole-quadrupole polarizability. We have also identified the main reason for the observed discrepancy between experiment and theory in the case of adamantane.

  11. Frequency-dependent facilitation of synaptic throughput via postsynaptic NMDA receptors in the nucleus of the solitary tract.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huan; Peters, James H; Zhu, Mingyan; Page, Stephen J; Ritter, Robert C; Appleyard, Suzanne M

    2015-01-01

    Hindbrain NMDA receptors play important roles in reflexive and behavioural responses to vagal activation. NMDA receptors have also been shown to contribute to the synaptic responses of neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), but their exact role remains unclear. In this study we used whole cell patch-clamping techniques in rat horizontal brain slice to investigate the role of NMDA receptors in the fidelity of transmission across solitary tract afferent-NTS neuron synapses. Results show that NMDA receptors contribute up to 70% of the charge transferred across the synapse at high (>5 Hz) firing rates, but have little contribution at lower firing frequencies. Results also show that NMDA receptors critically contribute to the fidelity of transmission across these synapses during high frequency (>5 Hz) afferent discharge rates. This novel role of NMDA receptors may explain in part how primary visceral afferents, including vagal afferents, can maintain fidelity of transmission across a broad range of firing frequencies. Neurons within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) receive vagal afferent innervations that initiate gastrointestinal and cardiovascular reflexes. Glutamate is the fast excitatory neurotransmitter released in the NTS by vagal afferents, which arrive there via the solitary tract (ST). ST stimulation elicits excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in NTS neurons mediated by both AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors (-Rs). Vagal afferents exhibit a high probability of vesicle release and exhibit robust frequency-dependent depression due to presynaptic vesicle depletion. Nonetheless, synaptic throughput is maintained even at high frequencies of afferent activation. Here we test the hypothesis that postsynaptic NMDA-Rs are essential in maintaining throughput across ST-NTS synapses. Using patch clamp electrophysiology in horizontal brainstem slices, we found that NMDA-Rs, including NR2B subtypes, carry up to 70% of the charge transferred

  12. Effect of chemically active medium on frequency dependence of magnetic losses in soft magnetic Fe-based amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skulkina, N. A.; Ivanov, O. A.; Stepanova, E. A.; Pavlova, I. O.

    2013-03-01

    The effects of the electrolytic hydrogenation and oxidation and of the interaction of the surface ribbon with water and vapor on the frequency dependence of magnetic losses per magnetization-reversal cycle are studied based on the example of soft magnetic Fe81B13Si4C2 amorphous alloy, which exhibits a positive saturation magnetostriction. It was shown that, after the hydrogenation and oxidation of soft magnetic amorphous alloys, their frequency dependences of magnetic losses per magnetization-reversal cycle, which are reduced to unit induction, exhibit groups of hydrogen- and oxygen-related peaks in the frequency ranges of 35-55 and 55-80 Hz, which can be explained by the formation of O- A and H- A atomic pairs (where A are atoms of alloy components) and their reorientation in a magnetic field in the course of magnetization reversal at certain frequencies. The formation of analogous groups of peaks for samples of soft magnetic Fe-based amorphous alloys was observed after the interaction of the ribbon surface with water and vapor and after heat treatment in air. This fact confirms the possibility of the hydrogenation and oxidation of the alloys during the aforementioned processes.

  13. Frequency-dependent reduction of voltage-gated sodium current modulates retinal ganglion cell response rate to electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, David; Morley, John W.; Suaning, Gregg J.; Lovell, Nigel H.

    2011-10-01

    The ability to elicit visual percepts through electrical stimulation of the retina has prompted numerous investigations examining the feasibility of restoring sight to the blind with retinal implants. The therapeutic efficacy of these devices will be strongly influenced by their ability to elicit neural responses that approximate those of normal vision. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) can fire spikes at frequencies greater than 200 Hz when driven by light. However, several studies using isolated retinas have found a decline in RGC spiking response rate when these cells were stimulated at greater than 50 Hz. It is possible that the mechanism responsible for this decline also contributes to the frequency-dependent 'fading' of electrically evoked percepts recently reported in human patients. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings of rabbit RGCs, we investigated the causes for the spiking response depression during direct subretinal stimulation of these cells at 50-200 Hz. The response depression was not caused by inhibition arising from the retinal network but, instead, by a stimulus-frequency-dependent decline of RGC voltage-gated sodium current. Under identical experimental conditions, however, RGCs were able to spike at high frequency when driven by light stimuli and intracellular depolarization. Based on these observations, we demonstrated a technique to prevent the spiking response depression.

  14. Strong frequency dependence of vibrational relaxation in bulk and surface water reveals sub-picosecond structural heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    van der Post, Sietse T.; Hsieh, Cho-Shuen; Okuno, Masanari; Nagata, Yuki; Bakker, Huib J.; Bonn, Mischa; Hunger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Because of strong hydrogen bonding in liquid water, intermolecular interactions between water molecules are highly delocalized. Previous two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy experiments have indicated that this delocalization smears out the structural heterogeneity of neat H2O. Here we report on a systematic investigation of the ultrafast vibrational relaxation of bulk and interfacial water using time-resolved infrared and sum-frequency generation spectroscopies. These experiments reveal a remarkably strong dependence of the vibrational relaxation time on the frequency of the OH stretching vibration of liquid water in the bulk and at the air/water interface. For bulk water, the vibrational relaxation time increases continuously from 250 to 550 fs when the frequency is increased from 3,100 to 3,700 cm−1. For hydrogen-bonded water at the air/water interface, the frequency dependence is even stronger. These results directly demonstrate that liquid water possesses substantial structural heterogeneity, both in the bulk and at the surface. PMID:26382651

  15. Frequency-dependent local field factors in dielectric liquids by a polarizable force field and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Davari, Nazanin; Haghdani, Shokouh; Åstrand, Per-Olof

    2015-12-31

    A force field model for calculating local field factors, i.e. the linear response of the local electric field for example at a nucleus in a molecule with respect to an applied electric field, is discussed. It is based on a combined charge-transfer and point-dipole interaction model for the polarizability, and thereby it includes two physically distinct terms for describing electronic polarization: changes in atomic charges arising from transfer of charge between the atoms and atomic induced dipole moments. A time dependence is included both for the atomic charges and the atomic dipole moments and if they are assumed to oscillate with the same frequency as the applied electric field, a model for frequency-dependent properties are obtained. Furthermore, if a life-time of excited states are included, a model for the complex frequency-dependent polariability is obtained including also information about excited states and the absorption spectrum. We thus present a model for the frequency-dependent local field factors through the first molecular excitation energy. It is combined with molecular dynamics simulations of liquids where a large set of configurations are sampled and for which local field factors are calculated. We are normally not interested in the average of the local field factor but rather in configurations where it is as high as possible. In electrical insulation, we would like to avoid high local field factors to reduce the risk for electrical breakdown, whereas for example in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, high local field factors are desired to give dramatically increased intensities.

  16. Capacitively-Coupled Resistivity measurements to determine frequency dependent electrical parameters in periglacial environment - theoretical considerations and first field tests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przyklenk, A.; Hördt, A.; Radić, T.

    2016-05-01

    Capacitively-Coupled Resistivity (CCR) is conventionally used to emulate DC resistivity measurements and may provide important information about the ice content of material in periglacial areas. The application of CCR theoretically enables the determination of both electrical parameters, i.e. the resistivity and the electrical permittivity, by analyzing magnitude and phase shift spectra. The electrical permittivity may dominate the impedance, especially in periglacial areas or regions of hydrogeological interest. However, previous theoretical work suggested that the phase shift may strongly depend on electrode height above ground, implying that electrode height must be known with great accuracy to determine electrical permittivity. Here, we demonstrate with laboratory test measurements, theoretical modelling and by analysing the Jacobian matrix of the inversion, that the sensitivity towards electrode height is drastically reduced if the electrical permittivity is frequency dependent in a way that is typical for ice. For the fist time, we used a novel broadband CCR device "Chameleon" for a field test located in one of the ridge galleries beneath the crest of Mount Zugspitze. A permanently ice covered bottom of a tunnel was examined. For the inversion of the measured spectra, the frequency dependance of the electrical parameters was parameterized in 3 different ways. A Debye Model for pure ices, a Cole-Cole Model for pure ices and a dual Cole-Cole Model including interfacial water additionally. The frequency-dependent resistivity and permittivity spectra obtained from the inversion, including low and high frequency limits, agree reasonably well with laboratory and field measurements reported in the literature.

  17. Frequency-dependent local field factors in dielectric liquids by a polarizable force field and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davari, Nazanin; Haghdani, Shokouh; Åstrand, Per-Olof

    2015-12-01

    A force field model for calculating local field factors, i.e. the linear response of the local electric field for example at a nucleus in a molecule with respect to an applied electric field, is discussed. It is based on a combined charge-transfer and point-dipole interaction model for the polarizability, and thereby it includes two physically distinct terms for describing electronic polarization: changes in atomic charges arising from transfer of charge between the atoms and atomic induced dipole moments. A time dependence is included both for the atomic charges and the atomic dipole moments and if they are assumed to oscillate with the same frequency as the applied electric field, a model for frequency-dependent properties are obtained. Furthermore, if a life-time of excited states are included, a model for the complex frequency-dependent polariability is obtained including also information about excited states and the absorption spectrum. We thus present a model for the frequency-dependent local field factors through the first molecular excitation energy. It is combined with molecular dynamics simulations of liquids where a large set of configurations are sampled and for which local field factors are calculated. We are normally not interested in the average of the local field factor but rather in configurations where it is as high as possible. In electrical insulation, we would like to avoid high local field factors to reduce the risk for electrical breakdown, whereas for example in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, high local field factors are desired to give dramatically increased intensities.

  18. Capacitively-Coupled Resistivity measurements to determine frequency dependent electrical parameters in periglacial environment - theoretical considerations and first field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przyklenk, A.; Hördt, A.; Radić, T.

    2016-05-01

    Capacitively-Coupled Resistivity (CCR) is conventionally used to emulate DC resistivity measurements and may provide important information about the ice content of material in periglacial areas. The application of CCR theoretically enables the determination of both electrical parameters, i.e. the resistivity and the electrical permittivity, by analyzing magnitude and phase shift spectra. The electrical permittivity may dominate the impedance, especially in periglacial areas or regions of hydrogeological interest. However, previous theoretical work suggested that the phase shift may strongly depend on electrode height above ground, implying that electrode height must be known with great accuracy to determine electrical permittivity. Here, we demonstrate with laboratory test measurements, theoretical modelling and by analysing the Jacobian matrix of the inversion, that the sensitivity towards electrode height is drastically reduced if the electrical permittivity is frequency dependent in a way that is typical for ice. For the fist time, we used a novel broadband CCR device "Chameleon" for a field test located in one of the ridge galleries beneath the crest of Mount Zugspitze. A permanently ice covered bottom of a tunnel was examined. For the inversion of the measured spectra, the frequency dependance of the electrical parameters was parameterized in 3 different ways. A Debye Model for pure ices, a Cole-Cole Model for pure ices and a dual Cole-Cole Model including interfacial water additionally. The frequency-dependent resistivity and permittivity spectra obtained from the inversion, including low and high frequency limits, agree reasonably well with laboratory and field measurements reported in the literature.

  19. Amplitude and frequency dependence of hysteresis loss in a magnet-superconductor levitation system

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z.J.; Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rossing, T.D.

    1995-08-01

    Using an electromagnetically controlled mechanical pendulum, we measured the energy loss for different amplitudes in a magnetic levitation system that contained high temperature superconductors (HTSs). Two procedures were followed to measure losses at 77 K for frequencies of 93.8 mHz to 80 Hz. In the first procedure, the distance between the permanent magnet and the HTS levitator was the same as that during (field) cooling. In the second procedure, the magnet was lowered (after cooling) closer to the HTS levitator before the measurements were performed. The experimental data show that these two procedures give essentially the same results at the same distance despite different cooling (and magnetization) histories for melt-textured YBaCuO levitators, and the frequency-independent energy loss is a power-law function of amplitude. We attribute the energy loss to magnetic hysteresis in the superconductor. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  20. Level-dependent auditory tuning: Transducer-based active processes in hearing and best-frequency shifts.

    PubMed

    Nadrowski, Björn; Göpfert, Martin C

    2009-01-01

    Ears boost their sensitivity by means of active, force-generating processes that augment the minute vibrations induced by soft sounds. These processes can alter auditory frequency-tuning in a level-dependent way. In the antennal hearing organ of Drosophila, for example, the active process shifts the best frequency (BF) of the antennal sound receiver when the sound intensity is varied, tuning the receiver to conspecific songs. Here we show that this level-dependent tuning can be reproduced by an active transduction model as proposed for vertebrate hair cells and the Drosophila ear. We further show that the direction of the frequency shift depends on the system to which the molecular modules for auditory transduction connect: If this system is mass-less such as the sensory hair bundles of bullfrog saccular hair cells, the BF of the displacement response will increase as the sound intensity declines. Conversely, BF will decrease with declining intensity if the transduction modules couple to inertial systems such as the fly's antennal sound receiver or cupulae in the fish lateral line. PMID:19704854

  1. Frequency-dependent ferroelectric behavior of BaMn3Ti4O14.25 at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Muhammad E.; Liu, Shuangyi; O'Brien, Stephen; Li, Jackie

    2015-07-01

    We report the activation field and selective frequency-dependent ferroelectric behavior of BaMn3Ti4O14.25 (BMT-134) at room temperature. BMT-134, a recently discovered multiferroic complex oxide, exhibits antiferromagnetic and ferroelectric behavior and belongs to the hollandite crystal class. The microstructure can be manipulated through processing conditions to prepare a nanocrystalline textured tablet. We measured polarization-electric field (P-E) hysteresis loops and strain-electric field butterfly loops as a function of frequency in order to investigate the AC dynamics of domain switching and strain behavior. Under an electric field loading condition, a clear hysteresis loop of the electric field-displacement curve is obtained at 50 Hz, indicating that room temperature ferroelectricity is attainable under the right processing conditions. When the frequency is increased to 500 Hz, the coercive field also increases, until the frequency reaches 5 kHz, at which point the electric field versus electric displacement becomes linear indicating the limit of domain switching at high frequency.

  2. Spatial hearing in Cope's gray treefrog: II. Frequency-dependent directionality in the amplitude and phase of tympanum vibrations.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Michael S; Lee, Norman; Schrode, Katrina M; Johns, Anastasia R; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Bee, Mark A

    2014-04-01

    Anuran ears function as pressure difference receivers, and the amplitude and phase of tympanum vibrations are inherently directional, varying with sound incident angle. We quantified the nature of this directionality for Cope's gray treefrog, Hyla chrysoscelis. We presented subjects with pure tones, advertisement calls, and frequency-modulated sweeps to examine the influence of frequency, signal level, lung inflation, and sex on ear directionality. Interaural differences in the amplitude of tympanum vibrations were 1-4 dB greater than sound pressure differences adjacent to the two tympana, while interaural differences in the phase of tympanum vibration were similar to or smaller than those in sound phase. Directionality in the amplitude and phase of tympanum vibration were highly dependent on sound frequency, and directionality in amplitude varied slightly with signal level. Directionality in the amplitude and phase of tone- and call-evoked responses did not differ between sexes. Lung inflation strongly affected tympanum directionality over a narrow frequency range that, in females, included call frequencies. This study provides a foundation for further work on the biomechanics and neural mechanisms of spatial hearing in H. chrysoscelis, and lends valuable perspective to behavioral studies on the use of spatial information by this species and other frogs. PMID:24504183

  3. Stability of the human upright stance depending on the frequency of external disturbances.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Akimasa; Masuda, Tadashi; Inaoka, Hidenori; Fukuoka, Yutaka

    2008-03-01

    During an upright stance of humans, it is usually assumed that a stiffer ankle joint contributes to stabilize the stance. To show that under certain conditions a stiffer ankle joint can reduce the stability, the frequency responses of the moment and the angle of the ankle joint against external disturbances caused by random horizontal translations of the support surface were evaluated in ten healthy adult subjects by varying the difficulty of the task at four levels. When it was difficult to keep the upright stance, the subject tended to make the ankle joint stiffer. The transfer function relating the external disturbance moment to the ankle joint moment showed a larger gain in the high frequency range (>0.3 Hz) compared with the gains obtained under easier conditions. A simulation analysis based on a simple inverted pendulum model also reproduced this tendency. These results indicate that the stiffer ankle joint and the resulting higher ankle moment for high frequency external disturbances enhance the possibility that the center of pressure exceeds the limit arising from the size of the feet and can make the upright stance unstable. PMID:17929068

  4. Sound radiation by a moving line source above an impedance plane with frequency-dependent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragna, D.; Blanc-Benon, P.

    2015-08-01

    An analytic solution for the problem of sound radiation by a harmonic line source moving at a uniform subsonic speed parallel to an impedance plane is proposed. The main originality of this work is that the variation of the impedance with the frequency is taken into account. Compared to the case of a constant impedance, the reflection coefficient and the location of its poles in the complex plane are modified. A uniform asymptotic expression is then developed for moderate Mach numbers and a closed-form expression, corresponding to a Weyl-Van der Pol formula, is proposed for a grazing incidence for hard grounds and for low Mach numbers. Unlike previous analytical solutions derived in the literature for a point-source, the impedance is evaluated at the Doppler frequency instead of at the source frequency. The analytical solution and asymptotic expressions are then compared satisfactorily to a numerical solution obtained from a time-domain solver of the linearized Euler equations. Finally, a parametric study is carried out showing that the assumption of a constant impedance is valid if the source Mach number remains small, typically less than 0.2, and if the source is not too close to the ground.

  5. Determinants of frequency-dependent regulation of Kv1.2-containing potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Baronas, Victoria A.; Yang, Runying; Vilin, Yury Y.; Kurata, Harley T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Voltage-gated potassium channels are important regulators of electrical excitation in many tissues, with Kv1.2 standing out as an essential contributor in the CNS. Genetic deletion of Kv1.2 invariably leads to early lethality in mice. In humans, mutations affecting Kv1.2 function are linked to epileptic encephalopathy and movement disorders. We have demonstrated that Kv1.2 is subject to a unique regulatory mechanism in which repetitive stimulation leads to dramatic potentiation of current. In this study, we explore the properties and molecular determinants of this use-dependent potentiation/activation. First, we examine how alterations in duty cycle (depolarization and repolarization/recovery times) affect the onset and extent of use-dependent activation. Also, we use trains of repetitive depolarizations to test the effects of a variety of Thr252 (S2-S3 linker) mutations on use-dependent activation. Substitutions of Thr with some sterically similar amino acids (Ser, Val, and Met, but not Cys) retain use-dependent activation, while bulky or charged amino acid substitutions eliminate use-dependence. Introduction of Thr at the equivalent position in other Kv1 channels (1.1, 1.3, 1.4), was not sufficient to transfer the phenotype. We hypothesize that use-dependent activation of Kv1.2 channels is mediated by an extrinsic regulator that binds preferentially to the channel closed state, with Thr252 being necessary but not sufficient for this interaction to alter channel function. These findings extend the conclusions of our recent demonstration of use-dependent activation of Kv1.2-containing channels in hippocampal neurons, by adding new details about the molecular mechanism underlying this effect. PMID:26646078

  6. Implants as absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Kan, Joseph Y K; Caruso, Joseph M

    2005-11-01

    Anchorage control is essential for successful orthodontic treatment. Each tooth has its own anchorage potential as well as propensity to move when force is applied. When teeth are used as anchorage, the untoward movements of the anchoring units may result in the prolonged treatment time, and unpredictable or less-than-ideal outcome. To maximize tooth-related anchorage, techniques such as differential torque, placing roots into the cortex of the bone, the use of various intraoral devices and/or extraoral appliances have been implemented. Implants, as they are in direct contact with bone, do not possess a periodontal ligament. As a result, they do not move when orthodontic/orthopedic force is applied, and therefore can be used as "absolute anchorage." This article describes different types of implants that have been used as orthodontic anchorage. Their clinical applications and limitations are also discussed. PMID:16463910

  7. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  8. In Vivo and In Silico Investigation Into Mechanisms of Frequency Dependence of Repolarization Alternans in Human Ventricular Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Orini, Michele; Hanson, Ben; Hayward, Martin; Taggart, Peter; Lambiase, Pier D.; Burrage, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Repolarization alternans (RA) are associated with arrhythmogenesis. Animal studies have revealed potential mechanisms, but human-focused studies are needed. RA generation and frequency dependence may be determined by cell-to-cell variability in protein expression, which is regulated by genetic and external factors. Objective: To characterize in vivo RA in human and to investigate in silico using human models, the ionic mechanisms underlying the frequency-dependent differences in RA behavior identified in vivo. Methods and Results: In vivo electrograms were acquired at 240 sites covering the epicardium of 41 patients at 6 cycle lengths (600–350 ms). In silico investigations were conducted using a population of biophysically detailed human models incorporating variability in protein expression and calibrated using in vivo recordings. Both in silico and in vivo, 2 types of RA were identified, with Fork- and Eye-type restitution curves, based on RA persistence or disappearance, respectively, at fast pacing rates. In silico simulations show that RA are strongly correlated with fluctuations in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium, because of strong release and weak reuptake. Large L-type calcium current conductance is responsible for RA disappearance at fast frequencies in Eye-type (30% larger in Eye-type versus Fork-type; P<0.01), because of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase pump potentiation caused by frequency-induced increase in intracellular calcium. Large Na+/Ca2+ exchanger current is the main driver in translating Ca2+ fluctuations into RA. Conclusions: In human in vivo and in silico, 2 types of RA are identified, with RA persistence/disappearance as frequency increases. In silico, L-type calcium current and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger current determine RA human cell-to-cell differences through intracellular and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium regulation. PMID:26602864

  9. Frequency dependence of power and its implications for contractile function of muscle fibers from the digital flexors of horses.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Michael T; Bertram, John E A; Syme, Douglas A; Hermanson, John W; Chase, P Bryant

    2014-10-01

    The digital flexors of horses must produce high force to support the body weight during running, and a need for these muscles to generate power is likely limited during locomotion over level ground. Measurements of power output from horse muscle fibers close to physiological temperatures, and when cyclic strain is imposed, will help to better understand the in vivo performance of the muscles as power absorbers and generators. Skinned fibers from the deep (DDF) and superficial (SDF) digital flexors, and the soleus (SOL) underwent sinusoidal oscillations in length over a range of frequencies (0.5-16 Hz) and strain amplitudes (0.01-0.06) under maximum activation (pCa 5) at 30°C. Results were analyzed using both workloop and Nyquist plot analyses to determine the ability of the fibers to absorb or generate power and the frequency dependence of those abilities. Power absorption was dominant at most cycling frequencies and strain amplitudes in fibers from all three muscles. However, small amounts of power were generated (0.002-0.05 Wkg(-1)) at 0.01 strain by all three muscles at relatively slow cycling frequencies: DDF (4-7 Hz), SDF (4-5 Hz) and SOL (0.5-1 Hz). Nyquist analysis, reflecting the influence of cross-bridge kinetics on power generation, corroborated these results. The similar capacity for power generation by DDF and SDF versus lower for SOL, and the faster frequency at which this power was realized in DDF and SDF fibers, are largely explained by the fast myosin heavy chain isoform content in each muscle. Contractile function of DDF and SDF as power absorbers and generators, respectively, during locomotion may therefore be more dependent on their fiber architectural arrangement than on the physiological properties of their muscle fibers. PMID:25293602

  10. Frequency dependence of power and its implications for contractile function of muscle fibers from the digital flexors of horses

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Michael T.; Bertram, John E.A.; Syme, Douglas A.; Hermanson, John W.; Chase, P. Bryant

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The digital flexors of horses must produce high force to support the body weight during running, and a need for these muscles to generate power is likely limited during locomotion over level ground. Measurements of power output from horse muscle fibers close to physiological temperatures, and when cyclic strain is imposed, will help to better understand the in vivo performance of the muscles as power absorbers and generators. Skinned fibers from the deep (DDF) and superficial (SDF) digital flexors, and the soleus (SOL) underwent sinusoidal oscillations in length over a range of frequencies (0.5–16 Hz) and strain amplitudes (0.01–0.06) under maximum activation (pCa 5) at 30°C. Results were analyzed using both workloop and Nyquist plot analyses to determine the ability of the fibers to absorb or generate power and the frequency dependence of those abilities. Power absorption was dominant at most cycling frequencies and strain amplitudes in fibers from all three muscles. However, small amounts of power were generated (0.002–0.05 Wkg−1) at 0.01 strain by all three muscles at relatively slow cycling frequencies: DDF (4–7 Hz), SDF (4–5 Hz) and SOL (0.5–1 Hz). Nyquist analysis, reflecting the influence of cross‐bridge kinetics on power generation, corroborated these results. The similar capacity for power generation by DDF and SDF versus lower for SOL, and the faster frequency at which this power was realized in DDF and SDF fibers, are largely explained by the fast myosin heavy chain isoform content in each muscle. Contractile function of DDF and SDF as power absorbers and generators, respectively, during locomotion may therefore be more dependent on their fiber architectural arrangement than on the physiological properties of their muscle fibers. PMID:25293602

  11. Frequency-Dependent Neural Activity in Patients with Unilateral Vascular Pulsatile Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Han; Zhao, Pengfei; Liu, Zhaohui; Wang, Guopeng; Zeng, Rong; Yan, Fei; Dong, Cheng; Zhang, Ling; Li, Rui; Wang, Peng; Li, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Previous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) studies have shown that neurological changes are important findings in vascular pulsatile tinnitus (PT) patients. Here, we utilized rs-fMRI to measure the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) in forty patients with unilateral PT and forty age-, gender-, and education-matched normal control subjects. Two different frequency bands (slow-4, 0.027–0.073 Hz, and slow-5, 0.010–0.027 Hz, which are more sensitive to subcortical and cortical neurological signal changes, resp.) were analyzed to examine the intrinsic brain activity in detail. Compared to controls, PT patients had increased ALFF values mainly in the PCu, bilateral IPL (inferior parietal lobule), left IFG (inferior frontal gyrus), and right IFG/anterior insula and decreased ALFF values in the multiple occipital areas including bilateral middle-inferior occipital lobe. For the differences of the two frequency bands, widespread ALFF differences were observed. The ALFF abnormalities in aMPFC/ACC, PCu, right IPL, and some regions of occipital and parietal cortices were greater in the slow-5 band compared to the slow-4 band. Additionally, the THI score of PT patients was positively correlated with changes in slow-5 and slow-4 band in PCu. Pulsatile tinnitus is a disease affecting the neurological activities of multiple brain regions. Slow-5 band is more sensitive in detecting the alternations. Our results also indicated the importance of pathophysiological investigations in patients with pulsatile tinnitus in the future. PMID:27413554

  12. Frequency-Dependent Neural Activity in Patients with Unilateral Vascular Pulsatile Tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Lv, Han; Zhao, Pengfei; Liu, Zhaohui; Wang, Guopeng; Zeng, Rong; Yan, Fei; Dong, Cheng; Zhang, Ling; Li, Rui; Wang, Peng; Li, Ting; Gong, Shusheng; Wang, Zhenchang

    2016-01-01

    Previous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) studies have shown that neurological changes are important findings in vascular pulsatile tinnitus (PT) patients. Here, we utilized rs-fMRI to measure the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) in forty patients with unilateral PT and forty age-, gender-, and education-matched normal control subjects. Two different frequency bands (slow-4, 0.027-0.073 Hz, and slow-5, 0.010-0.027 Hz, which are more sensitive to subcortical and cortical neurological signal changes, resp.) were analyzed to examine the intrinsic brain activity in detail. Compared to controls, PT patients had increased ALFF values mainly in the PCu, bilateral IPL (inferior parietal lobule), left IFG (inferior frontal gyrus), and right IFG/anterior insula and decreased ALFF values in the multiple occipital areas including bilateral middle-inferior occipital lobe. For the differences of the two frequency bands, widespread ALFF differences were observed. The ALFF abnormalities in aMPFC/ACC, PCu, right IPL, and some regions of occipital and parietal cortices were greater in the slow-5 band compared to the slow-4 band. Additionally, the THI score of PT patients was positively correlated with changes in slow-5 and slow-4 band in PCu. Pulsatile tinnitus is a disease affecting the neurological activities of multiple brain regions. Slow-5 band is more sensitive in detecting the alternations. Our results also indicated the importance of pathophysiological investigations in patients with pulsatile tinnitus in the future. PMID:27413554

  13. Thermal resistance at a liquid-solid interface dependent on the ratio of thermal oscillation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, BoHung

    2012-12-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of atomic-scale thermal resistance at a solid-liquid interface are theoretically investigated with a simple modal analysis of a one-dimensional lattice system. In the modal analysis, the solid-liquid intermolecular interaction strength between is taken into account as the stiffness constant between the solid and liquid molecular masses, and plays a key role in understanding the interfacial thermal resistance. The results show that the interfacial thermal resistance is proportional to the 4th power of the ratio of the thermal oscillation frequencies for the solid and liquid molecules, which provides a better physical description for the interfacial thermal resistance.

  14. Reply to ``Comment on `Frequency-dependent dispersion in porous media' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés-Parada, Francisco J.; Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose

    2012-07-01

    In a recent paper [Valdés-Parada and Alvarez-Ramirez, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.84.031201 84, 031201 (2011)], we studied the passive transport of a solute in a rigid and homogeneous porous medium in the domain of frequency and obtained good agreement between upscaled and pore-scale results for several values of the frequency. This work was commented on by Davit and Quintard, who wrote about the closure problem in the Laplace domain and provided the correct definition of the dispersion coefficient. However, the obtention of the inverse Laplace transform is not always an easy (or even possible) task to perform. For this reason, in this Reply we show that the same result reached by Davit and Quintard can be obtained using integral equation formulations based on Green's functions without the need of the Laplace transform. In addition, we identify three time stages for the transport process and we point out that the derivations provided by Davit and Quintard are only valid once a pre-asymptotic stage has been reached in which there is a separation of characteristic length scales that allows treating volume averaged quantities as constants in space but not in time.

  15. Assessment of breadmaking performance of wheat flour dough by means of frequency dependent ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunstein, D.; Page, J. H.; Strybulevych, A.; Peressini, D.; Scanlon, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    Technological performance of wheat flour varies among different wheat varieties. Gluten plays a key role within the solid phase of dough in the formation and the retention of gas bubbles during breadmaking. Rheological tests are usually performed to predict breadmaking potential. The aim here was to investigate the ability of ultrasound to discriminate wheat doughs based on breadmaking qualities. The ultimate goal is the development of an online quality control system currently unavailable in the baked goods industry, rendering this work innovative. Samples were prepared from a strong wheat flour, with one control sample and one added with inulin and distilled monoglycerides, producing doughs of distinct breadmaking quality. Doughs were subjected to density determination, elongation tests, and ultrasound analysis. The ultrasound tests were performed in the frequency range of 300 kHz - 6 MHz. Ultrasonic phase velocity increased with increasing frequency to about 2 MHz, becoming constant and then decreasing from 3 MHz for the control sample. Distinct differences in attenuation coefficient between the fibre-enriched and control doughs were observed. Ultrasound can potentially add to a better understanding of dough quality and can discriminate between doughs of contrasting properties.

  16. Thickness-Dependent Coherent Phonon Frequency in Ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO₃ Films.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuolong; Sobota, Jonathan A; Leuenberger, Dominik; Kemper, Alexander F; Lee, James J; Schmitt, Felix T; Li, Wei; Moore, Rob G; Kirchmann, Patrick S; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2015-06-10

    Ultrathin FeSe films grown on SrTiO3 substrates are a recent milestone in atomic material engineering due to their important role in understanding unconventional superconductivity in Fe-based materials. By using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, we study phonon frequencies in ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO3 films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. After optical excitation, we observe periodic modulations of the photoelectron spectrum as a function of pump-probe delay for 1-unit-cell, 3-unit-cell, and 60-unit-cell thick FeSe films. The frequencies of the coherent intensity oscillations increase from 5.00 ± 0.02 to 5.25 ± 0.02 THz with increasing film thickness. By comparing with previous works, we attribute this mode to the Se A1g phonon. The dominant mechanism for the phonon softening in 1-unit-cell thick FeSe films is a substrate-induced lattice strain. Our results demonstrate an abrupt phonon renormalization due to a lattice mismatch between the ultrathin film and the substrate. PMID:26027951

  17. Scattering approach to frequency-dependent current noise in Fabry-Pérot graphene devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Jan; Belzig, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    We study finite-frequency quantum noise and photon-assisted electron transport through a wide and ballistic graphene sheet between two metallic leads. The elementary excitations allow us to examine the differences between effects related to Fabry-Pérot-like interferences and signatures caused by correlations of coherently scattered particles in electron- and holelike parts of the Dirac spectrum. We identify different features in the current-current auto- and cross-correlation spectra and trace them back to the interference patterns of the product of transmission and reflection amplitudes, which define the integrands of the involved correlators. At positive frequencies, the correlator of the autoterminal noise spectrum with final and initial states associated to the measurement terminal is dominant. Phase jumps occur within the interference patterns of corresponding integrands, which also reveal the intrinsic energy scale of the two-terminal graphene setup. The excess noise spectra, as well as the cross-correlation ones, show large fluctuations between positive and negative values. Oscillatory signatures of the cross-correlation noise are due to an alternating behavior of the integrands.

  18. Estimates of frequency-dependent compressibility from a quasistatic double-porosity model

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J. G.; Wang, H. F.

    1998-09-16

    Gassmann's relationship between the drained and undrained bulk modulus of a porous medium is often used to relate the dry bulk modulus to the saturated bulk modulus for elastic waves, because the compressibility of air is considered so high that the dry rock behaves in a drained fashion and the frequency of elastic waves is considered so high that the saturated rock behaves in an undrained fashion. The bulk modulus calculated from ultrasonic velocities, however, often does not match the Gassmann prediction. Mavko and Jizba examined how local flow effects and unequilibrated pore pressures can lead to greater stiffnesses. Their conceptual model consists of a distribution of porosities obtained from the strain-versus-confining-pressure behavior. Stiff pores that close at higher confining pressures are considered to remain undrained (unrelaxed) while soft pores drain even for high-frequency stress changes. If the pore shape distribution is bimodal, then the rock approximately satisfies the assumptions of a double-porosity, poroelastic material. Berryman and Wang [1995] established linear constitutive equations and identified four different time scales of ow behavior: (1) totally drained, (2) soft pores are drained but stiff pores are undrained, (3) soft and stiff pores are locally equilibrated, but undrained beyond the grain scale, and (4) both soft and stiff pores are undrained. The relative magnitudes of the four associated bulk moduli will be examined for all four moduli and illustrated for several sandstones.

  19. Frequency-dependent performance analysis of a parallel DSP-based computer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christou, Ch. S.

    2014-11-01

    The performance of a shared-memory low-cost high-performance DSP-Based multiprocessor system [3] is investigated, by varying the frequency of the core processor from 200MHz to 1GHZ, in steps of 200 MHZ, and keeping constant parameters such as the shared-memory-access-time and the prefetching-workload-size. The innovation of this Parallel DSP-Based computer system is the introduction of two small programmable small fast memories (Twins) between the processor and the shared bus interconnect. While one memory (Twin) transfers data from/to the shared memory, the other Twin supplies the core DSP-processor with data. Results indicate an increase of the shared-bus bottleneck as the core DSP processors' clock-rate increases. Workload of the Twins is processed faster thus greater the demand of the shared-bus. Results show an effectively supported robust parallel shared-memory system where fewer but faster (clocked with higher frequency) processors produce the same execution times as a greater number of slower processors, with most system configurations achieving perfect speedups, mainly due to the twin-prefetching mechanism.

  20. The Severity, Frequency, and Variety of Crime in Heroin-Dependent Prisoners Enrolled in a Buprenorphine Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Michael S.; Kinlock, Timothy W.; Schwartz, Robert P.; Couvillion, Kathryn A.; O’Grady, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    Data were obtained on four dimensions of criminal activity (frequency, variety, severity, and income) from male and female prisoners (N = 200) with preincarceration heroin dependence who participated in a randomized clinical trial of buprenorphine treatment. The article examines the above-mentioned dimensions of crime and their relationships with demographic characteristics, substance use, legitimate employment, drug treatment episodes, and psychological problems. Results largely show several important similarities to results on previous prison inmate cohorts with histories of heroin addiction, although the present sample may have more of a tendency toward violent crime than earlier cohorts of heroin-dependent offenders. This study’s findings may have implications for the design of appropriate treatment interventions for prisoners with preincarceration heroin dependence that address not only substance use but also criminal activity. PMID:25392564

  1. Time- and Frequency-Dependent Imaging of Nuclear Dynamics in Laser-Excited Nobel-Gas Dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, M.; Kramer, A.; Bartschat, K.; Thumm, U.

    2014-05-01

    We study the nuclear dynamics of noble-gas dimer ions resolved in time using intense ultrashort pump in combination with delayed probe laser pulses. We compare our time-dependent numerical results with those from a complementary description of the same basic dynamics in the frequency domain. This alternative analysis is based on the Fourier transformation of the time- and internuclear-separation-dependent wavefunction probability density or, equivalently, the Fourier transformation of the delay-dependent kinetic-energy-release spectra. Specifically, for pump-laser excited diatomic molecules, it allows for the characterization of their nuclear motion in terms of coherently superimposed stationary vibrational states and the mapping of the laser-dressed nuclear potential curves, thereby supplementing the time-domain formulation, as we will demonstrate for the sequence He2+ to Xe2+ of dimer cations.

  2. Resistance to Change and Frequency of Response-Dependent Stimuli Uncorrelated with Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina; Ward, Ryan D.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2009-01-01

    Stimuli uncorrelated with reinforcement have been shown to enhance response rates and resistance to disruption; however, the effects of different rates of stimulus presentations have not been assessed. In two experiments, we assessed the effects of adding different rates of response-dependent brief stimuli uncorrelated with primary reinforcement…

  3. Frequency-dependent streaming potential of porous media: Experimental measurement of Ottawa sand, Lochaline sand and quartz glass beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Paul; Walker, Emilie; Ruel, Jean; Yagout, Fuad

    2013-04-01

    High quality frequency-dependent streaming potential coefficient measurements have been made upon Ottawa sand, Lochaline sand and glass bead packs using a new apparatus that is based on an electro-magnetic drive. The apparatus operates in the range 1 Hz to 1 kHz with samples of 25.4mm diameter up to 150 mm long. The results have been analysed using theoretical models that are either (i) based upon vibrational mechanics, (ii) treat the geological material as a bundle of capillary tubes, or (iii) treat the material as a porous medium. In each case we have considered the real and imaginary parts of the complex streaming potential coefficient as well as its magnitude. It is clear from the results that the complex streaming potential coefficient does not follow a Debye-type behaviour, differing from the Debye-type behaviour most markedly for frequencies above the transition frequency. The best fit to all the data was provided by the Pride (1994) model and its simplification by Walker and Glover (2010), which is satisfying as this model was conceived for porous media rather than capillary tube bundles. Theory predicts that the transition frequency is related to the inverse square of the effective pore radius. Values for the transition frequency were derived from each of the models for each sample and were found to be in good agreement with those expected from the independently measured effective pore radius of each material. The fit to the Pride model for all four samples was also found to be consistent with the independently measured steady-state permeability, while the value of the streaming potential coefficient in the low-frequency limit was found to be in good agreement with steady-state streaming potential coefficient data measured using a steady-state streaming potential rig as well as the corpus of steady-state determinations for quartz-based samples existing in the literature.

  4. Frequency-dependence of Vmax in K-depolarized guinea pig ventricle: effects of nifedipine and verapamil.

    PubMed

    Woods, J P; West, T C

    1985-01-01

    Right ventricular strips from guinea pig hearts were used to compare the effects of nifedipine and verapamil on the maximal upstroke velocity (Vmax) of rapid depolarization in potassium-depolarized preparations. The Vmax was used as an indirect measure of the slow inward current (Isi). Barium (0.8 mM) was added to the Tyrode solution to restore excitability of the K-depolarized tissue. The effects of nifedipine and verapamil on rested state Vmax (VmaxRS), frequency-dependent changes in Vmax, and recovery of Vmax as a function of diastolic interval were studied. The depression of Vmax at rested state (RS), following 3-5-min rest, was concentration-dependent for both drugs, although the effect of nifedipine was greater. The percentage depression of VmaxRS by nifedipine was 24.3 +/- 6.4 at 10(-8)M, 51.3 +/- 2.6 at 5 X 10(-8)M, and 74.0 +/- 1.0 at 10(-7)M. For verapamil the values were 6.2 +/- 3.8 at 10(-7)M, 13.1 +/- 0.9 at 5 X 10(-7)M, and 42.0 +/- 0.5 at 10(-6)M. The depression of Vmax by each drug was frequency-dependent over a range from 0.05 to 2.0 Hz. Frequency-dependence was quantitatively greater with verapamil. The kinetics of recovery of Vmax were assessed by means of paired stimuli given at varying diastolic intervals during recovery from a RS depolarization. The recovery curve was biexponential. In the drug-free condition, the time constant for the first phase of recovery (Tr1) was 140 +/- 12 ms and the time constant for the second phase (Tr2) was 2689 +/- 146 ms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2580143

  5. Emotion Regulation and Substance Use Frequency in Women with Substance Dependence and Borderline Personality Disorder Receiving Dialectical Behavior Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, Seth R.; Perepletchikova, Francheska; Holtzman, Kevin; Sinha, Rajita

    2011-01-01

    Background Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) identifies emotion dysregulation as central to the dangerous impulsivity of borderline personality disorder (BPD) including substance use disorders, and DBT targets improved emotion regulation as a primary mechanism of change. However, improved emotion regulation with DBT and associations between such improvement and behavioral outcomes such as substance use has not been previously reported. Objective Thus, the goal of this study was to assess for improvement in emotion regulation and to examine the relationship between improvements in the emotion regulation and substance use problems following DBT treatment. Method Emotion regulation as assessed by the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, depressed mood as assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory, and their associations with substance use frequency were investigated in 27 women with substance dependence and BPD receiving 20 weeks of DBT in an academic community outpatient substance abuse treatment program. Results indicated improved emotion regulation, improved mood, and decreased substance use frequency. Further, emotion regulation improvement, but not improved mood, explained the variance of decreased substance use frequency. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate improved emotion regulation in BPD patients treated with DBT and to show that improved emotion regulation can account for increased behavioral control in BPD patients. Significance and Future Research Emotion regulation assessment is recommended for future studies to further clarify the etiology and maintenance of disorders associated with emotional dyregulation such as BPD and substance dependence, and to further explore emotion regulation as a potential mechanism of change for clinical interventions. PMID:21091162

  6. Control strategy for stabilizing force with goal-equivalent joint torques is frequency-dependent during human hopping.

    PubMed

    Yen, Jasper T; Chang, Young-Hui

    2009-01-01

    Normal human locomotion requires the ability to control a complex, redundant neuromechanical system to repetitively cycle the legs in a stable manner. In a reduced paradigm of locomotion, hopping, we investigated the ability of human subjects to exploit motor redundancy in the legs to coordinate joint torques fluctuations to minimize force fluctuations generated against the ground. Although we saw invariant performance in terms of force stabilization across frequencies, we found that the role of joint torque coordination in stabilizing force was most important at slow hopping frequencies. Notably, the role of this coordinated variation strategy decreased as hopping frequency increased, giving way to an independent joint variation strategy. At high frequencies, the control strategy to stabilize force was more dependent on a direct reduction in ankle torque fluctuations. Through the systematic study of how joint-level variances affect task-level end-point function, we can gain insight into the underlying control strategies in place for automatically counteracting cycle-to-cycle deviations during normal human locomotion. PMID:19964783

  7. Frequency-dependent alternating-current scanning electrochemical microscopy (4D AC-SECM) for local visualisation of corrosion sites.

    PubMed

    Eckhard, Kathrin; Erichsen, Thomas; Stratmann, Martin; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    For a better understanding of the initiation of localised corrosion, there is a need for analytical tools that are capable of imaging corrosion pits and precursor sites with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. The lateral electrochemical contrast in alternating-current scanning electrochemical microscopy (AC-SECM) has been found to be highly dependent on the frequency of the applied alternating voltage. In order to be able to obtain data with optimum contrast and high resolution, the AC frequency is swept in a full spectrum at each point in space instead of performing spatially resolved measurements at one fixed perturbation frequency. In doing so, four-dimensional data sets are acquired (4D AC-SECM). Here, we describe the instrument set-up and modus operandi, along with the first results from the imaging of corroding surfaces. Corrosion precursor sites and local defects in protective organic coatings, as well as an actively corroding pit on 304 stainless steel, have been successfully visualised. Since the lateral electrochemical contrast in these images varies with the perturbation frequency, the proposed approach constitutes an indispensable tool for obtaining optimum electrochemical contrast. PMID:18351698

  8. Frequency-dependent viscous flow in channels with fractal rough surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cortis, A.; Berryman, J.G.

    2010-05-01

    The viscous dynamic permeability of some fractal-like channels is studied. For our particular class of geometries, the ratio of the pore surface area-to-volume tends to {infinity} (but has a finite cutoff), and the universal scaling of the dynamic permeability, k({omega}), needs modification. We performed accurate numerical computations of k({omega}) for channels characterized by deterministic fractal wall surfaces, for a broad range of fractal dimensions. The pertinent scaling model for k({omega}) introduces explicitly the fractal dimension of the wall surface for a range of frequencies across the transition between viscous and inertia dominated regimes. The new model provides excellent agreement with our numerical simulations.

  9. Pressureless Mechanical Induction of Stem Cell Differentiation Is Dose and Frequency Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrer, Roland; Hofmann, Sandra; Hild, Nora; Vetsch, Jolanda R.; Herrmann, Inge K.; Grass, Robert N.; Stark, Wendelin J.

    2013-01-01

    Movement is a key characteristic of higher organisms. During mammalian embryogenesis fetal movements have been found critical to normal tissue development. On the single cell level, however, our current understanding of stem cell differentiation concentrates on inducing factors through cytokine mediated biochemical signaling. In this study, human mesenchymal stem cells and chondrogenesis were investigated as representative examples. We show that pressureless, soft mechanical stimulation precipitated by the cyclic deformation of soft, magnetic hydrogel scaffolds with an external magnetic field, can induce chondrogenesis in mesenchymal stem cells without any additional chondrogenesis transcription factors (TGF-β1 and dexamethasone). A systematic study on the role of movement frequency revealed a classical dose-response relationship for human mesenchymal stem cells differentiation towards cartilage using mere mechanical stimulation. This effect could even be synergistically amplified when exogenous chondrogenic factors and movement were combined. PMID:24278427

  10. Bayesian analysis of size-dependent overwinter mortality from size-frequency distributions.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Stephanie M; Kottas, Athanasios; Mangel, Marc

    2010-04-01

    Understanding the relationship between body size and mortality is an important problem in ecology. We introduce a novel Bayesian method that can be used to quantify this relationship when the only data available are size-frequency distributions of unmarked individuals measured at two successive time periods. The inverse Gaussian distribution provides a parametric form for the statistical model development, and we use Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to evaluate posterior distributions. We illustrate the method using data on threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) collected before and after the winter season in an Alaskan lake. Our method allows us to compare the intensity of size-biased mortality in different years. We discuss generalizations that include more complicated relationships between size and survival as well as time-series modeling. PMID:20462116

  11. Unsteady Newton-Busemann flow theory. III - Frequency dependence and indicial response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    Hui and Tobak applied the complete unsteady Newton-Busemann flow theory to the study of dynamic stability of oscillating aerofoils and bodies in revolution. The present article extends the results to general frequencies that may be applicable to flutter analysis. The results are likewise applied to the indicial response fluctuations in unsteady flow at very high Mach numbers. The study shows that for a group of body shapes in Newtonian flow (including the cone and wedge), the aerodynamic response to a step change in angle of attack or pitching velocity contains an initial-instant impulse followed by a rapid adjustment to the new steady-flow conditions. The impulse component is in effect an apparent mass term analogous to that which occurs initially in the aerodynamic indicial response at the zero Mach number limit.

  12. Unsteady Newton-Busemann flow theory. III - Frequency dependence and indicial response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, W. H.

    1982-11-01

    Hui and Tobak applied the complete unsteady Newton-Busemann flow theory to the study of dynamic stability of oscillating aerofoils and bodies in revolution. The present article extends the results to general frequencies that may be applicable to flutter analysis. The results are likewise applied to the indicial response fluctuations in unsteady flow at very high Mach numbers. The study shows that for a group of body shapes in Newtonian flow (including the cone and wedge), the aerodynamic response to a step change in angle of attack or pitching velocity contains an initial-instant impulse followed by a rapid adjustment to the new steady-flow conditions. The impulse component is in effect an apparent mass term analogous to that which occurs initially in the aerodynamic indicial response at the zero Mach number limit.

  13. Potential-dependent sum frequency generation study of 5-methylbenzotriazole on polycrystalline copper, platinum, and gold.

    PubMed

    Romero, Casey; Baldelli, Steven

    2006-06-22

    In situ sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy, at varied potentials and polarization combinations, was performed on polycrystalline copper, polycrystalline platinum, and polycrystalline gold samples in 0.5 M HClO4 with 50 mM 5-methylbenzotriazole (5-methylBTAH) added. These studies were performed to determine the orientation of 5-methylBTAH on the surface at different potentials. For copper surfaces, orientation of the molecule on the surface is not affected by potential within the potential window studied (-500 to -100 mV vs saturated calomel electrode (SCE)). Sum frequency generation spectra of 5-methylBTAH on platinum show a change in orientation over the potential range studied (-250 to 750 mV vs SCE). The orientation of the methyl group tilts more toward the plane of the interface as the potential is scanned in the positive direction. This orientation change is correlated to hydrogen coadsorption on the platinum surface at low potentials. 5-Methylbenzotriazole lies in the surface plane or does not orient on gold at lower potentials but the orientation is tilted toward normal at more positive potentials over the potential range studied (-500 to 900 mV vs SCE). To compliment these results, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements were performed. Cyclic voltammograms of copper show that addition of 5-methylBTAH protects the surface from copper dissolution, increasing the electrochemical window by 450 mV. Cyclic voltammetry of 5-methylBTAH on platinum showed a partial blockage of adsorbed hydrogen and also prevented the adsorption of oxygenated species at 450-600 mV. Cyclic voltammetry on gold shows that 5-methylBTAH blocks oxide formation for 400 mV thus increasing the electrochemical window. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been performed to determine the potential of zero charge of 5-methylBTAH on copper. PMID:16800498

  14. Frequency-Dependent Seismic Waves in Fluid-Saturated Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, V. A.; Goloshubin, G.

    2015-12-01

    Fractures are the natural and essential elements of rock. Fracture systems are the most important features that define rock permeability and strength, as well as their anisotropy properties. Recent advancement in induced fracturing is a core part of the gas/oil shale technology, where fracture monitoring and control became a special topic of interest. Krauklis wave (K-wave) is the result of interaction between a fluid mass and elasticity of fracture walls, and it propagates primarily along the fracture systems in the fluid. At the fracture tips and fracture intersections it partially converts into the body waves. It is quite clear that incorporation of K-waves in a theory of wave propagation in fractured rock is one of the most important problems to solve for understanding of their seismic properties. One of the most fundamental properties of fractured rock is a fractal fracture distribution and it is rarely, if ever, taken into account in existing wave propagation theories. However, this property exists on a widest variety of scales and in particular reveals itself in a form of Gutenberg-Richter Law experimentally proven, starting from laboratory measurements and up to the global seismicity. We computed P and S-wave velocities of the rock containing fluid (and proppant) filled fractures, considering the effect of extremely slow and dispersive wave propagation within individual fractures. This was made possible by introducing the concept of "effective fracture-wave volume," and by evaluating the elastic constants of rock containing a complex, fractal network of fractures. These velocities were used to compute seismic waves reflected normally from a fractured reservoir. We demonstrate that by taking into account the Krauklis wave phenomenon for the fractally distributed fluid-filled fractures, it is possible to explain the observed low-frequency anomalies above the underground natural reservoirs. These anomalies include increase of amplitude and a phase delay of

  15. Perceptual Qualities of Ethanol Depend on Concentration, and Variation in These Percepts Associates with Drinking Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Nolden, Alissa A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ethanol, the pharmaceutically active ingredient in all alcoholic beverages, elicits multiple percepts including sweet, bitter, drying, and burning. However, quality-specific perceptual dose-response functions have not been previously reported. Also, individual differences in ethanol perception may associate with differences in alcoholic beverage use. Here, we describe the chemosensory profile of ethanol across concentrations in a convenience sample of mixed-age adults; secondarily, we explore whether individual differences in various qualities from ethanol associate with alcohol use behaviors. Methods Participants (n=100, 33 men) aged 21 to 55 (mean 33 years) tasted ethanol in water (4, 8, 16, 32, and 48 % v/v) and rated sweetness, bitterness, drying, and burning/tingling on four general Labeled Magnitude Scales. Demographic question and alcohol use measures (years drinking and reported frequency of drinking occasions) were also collected. Results Intensity of most qualities increased as a function of ethanol concentration, although the dominant sensation differed with concentration. The dominant sensation for 8 and 16 % ethanol was bitterness (7.4±1.0; 13.5±1.4), whereas for 32 and 48 % ethanol, burning/tingling was the dominant sensation (29.7±2.1; 44.7±2.4). Variation in quality-specific intensities of sampled ethanol explained variability in the reported intake frequency for beer, wine, straight spirits, and number of drinking occasions. The number of years reported drinking (grand mean 10.5±0.8) was not significantly associated with perceptual ratings for sampled ethanol. Conclusions In a convenience sample of mixed-aged adults, the sensations from suprathreshold ethanol varied by concentration: bitterness dominated at lower concentrations, while burn dominated at higher concentrations. Exploratory analyses also suggest that differences in chemosensory responses across participants may associate with measures of alcohol use. PMID:27594968

  16. Dielectric spectra of ionic water-in-oil microemulsions below percolation: Frequency dependence behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cametti, C.

    2010-03-01

    We have investigated the dielectric properties of water-in-oil microemulsions composed of sodium bis(2-ethyl-hexyl)sulfosuccinate, water, and decane, using radiofrequency impedance spectroscopy, below the percolation threshold, where the system behaves as surfactant-coated individual water droplets dispersed in a continuous oil phase. The analysis of the dielectric spectra has evidenced that the whole dielectric response below percolation is due to two different contributions, which give rise to two partially overlapping dielectric relaxations, approximately in the frequency range from 10 to 500 MHz. The first of these mechanisms is originated by the bulk polarization of counterions distributed in the electrical double layer of the droplet interior. The second mechanism is associated with a correlated motion of the anionic head groups SO3- at the surfactant-water interface. The introduction of this latter contribution allows us to justify the experimentally observed increase in the low-frequency permittivity as a function of temperature up to temperatures very close to percolation. The present study shows that deviations from the expected values on the basis of dielectric theories of heterogeneous systems (Maxwell-Wagner effect) observed when percolation is approaching can be accounted for, in a reasonable way, by the introduction of a further polarization mechanism, which involves the anionic surfactant groups. Only very close to percolation, when microemulsions undergo a scaling behavior, deviations of the permittivity (and electrical conductivity as well) are a print of the structural rearrangement of the whole system and models based on colloidal particle suspension theories fail. Even if the whole picture of the dielectric properties of microemulsion systems does not change in deep, nevertheless, the refinement introduced in this paper demonstrates how different polarization mechanisms could be simultaneously present in these rather complex systems and, above

  17. Dependence of vestibular reactions on frequency of action of sign-variable accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapayev, E. V.; Vorobyev, O. A.; Ivanov, V. V.

    1980-01-01

    It was revealed that during the tests with continuous action of sign variable Coriolis acceleration the development of kinetosis was proportionate to the time of head inclinations in the range of 1 to 4 seconds while illusions of rocking in sagittal plane was more expressed in fast inclinations. The obtained data provided the evidence of sufficient dependence of vestibulovegetative and vestibulosensory reactions on the period of repetition of sign variable Coriolis acceleration.

  18. Phase-dependent interference between frequency doubled comb lines in a χ(2) phase-matched aluminum nitride microring.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hojoong; Guo, Xiang; Zhu, Na; Papp, Scott B; Diddams, Scott A; Tang, Hong X

    2016-08-15

    Nonlinear optical conversion with frequency combs is important for self-referencing and for generating shorter wavelength combs. Here we demonstrate efficient frequency comb doubling through the combination of second-harmonic generation (SHG) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) of an input comb with a high Q, phase-matched χ(2) microring resonator. Phase coherence of the SHG and SFG nonlinear conversion processes is confirmed by sinusoidal phase-dependent interference between frequency doubled comb lines. PMID:27519079

  19. Size-, electric-field-, and frequency-dependent third-order nonlinear optical properties of hydrogenated silicon nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haipeng; Xu, Hu; Shen, Xiaopeng; Han, Kui; Bi, Zetong; Xu, Runfeng

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the electronic properties and second hyperpolarizabilities of hydrogenated silicon nanoclusters (H-SiNCs) by using the density functional theory method. The effects of cluster size, external electric field and incident frequency on the second hyperpolarizability were also examined, respectively. We found that small H-SiNCs exhibit large second hyperpolarizability. With the increase of the number of silicon atoms in H-SiNCs, the frontier molecular orbital energy gap decreases, attributed to the enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability. Interestingly, we also found the electric-field-induced gigantic enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability for H-SiNCs due to the change of electron density distributions. In addition, our results demonstrate a significant dependence on the frequency of incident light.

  20. Experimental and theoretical analysis of THz-frequency, direction-dependent, phonon polariton modes in a subwavelength, anisotropic slab waveguide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chengliang; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Jingjun; Nelson, Keith A; Werley, Christopher A

    2010-12-01

    Femtosecond optical pulses were used to generate THz-frequency phonon polariton waves in a 50 micrometer lithium niobate slab, which acts as a subwavelength, anisotropic planar waveguide. The spatial and temporal electric field profiles of the THz waves were recorded for different propagation directions using a polarization gating imaging system, and experimental dispersion curves were determined via a two-dimensional Fourier transform. Dispersion relations for an anisotropic slab waveguide were derived via analytical analysis and found to be in excellent agreement with all observed experimental modes. From the dispersion relations, we analyze the propagation-direction-dependent behavior, effective refractive index values, and generation efficiencies for THz-frequency modes in the subwavelength, anisotropic slab waveguide. PMID:21164986