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Sample records for absolute gravity stations

  1. Continuous Gravity Monitoring in South America with Superconducting and Absolute Gravimeters: More than 12 years time series at station TIGO/Concepcion (Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wziontek, Hartmut; Falk, Reinhard; Hase, Hayo; Armin, Böer; Andreas, Güntner; Rongjiang, Wang

    2016-04-01

    As part of the Transportable Integrated Geodetic Observatory (TIGO) of BKG, the superconducting gravimeter SG 038 was set up in December 2002 at station Concepcion / Chile to record temporal gravity variations with highest precision. Since May 2006 the time series was supported by weekly observations with the absolute gravimeter FG5-227, proving the large seasonal variations of up to 30 μGal and establishing a gravity reference station in South America. With the move of the whole observatory to the new location near to La Plata / Argentina the series was terminated. Results of almost continuously monitoring gravity variations for more than 12 years are presented. Seasonal variations are interpreted with respect of global and local water storage changes and the impact of the 8.8 Maule Earthquake in February 2010 is discussed.

  2. The AFGL absolute gravity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. A.; Iliff, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A brief discussion of the AFGL's (Air Force Geophysics Laboratory) program in absolute gravity is presented. Support of outside work and in-house studies relating to gravity instrumentation are discussed. A description of the current transportable system is included and the latest results are presented. These results show good agreement with measurements at the AFGL site by an Italian system. The accuracy obtained by the transportable apparatus is better than 0.1 microns sq sec 10 microgal and agreement with previous measurements is within the combined uncertainties of the measurements.

  3. Global absolut gravity reference system as replacement of IGSN 71

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmes, Herbert; Wziontek, Hartmut; Falk, Reinhard

    2015-04-01

    The determination of precise gravity field parameters is of great importance in a period in which earth sciences are achieving the necessary accuracy to monitor and document global change processes. This is the reason why experts from geodesy and metrology joined in a successful cooperation to make absolute gravity observations traceable to SI quantities, to improve the metrological kilogram definition and to monitor mass movements and smallest height changes for geodetic and geophysical applications. The international gravity datum is still defined by the International Gravity Standardization Net adopted in 1971 (IGSN 71). The network is based upon pendulum and spring gravimeter observations taken in the 1950s and 60s supported by the early free fall absolute gravimeters. Its gravity values agreed in every case to better than 0.1 mGal. Today, more than 100 absolute gravimeters are in use worldwide. The series of repeated international comparisons confirms the traceability of absolute gravity measurements to SI quantities and confirm the degree of equivalence of the gravimeters in the order of a few µGal. For applications in geosciences where e.g. gravity changes over time need to be analyzed, the temporal stability of an absolute gravimeter is most important. Therefore, the proposition is made to replace the IGSN 71 by an up-to-date gravity reference system which is based upon repeated absolute gravimeter comparisons and a global network of well controlled gravity reference stations.

  4. Four Years of Absolute Gravity in the Taiwan Orogen (AGTO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouyen, M.; Masson, F.; Hwang, C.; Cheng, C.; Le Moigne, N.; Lee, C.; Kao, R.; Hsieh, N.

    2009-12-01

    AGTO is a scientific project between Taiwanese and French institutes which aim is to improve tectonic knowledge of Taiwan primarily using absolute gravity measurements and permanent GPS stations. Both tools are indeed useful to study vertical movements and mass transfers involved in mountain building, a major process in Taiwan located at the convergent margin between Philippine Sea plate and Eurasian plate. This convergence results in two subductions north and south of Taiwan (Ryukyu and Manilla trenches, respectively), while the center is experiencing collision. These processes make Taiwan very active tectonically, as illustrated by numerous large earthquakes and rapid uplift of the Central Range. High slopes of Taiwan mountains and heavy rains brought by typhoons together lead to high landslides and mudflows risks. Practically, absolute gravity measurements have been yearly repeated since 2006 along a transect across south Taiwan, from Penghu to Lutao island, using FG5 absolute gravimeters. This transect contains ten sites for absolute measurements and has been densified in 2008 by incorporating 45 sites for relative gravity measurements with CG5 gravimeters. At the end of 2009, the relative gravity network will be densified again in its eastern part, i.e. in the Longitudinal Valley and the Central Range. A fourth set of absolute gravity measurements will also be performed at the same period. Most of the absolute sites have been measured with a good accuracy, about 1 or 2 μGal. Only the site located in Tainan University has higher standard deviation, due to the city noise. The stronger change in gravity reaches -7 μGal a -1 west of the Longitudinal Valley and might be explained by tectonic movement along a fault. A large decrease of -5 μGal a-1 is also measured in Tainan city and could be correlated with uplift of this region, also denoted by InSAR, leveling and GPS. Changes occurring in the Central Range are more difficult to interpret due to the small

  5. The National Geodetic Survey absolute gravity program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, George; Moose, Robert E.; Wessells, Claude W.

    1989-03-01

    The National Geodetic Survey absolute gravity program will utilize the high precision afforded by the JILAG-4 instrument to support geodetic and geophysical research, which involves studies of vertical motions, identification and modeling of other temporal variations, and establishment of reference values. The scientific rationale of these objectives is given, the procedures used to collect gravity and environmental data in the field are defined, and the steps necessary to correct and remove unwanted environmental effects are stated. In addition, site selection criteria, methods of concomitant environmental data collection and relative gravity observations, and schedule and logistics are discussed.

  6. The Austrian absolute gravity base net: 27 years of spatial and temporal acquisition of gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Christian; Ruess, Diethard

    2014-05-01

    Since 1987 the BEV (Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying) has been operating the absolute gravimeters JILAg-6 and FG5 which are used for basic measurements to determine or review fundamental gravity stations in Austria and abroad. Overall more than 70 absolute gravity stations were installed in Austria and neighbouring countries and some of them have been regularly monitored. A few stations are part of international projects like ECGN (European Combined Geodetic network) and UNIGRACE (Unification of Gravity System in Central and Eastern Europe). As a national metrology institute (NMI) the Metrology Service of the BEV maintains the national standards for the realisation of the legal units of measurement and ensures their international equivalence and recognition. Thus the BEV maintains the national standard for gravimetry in Austria, which is validated and confirmed by international comparisons. Since 1989 the Austrian absolute gravimeters participated seven times in the ICAG's (International Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters) at the BIPM in Paris and Luxemburg and as well participated three times at the ECAG (European Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters) in Luxemburg. The results of these ICAG's and especially the performance of the Austrian absolute gravimeter are reported in this presentation. We also present some examples and interpretation of long time monitoring stations of absolute gravity in several Austrian locations. Some stations are located in large cities like Vienna and Graz and some others are situated in mountainous regions. Mountain stations are at the Conrad Observatory where a SG (Superconducting Gravimeter) is permanently monitoring and in Obergurgl (Tyrolia) at an elevation of approx. 2000 m which is very strong influenced from the glacier retreat.

  7. Four Years of Absolute Gravity in the Taiwan Orogen (AGTO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouyen, Maxime; Masson, Frédéric; Hwang, Cheinway; Cheng, Ching-Chung; Le Moigne, Nicolas; Lee, Chiung-Wu; Kao, Ricky; Hsieh, Nicky

    2010-05-01

    AGTO is a scientific project between Taiwanese and French institutes, which aim is to improve tectonic knowledge of Taiwan primarily using absolute gravity measurements and permanent GPS stations. Both tools are indeed useful to study vertical movements and mass transfers involved in mountain building, a major process in Taiwan located at the convergent margin between Philippine Sea plate and Eurasian plate. This convergence results in two subductions north and south of Taiwan (Ryukyu and Manilla trenches, respectively), while the center is experiencing collision. These processes make Taiwan very active tectonically, as illustrated by numerous large earthquakes and rapid uplift of the Central Range. High slopes of Taiwan mountains and heavy rains brought by typhoons together lead to high landslides and mudflows risks. Practically, absolute gravity measurements have been yearly repeated since 2006 along a transect across south Taiwan, from Penghu to Lutao islands, using FG5 absolute gravimeters. This transect contains ten sites for absolute measurements and has been densified in 2008 by incorporating 45 sites for relative gravity measurements with CG5 gravimeters. The last relative and absolute measurements have been performed in November 2009. Most of the absolute sites have been measured with a good accuracy, about 1 or 2 ?Gal. Only the site located in Tainan University has higher standard deviation, due to the city noise. We note that absolute gravity changes seem to follow a trend in every site. However, straightforward tectonic interpretation of these trends is not valuable as many non-tectonic effects are supposed to change g with time, like groundwater or erosion. Estimating and removing these effects leads to a tectonic gravity signal, which has theoretically two origins : deep mass transfers around the site and vertical movements of the station. The latter can be well constrained by permanent GPS stations located close to the measurement pillar. Deep mass

  8. Time dependent corrections to absolute gravity determinations in the establishment of modern gravity control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykowski, Przemyslaw; Krynski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The establishment of modern gravity control with the use of exclusively absolute method of gravity determination has significant advantages as compared to the one established mostly with relative gravity measurements (e.g. accuracy, time efficiency). The newly modernized gravity control in Poland consists of 28 fundamental stations (laboratory) and 168 base stations (PBOG14 - located in the field). Gravity at the fundamental stations was surveyed with the FG5-230 gravimeter of the Warsaw University of Technology, and at the base stations - with the A10-020 gravimeter of the Institute of Geodesy and Cartography, Warsaw. This work concerns absolute gravity determinations at the base stations. Although free of common relative measurement errors (e.g. instrumental drift) and effects of network adjustment, absolute gravity determinations for the establishment of gravity control require advanced corrections due to time dependent factors, i.e. tidal and ocean loading corrections, atmospheric corrections and hydrological corrections that were not taken into account when establishing the previous gravity control in Poland. Currently available services and software allow to determine high accuracy and high temporal resolution corrections for atmospheric (based on digital weather models, e.g. ECMWF) and hydrological (based on hydrological models, e.g. GLDAS/Noah) gravitational and loading effects. These corrections are mostly used for processing observations with Superconducting Gravimeters in the Global Geodynamics Project. For the area of Poland the atmospheric correction based on weather models can differ from standard atmospheric correction by even ±2 µGal. The hydrological model shows the annual variability of ±8 µGal. In addition the standard tidal correction may differ from the one obtained from the local tidal model (based on tidal observations). Such difference at Borowa Gora Observatory reaches the level of ±1.5 µGal. Overall the sum of atmospheric and

  9. Observing absolute gravity change in the Fennoscandian postglacial rebound area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, J.; Engfeldt, A.; Gitlein, O.; Kaminskis, J.; Klopping, F.; Oja, T.; Paršeliunas, E.; Pettersen, B. R.; Strykowski, G.; Wilmes, H.

    2009-04-01

    Absolute gravity measurements in the Fennoscandian postglacial rebound area started already in 1976 when a team from Istituto di Metrología "G. Colonnetti" (Torino) measured six stations with the rise-and-fall gravimeter IMGC (Cannizzo et al., 1978). In 1980 two stations were measured by the team of the AN SSSR from Novosibirsk, using the gravimeter GABL (Arnautov et al., 1982). From the beginning the goal was to establish reference values for future remeasurement in order to detect gravity change due to the postglacial rebound. The maximum uplift rates are 1 cm/yr, which implies a surface gravity change of about -2 microgal/yr. In 1988, regular repeat measurements were began by the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI) with the JILAg-5. An important advance was the introduction of FG5 gravimeters into the work by BKG (Frankfurt a/M) and NOAA (Boulder, CO) in 1993. In 2003 annual large-scale campaigns with FG5 gravimeters started, coordinated by the Working Group for Geodynamics of the Nordic Geodetic Commission (NKG). This was prompted by the launch of the GRACE satellite gravity mission, which made it important to collect a comprehensive set of ground-truth values of gravity change during the lifetime of the satellite pair. The initial participation by gravimeter teams of Leibniz Universität Hannover, FGI and BKG has since expanded to include the University of Life Sciences (Ås, Norway) and Lantmäteriet (Gävle, Sweden). At present some 50 sites have repeated absolute measurements and most of them are co-located with continuous GPS. We give an overview of the sites, instrumentation and campaigns, and show examples of results achieved so far.

  10. The Path to an Up-to-date Absolute Gravity Reference System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmes, H.; Falk, R.; Wziontek, H.

    2014-12-01

    The determination of precise gravity field parameters is of great importance in a period in which earth sciences are achieving the necessary accuracy to monitor and document global change processes. This is the reason why experts from geodesy and metrology joined in a successful cooperation to make absolute gravity observations traceable to SI quantities, to improve the metrological kilogram definition and to monitor mass movements and smallest height changes for geodetic and geophysical applications. How can we determine such a gravity reference system and secure it over multiple decades? Precise knowledge of the gravity acceleration and definition of standards, models and corrections are an important prerequisite to the definition of the gravity system. Over more than three decades, the absolute gravity community cooperated successfully to obtain the gravity reference in comparisons at intervals of 4 years and to certify metrological equivalence between National Metrology Institutes. With increasing resolution of the absolute gravimeter sensors and new measurement principles it becomes obvious that such comparisons are not sufficient for all applications. Mainly for geodetic purposes it is necessary to sub-divide comparison intervals and maintain a connected network of gravity reference sites where compared absolute gravimeters operate together with superconducting gravimeters to derive a continuous gravity reference function. By means of this distributed monitoring of the gravity reference it will also be possible to relate observations of earlier absolute gravimeters to the present-day and to future instruments. It will be possible to include new sensors like atom interferometers and in future to relate the results of precise optical clocks. With co-located space geodetic sensors like GNSS, SLR and VLBI, these reference sites fulfill the conditions of a geodetic fundamental station as a component of IAG's Global Geodetic Observing System.

  11. Absolute Gravity Datum in the Age of Cold Atom Gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, V. A.; Eckl, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The international gravity datum is defined today by the International Gravity Standardization Net of 1971 (IGSN-71). The data supporting this network was measured in the 1950s and 60s using pendulum and spring-based gravimeter ties (plus some new ballistic absolute meters) to replace the prior protocol of referencing all gravity values to the earlier Potsdam value. Since this time, gravimeter technology has advanced significantly with the development and refinement of the FG-5 (the current standard of the industry) and again with the soon-to-be-available cold atom interferometric absolute gravimeters. This latest development is anticipated to provide improvement in the range of two orders of magnitude as compared to the measurement accuracy of technology utilized to develop ISGN-71. In this presentation, we will explore how the IGSN-71 might best be "modernized" given today's requirements and available instruments and resources. The National Geodetic Survey (NGS), along with other relevant US Government agencies, is concerned about establishing gravity control to establish and maintain high order geodetic networks as part of the nation's essential infrastructure. The need to modernize the nation's geodetic infrastructure was highlighted in "Precise Geodetic Infrastructure, National Requirements for a Shared Resource" National Academy of Science, 2010. The NGS mission, as dictated by Congress, is to establish and maintain the National Spatial Reference System, which includes gravity measurements. Absolute gravimeters measure the total gravity field directly and do not involve ties to other measurements. Periodic "intercomparisons" of multiple absolute gravimeters at reference gravity sites are used to constrain the behavior of the instruments to ensure that each would yield reasonably similar measurements of the same location (i.e. yield a sufficiently consistent datum when measured in disparate locales). New atomic interferometric gravimeters promise a significant

  12. Differential results integrated with continuous and discrete gravity measurements between nearby stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weimin; Chen, Shi; Lu, Hongyan

    2016-04-01

    Integrated gravity is an efficient way in studying spatial and temporal characteristics of the dynamics and tectonics. Differential measurements based on the continuous and discrete gravity observations shows highly competitive in terms of both efficiency and precision with single result. The differential continuous gravity variation between the nearby stations, which is based on the observation of Scintrex g-Phone relative gravimeters in every single station. It is combined with the repeated mobile relative measurements or absolute results to study the regional integrated gravity changes. Firstly we preprocess the continuous records by Tsoft software, and calculate the theoretical earth tides and ocean tides by "MT80TW" program through high precision tidal parameters from "WPARICET". The atmospheric loading effects and complex drift are strictly considered in the procedure. Through above steps we get the continuous gravity in every station and we can calculate the continuous gravity variation between nearby stations, which is called the differential continuous gravity changes. Then the differential results between related stations is calculated based on the repeated gravity measurements, which are carried out once or twice every year surrounding the gravity stations. Hence we get the discrete gravity results between the nearby stations. Finally, the continuous and discrete gravity results are combined in the same related stations, including the absolute gravity results if necessary, to get the regional integrated gravity changes. This differential gravity results is more accurate and effective in dynamical monitoring, regional hydrologic effects studying, tectonic activity and other geodynamical researches. The time-frequency characteristics of continuous gravity results are discussed to insure the accuracy and efficiency in the procedure.

  13. Gravity change from repeated absolute measurements in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania 1994-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, J.; Bilker-Koivula, M.; Falk, R.; Gitlein, O.; Kaminskis, J.; Lapushka, K.; Oja, T.; Paršeliunas, E.; Petroškevičius, P.; Timmen, L.

    2009-04-01

    Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania belong to the margin of the Fennoscandian postglacial rebound (PGR) area. Vertical rates predicted by PGR models are in the range 0 to +3 mm/yr. Our first absolute gravity campaigns in the area were performed with the JILAg-5 gravimeter in 1994-1995 when three stations were measured in each country. All three stations in Lithuania were repeated with the JILAg-5 in 2002 and one of them (Vilnius) with the FG5#221 gravimeter in 2007. In Latvia one station (Riga) was remeasured with the FG5#101 and FG5#107 (D. Stizza, NIMA) in 1986 and with the FG5#221 in 2007. In Estonia two of the stations (Suurupi and Töravere) were remeasured with the FG5#220 in 2007 and with the FG5#221 in 2008, the third (Kuressaare) was only remeasured in 2008 with the FG5#221. This amounts to seven repeated stations with time spans of 8-13 years. In interpreting gravity change, special attention must be paid to subsurface water storage, as (due to inaccessibility of crystalline bedrock) many stations are on thick sediments, the repeat measurements were partly made in different seasons, and in some cases there is evidence of strong interannual variation in hydrology. We discuss the constraints to PGR implied by the observed gravity change and compare it with PGR models and with available observations of vertical motion.

  14. Measured and modelled absolute gravity changes in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, J. Emil; Forsberg, Rene; Strykowski, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    In glaciated areas, the Earth is responding to the ongoing changes of the ice sheets, a response known as glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). GIA can be investigated through observations of gravity change. For the ongoing assessment of the ice sheets mass balance, where satellite data are used, the study of GIA is important since it acts as an error source. GIA consists of three signals as seen by a gravimeter on the surface of the Earth. These signals are investigated in this study. The ICE-5G ice history and recently developed ice models of present day changes are used to model the gravity change in Greenland. The result is compared with the initial measurements of absolute gravity (AG) change at selected Greenland Network (GNET) sites.

  15. Hydrology and Gravity at the Membach Station, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Camp, M.; Dassargues, A.; Vanclooster, M.; Crommen, O.; Petermans, T.; Vanneste, K.; Verbeeck, K.; Meurers, B.

    2005-12-01

    This paper investigates hydrological processes and their influence on gravity at the underground Membach station (eastern Belgium), where absolute (AG) and superconducting (SG) gravity measurements have been performed since 1996. Seasonal and short term effects are observed. The 3 μGal seasonal effect reflects long-wavelength component of annual continental water storage variations. The short-term effects consist of fast gravity decrease lasting minutes to a few days. These variations are anticorrelated with rainfall events in 80 % of the cases. The largest decrease was 4 muGal after a significant rainfall (150 mm in 3 days). Apart from rainfall, the Newtonian effect of vertical air mass distribution plays also an essential role (Meurers et al., this session). The gravity station was excavated in low-porosity argillaceous sandstone. Geophysical prospecting showed that the thickness of the weathered zone covering this bedrock can be highly variable between zero and 10 meters. In 2004, soil moisture and temperature probes were installed in the shallow upper 60 cm partially saturated soil, 45 m above the station. Based on a digital elevation model and geological studies, we investigated the soil moisture data and their relationships with high temporal resolution rainfall and gravity time series. This work can be essential to correct local effects that can mask regional effects such as changes in continental water storage. Local effects, indeed, could prevent the combination of satellite data (e.g. GRACE) with ground-based gravity measurements. On the other hand, studying the local seasonal variations also contributes to investigate the influence of the water storage variations in small river basins on the time dependent gravity field.

  16. Constraints on the Mid-Continent Deformation Gravity Gradient Determined from Co-located GPS and Absolute Gravity Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, T. S.; Mazzotti, S.; Mazzotti, S.; Lambert, A.

    2001-12-01

    The deformation gravity gradient (DGG) is the ratio of the time rate of change of surface gravity to vertical crustal velocity. Different processes generate different theoretical predictions of the DGG. Consequently, observational constraints on the DGG are necessary to link crustal uplift observations to satellite-derived observations of the time rate of change of the Earth's gravitational field, which will be generated by upcoming satellite missions such as GRACE. Larson and van Dam (2000) have compared secular gravity trends from 4 sites in interior North America to crustal uplift rates obtained from global point-positioning analyses of GPS observations, and found they agree, assuming a nominal DGG value appropriate to postglacial rebound of -0.15 μ Gal/mm (Wahr et al., 1995). Here we revisit and extend their analysis in order to determine the observational constraints on the DGG in mid-continent North America. We use recently published gravity rates derived from significantly more absolute gravity observations and a different GPS analysis scheme. Lambert et al. (2001) have published secular gravity rates for 7 sites in mid-continent North America, using all available absolute gravity observations and allowing for instrumental offsets. The sites, chosen to sample postglacial rebound, lie on a transect from Churchill, Manitoba, located on Hudson Bay, to North Liberty, Iowa. Four of these sites (Churchill, Flin Flon, Lac du Bonnet, and North Liberty) also feature a nearby GPS station. The GPS observations were analyzed using double differencing with Bernese 4.2, yielding 5 year time series for vertical position. The daily repeatabilities of 5 to 9 mm compare well to the weekly repeatabilities of 7-8 mm reported by Larson and van Dam (2000). A comparison of the vertical rates derived from these time series to the secular solid-surface gravity trends finds a DGG of -0.14 +/- 0.06 μ Gal/mm. This value is in good agreement with model predictions for postglacial

  17. Separating climate-induced mass transfers and instrumental effects from tectonic signal in repeated absolute gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Camp, M.; Viron, O.; Avouac, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    We estimate the signature of the climate-induced mass transfers in repeated absolute gravity measurements based on satellite gravimetric measurements from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. We show results at the globe scale and compare them with repeated absolute gravity (AG) time behavior in three zones where AG surveys have been published: Northwestern Europe, Canada, and Tibet. For 10 yearly campaigns, the uncertainties affecting the determination of a linear gravity rate of change range 3-4 nm/s2/a in most cases, in the absence of instrumental artifacts. The results are consistent with what is observed for long-term repeated campaigns. We also discuss the possible artifact that can result from using short AG survey to determine the tectonic effects in a zone of high hydrological variability. We call into question the tectonic interpretation of several gravity changes reported from stations in Tibet, in particular the variation observed prior to the 2015 Gorkha earthquake.

  18. Using absolute gravimeter data to determine vertical gravity gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    The position versus time data from a free-fall absolute gravimeter can be used to estimate the vertical gravity gradient in addition to the gravity value itself. Hipkin has reported success in estimating the vertical gradient value using a data set of unusually good quality. This paper explores techniques that may be applicable to a broader class of data that may be contaminated with "system response" errors of larger magnitude than were evident in the data used by Hipkin. This system response function is usually modelled as a sum of exponentially decaying sinusoidal components. The technique employed here involves combining the x0, v0 and g parameters from all the drops made during a site occupation into a single least-squares solution, and including the value of the vertical gradient and the coefficients of system response function in the same solution. The resulting non-linear equations must be solved iteratively and convergence presents some difficulties. Sparse matrix techniques are used to make the least-squares problem computationally tractable.

  19. a Portable Apparatus for Absolute Measurements of the Earth's Gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumberge, Mark Andrew

    We have developed a new, portable apparatus for making absolute measurements of the acceleration due to the earth's gravity. We use the method of interferometrically determining the acceleration of a freely falling corner -cube prism. The falling object is surrounded by a chamber which is driven vertically inside a fixed vacuum chamber. This falling chamber is servoed to track the falling corner -cube to shield it from drag due to background gas. In addition, the drag-free falling chamber removes the need for a magnetic release, shields the falling object from electrostatic forces, and provides a means of both gently arresting the falling object and quickly returning it to its start position, to allow rapid acquisition of data. A synthesized long period isolation device reduces the noise due to seismic oscillations. A new type of Zeeman laser is used as the light source in the interferometer, and is compared with the wavelength of an iodine stabilized laser. The times of occurrence of 45 interference fringes are measured to within 0.2 nsec over a 20 cm drop and are fit to a quadratic by an on-line minicomputer. 150 drops can be made in ten minutes resulting in a value of g having a precision of 3 to 6 parts in 10('9). Systematic errors have been determined to be less than 5 parts in 10('9) through extensive tests. Three months of gravity data have been obtained with a reproducibility ranging from 5 to 10 parts in 10('9). The apparatus has been designed to be easily portable. Field measurements are planned for the immediate future. An accuracy of 6 parts in 10('9) corresponds to a height sensitivity of 2 cm. Vertical motions in the earth's crust and tectonic density changes that may precede earthquakes are to be investigated using this apparatus.

  20. Combined absolute and relative gravity measurement for microgravity monitoring in Aso volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofyan, Yayan; Nishijima, Jun; Yoshikawa, Shin; Fujimitsu, Yasuhiro; Kagiyama, Tsuneomi; Fukuda, Yoichi

    2014-05-01

    Absolute measurement with a portable A10-017 absolute gravimeter at some benchmarks in the Aso volcanic field are valuable for reducing uncertainties of regional gravity variations and will be useful for delineating the long term trends of gravity changes. A10 absolute gravimeter is a new generation of portable absolute instrument and has accuracy 10 microGal. To further the development of a high precision gravity data, we also conducted measurement using two relative gravimeter (Scintrex CG-5 [549] and LaCoste type G-1016) to be combined with an A10 absolute gravimeter. The using absolute gravimeter along with relative gravimeter can reduce drift correction factor and improve the result of gravity change data in microgravity monitoring. Microgravity monitoring is a valued tool for mapping the redistribution of subsurface mass and for assessing changes in the fluid as a dynamic process in volcanic field. Gravity changes enable the characterization of subsurface processes: i.e., the mass of the intrusion or hydrothermal flow. A key assumption behind gravity monitoring is that changes in earth's gravity reflect mass-transport processes at depth [1]. The absolute gravity network was installed at seven benchmarks using on May 2010, which re-occupied in October 2010, and June 2011. The relative gravity measurements were performed at 28 benchmarks in one month before the eruption on May 2011 and then followed by series of gravity monitoring after the eruption in every three to five months. Gravity measurements covered the area more than 60 km2 in the west side of Aso caldera. Some gravity benchmarks were measured using both absolute and relative gravimeter and is used as the reference benchmarks. In longer time period, the combined gravity method will improve the result of gravity change data for monitoring in the Aso volcanic field. As a result, the gravity changes detected the hydrothermal flow in the subsurface which has a correlation to water level fluctuation in the

  1. Absolute gravity measurements in Southeast Alaska and continuous gravity observation in Juneau by ISEA2 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Kazama, T.; Miura, S.; Ohta, Y.; Okubo, S.; Fujimoto, H.; Kaufman, M.; Herreid, S. J.; Larsen, C. F.; Freymueller, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    It is known that Southeast Alaska (SE-AK) shows a large uplift rates exceeding 32 mm/year at the maximum mainly due to the three ice changes in ages, i.e. in the Large Glacier Maximum, the Little Ice Age and the present day. Comparisons between rates of change obtained from GPS and absolute gravimeter (AG) observations and the rates predicted by model computations based on independently estimated ice mass changes indicate the existence of a very thin lithosphere (on the order of 60 km) and a low viscousity upper mantle (on the order of 1.E18 Pa s) beneath SE-AK (Larsen et al., 2005; Sato et al, 2011; Sato et al., 2012). On the other hand, it is also known that there are very large oceanic tidal loading effects in SE-AK, i.e. exceeding 2.7 cm and 8 microGals for the M2 constituent of the vertical displacement and gravity, respectively (Sato et al., 2008; Inazu et al., 2009; Sun et al., 2010; Sato et al., 2012). These regional large loading and unloading effects provide good signals to study the viscoelastic structure beneath SE-AK. A joint observation project (ISEA2) between Japan and USA groups has restarted as a five years project beginning in 2012. In June 2012, we conducted the AG measurements at the 6 sites in SE-AK at where the AG measurements were conducted by the previous ISEA1 project (Sun et al., 2010). Continuous gravity observation started also on June 2012 with a portable super conducting gravimeter (iGrav) at the EGAN library of UAS. We will introduce the results for these observations and comparisons with the previous observations and model computations. It is noted that the precipitation during the period from the winter in 2011 to the spring in 2012 was very large compared with the usual amount. We evaluate this effect on our gravity observations with a hydrological model computation (Kazama and Okubo, 2009) using the observed precipitation data as an input data. The observation with the iGrav super conducting gravimeter shall give us a useful data

  2. Variable artificial gravity facility for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The project selected by the U.S. Naval Academy and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for the 1986-87 NASA/USRA University Advanced Design Program was a variable artificial gravity facility, an adjunct to the Space Station. Recently, Goddard Space Flight Center had proposed that a formal study be conducted by NASA to investigate the question of whether an artificial gravity capability should be added to the Space Station. Therefore, not only does this project fit the goals of the Design Program, but it was a timely and interesting project. The variable artificial gravity was generated by a spinning module, and became an adjunct to the Space Station. It was planned that as much of the Space Station technology as possible be incorporated into the design. The components of the system were inserted into orbit. The specific design parameters were essentially open. The primary design objectives were: (1) The highest gravity level sufficient to prevent bone calcium loss in astronauts. (2) The cost of the Space Station should not be increased by more than 20 percent. (3) The number of launches to orbit the Space Station should not be increased by more than 30 percent. A secondary design objective was to investigate whether this design was suitable for a long duration space flight, such as a mission to Mars, or if the design is easily and inexpensively modified for such a mission.

  3. Potential causes of absolute gravity changes in Taiwan over 2004-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, R.; Hwang, C.; Kim, J. W.; Masson, F.; Mouyen, M.

    2015-12-01

    We use absolute gravimeter (AG) and GPS observations collected from 2004 to 2014 in Taiwan to identify mass changes in connection to Moho deepening, volcanism, subsidence, earthquake and plate collision. The gravity observations are measured at sites of different geological settings under the AGTO and NGDS projects. The resulting gravity changes cannot be fully explained by vertical motions derived from GPS. Unlike previous AG gravity studies in Taiwan, we apply hydrology-induced gravity changes to raw gravity measurements using a simple model that estimates the Bouguer gravity effect due to rainfalls. Typhoon Morakot, occurring on August 8, 2009, results in torrential rainfalls and large debris flows in southern Taiwan. Morakot causes a gravity increase of 51.22 μGal near an AG site along the southern cross-island highway. The M7.0 Hengchun earthquake on December 26, 2006 causes a gravity rise of 2.32 μGal at the KDNG AG site near its epicenter. A Moho thickening rate (-0.81 μGal/yr) in central Taiwan and a deep-fault slip rate (-0.94 μGal/yr) in eastern Taiwan are postulated from the gravity changes. Other distinct gravity changes are potentially associated with the subsidence in Yunlin County (-2.73 μGal/yr), the magma coolings in Tatun Volcano Group (0.12 μGal/yr), Green Island (-2.95 μGal/yr) and Orchid Island (-0.97μGal/yr).

  4. Gravity change in Finland 1962-2010 from the comparison of new measurements using the outdoor absolute gravimeter A10-020 with legacy relative measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, Jaakko; Sękowski, Marcin; Kryński, Jan; Kuokkanen, Jaakko; Näränen, Jyri; Raja-Halli, Arttu; Ruotsalainen, Hannu; Virtanen, Heikki

    2013-04-01

    Finland belongs to the Fennoscandian Postglacial Rebound (PGR) area, with vertical velocities of up to 1 cm/yr and corresponding surface gravity rates as large as -2 microgal/yr. Knowledge of the secular gravity change in Finland comes so far from three sources: (i) repeated absolute gravity measurements at a limited number of indoor laboratory-type sites, made by various teams and instruments (1976-), (ii) repeated relative measurements on the Fennoscandian Land Uplift Gravity Lines (1966-2003) which run in East-West direction along the approximate latitudes 61, 63 and 65 degrees N, (iii) satellite gravimetry with the GRACE (2002-). We are adding a new source: In 2009-2010 the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI) together with the Institute of Geodesy and Cartography (IGiK) re-measured the Finnish First Order Gravity Network (FOGN), using the A10 No. 020 outdoor absolute gravimeter of the IGiK. The FOGN consists of 50 outdoor stations, typically on the stairs of churches and other monumental buildings. The purpose of the FOGN (or its re-measurement) is not geodynamic research but the provision of easily-accessible reference sites for tasks of practical relative gravimetry, like gravity mapping for geodesy, geology and applied geophysics. However, as the FOGN was first measured in 1962 (with a Worden gravimeter) and re-surveyed in 1988 (with two LCR gravimeters), the time span 1962-2010 provides the opportunity to extract a signal of gravity change from the comparison of the three campaigns. While the accuracy of the 1962 measurements is limited, at some FOGN stations additional data is provided by North-South traverses measured from 1966 onwards for calibrating LCR gravimeters. During the 2009-2010 campaign with the A10-020 altogether 50 old and new stations in the FOGN were occupied. Some original stations had been destroyed or were not accessible with the A10, e.g. for lack of mounting space. In 2010-11 relative ties were established to connect original and new

  5. Low-gravity facilities for Space Station planetology experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penzo, Paul A.

    1987-01-01

    For experimentation, space offers an environment which is unobtainable on earth. One characteristic is a gravity force less than 1 g, where g is the mean earth gravity acceleration of 9.8 m/sq s. The production of uniform gravity levels above zero g in space is discussed in relationship to experimental needs. For planetology experiments, providing gravity in space will make it possible to more nearly simulate conditions on natural bodies. The g-level is but one parameter involved in the design of a specific experiment. Other requirements may be: g-level range; g-level tolerance value; Coriolis tolerance value; volume requirement g-level duration; power and materials for the experiment; and automated or man-tended operations. These requirements, and certainly others, will dictate the type of facility which should be considered. The use of the Space Station of the Tethered Satellite System configurations is discussed.

  6. Improving absolute gravity estimates by the L p -norm approximation of the ballistic trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornyi, V. D.; Svitlov, S.; Araya, A.

    2016-04-01

    Iteratively re-weighted least squares (IRLS) were used to simulate the L p -norm approximation of the ballistic trajectory in absolute gravimeters. Two iterations of the IRLS delivered sufficient accuracy of the approximation without a significant bias. The simulations were performed on different samplings and perturbations of the trajectory. For the platykurtic distributions of the perturbations, the L p -approximation with 3  <  p  <  4 was found to yield several times more precise gravity estimates compared to the standard least-squares. The simulation results were confirmed by processing real gravity observations performed at the excessive noise conditions.

  7. Gravity change in Finland from comparison of new measurements using the outdoor absolute gravimeter A10 with legacy relative measurements - first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, Jaakko; Sekowski, Marcin; Krynski, Jan; Ruotsalainen, Hannu

    2010-05-01

    Finland belongs to the Fennoscandian postglacial rebound (PGR) area, with vertical velocities of up to 1 cm/yr and corresponding surface gravity rates as large as -2 microgal/yr. Knowledge of the secular gravity change in Finland comes so far from three sources: (i) repeated absolute gravity measurements at a limited number of indoor laboratory-type sites, made by various teams and instruments (1976-), (ii) repeated relative measurements on the Fennoscandian Land Uplift Gravity Lines (1966-2003) which run in East-West direction along the approximate latitudes 61, 63 and 65 degrees N, (iii) satellite gravimetry with the GRACE (2002-). We are about to add a fourth source: In 2009 the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI) together with the Institute of Geodesy and Cartography (IGiK) started the re-measurement of the Finnish First Order Absolute Gravity Network (FOGN), using the A10 No. 020 outdoor absolute gravimeter of the IGiK. The FOGN consists of 50 outdoor stations, typically on the stairs of churches and other monumental buildings. The purpose of the FOGN (or its re-measurement) is not geodynamic research but the provision of easily-accessible reference sites for tasks of practical relative gravimetry, say gravity mapping for geodesy, geology and applied geophysics. However, as the FOGN was first measured in 1962-63 (with a Worden gravimeter) and re-surveyed in 1988 (with two LCR gravimeters), the time span of more than 45 years to 2009 provides the opportunity to extract a signal of gravity change from the comparison of the three campaigns. While the accuracy of the 1962-63 measurements is limited, at some FOGN stations additional data is provided by North-South traverses measured from 1966 onwards for calibration of LCR gravimeters. During the 2009 campaign with the A10-020 altogether 19 stations in the FOGN were occupied, and about 10 of them are sufficiently well-preserved from 1962-63 to make a gravity comparison meaningful. The experience with the A10 and the

  8. Artificial gravity studies and design considerations for Space Station centrifuges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, T. W.; Brown, A. H.; Fuller, C. A.; Oyama, J.

    1984-01-01

    The requirements to and capabilities of a Space Station biological facility centrifuge are discussed on the basis of an assessment of the objectives and subjects of future microgravity biological experiments. It is argued that the facility should be capable of both acute and extended chronic exposure of test subjects and biological materials to altered-g loading. In addition, the experimental approaches and equipment for microgravity studies on a Space Station are outlined. Finally, the engineering requirements of such a centrifuge are examined, with consideration of radial gravity gradients, size, and physical access to animals.

  9. Synchronous absolute EIT in three thoracic planes at different gravity levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, G.; Just, A.; Dittmar, J.; Fromm, K. H.; Quintel, M.

    2013-04-01

    The validity of absolute Electrical Impedance Tomography (a-EIT) for assessment of local lung volume has been investigated far less than the well evaluated ventilation monitoring by functional EIT (f-EIT). To achieve progress in a-EIT we investigated 10 healthy volunteers in an upright sitting position by using a-EIT at normal gravity (1 g), weightlessness (0 g) and approx. double gravity (1.8 g) during parabolic flight manoeuvres. Lung resistivity in three thoracic planes was determined by a-EIT using a multiple-plane synchronised Goe-MF II EIT system. Tomograms of resistivity at end-expiration in normal spontaneous breathing were reconstructed by a modified SIRT algorithm. Local lung resistivity was determined separately for both lungs. The respective resistivity values at 1 g and 1.8 g before and after weightlessness show an almost reversible behaviour along the sequence of gravity changes with a tendency to be lower after occurrence of weightlessness. The results reveal not only the expected varying resistivity of lung tissue in cranio-caudal direction but also a clear difference in these cranio-caudal stratifications of local lung volume between the left and right lung. The resolution and stability of absolute EIT seem to be valid and expressive for future investigations of unilateral lung volume under different physiological and pathological conditions.

  10. Data reduction and tying in regional gravity surveys—results from a new gravity base station network and the Bouguer gravity anomaly map for northeastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtado-Cardador, Manuel; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime

    2006-12-01

    Since 1947 Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex) has conducted oil exploration projects using potential field methods. Geophysical exploration companies under contracts with Pemex carried out gravity anomaly surveys that were referred to different floating data. Each survey comprises observations of gravity stations along highways, roads and trails at intervals of about 500 m. At present, 265 separate gravimeter surveys that cover 60% of the Mexican territory (mainly in the oil producing regions of Mexico) are available. This gravity database represents the largest, highest spatial resolution information, and consequently has been used in the geophysical data compilations for the Mexico and North America gravity anomaly maps. Regional integration of gravimeter surveys generates gradients and spurious anomalies in the Bouguer anomaly maps at the boundaries of the connected surveys due to the different gravity base stations utilized. The main objective of this study is to refer all gravimeter surveys from Pemex to a single new first-order gravity base station network, in order to eliminate problems of gradients and spurious anomalies. A second objective is to establish a network of permanent gravity base stations (BGP), referred to a single base from the World Gravity System. Four regional loops of BGP covering eight States of Mexico were established to support the tie of local gravity base stations from each of the gravimeter surveys located in the vicinity of these loops. The third objective is to add the gravity constants, measured and calculated, for each of the 265 gravimeter surveys to their corresponding files in the Pemex and Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo database. The gravity base used as the common datum is the station SILAG 9135-49 (Latin American System of Gravity) located in the National Observatory of Tacubaya in Mexico City. We present the results of the installation of a new gravity base network in northeastern Mexico, reference of the 43 gravimeter surveys

  11. Integrating stations from the North America Gravity Database into a local GPS-based land gravity survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoberg, Thomas G.; Stoddard, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to augment local gravity surveys with additional gravity stations from easily accessible national databases can greatly increase the areal coverage and spatial resolution of a survey. It is, however, necessary to integrate such data seamlessly with the local survey. One challenge to overcome in integrating data from national databases is that these data are typically of unknown quality. This study presents a procedure for the evaluation and seamless integration of gravity data of unknown quality from a national database with data from a local Global Positioning System (GPS)-based survey. The starting components include the latitude, longitude, elevation and observed gravity at each station location. Interpolated surfaces of the complete Bouguer anomaly are used as a means of quality control and comparison. The result is an integrated dataset of varying quality with many stations having GPS accuracy and other reliable stations of unknown origin, yielding a wider coverage and greater spatial resolution than either survey alone.

  12. Seasonal changes in groundwater storage estimated by absolute ground gravity and MRS surveys in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favreau, G.; Boucher, M.; Luck, B.; Pfeffer, J.; Genthon, P.; Hinderer, J.

    2009-04-01

    Important and fast groundwater storage changes occur in tropical monsoon regions in response to seasonal rainfall and subsequent surface water redistribution. In West Africa, one main goal of the GHYRAF experiment (Gravity and Hydrology in Africa, 2008-2010) is to compare absolute gravimetric measurements with dense hydrological surveys to better estimate and model water storage changes at various time scales. Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS) is a non-invasive geophysical method having a signal directly related to groundwater quantity. In SW Niger, MRS surveys were performed concurrently with gravimetric (FG5) measurements for monitoring seasonal changes in groundwater storage. Water table levels were recorded on a 4-piezometers profile (~500 m) near a temporary pond (area ~2 ha) fed by sandy gullies. The volume of water drained from the pond to the phreatic aquifer was computed to be ~100,000 m3/yr. Large piezometric fluctuations (3-6 m) occurred in response to indirect recharge through the pond during the 2008 rainy season (July-Sept.), with stronger water table fluctuations recorded near the pond. Absolute gravimetric (FG5) measurements were performed at a distance of 150 m from the pond, in order to minimize the influence of 2D effects on gravimetric records. The increase in absolute gravity measured between two dates (July-Sept.) was 8.7 ± 2.6 µGal; for the same period, the measured water table rise was +3.0 m. Considering these values, a first estimate of the groundwater storage increase is 0.2 m, corresponding to a porosity filled up by the water table rise of ~7%. Repeated MRS surveys were performed at the same location for different dates (three soundings in Sept., one in Dec.). The MRS water content was 13%, with little variation in space (±3%) along the piezometric profile. In response to a 3 metres drop in the water table (Sept- Dec), there was no significant recorded change in the MRS water content and/or in the estimated MRS water table depth. MRS

  13. Long-term variations of absolute and superconducting gravity values in Southeast Alaska, observed by the ISEA2 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazama, T.; Hideaki, H.; Miura, S.; Kaufman, M.; Sato, T.; Larsen, C. F.; Freymueller, J. T.

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that gravity values have been decreasing in Southeast Alaska, mainly due to glacier mass changes from the end of the Little Ice Age to the present. For example, absolute gravity measurements made by the ISEA1 project (2006-2008) showed a maximum gravity change rate of -5.6 micro-gal/year (Sun et al., 2010; Sato et al., 2012a), which was consistent with large uplift rates obtained from GPS data (Larsen et al., 2005). However, the newly-obtained absolute gravity values in 2012 were about 10 micro-gal greater than expected based on the gravity trends of Sun et al. (2010), possibly because of above-average snowfall in the winter of 2011-2012 (Sato et al., 2012b). In order to monitor spatiotemporal gravity changes associated with glacier mass changes, seasonal hydrological gravity changes should be quantified via continuous gravity observations and/or hydrological modeling. We thus installed a superconducting gravimeter iGrav (serial number: 003) at Egan Library, University of Alaska Southeast in June 2012, as part of the ISEA2 project (2011-2015). The mass position (unit: volts) and air pressure have been recorded every second since June 2012, and the gravity value was then calculated from the mass position, using the scale factor of -89.561 micro-gal/V (Sato et al., 2012b). After the removal of tidal gravity changes using the BAYTAP software (Tamura et al., 1991), a gravity change of 4 micro-gal in peak to peak was extracted from the long-term superconducting gravity data from June 2012 to July 2013. Note that this non-tidal gravity change includes the instrumental drift, although the drift rate was very small (less than 1 micro-gal/year) according to the linear regression to the gravity change. We will discuss possible physical mechanisms of the non-tidal gravity change associated with water redistribution, using a hydrological model (e.g., Kazama et al., 2012) and/or long-term weather data. In addition, we also measured absolute gravity values at 6

  14. Atom-chip based quantum gravimetry for the precise determination of absolute local gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abend, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a novel technique for the precise measurement of absolute local gravity based on cold atom interferometry. Atom interferometry utilizes the interference of matter waves interrogated by laser light to read out inertial forces. Today's generation of these devices typically operate with test mass samples, that consists of ensembles of laser cooled atoms. Their performance is limited by the velocity spread and finite-size of the test masses that impose systematic uncertainties at the level of a few μGal. Rather than laser cooled atoms we employ quantum degenerate ensembles, so called Bose-Einstein condensates, as ultra-sensitive probes for gravity. These sources offer unique properties in temperature as well as in ensemble size that will allow to overcome the current limitations with the next generation of sensors. Furthermore, atom-chip technologies offer the possibility to generate Bose-Einstein condensates in a fast and reliable way. We show a lab-based prototype that uses the atom-chip itself to retro-reflect the interrogation laser and thus serving as inertial reference inside the vacuum. With this setup it is possible to demonstrate all necessary steps to measure gravity, including the preparation of the source, spanning an interferometer as well as the detection of the output signal, within an area of 1 cm3 right below the atom-chip and to analyze relevant systematic effects. In the framework of the center of excellence geoQ a next generation device is under construction at the Institut für Quantenoptik, that will allow for in-field measurements. This device will feature a state-of-the-art atom-chip source with a high-flux of ultra-cold atoms at a repetition rate of 1-2 Hz. In cooperation with the Müller group at the Institut für Erdmessung the sensor will be characterized in the laboratory first, to be ultimately employed in campaigns to measure the Fennoscandian uplift at the level of 1 μGal. The presented work is part of the center of

  15. Inversion of Multi-Station Schumann Resonance Background Records for Global Lightning Activity in Absolute Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, E. R.; Mushtak, V. C.; Guha, A.; Boldi, R. A.; Bor, J.; Nagy, T.; Satori, G.; Sinha, A. K.; Rawat, R.; Hobara, Y.; Sato, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Price, C. G.; Neska, M.; Alexander, K.; Yampolski, Y.; Moore, R. C.; Mitchell, M. F.; Fraser-Smith, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Every lightning flash contributes energy to the TEM mode of the natural global waveguide that contains the Earth's Schumann resonances. The modest attenuation at ELF (0.1 dB/Mm) allows for the continuous monitoring of the global lightning with a small number of receiving stations worldwide. In this study, nine ELF receiving sites (in Antarctica (3 sites), Hungary, India, Japan, Poland, Spitsbergen and USA) are used to provide power spectra at 12-minute intervals in two absolutely calibrated magnetic fields and occasionally, one electric field, with up to five resonance modes each. The observables are the extracted modal parameters (peak intensity, peak frequency and Q-factor) for each spectrum. The unknown quantities are the geographical locations of three continental lightning 'chimneys' and their lightning source strengths in absolute units (C2 km2/sec). The unknowns are calculated from the observables by the iterative inversion of an evolving 'sensitivity matrix' whose elements are the partial derivatives of each observable for all receiving sites with respect to each unknown quantity. The propagation model includes the important day-night asymmetry of the natural waveguide. To overcome the problem of multiple minima (common in inversion problems of this kind), location information from the World Wide Lightning Location Network has been used to make initial guess solutions based on centroids of stroke locations in each chimney. Results for five consecutive days in 2009 (Jan 7-11) show UT variations with the African chimney dominating on four of five days, and America dominating on the fifth day. The amplitude variations in absolute source strength exceed that of the 'Carnegie curve' of the DC global circuit by roughly twofold. Day-to-day variations in chimney source strength are of the order of tens of percent. Examination of forward calculations performed with the global inversion solution often show good agreement with the observed diurnal variations at

  16. Absolute calibration of the fast-delivery SAR product processed at Tromso satellite station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weydahl, Dan J.

    1994-12-01

    Tromso Satellite Station (TSS) is the Norwegian national receiving station for ERS-1 SAR data. The TSS Fast Delivery (FD) SAR processor was upgraded during spring 1994 so that the whole processing chain will now be performed in power rather than in voltage. This new FD SAR product from TSS needs absolute calibration, and a calibration constant is therefore estimated. First, a TSS Power-processed ERS-1 SAR image was used. This image covers the ESA transponders in Flevoland. The integration method was used to estimate the backscattered power from the 3 transponders. The Earth ellipsoid, local incidence angle, antenna pattern, range-spread loss, pixel size and RCS were also taken into account in the calculation. The result was a calibration constant of 53.51 dB. An other method is to compare the backscatter from an ESA processed PRI product and a TSS Power-processed FD product acquired at the same place and time. Areas were extracted from two such SAR images, and the pixel values averaged in power. The known calibration constant for the PRI product was used in the comparison of the image products. The calibration constant for the TSS FD product was then found to be 54.20 dB. This is close to the result from using the ESA transponders.

  17. Principal facts of gravity stations with gravity and magnetic profiles from the Southwest Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, as of January, 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jansma, P.E.; Snyder, D.B.; Ponce, David A.

    1983-01-01

    Three gravity profiles and principal facts of 2,604 gravity stations in the southwest quadrant of the Nevada Test Site are documented in this data report. The residual gravity profiles show the gravity measurements and the smoothed curves derived from these points that were used in geophysical interpretations. The principal facts include station label, latitude, longitude, elevation, observed gravity value, and terrain correction for each station as well as the derived complete Bouguer and isostatic anomalies, reduced at 2.67 g/cm 3. Accuracy codes, where available, further document the data.

  18. Laser interferometry method for absolute measurement of the acceleration of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, O. K.

    1971-01-01

    Gravimeter permits more accurate and precise absolute measurement of g without reference to Potsdam values as absolute standards. Device is basically Michelson laser beam interferometer in which one arm is mass fitted with corner cube reflector.

  19. ISEA (International geodetic project in SouthEastern Alaska) for rapid uplifting caused by glacial retreat: (3) Absolute gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W.; Miura, S.; Sato, T.; Kaufman, A. M.; Cross, R.; Freymueller, J. T.; Schiel, A.

    2006-12-01

    The southeast Alaska is undergoing a rapid ice-melting and land uplift due to the effect of global warming in the last three hundred years. The corresponding crustal deformation caused by the post-glacial rebound has been clearly detected by modern geodetic techniques, e.g., GPS and tidal gauge measurements (Larsen et al., 2004; Sato et al., 2005). The geodetic deformation provides us useful information in evaluating ice-melting rate, effect of global warming, and even the viscosity beneath the crust. For this purpose, however, integrated geodetic observation, especially including gravity measurement, is considered very important (Miura et al., a separate presentation at the same AGU conference; Wahr et al., 1995). Therefore, to detect the crutal deformation caused by the post-glacial rebound and to study the viscoelastic structure of the earth in the southeast Alaska, a joint team of Japanese and U.S. researchers has begun a three year project of GPS, earth tide, and absolute gravity measurements. In this presentation, results of the absolute gravity observation carried out between June 3 and June 18, 2006 are reported. During the 2006 observation campaign, a network of absolute gravity was for the first time established which is composed of five sites about 100 km around of Juneau: Bartlett Cove at Gustavus, Russell Island, Hains Fairground at Hains, UAS Egan Library at Juneau and Mendenhall Glacier Visitors Center at Juneau, Alaska. Absolute gravity data were acquired at the five sites using a Micro-LaCoste absolute gravimeter, serial number 111. A typical occupation recorded a set of 100 single measurements every half hour. At each site data were collected over a 48~62 hour period. Due to the bad ocean model in this area, ocean loading correction seems not efficient because large tidal residuals remain in the observed results. To carry out an accurate tidal correction, on site tidal observation was also performed. Detail discussions on tidal observation and

  20. Gravity effect of water storage changes in a weathered hard-rock aquifer in West Africa: results from joint absolute gravity, hydrological monitoring and geophysical prospection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hector, Basile; Séguis, Luc; Hinderer, Jacques; Descloitres, Marc; Vouillamoz, Jean-Michel; Wubda, Maxime; Boy, Jean-Paul; Luck, Bernard; Le Moigne, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    Advances in groundwater storage monitoring are crucial for water resource management and hydrological processes understanding. The evaluation of water storage changes (WSC) often involve point measurements (observation wells, moisture probes, etc.), which may be inappropriate in heterogeneous media. Over the past few years, there has been an increasing interest in the use of gravimetry for hydrological studies. In the framework of the GHYRAF (Gravity and Hydrology in Africa) project, 3 yr of repeated absolute gravity measurements using a FG5-type gravimeter have been undertaken at Nalohou, a Sudanian site in northern Benin. Hydrological data are collected within the long-term observing system AMMA-Catch. Once corrected for solid earth tides, ocean loading, air pressure effects, polar motion contribution and non-local hydrology, seasonal gravity variations reach up to 11 μGal, equivalent to a WSC of 260-mm thick infinite layer of water. Absolute temporal gravity data are compared to WSC deduced from neutron probe and water-table variations through a direct modelling approach. First, we use neutronic measurements available for the whole vertical profile where WSC occur (the vadose zone and a shallow unconfined aquifer). The RMSD between observed and modelled gravity variations is 1.61 μGal, which falls within the error bars of the absolute gravity data. Second, to acknowledge for the spatial variability of aquifer properties, we use a 2-D model for specific yield (Sy) derived from resistivity mapping and Magnetic Resonance Soundings (MRS). The latter provides a water content (θMRS) known to be higher than the specific yield. Hence, we scaled the 2-D model of θMRS with a single factor (α). WSC are calculated from water-table monitoring in the aquifer layer and neutronic measurements in the vadose layer. The value of α is obtained with a Monte-Carlo sampling approach, minimizing the RMSD between modelled and observed gravity variations. This leads to α = Sy

  1. Observed secular gravity trend at Onsala station with the FG5 gravimeter from Hannover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmen, L.; Engfeldt, A.; Scherneck, H.-G.

    2015-04-01

    Annual absolute gravity measurements with a FG5 instrument were performed in Onsala Space Observatory by the Institute of Geodesy of the Leibniz Universität Hannover from 2003 to 2011 and have been continued with the upgraded meter FG5X in 2014. Lantmäteriet, Gävle, with their FG5 absolute gravimeter have visited Onsala since 2007. Because small systematic errors may be inherent in each absolute gravimeter, their measuring level and a resulting bias (offset) between the instruments must be controlled over time by means of inter-comparison. From 2007 to 2014, 8 direct comparisons took place well distributed over the time span. A complete re-processing of the absolute gravity observations with the Hannover instrument has been conducted to improve the reduction of unwanted gravity effects. A new tidal model is based on continuous time series recorded with the GWR superconducting gravimeter at Onsala since 2009. The loading effect of the Kattegat is described with a varying sea bottom pressure (water and air mass load) and has been validated with the continuous gravity measurements. For the land uplift,which is a result of the still ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment in Fennoscandia, a secular gravity trend of -0.22 μGal/yr was obtained with a standard deviation of 0.17 μGal/yr. That indicates a slight uplift but is still not significantly different from zero.

  2. Possibilities of modelling of local and global hydrological changes from high-resolution Global Hydrological Model in the absolute gravity observations - the case of Józefosław Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olszak, Tomasz; Barlik, Marcin; Pachuta, Andrzej; Próchniewicz, Dominik

    2014-05-01

    Geodynamical use of epoch gravimetric relative and absolute observations requires the elimination of one from the most significant effect related to local and global changes of hydrological conditions. It is understood that hydrological effect is associated with changes in groundwater levels and soil moisture around the gravimetric station. In Poland, the quasi - permanent observations of gravity changes by absolute method carried out since 2005 on gravity station located in the Astronomical - Geodetic Observatory in Józefosław. In the poster will be shortly described measurement strategy of absolute observations and different approaches to the elimination of the local and global effects associated with changes in hydrology. This paper will discuss the results of the analysis of tidal observations relevant to the development of absolute observations - seasonal changes in barometric correction factor and differences in the locally designated tidal corrections model. Analysis of the possibility of elimination the impact of global hydrological influence is based on the model GLDAS a spatial resolution of 0.25 degree independently on a local scale and global. Józefosław Observatory is equipped with additional sensors linked to the monitoring of local hydrological conditions. It gives a possibility to verify the quality of modeling of hydrological changes using global models in local and global scale.

  3. Satellite observations of middle atmosphere gravity wave absolute momentum flux and of its vertical gradient during recent stratospheric warmings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, Manfred; Trinh, Quang Thai; Kaufmann, Martin; Krisch, Isabell; Preusse, Peter; Ungermann, Jörn; Zhu, Yajun; Gille, John C.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Russell, James M., III; Schwartz, Michael J.; Riese, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs) are circulation anomalies in the polar region during winter. They mostly occur in the Northern Hemisphere and affect also surface weather and climate. Both planetary waves and gravity waves contribute to the onset and evolution of SSWs. While the role of planetary waves for SSW evolution has been recognized, the effect of gravity waves is still not fully understood, and has not been comprehensively analyzed based on global observations. In particular, information on the gravity wave driving of the background winds during SSWs is still missing.We investigate the boreal winters from 2001/2002 until 2013/2014. Absolute gravity wave momentum fluxes and gravity wave dissipation (potential drag) are estimated from temperature observations of the satellite instruments HIRDLS and SABER. In agreement with previous work, we find that sometimes gravity wave activity is enhanced before or around the central date of major SSWs, particularly during vortex-split events. Often, SSWs are associated with polar-night jet oscillation (PJO) events. For these events, we find that gravity wave activity is strongly suppressed when the wind has reversed from eastward to westward (usually after the central date of a major SSW). In addition, gravity wave potential drag at the bottom of the newly forming eastward-directed jet is remarkably weak, while considerable potential drag at the top of the jet likely contributes to the downward propagation of both the jet and the new elevated stratopause. During PJO events, we also find some indication for poleward propagation of gravity waves. Another striking finding is that obviously localized gravity wave sources, likely mountain waves and jet-generated gravity waves, play an important role during the evolution of SSWs and potentially contribute to the triggering of SSWs by preconditioning the shape of the polar vortex. The distribution of these hot spots is highly variable and strongly depends on the zonal and

  4. Variations of absolute gravity accompanying earthquake-induced changes in subsurface pore water pressure at the Mizunami Underground Research Institute construction site, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Salden, W.; Martin, A. J.; Saegusa, H.; Asai, Y.; Fujita, Y.; Aoki, H.

    2006-03-01

    The Tono Research Institute of Earthquake Science has been measuring gravity using an FG5 absolute gravimeter located at the Mizunami Geoscience Academy (MGA) in central Japan since January 2004. Measured gravity decreased immediately following the 2004 earthquake off the Kii peninsula (MJMA 7.4) by about 6 μGal. Here, we investigate the empirical relationship between pore water pressure change in a borehole near the MGA and gravity change measured at the MGA. We reveal that (1) gravity change correlates inversely with pore water pressure change at 81 m below the surface at a particular borehole and (2) several different sets of conversion coefficients from pressure head to gravity can be used to explain 60-70% of gravity variations with less than 2 μGal uncertainty. These newly identified relationships may suggest that an absolute gravimeter alone could be used to observe the change of groundwater quantity.

  5. Principal facts for gravity stations in Dixie; Fairview, and Stingaree valleys, Churchill and Pershing counties, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, D.H.; Thomas, J.M.; Duffrin, B.G.

    1984-01-01

    During March through July 1979, gravity measurements were made at 300 stations in Dixie Valley, Nevada. In December 1981, 45 additional stations were added--7 in Dixie Valley, 23 in Fairview Valley, and 15 in Stingaree Valley. Most altitudes were determined by using altimeters or topographic maps. The gravity observations were made with a Worden temperature-controlled gravimeter with an initial scale factor of 0.0965 milliGal/scale division. Principal facts for each of the 345 stations are tabulated; they consist of latitude, longitude, altitude, observed gravity, free-air anomaly, terrain correction, and Bouguer anomaly values at a bedrock density of 2.67 grams/cu cm. (Lantz-PTT)

  6. Principal facts for gravity stations in the Nevada portion of the Kingman 1 degree by 2 degree quadrangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, R. E.; Kane, M. F.

    The principal facts contained in the tables of this report document 862 gravity stations in the Nevada portion of the Kingman 1 degree x 2 degree quadrangle. Two data sets are documented: 193 stations by the USGS, and 669 from the Department of Defense gravity data file. The description of the USGS stations includes gravity meter used, base station locations and values, elevation sources and errors, data reduction methods, and Bouguer anomaly error analysis. Only principal facts are listed for the Department of Defense data. All stations have been terrain corrected.

  7. Five years' gravity observation with the superconducting gravimeter OSG#058 at Syowa Station, East Antarctica: gravitational effects of accumulated snow mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Yuichi; Doi, Koichiro; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Hideaki; Shibuya, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    Continuous gravimetric observations have been made with three successive generations of superconducting gravimeter over 20 yr at Syowa Station (39.6°E, 69.0°S), East Antarctica. The third-generation instrument, OSG#058, was installed in January 2010 and was calibrated by an absolute gravimeter during January and February, 2010. The estimated scale factor was -73.823 ± 0.053 μGal V-1 (1 μGal = 10-8 m s-2). The first 5 yr of OSG#058 data from 2010 January 7 to 2015 January 10 were decomposed into tidal waves (M3 to Ssa) and other non-tidal components by applying the Bayesian tidal analysis program BAYTAP. Long-term non-tidal gravity residuals, which were obtained by subtracting annual and 18.6 year tidal waves and the predicted gravity response to the Earth's variable rotation, showed significant correlation with the accumulated snow depth measured at Syowa Station. The greatest correlation occurred when the gravity variations lagged the accumulated snow depth by 21 d. To estimate the gravitational effect of the accumulated snow mass, we inferred a conversion factor of 3.13 ± 0.08 μGal m-1 from this relation. The accumulated snow depth at Syowa Station was found to represent an extensive terrestrial water storage (the snow accumulation) around Syowa Station, which was estimated from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment satellite gravity data. The snow accumulation around Syowa Station was detectable by the superconducting gravimeter.

  8. Five years' gravity observation with the superconducting gravimeter OSG#058 at Syowa Station, East Antarctica: Gravitational effects of accumulated snow mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Yuichi; Doi, Koichiro; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Hideaki; Shibuya, Kazuo

    2016-02-01

    Continuous gravimetric observations have been made with three successive generations of superconducting gravimeter over 20 years at Syowa Station (39.6°E, 69.0°S), East Antarctica. The third-generation instrument, OSG#058, was installed in January 2010 and was calibrated by an absolute gravimeter during January and February, 2010. The estimated scale factor was -73.823 ± 0.053 μGal/V (1 μGal = 10-8 m/s2). The first five years of OSG#058 data from January 7, 2010 to January 10, 2015 were decomposed into tidal waves (M3 to Ssa) and other non-tidal components by applying the Bayesian tidal analysis program BAYTAP. Long-term non-tidal gravity residuals, which were obtained by subtracting annual and 18.6 year tidal waves and the predicted gravity response to the Earth's variable rotation, showed significant correlation with the accumulated snow depth measured at Syowa Station. The greatest correlation occurred when the gravity variations lagged the accumulated snow depth by 21 days. To estimate the gravitational effect of the accumulated snow mass, we inferred a conversion factor of 3.13 ± 0.08 μGal/m from this relation. The accumulated snow depth at Syowa Station was found to represent an extensive terrestrial water storage (the snow accumulation) around Syowa Station, which was estimated from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite gravity data. The snow accumulation around Syowa Station was detectable by the superconducting gravimeter.

  9. SLR Station Recovery, Center of Frame Motion, and Time Varying Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelensky, Nikita P.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Chinn, Douglas S.; Melachroinos, Stavros; Wiser Beall, Jennifer; Larson, Jordan D.

    2012-01-01

    Weekly station position estimates, beginning with 1993, are derived from the ITRF2008-based SLR processing of up to four satellites: Lageos 1, Lageos2, Starlette, and Stella. Helmert parameters obtained from c omparison of weekly SLR station positions and the a-priori SLRF2008 station complement are evaluated for geocenter motion and scale. Two me thods for modeling time varying gravity are employed in the SLR satel lite POD processing, with GGM03S serving as the static gravity field. Both methods forward model atmosphere gravity derived from 6-hour ECM WF pressure data. The standard approach applies an annual 20x20 field estimated from 4 years of GRACE data, and the IERS2003 recommended linear rates for C20, C30, C40, C21, and S21. The alternate approach us es a new set of low-order/degree 4x4 coefficients estimated weekly fr om SLR & DORIS processing to 10 satellites from 1993-2012. This exper imental tvg4x4 model has been shown to improve the TOPEX, Jason-1, and Jason-2 altimeter satellite orbits,. In this paper we apply the more detailed time-variable gravity modeling to the SLR satellite POD pro cessing and subsequent reference frame analyses. For this study we will evaluate the orbit differences (periodic and secular) for the satel lites concerned, characterize the impact on the station coordinate solutions, and the impact on reference frame parameters (geocenter and s cale).

  10. Low-gravity materials experiments in the Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chassay, Roger P.

    1990-01-01

    The science and hardware programs laying the science and technology framework for experiments to be conducted aboard SSF are described. Six microgravity facilities planned for the Laboratory Module encompass the Fluid Physics/Dynamics Facility, investigating fundamental fluid behavior; the Advanced Protein Crystal Growth Facility, growing high-quality crystals for pharmaceutical, medical, chemical, and biotechnology applications; the Biotechnology Facility, investigating microgravity effects on biological processes and living organisms at the cellular level and on the purification and production of biological materials; the Space Station Furnace Facility, conducting metal and alloy solidification experiments; the Modular Containerless Processing Facility, supporting experiments through levitation techniques; and the Modular Combustion Facility, performing studies of fundumental combustion processes.

  11. An evaluation of the accuracy of geomagnetic data obtained from an unattended, automated, quasi-absolute station

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herzog, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison is made of geomagnetic calibration data obtained from a high-sensitivity proton magnetometer enclosed within an orthogonal bias coil system, with data obtained from standard procedures at a mid-latitude U.S. Geological Survey magnetic observatory using a quartz horizontal magnetometer, a Ruska magnetometer, and a total field magnetometer. The orthogonal coil arrangement is used with the proton magnetometer to provide Deflected-Inclination-Deflected-Declination (DIDD) data from which quasi-absolute values of declination, horizontal intensity, and vertical intensity can be derived. Vector magnetometers provide the ordinate values to yield baseline calibrations for both the DIDD and standard observatory processes. Results obtained from a prototype system over a period of several months indicate that the DIDD unit can furnish adequate absolute field values for maintaining observatory calibration data, thus providing baseline control for unattended, remote stations. ?? 1990.

  12. Gravity data from the Sierra Vista Subwatershed, Upper San Pedro Basin, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    This report (1) summarizes changes to the Sierra Vista Subwatershed regional time-lapse gravity network with respect to station locations and (2) presents 2014 and 2015 gravity measurements and gravity values at each station. A prior gravity network, established between 2000 and 2005, was revised in 2014 to cover a larger number of stations over a smaller geographic area in order to decrease measurement and interpolation uncertainty. The network currently consists of 59 gravity stations, including 14 absolute-gravity stations. Following above-average rainfall during summer 2014, gravity increased at all but one of the absolute-gravity stations that were observed in both June 2014 and January 2015. This increase in gravity indicates increased groundwater storage in the aquifer and (or) unsaturated zone as a result of rainfall and infiltration.

  13. Extraction of the global absolute temperature for Northern Hemisphere using a set of 6190 meteorological stations from 1800 to 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopoulos, Demetris T.

    2015-06-01

    Starting from a set of 6190 meteorological stations we are choosing 6130 of them and only for Northern Hemisphere we are computing average values for absolute annual Mean, Minimum, Q1, Median, Q3, Maximum temperature plus their standard deviations for years 1800-2013, while we use 4887 stations and 389 467 rows of complete yearly data. The data quality and the seasonal bias indices are defined and used in order to evaluate our dataset. After the year 1969 the data quality is monotonically decreasing while the seasonal bias is positive in most of the cases. An Extreme Value Distribution estimation is performed for minimum and maximum values, giving some upper bounds for both of them and indicating a big magnitude for temperature changes. Finally suggestions for improving the quality of meteorological data are presented.

  14. Scientific uses and technical implementation of a variable gravity centrifuge on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. C.; Hargens, A. R.

    1990-01-01

    The potential need and science requirements for a centrifuge to be designed and flown on Space Station Freedom are discussed, with a focus on a design concept for a centrifuge developed at NASA Ames. Applications identified for the centrifuge include fundamental studies in which gravity is a variable under experimental control, the need to provide a 1-g control, attempts to discover the threshold value of gravitation force for psychological response, and an effort to determine the effects of intermittent hypergravity. Science requirements specify the largest possible diameter at approximately 2.5 m, gravity levels ranging from 0.01 to 2 g, a nominal ramp-up rate of 0.01 g/sec, and life support for plants and animals. Ground-based studies using rats and squirrel monkeys on small-diameter centrifuges have demonstrated that animals can adapt to centrifugation at gravity gradients higher than those normally used in ground-based hypergravity studies.

  15. Precise gravity-field modeling in the area of the Japanese Antarctic station Syowa and evaluation of recent EGMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Yoichi; Nogi, Yoshifumi; Matsuzaki, Kazuya

    2016-03-01

    By combining a Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) Earth Gravity Model (EGM) and in situ gravity data obtained from the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) surveys, we estimated the regional gravity field in the area of Syowa Station, a Japanese research station located in Lützow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica. In situ data sets that were used consisted of land gravity data collected since 1967, shipborne data collected since 1985 and airborne gravity data collected in 2006. The GOCE direct (DIR) solution release 5 (R5) model was used as the long-wavelength reference of the gravity field. Using these data sets, we calculated gravity anomalies and geoid heights at 1-by-1‧ grid by means of least-squares collocation. The resulting geoid height at Syowa Station was compared with a local height based on GPS, spirit leveling and tide gauge data. The result suggests that the sea surface height at Syowa Station is -1.57 m, which is consistent with a dynamic ocean topography model. During this investigation, we also evaluated GOCE EGMs and other recent EGMs by comparing them with the airborne gravity data. The results indicate that the GOCE DIR R5 produced the smallest RMS (Root Mean Square) differences and that the newer models performed nearly as well. These comparisons demonstrate the importance of using reliable in situ data when evaluating satellite-only EGMs.

  16. Apollo 17, Station 6 boulder sample 76255 - Absolute petrology of breccia matrix and igneous clasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, J. L.; Phinney, W. C.; Simonds, C. H.

    1976-01-01

    The matrix of 76255 is the finest-grained, most clast-laden, impact-melt polymict breccia sampled from the Station 6 boulder. The paper speculates on how the matrix of 76255 fits into and enhances existing thermal models of breccia lithification. Emphasis is on the detailed petrology of five lithic clasts, two of which display mineralogical and textural affinities to mare basalts, while three, a gabbro, a norite, and a troctolite are considered primitive plutonic rocks.

  17. Near-station terrain corrections for gravity data by a surface-integral technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    A new method of computing gravity terrain corrections by use of a digitizer and digital computer can result in substantial savings in the time and manual labor required to perform such corrections by conventional manual ring-chart techniques. The method is typically applied to estimate terrain effects for topography near the station, for example within 3 km of the station, although it has been used successfully to a radius of 15 km to estimate corrections in areas where topographic mapping is poor. Points (about 20) that define topographic maxima, minima, and changes in the slope gradient are picked on the topographic map, within the desired radius of correction about the station. Particular attention must be paid to the area immediately surrounding the station to ensure a good topographic representation. The horizontal and vertical coordinates of these points are entered into the computer, usually by means of a digitizer. The computer then fits a multiquadric surface to the input points to form an analytic representation of the surface. By means of the divergence theorem, the gravity effect of an interior closed solid can be expressed as a surface integral, and the terrain correction is calculated by numerical evaluation of the integral over the surfaces of a cylinder, The vertical sides of which are at the correction radius about the station, the flat bottom surface at the topographic minimum, and the upper surface given by the multiquadric equation. The method has been tested with favorable results against models for which an exact result is available and against manually computed field-station locations in areas of rugged topography. By increasing the number of points defining the topographic surface, any desired degree of accuracy can be obtained. The method is more objective than manual ring-chart techniques because no average compartment elevations need be estimated ?

  18. Analysis of low gravity tolerance of model experiments for space station: Preliminary results for directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Ouazzani, Jalil

    1988-01-01

    It has become clear from measurements of the acceleration environment in the Spacelab that the residual gravity levels on board a spacecraft in low Earth orbit can be significant and should be of concern to experimenters who wish to take advantage of the low gravity conditions on future Spacelab missions and on board the Space Station. The basic goals are to better understand the low gravity tolerance of three classes of materials science experiments: crystal growth from a melt, a vapor, and a solution. The results of the research will provide guidance toward the determination of the sensitivity of the low gravity environment, the design of the laboratory facilites, and the timelining of materials science experiments. To data, analyses of the effects of microgravity environment were, with a few exceptions, restricted to order of magnitude estimates. Preliminary results obtained from numerical models of the effects of residual steady and time dependent acceleration are reported on: heat, mass, and momentum transport during the growth of a dilute alloy by the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique, and the response of a simple fluid physics experiment involving buoyant convection in a square cavity.

  19. Numerical estimates of secular effects in the translational-rotational motion of an orbital station with artificial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenov, D. Z.

    The coefficients of the secular terms in the translational-rotational motion of an orbital station with artificial gravity were determined. It is shown that the mean anomaly M = 1 of the mass center of the station for every mean solar day increases by about 5179.25 deg. This indicates that the station makes more than 14 revolutions about the earth in the course of a mean solar day.

  20. Estimated SLR station position and network frame sensitivity to time-varying gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelensky, Nikita P.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Chinn, Douglas S.; Melachroinos, Stavros; Beckley, Brian D.; Beall, Jennifer Wiser; Bordyugov, Oleg

    2014-06-01

    This paper evaluates the sensitivity of ITRF2008-based satellite laser ranging (SLR) station positions estimated weekly using LAGEOS-1/2 data from 1993 to 2012 to non-tidal time-varying gravity (TVG). Two primary methods for modeling TVG from degree-2 are employed. The operational approach applies an annual GRACE-derived field, and IERS recommended linear rates for five coefficients. The experimental approach uses low-order/degree coefficients estimated weekly from SLR and DORIS processing of up to 11 satellites (tvg4x4). This study shows that the LAGEOS-1/2 orbits and the weekly station solutions are sensitive to more detailed modeling of TVG than prescribed in the current IERS standards. Over 1993-2012 tvg4x4 improves SLR residuals by 18 % and shows 10 % RMS improvement in station stability. Tests suggest that the improved stability of the tvg4x4 POD solution frame may help clarify geophysical signals present in the estimated station position time series. The signals include linear and seasonal station motion, and motion of the TRF origin, particularly in Z. The effect on both POD and the station solutions becomes increasingly evident starting in 2006. Over 2008-2012, the tvg4x4 series improves SLR residuals by 29 %. Use of the GRGS RL02 series shows similar improvement in POD. Using tvg4x4, secular changes in the TRF origin Z component double over the last decade and although not conclusive, it is consistent with increased geocenter rate expected due to continental ice melt. The test results indicate that accurate modeling of TVG is necessary for improvement of station position estimation using SLR data.

  1. National Geodetic Survey Gravity Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moose, R. E.

    1986-12-01

    In 1966, the U.S. National Gravity Base Network was established through the cooperative efforts of several government agencies and academic institutions involved in nationwide gravity observations. The network was reobserved between 1975 and 1979 by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) using field procedures designed to give high-quality gravity differences. The report discusses the adjustment and the areas where apparent gravity change was observed. NGS plans to densify and maintain this network and to improve the accuracy of the station values by additional high-quality relative ties and by making observations with a new, absolute gravity meter in each of the states.

  2. Principal facts for gravity stations in the Antelope Valley-Bedell Flat area, west-central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jewel, Eleanore B.; Ponce, David A.; Morin, Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    In April 2000 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) established 211 gravity stations in the Antelope Valley and Bedell Flat area of west-central Nevada (see figure 1). The stations were located about 15 miles north of Reno, Nevada, southwest of Dogskin Mountain, and east of Petersen Mountain, concentrated in Antelope Valley and Bedell Flat (figure 2). The ranges in this area primarily consist of normal-faulted Cretaceous granitic rocks, with some volcanic and metavolcanic rocks. The purpose of the survey was to characterize the hydrogeologic framework of Antelope Valley and Bedell Flat in support of future hydrologic investigations. The information developed during this study can be used in groundwater models. Gravity data were collected between latitude 39°37.5' and 40°00' N and longitude 119°37.5' and 120°00' W. The stations were located on the Seven Lakes Mountain, Dogskin Mountain, Granite Peak, Bedell Flat, Fraser Flat, and Reno NE 7.5 minute quadrangles. All data were tied to secondary base station RENO-A located on the campus of the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR) in Reno, Nevada (latitude 39°32.30' N, longitude 119°48.70' W, observed gravity value 979674.69 mGal). The value for observed gravity was calculated by multiple ties to the base station RENO (latitude 39°32.30' N, longitude 119°48.70' W, observed gravity value 979674.65 mGal), also on the UNR campus. The isostatic gravity map (figure 3) includes additional data sets from the following sources: 202 stations from a Geological Survey digital data set (Ponce, 1997), and 126 stations from Thomas C. Carpenter (written commun., 1998).

  3. Gravity data from the San Pedro River Basin, Cochise County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Jeffrey R.; Winester, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, Arizona Water Science Center in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Geodetic Survey has collected relative and absolute gravity data at 321 stations in the San Pedro River Basin of southeastern Arizona since 2000. Data are of three types: observed gravity values and associated free-air, simple Bouguer, and complete Bouguer anomaly values, useful for subsurface-density modeling; high-precision relative-gravity surveys repeated over time, useful for aquifer-storage-change monitoring; and absolute-gravity values, useful as base stations for relative-gravity surveys and for monitoring gravity change over time. The data are compiled, without interpretation, in three spreadsheet files. Gravity values, GPS locations, and driving directions for absolute-gravity base stations are presented as National Geodetic Survey site descriptions.

  4. Phototropism of Arabidopsis thaliana in microgravity and fractional gravity on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Kiss, John Z; Millar, Katherine D L; Edelmann, Richard E

    2012-08-01

    While there is a great deal of knowledge regarding plant growth and development in microgravity aboard orbiting spacecraft, there is little information available about these parameters in reduced or fractional gravity conditions (less than the nominal 1g on Earth). Thus, in these experiments using the European Modular Cultivation System on the International Space Station, we studied the interaction between phototropism and gravitropism in the WT and mutants of phytochrome A and B of Arabidopis thaliana. Fractional gravity and the 1 g control were provided by centrifuges in the spaceflight hardware, and unidirectional red and blue illumination followed a white light growth period in the time line of the space experiments. The existence of red-light-based positive phototropism in hypocotyls of seedlings that is mediated by phytochrome was confirmed in these microgravity experiments. Fractional gravity studies showed an attenuation of red-light-based phototropism in both roots and hypocotyls of seedlings occurring due to gravitational accelerations ranging from 0.l to 0.3 g. In contrast, blue-light negative phototropism in roots, which was enhanced in microgravity compared with the 1g control, showed a significant attenuation at 0.3 g. In addition, our studies suggest that the well-known red-light enhancement of blue-light-induced phototropism in hypocotyls is likely due to an indirect effect by the attenuation of gravitropism. However, red-light enhancement of root blue-light-based phototropism may occur via a more direct effect on the phototropism system itself, most likely through the phytochrome photoreceptors. To our knowledge, these experiments represent the first to examine the behavior of flowering plants in fractional or reduced gravity conditions. PMID:22481136

  5. Evaluation of the new gravity control in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sękowski, M.; Dykowski, P.; Krynski, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The new gravity control in Poland is based on absolute gravity measurements. It consists of 28 fundamental stations and 168 base stations. Fundamental stations are located in laboratories; they are to be surveyed in 2014 with the FG5-230 of the Warsaw University of Technology. Base stations are monumented field stations; they were surveyed in 2012 and 2013 with the A10-020 gravimeter. They are the subject of the paper. Besides absolute gravity measurements the vertical gravity gradient was precisely determined at all 168 base stations. Inconsistency of the determined vertical gravity gradients with respect to the normal ones has been presented. 77 base stations are also the stations of the previous gravity (POGK98) established in 90. of 20 century. Differences between newly determined gravity at those stations with those of POGK98 were evaluated. Alongside the establishment of the base stations of the gravity control multiple additional activities were performed to assure and provide the proper gravity reference level. They concerned regular gravity measurements on monthly basis with the A10-020 at three sites in Borowa Gora Geodetic-Geophysical Observatory, calibrations of metrological parameters of the A10-020 gravimeter and scale factor calibrations of LCR gravimeters, participation with the A10-020 in the international (ECAG2011, ICAG2013) and regional comparison campaigns of absolute gravimeters, and local comparisons of the A10-020 with the FG5-230. The summary of the work performed during the establishment of the gravity control is best described by total uncertainty budget for the A10-020 gravimeter determined on each of the 168 gravity stations.

  6. Earth's gravity field to the eighteenth degree and geocentric coordinates for 104 stations from satellite and terrestrial data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1973-01-01

    Geodetic parameters describing the earth's gravity field and the positions of satellite-tracking stations in a geocentric reference frame were computed. These parameters were estimated by means of a combination of five different types of data: routine and simultaneous satellite observations, observations of deep-space probes, measurements of terrestrial gravity, and surface-triangulation data. The combination gives better parameters than does any subset of data types. The dynamic solution used precision-reduced Baker-Nunn observations and laser range data of 25 satellites. Data from the 49-station National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration BC-4 network, the 19-station Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Baker-Nunn network, and independent camera stations were employed in the geometrical solution. Data from the tracking of deep-space probes were converted to relative longitudes and distances to the earth's axis of rotation of the tracking stations. Surface-gravity data in the form of 550-km squares were derived from 19,328 1 deg X 1 deg mean gravity anomalies.

  7. Earth's gravity field to the eighteenth degree and geocentric coordinates for 104 stations from satellite and terrestrial data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1974-01-01

    Geodetic parameters describing the earth's gravity field and the positions of satellite-tracking stations in a geocentric reference frame have been computed. These parameters were estimated by means of a combination of five different types of data: routine and simultaneous satellite observations, observations of deep space probes, measurements of terrestrial gravity, and surface triangulation data. The combination gives better parameters than does any subset of data types. The dynamic solution used precision-reduced Baker-Nunn observations and laser range data of 25 satellites. Data from the 49-station National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration BC-4 network, the 19-station Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Baker-Nunn network, and independent camera stations were employed in the geometrical solution.

  8. World gravity standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uotila, U. A.

    1978-01-01

    In order to use gravity anomalies in geodetic computations and geophysical interpretations, the observed gravity values from which anomalies are derived should be referred to one consistent world wide system. The International Gravity Standardization Net 1971 was adapted by the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics at Moscow in 1971, the network was result of extensive cooperation by many organizations and individuals around the world. The network contains more than 1800 stations around the world. The data used in the adjustment included more than 25,000 gravimetry, pendulum and absolute measurements.

  9. SOLSPEC investigation on board the International Space Station: The Absolute Solar Spectral Irradiance in the Infrared Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, Gérard; Harder, Jerry; Shapiro, Alexander; Woods, Thomas; Perrin, Jean-Marie; Snow, Marty; Sukhodolov, Timofei; Schmutz, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Onboard the SOLAR payload of the International Space Station (ISS), the SOLSPEC spectrometer measures the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) from 16 to 2900 nm. This instrument uses lamps to monitor its behavior in orbit. In particular, it employs two tungsten ribbon lamps in the IR domain (1000-2900 nm). Initially, the infrared absolute irradiance scale was determined from the preflight laboratory calibration coefficients and the in-flight measurements gathered at first light in April 2008. Subsequent publications suggest a systematic discrepancy between SOLAR-ISS measurements and the ATLAS 3 spectrum obtained from SOLSPEC observations onboard the shuttle-ATLAS missions with the discrepancy reaching 10 % at 1800 nm. We show that such a discrepancy has strong implications for the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and the brightness temperature of the lower solar photosphere. Furthermore, comparisons with independent spectra either obtained on ground and in space will be also shown and commented. The origin of the ATLAS 3 to SOLSPEC differences have been extensively analyzed; the onboard lamp and solar data time series indicates that the IR spectrometer did not reach a permanent regime until after several months of operation. The solar measurements at first light and in permanent regime show a difference, which provides an effective wavelength dependent correction factor for the first light spectrum. The SOLSPEC-ISS spectrum obtained in this permanent regime is consistent with the ATLAS 3 spectrum within their combined uncertainties and will be identified in the literature as SOLAR 2rev. We present analysis of this SOLAR 2rev spectrum in terms of its contribution to TSI, the lower photospheric temperature, and comparisons with independently measured IR spectra from ground-based and on-orbit platforms.

  10. The oscillation model of hydrothermal dynamics beneath Aso volcano, southwest Japan after small eruption on May 2011: A new understanding model using repeated absolute and relative gravity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofyan, Yayan; Nishijima, Jun; Fujimitsu, Yasuhiro; Yoshikawa, Shin; Kagiyama, Tsuneomi; Ohkura, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    At the end of 2010, the seismic activity in Aso volcano intensely increased and water level in the Nakadake crater decreased until early in 2011, then was followed by a small eruption in May 2011. After the eruption and heavy rain, the volcanic activity subsided to calm period, crater bottom was refilled with water, and water level increased in the Nakadake crater. The next tremor reappeared in 2014 and tracked to eruption in November 2014. This eruptive pattern and water level variation in the crater repeatedly appeared on the surface, and it should be related to the hydrothermal dynamics beneath Aso volcano. We initiated the gravity measurements in relation to hydrothermal dynamics in the subsurface of Aso volcano using Scintrex CG-5 (549) and LaCoste Romberg type G-1016 relative gravimeter at 28 benchmarks in April 2011, one month before the eruption. The repeated gravity measurements continue to monitor Aso volcano with a series of the measurement after the eruption in every three months to a half year. We analyze the gravity variation from 2011 to 2014 between the time of the phreatic and strombolian eruption. The measurements covered the area more than 60 km2 in the west side of Aso caldera. A new gravity network was also installed in May 2010 at seven benchmarks using A10-017 absolute gravimeter, which re-occupied in October 2010, June 2011 and two benchmarks in June 2014. As a result, the gravity changes distinguish hydrothermal dynamic in the subsurface, which has a direct correlation to water level fluctuation in the crater, after the first eruption and before the second discharge. The monitoring data notice large gravity changes between the surveys at benchmarks around Nakadake crater and Kusasenri area. The simple 3D inversion models of the 4-D gravity data deduce the density contrast distribution beneath Aso volcano. The inversion and mass change result generate the oscillation typical as a new understanding model. The variation of the mass shows a

  11. Video meteor light curve analysis of Orionids and Geminids and developing a method for obtaining the absolute light curves of shower meteors from the single station data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grašić, L.; Milanović, N.; Pavlović, D.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a method for obtaining the absolute light curves of the shower meteors from single station video data. We found that even though the height of a meteor atmospheric trajectory obtained by using this method may have a large error, the absolute light curve shape is preserved. We used our method to calculate the F parameters of the Orionid and Geminid light curves. The light curves were obtained from the single station video data by the instrument with a limiting sensitivity of 3.5m. We found that for our sample of the light curves the zenith distance of meteor radiant does not affect the F parameter for either of the two showers. The value of F parameter of the Orionids obtained in this paper matches the values obtained by other authors, whilst for the Geminids it is significantly different.

  12. A highly accurate absolute gravimetric network for Albania, Kosovo and Montenegro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Christian; Ruess, Diethard; Butta, Hubert; Qirko, Kristaq; Pavicevic, Bozidar; Murat, Meha

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this project is to establish a basic gravity network in Albania, Kosovo and Montenegro to enable further investigations in geodetic and geophysical issues. Therefore the first time in history absolute gravity measurements were performed in these countries. The Norwegian mapping authority Kartverket is assisting the national mapping authorities in Kosovo (KCA) (Kosovo Cadastral Agency - Agjencia Kadastrale e Kosovës), Albania (ASIG) (Autoriteti Shtetëror i Informacionit Gjeohapësinor) and in Montenegro (REA) (Real Estate Administration of Montenegro - Uprava za nekretnine Crne Gore) in improving the geodetic frameworks. The gravity measurements are funded by Kartverket. The absolute gravimetric measurements were performed from BEV (Federal Office of Metrology and Surveying) with the absolute gravimeter FG5-242. As a national metrology institute (NMI) the Metrology Service of the BEV maintains the national standards for the realisation of the legal units of measurement and ensures their international equivalence and recognition. Laser and clock of the absolute gravimeter were calibrated before and after the measurements. The absolute gravimetric survey was carried out from September to October 2015. Finally all 8 scheduled stations were successfully measured: there are three stations located in Montenegro, two stations in Kosovo and three stations in Albania. The stations are distributed over the countries to establish a gravity network for each country. The vertical gradients were measured at all 8 stations with the relative gravimeter Scintrex CG5. The high class quality of some absolute gravity stations can be used for gravity monitoring activities in future. The measurement uncertainties of the absolute gravity measurements range around 2.5 micro Gal at all stations (1 microgal = 10-8 m/s2). In Montenegro the large gravity difference of 200 MilliGal between station Zabljak and Podgorica can be even used for calibration of relative gravimeters

  13. Principal facts for gravity stations and physical property measurements in the Lake Mead 30' by 60' quadrangle, Nevada and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Davidson, J.G.; Anderson, M.L.; Blank, H.R., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected 811 gravity stations on the Lake Mead 30' by 60' quadrangle from October, 1997 to September, 1999. These data were collected in support of geologic mapping of the Lake Mead quadrangle. In addition to these new data, gravity stations were compiled from a number of sources. These stations were reprocessed according to the reduction method described below and used for the new data. Density and magnetic susceptibility measurements were also performed on more than 250 rock samples. The Lake Mead quadrangle ranges from 360 to 360 30' north latitude and from 114° to 115° west longitude. It spans most of Lake Mead (see index map, below), the largest manmade lake in the United States, and includes most of the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. Its geology is very complex; Mesozoic thrust faults are exposed in the Muddy Mountains, Precambrian crystalline basement rocks are exhumed in tilted fault blocks near Gold Butte, extensive Tertiary volcanism is evident in the Black Mountains, and strike-slip faults of the right-lateral Las Vegas Valley shear zone and the left-lateral Lake Mead fault system meet near the Gale Hills. These gravity data and physical property measurements will aid in the 3-dimensional characterization of structure and stratigraphy in the quadrangle as part of the Las Vegas Urban Corridor mapping project.

  14. Acceleration levels on board the Space Station and a tethered elevator for micro and variable-gravity applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E. C.; Cosmo, M.; Vetrella, S.; Moccia, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the dynamics and acceleration levels of a new tethered system for micro and variable-gravity applications. The system consists of two platforms tethered on opposite sides to the Space Station. A fourth platform, the elevator, is placed in between the Space Station and the upper platform. Variable-g levels on board the elevator are obtained by moving this facility along the upper tether, while micro-g experiments are carried out on board the Space Station. By controlling the length of the lower tether the position of the system CM can be maintained on board the Space Station despite variations of the station's distribution of mass. The paper illustrates the mathematical model, the environmental perturbations and the control techniques which have been adopted for the simulation and control of the system dynamics. Two sets of results from two different simulation runs are shown. The first set shows the system dynamics and the acceleration spectra on board the Space Station and the elevator during station-keeping. The second set of results demonstrates the capability of the elevator to attain a preselected g-level.

  15. Principal facts for gravity stations in the vicinity of Coyote Spring Valley, Nevada, with initial gravity modeling results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, Geoffrey A.; Jewel, E.B.; Langenheim, V.E.; Jachens, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    Gravity measurements were made along 5 profiles across parts of the Coyote Spring Valley and vicinity in order to aid in modeling the depth and shapes of the underlying basins and to locate faults concealed beneath the basin fill. Measurements were taken at 200 m (660 ft) spacing along the profiles. Models based on these and existing regional data reveal two north-south-trending basins beneath Coyote Spring Valley that reach maximum depths of greater than 1 km (0.6 mi). A small valley, located just east of Coyote Spring Valley and containing Dead Man Wash, includes a small basin about 500 m (1600 ft) deep that appears to be the southern continuation of the northern basin beneath Coyote Spring Valley. The profile gravity data are further used to identify the locations of possible faults concealed beneath the basin fill.

  16. Secular effects in the translational-rotational motion of an orbital station with artificial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenov, D. Z.

    Attention is given to an orbital station which has the form of two spheres of the same radius connected with a long tether; the spheres rotate about an axis passing through their common center of mass. Formulas are derived which show that the form of this station has a substantial effect on the translational motion of the station around the earth. The form of the station does not have any secular effect on the rotational motion of the station about the nutation axis.

  17. Surveying with the A10-20 Absolute Gravimeter for Geodesy and Geodynamics - first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krynski, Jan; Sekowski, Marcin

    2010-05-01

    The A10 is the first outdoor absolute gravimeter that allows for the determination of gravity with high precision. Absolute gravity survey with the A10 becomes highly competitive in terms of both efficiency and precision with traditional relative gravity survey. The portable A10-20 absolute gravimeter has been installed at the Borowa Gora Geodetic-Geophysical Observatory in September 2008. Since then a number of test measurements was conducted. Under laboratory conditions the series of gravity determination was obtained at two independent pillars at Borowa Gora as well as in Metsahovi and the BIPM gravimetric laboratories. Also a number outdoor gravity measurements with the use of mobile gravimetric laboratory was performed at the stations of gravity control in Poland and in Finland. The results obtained indicate high quality of gravity determination with the A10 under laboratory conditions and unprecedented quality under field conditions. They confirm the applicability of the A10 absolute gravimeter to the modernization of gravity control and high precision gravity survey required in modern gravity networks, but also its usefulness in microgravimetry as well as geodynamics. Some practical problems concerning the use of the A10 and its operational procedure including laser and frequency standard are discussed.

  18. Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Eric; Will, Clifford M.

    2014-05-01

    Preface; 1. Foundations of Newtonian gravity; 2. Structure of self-gravitating bodies; 3. Newtonian orbital dynamics; 4. Minkowski spacetime; 5. Curved spacetime; 6. Post-Minkowskian theory: formulation; 7. Post-Minkowskian theory: implementation; 8. Post-Newtonian theory: fundamentals; 9. Post-Newtonian theory: system of isolated bodies; 10. Post-Newtonian celestial mechanics, astrometry and navigation; 11. Gravitational waves; 12. Radiative losses and radiation reaction; 13. Alternative theories of gravity; References; Index.

  19. The Planck Constant, the International System of Units, and the 2012 North American Watt Balance Absolute Gravity Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    As outlined in Resolution 1 of the 24th Meeting of the General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM) on the future revision of the International System of Units (SI) [1], the current four SI base units the kilogram, the ampere, the kelvin and the mole, will be redefined in terms of invariants of nature. The new definitions will be based on fixed numerical values of the Planck constant (h), the elementary charge (e), the Boltzmann constant (k), and the Avogadro constant (NA), respectively. While significant progress has been made towards providing the necessary experimental results for the redefinition, some disagreement among the relevant data remain. Among the set of discrepant data towards the redefinition of the SI are the determinations of the Planck constant from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) watt balance [2] and the recent result from the National Research Council Canada (NRC) watt balance [3], with the discrepancy of roughly 2.5 parts in 107 being significantly outside the reported uncertainties. Of major concern is that the watt balance experiment is seen as a key component of a mise en pratique for the new kilogram definition, once such a redefinition takes place. The basic operational principle of a watt balance relates the Planck constant to mass, length, and time through h = mgvC, where m is the mass of an artifact mass standard, g is the local acceleration of gravity, v is a velocity, and C is a combination of frequencies and scalar constants. With the total uncertainty goal for the watt balance on the order of a few parts in 108, g needs to be determined at the location of the mass standard to parts in 109 such that its uncertainty is negligible in the final watt balance result. NIST and NRC have formed a collaborative effort to reconcile the relevant discrepant data and provide further progress towards preparing and testing a mise en pratique for the new kilogram definition. As an initial step, direct comparisons of

  20. Space stations: Living in zero gravity, developmental task for psychologists and space environmental experts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, E.

    1984-01-01

    The recent advances in the psychological aspects of space station design are discussed, including the impact of the increase in awareness of both the public in general as well as space environmental experts of the importance of psychological factors when designing space stations and training astronauts.

  1. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  2. Discharge Estimation Using Satellite Gravity During Flood Seasons at the Óbidos Gauge Station, Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, J.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, Y. K.

    2014-12-01

    Reliable measurement of river discharge is important for management of water resource and understanding of hydrological cycles particularly associated with global and regional climate changes. Practically, to obtain continuous time series of river discharge, regression analysis of an empirical relationship between accumulated water level and discharge data is used. During wet season, however, the relationship includes more uncertainty due to the difficulty of accurate discharge measurement. This is particularly true for the Amazon River because significant amount of water flows outside river channel during flooding. For an alternative way to estimate river discharge, we use GRACE time-varying gravity measurement from January 2003 to December 2012. We first apply Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) for GRACE time-varying gravity fields in Amazon and successfully isolate gravity signal in the main stream. The EOF time series represents relative river discharge variations without larger uncertainty during flooding season compared to conventional in-situ discharge estimate. Estimates of Amazon River discharge based on GRACE data are very close to those from observed at gauge stations during dry seasons. However, our estimates are larger than in-situ data in high water seasons, and the difference is the maximum at the 2009 flooding. This is probably because in-situ observation underestimates river discharge during wet season due possibly to detoured water in river pathway developed during flooding while GRACE observes integrated water mass variations in river channels.

  3. Principal facts for gravity stations collected in 2010 from White Pine and Lincoln Counties, east-central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mankinen, Edward A.; McKee, Edwin H.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing demands on the Colorado River system within the arid Southwestern United States have focused attention on finding new, alternative sources of water. Particular attention is being paid to the eastern Great Basin, where important ground-water systems occur within a regionally extensive sequence of Paleozoic carbonate rocks and in the Cenozoic basin-fill deposits that occur throughout the region. Geophysical investigations to characterize the geologic framework of aquifers in eastern Nevada and western Utah began in a series of cooperative agreements between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Southern Nevada Water Authority in 2003. These studies were intended to better understand the formation of basins, define their subsurface shape and depth, and delineate structures that may impede or enhance groundwater flow. We have combined data from gravity stations established during the current study with previously available data to produce an up-to-date isostatic-gravity map of the study area, using a gravity inversion method to calculate depths to pre-Cenozoic basement rock and to estimate alluvial/volcanic fill in the valleys.

  4. MODELING MULTI-WAVELENGTH STELLAR ASTROMETRY. II. DETERMINING ABSOLUTE INCLINATIONS, GRAVITY-DARKENING COEFFICIENTS, AND SPOT PARAMETERS OF SINGLE STARS WITH SIM LITE

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Harrison, Thomas E.; Gelino, Dawn M.

    2010-11-10

    We present a novel technique to determine the absolute inclination of single stars using multi-wavelength submilliarcsecond astrometry. The technique exploits the effect of gravity darkening, which causes a wavelength-dependent astrometric displacement parallel to a star's projected rotation axis. We find that this effect is clearly detectable using SIM Lite for various giant stars and rapid rotators, and present detailed models for multiple systems using the REFLUX code. We also explore the multi-wavelength astrometric reflex motion induced by spots on single stars. We find that it should be possible to determine spot size, relative temperature, and some positional information for both giant and nearby main-sequence stars utilizing multi-wavelength SIM Lite data. These data will be extremely useful in stellar and exoplanet astrophysics, as well as supporting the primary SIM Lite mission through proper multi-wavelength calibration of the giant star astrometric reference frame, and reduction of noise introduced by starspots when searching for extrasolar planets.

  5. Principal facts for gravity stations in the Elko, Steptoe Valley, Coyote Spring Valley, and Sheep Range areas, eastern and southern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, D.L.; Schaefer, D.H.; Frick, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    Principal facts for 537 gravity stations in the carbonate-rock province of eastern and southern Nevada are tabulated and presented. The gravity data were collected in support of groundwater studies in several valleys. The study areas include the Elko area, northern Steptoe Valley, Coyote Spring Valley, and the western Sheep Range area. The data for each site include values for latitude, longitude, altitude, observed gravity, free- air anomaly, terrain correction, and Bouguer anomaly (calculated at a bedrock density of 2.67 g/cu cm. (USGS)

  6. Equations of motion of a space station with emphasis on the effects of the gravity gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuell, L. P.

    1987-01-01

    The derivation of the equations of motion is based upon the principle of virtual work. As developed, these equations apply only to a space vehicle whose physical model consists of a rigid central carrier supporting several flexible appendages (not interconnected), smaller rigid bodies, and point masses. Clearly evident in the equations is the respect paid to the influence of the Earth's gravity field, considerably more than has been the custom in simulating vehicle motion. The effect of unpredictable crew motion is ignored.

  7. Gravity related research with fishes — perspectives in regard to the upcoming international space station, ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmann, H.; Anken, R. H.

    During the entire evolution of life on Earth, the development of all organisms took place under constant gravity conditions, against which they achieved specific countermeasures for compensation and adaptation. On this background, it is still an open question to which extent altered gravity such as hypergravity (centrifuge) or microgravity (spaceflight) affects the normal individual development, either on the systemic level of the whole organism or on the level of individual organs or even single cells. The present review provides information on these questions, comprising gravistimulated effects on invertebrates and vertebrates (with the exception of mammals, since respective biomedically oriented reviews abound), focusing on developing fish as model systems, with special emphasis on the effect of altered gravity on the developing brain and vestibular system, comprising investigations on behaviour and plastic reactivities of the brain and inner ear. Clues and insights into the possible basic causes of space motion sickness-phenomena (SMS; a kinetosis) are provided as well as perspectives in regard to future work to be done including studies on the ISS concerning the analysis of gravistimulated effects on developmental issues (imprinting phase for graviperception?).

  8. Effects of strength training, using a gravity-independent exercise system, performed during 110 days of simulated space station confinement.

    PubMed

    Alkner, Björn A; Berg, Hans E; Kozlovskaya, Inessa; Sayenko, Dimitri; Tesch, Per A

    2003-09-01

    The efficacy of a resistance exercise paradigm, using a gravity-independent flywheel principle, was examined in four men subjected to 110 days of confinement (simulation of flight of international crew on space station; SFINCSS-99). Subjects performed six upper- and lower-body exercises (calf raise, squat, back extension, seated row, lateral shoulder raise, biceps curl) 2-3 times weekly during the confinement. The exercise regimen consisted of four sets of ten repetitions of each exercise at estimated 80-100% of maximal effort. Work was measured and recorded in each exercise session. Maximal voluntary isometric force in the calf press, squat and back extension, was assessed at three different joint angles before and after confinement. Overall, the training load (work) increased in all subjects (range 16-108%) over the course of the intervention. Maximal voluntary isometric force was unchanged following confinement. Although the perceived level of strain and comfort varied between exercises and among individuals, the results of the present study suggest this resistance exercise regimen is effective in maintaining or even increasing performance and maximal force output during long-term confinement. These findings should be considered in the design of resistance exercise hardware and prescriptions to be employed on the International Space Station. PMID:12783231

  9. Mobile work station concept for assembly of large space structures (zero gravity simulation tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, W. L., Jr.; Bush, H. G.; Wallsom, R. E.; Jensen, J. K.

    1982-01-01

    The concept presented is intended to enhance astronaut assembly of truss structure that is either too large or complex to fold for efficient Shuttle delivery to orbit. The potential of augmented astronaut assembly is illustrated by applying the result of the tests to a barebones assembly of a truss structure. If this structure were assembled from the same nestable struts that were used in the Mobile Work Station assembly tests, the spacecraft would be 55 meters in diameter and consist of about 500 struts. The struts could be packaged in less than 1/2% of the Shuttle cargo bay volume and would take up approximately 3% of the mass lift capability. They could be assembled in approximately four hours. This assembly concept for erectable structures is not only feasible, but could be used to significant economic advantage by permitting the superior packaging feature of erectable structures to be exploited and thereby reduce expensive Shuttle delivery flights.

  10. Field estimates of gravity terrain corrections and Y2K-compatible method to convert from gravity readings with multiple base stations to tide- and long-term drift-corrected observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plouff, Donald

    2000-01-01

    Gravity observations are directly made or are obtained from other sources by the U.S. Geological Survey in order to prepare maps of the anomalous gravity field and consequently to interpret the subsurface distribution of rock densities and associated lithologic or geologic units. Observations are made in the field with gravity meters at new locations and at reoccupations of previously established gravity "stations." This report illustrates an interactively-prompted series of steps needed to convert gravity "readings" to values that are tied to established gravity datums and includes computer programs to implement those steps. Inasmuch as individual gravity readings have small variations, gravity-meter (instrument) drift may not be smoothly variable, and acommodations may be needed for ties to previously established stations, the reduction process is iterative. Decision-making by the program user is prompted by lists of best values and graphical displays. Notes about irregularities of topography, which affect the value of observed gravity but are not shown in sufficient detail on topographic maps, must be recorded in the field. This report illustrates ways to record field notes (distances, heights, and slope angles) and includes computer programs to convert field notes to gravity terrain corrections. This report includes approaches that may serve as models for other applications, for example: portrayal of system flow; style of quality control to document and validate computer applications; lack of dependence on proprietary software except source code compilation; method of file-searching with a dwindling list; interactive prompting; computer code to write directly in the PostScript (Adobe Systems Incorporated) printer language; and high-lighting the four-digit year on the first line of time-dependent data sets for assured Y2K compatibility. Computer source codes provided are written in the Fortran scientific language. In order for the programs to operate, they first

  11. Loading effect of a self-consistent equilibrium ocean pole tide on the gravimetric parameters of the gravity pole tides at superconducting gravimeter stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Ducarme, Bernard; Sun, Heping; Xu, Jianqiao

    2008-05-01

    The gravimetric parameters of the gravity pole tide are the amplitude factor δ, which is the ratio of gravity variations induced by polar motion for a real Earth to variations computed for a rigid one, and the phase difference κ between the observed and the rigid gravity pole tide. They can be estimated from the records of superconducting gravimeters (SGs). However, they are affected by the loading effect of the ocean pole tide. Recent results from TOPEX/Poseidon (TP) altimeter confirm that the ocean pole tide has a self-consistent equilibrium response. Accordingly, we calculate the gravity loading effects as well as their influence on the gravimetric parameters of gravity pole tide at all the 26 SG stations in the world on the assumption of a self-consistent equilibrium ocean pole tide model. The gravity loading effect is evaluated between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2006. Numerical results show that the amplitude of the gravity loading effect reaches 10 -9 m s -2, which is larger than the accuracy (10 -10 m s -2) of a SG. The gravimetric factor δ is 1% larger at all SG stations. Then, the contribution of a self-consistent ocean pole tide to the pole tide gravimetric parameters cannot be ignored as it exceeds the current accuracy of the estimation of the pole tide gravity factors. For the nine stations studied in Ducarme et al. [Ducarme, B., Venedikov, A.P., Arnoso, J., et al., 2006. Global analysis of the GGP superconducting gravimeters network for the estimation of the pole tide gravimetric amplitude factor. J. Geodyn. 41, 334-344.], the mean of the modeled tidal factors δm = 1.1813 agrees very well with the result of a global analysis δCH = 1.1816 ± 0.0047 in that paper. On the other hand, the modeled phase difference κm varies from -0.273° to 0.351°. Comparing to the two main periods of the gravity pole tide, annual period and Chandler period, κm is too small to be considered. Therefore, The computed time difference κL induced by a self

  12. Identification of inertia gravity wave sources observed in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere over a tropical station Gadanki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramitha, M.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Leena, P. P.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.; Vijaya Bhaskar Rao, S.

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, sources for the inertia-gravity waves (IGWs) that are observed in the troposphere and lower stratosphere during different seasons over a tropical station Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), India, have been identified. For this we have used long-term high resolution radiosonde observations of horizontal winds and temperature during May 2006 to March 2014. The IGW parameters are extracted using Stokes method. Rotary analysis is applied to the wind data to find the vertical direction of propagation. Dominant vertical wavelengths for these waves are obtained from FFT in the altitude domain as well as from apparent frequency method. The vertical and horizontal wavelengths are found to be in the range of 2-5 km (1-3 km) and 500-1500 km (1000-2000 km) in the troposphere (stratosphere), respectively. Using Stokes parameter method we have obtained the statistics of the number of the waves which are monochromatic. GROGRAT model with ERA-Interim data as the background atmosphere is used to identify the terminal (and source) points (sources) for the observed waves. In general, 53% of the waves observed over this location have convection as source and for only 38% of the cases vertical shear in the horizontal wind is identified as a source. For the rest of the 9% of the cases, these two sources are not found to be active.

  13. The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), a Resource for Gravity-Dependent Phenomena Research on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Reggie A.; Jeter, Linda B.; Vonk, Chris

    2007-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is a double rack facility aboard the International Space Station (ISS) designed for gravity-dependent phenomena investigation handling. The MSG has been operating in the ISS US Laboratory Module since July 2002. The MSG facility provides an enclosed working area for investigation manipulation and observation in the ISS. The MSG s unique design provides two levels of containment to protect the ISS crew from hazardous operations. Research investigations operating inside the MSG are provided a large 255 liter work volume, 1000 watts of dc power via a versatile supply interface (120,28, +/-12, and 5 Vdc), 1000 watts of cooling capability, video and data recording and real time downlink, ground commanding capabilities, access to ISS Vacuum Exhaust and Vacuum Resource Systems, and gaseous nitrogen supply. With these capabilities, the MSG is an ideal platform for research required to advance the technology readiness levels (TRL) needed for the Crew Exploration Vehicle and the Exploration Initiative. Areas of research that will benefit from investigations in the MSG include thermal management, fluid physics, spacecraft fire safety, materials science, combustion and reacting control systems, in situ fabrication and repair, and advanced life support technologies. This paper will provide a detailed explanation of the MSG facility, a synopsis of the research that has already been accomplished in the MSG, an overview of investigations planning to operate in the MSG, and possible augmentations that can be added to the MSG facility to further enhance the resources provided to investigations.

  14. Gravity gradient torque profiles over an orbit for arbitrary modular space station configurations in the Y-POP and inertial hold modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgill, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    For several proposed configurations of the modular space station, the gravity gradient torque distribution is examined for both Y-POP and inertial hold orbits. The necessary equations are derived to allow for solar panel gimbaling, and a procedure is established which will allow any desired space station configuration to be built up. Results indicated that solar panel gimbaling can be a significant factor in the torque distribution in Y-POP orbits. In addition, for the two configurations that were plotted, bias torque magnitudes varied widely in inertial hold modes.

  15. Absolute Gravimetry in Fennoscandia - A Contribution to Understanding Postglacial Uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, B. R.; Timmen, L.; Gitlein, O.; Muller, J.; Denker, H.; Makinen, J.; Bilker, M.; Lysaker, D. I.; Omang, O. C.; Svendsen, J. G.; Wilmes, H.; Falk, R.; Reinhold, A.; Hoppe, W.; Scherneck, H.; Lidberg, M.; Engen, B.; Kristiansen, O.; Engfeldt, A.; Strykowski, G.; Forsberg, R.; Klopping, F.; Sasagawa, G.

    2005-12-01

    The Fennoscandian postglacial uplift has been mapped geometrically using precise levelling, tide gauges, and networks of permanent GPS stations. The results identify major uplift rates at sites located around the northern part of the Gulf of Bothnia. The vertical motions decay in all directions away from this central location. An oval shaped zero uplift isoline tracks the general western and northern coastline of Norway and the Kola peninsula. It returns southwest through Russian Karelia and touches the southern tip of Sweden and northern Denmark. The uplift area (as measured by present day motions) has its major axis in the direction of southwest to northeast and covers a distance of about 2000 km. Absolute gravimetry was made in Finland and Norway in 1976 with a rise-and fall instrument. A decade later the number of gravity stations was expanded by JILAg-5, in Finland from 1988, in Norway from 1991, and in Sweden from 1992. FG5 was introduced in these three countries in 1993 (7 stations) and continued with an extended campaign in 1995 (12 stations). In 2003 a project was initiated by IfE, Hannover to collect observations simultaneously with GRACE on an annual cycle. New instruments were acquired by IfE (FG5-220), FGI (FG5-221), and UMB (FG5-226). New absolute gravity stations were established by the national mapping agencies in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. The total number of prepared sites in Fennoscandia is now about 30. Most of them are co-located with permanent GPS, for many of which time series of several years are now available. Along the coast there are nearby tide gauge stations, many of which have time series of several decades. We describe the observing network, procedures, auxiliary observations, and discuss results obtained for selected sites. We compare the gravity results from different instruments and discuss the challenges of combining and validating such data products. Examples are shown where temporal gravity change may be compared to

  16. Principal facts, accuracies, sources, and base station descriptions for gravity stations in the Nevada part of the Goldfield and Mariposa 2/sup 0/ sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Healey, D.L.; Wahl, R.R.; Currey, F.E.

    1981-03-01

    More than 12,000 gravity observations have been taken, from 1958 to the present, in the Nevada part of the Goldfield and Mariposa 2/sup 0/ sheets. Numerous reports are available that present discrete parts of the data. This report is a compilation of all these data after conversion to the International Gravity Standardization Network. The report provides descriptive information and offers a source for principal facts.

  17. Principal facts for new gravity stations in the Pahute Mesa and Oasis Valley areas, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Jeffrey G.; Hildenbrand, Thoma G.; Mankinen, Edward A.; Roberts, Carter W.

    1998-12-15

    Regional gravity and aeromagnetic maps of the Pahute Mesa and Oasis Valley region indicate the presence of several structures that may influence the flow of groundwater. For example, several prominent linear features expressed by both gravity and aeromagentic data could act either as barriers or conduits for groundwater. The current gravity study was undertaken to better define the boundaries of the interpreted major regional structures in the area.

  18. Gravity Variations in the Austrian Central Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruess, D. R.

    2003-04-01

    Gravity measurements have been carried out in the Oetztaler Alpen in Tyrol, Austria twice a year since 1987 using the JILAg-6 free fall absolute gravimeter. An Increasing g-value has been detected in the order of about 25 μGals (250 nm/s^2). The observation station is situated in an area of postulated uplift of ˜1,5 mm/year which should have effected a decreasing gravity of ˜5 μGals over 15 years. There also a seasonal effect can be seen in the gravity graph. The increasing gravity will be explained by ablation of the surrounding glaciers and the seasonal variations may be traced back to the compounded precipitation (snow) during the winter time.

  19. Development of Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment on the International Space Station- Normal and Low Gravity Flow Boiling Experiment Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Hall, Nancy R.; Hasan, Mohammad M.; Wagner, James D.; May, Rochelle L.; Mackey, Jeffrey R.; Kolacz, John S.; Butcher, Robert L.; Frankenfield, Bruce J.; Mudawar, Issam; Konichi, Chris; Hyounsoon, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Flow boiling and condensation have been identified as two key mechanisms for heat transport that are vital for achieving weight and volume reduction as well as performance enhancement in future space systems. Since inertia driven flows are demanding on power usage, lower flows are desirable. However, in microgravity, lower flows are dominated by forces other than inertia (like the capillary force). It is of paramount interest to investigate limits of low flows beyond which the flow is inertial enough to be gravity independent. One of the objectives of the Flow Boiling and Condensation Flight Experiment sets to investigate these limits for flow boiling and condensation. A two-phase flow loop consisting of a Flow Boiling Module and two Condensation Modules has been developed to experimentally study flow boiling condensation heat transfer in the reduced gravity environment provided by the reduced gravity platform. This effort supports the development of a flow boiling and condensation facility for the International Space Station (ISS). The closed loop test facility is designed to deliver the test fluid, FC-72 to the inlet of any one of the test modules at specified thermodynamic and flow conditions. The zero-g-aircraft tests will provide subcooled and saturated flow boiling critical heat flux and flow condensation heat transfer data over wide range of flow velocities. Additionally, these tests will verify the performance of all gravity sensitive components, such as evaporator, condenser and accumulator associated with the two-phase flow loop. We will present in this paper the breadboard development and testing results which consist of detailed performance evaluation of the heater and condenser combination in reduced and normal gravity. We will also present the design of the reduced gravity aircraft rack and the results of the ground flow boiling heat transfer testing performed with the Flow Boiling Module that is designed to investigate flow boiling heat transfer and

  20. Seasonal and height variations of gravity waves in the middle atmosphere over Syowa Station (69S, 40E) in the Antarctic using Rayleigh/Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takuji; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Nishiyama, Takanori; Tomikawa, Yoshihiro; Kogure, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves generated in the lower atmosphere, or near the surface, propagate upward and transfer significant momentum and energy into the middle atmosphere/lower thermosphere. Recently it is known gravity waves are extensively generated in the high latitudes in the southern hemisphere, but not many have been reported on the generation, propagation and dissipation of such waves. In this study, we investigated gravity wave profiles in the high latitude southern hemisphere by potential energy (Ep) in the height range of 15-70 km from May 2011 to October 2013 by using Rayleigh/Raman lidar located at Syowa station (69S, 40E), in the Antarctic. Above 35km altitude, Ep was maximized during winter. The seasonal dependence of Ep over Syowa was similar to those observed at Davis (69S,79E) [Alexander et al., 2011]. Below 35 km altitude, Ep was enhanced in around May, and did not decrease in September. Almost all monthly mean profiles showed similar growth rate (corresponding scale height of about 12-14 km) above 30 km altitude. Furthermore, almost all Ep profiles have a local minimum around 25 km altitude and a local maximum around 20 km altitude, suggesting significant loss of the gravity waves between 20-25 km. In October 2012, The profile of Ep in October 2012 was quite different from those in the other months. Comparisons with zonal wind in the NASA/MERRA reanalysis data suggests that a height region of weak zonal winds descended earlier in 2012 than in the other years. This also suggests gravity waves below stratosphere include waves with slow phase speed.

  1. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  2. The Implications for Higher-Accuracy Absolute Measurements for NGS and its GRAV-D Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, V. A.; Winester, D.; Roman, D. R.; Eckl, M. C.; Smith, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Absolute and relative gravity measurements play an important role in the work of NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS). When NGS decided to replace the US national vertical datum, the Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) project added a new dimension to the NGS gravity program. Airborne gravity collection would complement existing satellite and surface gravity data to allow the creation of a gravimetric geoid sufficiently accurate to form the basis of the new reference surface. To provide absolute gravity ties for the airborne surveys, initially new FG5 absolute measurements were made at existing absolute stations and relative measurements were used to transfer those measurements to excenters near the absolute mark and to the aircraft sensor height at the parking space. In 2011, NGS obtained a field-capable A10 absolute gravimeter from Micro-g LaCoste which became the basis of the support of the airborne surveys. Now A10 measurements are made at the aircraft location and transferred to sensor height. Absolute and relative gravity play other roles in GRAV-D. Comparison of surface data with new airborne collection will highlight surface surveys with bias or tilt errors and can provide enough information to repair or discard the data. We expect that areas of problem surface data may be re-measured. The GRAV-D project also plans to monitor the geoid in regions of rapid change and update the vertical datum when appropriate. Geoid change can result from glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA), tectonic change, and the massive drawdown of large scale aquifers. The NGS plan for monitoring these changes over time is still in its preliminary stages and is expected to rely primarily on the GRACE and GRACE Follow On satellite data in conjunction with models of GIA and tectonic change. We expect to make absolute measurements in areas of rapid change in order to verify model predictions. With the opportunities presented by rapid, highly accurate

  3. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  4. Gravity investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Healey, D.L.

    1983-12-31

    A large density contrast exists between the Paleozoic rocks (including the rocks of Climax stock) and less dense, Tertiary volcanic rocks and alluvium. This density contrast ranges widely, and herein for interpretive purposes, is assumed to average 0.85 Mg/m{sup 3} (megagrams per cubic meter). The large density contrast makes the gravity method a useful tool with which to study the interface between these rock types. However, little or no density contrast is discernible between the sedimentary Paleozoic rocks that surround the Climax stock and the intrusive rocks of the stock itself. Therefore the gravity method can not be used to define the configuration of the stock. Gravity highs coincide with outcrops of the dense Paleozoic rocks, and gravity lows overlie less-dense Tertiary volcanic rocks and Quaternary alluvium. The positions of three major faults (Boundary, Yucca, and Butte faults) are defined by steep gravity gradients. West of the Climax stock, the Tippinip fault has juxtaposed Paleozoic rocks of similar density, and consequently, has no expression in the gravity data in that area. The gravity station spacing, across Oak Spring Butte, is not sufficient to adequately define any gravity expression of the Tippinip fault. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Particle Engulfment and Pushing (PEP): Past Micro-Gravity Experiments and Future Experimental Plan on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, Subhayu; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Catalina, A. V.; Juretzko, F.; Dhindaw, B. K.; Curreri, P. A.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of an insoluble particle with a growing solid-liquid interface (SLI) has been a subject of investigation for the four decades. For a metallurgist or a material scientist understanding the fundamental physics of such an interaction is relevant for applications that include distribution of reinforcement particles in metal matrix composites, inclusion management in castings, and distribution of Y2Ba1Cu1O5 (211) precipitates (flux pinning sites) in Y1Ba2Cu3O7 (123) superconducting crystals. The same physics is also applicable to other areas including geological applications (frost heaving in soils) and preservation of biological cells. Experimentally this interaction can be quantified in terms of a critical growth velocity, Vcr, of the SLI below which particles are pushed ahead of the advancing interface, and above which the particles are engulfed. Past experimental evidence suggests that this Vcr is an inverse function of the particle radius, R. In order to isolate the fundamental physics that governs such a relationship it is necessary to minimize natural convection at the SLI that is inherent in ground based experiments. Hence for the purpose of producing benchmark data (Vcr vs. R) PEP is a natural candidate for micro-gravity experimentation. Accordingly, experiments with pure Al containing a dispersion of ZrO2 particles and an organic analogue, succinonitrile (SCN) containing polystyrene particles have been performed on the LMS and USMP-4 mission respectively. In this paper we will summarize the experimental data that was obtained during these two micro-gravity missions and show that the results differ compared to terrestrial experiments. We will also discuss the basic elements of our analytical and numerical model and present a comparison of the predictions of these models against micro-gravity experimental data. Finally. we will discuss our future experimental plan that includes the ISS glovebox and MSRRl.

  6. Gravity increase before the 2015 Mw 7.8 Nepal earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shi; Liu, Mian; Xing, Lelin; Xu, Weimin; Wang, Wuxing; Zhu, Yiqing; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The 25 April 2015 Nepal earthquake (Mw 7.8) ruptured a segment of the Himalayan front fault zone. Four absolute gravimetric stations in southern Tibet, surveyed from 2010/2011 to 2013 and corrected for secular variations, recorded up to 22.40 ± 1.11 μGal/yr of gravity increase during this period. The gravity increase is distinct from the long-wavelength secular trends of gravity decrease over the Tibetan Plateau and may be related to interseismic mass change around the locked plate interface under the Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau. We modeled the source region as a disk of 580 km in diameter, which is consistent with the notion that much of the southern Tibetan crust is involved in storing strain energy that drives the Himalayan earthquakes. If validated in other regions, high-precision ground measurements of absolute gravity may provide a useful method for monitoring mass changes in the source regions of potential large earthquakes.

  7. Our World: Gravity in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    What is gravity? Find out about the balance between gravity and inertia that keeps the International Space Station in orbit. Learn why astronauts "float" in space and how the space shuttle has to s...

  8. Gravity effects obtained from global hydrology models in comparison with high precision gravimetric time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wziontek, Hartmut; Wilmes, Herbert; Güntner, Andreas; Creutzfeldt, Benjamin

    2010-05-01

    Water mass changes are a major source of variations in residual gravimetric time series obtained from the combination of observations with superconducting and absolute gravimeters. Changes in the local water storage are the main influence, but global variations contribute to the signal significantly. For three European gravity stations, Bad Homburg, Wettzell and Medicina, different global hydrology models are compared. The influence of topographic effects is discussed and due to the long-term stability of the combined gravity time series, inter-annual signals in model data and gravimetric observations are compared. Two sources of influence are discriminated, i.e., the effect of a local zone with an extent of a few kilometers around the gravimetric station and the global contribution beyond 50km. Considering their coarse resolution and uncertainties, local effects calculated from global hydrological models are compared with the in-situ gravity observations and, for the station Wettzell, with local hydrological monitoring data.

  9. Gravity-dependent differentiation and root coils in Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and phospholipase-A-I knockdown mutant grown on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Scherer, G F E; Pietrzyk, P

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis roots on 45° tilted agar in 1-g grow in wave-like figures. In addition to waves, formation of root coils is observed in several mutants compromised in gravitropism and/or auxin transport. The knockdown mutant ppla-I-1 of patatin-related phospholipase-A-I is delayed in root gravitropism and forms increased numbers of root coils. Three known factors contribute to waving: circumnutation, gravisensing and negative thigmotropism. In microgravity, deprivation of wild type (WT) and mutant roots of gravisensing and thigmotropism and circumnutation (known to slow down in microgravity, and could potentially lead to fewer waves or increased coiling in both WT and mutant). To resolve this, mutant ppla-I-1 and WT were grown in the BIOLAB facility in the International Space Station. In 1-g, roots of both types only showed waving. In the first experiment in microgravity, the mutant after 9 days formed far more coils than in 1-g but the WT also formed several coils. After 24 days in microgravity, in both types the coils were numerous with slightly more in the mutant. In the second experiment, after 9 days in microgravity only the mutant formed coils and the WT grew arcuated roots. Cell file rotation (CFR) on the mutant root surface in microgravity decreased in comparison to WT, and thus was not important for coiling. Several additional developmental responses (hypocotyl elongation, lateral root formation, cotyledon expansion) were found to be gravity-influenced. We tentatively discuss these in the context of disturbances in auxin transport, which are known to decrease through lack of gravity. PMID:24373011

  10. Artificial gravity in space and in medical research.

    PubMed

    Cardús, D

    1994-05-01

    The history of manned space flight has repeatedly documented the fact that prolonged sojourn in space causes physiological deconditioning. Physiological deterioration has raised a legitimate concern about man's ability to adequately perform in the course of long missions and even the possibility of leading to circumstances threatening survival. One of the possible countermeasures of physiological deconditioning, theoretically more complete than others presently used since it affects all bodily systems, is artificial gravity. Space stations and spacecrafts can be equipped with artificial gravity, but is artificial gravity necessary? The term "necessary" must be qualified because a meaningful answer to the question depends entirely on further defining the purpose of space travel. If man intends to stay only temporarily in space, then he must keep himself in good physical condition so as to be able to return to earth or to land on any other planetary surface without undue exposure to major physiological problems resulting from transition through variable gravitational fields. Such a situation makes artificial gravity highly desirable, although perhaps not absolutely necessary in the case of relative short exposure to microgravity, but certainly necessary in interplanetary flight and planetary landings. If the intent is to remain indefinitely in space, to colonize space, then artificial gravity may not be necessary, but in this case the consequences of long term effects of adaptation to weightlessness will have to be weighed against the biological evolutionary outcomes that are to be expected. At the moment, plans for establishing permanent colonies in space seem still remote. More likely, the initial phase of exploration of the uncharted solar system will take place through successive, scope limited, research ventures ending with return to earth. This will require man to be ready to operate in gravitational fields of variable intensity. Equipping spacecrafts or space

  11. Artificial gravity in space and in medical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardus, D.

    1994-01-01

    The history of manned space flight has repeatedly documented the fact that prolonged sojourn in space causes physiological deconditioning. Physiological deterioration has raised a legitimate concern about man's ability to adequately perform in the course of long missions and even the possibility of leading to circumstances threatening survival. One of the possible countermeasures of physiological deconditioning, theoretically more complete than others presently used since it affects all bodily systems, is artificial gravity. Space stations and spacecrafts can be equipped with artificial gravity, but is artificial gravity necessary? The term "necessary" must be qualified because a meaningful answer to the question depends entirely on further defining the purpose of space travel. If man intends to stay only temporarily in space, then he must keep himself in good physical condition so as to be able to return to earth or to land on any other planetary surface without undue exposure to major physiological problems resulting from transition through variable gravitational fields. Such a situation makes artificial gravity highly desirable, although perhaps not absolutely necessary in the case of relative short exposure to microgravity, but certainly necessary in interplanetary flight and planetary landings. If the intent is to remain indefinitely in space, to colonize space, then artificial gravity may not be necessary, but in this case the consequences of long term effects of adaptation to weightlessness will have to be weighed against the biological evolutionary outcomes that are to be expected. At the moment, plans for establishing permanent colonies in space seem still remote. More likely, the initial phase of exploration of the uncharted solar system will take place through successive, scope limited, research ventures ending with return to earth. This will require man to be ready to operate in gravitational fields of variable intensity. Equipping spacecrafts or space

  12. An Overview of the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Facility, and the Gravity-Dependent Phenomena Research Performed in the MSG on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Reggie A.; Sheredy, William A.; Flores, Ginger

    2008-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is a double rack facility aboard the International Space Station (ISS) designed for gravity-dependent phenomena investigation handling. The MSG has been operating in the ISS US Laboratory Module since July 2002. The MSG facility provides an enclosed working area for investigation manipulation and observation, The MSG's unique design provides two levels of containment to protect the ISS crew from hazardous operations. Research investigations operating inside the MSG are provided a large 255 liter work volume, 1000 watts of dc power via a versatile supply interface (120, 28, +/-12, and 5 Vdc), 1000 watts of cooling capability, video and data recording and real time downlink, ground commanding capabilities, access to ISS Vacuum Exhaust and Vacuum Resource Systems, and gaseous nitrogen supply. With these capabilities, the MSG is an ideal platform for research required to advance the technology readiness levels (TRL) needed for the Crew Exploration Vehicle and the Exploration Initiative. Areas of research that will benefit from investigations in the MSG include thermal management, fluid physics, spacecraft fire safety, materials science, combustion, reaction control systems, in situ fabrication and repair, and advanced life support technologies. This paper will provide a detailed explanation of the MSG facility, a synopsis of the research that has already been accomplished in the MSG and an overview of investigations planning to operate in the MSG. In addition, this paper will address possible changes to the MSG utilization process that will be brought about by the transition to ISS as a National Laboratory.

  13. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    The use is studied of tether systems to improve the lowest possible steady gravity level on the Space Station. Particular emphasis is placed by the microgravity community on the achievement of high quality microgravity conditions. The tether capability is explored for active control of the center of gravity and the analysis of possible tethered configurations.

  14. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  15. The Current Status of the Space Station Biological Research Project: a Core Facility Enabling Multi-Generational Studies under Slectable Gravity Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, O.

    2002-01-01

    The Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) has developed a new plan which greatly reduces the development costs required to complete the facility. This new plan retains core capabilities while allowing for future growth. The most important piece of equipment required for quality biological research, the 2.5 meter diameter centrifuge capable of accommodating research specimen habitats at simulated gravity levels ranging from microgravity to 2.0 g, is being developed by NASDA, the Japanese space agency, for the SSBRP. This is scheduled for flight to the ISS in 2007. The project is also developing a multi-purpose incubator, an automated cell culture unit, and two microgravity habitat holding racks, currently scheduled for launch in 2005. In addition the Canadian Space Agency is developing for the project an insect habitat, which houses Drosophila melanogaster, and provides an internal centrifuge for 1 g controls. NASDA is also developing for the project a glovebox for the contained manipulation and analysis of biological specimens, scheduled for launch in 2006. This core facility will allow for experimentation on small plants (Arabidopsis species), nematode worms (C. elegans), fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), and a variety of microorganisms, bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells. We propose a plan for early utilization which focuses on surveys of changes in gene expression and protein structure due to the space flight environment. In the future, the project is looking to continue development of a rodent habitat and a plant habitat that can be accommodated on the 2.5 meter centrifuge. By utilizing the early phases of the ISS to broadly answer what changes occur at the genetic and protein level of cells and organisms exposed to the ISS low earth orbit environment, we can generate interest for future experiments when the ISS capabilities allow for direct manipulation and intervention of experiments. The ISS continues to hold promise for high quality, long

  16. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  17. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1990-01-01

    The scope of the study is to investigate ways of controlling the microgravity environment of the International Space Station by means of a tethered system. Four main study tasks were performed. First, researchers analyzed the utilization of the tether systems to improve the lowest possible steady gravity level on the Space Station and the tether capability to actively control the center of gravity position in order to compensate for activities that would upset the mass distribution of the Station. The purpose of the second task was to evaluate the whole of the experiments performable in a variable gravity environment and the related beneficial residual accelerations, both for pure and applied research in the fields of fluid, materials, and life science, so as to assess the relevance of a variable g-level laboratory. The third task involves the Tethered Variable Gravity Laboratory. The use of the facility that would crawl along a deployed tether and expose experiments to varying intensities of reduced gravity is discussed. Last, a study performed on the Attitude Tether Stabilizer concept is discussed. The stabilization effect of ballast masses tethered to the Space Station was investigated as a means of assisting the attitude control system of the Station.

  18. New gravity control in Poland - needs, the concept and the design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krynski, Jan; Olszak, Tomasz; Barlik, Marcin; Dykowski, Przemyslaw

    2013-06-01

    The existing Polish gravity control (POGK) established in the last few years of 20th century according to the international standards is spanned on 12 absolute gravity stations surveyed with four different types of absolute gravimeters. Relative measurements performed by various groups on nearly 350 points of POGK with the use of LaCoste&Romberg (LCR) gravimeters were linked to those 12 stations. The construction of the network, in particular the limited number of non homogeneously distributed absolute gravity stations with gravity determined with different instruments in different epochs is responsible for systematic errors in g on POGK stations. The estimate of those errors with the use of gravity measurements performed in 2007-2008 is given and their possible sources are discussed. The development of absolute gravity measurement technologies, in particular instruments for precise field absolute gravity measurements, provides an opportunity to establish new type of gravity control consisting of stations surveyed with absolute gravimeters. New gravity control planned to be established in 2012-2014 will consist of 28 fundamental points (surveyed with the FG5 - gravimeter), and 169 base points (surveyed with the A10 gravimeter). It will fulfill recent requirements of geodesy and geodynamics and it will provide good link to the existing POGK. A number of stations of the new gravity control with precisely determined position and height will form the national combined geodetic network. Methodology and measurement schemes for both absolute gravimeters as well as the technology for vertical gravity gradient determinations in the new gravity control were developed and tested. The way to assure proper gravity reference level with relation to ICAG and ECAG campaigns as well as local absolute gravimeter comparisons are described highlighting the role of metrology in the project. Integral part of the project are proposals of re-computation of old gravity data and their

  19. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  20. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  1. Electricity from Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Roy

    2007-03-01

    Einstein's cosmological constant as gravity, will unify quantum mechanics to general relativity and link gravity to electromagnetism. Then, an electromagnetic vacuum engine driven by the force that spins, moves, and sustains mass at the subatomic level, will do free, what generators cannot. Flowing outward-bound sinusoidally from its source, this gravity force assumes a three-dimensional spherical universe. Lines of force intersect, spinning into gyroscopic particles and passes as time-present, with a compression gravity of space-time curvature continuum unifying all mass. The spaces between approaching masses suffer a decrease of right-angled vacuum energy, increasing external pressures, pushing them together. Ubiquitous gravity now interacts electromagnetically with mass. Gravity's ``heat energy'' operates below absolute zero and squeezes mass into thermonuclear ignition of stars. Creation needs a gravity field for the propagation of light that will make sense of its wave/particle behavior. Creation from a white hole recycles down through a black one, into new beginnings of galaxies. ``Vacuum energy'' will light cities and factories; faster than light spacecraft will raise silently from the ground utilizing the very gravity it defies, propelling us to the stars.

  2. Variable gravity research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Sean; Ancheta, Stan; Beine, Donna; Cink, Brian; Eagon, Mark; Eckstein, Brett; Luhman, Dan; Mccowan, Daniel; Nations, James; Nordtvedt, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Spin and despin requirements; sequence of activities required to assemble the Variable Gravity Research Facility (VGRF); power systems technology; life support; thermal control systems; emergencies; communication systems; space station applications; experimental activities; computer modeling and simulation of tether vibration; cost analysis; configuration of the crew compartments; and tether lengths and rotation speeds are discussed.

  3. Coupled Gravity and Elevation Measurements of Ice Sheet Mass Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezek, K. C.

    2005-01-01

    We measured surface gravity and position at ten locations about two glaciological measurement networks located on the South-central Greenland Ice during June 2004. Six of the individual sites of the first network were occupied the previous year. At the repeat sites we were able to measure annual accumulation rate and surface displacement by referencing measurements to aluminum poles left in the firn the previous year. We occupied 4 additional sites at a second measurement network for the first time since initial observations were last made at the network in 1981. At each individual site, we operated a GPS unit for 90 minutes - the unit was operated simultaneously with a base station unit in Sondrestrom Fjord so as to enable differential, post-processing of the data. We installed an aluminum, accumulation-rate-pole at each site. The base section of the pole also served as the mount for the GPS antenna. A new, Scintrex gravimeter was used at each site and relative gravity measurements were tied to the network of absolute gravity stations in Sondrestrom. We measured snow physical properties in two shallow pits. This report summarizes our observations and data analysis.

  4. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses. PMID:23586876

  5. GravProcess: An easy-to-use MATLAB software to process campaign gravity data and evaluate the associated uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattin, Rodolphe; Mazzotti, Stephane; Baratin, Laura-May

    2015-08-01

    We present GravProcess, a set of MATLAB routines to process gravity data from complex campaign surveys and calculate the associated gravity field. Data reduction, analysis, and representation are done using the MATLAB Graphical User Interface Tool, which can be installed on most systems and platforms. Data processing is divided into several steps: (1) Integration of gravity data, station location, and gravity line connection input files; (2) Gravity data reduction applying solid-Earth tide and instrumental drift corrections and, depending on the required processing level, air pressure and oceanic tidal corrections; (3) Automatic network adjustment and alignment to absolute base stations; (4) Free air and terrain corrections to calculate gravity values and anomalies, and to estimate the associated errors. The final step is dedicated to post-processing and includes graphical representations of data and an output text file, which can be used by Geographic Information System software. An example of this processing chain applied to a recent survey in northern Morocco is given and compared with previous available results.

  6. Validation of GOCE by absolute and relative gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, B. R.; Sprlak, M.; Lysaker, D. I.; Omang, O. C. D.; Sekowski, M.; Dykowski, P.

    2012-04-01

    Absolute gravimetry has been performed in 2011 by FG5 and A10 instruments in selected sites of the Norwegian first order gravity network. These observations are used as reference values to transform a large number of relative gravity values collected in 1968-1972. The outcome is a database at current epoch in a reference frame defined by the absolute gravity values. This constitutes our test field for validation of GOCE results. In the test fields, validation of GOCE-derived gravity anomalies was performed. The spectral enhancement method was applied to avoid the spectral inconsistency between the terrestrial and the satellite data. For this purpose, contributions of the EGM2008 model and a gravitational effect of a residual terrain model were calculated.

  7. The new Absolute Quantum Gravimeter (AQG): first results and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvalot, Sylvain; Le Moigne, Nicolas; Merlet, Sebastien; Desruelle, Bruno; Lautier-Gaud, Jean; Menoret, Vincent; Vermeulen, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Cold atom gravimetry represents one of the most innovative evolution in gravity instrumentation since the last 20 years. The concept of measuring the gravitational acceleration by dropping atoms and the development of the first instrumental devices during this last decade quickly revealed the promising perspectives of this new generation of gravity meters enabling accurate and absolute measurements of the Earth's gravity field for a wide range of applications (geophysics, geodesy, metrology, etc.). The Absolute Quantum Gravimeter (AQG) gravity meter, developed by MUQUANS (Talence, France - http://www.muquans.com/) with the support of RESIF, the French Seismologic and Geodetic Network (http://www.resif.fr/) belongs to this new generation of instruments. It also represents the first commercial device based on the utilization of advanced matter-wave interferometry techniques, which allow to characterize precisely the vertical acceleration experienced by a cloud of cold atoms. Recently, the first operational unit (AQG01) has been achieved as a compact transportable gravimeter with the aim of satisfying absolute gravity measurements in laboratory conditions under the following specifications: measurements the μGal level at a few Hz cycling frequency, sensitivity of 50μGal/√Hz, immunity to ground vibrations, easy and quickness of operation, automated continuous data acquisition for several months, etc. In order to evaluate the current performances of the AQG01, several experiments are carried out in collaboration between RESIF user's teams and the MUQUANS manufacturer on different reference gravity sites and laboratories in France. These measurements performed in indoor conditions including simultaneous observations with classical reference gravity instruments (corner-cube absolute gravity meters, relative superconducting meters) as well with the Cold Atom Gravity meter (CAG) developed by LNE-SYRTE, lead to a first objective characterization of the performances of

  8. Space agriculture in micro- and hypo-gravity: A comparative study of soil hydraulics and biogeochemistry in a cropping unit on Earth, Mars, the Moon and the space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Federico; Pallud, Céline

    2010-12-01

    Increasing interest is developing towards soil-based agriculture as a long-term bioregenerative life support during space and planetary explorations. Contrary to hydroponics and aeroponics, soil-based cropping would offer an effective approach to sustain food and oxygen production, decompose organic wastes, sequester carbon dioxide, and filter water. However, the hydraulics and biogeochemical functioning of soil systems exposed to gravities lower than the Earth's are still unknown. Since gravity is crucial in driving water flow, hypogravity will affect nutrient and oxygen transport in the liquid and gaseous phases, and could lead to suffocation of microorganisms and roots, and emissions of toxic gases. A highly mechanistic model coupling soil hydraulics and nutrient biogeochemistry previously tested on soils on Earth ( g=9.806 m s -2) is used to highlight the effects of gravity on the functioning of cropping units on Mars (0.38 g), the Moon (0.16 g), and in the international space station (ISS, nearly 0 g). For each scenario, we have compared the net leaching of water, the leaching of NH 3, NH 4+, NO 2- and NO 3- solutes, the emissions of NH 3, CO 2, N 2O, NO and N 2 gases, the concentrations profiles of O 2, CO 2 and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in soil, the pH, and the dynamics of various microbial functional groups within the root zone against the same control variables in the soil under terrestrial gravity. The response of the soil ecodynamics was relatively linear; gravitational accelerations lower than the Earth's resulted in 90-100% lower water leaching rates, 95-100% lower nutrient leaching rates, and lower emissions of NH 3 and NO gases (80-95% and 30-40%, respectively). Lower N loss through leaching resulted in 60-100% higher concentration of the microbial biomass, but did not alter the vertical stratification of the microbial functional groups with respect to the stratification on Earth. However, the higher biomass concentration produced higher

  9. Repeated terrestrial gravity measurements in the Fennoscandian Postglacial Rebound area: comparison of gravity change with observed vertical motion and with GIA models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, Jaakko; Engfeldt, Andreas; Gitlein, Olga; Kaminskis, Janis; Klopping, Fred; Oja, Tõnis; Paršeliunas, Eimuntas; Ragnvald Pettersen, Bjørn; Strykowski, Gabriel; Wilmes, Herbert

    2010-05-01

    Relative high-precision measurements to detect the change in gravity differences due to the Fennoscandian Postglacial Rebound (PGR) were started in 1966 on an east-west line at the latitude 63°N in Finland (Kiviniemi, 1974). In 1967 the line was extended to Sweden and Norway by Rikets Allmänna Kartverk (now Lantmäteriet, Sweden) and Norges Geografiske Oppmåling (now the Norwegian Mapping Authority). Today the Fennoscandian Land Uplift Gravity Lines consist of four east-west profiles across the PGR area, along the approximate latitudes 65°, 63°, 61°, and 56°N. Repeated relative gravity measurements have been performed on them 1975-2000 (65°N), 1966-2003 (63°N), 1976-1983 (61°N), and 1977-2003 (56°N). The work has been coordinated by the Working Group for Geodynamics (WGG) of the Nordic Geodetic Commission (NKG). The line 63°N has most observations. From the measurements along it up to 1993, Ekman and Mäkinen (1996) deduced the ratio -0.20 µgal/mm between surface gravity change and uplift relative to the Earth's center of mass. From 2003 on, the measurements on the line 63°N are continued using absolute gravity techniques. Absolute gravity measurements in the Fennoscandian postglacial rebound area started in 1976 when a team from Istituto di Metrología "G. Colonnetti" (Torino) measured six stations with the rise-and-fall gravimeter IMGC (Cannizzo et al., 1978). In 1980 two stations were measured by the team of the AN SSSR from Novosibirsk, using the gravimeter GABL (Arnautov et al., 1982). From the beginning the goal was to establish reference values for future remeasurement in order to detect gravity change due to the postglacial rebound. In 1988, regular repeat measurements were started by the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI) with the JILAg-5. An important advance was the introduction of FG5 gravimeters into the work by BKG (Frankfurt a/M) and NOAA (Boulder, CO) in 1993. In 2003 annual large-scale campaigns with FG5 gravimeters started, coordinated

  10. The absolute path command

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it canmore » provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.« less

  11. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  12. Principal facts for a gravity survey made in northeastern Oklahoma and southeastern Kansas during 1948

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, K.L.; Hoskinson, A.J.; Shelton, G.R.

    1971-01-01

    Observed gravity values, station locations, elevations, theoretical gravity, and free-air anomaly values are provided in tabular form for 554 gravity locations in northeastern Oklahoma-southeastern Kansas.

  13. The NASA Physical Science Program in Reduced Gravity: Combustion and Fluid Physics Work at the NASA Glenn Research Center and the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacksteder, Kurt

    The completion of the International Space Station (ISS) includes the launching and installa-tion of the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) and the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR), providing an unprecedented capability for conducting fundamental and applied research in the physical sciences. In addition to ongoing work, NASA has initiated a variety of investigations in combus-tion and fluid physics including ground-based testing and theoretical development to prepare for the utilization of these ISS capabilities. This paper will provide an overview of the CIR and FIR facilities and the portfolio of investigations that are currently aboard the ISS utilizing these facilities and the investigations that are underway for future utilization.

  14. Space Station - early concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    'A Langley engineer takes a walk-in simulated zero gravity around a mock-up of a full-scale, 24-foot-diameter space station.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 282.

  15. Accounting for time- and space-varying changes in the gravity field to improve the network adjustment of relative-gravity data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Jeffrey R.; Ferre, Ty P.A.

    2015-01-01

    The relative gravimeter is the primary terrestrial instrument for measuring spatially and temporally varying gravitational fields. The background noise of the instrument—that is, non-linear drift and random tares—typically requires some form of least-squares network adjustment to integrate data collected during a campaign that may take several days to weeks. Here, we present an approach to remove the change in the observed relative-gravity differences caused by hydrologic or other transient processes during a single campaign, so that the adjusted gravity values can be referenced to a single epoch. The conceptual approach is an example of coupled hydrogeophysical inversion, by which a hydrologic model is used to inform and constrain the geophysical forward model. The hydrologic model simulates the spatial variation of the rate of change of gravity as either a linear function of distance from an infiltration source, or using a 3-D numerical groundwater model. The linear function can be included in and solved for as part of the network adjustment. Alternatively, the groundwater model is used to predict the change of gravity at each station through time, from which the accumulated gravity change is calculated and removed from the data prior to the network adjustment. Data from a field experiment conducted at an artificial-recharge facility are used to verify our approach. Maximum gravity change due to hydrology (observed using a superconducting gravimeter) during the relative-gravity field campaigns was up to 2.6 μGal d−1, each campaign was between 4 and 6 d and one month elapsed between campaigns. The maximum absolute difference in the estimated gravity change between two campaigns, two months apart, using the standard network adjustment method and the new approach, was 5.5 μGal. The maximum gravity change between the same two campaigns was 148 μGal, and spatial variation in gravity change revealed zones of preferential infiltration and areas of relatively

  16. Accounting for time- and space-varying changes in the gravity field to improve the network adjustment of relative-gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Jeffrey R.; Ferré, Ty P. A.

    2016-02-01

    The relative gravimeter is the primary terrestrial instrument for measuring spatially and temporally varying gravitational fields. The background noise of the instrument-that is, non-linear drift and random tares-typically requires some form of least-squares network adjustment to integrate data collected during a campaign that may take several days to weeks. Here, we present an approach to remove the change in the observed relative-gravity differences caused by hydrologic or other transient processes during a single campaign, so that the adjusted gravity values can be referenced to a single epoch. The conceptual approach is an example of coupled hydrogeophysical inversion, by which a hydrologic model is used to inform and constrain the geophysical forward model. The hydrologic model simulates the spatial variation of the rate of change of gravity as either a linear function of distance from an infiltration source, or using a 3-D numerical groundwater model. The linear function can be included in and solved for as part of the network adjustment. Alternatively, the groundwater model is used to predict the change of gravity at each station through time, from which the accumulated gravity change is calculated and removed from the data prior to the network adjustment. Data from a field experiment conducted at an artificial-recharge facility are used to verify our approach. Maximum gravity change due to hydrology (observed using a superconducting gravimeter) during the relative-gravity field campaigns was up to 2.6 μGal d-1, each campaign was between 4 and 6 d and one month elapsed between campaigns. The maximum absolute difference in the estimated gravity change between two campaigns, two months apart, using the standard network adjustment method and the new approach, was 5.5 μGal. The maximum gravity change between the same two campaigns was 148 μGal, and spatial variation in gravity change revealed zones of preferential infiltration and areas of relatively high

  17. Artificial gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markley, Larry C.; Lindner, John F.

    Using computer algebra to run Einstein's equations "backward", from field to source rather than from source to field, we design an artificial gravity field for a space station or spaceship. Everywhere inside astronauts experience normal Earth gravity, while outside they float freely. The stress-energy that generates the field contains exotic matter of negative energy density but also relies importantly on pressures and shears, which we describe. The same techniques can be readily used to design other interesting spacetimes and thereby elucidate the connection between the source and field in general relativity.

  18. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  19. Too Fast to Measure: Network Adjustment of Rapidly Changing Gravity Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, J.; Ferre, T. P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of spatially-variable gravity at the field scale are difficult; measurements of the time-varying field even more so. Every previous gravity survey using relative gravimeters—still the workhorse of gravity studies, despite their nearly 80 year history—has assumed a static gravity field during the course of a survey, which may last days to weeks. With recently-improved instrumentation, however, measurements of fields changing on the order of tens of nm/sec2 per day are now possible. In particular, the A-10 portable absolute gravimeter provides not only absolute control, but also the change in that control during the course of a survey. Using digitally-recording spring-based relative gravimeters (namely, the ZLS Burris meter and the Scintrex CG-5), with their more efficient data collection and lower drift than previous generations, many more data are collected in a day. We demonstrate a method for incorporating in the least-squares network adjustment of relative gravity data a relation between the rate of change of gravity, dg, and distance from an infiltration source, x. This relation accounts for the fact that gravity at stations adjacent to the infiltration source changes more rapidly than stations further away; if all measurements collected over several days are to be included in a single network-adjustment, consideration of this change is required. Two methods are used to simulate the dg(x) relation: a simple model where dg is a linear function of x, and a coupled-hydrogeophysical method where a groundwater flow model predicts the nonlinear spatial variation of dg. Then, the change in gravity between different, independently adjusted surveys is used to parameterize the groundwater model. Data from two recent field examples, an artificial recharge facility near Tucson, Arizona, USA, and from the 2014 Lower Colorado River pulse flow experiment, clearly show the need to account for gravity change during a survey; maximum rates of change for the two

  20. Gravity Waves

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Gravity Waves Ripple over Marine Stratocumulus Clouds ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), a fingerprint-like gravity wave feature occurs over a deck of marine stratocumulus clouds. Similar ... that occur when a pebble is thrown into a still pond, such "gravity waves" sometimes appear when the relatively stable and stratified air ...

  1. Artificial gravity experiment satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Tadashi

    1992-07-01

    An overview of the conceptual study of an artificial gravity experiment satellite based on the assumption of a launch by the H-2 launch vehicle with a target launch date in the Year 2000 is presented. While many satellites provided with artificial gravity have been reported in relation to a manned Mars exploration spacecraft mission, the review has been conducted on missions and test subjects only for experimental purposes. Mission requirements were determined based on the results of reviews on the mission, test subjects, and model missions. The system baseline and development plan were based on the results of a study on conceptual structure and scale of the system, including measures to generate artificial gravity. Approximate scale of the system and arm length, mission orbit, visibility of the operation orbit from ground stations in Japan, and satellite attitude on the mission orbit are outlined.

  2. Properties of inertia-gravity waves in the lowermost stratosphere as observed by the PANSY radar over Syowa Station in the Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalikova, Maria; Sato, Kaoru; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Sato, Toru

    2016-05-01

    Inertia-gravity waves (IGWs) are an important component for the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. However, observational studies needed to constrain their forcing are still insufficient especially in the remote areas of the Antarctic region. One year of observational data (January to December 2013) by the PANSY radar of the wind components (vertical resolution of 150 m and temporal resolution of 30 min) are used to derive statistical analysis of the properties of IGWs with short vertical wavelengths ( ≤ 4 km) and ground-based periods longer than 4 h in the lowermost stratosphere (height range 10 to 12 km) with the help of the hodograph method. The annual change of the IGWs parameters are inspected but no pronounced year cycle is found. The year is divided into two seasons (summer and winter) based on the most prominent difference in the ratio of Coriolis parameter (f) to intrinsic frequency (ω^) distribution. Average of f/ω^ for the winter season is 0.40 and for the summer season 0.45 and the average horizontal wavelengths are 140 and 160 km respectively. Vertical wavelengths have an average of 1.85 km through the year. For both seasons the properties of IGWs with upward and downward propagation of the energy are also derived and compared. The percentage of downward propagating waves is 10.7 and 18.4 % in the summer and winter season respectively. This seasonal change is more than the one previously reported in the studies from mid-latitudes and model-based studies. It is in agreement with the findings of past radiosonde data-based studies from the Antarctic region. In addition, using the so-called dual-beam technique, vertical momentum flux and the variance of the horizontal perturbation velocities of IGWs are examined. Tropospheric disturbances of synoptic-scale are suggested as a

  3. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  4. Antarctic MLT Gravity Wave Momentum Flux Observed by the Davis MST Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, P. T.; Murphy, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The MST radar at Davis Station, Antarctica, 68.6 S 78.0 E, was used to make dual coplanar beam measurements of short period (12-60 minutes) gravity wave momentum flux in the mesopause region during the southern hemisphere summer of 2014-2015. Mean zonal and meridional momentum flux estimates are eastward and southward respectively, throughout the region and season, with a bias towards both larger mean flux and number of eastward and southward propagating waves. Lognormal distributions of the absolute momentum flux attributable to individual wave events are broadly consistent with satellite and other middle atmosphere gravity wave observation and modelling techniques, with greater than 40% of the total flux being contributed by the largest 10% of wave events. Estimates of flux divergence are made during periods where sufficient density of observations exist. Ray tracing methods are employed to identify potential source regions and mechanisms to aid the development of meteorologically interactive parameterization schemes for the region.

  5. ABSOLUTE POLARIMETRY AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    OKADA; BRAVAR, A.; BUNCE, G.; GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; MAKDISI, Y.; NASS, A.; WOOD, J.; ZELENSKI, Z.; ET AL.

    2007-09-10

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy Of {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} < 5%. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power A{sub N} of this process has allowed us to achieve {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} = 4.2% in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of AN in the CNI region (four-momentum transfer squared 0.001 < -t < 0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2}) are also discussed. We point out the current issues and expected optimum accuracy in 2006 and the future.

  6. Thermophysical property measurements on international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banish, R. Michael; Jalbert, Lyle B.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of both species (mass) and thermal diffusivities on Earth are prone to be contaminated by convective contributions to the overall transport. Previous studies of mass and thermal diffusivities conducted on spacecraft have demonstration the gain in precision, and lower absolute values, resulting from the reduced convective transport possible in a low-gravity environment. We have developed a technique for the in-situ measurement of mass diffusivity in liquids at several temperatures utilizing a single sample. In this approach, which circumvents solidification of the diffusion sample prior to concentration profiling, the evolution of the concentration distribution of a radiotracer is followed in real time using two pairs of radiation detectors. A low-temperature version of this hardware was flown successfully on the Mir space station as a risk-mitigation experiment. The experimental hardware for the space station is based on this design. We will measure the self-diffusivity of several metal elements over a wide temperature range and the binary- and impurity-diffusivities of II-VI compounds approximately 100 K above their melting points. Thermal diffusivity measurement of the II-VI materials will be conducted in hardware presently in the design phase.

  7. Venus gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    The anomalous gravity field of Venus shows high correlation with surface features revealed by radar. We extract gravity models from the Doppler tracking data from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) by means of a two-step process. In the first step, we solve the nonlinear spacecraft state estimation problem using a Kalman filter-smoother. The Kalman filter was evaluated through simulations. This evaluation and some unusual features of the filter are discussed. In the second step, we perform a geophysical inversion using a linear Bayesian estimator. To allow an unbiased comparison between gravity and topography, we use a simulation technique to smooth and distort the radar topographic data so as to yield maps having the same characteristics as our gravity maps. The maps presented cover 2/3 of the surface of Venus and display the strong topography-gravity correlation previously reported. The topography-gravity scatter plots show two distinct trends.

  8. Implants as absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Kan, Joseph Y K; Caruso, Joseph M

    2005-11-01

    Anchorage control is essential for successful orthodontic treatment. Each tooth has its own anchorage potential as well as propensity to move when force is applied. When teeth are used as anchorage, the untoward movements of the anchoring units may result in the prolonged treatment time, and unpredictable or less-than-ideal outcome. To maximize tooth-related anchorage, techniques such as differential torque, placing roots into the cortex of the bone, the use of various intraoral devices and/or extraoral appliances have been implemented. Implants, as they are in direct contact with bone, do not possess a periodontal ligament. As a result, they do not move when orthodontic/orthopedic force is applied, and therefore can be used as "absolute anchorage." This article describes different types of implants that have been used as orthodontic anchorage. Their clinical applications and limitations are also discussed. PMID:16463910

  9. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  10. Seasonal and short time gravity changes due to monsoonal rainfall in West Africa using a superconducting gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hector, Basile; Hinderer, Jacques; Séguis, Luc; Boy, Jean-Paul; Calvo, Marta; Descloitres, Marc; Rosat, Séverine; Riccardi, Umberto

    2013-04-01

    A superconducting gravimeter (SG) has been installed since 2010 in Djougou, northern Benin, within the framework of the GHYRAF (Gravity and Hydrology in Africa) project. This site was first measured with a FG5 absolute gravimeter four times a year from 2008 to 2011. It was then decided to install a superconducting gravimeter in order to monitor in a continuous way the strong annual monsoon signal with both local and non-local hydrological contributions within the humid sudanian zone of West-Africa. The area is also part of the long-term observing system AMMA-Catch, and thus under intense hydro-meteorological monitoring (rain, soil moisture, water table level, evapotranspiration, etc…). We present here the results of the first two years relative gravity monitoring with SG-060 from GWR Instruments. FG5 absolute gravity data are used for calibration and drift estimate of the SG. As everywhere on the GGP (Global Geodynamics project) stations, the signal includes solid earth tides, ocean loading, polar motion, atmospheric pressure effects, drift and water storage changes (WSC). The barometric corrections are more complicated than for mid-latitude stations; indeed pressure effects are of major concern in the equatorial band, because they are governed by S1 and S2 thermal pressure waves. These waves dominate both the local Newtonian effect (an increase in local pressure decreases the gravity) and the smaller non-local loading effect (an increase in regional pressure decreases the gravity mostly by a subsidence effect of the elastic earth) because of their coherency at the regional scale. We focus here on two predominant frequencies: first the seasonal cycle where we compare the seasonal gravity signal left in the residuals after correction for solid Earth and ocean tides, atmosphere, polar motion and long term drift to Water Storage Changes (WSC) computed from observations in soil moisture (using neutronic measurements) and water table variations. Second we investigate

  11. A general relativistic model for free-fall absolute gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yu-Jie; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Li, Jia; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2016-04-01

    Although the relativistic manifestations of gravitational fields in gravimetry were first studied 40 years ago, the relativistic effects combined with free-fall absolute gravimeters have rarely been considered. In light of this, we present a general relativistic model for free-fall absolute gravimeters in a local-Fermi coordinates system, where we focus on effects related to the measuring devices: relativistic transverse Doppler effects, gravitational redshift effects and Earth’s rotation effects. Based on this model, a general relativistic expression of the measured gravity acceleration is obtained.

  12. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-01

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2β) searches, single β-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy. Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium β-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope (137Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R&D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2β decay and single β-decay.

  13. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  14. Up-to-date Terrain Correction Evaluation within the Gravity Database of the Slovak Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasteka, R.; Zahorec, P.; Marusiak, I.; Mikuška, J.; Papčo, J.; Bielik, M.

    2014-12-01

    In our contribution we present a new method for the evaluation of terrain corrections (TC) and/or topographical effects (TE) for the Gravity Database of the Slovak Republic - using a new software solution (program Toposk) and up to date high-quality digital terrain models. The program was successfully tested on several synthetic models. In our algorithm we have used the well established approach, developed by the gravimetrical school in former Czechoslovakia i.e. dividing the surrounding area into so called inner zone T1 (0 - 250 m), intermediate zone T2 (250 - 5240 m) and outer zone (5.24 - 166.7 km). When calculating the T1 zone contribution we have used interpolated station elevations instead the measured ones, which yield in our opinion better solution to the problem of small-scale inaccuracies of the detailed terrain model. Newly recalculated TC values for the Gravity Database of the Slovak Republic (total number of gravity stations equals 212478, with an average of 3-6 points/km2) are in the range from 0.20 to 79.84 mGal (for the correction density 2.67 gcm-3). Thanks to the new TC values, the final version of the obtained Bouguer anomaly field is more independent from non-geological influences and determines in a better way the information content on the lithospheric density distributions.In the frame of the presented recalculation of regional gravity database we have worked with the concept of terrain corrections, but for other types of gravity method applications, the evaluation of topographical effects is much more straightforward - e.g. elimination of the effect of topography in the vertical gravity (tower) gradients approximation or during processing of absolute gravity measurements (with FG-5 and/or A-10 gravity meters). Another very important property of our proposed approach is that we can evaluate TC and TE in calculating points below the Earth's surface (applicable also in borehole gravity method, BHGM). This work was supported by the Slovak

  15. GHYRAF (Gravity and HYdrology in AFrica): a New Experiment Combining Hydrology and Geodesy to Investigate Water Storage Changes from the Sahara to the Equatorial Monsoon Zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Linage, C.; Hinderer, J.; Boy, J.; Masson, F.; Gegout, P.; Diament, M.; de Viron, O.; Bayer, R.; Balmino, G.; Biancale, R.; Bonvalot, S.; Genthon, P.

    2007-12-01

    We present a new project using multi-disciplinary data (gravity, geodesy, hydrology, and meteorology) to determine seasonal changes in water storage in Africa. We foresee to concentrate on two areas: the desert zone in the Sahara (Tamanrasset, Algeria) where almost no hydrological change is present, and the equatorial monsoon band (Niger, Benin Republic) that provides on the contrary a large rainfall signal. This project will be a first attempt to do a ground validation of satellite-derived gravity observations such as GRACE or GOCE in Africa. We will pay attention to the various length scales involved in hydrological processes that are differently retrieved whether gravity is measured at the ground or by satellite. Our experience includes two types of ground-based gravity measurements. First we will perform a repeated survey with absolute gravimeters (AG) on a North-South profile during 2-3 years (2008-2010) to assess the large soil moisture changes as predicted by existing hydrological models such as GLDAS or LadWorld. Second we plan to establish a superconducting gravimeter (SG) to act as a continuously monitored base station in a region of large soil moisture changes. In addition, continuous geodetic GPS measurements will be made along the gravity profile to assess the vertical deformation which acts to alter ground gravity but not satellite gravity. In-situ measurements of hydrological parameters at each station will assist us in modelling local gravity effects. The goal is a better characterization of continental water storage, particularly in the critical areas of water management in the north and central parts of the African continent.

  16. Summary presentation to the Artificial Gravity Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, G.

    1985-01-01

    General requirements for artificial gravity under a wide range of circumstances are considered. Appropriate or feasible ways of filling these requirements are explored with the focus on using tethers. The orbiter itself does not appear to be a good platform for tether research and development. Therefore, tethers that would be attached to space stations are emphasized. However, orbiter demonstrations and external tank demonstrations might be useful in exploring and developing tether operations prior to the space station. The general recommendations include requirements of artificial gravity in medicine and physiology, technology, microgravity sciences, habitability, operations in space, and what artificial gravity would mean to operations in space.

  17. Gravity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, John E.

    1997-03-01

    This book comprehensively describes all aspects of gravity flow, a physical process in the environment that is covered by many disciplines including meteorology, oceanography, the earth sciences and industrial processes. The first edition was very well received, and the author has brought the new edition completely up to date, with much new material. Simpson describes gravity currents with a variety of laboratory experiments, many from his own work. Gravity Currents is a valuable supplementary textbook for undergraduates and a reference work for research workers. The general reader will also find much of interest, since the author clearly describes the physics of flows involved without advanced mathematics, and with numerous photographs and illustrations.

  18. Gravity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, John E.

    1999-11-01

    This book comprehensively describes all aspects of gravity flow, a physical process in the environment that is covered by many disciplines including meteorology, oceanography, the earth sciences and industrial processes. The first edition was very well received, and the author has brought the new edition completely up to date, with much new material. Simpson describes gravity currents with a variety of laboratory experiments, many from his own work. Gravity Currents is a valuable supplementary textbook for undergraduates and a reference work for research workers. The general reader will also find much of interest, since the author clearly describes the physics of flows involved without advanced mathematics, and with numerous photographs and illustrations.

  19. Mars mission gravity profile simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetz, Lawrence H.

    1990-01-01

    A flight experiment designed to determine the need for artificial gravity for Mars mission architectures at earlier stages of the design process is proposed. The Soviet Mir space station, the NASA Space Shuttle, and the resources of NASA Ames Research Center would be used to duplicate in the terrestrial environment the complete Mars-mission gravity profile in order to assess the need for artificial gravity. All mission phases of 1 G would be on earth; all mission phases of zero or micro G would be in space aboard Mir; and all launch, ascent, orbit, deorbit, approach, departure, and descent G loads would be provided by actual spacecraft in operations that could be designed to simulate the actual G loads, while the Mars stay time would be simulated on earth or in a variable-gravity research facility in space. Methods of simulating activities on the Martian surface are outlined along with data monitoring, countermeasures, and launch site and vehicle selection criteria.

  20. History of Artificial Gravity. Chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Gilles; Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William

    2006-01-01

    This chapter reviews the past and current projects on artificial gravity during space missions. The idea of a rotating wheel-like space station providing artificial gravity goes back in the writings of Tsiolkovsky, Noordung, and Wernher von Braun. Its most famous fictional representation is in the film 2001: A Space Odyssey, which also depicts spin-generated artificial gravity aboard a space station and a spaceship bound for Jupiter. The O Neill-type space colony provides another classic illustration of this technique. A more realistic approach to rotating the space station is to provide astronauts with a smaller centrifuge contained within a spacecraft. The astronauts would go into it for a workout, and get their gravity therapeutic dose for a certain period of time, daily or a few times a week. This simpler concept is current being tested during ground-based studies in several laboratories around the world.

  1. Gravity brake

    DOEpatents

    Lujan, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanical gravity brake that prevents hoisted loads within a shaft from free-falling when a loss of hoisting force occurs. A loss of hoist lifting force may occur in a number of situations, for example if a hoist cable were to break, the brakes were to fail on a winch, or the hoist mechanism itself were to fail. Under normal hoisting conditions, the gravity brake of the invention is subject to an upward lifting force from the hoist and a downward pulling force from a suspended load. If the lifting force should suddenly cease, the loss of differential forces on the gravity brake in free-fall is translated to extend a set of brakes against the walls of the shaft to stop the free fall descent of the gravity brake and attached load.

  2. Absolute Identification by Relative Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Neil; Brown, Gordon D. A.; Chater, Nick

    2005-01-01

    In unidimensional absolute identification tasks, participants identify stimuli that vary along a single dimension. Performance is surprisingly poor compared with discrimination of the same stimuli. Existing models assume that identification is achieved using long-term representations of absolute magnitudes. The authors propose an alternative…

  3. Be Resolute about Absolute Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret L.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how conceptualization of absolute value can start long before it is introduced. The manner in which absolute value is introduced to students in middle school has far-reaching consequences for their future mathematical understanding. It begins to lay the foundation for students' understanding of algebra, which can change…

  4. GARS O'Higgins as a core station for geodesy in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klügel, Thomas; Diedrich, Erhard; Falk, Reinhard; Hessels, Uwe; Höppner, Kathrin; Kühmstedt, Elke; Metzig, Robert; Plötz, Christian; Reinhold, Andreas; Schüler, Torben; Wojdziak, Reiner

    2014-05-01

    The German Antarctic Receiving Station GARS O'Higgins at the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula is a dual purpose facility for Earth observation since more than 20 years. It serves as a satellite ground station for payload data downlink and telecommanding of remote sensing satellites as well as a geodetic observatory for global reference frames and global change. Both applications use the same 9m diameter radio telescope. For space geodesy and astrometry the radio telescope significantly improves the coverage on the southern hemisphere and plays an essential role within the global Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) network. In particular the determination of the Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) and the sky coverage of the International Celectial Reference Frame (ICRF) benefit from the location at high southern latitude. Further geodetic instrumentation includes different permanent GNSS receivers (since 1995), two SAR corner reflectors (since 2013) and in the past a PRARE system (1996 - 2004). In addition absolute gravity measurements were performed in 1997 and 2011. All geodetic reference points are tied together by a local survey network. The various geodetic instrumentation and the long time series at O'Higgins allow a reliable determination of crustal motions. VLBI station velocities, continuous GNSS time series and absolute gravity measurements consistently document an uplift rate of about 5 mm/a. A pressure gauge and a radar tide gauge being refererenced to space by a GNSS antenna on top allow the measurement of sea level changes independently from crustal motions, and the determination of the ellipsoidal height of the sea surface, which is, the geoid height plus the mean dynamic topography. The outstanding location on the Antarctic continent makes GARS O'Higgins also in future attractive for polar orbiting satellite missions and an essential station for the global VLBI network. Future plans envisage a development towards an observatory for

  5. Karst Water System Investigated by Absolute Gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinif, Y.; Meus, P.; van Camp, M.; Kaufmann, O.; van Ruymbeke, M.; Vandiepenbeeck, M.; Camelbeeck, T.

    2006-12-01

    The highly anisotropic and heterogeneous hydrogeological characteristics of karst aquifers are difficult to characterize and present challenges for modeling of storage capacities. Little is known about the surface and groundwater interconnection, about the connection between the porous formations and the draining cave and conduits, and about the variability of groundwater volume within the system. Usually, an aquifer is considered as a black box, where water fluxes are monitored as input and output. However, water inflow and outflow are highly variable and cannot be measured directly. A recent project, begun in 2006 sought to constrain the water budget in a Belgian karst aquifer and to assess the porosity and water dynamics, combining absolute gravity (AG) measurements and piezometric levels around the Rochefort cave. The advantage of gravity measurements is that they integrate all the subsystems in the karst system. This is not the case with traditional geophysical tools like boring or monitoring wells, which are soundings affected by their near environment and its heterogeneity. The investigated cave results from the meander cutoff system of the Lomme River. The main inputs are swallow holes of the river crossing the limestone massif. The river is canalized and the karst system is partly disconnected from the hydraulic system. In February and March 2006, when the river spilled over its dyke and sank into the most important swallow hole, this resulted in dramatic and nearly instantaneous increases in the piezometric levels in the cave, reaching up to 13 meters. Meanwhile, gravity increased by 50 and 90 nms-2 in February and March, respectively. A first conclusion is that during these sudden floods, the pores and fine fissures were poorly connected with the enlarged fractures, cave, and conduits. With a rise of 13 meters in the water level and a 5% porosity, a gravity change of 250 nms-2 should have been expected. This moderate gravity variation suggests either a

  6. Zero-gravity open-type urine receptacle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girala, A. S.

    1972-01-01

    The development of the zero-gravity open-type urine receptacle used in the Apollo command module is described. This type receptacle eliminates the need for a cuff-type urine collector or for the penis to circumferentially contact the receptacle in order to urinate. This device may be used in a gravity environment, varying from zero gravity to earth gravity, such as may be experienced in a space station or space base.

  7. Monitoring Groundwater Variations Using a Portable Absolute Gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Yoichi; Nishijima, Jun; Hasegawa, Takashi; Sofyan, Yayan; Taniguchi, Makoto; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.; Delinom, Robert M.

    2010-05-01

    In urbanized areas, one of the urgent problems is to monitor the groundwater variations especially connected with land subsidence. Although the groundwater variations are usually measured by water level meters, gravity measurements can provide us additional information about the water mass movements which should be beneficial for the analyses of groundwater flow and the managements of water resources as well. Therefore, in order to establish a new technique to monitor the groundwater variations by means of the gravity measurements, we investigated the applicability of a portable type absolute gravimeter (Micro-G LaCoste Inc. A10-017). We will report the results of some test measurements in Japan, and the outline of the surveys in Jakarta, Indonesia. As for the absolute gravity measurements, FG-5 of MGL would be more popular. FG-5 is a high precision absolute gravimeter with a 2ugal-accuracy for laboratory use, while the nominal accuracy of A-10 is 10ugal (measurement precision: ±5ugal). In spite of the disadvantage, A-10 is well suited for the field surveys because it is much smaller than FG-5 and can be operated with 12VDC power. The repeated measurements using A10-017 in Kyushu University show good correlations between the measured gravity values and the groundwater levels in nearby observation wells. In a geothermal plant of Takigami, we also observed the gravity changes associated with the cycle of the geothermal fluid. All these test measurements have proved that the gravimeter can achieve a 10ugal (10nm/s2) or better accuracy in the field surveys. In Jakarta, Indonesia, excess groundwater pumping is going on and it causes land subsidence. To reveal the associated gravity changes, we conducted the first gravity survey in August 2008 and the second survey in July 2009. Mainly due to the instrumental troubles during the 2008 surveys, we have not obtained enough reliable data yet. Nevertheless the result obtained so far suggested the gravity increases in the

  8. Space station control moment gyro control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bordano, Aldo

    1987-01-01

    The potential large center-of-pressure to center-of-gravity offset of the space station makes the short term, within an orbit, variations in density of primary importance. The large range of uncertainty in the prediction of solar activity will penalize the design, developments, and operation of the space station.

  9. Method of Discriminant Gravity Tolerance using Heart Rate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Kiyoko; Takada, Hiroki; Iwase, Satoshi

    When returning on the earth by the space flight, the space deconditioning may be developed. As this countermeasure, the artificial gravity load device using the centrifuge is proposed in the space station. But the gravity load might cause the faint, and safe gravity load is uncertainty. We proposed that discriminate strength of gravity tolerance using heart rate variability time series. Step function was inputted to AR model estimated from heart rate variability time series during rest or under light gravity load, and strength of the gravity tolerance was discriminated by the step response function. On the result, discriminant accuracy was 87.5% by using heart rate variability time series when gravity load of 1.0 G was added to the human lying on the supine. Therefore, possibility of discriminant of gravity tolerance was obtained by using heart rate variability time series when sympathetic hyperactivity. Discriminant of the gravity tolerance is expected before countermeasure of space deconditioning is executed.

  10. Gravity and geoid model for South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blitzkow, Denizar; Oliveira Cancoro de Matos, Ana Cristina; do Nascimento Guimarães, Gabriel; Pacino, María Cristina; Andrés Lauría, Eduardo; Nunes, Marcelo; Castro Junior, Carlos Alberto Correia e.; Flores, Fredy; Orihuela Guevara, Nuris; Alvarez, Ruber; Napoleon Hernandez, José

    2016-04-01

    In the last 20 years, South America Gravity Studies (SAGS) project has undertaken an ongoing effort in establishing the fundamental gravity network (FGN); terrestrial, river and airborne relative gravity densifications; absolute gravity surveys and geoid (quasi-geoid) model computation for South America. The old FGN is being replaced progressively by new absolute measurements in different countries. In recent years, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Paraguay and Venezuela organizations participated with relative gravity surveys. Taking advantage of the large amount of data available, GEOID2015 model was developed for 15°N and 57°S latitude and 30 ° W and 95°W longitude based on EIGEN-6C4 until degree and order 200 as a reference field. The ocean area was completed with mean free air gravity anomalies derived from DTU10 model. The short wavelength component was estimated using FFT. The global gravity field models EIGEN-6C4, DIR_R5 were used for comparison with the new model. The new geoid model has been evaluated against 1,319 GPS/BM, in which 592 are located in Brazil and the reminder in other countries. The preliminary RMS difference between GPS/BM and GEOID2015 throughout South America and in Brazil is 46 cm and 17 cm, respectively. New activities are carrying out with the support of the IGC (Geographic and Cartographic Institute) under the coordination of EPUSP/LTG and CENEGEO (Centro de Estudos de Geodesia). The new project aims to establish new gravity points with the A-10 absolute gravimeter in South America. Recent such surveys occurred in São Paulo state, Argentina and Venezuela.

  11. Needs of physiological and psychological research using artificial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, M.; Toyobe, M.; Hamami, H.; Tayama, M.; Fujii, T.; Sato, T.; Nitta, K.; Kibe, S.

    In the next century, mankind will expand its activity to the moon and Mars. At that time, humans will be exposed to a low and micro-gravity environment in long term which causes physiological and psychological problems. The authors propose an artificial gravity space station for a research laboratory on human physiology and psychology at various gravity levels. The baseline specifications and the configuration of the space station are shown. Reviewing the history of manned space flight, the necessity of the research on an artificial gravity space station is discussed, including themes of research to be conducted on the station and the application of its results. Technical issues for realization of the space station such as environmental factors, system function and assembly scenario are also discussed.

  12. Habitability factors in a rotating space station.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    Factors aiding man to adjust to the artificial gravity environment of a rotating space station in orbit are considered. From recent experiments reported by Newsom et al. (1966), it is known that, if man is taken stepwise into a rotating environment, he can adjust (without becoming ill) to spin rates above that required for maintaining an artificial gravity environment in a space station. Little or no data are available, and much work remains to be done in the area of prehabituation and the rate at which habituation is extinguished. At least three factors must be considered in the design of an artificial gravity space station, and these factors directly affect the degree of habitability of the space-station environment. The three factors are rotation rate, stability, and Coriolis force.

  13. The spinning artificial gravity environment: A design project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pignataro, Robert; Crymes, Jeff; Marzec, Tom; Seibert, Joe; Walker, Gary

    1987-01-01

    The SAGE, or Spinning Artificial Gravity Environment, design was carried out to develop an artificial gravity space station which could be used as a platform for the performance of medical research to determine the benefits of various, fractional gravity levels for astronauts normally subject to zero gravity. Desirable both for its medical research mission and a mission for the study of closed loop life-support and other factors in prolonged space flight, SAGE was designed as a low Earth orbiting, solar powered, manned space station.

  14. Gravity settling

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Hyman R.; Long, R. H.; Simone, A. A.

    1979-01-01

    Solids are separated from a liquid in a gravity settler provided with inclined solid intercepting surfaces to intercept the solid settling path to coalesce the solids and increase the settling rate. The intercepting surfaces are inverted V-shaped plates, each formed from first and second downwardly inclined upwardly curved intersecting conical sections having their apices at the vessel wall.

  15. Simulating Gravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  16. Absolute Antenna Calibration at the US National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, G. L.; Bilich, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    format. The NGS absolute system is located in Corbin, Virginia, and uses field measurements and actual GNSS satellite signals to quantitatively determine the carrier phase advance/delay introduced by the antenna element. NGS is interested in providing calibrations for a wide variety of dual-frequency, geodetic-grade antennas, from types in use at IGS and CORS reference stations to rover antennas not normally seen in those networks. In this presentation, we describe the NGS absolute calibration facility, and discuss the observation models and strategy used to generate NGS absolute calibrations. We also demonstrate that NGS absolute phase center variation (PCV) patterns are consistent with published values determined by other absolute antenna calibration facilities.

  17. A lunar space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, LU; Merrow, Mark; Coons, Russ; Iezzi, Gabrielle; Palarz, Howard M.; Nguyen, Marc H.; Spitzer, Mike; Cubbage, Sam

    1989-01-01

    A concept for a space station to be placed in low lunar orbit in support of the eventual establishment of a permanent moon base is proposed. This space station would have several functions: (1) a complete support facility for the maintenance of the permanent moon base and its population; (2) an orbital docking area to facilitate the ferrying of materials and personnel to and from Earth; (3) a zero gravity factory using lunar raw materials to grow superior GaAs crystals for use in semiconductors and mass produce inexpensive fiber glass; and (4) a space garden for the benefit of the air food cycles. The mission scenario, design requirements, and technology needs and developments are included as part of the proposal.

  18. Space Station Furnace Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, S.D.; Lehoczky, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    The Space Station Furnace Facility (SSFF) is the modular, multi-user scientific instrumentation for conducting materials research in the reduced gravity ({approximately}10{sup {minus}6} g) environment of the International Space Station (ISS). The facility is divided into the Core System and two Instrument Racks (IRs). The Core System provides the common electrical and mechanical support equipment required to operate Experiment Modules (EMs). The EMs are investigator unique furnaces or apparatus designed to accomplish specific science investigations. Investigations are peer selected every two years from proposals submitted in response to National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Research Announcements. The SSFF Core systems are designed to accommodate an envelope of eight types of experiment modules. The first two modules to be developed for the first Instrument Rack include a High Temperature Gradient Furnace with Quench (HGFQ), and a Low Temperature Gradient Furnace (LGF). A new EM is planned to be developed every two years.

  19. Mechanism of secular increasing of mean gravity in Northern hemisphere and secular decreasing of mean gravity in Southern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.; Ferrandiz, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    regions (for example, in subduction zones, a hilly terrain, a zone of volcanism etc.) at times is more brightly shown. Therefore the steadfast attention should be paid to local factors of changes of a gravity. In result the phenomenon of inversion changes of a gravity in northern and southern hemispheres has been predicted: mean value of a gravity in northern hemisphere accrues with velocity 1.36 micro gals in year (mGal), and in southern decreases with the same velocity. Secular variations of a gravity depend from latitude and on equator (within the framework of considered model) change a sign: dg=2.72tsinф micro gals in year (mGal), where ф is a latitude of a place of observations, t is the time in years (Barkin, 2005). The data of gravimetric measurements at the European stations: Metsahovi, Potsdam, Moha, Vienna, Wettzell, Strastburg, Medicina etc., in Asia and Australia: Eshashi, Canberra etc., in Northern and South America: Bolder (Colorado), Patagonia (Argentina) etc., and also in Antarctic Region (station Syowa), will well be coordinated to the theoretical values of secular variations of a gravity predicted earlier at the specified stations. Gravity trends are studied and evaluated after removal effects of tides, local pressure and polar motion. The secular gravity variation at Potsdam is evaluated in 2.1 mGal/yr. During 1976-1986 the similar tendency - gravity trend with velocity 2.6 mGal/yr (absolute measurements) here have been observed. The similar tendency has been determined on measurements on superconducting gravimeters during 1993-1997: 2.3-2.5 mGal/yr (Neumeyer and Dittfeled, 1997). For more extensive period of observation (Neumayer, 2002) the similar result for gravity trend has been obtained. Observable annual variations of a gravity are characterized by amplitude about 3 mGal (on our model it is 3.5 mGal). Observations at Syowa station have been confirmed the developed model. Here it was expected negative gravity trend - decreasing of gravity with

  20. Understanding infiltration and groundwater flow at an artificial recharge facility using time-lapse gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Jeffrey

    Groundwater provides a fundamental resource for modern life. Throughout the world, groundwater is managed by storing (recharging) it underground in natural aquifers for future withdrawal and consumptive use. In Arizona, over 4 million people benefit from managed aquifer storage, but little effort is made to track the movement of recharged water through the subsurface. Motivated by current limitations in our ability to monitor percolation and groundwater movement at the scale of a recharge facility, an effort to collect time-lapse gravity data was carried out at the Southern Avra Valley Storage and Recovery Project (SAVSARP) operated by the City of Tucson, Arizona. In addition to collecting water-level data 12 wells, there were three primary gravity experiments: (1) five continuously-recording gravity meters (2 iGrav superconducting gravity meters and 3 gPhone gravity meters) were installed semi-permanently in control buildings adjacent to the recharge basins, (2) absolute gravity measurements were made at nine locations over a 17 month period, and (3) three relative-gravity campaigns were carried out on a network of 70 stations. This large-scale controlled experiment, with known infiltration and pumping rates, resulted in one of the most comprehensive datasets of its kind. Gravity data led to several hydrologic insights, both through direct measurement and modeling. First, the infiltration rate could be estimated accurately based on the initial rate of gravity change during infiltration, regardless of the specific yield. Using two gravity meters, the depth, and therefore speed, of the wetting front beneath a recharge basin was observed, including the time at which the water table was reached. Spatial maps of gravity change from relative gravity surveys show areas where infiltration efficiency is highest, and where groundwater accumulates; storage accumulated preferentially to the west of the recharge basins, away from pumping wells. Such information would be

  1. Space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Donald F.; Hayes, Judith

    1989-01-01

    The history of American space flight indicates that a space station is the next logical step in the scientific pursuit of greater knowledge of the universe. The Space Station and its complement of space vehicles, developed by NASA, will add new dimensions to an already extensive space program in the United States. The Space Station offers extraordinary benefits for a comparatively modest investment (currently estimated at one-ninth the cost of the Apollo Program). The station will provide a permanent multipurpose facility in orbit necessary for the expansion of space science and technology. It will enable significant advancements in life sciences research, satellite communications, astronomy, and materials processing. Eventually, the station will function in support of the commercialization and industrialization of space. Also, as a prerequisite to manned interplanetary exploration, the long-duration space flights typical of Space Station missions will provide the essential life sciences research to allow progressively longer human staytime in space.

  2. Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderton, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The official start of a bold new space program, essential to maintain the United States' leadership in space was signaled by a Presidential directive to move aggressively again into space by proceeding with the development of a space station. Development concepts for a permanently manned space station are discussed. Reasons for establishing an inhabited space station are given. Cost estimates and timetables are also cited.

  3. Expanding Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisenberg, Sol

    2005-04-01

    Newton's gravitational constant Gn and Laws of Gravity are based upon observations in our solar system. Mysteries appear when they are used far outside our solar system Apparently, Newton's gravitational constant can not be applied at large distances. Dark matter was needed to explain the observed flat rotational velocity curves of spiral galaxies (Rubin), and of groups of remote galaxies (Zwicky). Our expansion of Newton's gravitational constant Gn as a power series in distance r, is sufficient to explain these observations without using dark matter. This is different from the MOND theory of Milgrom involving acceleration. Also, our Expanded Gravitational Constant (EGC) can show the correct use of the red shift. In addition to the Doppler contribution, there are three other contributions and these depend only upon gravity. Thus, velocity observations only based on the red shift can not be used to support the concept of the expanding universe, the accelerating expansion, or dark energy. Our expanded gravity constant can predict and explain Olbers' paradox (dark sky), and the temperature of the CMB (cosmic microwave background). Thus, CMB may not support the big bang and inflation.

  4. Gravity Data for west-central Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard

    2012-04-06

    Modeled Bouger Gravity data was extracted from the Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies Gravity Database of the U.S. at http://irpsrvgis08.utep.edu/viewers/Flex/GravityMagnetic/GravityMagnetic_CyberShare/ on 2/29/2012. The downloaded text file was opened in an Excel spreadsheet. This spreadsheet data was then converted into an ESRI point shapefile in UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection, showing location and gravity (in milligals). This data was then converted to grid and then contoured using ESRI Spatial Analyst. This dataset contains the original spreadsheet data, a point shapefile showing gravity station locations and Bouger gravity, and a line shapefile showing 1 milligal contours. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Gravity Contour Shapefile Extent: West -108.366690 East -105.478730 North 40.932318 South 36.961606 Gravity Point Shapefile Extent: West -108.366692 East -105.478847 North 40.932361 South 36.961606 Data from From University of Texas: Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies

  5. Is nonrelativistic gravity possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Kocharyan, A. A.

    2009-07-15

    We study nonrelativistic gravity using the Hamiltonian formalism. For the dynamics of general relativity (relativistic gravity) the formalism is well known and called the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) formalism. We show that if the lapse function is constrained correctly, then nonrelativistic gravity is described by a consistent Hamiltonian system. Surprisingly, nonrelativistic gravity can have solutions identical to relativistic gravity ones. In particular, (anti-)de Sitter black holes of Einstein gravity and IR limit of Horava gravity are locally identical.

  6. Correction of NIM-3A absolute gravimeter for self-attraction effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunjian; Xu, Jin-yi; Feng, Jin-yang; SU, Duo-wu; Wu, Shu-qing

    2015-02-01

    The mass of free-fall absolute gravimeter can produce vertical gravitational attraction to the free-falling test body during the measurement of acceleration due to gravity. The vertical gravitational attraction can cause an artificial deviation to the measured value of gravitational acceleration. This paper describes the operating principle of a free-fall absolute gravimeter and the method used to determine the reference height of a gravimeter. It also describes the physical structure of NIM-3A absolute gravimeter lately developed by National Institute of Metrology (China), and studies the correction of gravimeter for Self-attraction effect.

  7. Absolute homogeneity test of Kelantan catchment precipitation series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Faizah Che; Tosaka, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Kenji; Sidek, Lariyah Mohd; Basri, Hidayah

    2015-05-01

    Along the Kelantan River in north east of Malaysia Peninsular, there are several areas often damaged by flood during north-east monsoon season every year. It is vital to predict the expected behavior of precipitation and river runoff for reducing flood damages of the area under rapid urbanization and future planning. Nevertheless, the accuracy and reliability of any hydrological and climate studies vary based on the quality of the data used. The factors causing variations on these data are the method of gauging and data collection, stations environment, station relocation and the reliability of the measurement tool affect the homogenous precipitation records. Hence in this study, homogeneity of long precipitation data series is checked via the absolute homogeneity test consisting of four methods namely Pettitt test, standard normal homogeneity test (SNHT), Buishand range test and Von Neumann ratio test. For homogeneity test, the annual rainfall amount from the daily precipitation records at stations located in Kelantan operated by Department of Irrigation and Drainage Malaysia were considered in this study. The missing values were completed using the correlation and regression and inverse distance method. The data network consists of 103 precipitation gauging stations where 31 points are inactive, 6 gauging stations had missing precipitation values more than five years in a row and 16 stations have records less than twenty years. So total of 50 stations gauging stations were evaluated in this analysis. With the application of the mentioned methods and further graphical analysis, inhomogeneity was detected at 4 stations and 46 stations are found to be homogeneous.

  8. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  9. Site surveys at the fundamental geodetic station in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kierulf, H. P.; Bockmann, L.; Kristiansen, O.; Plag, H.-P.

    2003-04-01

    The Space-Geodetic Observatory at Ny-Ålesund, Kings Bay, Svalbard, which is operated by the Norwegian Mapping Authority (NMA), has developed over recent years into a fundamental geodetic station. The geodetic infrastructure at the observatory, includes a 20-m VLBI-antenna, several GPS and GPS/GLONASS receivers, a tide gauge, a super-conducting gravimeter and a co-located DORIS station. Repeated absolute gravity measurements complement the observations. At such fundamental sites, detailed knowledge of the stability of the station is essential for geodetic and geophysical applications of the observations. The foot-print is determined by the stability of the monument with respect to the surrounding ground, but also by the representativity of the location with respect to the surrounding area and even region. The extensive foot-print study carried out over the past five years includes repeated GPS campaigns on a 50 km by 30 km control network. These GPS campaigns indicates relative movements of the campaign stations and consequently neo-tectonic activity in the area. The observed movements are in good accordance with the complex fault system in the Kings Bay area.

  10. 98. (Credit BLV) Detail of gravity, flow conduit intake at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. (Credit BLV) Detail of gravity, flow conduit intake at cross Lake dam Cribbing supports extra suction intake installed in 1930. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  11. From Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, S. R.; Lindler, D.

    2016-05-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R˜1000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18–1.03 μ. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsl/. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We have therefore developed an observing procedure, data-reduction procedure, and correction algorithms that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1%.

  12. Joint analysis of the seismic data and velocity gravity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakov, A. S.; Lavrov, V. S.; Muchamedov, V. A.; Nikolaev, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    We performed joint analysis of the seismic noises recorded at the Japanese Ogasawara station located on Titijima Island in the Philippine Sea using the STS-2 seismograph at the OSW station in the winter period of January 1-15, 2015, over the background of a velocity gravity model. The graphs prove the existence of a cause-and-effect relation between the seismic noise and gravity and allow us to consider it as a desired signal.

  13. First year's results and field experience with the latest JILA absolute gravimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peter, G.; Moose, R. E.; Wessells, C. W.

    1989-01-01

    One of the six absolute gravity instruments developed and built by the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics (JILA) between 1982 and 1985 was tested under a variety of environmental conditions between May 1987 and 1988. Of the 30 sites visited during this period, 10 were occupied more than once. These reobservations indicate repeatability between 1 and 4 microgals.

  14. Gravity survey of the southwestern part of the sourthern Utah geothermal belt

    SciTech Connect

    Green, R.T.; Cook, K.L.

    1981-03-01

    A gravity survey covering an area of 6200 km/sup 2/ was made over the southwestern part of the southern Utah geothermal belt. The objective of the gravity survey is to delineate the geologic structures and assist in the understanding of the geothermal potential of the area. A total of 726 new gravity stations together with 205 existing gravity stations, are reduced to give: (1) a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map, and (2) a fourth-order residual gravity anomaly map; both maps have a 2-mgal contour interval. The complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map shows an east-trending regional gravity belt with a total relief of about 70 mgal which crosses the central portion of the survey area. The gravity belt is attributed to a crustal lateral density variation of 0.1 gm/cc from a depth of 5 to 15 km.

  15. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  16. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  17. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  18. Combined discrete and continuous gravity observations at Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Daniele; Budetta, Gennaro; Greco, Filippo; Rymer, Hazel

    2003-04-01

    Systematic investigation of discrete gravity measurements has continued at Mount Etna since 1986. The network now covers an area of 400 km 2 with about 70 stations 0.5-3 km apart. Mass redistributions occurring at depths ranging between about 8 km below sea level and a few hundred metres below the surface (magma level changes within the shallower parts of the feeding conduits) have been identified from these data. Conventional (discrete) microgravity monitoring on a network of stations furnishes only instantaneous states of the mass distribution at continuously active systems. In order to obtain information on the rate at which the volcanic processes (and thus mass transfers) occur, three stations for continuously recording gravity where installed on Mount Etna in 1998. A 16-month long sequence from one of the continuously running stations (PDN, located 2 km from the active northeast crater at the summit of Etna volcano) is presented. After removing the effects of Earth Tide and tilt, the correlation of the residual gravity sequence with simultaneous recordings of meteorological parameters acquired at the same station was analysed. Once the meteorological effects have also been removed, continuous gravity changes are within 10 μGal of gravity changes measured using conventional microgravity observations at sites very close to the continuous station. This example shows how discrete and continuous gravity observations can be used together at active volcanoes to get a fuller and more accurate picture of the spatial and temporal characteristics of volcanic processes.

  19. Complete Bouguer gravity map of the Nevada Test Site and vicinity, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Healey, D.L.; Harris, R.N.; Ponce, D.A.; Oliver, H.W.

    1987-12-31

    About 15,000 gravity stations were used to create the gravity map. Gravity studies at the Nevada Test Site were undertaken to help locate geologically favorable areas for underground nuclear tests and to help characterize potential high-level nuclear waste storage sites. 48 refs. (TEM)

  20. Principal Facts for Gravity Data Collected in Wisconsin: A Web Site and CD-ROM for Distribution of Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, Stephen L.; Geister, Daniel W.; Daniels, David L.; Ervin, C. Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Principal facts for 40,488 gravity stations covering the entire state of Wisconsin are presented here in digital form. This is a compilation of previously published data collected between 1948 and 1992 from numerous sources, along with over 10,000 new gravity stations collected by the USGS since 1999. Also included are 550 gravity stations from previously unpublished sources. Observed gravity and complete-Bouguer gravity anomaly data for this statewide compilation are included here. Altogether, 14 individual surveys are presented here.

  1. General Adjustment of the Fundamental Gravity Network in Mexico, Preliminary Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avalos-Naranjo, D.; Pagiatakis, S. D.; Alvarado-Cortez, A.; Vanicek, P.; Santos, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The fundamental gravity network in Mexico is currently a set of 661 stations distributed in the country to serve as an absolute reference to local relative surveys. The National Institute of Statistics and Geography maintains a program that continuously adds new observations to the network thus increasing the robustness of its structure. This activity has led us to identification of stations with time-variable g value as well as stations with a systematic difference to the official IGSN71 solution. Following an approach to assemble in a single data set all the available observations, collected from the early 1960's to 2014, we make an effort to create a simultaneous adjustment of nearly 6600 relative ties by a generalized least squares scheme. At this time, a careful review of the conditions in which the surveys were made is the main challenge so as to assign proper weight to each observation. So far the first execution of the adjustment delivers a result that compares well to the IGSN71 solution (with a standard deviation of 0.171 mGal) and the time variations computed for some points are being verified against known effects of local or regional geodynamics.

  2. Measuring groundwater flow at the Sanford Laboratory with coupled surface/subsurface time-lapse gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, J.; Murdoch, L.; Long, A. J.; Koth, K.

    2011-12-01

    Limited options exist to measure groundwater processes, particularly at large depths. Coupled time-lapse gravity measurements at the surface and underground are one possibility, but despite recent advances in borehole instruments, no repeat underground gravity measurements of water-mass change have been reported. At the Sanford Laboratory-located at the Homestake Mine in Lead, South Dakota, and site of the proposed Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL)-the U.S. Geological Survey has established a network of 19 surface and 5 underground gravity stations to monitor groundwater-storage change over the projected 20-year existence of the underground laboratory. Continuous pumping is planned to dewater the mine to a depth of 2,500 m; the current pumping regime began in 2007 and current water levels (2011) are at a depth of about 1,700 m. Measurements using a field-portable A-10 absolute gravimeter have been made approximately annually at surface stations since 2007. Underground stations forming a vertical profile along the Ross Shaft on the 300, 800, 2000, 4100, and 4850 levels (numbers indicate approximate depth in feet) were established in 2011, and it is expected all stations will be surveyed annually. To date, surface time-lapse measurements show gravity increases of 50 to 100 nm/s^2 (10 nm/s^2 = 1 microgal) at some stations and equivalent decreases at others, indicating little evidence of water-mass change from pumping. Preliminary modeling, in which the dewatered zone is represented by a series of horizontal prisms that undergo mass change equal to the porosity (assumed 0.005, an average of rock porosity and mined-out voids), indicates that this is the expected result. At pumping rates required to maintain drawdown to a depth of 2,500 m, however, the expected gravity change increases from about 50 nm/s^2 at the surface to 250 nm/s^2 at the 4850 level. Gravity stations in the subsurface are advantageous because they are both closer to the water

  3. Time-dependent gravity in southern California, May 1974 - Apr 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, J. H.; Franzen, W. O.; Given, J. W.; Pechman, J. C.; Ruff, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Gravity measurements were coordinated with the long baseline three dimensional geodetic measurements of the Astronomical Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying project which used radio interferometry with extra-galactic radio sources. Gravity data from 28 of the stations had a single reading standard deviation of 11 microgal which gives a relative single determination between stations a standard deviation of 16 microgal. The largest gravity variation observed, 80 microgal, correlated with nearby waterwell variations and with smoothed rainfall. Smoothed rainfall data appeared to be a good indicator of the qualitative response of gravity to changing groundwater levels at other suprasediment stations, but frequent measurement of gravity at a station was essential until the quantitative calibration of the station's response to groundwater variations was accomplished.

  4. A new gravimetric reference station in South America: The installation of the Superconducting Gravimeters SG038 at the Argentinian-German Geodetic Observatory AGGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wziontek, Hartmut; Nowak, Ilona; Hase, Hayo; Häfner, Michael; Güntner, Andreas; Reich, Marvin; Brunini, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    In April 2015, the Transportable Integrated Geodetic Observatory (TIGO) of BKG was moved from Concepcion / Chile to La Plata / Argentina and was inaugurated in July 2015 as the Argentinian-German Geodetic Observatory (AGGO). In December 2015 the superconducting gravimeter SG038 was set up. The new station is equipped with four stable pillars to serve as a reference station and comparison site for absolute gravimeters in the future. We report about the overland transportation of the SG with the sphere floating, its installation at the new site and the hydrological instrumentation to observe local water storage changes to model near field gravimetric effects. We give an outlook about the first months of gravity time series and assess the drift behaviour after transport.

  5. Global detailed gravimetric geoid. [based on gravity model derived from satellite tracking and surface gravity data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, S.; Marsh, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    A global detailed gravimetric geoid has been computed by combining the Goddard Space Flight Center GEM-4 gravity model derived from satellite and surface gravity data and surface 1 deg-by-1 deg mean free air gravity anomaly data. The accuracy of the geoid is + or - 2 meters on continents, 5 to 7 meters in areas where surface gravity data are sparse, and 10 to 15 meters in areas where no surface gravity data are available. Comparisons have been made with the astrogeodetic data provided by Rice (United States), Bomford (Europe), and Mather (Australia). Comparisons have also been carried out with geoid heights derived from satellite solutions for geocentric station coordinates in North America, the Caribbean, Europe, and Australia.

  6. 2006 Compilation of Alaska Gravity Data and Historical Reports

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltus, Richard W.; Brown, Philip J., II; Morin, Robert L.; Hill, Patricia L.

    2008-01-01

    Gravity anomalies provide fundamental geophysical information about Earth structure and dynamics. To increase geologic and geodynamic understanding of Alaska, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected and processed Alaska gravity data for the past 50 years. This report introduces and describes an integrated, State-wide gravity database and provides accompanying gravity calculation tools to assist in its application. Additional information includes gravity base station descriptions and digital scans of historical USGS reports. The gravity calculation tools enable the user to reduce new gravity data in a consistent manner for combination with the existing database. This database has sufficient resolution to define the regional gravity anomalies of Alaska. Interpretation of regional gravity anomalies in parts of the State are hampered by the lack of local isostatic compensation in both southern and northern Alaska. However, when filtered appropriately, the Alaska gravity data show regional features having geologic significance. These features include gravity lows caused by low-density rocks of Cenozoic basins, flysch belts, and felsic intrusions, as well as many gravity highs associated with high-density mafic and ultramafic complexes.

  7. A computer system for the storage and retrieval of gravity data, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godson, Richard H.; Andreasen, Gordon H.

    1974-01-01

    A computer system has been developed for the systematic storage and retrieval of gravity data. All pertinent facts relating to gravity station measurements and computed Bouguer values may be retrieved either by project name or by geographical coordinates. Features of the system include visual display in the form of printer listings of gravity data and printer plots of station locations. The retrieved data format interfaces with the format of GEOPAC, a system of computer programs designed for the analysis of geophysical data.

  8. Bacteriorhodopsin crystal growth in reduced gravity--results under the conditions, given in CPCF on board of a Space Shuttle, versus the conditions, given in DCAM on board of the Space Station Mir.

    PubMed

    Zorb, Ch; Weisert, A; Stapelmann, J; Smolik, G; Carter, D C; Wright, B S; Brunner-Joos, K D; Wagner, G

    2002-01-01

    For the purpose of bio-electronics, bacteriorhodopsin was crystallized into two habits through liquid-liquid-diffusion, namely individual needles of up to 1.9 mm in length and needle bunch-like clusters of up 4.9 mm in total length. In both the reduced gravity experiments performed, the morphology of the individual needles (crystal form A) had improved in terms of sharp needle edges and compact needle packing, compared to the parallel ground controls. For the long duration wide range low gravity condition in the "Diffusion-controlled Crystallization Apparatus for Microgravity (DCAM)" on Mir (STS-89 up), needle bunches on average were longer there than on the ground, while the compactness of the clusters, i.e. the average ratio of clustered length to clustered width was the reverse. Some exceptionally large individuals needles were grown in DCAM. For the "Commercial Protein Crystallization Facility (CPCF)" in short duration high definition microgravity conditions during a science mission of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-95), size and shape of the individual needles were homogeneous and superior to those of both the parallel ground controls and the results in DCAM. In CPCF, the average volume of the individual needles in suspension was increased by 50% in microgravity compared to those in the ground control. PMID:12206160

  9. Approaches to Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriti, Daniele

    2009-03-01

    Preface; Part I. Fundamental Ideas and General Formalisms: 1. Unfinished revolution C. Rovelli; 2. The fundamental nature of space and time G. 't Hooft; 3. Does locality fail at intermediate length scales R. Sorkin; 4. Prolegomena to any future quantum gravity J. Stachel; 5. Spacetime symmetries in histories canonical gravity N. Savvidou; 6. Categorical geometry and the mathematical foundations of quantum gravity L. Crane; 7. Emergent relativity O. Dreyer; 8. Asymptotic safety R. Percacci; 9. New directions in background independent quantum gravity F. Markopoulou; Questions and answers; Part II: 10. Gauge/gravity duality G. Horowitz and J. Polchinski; 11. String theory, holography and quantum gravity T. Banks; 12. String field theory W. Taylor; Questions and answers; Part III: 13. Loop Quantum Gravity T. Thiemann; 14. Covariant loop quantum gravity? E. LIvine; 15. The spin foam representation of loop quantum gravity A. Perez; 16. 3-dimensional spin foam quantum gravity L. Freidel; 17. The group field theory approach to quantum gravity D. Oriti; Questions and answers; Part IV. Discrete Quantum Gravity: 18. Quantum gravity: the art of building spacetime J. Ambjørn, J. Jurkiewicz and R. Loll; 19. Quantum Regge calculations R. Williams; 20. Consistent discretizations as a road to quantum gravity R. Gambini and J. Pullin; 21. The causal set approach to quantum gravity J. Henson; Questions and answers; Part V. Effective Models and Quantum Gravity Phenomenology: 22. Quantum gravity phenomenology G. Amelino-Camelia; 23. Quantum gravity and precision tests C. Burgess; 24. Algebraic approach to quantum gravity II: non-commutative spacetime F. Girelli; 25. Doubly special relativity J. Kowalski-Glikman; 26. From quantum reference frames to deformed special relativity F. Girelli; 27. Lorentz invariance violation and its role in quantum gravity phenomenology J. Collins, A. Perez and D. Sudarsky; 28. Generic predictions of quantum theories of gravity L. Smolin; Questions and

  10. Space station furnace facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Sharon D.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1996-07-01

    The Space Shuttle Furnace Facility (SSFF) is the modular, multi-user scientific instrumentation for conducting materials research in the reduced gravity environment of the International Space Station. The facility is divided into the Core System and two Instrument Racks. The core system provides the common electrical and mechanical support equipment required to operate experiment modules (EMs). The EMs are investigator unique furnaces or apparatus designed to accomplish specific science investigations. Investigations are peer selected every two years from proposals submitted in response to National Aeronautics and Space Administration Research Announcements. The SSFF Core systems are designed to accommodate an envelope of eight types of experiment modules. The first two modules to be developed for the first instrument rack include a high temperature gradient furnace with quench, and a low temperature gradient furnace. A new EM is planned to be developed every two years.

  11. Gravity Survey of the Carson Sink - Data and Maps

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    A detailed gravity survey was carried out for the entire Carson Sink in western Nevada (Figure 1) through a subcontract to Zonge Engineering, Inc. The Carson Sink is a large composite basin containing three known, blind high‐temperature geothermal systems (Fallon Airbase, Stillwater, and Soda Lake). This area was chosen for a detailed gravity survey in order to characterize the gravity signature of the known geothermal systems and to identify other potential blind systems based on the structural setting indicated by the gravity data. Data: Data were acquired at approximately 400, 800, and 1600 meter intervals for a total of 1,243 stations. The project location and station location points are presented in Figure 14. The station distribution for this survey was designed to complete regional gravity coverage in the Carson Sink area without duplication of available public and private gravity coverage. Gravity data were acquired using a Scintrex CG‐5 gravimeter and a LaCoste and Romberg (L&R) Model‐G gravimeter. The CG‐5 gravity meter has a reading resolution of 0.001 milligals and a typical repeatability of less than 0.005 milligals. The L&R gravity meter has a reading resolution of 0.01 milligals and a typical repeatability of 0.02 milligals. The basic processing of gravimeter readings to calculate through to the Complete Bouguer Anomaly was made using the Gravity and Terrain Correction software version 7.1 for Oasis Montaj by Geosoft LTD. Results: The gravity survey of the Carson Sink yielded the following products. Project location and station location map (Figure 14). Complete Bouguer Anomaly @ 2.67 gm/cc reduction density. Gravity Complete Bouguer Anomaly at 2.50 g/cc Contour Map (Figure 15). Gravity Horizontal Gradient Magnitude Shaded Color Contour Map. Gravity 1st Vertical Derivative Color Contour Map. Interpreted Depth to Mesozoic Basement (Figure 16), incorporating drill‐hole intercept values. Preliminary Interpretation of Results: The Carson Sink

  12. An artificial gravity research facility for life sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Larry G.

    1988-01-01

    To obtain data for the design of a Mars mission vehicle configured for artificial gravity, NASA is currently studying the design of a variable-gravity research facility (VGRF) in a low earth orbit. The VGRF could be flown as a coorbiting payload requiring periodic servicing, resupply, and contingency intervention from the Space Station. The reasons why artificial gravity is needed for long-term missions are discussed; preliminary designs of a Mars vehicle with artificial gravity (at a weight cost of about 20 percent) are described; and particular attention is given to the VGRF design and mission profile.

  13. Evaluation of low-temperature geothermal potential in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. Part I. Gravity survey

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.A.; Cook, K.L.

    1983-04-01

    During 1980 and 1981 a total of 569 new gravity stations were taken in Utah and Goshen Valleys and adjacent areas, Utah. The new stations were combined with 530 other gravity stations taken in previous surveys which resulted in a compilation of 1099 stations which were used in this study. The additional surveys were undertaken to assist in the evaluation of the area for the possible development of geothermal resources by providing an interpreted structural framework by delineating faults, structural trends, intrusions, thickness of valley fill, and increased density of host rock. The gravity data are presented as (1) a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a 2 mgal contour interval on a scale of 1:100,000 and (2) five generally east-trending gravity profiles. A geologic interpretation of the study area was made from the gravity map and from the interpretive geologic cross sections which were modeled along the gravity profiles.

  14. An Experimental and Computational Study on Soot Formation in a Coflow Jet Flame Under Microgravity and Normal Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Bin; Cao, Su; Giassi, Davide; Stocker, Dennis P.; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Bennett, Beth Anne V.; Smooke, Mitchell D.; Long, Marshall B.

    2014-01-01

    Upon the completion of the Structure and Liftoff in Combustion Experiment (SLICE) in March 2012, a comprehensive and unique set of microgravity coflow diffusion flame data was obtained. This data covers a range of conditions from weak flames near extinction to strong, highly sooting flames, and enabled the study of gravitational effects on phenomena such as liftoff, blowout and soot formation. The microgravity experiment was carried out in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) on board the International Space Station (ISS), while the normal gravity experiment was performed at Yale utilizing a copy of the flight hardware. Computational simulations of microgravity and normal gravity flames were also carried out to facilitate understanding of the experimental observations. This paper focuses on the different sooting behaviors of CH4 coflow jet flames in microgravity and normal gravity. The unique set of data serves as an excellent test case for developing more accurate computational models.Experimentally, the flame shape and size, lift-off height, and soot temperature were determined from line-of-sight flame emission images taken with a color digital camera. Soot volume fraction was determined by performing an absolute light calibration using the incandescence from a flame-heated thermocouple. Computationally, the MC-Smooth vorticity-velocity formulation was employed to describe the chemically reacting flow, and the soot evolution was modeled by the sectional aerosol equations. The governing equations and boundary conditions were discretized on an axisymmetric computational domain by finite differences, and the resulting system of fully coupled, highly nonlinear equations was solved by a damped, modified Newtons method. The microgravity sooting flames were found to have lower soot temperatures and higher volume fraction than their normal gravity counterparts. The soot distribution tends to shift from the centerline of the flame to the wings from normal gravity to

  15. Prediction of physical workload in reduced gravity.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, J H; Alred, J W

    1988-12-01

    As we plan for long-term living and working in low-gravity environments, a system to predict mission support requirements, such as food and water, becomes critical. Such a system must consider the workload imposed by physical tasks for efficient estimation of these supplies. An accurate estimate of human energy expenditure on a space station or lunar base is also necessary to allocate personnel to tasks, and to assign work-rest schedules. An elemental analysis approach for predicting one's energy expenditure in industrial jobs was applied to low-gravity conditions in this paper. This was achieved by a reduction of input body and load weights in a well-accepted model, in proportion to lowered gravity, such as on the moon. Validation was achieved by applying the model to Apollo-era energy expenditure data. These data were from simulated lunar gravity walking studies, observed Apollo 14 walking, simulated lunar gravity upper body torquing, and simulated lunar gravity cart pulling. The energy expenditure model generally underpredicted high energy expenditures, and overpredicted low to medium energy expenditures. The predictions for low to medium workloads were, however, within 15-30% of actual values. Future developmental work will be necessary to include the effects of traction changes, as well as other nonlinear expenditure changes in reduced gravity environments. PMID:3240215

  16. Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters fluctuate on all scales. In the mesoscale these fluctuations are occasionally sinusoidal so that they can be interpreted as gravity waves. Usually, however, the fluctuations are noise like, so that their cause is not immediately evident. Results of mesoscale observations in the 20 to 120 m altitude range that are suitable for incorporation into a model atmosphere are very limited. In the stratosphere and lower mesosphere observations are sparse and very little data has been summarized into appropriate form. There is much more data in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but again very little of it has been summarized. The available mesoscale spectra of horizontal wind u versus vertical wave number m in the 20 to 120 km altitude range are shown together with a spectrum from the lower atmosphere for comparison. Further information about these spectra is given. In spite of the large range of altitudes and latitudes, the spectra from the lower atmosphere (NASA, 1971 and DEWAN, 1984) are remarkably similar in both shape and amplitude. The mean slopes of -2.38 for the NASA spectrum and -2.7 for the Dewan spectra are supported by the mean slope of -2.75 found by ROSENBERG et al. (1974). The mesospheric spectrum is too short to establish a shape. Its amplitude is about an order of magnitude larger than the NASA spectrum in the same wave number range. The NASA and Dewan spectra suggest that the mesoscale spectra in the lower atmosphere are insensitive to meteorological conditions.

  17. Gravity wave transmission diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomikawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    A possibility of gravity wave propagation from a source region to the airglow layer around the mesopause has been discussed based on the gravity wave blocking diagram taking into account the critical level filtering alone. This paper proposes a new gravity wave transmission diagram in which both the critical level filtering and turning level reflection of gravity waves are considered. It shows a significantly different distribution of gravity wave transmissivity from the blocking diagram.

  18. Observation Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Heather

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how a teacher integrates science observations into the writing center. At the observation station, students explore new items with a science theme and use their notes and questions for class writings every day. Students are exposed to a variety of different topics and motivated to write in different styles all while…

  19. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < ‑1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  20. Precision gravity studies at Cerro Prieto: a progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Grannell, R.B.; Kroll, R.C.; Wyman, R.M.; Aronstam, P.S.

    1981-01-01

    A third and fourth year of precision gravity data collection and reduction have now been completed at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field. In summary, 66 permanently monumented stations were occupied between December and April of 1979 to 1980 and 1980 to 1981 by a LaCoste and Romberg gravity meter (G300) at least twice, with a minimum of four replicate values obtained each time. Station 20 alternate, a stable base located on Cerro Prieto volcano, was used as the reference base for the third year and all the stations were tied to this base, using four to five hour loops. The field data were reduced to observed gravity values by (1) multiplication with the appropriate calibration factor; (2) removal of calculated tidal effects; (3) calculation of average values at each station, and (4) linear removal of accumulated instrumental drift which remained after carrying out the first three reductions. Following the reduction of values and calculation of gravity differences between individual stations and the base stations, standard deviations were calculated for the averaged occupation values (two to three per station). In addition, pooled variance calculations were carried out to estimate precision for the surveys as a whole.

  1. Medical operations and life sciences activities on space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C. (Editor); Mason, J. A. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Space station health maintenance facilities, habitability, personnel, and research in the medical sciences and in biology are discussed. It is assumed that the space station structure will consist of several modules, each being consistent with Orbiter payload bay limits in size, weight, and center of gravity.

  2. Gravity independence of seed-to-seed cycling in Brassica rapa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, M. E.; Kuang, A.; Xiao, Y.; Stout, S. C.; Bingham, G. E.; Briarty, L. G.; Levenskikh, M. A.; Sychev, V. N.; Podolski, I. G.

    2000-01-01

    Growth of higher plants in the microgravity environment of orbital platforms has been problematic. Plants typically developed more slowly in space and often failed at the reproductive phase. Short-duration experiments on the Space Shuttle showed that early stages in the reproductive process could occur normally in microgravity, so we sought a long-duration opportunity to test gravity's role throughout the complete life cycle. During a 122-d opportunity on the Mir space station, full life cycles were completed in microgravity with Brassica rapa L. in a series of three experiments in the Svet greenhouse. Plant material was preserved in space by chemical fixation, freezing, and drying, and then compared to material preserved in the same way during a high-fidelity ground control. At sampling times 13 d after planting, plants on Mir were the same size and had the same number of flower buds as ground control plants. Following hand-pollination of the flowers by the astronaut, siliques formed. In microgravity, siliques ripened basipetally and contained smaller seeds with less than 20% of the cotyledon cells found in the seeds harvested from the ground control. Cytochemical localization of storage reserves in the mature embryos showed that starch was retained in the spaceflight material, whereas protein and lipid were the primary storage reserves in the ground control seeds. While these successful seed-to-seed cycles show that gravity is not absolutely required for any step in the plant life cycle, seed quality in Brassica is compromised by development in microgravity.

  3. Chiral gravity, log gravity, and extremal CFT

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, Alexander; Song Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2010-03-15

    We show that the linearization of all exact solutions of classical chiral gravity around the AdS{sub 3} vacuum have positive energy. Nonchiral and negative-energy solutions of the linearized equations are infrared divergent at second order, and so are removed from the spectrum. In other words, chirality is confined and the equations of motion have linearization instabilities. We prove that the only stationary, axially symmetric solutions of chiral gravity are BTZ black holes, which have positive energy. It is further shown that classical log gravity--the theory with logarithmically relaxed boundary conditions--has finite asymptotic symmetry generators but is not chiral and hence may be dual at the quantum level to a logarithmic conformal field theories (CFT). Moreover we show that log gravity contains chiral gravity within it as a decoupled charge superselection sector. We formally evaluate the Euclidean sum over geometries of chiral gravity and show that it gives precisely the holomorphic extremal CFT partition function. The modular invariance and integrality of the expansion coefficients of this partition function are consistent with the existence of an exact quantum theory of chiral gravity. We argue that the problem of quantizing chiral gravity is the holographic dual of the problem of constructing an extremal CFT, while quantizing log gravity is dual to the problem of constructing a logarithmic extremal CFT.

  4. Feeling Gravity's Pull: Gravity Modeling. The Gravity Field of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank; Smith, David; Rowlands, David; Zuber, Maria; Neumann, G.; Chinn, Douglas; Pavlis, D.

    2000-01-01

    Most people take the constant presence of gravitys pull for granted. However, the Earth's gravitational strength actually varies from location to location. This variation occurs because mass, which influences an object's gravitational pull, is not evenly distributed within the planet. Changes in topography, such as glacial movement, an earthquake, or a rise in the ocean level, can subtly affect the gravity field. An accurate measurement of the Earth's gravity field helps us understand the distribution of mass beneath the surface. This insight can assist us in locating petroleum, mineral deposits, ground water, and other valuable substances. Gravity mapping can also help notice or verify changes in sea surface height and other ocean characteristics. Such changes may indicate climate change from polar ice melting and other phenomena. In addition, gravity mapping can indicate how land moves under the surface after earthquakes and other plate tectonic processes. Finally, changes in the Earth's gravity field might indicate a shift in water distribution that could affect agriculture, water supplies for population centers, and long-term weather prediction. Scientists can map out the Earth's gravity field by watching satellite orbits. When a satellite shifts in vertical position, it might be passing over an area where gravity changes in strength. Gravity is only one factor that may shape a satellite's orbital path. To derive a gravity measurement from satellite movement, scientists must remove other factors that might affect a satellite's position: 1. Drag from atmospheric friction. 2. Pressure from solar radiation as it heads toward Earth and. as it is reflected off the surface of the Earth 3. Gravitational pull from the Sun, the Moon, and other planets in the Solar System. 4. The effect of tides. 5. Relativistic effects. Scientists must also correct for the satellite tracking process. For example, the tracking signal must be corrected for refraction through the

  5. Finite field-dependent symmetries in perturbative quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the absolutely anticommuting nilpotent symmetries for perturbative quantum gravity in general curved spacetime in linear and non-linear gauges. Further, we analyze the finite field-dependent BRST (FFBRST) transformation for perturbative quantum gravity in general curved spacetime. The FFBRST transformation changes the gauge-fixing and ghost parts of the perturbative quantum gravity within functional integration. However, the operation of such symmetry transformation on the generating functional of perturbative quantum gravity does not affect the theory on physical ground. The FFBRST transformation with appropriate choices of finite BRST parameter connects non-linear Curci-Ferrari and Landau gauges of perturbative quantum gravity. The validity of the results is also established at quantum level using Batalin-Vilkovisky (BV) formulation.

  6. Improving HST Pointing & Absolute Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallo, Matthew; Nelan, E.; Kimmer, E.; Cox, C.; Casertano, S.

    2007-05-01

    Accurate absolute astrometry is becoming increasingly important in an era of multi-mission archives and virtual observatories. Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) Guidestar Catalog II (GSC2) has reduced coordinate error to around 0.25 arcsecond, a factor 2 or more compared with GSC1. With this reduced catalog error, special attention must be given to calibrate and maintain the Fine Guidance Sensors (FGSs) and Science Instruments (SIs) alignments in HST to a level well below this in order to ensure that the accuracy of science product's astrometry keywords and target positioning are limited only by the catalog errors. After HST Servicing Mission 4, such calibrations' improvement in "blind" pointing accuracy will allow for more efficient COS acquisitions. Multiple SIs and FGSs each have their own footprints in the spatially shared HST focal plane. It is the small changes over time in primarily the whole-body positions & orientations of these instruments & guiders relative to one another that is addressed by this work. We describe the HST Cycle 15 program CAL/OTA 11021 which, along with future variants of it, determines and maintains positions and orientations of the SIs and FGSs to better than 50 milli- arcseconds and 0.04 to 0.004 degrees of roll, putting errors associated with the alignment sufficiently below GSC2 errors. We present recent alignment results and assess their errors, illustrate trends, and describe where and how the observer sees benefit from these calibrations when using HST.

  7. Absolute oral bioavailability of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Drusano, G L; Standiford, H C; Plaisance, K; Forrest, A; Leslie, J; Caldwell, J

    1986-09-01

    We evaluated the absolute bioavailability of ciprofloxacin, a new quinoline carboxylic acid, in 12 healthy male volunteers. Doses of 200 mg were given to each of the volunteers in a randomized, crossover manner 1 week apart orally and as a 10-min intravenous infusion. Half-lives (mean +/- standard deviation) for the intravenous and oral administration arms were 4.2 +/- 0.77 and 4.11 +/- 0.74 h, respectively. The serum clearance rate averaged 28.5 +/- 4.7 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the intravenous administration arm. The renal clearance rate accounted for approximately 60% of the corresponding serum clearance rate and was 16.9 +/- 3.0 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the intravenous arm and 17.0 +/- 2.86 liters/h per 1.73 m2 for the oral administration arm. Absorption was rapid, with peak concentrations in serum occurring at 0.71 +/- 0.15 h. Bioavailability, defined as the ratio of the area under the curve from 0 h to infinity for the oral to the intravenous dose, was 69 +/- 7%. We conclude that ciprofloxacin is rapidly absorbed and reliably bioavailable in these healthy volunteers. Further studies with ciprofloxacin should be undertaken in target patient populations under actual clinical circumstances. PMID:3777908

  8. Absolute Instability in Coupled-Cavity TWTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, D. M. H.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Simon, D. H.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Chernin, D.; Antonsen, T. M., Jr.

    2014-10-01

    This paper will present results of our analysis of absolute instability in a coupled-cavity traveling wave tube (TWT). The structure mode at the lower and upper band edges are respectively approximated by a hyperbola in the (omega, k) plane. When the Briggs-Bers criterion is applied, a threshold current for onset of absolute instability is observed at the upper band edge, but not the lower band edge. The nonexistence of absolute instability at the lower band edge is mathematically similar to the nonexistence of absolute instability that we recently demonstrated for a dielectric TWT. The existence of absolute instability at the upper band edge is mathematically similar to the existence of absolute instability in a gyroton traveling wave amplifier. These interesting observations will be discussed, and the practical implications will be explored. This work was supported by AFOSR, ONR, and L-3 Communications Electron Devices.

  9. Soldering Tested in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Pettegrew, Richard D.; Watson, J. Kevin; Down, Robert S.; Haylett, Daniel R.

    2005-01-01

    Whether used occasionally for contingency repair or routinely in nominal repair operations, soldering will become increasingly important to the success of future long-duration human space missions. As a result, it will be critical to have a thorough understanding of the service characteristics of solder joints produced in reduced-gravity environments. The National Center for Space Exploration Research (via the Research for Design program), the NASA Glenn Research Center, and the NASA Johnson Space Center are conducting an experimental program to explore the influence of reduced gravity environments on the soldering process. Solder joint characteristics that are being considered include solder fillet geometry, porosity, and microstructural features. Both through-hole (see the drawing and image on the preceding figure) and surface-mounted devices are being investigated. This effort (the low-gravity portion being conducted on NASA s KC-135 research aircraft) uses the soldering hardware currently available on the International Space Station. The experiment involves manual soldering by a contingent of test operators, including both highly skilled technicians and less skilled individuals to provide a skill mix that might be encountered in space mission crews. The experiment uses both flux-cored solder and solid-core solder with an externally applied flux. Other experimental parameters include the type of flux, gravitational level (nominally zero,

  10. Absolute negative mobility of interacting Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Ya-li; Hu, Cai-tian; Wu, Jian-chun; Ai, Bao-quan

    2015-12-01

    Transport of interacting Brownian particles in a periodic potential is investigated in the presence of an ac force and a dc force. From Brownian dynamic simulations, we find that both the interaction between particles and the thermal fluctuations play key roles in the absolute negative mobility (the particle noisily moves backwards against a small constant bias). When no the interaction acts, there is only one region where the absolute negative mobility occurs. In the presence of the interaction, the absolute negative mobility may appear in multiple regions. The weak interaction can be helpful for the absolute negative mobility, while the strong interaction has a destructive impact on it.

  11. Urine specific gravity test

    MedlinePlus

    Urine specific gravity is a laboratory test that shows the concentration of all chemical particles in the urine. ... changes to will tell the provider the specific gravity of your urine. The dipstick test gives only ...

  12. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    Tethered gravity laboratories study is presented. The following subject areas are covered: variable gravity laboratory; attitude tether stabilizer; configuration analysis (AIT); dynamic analysis (SAO); and work planned for the next reporting period.

  13. Urine specific gravity test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003587.htm Urine specific gravity test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Urine specific gravity is a laboratory test that shows the concentration ...

  14. The Potential for Quantum Technology Gravity Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boddice, Daniel; Metje, Nicole; Tuckwell, George

    2016-04-01

    Gravity measurements are widely used in geophysics for the detection of subsurface cavities such as sinkhole and past mine workings. The chief advantage of gravity compared to other geophysical techniques is that it is passive method which cannot be shielded by intervening features or ground giving it no theoretical limitations on penetration depth beyond the resolution of the instrument, and that it responds to an absence of mass as opposed to a proxy ground property like other techniques. However, current instruments are limited both by their resolution and by sources of environmental noise. This can be overcome with the imminent arrival of gravity sensors using quantum technology (QT) currently developed and constructed by the QT-Hub in Sensors and Metrology, which promise a far greater resolution. The QT sensor uses a technique called atom interferometry, where cold atoms are used as ideal test-masses to create a gravity sensor which can measure a gravity gradient rather than an absolute value. This suppresses several noise sources and creates a sensor useful in everyday applications. The paper will present computer simulations of buried targets and noise sources to explore the potential uses of these new sensors for a range of applications including pipes, tunnels and mine shafts. This will provide information on the required resolution and sensitivity of any new sensor if it is to deliver the promised step change in geophysical detection capability.

  15. 3D absolute hypocentral determination - 13 years of seismicity in Ecuadorian subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Yvonne; Segovia, Monica; Theunissen, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    In Ecuador, the Nazca plate is subducting beneath the North Andean Block. This subduction triggered, during the last century, 4 major earthquakes of magnitude greater than 7.7. Between 1994 and 2007, the Geophysical Institute (Escuela National Politecnica, Quito) recorded about 40 000 events in whole Ecuador ranging from Mb 1.5 to 6.9. Unfortunately, the local network shows great density discrepancy between the Coastal and Andean regions where numerous stations were installed to survey volcanic activity. Consequently, seismicity in and around the interplate seismogenic zone - producer of the most destructive earthquakes and tsunamis - is not well constrained. This study aims to improve the location of 13 years seismicity occurred during an interseismic period in order to better localize the seismic deformation and gaps. The first step consists in the construction of a 3D "georealistic" velocity model. Because local tomography cannot provide satisfactory model, we combined all local crustal/lithospheric information on the geometry and velocity properties of different geological units. Those information cover the oceanic Nazca plate and sedimentary coverture the subducting plate dip angle; the North Andean Block margin composed of accreted oceanic plateaus (the Moho depth is approximated using gravity modeling); the metamorphic volcanic chain (oceanic nature for the occidental cordillera and inter-andean valley, continental one for the oriental cordillera); The continental Guyana shield and sedimentary basins. The resulting 3D velocity model extends from 2°N to 6.5°S and 277°E to 283°E and reaches a depth of 300 km. It is discretized in constant velocity blocks of 12 x 12 x 3 km in x, y and z, respectively. The second step consists in selecting an adequate sub-set of seismic stations in order to correct the effect of station density disequilibrium between coastal and volcanic regions. Consequently, we only keep the most representative volcanic stations in terms

  16. Dark Energy:. the Absolute Electric Potential of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Jose Beltrán; Maroto, Antonio L.

    Is there an absolute cosmic electric potential? The recent discovery of the accelerated expansion of the universe could be indicating that this is certainly the case. In this essay we show that the consistency of the covariant and gauge-invariant theory of electromagnetism is truly questionable when considered on cosmological scales. Out of the four components of the electromagnetic field, Maxwell's theory contains only two physical degrees of freedom. However, in the presence of gravity, one of the "unphysical" states cannot be consistently eliminated, thus becoming real. This third polarization state is completely decoupled from charged matter, but can be excited gravitationally, thus breaking gauge invariance. On large scales the new state can be seen as a homogeneous cosmic electric potential, whose energy density behaves as a cosmological constant.

  17. Physics of Artificial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    This chapter discusses potential technologies for achieving artificial gravity in a space vehicle. We begin with a series of definitions and a general description of the rotational dynamics behind the forces ultimately exerted on the human body during centrifugation, such as gravity level, gravity gradient, and Coriolis force. Human factors considerations and comfort limits associated with a rotating environment are then discussed. Finally, engineering options for designing space vehicles with artificial gravity are presented.

  18. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^-23 Hz^-1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  19. Gravity Monitoring of the Weber River Aquifer Storage Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettings, P.; Hurlow, H.; Chapman, D. S.; Harris, R. N.

    2004-12-01

    Repeated precision gravity measurements provide an economical way to track aquifer storage changes through time. In early 2004, the Weber River Water Conservancy District in northern Utah began an aquifer storage and recovery pilot project by infiltrating river water into a depleted aquifer. We are tracking the infiltrated water by measuring gravity changes over the aquifer through time. A network of 28 stations around the infiltration location was established, with an additional station in the nearby mountains for a stable reference. Gravity surveys are conducted at approximately two week intervals; monthly rapid-static GPS campaigns monitor ground deformation across the network. Gravity monitoring commenced in Feburary 2004, to establish a baseline before infiltration and investigate the magnitudes of natural signals and measurment noise. Infiltration commenced six weeks after the start of monitoring and by early July 2004, nearly 750 000 m3 of water were infiltrated; gravity changes at the infiltration site reached a peak of ˜100 μ Gal. Gaussian integration of the peak gravity signal is consistent with the total volume of infiltrated water. Continued monitoring during infiltration tracked the horizontal migration of infiltration water south and west of the site, consistent with known hydraulic gradients. Infiltration ended in July 2004 and gravity measurements show a declining recharge mound, with the peak decreasing to ˜60 μ Gal one month later. The spatial and temporal changes in gravity will be used to refine and enhance reservoir modeling around the infiltration site.

  20. Gravity base, jack-up platform - method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, R.P.; Pease, F.T.; Ray, D.R.

    1981-05-05

    The invention relates to an offshore, gravity base, jack-up platform comprising a deck, a gravity base and one or more legs interconnecting the deck and base. The gravity base comprises a generally polygonal shaped, monolithic hull structure with reaction members extending downwardly from the hull to penetrate the waterbed and react to vertical and lateral loads imposed upon the platform while maintaining the gravity hull in a posture elevated above the surface of the waterbed. A method aspect of the invention includes the steps of towing a gravity base, jack-up platform, as a unit, to a preselected offshore site floating upon the gravity hull. During the towing operation, the deck is mounted adjacent the gravity base with a leg or legs projecting through the deck. At a preselected offshore station ballast is added to the gravity base and the platform descends slightly to a posture where the platform is buoyantly supported by the deck. The base is then jacked down toward the seabed and the platform is laterally brought onto station. Ballast is then added to the deck and the reaction members are penetrated into the waterbed to operational soil refusal. Ballast is then ejected from the deck and the deck is jacked to an operational elevation above a predetermined statistical wave crest height.

  1. GTeC-A versatile MATLAB® tool for a detailed computation of the terrain correction and Bouguer gravity anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cella, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Gravity Terrain Correction (GTeC) is a versatile MATLAB® code for terrain correction aimed to this purpose and capable of going beyond the limits of other public domain codes targeted to this aim. It runs with input gravity data (absolute measurements or free air anomalies) at the land/sea surface and with one or more DTMs (indifferently gridded or scattered) at different detail levels. Each of them can be used to calculate the gravity contribution of a concentric terrain zone around the point station with increasing resolution toward the center. The user can choose between two alternative algorithms for terrain modeling. The simplest one considers each grid point as the flat top of a squared prism. For areas closer to the point station a second algorithm can be chosen to better approximate the relief, with respect to others formulas, by means of a tessellation based network formed by triangular prisms. A more precise terrain correction is therefore achieved, especially in presence of high topographic gradients or just outside the sea/land boundaries. In the last case a suitable algorithm was expressly devised to fit the tessellation based network to the irregular trend of the coastline. GTeC calculates also free air anomalies and both plate and curvature corrections, providing also a complete graphic output including topography, free air anomalies, plate correction, total terrain correction, Bouguer anomalies and the terrain effect due to each computational zone. GTeC speeds up CPU times taking advantage from the parallel computing functions and from the vectorization code, both exploited in MATLAB®. Two code versions of GTeC (for normal or parallel computation), executable under MATLAB environment (pcode), are fully available as public domain software. The results of a synthetic case, of a real case at the regional scale and of a microgravity survey carried out at a short scale, are here presented.

  2. Gravity is Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  3. Challenging Entropic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roveto, Jonathan

    2011-11-01

    A recent proposal by Erik Verlinde claims that gravity should be viewed not as a fundamental force, but an emergent thermodynamic phenomenon due to some yet undetermined microscopic theory. We present a challenge to this reformulation of gravity. Our claim is that a detailed derivation using Verlinde's proposed theory fails to correctly give Newton's laws or Einstein gravity.

  4. Combustion and fires in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Fire safety always receives priority attention in NASA mission designs and operations, with emphasis on fire prevention and material acceptance standards. Recently, interest in spacecraft fire-safety research and development has increased because improved understanding of the significant differences between low-gravity and normal-gravity combustion suggests that present fire-safety techniques may be inadequate or, at best, non-optimal; and the complex and permanent orbital operations in Space Station Freedom demand a higher level of safety standards and practices. This presentation outlines current practices and problems in fire prevention and detection for spacecraft, specifically the Space Station Freedom's fire protection. Also addressed are current practices and problems in fire extinguishment for spacecraft.

  5. Space Station tethered elevator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, Michael H.; Anderson, Loren A.; Hosterman, K.; Decresie, E.; Miranda, P.; Hamilton, R.

    1989-01-01

    The optimized conceptual engineering design of a space station tethered elevator is presented. The tethered elevator is an unmanned, mobile structure which operates on a ten-kilometer tether spanning the distance between Space Station Freedom and a platform. Its capabilities include providing access to residual gravity levels, remote servicing, and transportation to any point along a tether. The report discusses the potential uses, parameters, and evolution of the spacecraft design. Emphasis is placed on the elevator's structural configuration and three major subsystem designs. First, the design of elevator robotics used to aid in elevator operations and tethered experimentation is presented. Second, the design of drive mechanisms used to propel the vehicle is discussed. Third, the design of an onboard self-sufficient power generation and transmission system is addressed.

  6. Inequalities, Absolute Value, and Logical Connectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an approach to the concept of absolute value that alleviates students' problems with the traditional definition and the use of logical connectives in solving related problems. Uses a model that maps numbers from a horizontal number line to a vertical ray originating from the origin. Provides examples solving absolute value equations and…

  7. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  8. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    DOEpatents

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  9. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  10. Investigating Absolute Value: A Real World Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret; Pagni, David

    2009-01-01

    Making connections between various representations is important in mathematics. In this article, the authors discuss the numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of sums of absolute values of linear functions. The initial explanations are accessible to all students who have experience graphing and who understand that absolute value simply…

  11. Absolute Income, Relative Income, and Happiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Richard; Chernova, Kateryna

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses data from the World Values Survey to investigate how an individual's self-reported happiness is related to (i) the level of her income in absolute terms, and (ii) the level of her income relative to other people in her country. The main findings are that (i) both absolute and relative income are positively and significantly…

  12. Final report on the Seventh International Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters (ICAG 2005)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiang, Z.; Francis, O.; Vitushkin, L.; Palinkas, V.; Germak, A.; Becker, M.; D'Agostino, G.; Amalvict, M.; Bayer, R.; Bilker-Koivula, M.; Desogus, S.; Faller, J.; Falk, R.; Hinderer, J.; Gagnon, C.; Jakob, T.; Kalish, E.; Kostelecky, J.; Lee, C.; Liard, J.; Lokshyn, Y.; Luck, B.; Makinen, J.; Mizushima, S.; Le, Moigne N.; Origlia, C.; Pujol, E.R.; Richard, P.; Robertsson, L.; Ruess, D.; Schmerge, D.; Stus, Y.; Svitlov, S.; Thies, S.; Ullrich, C.; Van Camp, M.; Vitushkin, A.; Ji, W.; Wilmes, H.

    2011-01-01

    The Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), S??vres, France, hosted the 7th International Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters (ICAG) and the associated Relative Gravity Campaign (RGC) from August to September 2005. ICAG 2005 was prepared and performed as a metrological pilot study, which aimed: To determine the gravity comparison reference values; To determine the offsets of the absolute gravimeters; and As a pilot study to accumulate experience for the CIPM Key Comparisons. This document presents a complete and extensive review of the technical protocol and data processing procedures. The 1st ICAG-RGC comparison was held at the BIPM in 1980-1981 and since then meetings have been organized every 4 years. In this paper, we present an overview of how the meeting was organized, the conditions of BIPM gravimetric sites, technical specifications, data processing strategy and an analysis of the final results. This 7th ICAG final report supersedes all previously published reports. Readings were obtained from participating instruments, 19 absolute gravimeters and 15 relative gravimeters. Precise levelling measurements were carried out and all measurements were performed on the BIPM micro-gravity network which was specifically designed for the comparison. ?? 2011 BIPM & IOP Publishing Ltd.

  13. Inhalation risk in low-gravity spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Paul; Sklar, Michael V.; Ramirez, W. Fred; Smith, Gerald J.; Morgenthaler, George W.; McKinnon, J. T.; Oberdörster, Günter; Schulz, Jon

    Inhalation risks on long-duration manned spaced flight include gasses chronically released by outgassing of materials, gasses released during spills, thermodegradation events (including fires) with their attendant particulates, and fire extinguishment. As an example, an event in which electronic insulation consisting of polytetrafluoroethylene undergoes thermodegradation on the Space Station Freedom was modeled experimentally and theoretically from the initial chemistry and convective transport through pulmonary deposition in humans. The low-gravity environment was found to impact various stages of event simulation. Critical unknowns were identified, and these include the extent of production of ultrafine particles and polymeric products at the source in low gravity, the transport of ultrafine particles in the spacecraft air quality control system, and the biological response of the lung, including alveolar macrophages, to this inhalation risk in low gravity.

  14. Submerged AUV Charging Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Chao, Yi; Curtin, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    causes the AUV to rise, and emptying of the bladder allows the AUV to descend. This type of direct buoyancy control is much more energy efficient than using electrical pumps in that the inefficiencies of converting thermal energy to electrical energy to mechanical energy is avoided. AUV charging stations have been developed that use electricity produced by waves on floating buoys and that use electricity from solar photovoltaics on floating buoys. This is the first device that has absolutely no floating or visible parts, and is thus impervious to storms, inadvertent ocean vessel collisions, or enemy sabotage.

  15. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  16. Mobile quantum gravity sensor with unprecedented stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freier, C.; Hauth, M.; Schkolnik, V.; Leykauf, B.; Schilling, M.; Wziontek, H.; Scherneck, H.-G.; Müller, J.; Peters, A.

    2016-06-01

    Changes of surface gravity on Earth are of great interest in geodesy, earth sciences and natural resource exploration. They are indicative of Earth system's mass redistributions and vertical surface motion, and are usually measured with falling corner-cube- and superconducting gravimeters (FCCG and SCG). Here we report on absolute gravity measurements with a mobile quantum gravimeter based on atom interferometry. The measurements were conducted in Germany and Sweden over periods of several days with simultaneous SCG and FCCG comparisons. They show the best-reported performance of mobile atomic gravimeters to date with an accuracy of 39nm/s2, long-term stability of 0.5nm/s2 and short-term noise of 96nm/s2/√Hz. These measurements highlight the unique properties of atomic sensors. The achieved level of performance in a transportable instrument enables new applications in geodesy and related fields, such as continuous absolute gravity monitoring with a single instrument under rough environmental conditions.

  17. Space Station Freedom as an engineering experiment station: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, M. Frank

    1992-01-01

    In this presentation, the premise that Space Station Freedom has great utility as an engineering experiment station will be explored. There are several modes in which it can be used for this purpose. The most obvious are space qualification, process development, in space satellite repair, and materials engineering. The range of engineering experiments which can be done at Space Station Freedom run the gamut from small process oriented experiments to full exploratory development models. A sampling of typical engineering experiments are discussed in this session. First and foremost, Space Station Freedom is an elaborate experiment itself, which, if properly instrumented, will provide engineering guidelines for even larger structures which must surely be built if humankind is truly 'outward bound.' Secondly, there is the test, evaluation and space qualification of advanced electric thruster concepts, advanced power technology and protective coatings which must of necessity be tested in the vacuum of space. The current approach to testing these technologies is to do exhaustive laboratory simulation followed by shuttle or unmanned flights. Third, the advanced development models of life support systems intended for future space stations, manned mars missions, and lunar colonies can be tested for operation in a low gravity environment. Fourth, it will be necessary to develop new protective coatings, establish construction techniques, evaluate new materials to be used in the upgrading and repair of Space Station Freedom. Finally, the industrial sector, if it is ever to build facilities for the production of commercial products, must have all the engineering aspects of the process evaluated in space prior to a commitment to such a facility.

  18. Development of the new very broadband compliance ocean bottom station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Celia; Dahm, Torsten; Bulow, Joachim; Winter, Sven

    2010-05-01

    In the frame of the EMSEIS Project* the University of Hamburg has developed two broadband compliance ocean bottom stations (BCSs). The objective was to create a station capable of acquire pressure and velocity data on the seafloor in the frequency range where compliance and infragravity waves are studied (30 - 500s). A triaxial seismometer STS-2, a differential pressure gauge, an absolute pressure sensor, and a MLS Geolon recorder were installed on a Hamburg free-fall ocean bottom station. The whole system works in a broad frequency range (between 0.005 Hz and 25 Hz) with a sampling frequency of 50 Hz. The maximum deployment depth is 6000 meters. The BCSs were created to acquire compliance data during short time deployments (20-100 hours). However, laboratory tests and field experiences indicate that instruments can continuously work during about 30 days. To secure the correct leveling of the seismic sensor, a two stage active leveling process was designed. In the first stage the mechanical leveling is performed and during the second stage the internal leveling is done and the masses are re-centered. Two electronic circuits were designed and connected to the recorder and the seismometer to control the complete process. The tasks of the circuits are: 1) determinate the number of cycles during a measurement which depend on the number of leveling signals sent by the recorder, 2) to generate the impulse to initiate the mechanical leveling phase, 3) to send the signal to produce the internal leveling and 4) to sent the signal to lock and unlock the masses to protect the equipment. To perform the mechanical leveling process the STS2 was mounted in a glass sphere on two gimbaled rings made of aluminum. Additionally, a retractile cube connected to a small motor was built-in the seismometer bottom. With the help of the motor, the cube can be extended to fix the seismometer to the sphere or can be retracted to allow the free pendulum motion of the seismometer in the sphere

  19. Autonomous momentum management for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, E.

    1984-01-01

    Momentum management for the CDG planar space platform is discussed. It is assumed that the external torques on the space station are gravity gradient and aerodynamic, both have bias and cyclic terms. The integrals of the cyclic torques are the cyclic momenti which will be stored in the momentum storage actuator. Techniques to counteract the bias torques and center the cyclic momentum and gravity gradient desaturation by adjusting vehicle attitude, aerodynamic desaturation using solar panels and radiators and the deployment of flat plates at the end of long booms generating aerodynamic torques are investigated.

  20. Inconstancy-theory/quantum-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtaza, Faheem

    1999-05-01

    Inconstancy-theory is the union of "relativity" and "quantum" theories which rests upon the answers of the simple questions. 1) That if only the simple motion of a particle can not be observed without the "reference-frame" then how the whole universe can be expected to be observable without any "reference-frame". 2) Does not the inter-influence (Unity) of space-time-mass suggest that these are generated by common source and might not there be some invisible "flow" (dynamical-equilibrium) that is the cause of space-time-mass,as time itself is a flow. "Inconstancy" proposes, interalia, the principle that "relativity (generalised) is the universal law of nature in each and every respect". For that "inconstancy" admits only the light, being absolute, a real reference-frame and medium(mirror) for the display of relative "space-time-mass". Light as reference-frame in "Inconstancy" unifies "relativity" and "quantum" theories and establishes the inter-connection between "quantum-gravity" and strong-nuclear interactions, which offers the velocity of light in terms of physical and spatial-temporal components. "Inconstancy" introduces another "constant" operative in "quantum-gravity" and unveils the "graviton" location for its novel range as previously "relativity" escaped detection for v<<Gravity abolition hypothesis of "static" particles as the dynamical property of the particle influences the space around it through "graviton" in the similar fashion as previously mass-variation was replaced by "momentum-variation" in special relativity. 2) Due to new constant of inconstancy, negligibly small angular motion of rectilinearly moving particle occurs.

  1. Preliminary OARE absolute acceleration measurements on STS-50

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Nicholson, John Y.; Ritter, James

    1993-01-01

    On-orbit Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) data on STS-50 was examined in detail during a 2-day time period. Absolute acceleration levels were derived at the OARE location, the orbiter center-of-gravity, and at the STS-50 spacelab Crystal Growth Facility. The tri-axial OARE raw acceleration measurements (i.e., telemetered data) during the interval were filtered using a sliding trimmed mean filter in order to remove large acceleration spikes (e.g., thrusters) and reduce the noise. Twelve OARE measured biases in each acceleration channel during the 2-day interval were analyzed and applied to the filtered data. Similarly, the in situ measured x-axis scale factors in the sensor's most sensitive range were also analyzed and applied to the data. Due to equipment problem(s) on this flight, both y- and z- axis sensitive range scale factors were determined in a separate process (using the OARE maneuver data) and subsequently applied to the data. All known significant low-frequency corrections at the OARE location (i.e., both vertical and horizontal gravity-gradient, and rotational effects) were removed from the filtered data in order to produce the acceleration components at the orbiter's center-of-gravity, which are the aerodynamic signals along each body axes. Results indicate that there is a force of unknown origin being applied to the Orbiter in addition to the aerodynamic forces. The OARE instrument and all known gravitational and electromagnetic forces were reexamined, but none produce the observed effect. Thus, it is tentatively concluded that the Orbiter is creating the environment observed.

  2. Preliminary OARE absolute acceleration measurements on STS-50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Nicholson, John Y.; Ritter, James

    1993-02-01

    On-orbit Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) data on STS-50 was examined in detail during a 2-day time period. Absolute acceleration levels were derived at the OARE location, the orbiter center-of-gravity, and at the STS-50 spacelab Crystal Growth Facility. The tri-axial OARE raw acceleration measurements (i.e., telemetered data) during the interval were filtered using a sliding trimmed mean filter in order to remove large acceleration spikes (e.g., thrusters) and reduce the noise. Twelve OARE measured biases in each acceleration channel during the 2-day interval were analyzed and applied to the filtered data. Similarly, the in situ measured x-axis scale factors in the sensor's most sensitive range were also analyzed and applied to the data. Due to equipment problem(s) on this flight, both y- and z- axis sensitive range scale factors were determined in a separate process (using the OARE maneuver data) and subsequently applied to the data. All known significant low-frequency corrections at the OARE location (i.e., both vertical and horizontal gravity-gradient, and rotational effects) were removed from the filtered data in order to produce the acceleration components at the orbiter's center-of-gravity, which are the aerodynamic signals along each body axes. Results indicate that there is a force of unknown origin being applied to the Orbiter in addition to the aerodynamic forces. The OARE instrument and all known gravitational and electromagnetic forces were reexamined, but none produce the observed effect. Thus, it is tentatively concluded that the Orbiter is creating the environment observed.

  3. Absolute and convective instability of a viscous liquid jet surrounded by a viscous gas in a vertical pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Lian, Z. W.

    1993-01-01

    The absolute and convective instability of a viscous liquid jet emanating into a viscous gas in a vertical pipe is analyzed in a parameter space spanned by the Reynolds number, the Froude number, the Weber number, the viscosity ratio, the density ratio, and the diameter ratio. The numerical results of the analysis are used to demonstrate that reduction in gravity tends to enhance the Rayleigh mode of convective instability which leads to the breakup of a liquid jet into drops of diameters comparable with the jet diameter. On the contrary, the Taylor mode of convective instability that leads to atomization is retarded at reduced gravity. The Rayleigh mode becomes absolutely unstable when the Reynolds number exceeds a critical value for a given set of the rest of the relevant parameters. The domain of absolute instability is significantly enlarged when the effect of gas viscosity is not neglected.

  4. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator - Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Skylab's success proved that scientific experimentation in a low gravity environment was essential to scientific progress. A more permanent structure was needed to provide this space laboratory. President Ronald Reagan, on January 25, 1984, during his State of the Union address, claimed that the United States should exploit the new frontier of space, and directed NASA to build a permanent marned space station within a decade. The idea was that the space station would not only be used as a laboratory for the advancement of science and medicine, but would also provide a staging area for building a lunar base and manned expeditions to Mars and elsewhere in the solar system. President Reagan invited the international community to join with the United States in this endeavour. NASA and several countries moved forward with this concept. By December 1985, the first phase of the space station was well underway with the design concept for the crew compartments and laboratories. Pictured are two NASA astronauts, at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS), practicing construction techniques they later used to construct the space station after it was deployed.

  5. Intraspecific differences in bacterial responses to modelled reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, P. W.; Leff, L. G.

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: Bacteria are important residents of water systems, including those of space stations which feature specific environmental conditions, such as lowered effects of gravity. The purpose of this study was to compare responses with modelled reduced gravity of space station, water system bacterial isolates with other isolates of the same species. METHODS AND RESULTS: Bacterial isolates, Stenotrophomonas paucimobilis and Acinetobacter radioresistens, originally recovered from the water supply aboard the International Space Station (ISS) were grown in nutrient broth under modelled reduced gravity. Their growth was compared with type strains S. paucimobilis ATCC 10829 and A. radioresistens ATCC 49000. Acinetobacter radioresistens ATCC 49000 and the two ISS isolates showed similar growth profiles under modelled reduced gravity compared with normal gravity, whereas S. paucimobilis ATCC 10829 was negatively affected by modelled reduced gravity. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that microgravity might have selected for bacteria that were able to thrive under this unusual condition. These responses, coupled with impacts of other features (such as radiation resistance and ability to persist under very oligotrophic conditions), may contribute to the success of these water system bacteria. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: Water quality is a significant factor in many environments including the ISS. Efforts to remove microbial contaminants are likely to be complicated by the features of these bacteria which allow them to persist under the extreme conditions of the systems.

  6. An Analysis of the Effect on the Data Processing of Korea GPS Network by the Absolute Phase Center Variations of GPS Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Jeongho; Lim, Hyung-Chul; Jo, Jung Hyun; Cho, Sungki; Cho, Jung-Ho

    2006-12-01

    The International GNSS Service (IGS) has prepared for a transition from the relative phase center variation (PCV) to the absolute PCV, because the terrestrial scale problem of the absolute PCV was resolved by estimating the PCV of the GPS satellites. Thus, the GPS data will be processed by using the absolute PCV which will be an IGS standard model in the near future. It is necessary to compare and analyze the results between the relative PCV and the absolute PCV for the establishment of the reliable processing strategy. This research analyzes the effect caused by the absolute PCV via the GPS network data processing. First, the four IGS stations, Daejeon, Suwon, Beijing and Wuhan, are selected to make longer baselines than 1000 km, and processed by using the relative PCV and the absolute PCV to examine the effect of the antenna raydome. Beijing and Wuhan stations of which the length of baselines are longer than 1000 km show the average difference of 1.33 cm in the vertical! component, and 2.97 cm when the antenna raydomes are considered. Second, the 7 permanent GPS stations among the total 9 stations, operated by Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, are processed by applying the relative PCV and the absolute PCV, and their results are compared and analyzed. An insignificant effect of the absolute PCV is shown in Korea regional network with the average difference of 0.12 cm in the vertical component.

  7. Lunar gravity - A long-term Keplerian rate method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, A. J.; Ananda, M. P.

    1977-01-01

    Nearside tracking data from Apollo subsatellites and Lunar Orbiter 5 are used to construct a model of the farside lunar gravity field. An indirect method of calculating the average effect of all the gravity anomalies which affect spacecraft orbits is reduced to a linear estimation problem by eliminating the integration of spacecraft dynamics. Doppler frequency shifts between the lunar satellite and earth-based tracking station are used to measure the line of sight velocity component between the orbiter and the tracker; gravity determination is then performed in a weighted least squares estimator which employs the orbital rates as data and formulates the normal equations using the associated Keplerian state. Simulations performed demonstrate that farside gravity features can be economically determined by use of gravity estimates obtained from long-period models of nearside orbiting tracks.

  8. Measuring gravity currents in the Chicago River, Chicago, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, K.A.; Czuba, J.A.; Johnson, K.K.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies of the Chicago River have determined that gravity currents are responsible for persistent bidirectional flows that have been observed in the river. A gravity current is the flow of one fluid within another caused by a density difference between the fluids. These studies demonstrated how acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) can be used to detect and characterize gravity currents in the field. In order to better understand the formation and evolution of these gravity currents, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has installed ADCPs and other instruments to continuously measure gravity currents in the Chicago River and the North Branch Chicago River. These instruments include stage sensors, thermistor strings, and both upward-looking and horizontal ADCPs. Data loggers and computers installed at gaging stations along the river are used to collect data from these instruments and transmit them to USGS offices. ?? 2008 IEEE.

  9. Space Station Biological Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wade, C. E.; Givens, J. J.

    1997-01-01

    To meet NASA's objective of using the unique aspects of the space environment to expand fundamental knowledge in the biological sciences, the Space Station Biological Research Project at Ames Research Center is developing, or providing oversight, for two major suites of hardware which will be installed on the International Space Station (ISS). The first, the Gravitational Biology Facility, consists of Habitats to support plants, rodents, cells, aquatic specimens, avian and reptilian eggs, and insects and the Habitat Holding Rack in which to house them at microgravity; the second, the Centrifuge Facility, consists of a 2.5 m diameter centrifuge that will provide acceleration levels between 0.01 g and 2.0 g and a Life Sciences Glovebox. These two facilities will support the conduct of experiments to: 1) investigate the effect of microgravity on living systems; 2) what level of gravity is required to maintain normal form and function, and 3) study the use of artificial gravity as a countermeasure to the deleterious effects of microgravity observed in the crew. Upon completion, the ISS will have three complementary laboratory modules provided by NASA, the European Space Agency and the Japanese space agency, NASDA. Use of all facilities in each of the modules will be available to investigators from participating space agencies. With the advent of the ISS, space-based gravitational biology research will transition from 10-16 day short-duration Space Shuttle flights to 90-day-or-longer ISS increments.

  10. Absolute optical instruments without spherical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyc, Tomáš; Dao, H. L.; Danner, Aaron J.

    2015-11-01

    Until now, the known set of absolute optical instruments has been limited to those containing high levels of symmetry. Here, we demonstrate a method of mathematically constructing refractive index profiles that result in asymmetric absolute optical instruments. The method is based on the analogy between geometrical optics and classical mechanics and employs Lagrangians that separate in Cartesian coordinates. In addition, our method can be used to construct the index profiles of most previously known absolute optical instruments, as well as infinitely many different ones.

  11. Space Station Biological Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Catherine C.; Hargens, Alan R.; Wade, Charles E.

    1995-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center is responsible for the development of the Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) which will support non-human life sciences research on the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA). The SSBRP is designed to support both basic research to understand the effect of altered gravity fields on biological systems and applied research to investigate the effects of space flight on biological systems. The SSBRP will provide the necessary habitats to support avian and reptile eggs, cells and tissues, plants and rodents. In addition a habitat to support aquatic specimens will be provided by our international partners. Habitats will be mounted in ISSA compatible racks at u-g and will also be mounted on a 2.5 m diameter centrifuge except for the egg incubator which has an internal centrifuge. The 2.5 m centrifuge will provide artificial gravity levels over the range of 0.01 G to 2 G. The current schedule is to launch the first rack in 1999, the Life Sciences glovebox and a second rack early in 2001, a 4 habitat 2.5 in centrifuge later the same year in its own module, and to upgrade the centrifuge to 8 habitats in 2004. The rodent habitats will be derived from the Advanced Animal Habitat currently under development for the Shuttle program and will be capable of housing either rats or mice individually or in groups (6 rats/group and at least 12 mice/group). The egg incubator will be an upgraded Avian Development Facility also developed for the Shuttle program through a Small Business and Innovative Research grant. The Space Tissue Loss cell culture apparatus, developed by Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, is being considered for the cell and tissue culture habitat. The Life Sciences Glovebox is crucial to all life sciences experiments for specimen manipulation and performance of science procedures. It will provide two levels of containment between the work volume and the crew through the use of seals and negative pressure. The glovebox

  12. Space station impact experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P.; Ahrens, T.; Alexander, W. M.; Cintala, M.; Gault, D.; Greeley, R.; Hawke, B. R.; Housen, K.; Schmidt, R.

    1986-01-01

    Four processes serve to illustrate potential areas of study and their implications for general problems in planetary science. First, accretional processes reflect the success of collisional aggregation over collisional destruction during the early history of the solar system. Second, both catastrophic and less severe effects of impacts on planetary bodies survivng from the time of the early solar system may be expressed by asteroid/planetary spin rates, spin orientations, asteroid size distributions, and perhaps the origin of the Moon. Third, the surfaces of planetary bodies directly record the effects of impacts in the form of craters; these records have wide-ranging implications. Fourth, regoliths evolution of asteroidal surfaces is a consequence of cumulative impacts, but the absence of a significant gravity term may profoundly affect the retention of shocked fractions and agglutinate build-up, thereby biasing the correct interpretations of spectral reflectance data. An impact facility on the Space Station would provide the controlled conditions necessary to explore such processes either through direct simulation of conditions or indirect simulation of certain parameters.

  13. Gravity and the geoid in the Nepal Himalaya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilham, Roger

    1992-01-01

    Materials within the Himalaya are rising due to convergence between India and Asia. If the rate of erosion is comparable to the rate of uplift the mean surface elevation will remain constant. Any slight imbalance in these two processes will lead to growth or attrition of the Himalaya. The process of uplift of materials within the Himalaya coupled with surface erosion is similar to the advance of a glacier into a region of melting. If the melting rate exceeds the rate of downhill motion of the glacier then the terminus of the glacier will receed up-valley despite the downhill motion of the bulk of the glacier. Thus although buried rocks, minerals and surface control points in the Himalaya are undoubtably rising, the growth or collapse of the Himalaya depends on the erosion rate which is invisible to geodetic measurements. Erosion rates are currently estimated from suspended sediment loads in rivers in the Himalaya. These typically underestimate the real erosion rate since bed-load is not measured during times of heavy flood, and it is difficult to integrate widely varying suspended load measurements over many years. An alternative way to measure erosion rate is to measure the rate of change of gravity in a region of uplift. If a control point moves vertically it should be accompanied by a reduction in gravity as the point moves away from the Earth's center of mass. There is a difference in the change of gravity between uplift with and without erosion corresponding to the difference between the free-air gradient and the gradient in the acceleration due to gravity caused by a corresponding thickness of rock. Essentially gravity should change precisely in accord with a change in elevation of the point in a free-air gradient if erosion equals uplift rate. We were funded by NASA to undertake a measurement of absolute gravity simultaneously with measurements of GPS height within the Himalaya. Since both absolute gravity and time are known in an absolute sense to 1 part in

  14. OSSA Space Station Freedom science utilization plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cressy, Philip J.

    1992-01-01

    Long duration exposure to an essentially zero-gravity environment is a phenomenon exclusive to the Space Station Freedom that cannot be duplicated on Earth. The Freedom Station will offer periods of time on orbit extending to weeks and months rather than hours or days, allowing for in-depth space based research and analysis to a degree never before achieved. OSSA remains committed to exploiting the unique capabilities provided by the Space Station as well as other space-based facilities to study the nature of physical, chemical, and biological processes in a low-gravity environment and to apply these studies to advance science and applications in such fields as biomedical research, plant and animal physiology, exobiology, biotechnology, materials science, fluid physics, and combustion science. The OSSA focus is on progressive science investigations, many requiring hands-on scientist involvement using sophisticated experiment hardware. OSSA science utilization planning for the Freedom Station is firmly established. For this presentation, this planning is discussed in three general areas: OSSA goals and overall approach, the current and on-going program, and plans for space station utilization. In the first area, OSSA addresses its overall approach to space science research, its commitment to transition to Space Station Freedom, and its top-level strategy for the utilization of Freedom. The current and on-going program is next discussed, focusing on the various Spacelab series of missions which are providing the stepping-stones to Space Station Freedom. Selected science results from SLS-1 and USML-1 are cited which underline the value of properly outfitted laboratories in space in which crew-intensive experiment interactions are possible. The presentation is concluded with a discussion of top-level goals and strategies for utilizing the Freedom Station by OSSA's Life Sciences Division and its Microgravity Science and Applications Division.

  15. Absolute magnitudes of trans-neptunian objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffard, R.; Alvarez-candal, A.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Ortiz, J. L.; Morales, N.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Thirouin, A.

    2015-10-01

    Accurate measurements of diameters of trans- Neptunian objects are extremely complicated to obtain. Radiomatric techniques applied to thermal measurements can provide good results, but precise absolute magnitudes are needed to constrain diameters and albedos. Our objective is to measure accurate absolute magnitudes for a sample of trans- Neptunian objects, many of which have been observed, and modelled, by the "TNOs are cool" team, one of Herschel Space Observatory key projects grantes with ~ 400 hours of observing time. We observed 56 objects in filters V and R, if possible. These data, along with data available in the literature, was used to obtain phase curves and to measure absolute magnitudes by assuming a linear trend of the phase curves and considering magnitude variability due to rotational light-curve. In total we obtained 234 new magnitudes for the 56 objects, 6 of them with no reported previous measurements. Including the data from the literature we report a total of 109 absolute magnitudes.

  16. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  17. New standards for reducing gravity data: The North American gravity database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinze, W. J.; Aiken, C.; Brozena, J.; Coakley, B.; Dater, D.; Flanagan, G.; Forsberg, R.; Hildenbrand, T.; Keller, Gordon R.; Kellogg, J.; Kucks, R.; Li, X.; Mainville, A.; Morin, R.; Pilkington, M.; Plouff, D.; Ravat, D.; Roman, D.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Veronneau, M.; Webring, M.; Winester, D.

    2005-01-01

    The North American gravity database as well as databases from Canada, Mexico, and the United States are being revised to improve their coverage, versatility, and accuracy. An important part of this effort is revising procedures for calculating gravity anomalies, taking into account our enhanced computational power, improved terrain databases and datums, and increased interest in more accurately defining long-wavelength anomaly components. Users of the databases may note minor differences between previous and revised database values as a result of these procedures. Generally, the differences do not impact the interpretation of local anomalies but do improve regional anomaly studies. The most striking revision is the use of the internationally accepted terrestrial ellipsoid for the height datum of gravity stations rather than the conventionally used geoid or sea level. Principal facts of gravity observations and anomalies based on both revised and previous procedures together with germane metadata will be available on an interactive Web-based data system as well as from national agencies and data centers. The use of the revised procedures is encouraged for gravity data reduction because of the widespread use of the global positioning system in gravity fieldwork and the need for increased accuracy and precision of anomalies and consistency with North American and national databases. Anomalies based on the revised standards should be preceded by the adjective "ellipsoidal" to differentiate anomalies calculated using heights with respect to the ellipsoid from those based on conventional elevations referenced to the geoid. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.

  18. 300-days of parallel gravity record with the gPhone-054 spring gravimeter and the GWR-C026 superconducting gravimeter in Strasbourg (France): a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, Umberto; Rosat, Severine; Hinderer, Jacques

    2010-05-01

    A wide set of geodynamical and hydrological phenomena, involving underground mass redistribution and/or change of the Earth's figure, affects the gravity field, sometimes inducing "slow" and "small" temporal gravity changes, the detection of which relies on instruments with high sensitivity, long-term stability and a very low drift. Here we report on the results of a comparative analysis carried out on more than ten months of co-located record collected with a new generation spring gravimeter, the gPhone-054, owned by the IGN of Madrid (Spain), and the GWR-C026 superconducting gravimeter (SG-C026) at the J9 gravity station in Strasbourg (France). The Microg-LaCoste gPhone is a portable Earth tide gravimeter equipped with a 0.1 µGal resolution feedback. The core sensor is the patented LaCoste & Romberg (LR) zero-length spring suspension system. The gPhone is essentially a LR, model G meter, but with significant upgrades: it has an improved thermal system (a double-oven) for increased temperature stability. Moreover the instrument should have a "true" vacuum seal making it almost insensitive to the buoyancy changes due to atmospheric pressure fluctuations. We test the performances of the gPhone-054 in terms of resolution, accuracy, noise level and long-term stability (drift) with respect to the SG-C026. Our comparative analysis is performed in a wide spectral domain, ranging from the body tides to the seismic band. This study demonstrates that the SGs have better performances in the whole analyzed spectral band. Focusing on the gPhone-054 instrumental drift observed during this study, it still remains a critical point preventing the study of the long-term gravity changes. In fact the drift was large and even not linear, sometimes requiring a high degree (> 4) polynomial fitting to be reduced; the latter makes hard to distinguish real time gravity changes from the instrumental drift. We observed a drift rate evolution characterized by a decrease from 50 µGal/day to

  19. Canonical gravity with fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Bojowald, Martin; Das, Rupam

    2008-09-15

    Canonical gravity in real Ashtekar-Barbero variables is generalized to allow for fermionic matter. The resulting torsion changes several expressions in Holst's original vacuum analysis, which are summarized here. This in turn requires adaptations to the known loop quantization of gravity coupled to fermions, which is discussed on the basis of the classical analysis. As a result, parity invariance is not manifestly realized in loop quantum gravity.

  20. Animal research facility for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonting, Sjoerd L.

    1992-01-01

    An integrated animal research facility is planned by NASA for Space Station Freedom which will permit long-term, man-tended experiments on the effects of space conditions on vertebrates. The key element in this facility is a standard type animal habitat which supports and maintains the animals under full bioisolation during transport and during the experiment. A holding unit accommodates the habitats with animals to be maintained at zero gravity; and a centrifuge, those to be maintained at artificial gravity for control purposes or for gravity threshold studies. A glovebox permits handling of the animals for experimental purposes and for transfer to a clean habitat. These facilities are described, and the aspects of environmental control, monitoring, and bioisolation are discussed.

  1. Astrobee: Space Station Robotic Free Flyer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provencher, Chris; Bualat, Maria G.; Barlow, Jonathan; Fong, Terrence W.; Smith, Marion F.; Smith, Ernest E.; Sanchez, Hugo S.

    2016-01-01

    Astrobee is a free flying robot that will fly inside the International Space Station and primarily serve as a research platform for robotics in zero gravity. Astrobee will also provide mobile camera views to ISS flight and payload controllers, and collect various sensor data within the ISS environment for the ISS Program. Astrobee consists of two free flying robots, a dock, and ground data system. This presentation provides an overview, high level design description, and project status.

  2. Social factors in space station interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranz, Galen; Eichold, Alice; Hottes, Klaus; Jones, Kevin; Weinstein, Linda

    1987-01-01

    Using the example of the chair, which is often written into space station planning but which serves no non-cultural function in zero gravity, difficulties in overcoming cultural assumptions are discussed. An experimental approach is called for which would allow designers to separate cultural assumptions from logistic, social and psychological necessities. Simulations, systematic doubt and monitored brainstorming are recommended as part of basic research so that the designer will approach the problems of space module design with a complete program.

  3. Isostatic Gravity Map of the Battle Mountain 30 x 60 Minute Quadrangle, North Central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponce, D.A.; Morin, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction Gravity investigations of the Battle Mountain 30 x 60 minute quadrangle were begun as part of an interagency effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Bureau of Land Management to help characterize the geology, mineral resources, hydrology, and ecology of the Humboldt River Basin in north-central Nevada. The Battle Mountain quadrangle is located between 40?30' and 41?N. lat. and 116? and 117?W. long. This isostatic gravity map of the Battle Mountain quadrangle was prepared from data from about 1,180 gravity stations. Most of these data are publicly available on a CD-ROM of gravity data of Nevada (Ponce, 1997) and in a published report (Jewel and others, 1997). Data from about 780 gravity stations were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey since 1996; data from about 245 of these are unpublished (USGS, unpub. data, 1998). Data collected from the 400 gravity stations prior to 1996 are a subset of a gravity data compilation of the Winnemucca 1:250,000-scale quadrangle described in great detail by Wagini (1985) and Sikora (1991). This detailed information includes gravity meters used, dates of collection, sources, descriptions of base stations, plots of data, and a list of principal facts. A digital version of the entire data set for the Battle Mountain quadrangle is available on the World Wide Web at: http://wrgis.wr.usgs.gov/docs/gump/gump.html

  4. Correction due to the finite speed of light in absolute gravimeters Correction due to the finite speed of light in absolute gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornyi, V. D.; Zanimonskiy, Y. M.; Zanimonskiy, Y. Y.

    2011-06-01

    Equations (45) and (47) in our paper [1] in this issue have incorrect sign and should read \\tilde T_i=T_i+{b\\mp S_i\\over c},\\cr\\tilde T_i=T_i\\mp {S_i\\over c}. The error traces back to our formula (3), inherited from the paper [2]. According to the technical documentation [3, 4], the formula (3) is implemented by several commercially available instruments. An incorrect sign would cause a bias of about 20 µGal not known for these instruments, which probably indicates that the documentation incorrectly reflects the implemented measurement equation. Our attention to the error was drawn by the paper [5], also in this issue, where the sign is mentioned correctly. References [1] Nagornyi V D, Zanimonskiy Y M and Zanimonskiy Y Y 2011 Correction due to the finite speed of light in absolute gravimeters Metrologia 48 101-13 [2] Niebauer T M, Sasagawa G S, Faller J E, Hilt R and Klopping F 1995 A new generation of absolute gravimeters Metrologia 32 159-80 [3] Micro-g LaCoste, Inc. 2006 FG5 Absolute Gravimeter Users Manual [4] Micro-g LaCoste, Inc. 2007 g7 Users Manual [5] Niebauer T M, Billson R, Ellis B, Mason B, van Westrum D and Klopping F 2011 Simultaneous gravity and gradient measurements from a recoil-compensated absolute gravimeter Metrologia 48 154-63

  5. Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS) is enabling the integration of design, training, and operations capabilities into an intelligent virtual station for the International Space Station (ISS). A viewgraph of the IVS Remote Server is presented.

  6. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed. PMID:19831037

  7. Gravity and Heater Size Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; Raj, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    The current work is based on observations of boiling heat transfer over a continuous range of gravity levels between 0g to 1.8g and varying heater sizes with a fluorinert as the test liquid (FC-72/n-perfluorohexane). Variable gravity pool boiling heat transfer measurements over a wide range of gravity levels were made during parabolic flight campaigns as well as onboard the International Space Station. For large heaters and-or higher gravity conditions, buoyancy dominated boiling and heat transfer results were heater size independent. The power law coefficient for gravity in the heat transfer equation was found to be a function of wall temperature under these conditions. Under low gravity conditions and-or for smaller heaters, surface tension forces dominated and heat transfer results were heater size dependent. A pool boiling regime map differentiating buoyancy and surface tension dominated regimes was developed along with a unified framework that allowed for scaling of pool boiling over a wide range of gravity levels and heater sizes. The scaling laws developed in this study are expected to allow performance quantification of phase change based technologies under variable gravity environments eventually leading to their implementation in space based applications.

  8. Gauge/Gravity Duality (Gauge Gravity Duality)

    SciTech Connect

    Polchinski, Joseph

    2010-02-24

    Gauge theories, which describe the particle interactions, are well understood, while quantum gravity leads to many puzzles. Remarkably, in recent years we have learned that these are actually dual, the same system written in different variables. On the one hand, this provides our most precise description of quantum gravity, resolves some long-standing paradoxes, and points to new principles. On the other, it gives a new perspective on strong interactions, with surprising connections to other areas of physics. I describe these ideas, and discuss current and future directions.

  9. Demonstrating Reduced Gravity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearlman, Howard; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes the construction of the Reduced-Gravity Demonstrator, which can be used to illustrate the effects of gravity on a variety of phenomena, including the way fluids flow, flames burn, and mechanical systems behave. Presents experiments, appropriate for classroom use, to demonstrate how the behavior of common physical systems change when…

  10. Demonstrating Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Stocker, Dennis; Gotti, Daniel; Urban, David; Ross, Howard; Sours, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    A miniature drop tower, Reduced-Gravity Demonstrator is developed to illustrate the effects of gravity on a variety of phenomena including the way fluids flow, flames burn, and mechanical systems (such as pendulum) behave. A schematic and description of the demonstrator and payloads are given, followed by suggestions for how one can build his (her) own.

  11. TR-GRAV: National Center for Turkish Gravity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simav, Mehmet; Akpınar, İlyas; Sezen, Erdinc; Cingöz, Ayhan; Yıldız, Hasan

    2016-04-01

    TR-GRAV, the National Center for Turkish Gravity Field (TR-GRAV) that has recently become operational,is a national center that collects, processes and distributes Absolute Gravimetry,Relative Gravimetry, Airborne Gravimetry,Shipborne Gravimetry,Satellite Gravimetry, GNSS/Levelling, Astrogeodetic Vertical Deflection data to model and improve regional gravity field for the Turkish territory and its surrounding regions and to provide accurate, consistent and value-added data & products to the scientific and engineering communities. In this presentation, we will introduce the center web portal and give some details about the database.

  12. Anti-gravity device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palsingh, S. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An educational toy useful in demonstrating fundamental concepts regarding the laws of gravity is described. The device comprises a sphere 10 of radius r resting on top of sphere 12 of radius R. The center of gravity of sphere 10 is displaced from its geometrical center by distance D. The dimensions are so related that D((R+r)/r) is greater than r. With the center of gravity of sphere 10 lying on a vertical line, the device is in equilibrium. When sphere 10 is rolled on the surface of sphere 12 it will return to its equilibrium position upon release. This creates an illusion that sphere 10 is defying the laws of gravity. In reality, due to the above noted relationship of D, R, and r, the center of gravity of sphere 10 rises from its equilibrium position as it rolls a short distance up or down the surface of sphere 12.

  13. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  14. The opportunities for space biology research on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Rodney W.; Souza, Kenneth A.

    1987-01-01

    The goals of space biology research to be conducted aboard the Space Station in 1990s include long-term studies of reproduction, development, growth, physiology, behavior, and aging in both animals and plants. They also include studies of the mechanisms by which gravitational stimuli are sensed, processed, and transmitted to a responsive site, and of the effect of microgravity on each component. The Space Station configuration will include a life sciences research facility, where experiment cyles will be on a 90-day basis (since the Space Station missions planned for the 1990s call for 90-day intervals). A modular approach is taken to accomodate animal habitats, plant growth chambers, and other specimen holding facilities; the modular habitats would be transportable between the launch systems, habitat racks, a workbench, and a variable-gravity centrifuge (included for providing artificial gravity and accurately controlled acceleration levels aboard Space Station).

  15. Modular Extended-Stay HyperGravity Facility Design Concept: An Artificial-Gravity Space-Settlement Ground Analogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorais, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    This document defines the design concept for a ground-based, extended-stay hypergravity facility as a precursor for space-based artificial-gravity facilities that extend the permanent presence of both human and non-human life beyond Earth in artificial-gravity settlements. Since the Earth's current human population is stressing the environment and the resources off-Earth are relatively unlimited, by as soon as 2040 more than one thousand people could be living in Earthorbiting artificial-gravity habitats. Eventually, the majority of humanity may live in artificialgravity habitats throughout this solar system as well as others, but little is known about the longterm (multi-generational) effects of artificial-gravity habitats on people, animals, and plants. In order to extend life permanently beyond Earth, it would be useful to create an orbiting space facility that generates 1g as well as other gravity levels to rigorously address the numerous challenges of such an endeavor. Before doing so, developing a ground-based artificial-gravity facility is a reasonable next step. Just as the International Space Station is a microgravity research facility, at a small fraction of the cost and risk a ground-based artificial-gravity facility can begin to address a wide-variety of the artificial-gravity life-science questions and engineering challenges requiring long-term research to enable people, animals, and plants to live off-Earth indefinitely.

  16. Residual Gravity Changes at Kilauea: 1977-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, A. A.

    2006-12-01

    Microgravity surveys on volcanoes provide insight into the mechanisms of volcanic eruptions. Typically gravity is measured repeatedly over a dense network of stations using one or more meters. Raw gravity measurements corrected for effects of earthtides, instrumental drift, and concurrent elevation changes give residual gravity. Successive surveys give residual gravity changes reflecting mass redistributions within volcanoes affected by dynamic magmatic and/or hydrothermal systems. At Kilauea Volcano a network about 65 stations was most recently reoccupied by Johnson and Eggers in October and November 2003, and by Johnson in 1999 and 1998. Data from 1977 and 1981 surveys (by H.V.O. staff) are included in this study. The reduced gravity data (precision about 10 microgals) show residual gravity has consistently and steadily increased by more than 300 microgals since 1977 in a semicircular area several hundred meters in diameter, centered on the SE rim of Halemaumau Crater. Residual gravity change anomalies for the intervals 1999-2003, 1981-1999, and 1977-1981 have respective amplitudes of approximately 100, 140, and 100 microgals. Because of lower station density and lack of station-to-station continuity over time anomalies representing the two earlier intervals are less well defined. Half-widths at half-heights of the anomalies from each interval indicate a source depths for the masses producing the gravity change of 550 to 700 m below the caldera floor. Mogi point mass interpretations, assuming a 600 m depth, using the 100, 140, and 100 microgal respective amplitudes suggest a cumulative mass addition of about 18x10^9 kg since 1977. Mass has apparently been added to a shallow chamber below the caldera floor at 0.7x10^9 kg/yr on the average throughout most of the Pu'u `O'o eruption. From 1983-2002 magma throughput in the Kilauea/Pu'u `O'o system has averaged about 3.5x10^1^1kg/yr (Sutton et al 2003). This magma throughput represents only 83-87% of the primary magma

  17. The visual surface brightness relation and the absolute magnitudes of RR Lyrae stars. I - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manduca, A.; Bell, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical relation analogous to the Barnes-Evans relation between stellar surface brightness and V-R color is derived which is applicable to the temperatures and gravities appropriate to RR Lyrae stars. Values of the visual surface brightness and V-R colors are calculated for model stellar atmospheres with effective temperatures between 6000 and 8000 K, log surface gravities from 2.2 to 3.5, and A/H anbundance ratios from -0.5 to -3.0. The resulting relation is found to be in reasonable agreement with the empirical relation of Barnes, Evans and Moffet (1978), with, however, small sensitivities to gravity and metal abundance. The relation may be used to derive stellar angular diameters from (V,R) photometry and to derive radii, distances, and absolute magnitudes for variable stars when combined with a radial velocity curve. The accuracies of the radii and distances (within 10%) and absolute magnitudes (within 0.25 magnitudes) compare favorably with those of the Baade-Wesselink method currently in use.

  18. Results of the first North American comparison of absolute gravimeters, NACAG-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmerge, David; Francis, Olvier; Henton, J.; Ingles, D.; Jones, D.; Kennedy, Jeffrey R.; Krauterbluth, K.; Liard, J.; Newell, D.; Sands, R.; Schiel, J.; Silliker, J.; van Westrum, D.

    2012-01-01

    The first North American Comparison of absolute gravimeters (NACAG-2010) was hosted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at its newly renovated Table Mountain Geophysical Observatory (TMGO) north of Boulder, Colorado, in October 2010. NACAG-2010 and the renovation of TMGO are part of NGS’s GRAV-D project (Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum). Nine absolute gravimeters from three countries participated in the comparison. Before the comparison, the gravimeter operators agreed to a protocol describing the strategy to measure, calculate, and present the results. Nine sites were used to measure the free-fall acceleration of g. Each gravimeter measured the value of g at a subset of three of the sites, for a total set of 27 g-values for the comparison. The absolute gravimeters agree with one another with a standard deviation of 1.6 µGal (1 Gal = 1 cm s-2). The minimum and maximum offsets are -2.8 and 2.7 µGal. This is an excellent agreement and can be attributed to multiple factors, including gravimeters that were in good working order, good operators, a quiet observatory, and a short duration time for the experiment. These results can be used to standardize gravity surveys internationally.

  19. Absolute isotopic abundances of TI in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederer, F. R.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1985-03-01

    The absolute isotope abundance of Ti has been determined in Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende and Leoville meteorites and in samples of whole meteorites. The absolute Ti isotope abundances differ by a significant mass dependent isotope fractionation transformation from the previously reported abundances, which were normalized for fractionation using 46Ti/48Ti. Therefore, the absolute compositions define distinct nucleosynthetic components from those previously identified or reflect the existence of significant mass dependent isotope fractionation in nature. The authors provide a general formalism for determining the possible isotope compositions of the exotic Ti from the measured composition, for different values of isotope fractionation in nature and for different mixing ratios of the exotic and normal components.

  20. Molecular iodine absolute frequencies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, C.J.

    1990-06-25

    Fifty specified lines of {sup 127}I{sub 2} were studied by Doppler-free frequency modulation spectroscopy. For each line the classification of the molecular transition was determined, hyperfine components were identified, and one well-resolved component was selected for precise determination of its absolute frequency. In 3 cases, a nearby alternate line was selected for measurement because no well-resolved component was found for the specified line. Absolute frequency determinations were made with an estimated uncertainty of 1.1 MHz by locking a dye laser to the selected hyperfine component and measuring its wave number with a high-precision Fabry-Perot wavemeter. For each line results of the absolute measurement, the line classification, and a Doppler-free spectrum are given.

  1. Stimulus probability effects in absolute identification.

    PubMed

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of presentation probability on both proportion correct and response times. The effects were moderated by the ubiquitous stimulus position effect. The accuracy and response time data were predicted by an exemplar-based model of perceptual cognition (Kent & Lamberts, 2005). The bow in discriminability was also attenuated when presentation probability for middle items was relatively high, an effect that will constrain future model development. The study provides evidence for item-specific learning in absolute identification. Implications for other theories of absolute identification are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26478959

  2. Absolute calibration in vivo measurement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kruchten, D.A.; Hickman, D.P.

    1991-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating a new method for obtaining absolute calibration factors for radiation measurement systems used to measure internally deposited radionuclides in vivo. Absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems will eliminate the need to generate a series of human surrogate structures (i.e., phantoms) for calibrating in vivo measurement systems. The absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems utilizes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to define physiological structure, size, and composition. The MRI image provides a digitized representation of the physiological structure, which allows for any mathematical distribution of radionuclides within the body. Using Monte Carlo transport codes, the emission spectrum from the body is predicted. The in vivo measurement equipment is calibrated using the Monte Carlo code and adjusting for the intrinsic properties of the detection system. The calibration factors are verified using measurements of existing phantoms and previously obtained measurements of human volunteers. 8 refs.

  3. The space station: Key to living in space. [design concepts for Manned Orbiting Laboratory and Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    Design and scientific equipment for the Manned Orbiting Laboratory and Skylab are elaborated. Multideck designs accommodate both zero gravity and artificial gravity conditions as well as a core module potentially useful as a planetary mission module for a 12-man crew. Artificial gravity approaches consider assembly rotation and differential spin rates for the various decks. Counterrotation systems are projected to go from a station to a 50-man space base concept.

  4. Precision Gravity Monitoring of Artificial Recharge at Little Cottonwood Canyon, Wasatch Front, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. S.; Gettings, P.; Chapman, D. S.

    2008-12-01

    Repeated high-precision (± 5 μGal) gravity surveys are used to monitor artificial groundwater recharge at the Little Cottonwood Water Treatment Plant (LCWTP) in the southern portion of the Salt Lake Valley, UT. The gravity survey network consists of 30 sites arranged to capture the expected horizontal migration (> 500 meters/yr) of the infiltrated water. An additional 4 stations are arranged 1500 meters from the LCWTP infiltration sites for regional and environmental background control. Prior to starting recharge operations, a set of five background surveys were made between spring 2006 and summer 2007. Background (natural/environmental) variability is reliably estimated at 20 μGals. Infiltration commenced in mid-September 2007 and bimonthly gravity surveys were conducted until July 2008. A peak gravity change of 100 μGals was observed at the end of infiltration. The campaigns following cessation of infiltration showed a decreasing gravity anomaly indicating a dispersion of the ground water mound produced by the infiltration. The final gravity results from July of 2008 showed a 70 μGal decrease from the peak gravity value. Observations suggest the subsurface water flowed to the west of the LCWTP; however the control stations at the western most extent of the survey area show no increase in gravity. The gravity observations are comparable to a previous study conducted in the Weber River delta, which showed that the gravity decay over 3-5 months can be used to determine the bulk hydraulic conductivity of the area.

  5. Precise Measurement of the Absolute Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ave, M.; Bohacova, M.; Daumiller, K.; Di Carlo, P.; di Giulio, C.; San Luis, P. Facal; Gonzales, D.; Hojvat, C.; Hörandel, J. R.; Hrabovsky, M.; Iarlori, M.; Keilhauer, B.; Klages, H.; Kleifges, M.; Kuehn, F.; Monasor, M.; Nozka, L.; Palatka, M.; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Ridky, J.; Rizi, V.; D'Orfeuil, B. Rouille; Salamida, F.; Schovanek, P.; Smida, R.; Spinka, H.; Ulrich, A.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2011-09-01

    We present preliminary results of the absolute yield of fluorescence emission in atmospheric gases. Measurements were performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility with a variety of beam particles and gases. Absolute calibration of the fluorescence yield to 5% level was achieved by comparison with two known light sources--the Cherenkov light emitted by the beam particles, and a calibrated nitrogen laser. The uncertainty of the energy scale of current Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays experiments will be significantly improved by the AIRFLY measurement.

  6. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed. PMID:26022836

  7. Deregulation and Station Trafficking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Benjamin J.

    To test whether the revocation of the Federal Communications Commission's "Anti-Trafficking" rule (requiring television station owners to keep a station for three years before transferring its license to another party) impacted station owner behavior, a study compared the behavior of television station "traffickers" (owners seeking quick turnovers…

  8. Gravity anomaly detection: Apollo/Soyuz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.; Kahn, W. D.; Bryan, J. W.; Schmid, P. E.; Wells, W. T.; Conrad, D. T.

    1976-01-01

    The Goddard Apollo-Soyuz Geodynamics Experiment is described. It was performed to demonstrate the feasibility of tracking and recovering high frequency components of the earth's gravity field by utilizing a synchronous orbiting tracking station such as ATS-6. Gravity anomalies of 5 MGLS or larger having wavelengths of 300 to 1000 kilometers on the earth's surface are important for geologic studies of the upper layers of the earth's crust. Short wavelength Earth's gravity anomalies were detected from space. Two prime areas of data collection were selected for the experiment: (1) the center of the African continent and (2) the Indian Ocean Depression centered at 5% north latitude and 75% east longitude. Preliminary results show that the detectability objective of the experiment was met in both areas as well as at several additional anomalous areas around the globe. Gravity anomalies of the Karakoram and Himalayan mountain ranges, ocean trenches, as well as the Diamantina Depth, can be seen. Maps outlining the anomalies discovered are shown.

  9. The Effects of Landslides on Gravity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabulut, Savas; Ozturkan, Hasan; Cengiz Cinku, Mualla; Avcı, Kerim

    2016-04-01

    Microgravimetry is a very useful tool used by engineering geologists to examine various problems in predicting location of voids, size and depth of mining, determination and monitoring basin structures and faults. In landslides where the down slope of soils are under the influence of gravity, it should be noted that the gravity measurements on a landslide should be influenced. To test the slope effect ingravity measurements of a landslide we selected the area in Küçükçekmece, Avcilar located in the north-west of Marmara region. The slope geometry was determined by using 2-D Multi-channel analysis of Surface Wave (MASW-REMI), while single station microtremor measurements were applied to determine the fundamental frequency on the slope. To test the effect of the slope in microgravity measurements we employed daily gravity measurements with 50 meter interval in one profile line, afterwards countinues measurements were applied on the slope in an interval during 2 hours. As a result, we found some small anomalies on the slope differently from its adjacent area. This affect has to be removed from gravity measurements, especially in mining investigation like chrome where small anomaly differences are considered as an important factor.

  10. Space Station Spartan study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, J. H.; Schulman, J. R.; Neupert, W. M.

    1985-01-01

    The required extension, enhancement, and upgrading of the present Spartan concept are described to conduct operations from the space station using the station's unique facilities and operational features. The space station Spartan (3S), the free flyer will be deployed from and returned to the space station and will conduct scientific missions of much longer duration than possible with the current Spartan. The potential benefits of a space station Spartan are enumerated. The objectives of the study are: (1) to develop a credible concept for a space station Spartan; and (2) to determine the associated requirements and interfaces with the space station to help ensure that the 3S can be properly accommodated.

  11. Space Station/Orbiter berthing dynamics during an assembly flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Paul A.; Stockwell, Alan E.; Wu, Shih-Chin

    1993-01-01

    A large-angle, multi-body, dynamic modeling capability was developed to help validate numerical simulations of the dynamic motion and control forces which occur while berthing Space Station Freedom to the Shuttle Orbiter during early assembly flights. The paper describes the dynamics and control of the station, the attached Shuttle Remote Manipulator System, and the Orbiter during a maneuver from a gravity-gradient attitude to a torque equilibrium attitude using the station reaction control jets. The influence of the elastic behavior of the station and of the remote manipulator system on the attitude control of the station/Orbiter system during the maneuver is investigated. The flexibility of the station and the arm had only a minor influence on the attitude control of the system during the maneuver.

  12. Airborne gravity is here

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, S.

    1982-01-11

    After 20 years of development efforts, the airborne gravity survey has finally become a practical exploration method. Besides gravity data, the airborne survey can also collect simultaneous, continuous records of high-precision magneticfield data as well as terrain clearance; these provide a topographic contour map useful in calculating terrain conditions and in subsequent planning and engineering. Compared with a seismic survey, the airborne gravity method can cover the same area much more quickly and cheaply; a seismograph could then detail the interesting spots.

  13. Low-gravity impact experiments: Progress toward a facility definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cintala, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Innumerable efforts were made to understand the cratering process and its ramifications in terms of planetary observations, during which the role of gravity has often come into question. Well known facilities and experiments both were devoted in many cases to unraveling the contribution of gravitational acceleration to cratering mechanisms. Included among these are the explosion experiments in low gravity aircraft, the drop platform experiments, and the high gravity centrifuge experiments. Considerable insight into the effects of gravity was gained. Most investigations were confined to terrestrial laboratories. It is in this light that the Space Station is being examined as a vehicle with the potential to support otherwise impractical impact experiments. The results of studies performed by members of the planetary cratering community are summarized.

  14. Isostatic gravity map of the Monterey 30 x 60 minute quadrangle and adjacent areas, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Stiles, S.R.; Jachens, R.C.

    2002-01-01

    The digital dataset consists of one file (monterey_100k.iso) containing 2,385 gravity stations. The file, monterey_100k.iso, contains the principal facts of the gravity stations, with one point coded per line. The format of the data is described below. Each gravity station has a station name, location (latitude and longitude, NAD27 projection), elevation, and an observed gravity reading. The data are on the IGSN71 datum and the reference ellipsoid is the Geodetic Reference System 1967 (GRS67). The free-air gravity anomalies were calculated using standard formulas (Telford and others, 1976). The Bouguer, curvature, and terrain corrections were applied to the free-air anomaly at each station to determine the complete Bouguer gravity anomalies at a reduction density of 2.67 g/cc. An isostatic correction was then applied to remove the long-wavelength effect of deep crustal and/or upper mantle masses that isostatically support regional topography.

  15. Absolute partial photoionization cross sections of ozone.

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Chemistry

    2008-04-01

    Despite the current concerns about ozone, absolute partial photoionization cross sections for this molecule in the vacuum ultraviolet (valence) region have been unavailable. By eclectic re-evaluation of old/new data and plausible assumptions, such cross sections have been assembled to fill this void.

  16. Solving Absolute Value Equations Algebraically and Geometrically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiyuan, Wei

    2005-01-01

    The way in which students can improve their comprehension by understanding the geometrical meaning of algebraic equations or solving algebraic equation geometrically is described. Students can experiment with the conditions of the absolute value equation presented, for an interesting way to form an overall understanding of the concept.

  17. Teaching Absolute Value Inequalities to Mature Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierpinska, Anna; Bobos, Georgeana; Pruncut, Andreea

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an account of a teaching experiment on absolute value inequalities, whose aim was to identify characteristics of an approach that would realize the potential of the topic to develop theoretical thinking in students enrolled in prerequisite mathematics courses at a large, urban North American university. The potential is…

  18. Increasing Capacity: Practice Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Pennie; Donkin, Christopher; Brown, Scott D.; Heathcote, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In most of the long history of the study of absolute identification--since Miller's (1956) seminal article--a severe limit on performance has been observed, and this limit has resisted improvement even by extensive practice. In a startling result, Rouder, Morey, Cowan, and Pfaltz (2004) found substantially improved performance with practice in the…

  19. On Relative and Absolute Conviction in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Keith; Mejia-Ramos, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Conviction is a central construct in mathematics education research on justification and proof. In this paper, we claim that it is important to distinguish between absolute conviction and relative conviction. We argue that researchers in mathematics education frequently have not done so and this has lead to researchers making unwarranted claims…

  20. Absolute Points for Multiple Assignment Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adlakha, V.; Kowalski, K.

    2006-01-01

    An algorithm is presented to solve multiple assignment problems in which a cost is incurred only when an assignment is made at a given cell. The proposed method recursively searches for single/group absolute points to identify cells that must be loaded in any optimal solution. Unlike other methods, the first solution is the optimal solution. The…

  1. Nonequilibrium equalities in absolutely irreversible processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashita, Yuto; Funo, Ken; Ueda, Masahito

    2015-03-01

    Nonequilibrium equalities have attracted considerable attention in the context of statistical mechanics and information thermodynamics. Integral nonequilibrium equalities reveal an ensemble property of the entropy production σ as = 1 . Although nonequilibrium equalities apply to rather general nonequilibrium situations, they break down in absolutely irreversible processes, where the forward-path probability vanishes and the entropy production diverges. We identify the mathematical origins of this inapplicability as the singularity of probability measure. As a result, we generalize conventional integral nonequilibrium equalities to absolutely irreversible processes as = 1 -λS , where λS is the probability of the singular part defined based on Lebesgue's decomposition theorem. The acquired equality contains two physical quantities related to irreversibility: σ characterizing ordinary irreversibility and λS describing absolute irreversibility. An inequality derived from the obtained equality demonstrates the absolute irreversibility leads to the fundamental lower bound on the entropy production. We demonstrate the validity of the obtained equality for a simple model.

  2. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  3. Precision absolute positional measurement of laser beams.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimons, Ewan D; Bogenstahl, Johanna; Hough, James; Killow, Christian J; Perreur-Lloyd, Michael; Robertson, David I; Ward, Henry

    2013-04-20

    We describe an instrument which, coupled with a suitable coordinate measuring machine, facilitates the absolute measurement within the machine frame of the propagation direction of a millimeter-scale laser beam to an accuracy of around ±4 μm in position and ±20 μrad in angle. PMID:23669658

  4. Effects of background gravity stimuli on gravity-controlled behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, D. F.

    1976-01-01

    Physiological and developmental effects of altered gravity were researched. The stimulus properties of gravity have been found to possess reinforcing and aversive properties. Experimental approaches taken, used animals placed into fields of artificial gravity, in the form of parabolic or spiral centrifuges. Gravity preferences were noted and it was concluded that the psychophysics of gravity and background factors which support these behaviors should be further explored.

  5. Gravity investigation of a Niagaran reef

    SciTech Connect

    Bolla, W.O.; Noel, J.A.

    1983-09-01

    North Ridge and West Ridge, two isolated hills north of Cary, Ohio, in Wyandott County, were described by Winchell more than 100 years ago. About 75 years later, Cummings designated the ridges as being underlain by Niagaran reefs after studying exposures in several small quarries. The extensive exposures in the large quarries subsequently operated in North Ridge left little doubt that this ridge is underlain by a Niagaran reef. West Ridge is analogous in size, shape, orientation, and topographic expression. From the similarities, coupled with Cummings' earlier studies, it is assumed that West Ridge is also a Niagaran reef. A gravity survey, using a LaCoste-Romberg gravity meter, was conducted over West Ridge. The survey was several traverses consisting of 423 stations with station spacing along the traverses of 200 ft (61 m). Elevations were determined by transit surveys, and densities were measured in the laboratory from samples collected in the reef and enclosing rocks exposed in the Wyandott Dolomite Co. quarry on North Ridge. The thickness of the glacial drift was determined from all available water well records. The gravity profiles were analyzed using the Talwani Method. The theoretical profiles were computed using parameters which simulated the size, shape, and density of the reef exposed in the quarries on North Ridge. The field gravity profiles over West Ridge matched the theoretical closely with only 0.008 mgal difference. A cross section constructed from electric logs shows the stratigraphy of the area. A structure contour map of the bed rock reveals that West Ridge is a bedrock-controlled topogrpahic feature, and that its size and shape, although modified by glacial erosion, are similar to other Niagaran reefs in northwestern Ohio.

  6. Gravity independence of seed-to-seed cycling in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Musgrave, M E; Kuang, A; Xiao, Y; Stout, S C; Bingham, G E; Briarty, L G; Levenskikh, M A; Sychev, V N; Podolski, I G

    2000-02-01

    Growth of higher plants in the microgravity environment of orbital platforms has been problematic. Plants typically developed more slowly in space and often failed at the reproductive phase. Short-duration experiments on the Space Shuttle showed that early stages in the reproductive process could occur normally in microgravity, so we sought a long-duration opportunity to test gravity's role throughout the complete life cycle. During a 122-d opportunity on the Mir space station, full life cycles were completed in microgravity with Brassica rapa L. in a series of three experiments in the Svet greenhouse. Plant material was preserved in space by chemical fixation, freezing, and drying, and then compared to material preserved in the same way during a high-fidelity ground control. At sampling times 13 d after planting, plants on Mir were the same size and had the same number of flower buds as ground control plants. Following hand-pollination of the flowers by the astronaut, siliques formed. In microgravity, siliques ripened basipetally and contained smaller seeds with less than 20% of the cotyledon cells found in the seeds harvested from the ground control. Cytochemical localization of storage reserves in the mature embryos showed that starch was retained in the spaceflight material, whereas protein and lipid were the primary storage reserves in the ground control seeds. While these successful seed-to-seed cycles show that gravity is not absolutely required for any step in the plant life cycle, seed quality in Brassica is compromised by development in microgravity. PMID:10750897

  7. Einstein, Mach, and the Fortunes of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, David

    2005-04-01

    Early in his life, Albert Einstein considered himself a devoted student of the physicist and philosopher Ernst Mach. Mach's famous critiques of Newton's absolute space and time -- most notably Mach's explanation of Newton's bucket experiment -- held a strong sway over Einstein as he struggled to formulate general relativity. Einstein was convinced that his emerging theory of gravity should be consistent with Mach's principle, which states that local inertial effects arise due to gravitational interactions with distant matter. Once completed, Einstein's general relativity enjoyed two decades of worldwide attention, only to fall out of physicists' interest during the 1930s and 1940s, when topics like nuclear physics claimed center stage. Gravity began to return to the limelight during the 1950s and especially the 1960s, and once again Mach proved to be a major spur: Princeton physicists Carl Brans and Robert Dicke introduced a rival theory of gravity in 1961 which they argued satisfied Mach's principle better than Einstein's general relativity did. The Brans-Dicke theory, and the new generation of experiments designed to test its predictions against those of general relativity, played a major role in bringing Einstein's beloved topic back to the center of physics.

  8. Gravitational acceleration as a cue for absolute size and distance?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, H.; Kaiser, M. K.; Banks, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    When an object's motion is influenced by gravity, as in the rise and fall of a thrown ball, the vertical component of acceleration is roughly constant at 9.8 m/sec2. In principle, an observer could use this information to estimate the absolute size and distance of the object (Saxberg, 1987a; Watson, Banks, von Hofsten, & Royden, 1992). In five experiments, we examined people's ability to utilize the size and distance information provided by gravitational acceleration. Observers viewed computer simulations of an object rising and falling on a trajectory aligned with the gravitational vector. The simulated objects were balls of different diameters presented across a wide range of simulated distances. Observers were asked to identify the ball that was presented and to estimate its distance. The results showed that observers were much more sensitive to average velocity than to the gravitational acceleration pattern. Likewise, verticality of the motion and visibility of the trajectory's apex had negligible effects on the accuracy of size and distance judgments.

  9. Superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The employment of superconductivity and other material properties at cryogenic temperatures to fabricate sensitive, low-drift, gravity gradiometer is described. The device yields a reduction of noise of four orders of magnitude over room temperature gradiometers, and direct summation and subtraction of signals from accelerometers in varying orientations are possible with superconducting circuitry. Additional circuits permit determination of the linear and angular acceleration vectors independent of the measurement of the gravity gradient tensor. A dewar flask capable of maintaining helium in a liquid state for a year's duration is under development by NASA, and a superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer for the NASA Geodynamics Program is intended for a LEO polar trajectory to measure the harmonic expansion coefficients of the earth's gravity field up to order 300.

  10. Introduction to Massive Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rham, Claudia

    We review recent progress on massive gravity. We first show how extra dimensions prove to be a useful tool in building theories of modified gravity, including Galileon theories and their DBI extensions. DGP arises from an infinite size extra dimension, and we show how massive gravity arises from `deconstructing' the extra dimension in the vielbein formalism. We then explain how the ghost issue is resolved in that special theory of massive gravity. The viability of such models relies on the Vainshtein mechanism which is best described in terms of Galileons. While its implementation is successful in most of these models it also comes hand in hand with superluminalities and strong coupling which are reviewed and their real consequences are discussed.

  11. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    Variable Gravity Laboratory studies are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) conceptual design and engineering analysis; (2) control strategies (fast crawling maneuvers, main perturbations and their effect upon the acceleration level); and (3) technology requirements.

  12. Rotating Gravity Gradiometer Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The application of a Rotating Gravity Gradiometer (RGG) system on board a Lunar Polar Orbiter (LPO) for the measurement of the Lunar gravity field was investigated. A data collection simulation study shows that a gradiometer will give significantly better gravity data than a doppler tracking system for the altitudes under consideration for the LOP, that the present demonstrated sensitivity of the RGG is adequate for measurement of the Lunar gravity gradient field, and that a single RGG instrument will provide almost as much data for geophysical interpretation as an orthogonal three axis RGG system. An engineering study of the RGG sensor/LPO spacecraft interface characteristics shows that the RGG systems under consideration are compatible with the present models of the LPO spacecraft.

  13. Finite field-dependent symmetries in perturbative quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker

    2014-01-15

    In this paper we discuss the absolutely anticommuting nilpotent symmetries for perturbative quantum gravity in general curved spacetime in linear and non-linear gauges. Further, we analyze the finite field-dependent BRST (FFBRST) transformation for perturbative quantum gravity in general curved spacetime. The FFBRST transformation changes the gauge-fixing and ghost parts of the perturbative quantum gravity within functional integration. However, the operation of such symmetry transformation on the generating functional of perturbative quantum gravity does not affect the theory on physical ground. The FFBRST transformation with appropriate choices of finite BRST parameter connects non-linear Curci–Ferrari and Landau gauges of perturbative quantum gravity. The validity of the results is also established at quantum level using Batalin–Vilkovisky (BV) formulation. -- Highlights: •The perturbative quantum gravity is treated as gauge theory. •BRST and anti-BRST transformations are developed in linear and non-linear gauges. •BRST transformation is generalized by making it finite and field dependent. •Connection between linear and non-linear gauges is established. •Using BV formulation the results are established at quantum level also.

  14. Experimental assessment of the speed of light perturbation in free-fall absolute gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, H.; Pythoud, F.; Blas, D.; Sibiryakov, S.; Eichenberger, A.; Klingelé, E. E.

    2015-10-01

    Precision absolute gravity measurements are growing in importance, especially in the context of the new definition of the kilogram. For the case of free fall absolute gravimeters with a Michelson-type interferometer tracking the position of a free falling body, one of the effects that needs to be taken into account is the ‘speed of light perturbation’ due to the finite speed of propagation of light. This effect has been extensively discussed in the past, and there is at present a disagreement between different studies. In this work, we present the analysis of new data and confirm the result expected from the theoretical analysis applied nowadays in free-fall gravimeters. We also review the standard derivations of this effect (by using phase shift or Doppler effect arguments) and show their equivalence.

  15. Marine gravity image available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The image below shows the gravity field from 30-72°S computed from Geosat geodetic mission (GM) and exact repeat mission (ERM) data. A color shaded-relief image of these gravity anomalies is available from NOAA in poster form (report MGG-8, [Marks et al., 1993] and also as a digital gridded data set on CD-ROM. To order, contact the National Geophysical Data Center, E/GC3, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80303.

  16. Quantum massive conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, F. F.

    2016-04-01

    We first find the linear approximation of the second plus fourth order derivative massive conformal gravity action. Then we reduce the linearized action to separated second order derivative terms, which allows us to quantize the theory by using the standard first order canonical quantization method. It is shown that quantum massive conformal gravity is renormalizable but has ghost states. A possible decoupling of these ghost states at high energies is discussed.

  17. What Is Gravity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, George

    2004-01-01

    Gravity is the name given to the phenomenon that any two masses, like you and the Earth, attract each other. One pulls on the Earth and the Earth pulls on one the same amount. And one does not have to be touching. Gravity acts over vast distances, like the 150 million kilometers (93 million miles) between the Earth and the Sun or the billions of…

  18. Partial gravity habitat study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capps, Stephen; Lorandos, Jason; Akhidime, Eval; Bunch, Michael; Lund, Denise; Moore, Nathan; Murakawa, Kiosuke

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate comprehensive design requirements associated with designing habitats for humans in a partial gravity environment, then to apply them to a lunar base design. Other potential sites for application include planetary surfaces such as Mars, variable-gravity research facilities, and a rotating spacecraft. Design requirements for partial gravity environments include locomotion changes in less than normal earth gravity; facility design issues, such as interior configuration, module diameter, and geometry; and volumetric requirements based on the previous as well as psychological issues involved in prolonged isolation. For application to a lunar base, it is necessary to study the exterior architecture and configuration to insure optimum circulation patterns while providing dual egress; radiation protection issues are addressed to provide a safe and healthy environment for the crew; and finally, the overall site is studied to locate all associated facilities in context with the habitat. Mission planning is not the purpose of this study; therefore, a Lockheed scenario is used as an outline for the lunar base application, which is then modified to meet the project needs. The goal of this report is to formulate facts on human reactions to partial gravity environments, derive design requirements based on these facts, and apply the requirements to a partial gravity situation which, for this study, was a lunar base.

  19. Space Station life science research facility - The vivarium/laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilchey, J. D.; Arno, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research opportunities possible with the Space Station are discussed. The objective of the research program will be study gravity relationships for animal and plant species. The equipment necessary for space experiments including vivarium facilities are described. The cost of the development of research facilities such as the vivarium/laboratory and a bioresearch centrifuge is examined.

  20. International Space Station Crew Return Vehicle: X-38. Educational Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The International Space Station (ISS) will provide the world with an orbiting laboratory that will have long-duration micro-gravity experimentation capability. The crew size for this facility will depend upon the crew return capability. The first crews will consist of three astronauts from Russia and the United States. The crew is limited to three…

  1. Combined Use of Absolute and Differential Seismic Arrival Time Data to Improve Absolute Event Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, S.; Johannesson, G.

    2012-12-01

    Arrival time measurements based on waveform cross correlation are becoming more common as advanced signal processing methods are applied to seismic data archives and real-time data streams. Waveform correlation can precisely measure the time difference between the arrival of two phases, and differential time data can be used to constrain relative location of events. Absolute locations are needed for many applications, which generally requires the use of absolute time data. Current methods for measuring absolute time data are approximately two orders of magnitude less precise than differential time measurements. To exploit the strengths of both absolute and differential time data, we extend our multiple-event location method Bayesloc, which previously used absolute time data only, to include the use of differential time measurements that are based on waveform cross correlation. Fundamentally, Bayesloc is a formulation of the joint probability over all parameters comprising the multiple event location system. The Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method is used to sample from the joint probability distribution given arrival data sets. The differential time component of Bayesloc includes scaling a stochastic estimate of differential time measurement precision based the waveform correlation coefficient for each datum. For a regional-distance synthetic data set with absolute and differential time measurement error of 0.25 seconds and 0.01 second, respectively, epicenter location accuracy is improved from and average of 1.05 km when solely absolute time data are used to 0.28 km when absolute and differential time data are used jointly (73% improvement). The improvement in absolute location accuracy is the result of conditionally limiting absolute location probability regions based on the precise relative position with respect to neighboring events. Bayesloc estimates of data precision are found to be accurate for the synthetic test, with absolute and differential time measurement

  2. Gravity Before Einstein and Schwinger Before Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia L.

    2012-05-01

    Julian Schwinger was a child prodigy, and Albert Einstein distinctly not; Schwinger had something like 73 graduate students, and Einstein very few. But both thought gravity was important. They were not, of course, the first, nor is the disagreement on how one should think about gravity that is being highlighted here the first such dispute. The talk will explore, first, several of the earlier dichotomies: was gravity capable of action at a distance (Newton), or was a transmitting ether required (many others). Did it act on everything or only on solids (an odd idea of the Herschels that fed into their ideas of solar structure and sunspots)? Did gravitational information require time for its transmission? Is the exponent of r precisely 2, or 2 plus a smidgeon (a suggestion by Simon Newcomb among others)? And so forth. Second, I will try to say something about Scwinger's lesser known early work and how it might have prefigured his "source theory," beginning with "On the Interaction of Several Electrons (the unpublished, 1934 "zeroth paper," whose title somewhat reminds one of "On the Dynamics of an Asteroid," through his days at Berkeley with Oppenheimer, Gerjuoy, and others, to his application of ideas from nuclear physics to radar and of radar engineering techniques to problems in nuclear physics. And folks who think good jobs are difficult to come by now might want to contemplate the couple of years Schwinger spent teaching elementary physics at Purdue before moving on to the MIT Rad Lab for war work.

  3. Multi-station satellite radio-beacon study of ionospheric variations during total solar eclipses

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, L.; Tyagl, T.R.; Somayajulu, Y.V.; Vijayakumar, P.N.; Dabas, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    Faraday rotation data obtained at Delhi, Kurukshetra, Hyderabad, Bangalore, Waltair, Nagpur and Calcutta during the total solar eclipse of 16 February 1980 and at Delhi during the total solar eclipse of 31 July 1981 have been analyzed to detect the gravity waves generated by a total solar eclipse as hypothesized. It has been found that gravity waves can be generated by a total solar eclipse but their detection at ionospheric heights is critically dependent on the location of the observing station in relation to the eclipse path geometry. The distance of the observing station from the eclipse path should be more than 500 km in order to detect such gravity waves.

  4. Gravity and the geoid in the Nepal Himalaya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilham, Roger

    1992-01-01

    Materials within the Himalaya are rising due to convergence between India and Asia. If the rate of erosion is comparable to the rate of uplift, the mean surface elevation will remain constant. Any slight imbalance in these two processes will lead to growth or attrition of the Himalaya. Although buried rocks, minerals and surface control points in the Himalaya are undoubtably rising, the growth or collapse or the Himalaya depends on the erosion rate which is invisible to geodetic measurements. A way to measure erosion rate is to measure the rate of change of gravity in a region of uplift. Essentially gravity should change precisely in accord with a change in elevation of the point in a free air gradient if erosion equals uplift rate. A measurement of absolute gravity was made simultaneously with measurements of GPS height within the Himalaya. Absolute gravity is estimated from the change in velocity per unit distance of a falling corner cube in a vacuum. Time is measured with an atomic clock and the unit distance corresponds to the wavelength of an iodine stabilized laser. An experiment undertaken in the Himalaya in 1991 provide a site description also with a instrument description.

  5. Space Station Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baraona, C. R.

    1984-01-01

    The strategies, reasoning, and planning guidelines used in the development of the United States Space Station Program are outlined. The power required to support Space Station missions and housekeeping loads is a key driver in overall Space Station design. conversely, Space Station requirements drive the power technology. Various power system technology options are discussed. The mission analysis studies resulting in the required Space Station capabilities are also discussed. An example of Space Station functions and a concept to provide them is presented. The weight, area, payload and altitude requirements on draft and mass requirements are described with a summary and status of key power systems technology requirements and issues.

  6. Space Station power system

    SciTech Connect

    Baraona, C.R.

    1984-04-01

    The strategies, reasoning, and planning guidelines used in the development of the United States Space Station Program are outlined. The power required to support Space Station missions and housekeeping loads is a key driver in overall Space Station design. conversely, Space Station requirements drive the power technology. Various power system technology options are discussed. The mission analysis studies resulting in the required Space Station capabilities are also discussed. An example of Space Station functions and a concept to provide them is presented. The weight, area, payload and altitude requirements on draft and mass requirements are described with a summary and status of key power systems technology requirements and issues.

  7. Effect of gravity on vestibular neural development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Tomko, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    The timing, molecular basis, and morphophysiological and behavioral consequences of the interaction between external environment and the internal genetic pool that shapes the nervous system over a lifetime remain important questions in basic neuroscientific research. Space station offers the opportunity to study this interaction over several life cycles in a variety of organisms. This short review considers past work in altered gravity, particularly on the vestibular system, as the basis for proposing future research on space station, and discusses the equipment necessary to achieve goals. It is stressed that, in keeping with the international investment being made in this research endeavor, both the questions asked and the technologies to be developed should be bold. Advantage must be taken of this unique research environment to expand the frontiers of neuroscience. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  8. Operations analysis of gravity assisted rapid transit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Gravity assisted rapid transit (GART) with 6 percent grades before and after each station are compared with conventional systems in terms of energy consumption, run time, line capacity and schedule stability under abnormal circumstances. Parametric analyses of run times and energy consumption include the impact of alternate accelerating and braking levels. The capcity analysis uses a network simulation program to determine the location and severity of all signal delays. Based on results of initial simulations, the block design was revised to eliminate bottlenecks in normal operations. The systems are then compared at headways of 80 to 180 seconds. One month of incidence reports of a modern operating transit system are reviewed to determine the failures to be simulated. The impact of failures resulting in station delays (30 to 360 seconds), speed limit reduction (20 mph and 30 mph to one or more trains), vehicle performance (75 percent acceleration) are compared at scheduled headway of 90 to 180 seconds.

  9. Evaluation of absorption cycle for space station environmental control system application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, W. H.; Oneill, M. J.; Reid, H. C.; Bisenius, P. M.

    1972-01-01

    The study to evaluate an absorption cycle refrigeration system to provide environmental control for the space stations is reported. A zero-gravity liquid/vapor separator was designed and tested. The results were used to design a light-weight, efficient generator for the absorption refrigeration system. It is concluded that absorption cycle refrigeration is feasible for providing space station environmental control.

  10. A Rapid, Convenient, and Precise Method for the Absolute Determination of the Acceleration of Gravity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manche, Emanuel P.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a compact and portable apparatus for the measurement, with a high degree of precision, the value of the gravitational acceleration g. The apparatus consists of a falling mercury drop and an electronic timing circuit. (GA)

  11. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    SciTech Connect

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Romano, F.; Carpinelli, M.; Presti, D. Lo; Raffaele, L.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Sacchi, R.; Monaco, V.; Marchetto, F.; Giordanengo, S.

    2013-07-26

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  12. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum. PMID:25423049

  13. Absolute-magnitude distributions of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Dean; Wright, John; Jenkins III, Robert L.; Maddox, Larry

    2014-05-01

    The absolute-magnitude distributions of seven supernova (SN) types are presented. The data used here were primarily taken from the Asiago Supernova Catalogue, but were supplemented with additional data. We accounted for both foreground and host-galaxy extinction. A bootstrap method is used to correct the samples for Malmquist bias. Separately, we generate volume-limited samples, restricted to events within 100 Mpc. We find that the superluminous events (M{sub B} < –21) make up only about 0.1% of all SNe in the bias-corrected sample. The subluminous events (M{sub B} > –15) make up about 3%. The normal Ia distribution was the brightest with a mean absolute blue magnitude of –19.25. The IIP distribution was the dimmest at –16.75.

  14. Absolute radiometry and the solar constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of active cavity radiometers (ACRs) are described which have been developed as standard detectors for the accurate measurement of irradiance in absolute units. It is noted that the ACR is an electrical substitution calorimeter, is designed for automatic remote operation in any environment, and can make irradiance measurements in the range from low-level IR fluxes up to 30 solar constants with small absolute uncertainty. The instrument operates in a differential mode by chopping the radiant flux to be measured at a slow rate, and irradiance is determined from two electrical power measurements together with the instrumental constant. Results are reported for measurements of the solar constant with two types of ACRs. The more accurate measurement yielded a value of 136.6 plus or minus 0.7 mW/sq cm (1.958 plus or minus 0.010 cal/sq cm per min).

  15. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  16. Absolute calibration of TFTR helium proportional counters

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Diesso, M.; Jassby, D.; Johnson, L.; McCauley, S.; Munsat, T.; Roquemore, A.L.; Barnes, C.W. |; Loughlin, M. |

    1995-06-01

    The TFTR helium proportional counters are located in the central five (5) channels of the TFTR multichannel neutron collimator. These detectors were absolutely calibrated using a 14 MeV neutron generator positioned at the horizontal midplane of the TFTR vacuum vessel. The neutron generator position was scanned in centimeter steps to determine the collimator aperture width to 14 MeV neutrons and the absolute sensitivity of each channel. Neutron profiles were measured for TFTR plasmas with time resolution between 5 msec and 50 msec depending upon count rates. The He detectors were used to measure the burnup of 1 MeV tritons in deuterium plasmas, the transport of tritium in trace tritium experiments, and the residual tritium levels in plasmas following 50:50 DT experiments.

  17. Absolute enantioselective separation: optical activity ex machina.

    PubMed

    Bielski, Roman; Tencer, Michal

    2005-11-01

    The paper describes methodology of using three independent macroscopic factors affecting molecular orientation to accomplish separation of a racemic mixture without the presence of any other chiral compounds, i. e., absolute enantioselective separation (AES) which is an extension of a concept of applying these factors to absolute asymmetric synthesis. The three factors may be applied simultaneously or, if their effects can be retained, consecutively. The resulting three mutually orthogonal or near orthogonal directors constitute a true chiral influence and their scalar triple product is the measure of the chirality of the system. AES can be executed in a chromatography-like microfluidic process in the presence of an electric field. It may be carried out on a chemically modified flat surface, a monolithic polymer column made of a mesoporous material, each having imparted directional properties. Separation parameters were estimated for these media and possible implications for the natural homochirality are discussed. PMID:16342798

  18. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  19. Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Absolute Activity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loidl, M.; Leblanc, E.; Rodrigues, M.; Bouchard, J.; Censier, B.; Branger, T.; Lacour, D.

    2008-05-01

    We present a prototype of metallic magnetic calorimeters that we are developing for absolute activity measurements of low energy emitting radionuclides. We give a detailed description of the realization of the prototype, containing an 55Fe source inside the detector absorber. We present the analysis of first data taken with this detector and compare the result of activity measurement with liquid scintillation counting. We also propose some ways for reducing the uncertainty on the activity determination with this new technique.

  20. Absolute photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.

    1985-01-01

    The absolute values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.

  1. Absolute photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Pareek, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The absolute values of photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen were measured from the ionization threshold to 120 A. An auto-ionizing resonance belonging to the 2S2P4(4P)3P(3Do, 3So) transition was observed at 479.43 A and another line at 389.97 A. The experimental data is in excellent agreement with rigorous close-coupling calculations that include electron correlations in both the initial and final states.

  2. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  3. Blood pressure targets and absolute cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Odutayo, Ayodele; Rahimi, Kazem; Hsiao, Allan J; Emdin, Connor A

    2015-08-01

    In the Eighth Joint National Committee guideline on hypertension, the threshold for the initiation of blood pressure-lowering treatment for elderly adults (≥60 years) without chronic kidney disease or diabetes mellitus was raised from 140/90 mm Hg to 150/90 mm Hg. However, the committee was not unanimous in this decision, particularly because a large proportion of adults ≥60 years may be at high cardiovascular risk. On the basis of Eighth Joint National Committee guideline, we sought to determine the absolute 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease among these adults through analyzing the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2005-2012). The primary outcome measure was the proportion of adults who were at ≥20% predicted absolute cardiovascular risk and above goals for the Seventh Joint National Committee guideline but reclassified as at target under the Eighth Joint National Committee guideline (reclassified). The Framingham General Cardiovascular Disease Risk Score was used. From 2005 to 2012, the surveys included 12 963 adults aged 30 to 74 years with blood pressure measurements, of which 914 were reclassified based on the guideline. Among individuals reclassified as not in need of additional treatment, the proportion of adults 60 to 74 years without chronic kidney disease or diabetes mellitus at ≥20% absolute risk was 44.8%. This corresponds to 0.8 million adults. The proportion at high cardiovascular risk remained sizable among adults who were not receiving blood pressure-lowering treatment. Taken together, a sizable proportion of reclassified adults 60 to 74 years without chronic kidney disease or diabetes mellitus was at ≥20% absolute cardiovascular risk. PMID:26056340

  4. Relative errors can cue absolute visuomotor mappings.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Loes C J; Ernst, Marc O

    2015-12-01

    When repeatedly switching between two visuomotor mappings, e.g. in a reaching or pointing task, adaptation tends to speed up over time. That is, when the error in the feedback corresponds to a mapping switch, fast adaptation occurs. Yet, what is learned, the relative error or the absolute mappings? When switching between mappings, errors with a size corresponding to the relative difference between the mappings will occur more often than other large errors. Thus, we could learn to correct more for errors with this familiar size (Error Learning). On the other hand, it has been shown that the human visuomotor system can store several absolute visuomotor mappings (Mapping Learning) and can use associated contextual cues to retrieve them. Thus, when contextual information is present, no error feedback is needed to switch between mappings. Using a rapid pointing task, we investigated how these two types of learning may each contribute when repeatedly switching between mappings in the absence of task-irrelevant contextual cues. After training, we examined how participants changed their behaviour when a single error probe indicated either the often-experienced error (Error Learning) or one of the previously experienced absolute mappings (Mapping Learning). Results were consistent with Mapping Learning despite the relative nature of the error information in the feedback. This shows that errors in the feedback can have a double role in visuomotor behaviour: they drive the general adaptation process by making corrections possible on subsequent movements, as well as serve as contextual cues that can signal a learned absolute mapping. PMID:26280315

  5. Absolute distance measurements by variable wavelength interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bien, F.; Camac, M.; Caulfield, H. J.; Ezekiel, S.

    1981-02-01

    This paper describes a laser interferometer which provides absolute distance measurements using tunable lasers. An active feedback loop system, in which the laser frequency is locked to the optical path length difference of the interferometer, is used to tune the laser wavelengths. If the two wavelengths are very close, electronic frequency counters can be used to measure the beat frequency between the two laser frequencies and thus to determine the optical path difference between the two legs of the interferometer.

  6. 33-Foot-Diameter Space Station Leading to Space Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This picture illustrates a concept of a 33-Foot-Diameter Space Station Leading to a Space Base. In-house work of the Marshall Space Flight Center, as well as a Phase B contract with the McDornel Douglas Astronautics Company, resulted in a preliminary design for a space station in 1969 and l970. The Marshall-McDonnel Douglas approach envisioned the use of two common modules as the core configuration of a 12-man space station. Each common module was 33 feet in diameter and 40 feet in length and provided the building blocks, not only for the space station, but also for a 50-man space base. Coupled together, the two modules would form a four-deck facility: two decks for laboratories and two decks for operations and living quarters. Zero-gravity would be the normal mode of operation, although the station would have an artificial gravity capability. This general-purpose orbital facility was to provide wide-ranging research capabilities. The design of the facility was driven by the need to accommodate a broad spectrum of activities in support of astronomy, astrophysics, aerospace medicine, biology, materials processing, space physics, and space manufacturing. To serve the needs of Earth observations, the station was to be placed in a 242-nautical-mile orbit at a 55-degree inclination. An Intermediate-21 vehicle (comprised of Saturn S-IC and S-II stages) would have launched the station in 1977.

  7. Space station automation II

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of a conference on space station automation. Topics include the following: distributed artificial intelligence for space station energy management systems and computer architecture for tolerobots in earth orbit.

  8. Station Tour: Russian Segment

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams concludes her tour of the International Space Station with a visit to the Russian segment, which includes Zarya, the first segment of the station launched in 1...

  9. Space station power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Baraona, C. R.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that space station planning at NASA began when NASA was created in 1958. However, the initiation of the program for a lunar landing delayed the implementation of plans for a space station. The utility of a space station was finally demonstrated with Skylab, which was launched in 1972. In May 1982, the Space Station Task Force was established to provide focus and direction for space station planning activities. The present paper provides a description of the planning activities, giving particular attention to the power system. The initial space station will be required to supply 75 kW of continuous electrical power, 60 kW for the customer and 15 kW for space station needs. Possible alternative energy sources for the space station include solar planar or concentrator arrays of either silicon or gallium arsenide.

  10. Absolute dosimetry for extreme-ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Kurt W.; Campiotti, Richard H.

    2000-06-01

    The accurate measurement of an exposure dose reaching the wafer on an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithographic system has been a technical challenge directly applicable to the evaluation of candidate EUV resist materials and calculating lithography system throughputs. We have developed a dose monitoring sensor system that can directly measure EUV intensities at the wafer plane of a prototype EUV lithographic system. This sensor system, located on the wafer stage adjacent to the electrostatic chuck used to grip wafers, operates by translating the sensor into the aerial image, typically illuminating an 'open' (unpatterned) area on the reticle. The absolute signal strength can be related to energy density at the wafer, and thus used to determine resist sensitivity, and the signal as a function of position can be used to determine illumination uniformity at the wafer plane. Spectral filtering to enhance the detection of 13.4 nm radiation was incorporated into the sensor. Other critical design parameters include the packaging and amplification technologies required to place this device into the space and vacuum constraints of a EUV lithography environment. We describe two approaches used to determine the absolute calibration of this sensor. The first conventional approach requires separate characterization of each element of the sensor. A second novel approach uses x-ray emission from a mildly radioactive iron source to calibrate the absolute response of the entire sensor system (detector and electronics) in a single measurement.

  11. Constraints provided by ground gravity observations on geocentre motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogister, Y.; Mémin, A.; Rosat, S.; Hinderer, J.; Calvo, M.

    2016-06-01

    The geocentre motion is the motion of the centre of mass of the entire Earth, considered an isolated system, in a terrestrial system of reference. We first derive a formula relating the harmonic degree-1 Lagrangian variation of the gravity at a station to both the harmonic degree-1 vertical displacement of the station and the displacement of the whole Earth's centre of mass. The relationship is independent of the nature of the Earth deformation and is valid for any source of deformation. We impose no constraint on the system of reference, except that its origin must initially coincide with the centre of mass of the spherically-symmetric Earth model. Next, we consider the geocentre motion caused by surface loading. In a system of reference whose origin is the centre of mass of the solid Earth, we obtain a specific relationship between the gravity variation at the surface, the geocentre displacement and the load Love number h^' }_1, which demands the Earth's structure and rheological behaviour be known. For various networks of real or fictitious stations, we invert synthetic signals of surface gravity variations caused by atmospheric loading to retrieve the degree-1 variation of gravity. We then select 6 well distributed stations of the Global Geodynamics Project, which is a world network of superconducting gravimeters, to invert actual gravity data for the degree-1 variations and determine the geocentre displacement between the end of 2004 and the beginning of 2012, assuming it to be due to surface loading. We find annual and semi-annual displacements with amplitude 0.5 to 2.3 mm.

  12. Constraints provided by ground gravity observations on geocentre motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogister, Y.; Mémin, A.; Rosat, S.; Hinderer, J.; Calvo, M.

    2016-08-01

    The geocentre motion is the motion of the centre of mass of the entire Earth, considered an isolated system, in a terrestrial system of reference. We first derive a formula relating the harmonic degree-1 Lagrangian variation of the gravity at a station to both the harmonic degree-1 vertical displacement of the station and the displacement of the whole Earth's centre of mass. The relationship is independent of the nature of the Earth deformation and is valid for any source of deformation. We impose no constraint on the system of reference, except that its origin must initially coincide with the centre of mass of the spherically symmetric Earth model. Next, we consider the geocentre motion caused by surface loading. In a system of reference whose origin is the centre of mass of the solid Earth, we obtain a specific relationship between the gravity variation at the surface, the geocentre displacement and the load Love number h^' }_1, which demands the Earth's structure and rheological behaviour be known. For various networks of real or fictitious stations, we invert synthetic signals of surface gravity variations caused by atmospheric loading to retrieve the degree-1 variation of gravity. We then select six well-distributed stations of the Global Geodynamics Project, which is a world network of superconducting gravimeters, to invert actual gravity data for the degree-1 variations and determine the geocentre displacement between the end of 2004 and the beginning of 2012, assuming it to be due to surface loading. We find annual and semi-annual displacements with amplitude 0.5-2.3 mm.

  13. The Space Station program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinners, N. W.

    1986-01-01

    Cost constraints to a large degree control the functionality and form of the IOC of the Space Station. Planning of Station missions must be delayed to retain flexibility, a goal also served by modular development of the Station and by multi-use laboratory modules. Early emphasis on servicing other spacecraft is recommended, as is using available Shuttle flight time for R&D on Space Station technologies and operations.

  14. Walking in a rotating space station, an electromyographic and kinematic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Biomechanics were studied of locomotion in a rotating environment like that of a space station at various gravity levels. Comparisons were made of the walking gait patterns and the amplitudes of various leg muscle electrical outputs at different gravity levels. The results of these tests are applicable to planning future space missions by providing a part of the information that will be needed to determine the type of vehicle and the gravity level to be provided for the astronauts if it is decided that artificial gravity is to be utilized.

  15. Validation of Mean Absolute Sea Level of the North Atlantic obtained from Drifter, Altimetry and Wind Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maximenko, Nikolai A.

    2003-01-01

    Mean absolute sea level reflects the deviation of the Ocean surface from geoid due to the ocean currents and is an important characteristic of the dynamical state of the ocean. Values of its spatial variations (order of 1 m) are generally much smaller than deviations of the geoid shape from ellipsoid (order of 100 m) that makes the derivation of the absolute mean sea level a difficult task for gravity and satellite altimetry observations. Technique used by Niiler et al. for computation of the absolute mean sea level in the Kuroshio Extension was then developed into more general method and applied by Niiler et al. (2003b) to the global Ocean. The method is based on the consideration of balance of horizontal momentum.

  16. Gravity and Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.

    1996-01-01

    Gravity has been the most constant environmental factor throughout the evolution of biological species on Earth. Organisms are rarely exposed to other gravity levels, either increased or decreased, for prolonged periods. Thus, evolution in a constant 1G field has historically prevented us from appreciating the potential biological consequences of a multi-G universe. To answer the question 'Can terrestrial life be sustained and thrive beyond our planet?' we need to understand the importance of gravity on living systems, and we need to develop a multi-G, rather than a 1G, mentality. The science of gravitational biology took a giant step with the advent of the space program, which provided the first opportunity to examine living organisms in gravity environments lower than could be sustained on Earth. Previously, virtually nothing was known about the effects of extremely low gravity on living organisms, and most of the initial expectations were proven wrong. All species that have flown in space survive in microgravity, although no higher organism has ever completed a life cycle in space. It has been found, however, that many systems change, transiently or permanently, as a result of prolonged exposure to microgravity.

  17. n-DBI gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdeiro, Carlos; Hirano, Shinji; Sato, Yuki

    2011-12-01

    n-DBI gravity is a gravitational theory introduced in [C. Herdeiro and S. Hirano, arXiv:1109.1468.], motivated by Dirac-Born-Infeld type conformal scalar theory and designed to yield noneternal inflation spontaneously. It contains a foliation structure provided by an everywhere timelike vector field n, which couples to the gravitational sector of the theory, but decouples in the small curvature limit. We show that any solution of Einstein gravity with a particular curvature property is a solution of n-DBI gravity. Among them is a class of geometries isometric to a Reissner-Nordström-(anti)-de Sitter black hole, which is obtained within the spherically symmetric solutions of n-DBI gravity minimally coupled to the Maxwell field. These solutions have, however, two distinct features from their Einstein gravity counterparts: (1) the cosmological constant appears as an integration constant and can be positive, negative, or vanishing, making it a variable quantity of the theory; and (2) there is a nonuniqueness of solutions with the same total mass, charge, and effective cosmological constant. Such inequivalent solutions cannot be mapped to each other by a foliation preserving diffeomorphism. Physically they are distinguished by the expansion and shear of the congruence tangent to n, which define scalar invariants on each leaf of the foliation.

  18. Venus Gravity Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konopliv, Alexander S.; Sjogren, William L.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the Venus gravity methods and results to date (model MGNP90LSAAP). It is called a handbook in that it contains many useful plots (such as geometry and orbit behavior) that are useful in evaluating the tracking data. We discuss the models that are used in processing the Doppler data and the estimation method for determining the gravity field. With Pioneer Venus Orbiter and Magellan tracking data, the Venus gravity field was determined complete to degree and order 90 with the use of the JPL Cray T3D Supercomputer. The gravity field shows unprecedented high correlation with topography and resolution of features to the 2OOkm resolution. In the procedure for solving the gravity field, other information is gained as well, and, for example, we discuss results for the Venus ephemeris, Love number, pole orientation of Venus, and atmospheric densities. Of significance is the Love number solution which indicates a liquid core for Venus. The ephemeris of Venus is determined to an accuracy of 0.02 mm/s (tens of meters in position), and the rotation period to 243.0194 +/- 0.0002 days.

  19. Canadian Space Station program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doetsch, K. H.

    1991-01-01

    Information on the Canadian Space Station Program is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include the Mobile Servicing Center (MSC), Space Station Freedom assembly milestones, the MB-3 launch configuration, a new workstation configuration, strategic technology development, the User Development Program, the Space Station Program budget, and Canada's future space activities.

  20. Plant biology in reduced gravity on the Moon and Mars.

    PubMed

    Kiss, J Z

    2014-01-01

    While there have been numerous studies on the effects of microgravity on plant biology since the beginning of the Space Age, our knowledge of the effects of reduced gravity (less than the Earth nominal 1 g) on plant physiology and development is very limited. Since international space agencies have cited manned exploration of Moon/Mars as long-term goals, it is important to understand plant biology at the lunar (0.17 g) and Martian levels of gravity (0.38 g), as plants are likely to be part of bioregenerative life-support systems on these missions. First, the methods to obtain microgravity and reduced gravity such as drop towers, parabolic flights, sounding rockets and orbiting spacecraft are reviewed. Studies on gravitaxis and gravitropism in algae have suggested that the threshold level of gravity sensing is around 0.3 g or less. Recent experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) showed attenuation of phototropism in higher plants occurs at levels ranging from 0.l g to 0.3 g. Taken together, these studies suggest that the reduced gravity level on Mars of 0.38 g may be enough so that the gravity level per se would not be a major problem for plant development. Studies that have directly considered the impact of reduced gravity and microgravity on bioregenerative life-support systems have identified important biophysical changes in the reduced gravity environments that impact the design of these systems. The author suggests that the current ISS laboratory facilities with on-board centrifuges should be used as a test bed in which to explore the effects of reduced gravity on plant biology, including those factors that are directly related to developing life-support systems necessary for Moon and Mars exploration. PMID:23889757

  1. Microgravity Environment on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard; Hrovat, Kenneth; Kelly, Eric; McPherson, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    A primary feature of the International Space Station will be its microgravity environment--an environment in which the effects of gravity are drastically reduced. The International Space Station design has been driven by a long-standing, high-level requirement for a microgravity mode of operation. Various types of data are gathered when science experiments are conducted. The acceleration levels experienced during experiment operation should be factored into the analysis of the results of most microgravity experiments. To this end, the Space Acceleration Measurement System records the acceleration levels to support microgravity researchers for nearly three years of International Space Station operations. The Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project assists the experiments principal investigators with their analysis of the acceleration (microgravity) environment. The Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project provides cataloged data, periodic analysis summary reports, specialized reports for experiment teams, and real-time data in a variety of user-defined formats. Characterization of the various microgravity carriers (e.g., Shuttle and International Space Station) is also accomplished for the experiment teams. Presented in this paper will be a short description of how microgravity disturbances may affect some experiment classes, a snapshot of the microgravity environment, and a view into how well the space station is expected to meet the user requirements.

  2. Artificial gravity - A countermeasure for zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A. E.; Mccormack, P. D.

    1987-01-01

    Current knowledge on artificial gravity is presented with emphasis placed on the unique characteristics of such an environment and their effects on crew performance and vehicle habitability. A parametric optimization of the vehicle size and operation is performed. The following set of 'optimum' parameter values is obtained: a cost of 15.8 billion dollars, a radius of 80 feet, a rotation rate of 4.8 rpm, and a g-value of 0.62. Consideration is also given to the problems of adaptation, retention of adaptation, and simultaneous adaptation to both nonrotating and rotating environments.

  3. Cautionary tales for reduced-gravity particle research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, John R.; Greeley, Ronald; Tucker, D. W.

    1987-01-01

    Failure of experiments conducted on the KC-135 aircraft in zero gravity are discussed. Tests that were a total failure are reported. Why the failure occurred and the sort of questions that potential researchers should ask in order to avoid the appearance of abstracts such as this are discussed. Many types of aggregation studies were proposed for the Space Station, and it is hoped that the following synopsis of events will add a touch of reality to experimentation proposed for this zero-gravity environment.

  4. Analysis of a rotating advanced-technology space station for the year 2025

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queijo, M. J.; Butterfield, A. J.; Cuddihy, W. F.; King, C. B.; Stone, R. W.; Garn, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis is made of several aspects of an advanced-technology rotating space station configuration generated under a previous study. The analysis includes examination of several modifications of the configuration, interface with proposed launch systems, effects of low-gravity environment on human subjects, and the space station assembly sequence. Consideration was given also to some aspects of space station rotational dynamics, surface charging, and the possible application of tethers.

  5. Gravity and embryonic development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship between the developing embryo (both plant and animal) and a gravitational field has long been contemplated. The difficulty in designing critical experiments on the surface of the earth because of its background of 1 g, has been an obstacle to a resolution of the problem. Biological responses to gravity (particularly in plants) are obvious in many cases; however, the influence of gravity as an environmental input to the developing embryo is not as obvious and has proven to be extremely difficult to define. In spite of this, over the years numerous attempts have been made using a variety of embryonic materials to come to grips with the role of gravity in development. Three research tools are available: the centrifuge, the clinostat, and the orbiting spacecraft. Experimental results are now available from all three sources. Some tenuous conclusions are drawn, and an attempt at a unifying theory of gravitational influence on embryonic development is made.

  6. Inflation without quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markkanen, Tommi; Räsänen, Syksy; Wahlman, Pyry

    2015-04-01

    It is sometimes argued that observation of tensor modes from inflation would provide the first evidence for quantum gravity. However, in the usual inflationary formalism, also the scalar modes involve quantized metric perturbations. We consider the issue in a semiclassical setup in which only matter is quantized, and spacetime is classical. We assume that the state collapses on a spacelike hypersurface and find that the spectrum of scalar perturbations depends on the hypersurface. For reasonable choices, we can recover the usual inflationary predictions for scalar perturbations in minimally coupled single-field models. In models where nonminimal coupling to gravity is important and the field value is sub-Planckian, we do not get a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of scalar perturbations. As gravitational waves are only produced at second order, the tensor-to-scalar ratio is negligible. We conclude that detection of inflationary gravitational waves would indeed be needed to have observational evidence of quantization of gravity.

  7. Newberry Combined Gravity 2016

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kelly Rose

    2016-01-22

    Newberry combined gravity from Zonge Int'l, processed for the EGS stimulation project at well 55-29. Includes data from both Davenport 2006 collection and for OSU/4D EGS monitoring 2012 collection. Locations are NAD83, UTM Zone 10 North, meters. Elevation is NAVD88. Gravity in milligals. Free air and observed gravity are included, along with simple Bouguer anomaly and terrain corrected Bouguer anomaly. SBA230 means simple Bouguer anomaly computed at 2.30 g/cc. CBA230 means terrain corrected Bouguer anomaly at 2.30 g/cc. This suite of densities are included (g/cc): 2.00, 2.10, 2.20, 2.30, 2.40, 2.50, 2.67.

  8. Doppler sodar and radar wind-profiler observations of gravity-wave activity associated with a gravity current

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, F.M.; Venkateswaran, S.V. ); Mazaudier, C. ); Crochet, M. )

    1993-02-01

    Observations from two Doppler sodars and a radar wind profiler have been used in conjunction with data from a rawinsonde station and a mesoscale surface observation network to conduct a case study of a gravity current entering into an environment containing a nocturnal inversion and an elevated neutral layer. On the basis of synoptic and mesoscale analyses, it is concluded that the gravity current might have originated either as a scale-contracted cold front or as a gust front resulting from thunderstorm outflows observed very near the leading edge of a cold front. Despite this ambiguity, the detailed vertical structure of the gravity current itself is well resolved from the data. Moreover, the vertical velocity measurements provided by the sodars and the radar wind profiler at high time resolution have given unique information about the height structure of gravity waves excited by the gravity current. Although only wave periods, and not phase speeds or wavelengths, are directly measured, it is possible to make reasonable inferences about wave excitation mechanisms and about the influence and control of ambient stratification on wave-field characteristics. Both Kelvin-Helmholtz waves generated in the regions of high wind shear found in association with the gravity current and lee-type waves forced by the gravity current acting as an obstacle to opposing prefrontal flow are identified. It is also found that the propagation speed of the gravity current and the relative depths of the prefrontal inversion and the postfrontal cold air were not favorable for the formation of either internal bores or solitary waves at the time of day at which the gravity current was being observed. 42 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Space Station Live: Station Communications Upgrade

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters recently spoke with Penny Roberts, one of the leads for the International Space Station Avionics and Software group, about the upgrade of the K...

  10. Brane-World Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maartens, Roy; Koyama, Kazuya

    2010-09-01

    The observable universe could be a 1+3-surface (the "brane") embedded in a 1+3+d-dimensional spacetime (the "bulk"), with Standard Model particles and fields trapped on the brane while gravity is free to access the bulk. At least one of the d extra spatial dimensions could be very large relative to the Planck scale, which lowers the fundamental gravity scale, possibly even down to the electroweak (˜TeV) level. This revolutionary picture arises in the framework of recent developments in M theory. The 1+10-dimensional M theory encompasses the known 1+9-dimensional superstring theories, and is widely considered to be a promising potential route to quantum gravity. At low energies, gravity is localized at the brane and general relativity is recovered, but at high energies gravity “leaks” into the bulk, behaving in a truly higher-dimensional way. This introduces significant changes to gravitational dynamics and perturbations, with interesting and potentially testable implications for high-energy astrophysics, black holes, and cosmology. Brane-world models offer a phenomenological way to test some of the novel predictions and corrections to general relativity that are implied by M theory. This review analyzes the geometry, dynamics and perturbations of simple brane-world models for cosmology and astrophysics, mainly focusing on warped 5-dimensional brane-worlds based on the Randall-Sundrum models. We also cover the simplest brane-world models in which 4-dimensional gravity on the brane is modified at low energies - the 5-dimensional Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati models. Then we discuss co-dimension two branes in 6-dimensional models.

  11. Gravity and Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blencowe, Miles

    The emergence of the macroscopic classical world from the microscopic quantum world is commonly understood to be a consequence of the fact that any given quantum system is open, unavoidably interacting with unobserved environmental degrees of freedom that will cause initial quantum superposition states of the system to decohere, resulting in classical mixtures of either-or alternatives. A fundamental question concerns how large a macroscopic object can be placed in a manifest quantum state, such as a center of mass quantum superposition state, under conditions where the effects of the interacting environmental degrees of freedom are reduced (i.e. in ultrahigh vacuum and at ultralow temperatures). Recent experiments have in fact demonstrated manifest quantum behavior in nano-to-micron-scale mechanical systems. Gravity has been invoked in various ways as playing a possible fundamental role in enforcing classicality of matter systems beyond a certain scale. Adopting the viewpoint that the standard perturbative quantization of general relativity provides an effective description of quantum gravity that is valid at ordinary energies, we show that it is possible to describe quantitatively how gravity as an environment can induce the decoherence of matter superposition states. The justification for such an approach follows from the fact that we are considering laboratory scale systems, where the matter is localized to regions of small curvature. As with other low energy effects, such as the quantum gravity correction to the Newtonian potential between two ordinary masses, it should be possible to quantitatively evaluate gravitationally induced decoherence rates by employing standard perturbative quantum gravity as an effective field theory; whatever the final form the eventual correct quantum theory of gravity takes, it must converge in its predictions with the effective field theory description at low energies. Research supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF

  12. The Grip of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondhalekar, Prabhakar

    2001-09-01

    Gravity is one of the most inexplicable forces of nature, controlling everything, from the expansion of the Universe to the ebb and flow of ocean tides. The search for the laws of motion and gravitation began more than two thousand years ago, a quest that Prabhakar Gondhalekar recounts in The Grip of Gravity. Beginning with Aristotle and concluding with Planck, Gondhalekar outlines a 'genealogy' of gravity and lucidly explains how previous explanations have shaped the most recent development in the field, string theory. In this work, physicist and astronomer Gondhalekar describes experiments, both planned and proposed, and clearly explains natural phenomena like ocean tides, seasons, ice ages, the formation of planets, stars, and exotic objects like black holes and neutron stars, which are all controlled by gravity. Including anecdotes and thumb-nail sketches of the personalities involved, The Grip of Gravity provides an introduction to the foundation of modern physics and shows how the current developments in string theory may lead to a new and radical interpretation of gravity. Prabhakar Gondhalekar is an Honorary Fellow in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College, London. Until his retirement in 1998, he was the head of the Space Astronomy Group at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, where he had been a researcher for 18 years. His research has included a number of topics in galactic and extragalactic astronomy, with his major work focusing on the interstellar medium and active galactic nuclei. Gondhalekar has been awarded Royal Society, Leverhulme Trust, and NATO Research Fellowships to do research in universities in the United States and Israel.

  13. Atom Interferometer Technologies in Space for Gravity Mapping and Gravity Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jason; Chiow, Sheng-Wey; Kellogg, James; Kohel, James; Yu, Nan

    2015-05-01

    Atom interferometers utilize the wave-nature of atomic gases for precision measurements of inertial forces, with potential applications ranging from gravity mapping for planetary science to unprecedented tests of fundamental physics with quantum gases. The high stability and sensitivity intrinsic to these devices already place them among the best terrestrial sensors available for measurements of gravitational accelerations, rotations, and gravity gradients, with the promise of several orders of magnitude improvement in their detection sensitivity in microgravity. Consequently, multiple precision atom-interferometer-based projects are under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, including a dual-atomic-species interferometer that is to be integrated into the Cold Atom Laboratory onboard the International Space Station and a highly stable gravity gradiometer in a transportable design relevant for earth science measurements. We will present JPL's activities in the use of precision atom interferometry for gravity mapping and gravitational wave detection in space. Our recent progresses bringing the transportable JPL atom interferometer instrument to be competitive with the state of the art and simulations of the expected capabilities of a proposed flight project will also be discussed. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  14. Seeking the Light: Gravity Without the Influence of Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, Fred; Kern, Volker; Reed, Dave; Etheridge, Guy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    All living things sense gravity like humans might sense light or sound. The Biological Research In Canisters (BRIC-14) experiment, explores how moss cells sense and respond to gravity and light. This experiment studies how gravity influences the internal structure of moss cells and seeks to understand the influences of the spaceflight environment on cell growth. This knowledge will help researchers understand the role of gravity in the evolution of cells and life on earth.

  15. Terrestrial gravity instrumentation in the 20th Century: A brief review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valliant, H. D.

    1989-01-01

    At the turn of the century, only pendulum apparatuses and torsion balances were available for general exploration work. Both of these early techniques were cumbersome and time-consuming. It was no wonder that the development of the gravity meter was welcomed with a universal sigh of relief. By 1935 potential field measurements with gravity meters supplanted gradient measurements with torsion balances. Potential field measurements are generally characterized by three types: absolute - measurements are made in fundamental units, traceable to national standards of length and time at each observation site; relative with absolute scale - differences in gravity are measured in fundamental units traceable to national standards of length and time; and relative - differences in gravity are measured with arbitrary scale. Improvements in the design of gravity meters since their introduction has led to a significant reduction in size and greatly increased precision. As the precision increased, applications expanded to include the measurement of crustal motion, the search for non-Newtonian forces, archeology, and civil engineering. Apart from enhancements to the astatic gravity meter, few developments in hardware were achieved. One of these was the vibrating string gravity meter which was developed in the 1950s and was employed briefly for marine and borehole applications. Another is the cryogenic gravity meter which utilizes the stability of superconducting current to achieve a relative instrument with extremely low drift suitable for tidal and secular gravity measurements. An advance in performing measurements from a moving platform was achieved with the development of the straight-line gravity meter. The latter part of the century also saw the rebirth of gradient measurements which offers advantages for observations from a moving platform. Definitive testing of the Bell gradiometer was recently reported.

  16. Gauge/Gravity Duality

    ScienceCinema

    Polchinski, Joseph [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics

    2010-09-01

    Gauge theories, which describe the particle interactions, are well understood, while quantum gravity leads to many puzzles. Remarkably, in recent years we have learned that these are actually dual, the same system written in different variables. On the one hand, this provides our most precise description of quantum gravity, resolves some long-standing paradoxes, and points to new principles. On the other, it gives a new perspective on strong interactions, with surprising connections to other areas of physics. I describe these ideas, and discuss current and future directions.

  17. Continuous gravity gradient logging

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J.L.; Lyle, W.D. Jr.

    1986-07-29

    A method is described for conducting a gravimetry survey of an earth formation, comprising the steps of: (a) continuously traversing the earth formation with a gravity logging tool having a column of fluid within the tool, (b) measuring a first pressure difference along a first interval within the column of fluid, (c) measuring a second pressure difference along a second interval within the column of fluid, (d) differencing the first and second pressure differences to determine the gravity gradient along the earth formation between the first and second intervals.

  18. Position from gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Procedures for obtaining position from surface gravity observations are reviewed and their relevance assessed in the context of the application of modern geodetic techniques to programs of Earth and ocean physics. Solutions based on the use of surface layer techniques, the discrete value approach, and the development from Green's theorem are stated in summary, the latter being extended to order e cubed in the height anomaly. The representation of the surface gravity field which is required in order that this accuracy may be achieved is discussed. Interim techniques which could be used in the absence of such a representation are also outlined.

  19. Gauge/Gravity Duality

    SciTech Connect

    Polchinski, Joseph

    2010-02-24

    Gauge theories, which describe the particle interactions, are well understood, while quantum gravity leads to many puzzles. Remarkably, in recent years we have learned that these are actually dual, the same system written in different variables. On the one hand, this provides our most precise description of quantum gravity, resolves some long-standing paradoxes, and points to new principles. On the other, it gives a new perspective on strong interactions, with surprising connections to other areas of physics. I describe these ideas, and discuss current and future directions.

  20. Resummation of Massive Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Gabadadze, Gregory; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2011-06-10

    We construct four-dimensional covariant nonlinear theories of massive gravity which are ghost-free in the decoupling limit to all orders. These theories resume explicitly all the nonlinear terms of an effective field theory of massive gravity. We show that away from the decoupling limit the Hamiltonian constraint is maintained at least up to and including quartic order in nonlinearities, hence excluding the possibility of the Boulware-Deser ghost up to this order. We also show that the same remains true to all orders in a similar toy model.

  1. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  2. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  3. Does Paramecium sense gravity?

    PubMed

    Mogami, Y; Ishii, J; Baba, S A

    1995-03-01

    In order to get an insight into the cellular mechanisms for the integration of the effects of gravity, we investigated the gravitactic behaviour in Paramecium. There are two main categories for the model of the mechanism of gravitaxis; one is derived on the basis of the mechanistic properties of the cell (physical model) and the other of the physiological properties including cellular gravireception (physiological model). In this review article, we criticized the physical models and introduced a new physiological model. Physical models postulated so far can be divided into two; one explaining the negative gravitactic orientation of the cell in terms of the static torque generated by the structural properties of the cell (gravity-buoyancy model by Verworn, 1889 and drag-gravity model by Roberts, 1970), and the other explaining it in terms of the dynamic torque generated by the helical swimming of the cell (propulsion-gravity model by Winet and Jahn, 1974 and lifting-force model by Nowakowska and Grebecki, 1977). Among those we excluded the possibility of dynamic-torque models because of their incorrect theoretical assumptions. According to the passive orientation of Ni(2+)-immobilized cells, the physical effect of the static torque should be inevitable for the gravitactic orientation. Downward orientation of the immobilized cells in the course of floating up in the hyper-density medium demonstrated the gravitactic orientation is not resulted by the nonuniform distribution of cellular mass (gravity-buoyancy model) but by the fore-aft asymmetry of the cell (drag-gravity model). A new model explaining the gravitactic behaviour is derived on the basis of the cellular gravity sensation through mechanoreceptor channels of the cell membrane. Paramecium is known to have depolarizing receptor channels in the anterior and hyperpolarizing receptors in the posterior of the cell. The uneven distribution of the receptor may lead to the bidirectional changes of the membrane

  4. Physiological Considerations of Artificial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    Reasons for the development of artificial gravity environments on spacecraft are outlined. The physiological effects of weightlessness on the human cardiovascular skeletal, and vestibular systems are enumerated. Design options for creating artificial gravity environments are shown.

  5. Animal research on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonting, S. L.; Arno, R. D.; Corbin, S. D.

    1987-01-01

    The need for in-depth, long- and short-term animal experimentation in space to qualify man for long-duration space missions, and to study the effects of the absence and presence of Earth's gravity and of heavy particle radiation on the development and functioning of vertebrates is described. The major facilities required for these investigations and to be installed on the Space Station are: modular habitats for holding rodents and small primates in full bioisolation; a habitat holding facility; 1.8 and 4.0 m dia centrifuges; a multipurpose workbench; and a cage cleaner/disposal system. The design concepts, functions, and characteristics of these facilities are described.

  6. Biological research on a Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, A. D.; Johnson, Catherine C.

    1990-01-01

    A Space Station can provide reliable, long duration access to ug environments for basic and applied biological research. The uniqueness of access to near-weightless environments to probe fundamental questions of significance to gravitational and Space biologists can be exploited from many vantage points. Access to centrifuge facilities that can provide 1 g and hypo-g controls will permit identification of gravity-dependent or primary effects. Understanding secondary effects of the ug environment as well will allow a fuller exploitation of the Space environment.

  7. On the Error Sources in Absolute Individual Antenna Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, Wim; Baire, Quentin; Bilich, Andria; Bruyninx, Carine; Legrand, Juliette

    2013-04-01

    field) multi path errors, both during calibration and later on at the station, absolute sub-millimeter positioning with GPS is not (yet) possible. References [1] G. Wübbena, M. Schmitz, G. Boettcher, C. Schumann, "Absolute GNSS Antenna Calibration with a Robot: Repeatability of Phase Variations, Calibration of GLONASS and Determination of Carrier-to-Noise Pattern", International GNSS Service: Analysis Center workshop, 8-12 May 2006, Darmstadt, Germany. [2] P. Zeimetz, H. Kuhlmann, "On the Accuracy of Absolute GNSS Antenna Calibration and the Conception of a New Anechoic Chamber", FIG Working Week 2008, 14-19 June 2008, Stockholm, Sweden. [3] P. Zeimetz, H. Kuhlmann, L. Wanninger, V. Frevert, S. Schön and K. Strauch, "Ringversuch 2009", 7th GNSS-Antennen-Workshop, 19-20 March 2009, Dresden, Germany.

  8. An absolute radius scale for Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Cooke, Maren L.; Pelton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Radio and stellar occultation observations of Saturn's rings made by the Voyager spacecraft are discussed. The data reveal systematic discrepancies of almost 10 km in some parts of the rings, limiting some of the investigations. A revised solution for Saturn's rotation pole has been proposed which removes the discrepancies between the stellar and radio occultation profiles. Corrections to previously published radii vary from -2 to -10 km for the radio occultation, and +5 to -6 km for the stellar occultation. An examination of spiral density waves in the outer A Ring supports that the revised absolute radii are in error by no more than 2 km.

  9. Characterization of the DARA solar absolute radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finsterle, W.; Suter, M.; Fehlmann, A.; Kopp, G.

    2011-12-01

    The Davos Absolute Radiometer (DARA) prototype is an Electrical Substitution Radiometer (ESR) which has been developed as a successor of the PMO6 type on future space missions and ground based TSI measurements. The DARA implements an improved thermal design of the cavity detector and heat sink assembly to minimize air-vacuum differences and to maximize thermal symmetry of measuring and compensating cavity. The DARA also employs an inverted viewing geometry to reduce internal stray light. We will report on the characterization and calibration experiments which were carried out at PMOD/WRC and LASP (TRF).

  10. Absolute calibration of the Auger fluorescence detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauleo, P.; Brack, J.; Garrard, L.; Harton, J.; Knapik, R.; Meyhandan, R.; Rovero, A.C.; Tamashiro, A.; Warner, D.

    2005-07-01

    Absolute calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors uses a light source at the telescope aperture. The technique accounts for the combined effects of all detector components in a single measurement. The calibrated 2.5 m diameter light source fills the aperture, providing uniform illumination to each pixel. The known flux from the light source and the response of the acquisition system give the required calibration for each pixel. In the lab, light source uniformity is studied using CCD images and the intensity is measured relative to NIST-calibrated photodiodes. Overall uncertainties are presently 12%, and are dominated by systematics.

  11. Absolute angular positioning in ultrahigh vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Schief, H.; Marsico, V.; Kern, K.

    1996-05-01

    Commercially available angular resolvers, which are routinely used in machine tools and robotics, are modified and adapted to be used under ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) conditions. They provide straightforward and reliable measurements of angular positions for any kind of UHV sample manipulators. The corresponding absolute reproducibility is on the order of 0.005{degree}, whereas the relative resolution is better than 0.001{degree}, as demonstrated by high-resolution helium-reflectivity measurements. The mechanical setup and possible applications are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  13. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  14. Model-independent tests of cosmic gravity.

    PubMed

    Linder, Eric V

    2011-12-28

    Gravitation governs the expansion and fate of the universe, and the growth of large-scale structure within it, but has not been tested in detail on these cosmic scales. The observed acceleration of the expansion may provide signs of gravitational laws beyond general relativity (GR). Since the form of any such extension is not clear, from either theory or data, we adopt a model-independent approach to parametrizing deviations to the Einstein framework. We explore the phase space dynamics of two key post-GR functions and derive a classification scheme, and an absolute criterion on accuracy necessary for distinguishing classes of gravity models. Future surveys will be able to constrain the post-GR functions' amplitudes and forms to the required precision, and hence reveal new aspects of gravitation. PMID:22084288

  15. Determination of the absolute contours of optical flats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primak, W.

    1969-01-01

    Emersons procedure is used to determine true absolute contours of optical flats. Absolute contours of standard flats are determined and a comparison is then made between standard and unknown flats. Contour differences are determined by deviation of Fizeau fringe.

  16. Absolute flux density calibrations of radio sources: 2.3 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freiley, A. J.; Batelaan, P. D.; Bathker, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    A detailed description of a NASA/JPL Deep Space Network program to improve S-band gain calibrations of large aperture antennas is reported. The program is considered unique in at least three ways; first, absolute gain calibrations of high quality suppressed-sidelobe dual mode horns first provide a high accuracy foundation to the foundation to the program. Second, a very careful transfer calibration technique using an artificial far-field coherent-wave source was used to accurately obtain the gain of one large (26 m) aperture. Third, using the calibrated large aperture directly, the absolute flux density of five selected galactic and extragalactic natural radio sources was determined with an absolute accuracy better than 2 percent, now quoted at the familiar 1 sigma confidence level. The follow-on considerations to apply these results to an operational network of ground antennas are discussed. It is concluded that absolute gain accuracies within + or - 0.30 to 0.40 db are possible, depending primarily on the repeatability (scatter) in the field data from Deep Space Network user stations.

  17. Cubesat Gravity Field Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burla, Santoshkumar; Mueller, Vitali; Flury, Jakob; Jovanovic, Nemanja

    2016-04-01

    CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions have been successful in the field of satellite geodesy (especially to improve Earth's gravity field models) and have established the necessity towards the next generation gravity field missions. Especially, GRACE has shown its capabilities beyond any other gravity field missions. GRACE Follow-On mission is going to continue GRACE's legacy which is almost identical to GRACE mission with addition of laser interferometry. But these missions are not only quite expensive but also takes quite an effort to plan and to execute. Still there are few drawbacks such as under-sampling and incapability of exploring new ideas within a single mission (ex: to perform different orbit configurations with multi satellite mission(s) at different altitudes). The budget is the major limiting factor to build multi satellite mission(s). Here, we offer a solution to overcome these drawbacks using cubesat/ nanosatellite mission. Cubesats are widely used in research because they are cheaper, smaller in size and building them is easy and faster than bigger satellites. Here, we design a 3D model of GRACE like mission with available sensors and explain how the Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) works. The expected accuracies on final results of gravity field are also explained here.

  18. Low gravity phase separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, G. F.; Pope, W. L.; Smith, L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is described for phase separating a gas-liquid mixture as might exist in a subcritical cryogenic helium vessel for cooling a superconducting magnet at low gravity such as in planetary orbit, permitting conservation of the liquid and extended service life of the superconducting magnet.

  19. Cosmological tests of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Bhuvnesh; Khoury, Justin

    2010-07-15

    Modifications of general relativity provide an alternative explanation to dark energy for the observed acceleration of the universe. We review recent developments in modified gravity theories, focusing on higher-dimensional approaches and chameleon/f(R) theories. We classify these models in terms of the screening mechanisms that enable such theories to approach general relativity on small scales (and thus satisfy solar system constraints). We describe general features of the modified Friedman equation in such theories. The second half of this review describes experimental tests of gravity in light of the new theoretical approaches. We summarize the high precision tests of gravity on laboratory and solar system scales. We describe in some detail tests on astrophysical scales ranging from {approx} kpc (galaxy scales) to {approx} Gpc (large-scale structure). These tests rely on the growth and inter-relationship of perturbations in the metric potentials, density and velocity fields which can be measured using gravitational lensing, galaxy cluster abundances, galaxy clustering and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. A robust way to interpret observations is by constraining effective parameters, such as the ratio of the two metric potentials. Currently tests of gravity on astrophysical scales are in the early stages - we summarize these tests and discuss the interesting prospects for new tests in the coming decade.

  20. Hawaii Gravity Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-12-15

    Gravity model for the state of Hawaii. Data is from the following source: Flinders, A.F., Ito, G., Garcia, M.O., Sinton, J.M., Kauahikaua, J.P., and Taylor, B., 2013, Intrusive dike complexes, cumulate cores, and the extrusive growth of Hawaiian volcanoes: Geophysical Research Letters, v. 40, p. 3367–3373, doi:10.1002/grl.50633.

  1. Time in quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeh, H. D.

    1988-01-01

    The intrinsic time concept of quantum gravity allows one to derive thermodynamical and quantum mechanical time arrows correlated with cosmic expansion only. Tube-like standing waves subject to a ``final'' condition may resemble unparametrised orbits of the universe, with ``quantum Poincaré cycles'' coinciding with its durations. A recent criticism by Qadir is answered.

  2. Gravity and crustal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowin, C. O.

    1976-01-01

    Lunar gravitational properties were analyzed along with the development of flat moon and curved moon computer models. Gravity anomalies and mascons were given particular attention. Geophysical and geological considerations were included, and comparisons were made between the gravitional fields of the Earth, Mars, and the Moon.

  3. Revamped braneworld gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bao Ruoyu; Park, Minjoon; Carena, Marcela; Santiago, Jose; Lykken, Joseph

    2006-03-15

    Gravity in five-dimensional braneworld backgrounds often exhibits problematic features, including kinetic ghosts, strong coupling, and the van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov (vDVZ) discontinuity. These problems are an obstacle to producing and analyzing braneworld models with interesting and potentially observable modifications of 4d gravity. We examine these problems in a general AdS{sub 5}/AdS{sub 4} setup with two branes and localized curvature from arbitrary brane kinetic terms. We use the interval approach and an explicit straight gauge-fixing. We compute the complete quadratic gauge-fixed effective 4d action, as well as the leading cubic order corrections. We compute the exact Green's function for gravity as seen on the brane. In the full parameter space, we exhibit the regions which avoid kinetic ghosts and tachyons. We give a general formula for the strong coupling scale, i.e., the energy scale at which the linearized treatment of gravity breaks down, for relevant regions of the parameter space. We show how the vDVZ discontinuity can be naturally but nontrivially avoided by ultralight graviton modes. We present a direct comparison of warping versus localized curvature in terms of their effects on graviton mode couplings. We exhibit the first example of Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP)-like crossover behavior in a general warped setup.

  4. Revamped braneworld gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Ruoyu; Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph; Park, Minjoon; Santiago, Jose; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    Gravity in five-dimensional braneworld backgrounds often exhibits problematic features, including kinetic ghosts, strong coupling, and the vDVZ discontinuity. These problems are an obstacle to producing and analyzing braneworld models with interesting and potentially observable modifications of 4d gravity. We examine these problems in a general AdS{sub 5}/AdS{sub 4} setup with two branes and localized curvature from arbitrary brane kinetic terms. We use the interval approach and an explicit ''straight'' gauge-fixing. We compute the complete quadratic gauge-fixed effective 4d action, as well as the leading cubic order corrections. We compute the exact Green's function for gravity as seen on the brane. In the full parameter space, we exhibit the regions which avoid kinetic ghosts and tachyons. We give a general formula for the strong coupling scale, i.e. the energy scale at which the linearized treatment of gravity breaks down, for relevant regions of the parameter space. We show how the vDVZ discontinuity can be naturally but nontrivially avoided by ultralight graviton modes. We present a direct comparison of warping versus localized curvature in terms of their effects on graviton mode couplings. We exhibit the first example of DGP-like crossover behavior in a general warped setup.

  5. Spaceborne Gravity Gradiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, W. C. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The current status of gravity gradiometers and technology that could be available in the 1990's for the GRAVSAT-B mission are assessed. Problems associated with sensors, testing, spacecraft, and data processing are explored as well as critical steps, schedule, and cost factors in the development plan.

  6. Artificial Gravity Research Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the forward working plan to identify what countermeasure resources are needed for a vehicle with an artificial gravity module (intermittent centrifugation) and what Countermeasure Resources are needed for a rotating transit vehicle (continuous centrifugation) to minimize the effects of microgravity to Mars Exploration crewmembers.

  7. A Trick of Gravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburgh, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    It's both surprising and rewarding when an old, standard problem reveals a subtlety that expands its pedagogic value. I realized recently that the role of gravity in the range equation for a projectile is not so simple as first appears. This realization may be completely obvious to others but was quite new to me.

  8. Physiological Considerations of Artificial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    Weightlessness produces significant physiological changes. Whether these changes will stabilize or achieve medical significance is not clear. Artificial gravity is the physiological countermeasure, and the tether system represents an attractive approach to artificial gravity. The need for artificial gravity is examined.

  9. Techniques, analysis, and noise in a Salt Lake Valley 4D gravity experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, P.; Chapman, D.S.; Allis, R.

    2008-01-01

    Repeated high-precision gravity measurements using an automated gravimeter and analysis of time series of 1-Hz samples allowed gravity measurements to be made with an accuracy of 5 ??Gal or better. Nonlinear instrument drift was removed using a new empirical staircase function built from multiple station loops. The new technique was developed between March 1999 and September 2000 in a pilot study conducted in the southern Salt Lake Valley along an east-west profile of eight stations from the Wasatch Mountains to the Jordan River. Gravity changes at eight profile stations were referenced to a set of five stations in the northern Salt Lake Valley, which showed residual signals of <10 ??Gal in amplitude, assuming a reference station near the Great Salt Lake to be stable. Referenced changes showed maximum amplitudes of -40 through +40 ??Gal at profile stations, with minima in summer 1999, maxima in winter 1999-2000, and some decrease through summer 2000. Gravity signals were likely a composite of production-induced changes monitored by well-water levels, elevation changes, precipitation-induced vadose-zone changes, and local irrigation effects for which magnitudes were estimated quantitatively. ?? 2008 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a network RTK positioning and gravity-surveying application with gravity correction using a smartphone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinsoo; Lee, Youngcheol; Cha, Sungyeoul; Choi, Chuluong; Lee, Seongkyu

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a smartphone-based network real-time kinematic (RTK) positioning and gravity-surveying application (app) that allows semi-real-time measurements using the built-in Bluetooth features of the smartphone and a third-generation or long-term evolution wireless device. The app was implemented on a single smartphone by integrating a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) controller, a laptop, and a field-note writing tool. The observation devices (i.e., a GNSS receiver and relative gravimeter) functioned independently of this system. The app included a gravity module, which converted the measured relative gravity reading into an absolute gravity value according to tides; meter height; instrument drift correction; and network adjustments. The semi-real-time features of this app allowed data to be shared easily with other researchers. Moreover, the proposed smartphone-based gravity-survey app was easily adaptable to various locations and rough terrain due to its compact size. PMID:23857258

  11. Development of a Network RTK Positioning and Gravity-Surveying Application with Gravity Correction Using a Smartphone

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinsoo; Lee, Youngcheol; Cha, Sungyeoul; Choi, Chuluong; Lee, Seongkyu

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a smartphone-based network real-time kinematic (RTK) positioning and gravity-surveying application (app) that allows semi-real-time measurements using the built-in Bluetooth features of the smartphone and a third-generation or long-term evolution wireless device. The app was implemented on a single smartphone by integrating a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) controller, a laptop, and a field-note writing tool. The observation devices (i.e., a GNSS receiver and relative gravimeter) functioned independently of this system. The app included a gravity module, which converted the measured relative gravity reading into an absolute gravity value according to tides; meter height; instrument drift correction; and network adjustments. The semi-real-time features of this app allowed data to be shared easily with other researchers. Moreover, the proposed smartphone-based gravity-survey app was easily adaptable to various locations and rough terrain due to its compact size. PMID:23857258

  12. Exobiology research on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntington, J. L.; Stratton, D. M.; Scattergood, T. W.

    1995-01-01

    The Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) is a multidisciplinary experiment laboratory being developed by NASA at Ames Research Center for delivery to Space Station Freedom in 1998. This facility will employ the low-gravity environment of the Space Station to enable aerosol experiments of much longer duration than is possible in any ground-based laboratory. Studies of fractal aggregates that are impossible to sustain on Earth will also be enabled. Three research areas within exobiology that will benefit from the GGSF are described here. An analysis of the needs of this research and of other suggested experiments has produced a list of science requirements which the facility design must accommodate. A GGSF design concept developed in the first stage of flight hardware development to meet these requirements is also described.

  13. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. )

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  14. Absolute rates of hole transfer in DNA.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, Kittusamy; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Lewis, Frederick D; Berlin, Yuri A; Ratner, Mark A; Siebbeles, Laurens D A

    2005-10-26

    Absolute rates of hole transfer between guanine nucleobases separated by one or two A:T base pairs in stilbenedicarboxamide-linked DNA hairpins were obtained by improved kinetic analysis of experimental data. The charge-transfer rates in four different DNA sequences were calculated using a density-functional-based tight-binding model and a semiclassical superexchange model. Site energies and charge-transfer integrals were calculated directly as the diagonal and off-diagonal matrix elements of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian, respectively, for all possible combinations of nucleobases. Taking into account the Coulomb interaction between the negative charge on the stilbenedicarboxamide linker and the hole on the DNA strand as well as effects of base pair twisting, the relative order of the experimental rates for hole transfer in different hairpins could be reproduced by tight-binding calculations. To reproduce quantitatively the absolute values of the measured rate constants, the effect of the reorganization energy was taken into account within the semiclassical superexchange model for charge transfer. The experimental rates could be reproduced with reorganization energies near 1 eV. The quantum chemical data obtained were used to discuss charge carrier mobility and hole-transport equilibria in DNA. PMID:16231945

  15. Transient absolute robustness in stochastic biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Enciso, German A

    2016-08-01

    Absolute robustness allows biochemical networks to sustain a consistent steady-state output in the face of protein concentration variability from cell to cell. This property is structural and can be determined from the topology of the network alone regardless of rate parameters. An important question regarding these systems is the effect of discrete biochemical noise in the dynamical behaviour. In this paper, a variable freezing technique is developed to show that under mild hypotheses the corresponding stochastic system has a transiently robust behaviour. Specifically, after finite time the distribution of the output approximates a Poisson distribution, centred around the deterministic mean. The approximation becomes increasingly accurate, and it holds for increasingly long finite times, as the total protein concentrations grow to infinity. In particular, the stochastic system retains a transient, absolutely robust behaviour corresponding to the deterministic case. This result contrasts with the long-term dynamics of the stochastic system, which eventually must undergo an extinction event that eliminates robustness and is completely different from the deterministic dynamics. The transiently robust behaviour may be sufficient to carry out many forms of robust signal transduction and cellular decision-making in cellular organisms. PMID:27581485

  16. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  17. Sentinel-2/MSI absolute calibration: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonjou, V.; Lachérade, S.; Fougnie, B.; Gamet, P.; Marcq, S.; Raynaud, J.-L.; Tremas, T.

    2015-10-01

    Sentinel-2 is an optical imaging mission devoted to the operational monitoring of land and coastal areas. It is developed in partnership between the European Commission and the European Space Agency. The Sentinel-2 mission is based on a satellites constellation deployed in polar sun-synchronous orbit. It will offer a unique combination of global coverage with a wide field of view (290km), a high revisit (5 days with two satellites), a high resolution (10m, 20m and 60m) and multi-spectral imagery (13 spectral bands in visible and shortwave infra-red domains). CNES is involved in the instrument commissioning in collaboration with ESA. This paper reviews all the techniques that will be used to insure an absolute calibration of the 13 spectral bands better than 5% (target 3%), and will present the first results if available. First, the nominal calibration technique, based on an on-board sun diffuser, is detailed. Then, we show how vicarious calibration methods based on acquisitions over natural targets (oceans, deserts, and Antarctica during winter) will be used to check and improve the accuracy of the absolute calibration coefficients. Finally, the verification scheme, exploiting photometer in-situ measurements over Lacrau plain, is described. A synthesis, including spectral coherence, inter-methods agreement and temporal evolution, will conclude the paper.

  18. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  19. Space Station Freedom Utilization Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The topics addressed in Space Station Freedom Utilization Conference are: (1) space station freedom overview and research capabilities; (2) space station freedom research plans and opportunities; (3) life sciences research on space station freedom; (4) technology research on space station freedom; (5) microgravity research and biotechnology on space station freedom; and (6) closing plenary.

  20. On the effect of distortion and dispersion in fringe signal of the FG5 absolute gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Křen, Petr; Pálinkáš, Vojtech; Mašika, Pavel

    2016-02-01

    The knowledge of absolute gravity acceleration at the level of 1  ×  10-9 is needed in geosciences (e.g. for monitoring crustal deformations and mass transports) and in metrology for watt balance experiments related to the new SI definition of the unit of kilogram. The gravity reference, which results from the international comparisons held with the participation of numerous absolute gravimeters, is significantly affected by qualities of instruments prevailing in the comparisons (i.e. at present, FG5 gravimeters). Therefore, it is necessary to thoroughly investigate all instrumental (particularly systematic) errors. This paper deals with systematic errors of the FG5#215 coming from the distorted fringe signal and from the electronic dispersion at several electronic components including cables. In order to investigate these effects, we developed a new experimental system for acquiring and analysing the data parallel to the FG5 built-in system. The new system based on the analogue-to-digital converter with digital waveform processing using the FFT swept band pass filter is developed and tested on the FG5#215 gravimeter equipped with a new fast analogue output. The system is characterized by a low timing jitter, digital handling of the distorted swept signal with determination of zero-crossings for the fundamental frequency sweep and also for its harmonics and can be used for any gravimeter based on the laser interferometry. Comparison of the original FG5 system and the experimental systems is provided on g-values, residuals and additional measurements/models. Moreover, advanced approach for the solution of the free-fall motion is presented, which allows to take into account a non-linear gravity change with height.

  1. GRAVITY detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrgan, Leander H.; Finger, Gert; Accardo, Matteo; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Stegmeier, Joerg; Eisenhauer, Frank

    2014-07-01

    GRAVITY is a second generation instrument for the VLT Interferometer, designed to enhance the near-infrared astrometric and spectro-imaging capabilities of VLTI. It will combine the AO corrected beams of the four VLT telescopes. The GRAVITY instrument uses a total of five eAPD detectors, four of which are for wavefront sensing and one for the Fringe tracker. In addition two Hawaii2RG are used, one for the acquisition camera and one for the spectrometer. A compact bath cryostat is used for each WFS unit, one for each of the VLT Unit Telescopes. Both Hawaii2RG detectors have a cutoff wavelength of 2.5 microns. A new and unique element of GRAVITY is the use of infrared wavefront sensors. For this reason SELEX-Galileo has developed a new high speed avalanche photo diode detector for ESO. The SAPHIRA detector, which stands for Selex Avalanche Photodiodes for Highspeed Infra Red Applications, has been already evaluated by ESO. At a frame rate of 1 KHz, a read noise of less than one electron can be demonstrated. A more detailed presentation about the performance of the SPAHIRA detector will be given at this conference 1. Each SAPHIRA detector is installed in an LN2 bath cryostat. The detector stage, filter wheel and optics are mounted on the cold plate of the LN2 vessel and enclosed by a radiation shield. All seven detector systems are controlled and read out by the standard ESO NGC controller. The NGC is a controller platform which can be adapted and customized for all infrared and optical detectors. This paper will discuss specific controller modifications implemented to meet the special requirements of the GRAVITY detector systems and give an overview of the GRAVITY detector systems and their performance.

  2. A Conceptual Approach to Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. When absolute value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…

  3. Using, Seeing, Feeling, and Doing Absolute Value for Deeper Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponce, Gregorio A.

    2008-01-01

    Using sticky notes and number lines, a hands-on activity is shared that anchors initial student thinking about absolute value. The initial point of reference should help students successfully evaluate numeric problems involving absolute value. They should also be able to solve absolute value equations and inequalities that are typically found in…

  4. 20 CFR 404.1205 - Absolute coverage groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Absolute coverage groups. 404.1205 Section... INSURANCE (1950- ) Coverage of Employees of State and Local Governments What Groups of Employees May Be Covered § 404.1205 Absolute coverage groups. (a) General. An absolute coverage group is a...

  5. A Liquid-Helium-Cooled Absolute Reference Cold Load forLong-Wavelength Radiometric Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Bensadoun, M.; Witebsky, C.; Smoot, George F.; De Amici,Giovanni; Kogut, A.; Levin, S.

    1990-05-01

    We describe a large (78-cm) diameter liquid-helium-cooled black-body absolute reference cold load for the calibration of microwave radiometers. The load provides an absolute calibration near the liquid helium (LHe) boiling point, accurate to better than 30 mK for wavelengths from 2.5 to 25 cm (12-1.2 GHz). The emission (from non-LHe temperature parts of the cold load) and reflection are small and well determined. Total corrections to the LHe boiling point temperature are {le} 50 mK over the operating range. This cold load has been used at several wavelengths at the South Pole and at the White Mountain Research Station. In operation, the average LHe loss rate was {le} 4.4 l/hr. Design considerations, radiometric and thermal performance and operational aspects are discussed. A comparison with other LHe-cooled reference loads including the predecessor of this cold load is given.

  6. Wall Effect on the Convective-Absolute Boundary for the Compressible Shear Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinet, Jean-Christophe; Dussauge, Jean-Paul; Casalis, Grégoire

    The linear stability of inviscid compressible shear layers is studied. When the layer develops at the vicinity of a wall, the two parallel flows can have a velocity of the same sign or of opposite signs. This situation is examined in order to obtain first hints on the stability of separated flows in the compressible regime. The shear layer is described by a hyperbolic tangent profile for the velocity component and the Crocco relation for the temperature profile. Gravity effects and the superficial tension are neglected. By examining the temporal growth rate at the saddle point in the wave-number space, the flow is characterized as being either absolutely unstable or convectively unstable. This study principally shows the effect of the wall on the convective-absolute transition in compressible shear flow. Results are presented, showing the amount of the backflow necessary to have this type of transition for a range of primary flow Mach numbers M1 up to 3.0. The boundary of the convective-absolute transition is defined as a function of the velocity ratio, the temperature ratio and the Mach number. Unstable solutions are calculated for both streamwise and oblique disturbances in the shear layer.

  7. The opportunities for space biology research on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Rodney W.; Souza, Kenneth A.

    1987-01-01

    The life sciences research facilities for the Space Station are being designed to accommodate both animal and plant specimens for long durations studies. This will enable research on how living systems adapt to microgravity, how gravity has shaped and affected life on earth, and further the understanding of basic biological phenomena. This would include multigeneration experiments on the effects of microgravity on the reproduction, development, growth, physiology, behavior, and aging of organisms. To achieve these research goals, a modular habitat system and on-board variable gravity centrifuges, capable of holding various animal, plant, cells and tissues, is proposed for the science laboratory.

  8. Autonomous momentum management for space station, exhibit A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, E.

    1984-01-01

    The report discusses momentum management for the CDG Planar Space Platform. The external torques on the Space Station are assumed to be gravity gradient and aerodynamic with both having bias and cyclic terms. The integrals of the cyclic torques are the cyclic momenti which will be stored in the momentum storage actuator. Various techniques to counteract the bias torques and center the cyclic momentum were investigated including gravity gradient desaturation by adjusting vehicle attitude, aerodynamic desaturation using solar panels and radiators and the deployment of flat plates at the end of long booms generating aerodynamic torques.

  9. Space station power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baraona, Cosmo R.

    1987-01-01

    The major requirements and guidelines that affect the space station configuration and power system are explained. The evolution of the space station power system from the NASA program development-feasibility phase through the current preliminary design phase is described. Several early station concepts are described and linked to the present concept. Trade study selections of photovoltaic system technologies are described in detail. A summary of present solar dynamic and power management and distribution systems is also given.

  10. Plants and gravity. Special issue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    This issue of the Journal of Plant Growth Regulation explores the effects of gravity on plant growth and development from several perspectives. Most of the review papers consider plants and gravity from the viewpoint of ground-based laboratory research, and several papers consider gravitropism, the directed growth in response to gravity, in some detail. However, another approach to study the effects of gravity on plant is to effectively remove the force due to gravity. A very dramatic way to accomplish this goal is through the free-fall conditions achieved by spacecraft in low Earth orbit, so some of the authors have reviewed recent advances in spaceflight research with plant systems.

  11. Industrial processes influenced by gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon

    1988-01-01

    In considering new directions for low gravity research with particular regard to broadening the number and types of industrial involvements, it is noted that transport phenomena play a vital role in diverse processes in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, and biotech industries. Relatively little attention has been given to the role of gravity in such processes. Accordingly, numerous industrial processes and phenomena are identified which involve gravity and/or surface tension forces. Phase separations and mixing are examples that will be significantly different in low gravity conditions. A basis is presented for expanding the scope of the low gravity research program and the potential benefits of such research is indicated.

  12. Spherically symmetric conformal gravity and ``gravitational bubbles''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, V. A.; Dokuchaev, V. I.; Eroshenko, Yu. N.

    2016-01-01

    The general structure of the spherically symmetric solutions in the Weyl conformal gravity is described. The corresponding Bach equations are derived for the special type of metrics, which can be considered as the representative of the general class. The complete set of the pure vacuum solutions is found. It consists of two classes. The first one contains the solutions with constant two-dimensional curvature scalar of our specific metrics, and the representatives are the famous Robertson-Walker metrics. One of them we called the ``gravitational bubbles'', which is compact and with zero Weyl tensor. Thus, we obtained the pure vacuum curved space-times (without any material sources, including the cosmological constant) what is absolutely impossible in General Relativity. Such a phenomenon makes it easier to create the universe from ``nothing''. The second class consists of the solutions with varying curvature scalar. We found its representative as the one-parameter family. It appears that it can be conformally covered by the thee-parameter Mannheim-Kazanas solution. We also investigated the general structure of the energy-momentum tensor in the spherical conformal gravity and constructed the vectorial equation that reveals clearly some features of non-vacuum solutions. Two of them are explicitly written, namely, the metrics à la Vaidya, and the electrovacuum space-time metrics.

  13. Conformal gravity and “gravitational bubbles”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, V. A.; Dokuchaev, V. I.; Eroshenko, Yu. N.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the general structure of the spherically symmetric solutions in the Weyl conformal gravity. The corresponding Bach equations are derived for the special type of metrics, which can be considered as the representative of the general class. The complete set of the pure vacuum solutions, consisting of two classes, is found. The first one contains the solutions with constant two-dimensional curvature scalar, and the representatives are the famous Robertson-Walker metrics. We called one of them the “gravitational bubbles”, which is compact and with zero Weyl tensor. These “gravitational bubbles” are the pure vacuum curved space-times (without any material sources, including the cosmological constant), which are absolutely impossible in General Relativity. This phenomenon makes it easier to create the universe from “nothing”. The second class consists of the solutions with varying curvature scalar. We found its representative as the one-parameter family, which can be conformally covered by the thee-parameter Mannheim-Kazanas solution. We describe the general structure of the energy-momentum tensor in the spherical conformal gravity and construct the vectorial equation that reveals clearly some features of non-vacuum solutions.

  14. Station Crew Celebrates Christmas

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aboard the orbiting International Space Station, Expedition 34 Commander Kevin Ford, Russian Flight Engineers Oleg Novitskiy, Evgeny Tarelkin and Roman Romanenko, NASA Flight Engineer Tom Marshburn...

  15. Space Station fluid resupply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winters, AL

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on space station fluid resupply are presented. Space Station Freedom is resupplied with supercritical O2 and N2 for the ECLSS and USL on a 180 day resupply cycle. Resupply fluids are stored in the subcarriers on station between resupply cycles and transferred to the users as required. ECLSS contingency fluids (O2 and N2) are supplied and stored on station in a gaseous state. Efficiency and flexibility are major design considerations. Subcarrier approach allows multiple manifest combinations. Growth is achieved by adding modular subcarriers.

  16. Space Station operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    An evaluation of the success of the Space Station will be based on the service provided to the customers by the Station crew, the productivity of the crew, and the costs of operation. Attention is given to details regarding Space Station operations, a summary of operational philosophies and requirements, logistics and resupply operations, prelaunch processing and launch operations, on-orbit operations, aspects of maintainability and maintenance, habitability, and questions of medical care. A logistics module concept is considered along with a logistics module processing timeline, a habitability module concept, and a Space Station rescue mission.

  17. Modelling temporal gravity changes through the south of the Taiwan Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouyen, Maxime; Masson, Frédéric; Mouthereau, Frédéric; Hwang, Cheinway; Cheng, Ching-Chung

    2010-05-01

    The Taiwan mountain belt results from the collision between Philippine Sea and Eurasian plates. Taiwan island experiences high tectonic deformation due to fast convergence between the two plates. It has been and is still widely studied and is often considered as a natural laboratory for orogeny studies. Since 2006, the French-Taiwanese scientific project AGTO (Absolute Gravity in the Taiwanese Orogen) measures the gravity change along a transect through the south of the island. It includes 10 absolute and 45 relative gravity measurements sites. The aim of this project is to validate the use of temporal gravity data for tectonic purposes. In particular, this method should be interesting to monitor deep mass transfers involved in the Taiwanese orogeny. Deep tectonic processes occuring in Taiwan are indeed still discussed, as shown by the existence of several tectonic hypotheses, and gravity can bring useful contribution to this discussion. The value of g in a particular place physically depends on the density distribution around this place. Change of this density distribution will result in a change of g, to which we try to give a tectonic meaning. However it is worth noting that other factors, like hydrology, might also be responsible for temporal g variations. Gravity modelling should therefore provide significant help in interpreting measurements. First, it can be used to estimate non-tectonic factors like hydrology, erosion or landslides, which both are supposed to modify g value through time. Albeit interesting, these effects must be properly removed from our measures before attempting any tectonic interpretation. Second, modelling is a valuable step in this study as it can help to propose deep mass transfers hypothesis constrained by gravity data and in accordance with Taiwan tectonic context. In this work, we present results of both types, computed for the south of the Taiwan orogen. Water effects on gravity have been estimated using rainfall data and global

  18. Use of Absolute and Comparative Performance Feedback in Absolute and Comparative Judgments and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Don A.; Klein, William M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Which matters more--beliefs about absolute ability or ability relative to others? This study set out to compare the effects of such beliefs on satisfaction with performance, self-evaluations, and bets on future performance. In Experiment 1, undergraduate participants were told they had answered 20% correct, 80% correct, or were not given their…

  19. Radiological assessment for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.; Hardy, Alva C.; Robbins, Donald E.; Atwell, William

    1993-01-01

    Circumstances have made it necessary to reassess the risks to Space Station Freedom crewmembers that arise from exposure to the space radiation environment. An option is being considered to place it in an orbit similar to that of the Russian Mir space station. This means it would be in a 51.6 deg inclination orbit instead of the previously planned 28.5 deg inclination orbit. A broad range of altitudes is still being considered, although the baseline is a 407 km orbit. In addition, recent data from the Japanese A-bomb survivors has made it necessary for NASA to have the exposure limits reviewed. Preliminary findings of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements indicate that the limits must be significantly reduced. Finally, the Space Station will be a laboratory where effects of long-term zero gravity on human physiology will be studied in detail. It is possible that a few crewmembers will be assigned to as many as three 1-year missions. Thus, their accumulated exposure will exceed 1,000 days. Results of this radiation risk assessment for Space Station Freedom crewmembers finds that females less than 35 years old will be confined to mission assignments where the altitude is less than about 400 km. Slight restrictions may also need to be made for male crewmembers less than 35 years old.

  20. Geoid undulation computations at laser tracking stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Despotakis, Vasilios K.

    1987-01-01

    Geoid undulation computations were performed at 29 laser stations distributed around the world using a combination of terrestrial gravity data within a cap of radius 2 deg and a potential coefficient set up to 180 deg. The traditional methods of Stokes' and Meissl's modification together with the Molodenskii method and the modified Sjoberg method were applied. Performing numerical tests based on global error assumptions regarding the terrestrial data and the geopotential set it was concluded that the modified Sjoberg method is the most accurate and promising technique for geoid undulation computations. The numerical computations for the geoid undulations using all the four methods resulted in agreement with the ellipsoidal minus orthometric value of the undulations on the order of 60 cm or better for most of the laser stations in the eastern United States, Australia, Japan, Bermuda, and Europe. A systematic discrepancy of about 2 meters for most of the western United States stations was detected and verified by using two relatively independent data sets. For oceanic laser stations in the western Atlantic and Pacific oceans that have no terrestrial data available, the adjusted GEOS-3 and SEASAT altimeter data were used for the computation of the geoid undulation in a collocation method.

  1. Recent Advances in Conformal Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, James; Chaykov, Spasen

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, significant advances have been made in alternative gravitational theories. Although MOND remains the leading candidate among the alternative models, Conformal Gravity has been studied by Mannheim and O'Brien to solve the rotation curve problem without the need for dark matter. Recently, Mannheim, O'Brien and Chaykov have begun solving other gravitational questions in Conformal Gravity. In this presentation, we highlight the new work of Conformal Gravity's application to random motions of clusters (the original Zwicky problem), gravitational bending of light, gravitational lensing and a very recent survey of dwarf galaxy rotation curves. We will show in each case that Conformal Gravity can provide an accurate explanation and prediction of the data without the need for dark matter. Coupled with the fact that Conformal Gravity is a fully re-normalizable metric theory of gravity, these results help to push Conformal Gravity onto a competitive stage against other alternative models.

  2. Effect of reduced gravity on the preferred walk-run transition speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kram, R.; Domingo, A.; Ferris, D. P.

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the effect of reduced gravity on the human walk-run gait transition speed and interpreted the results using an inverted-pendulum mechanical model. We simulated reduced gravity using an apparatus that applied a nearly constant upward force at the center of mass, and the subjects walked and ran on a motorized treadmill. In the inverted pendulum model for walking, gravity provides the centripetal force needed to keep the pendulum in contact with the ground. The ratio of the centripetal and gravitational forces (mv2/L)/(mg) reduces to the dimensionless Froude number (v2/gL). Applying this model to a walking human, m is body mass, v is forward velocity, L is leg length and g is gravity. In normal gravity, humans and other bipeds with different leg lengths all choose to switch from a walk to a run at different absolute speeds but at approximately the same Froude number (0.5). We found that, at lower levels of gravity, the walk-run transition occurred at progressively slower absolute speeds but at approximately the same Froude number. This supports the hypothesis that the walk-run transition is triggered by the dynamics of an inverted-pendulum system.

  3. Effect of reduced gravity on the preferred walk-run transition speed.

    PubMed

    Kram, R; Domingo, A; Ferris, D P

    1997-02-01

    We investigated the effect of reduced gravity on the human walk-run gait transition speed and interpreted the results using an inverted-pendulum mechanical model. We simulated reduced gravity using an apparatus that applied a nearly constant upward force at the center of mass, and the subjects walked and ran on a motorized treadmill. In the inverted pendulum model for walking, gravity provides the centripetal force needed to keep the pendulum in contact with the ground. The ratio of the centripetal and gravitational forces (mv2/L)/(mg) reduces to the dimensionless Froude number (v2/gL). Applying this model to a walking human, m is body mass, v is forward velocity, L is leg length and g is gravity. In normal gravity, humans and other bipeds with different leg lengths all choose to switch from a walk to a run at different absolute speeds but at approximately the same Froude number (0.5). We found that, at lower levels of gravity, the walk-run transition occurred at progressively slower absolute speeds but at approximately the same Froude number. This supports the hypothesis that the walk-run transition is triggered by the dynamics of an inverted-pendulum system. PMID:9076966

  4. REXUS 16 Low Gravity Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoliu, L.; Ciuca, I.; Lupu, E. S.; Ciobanu, I.; Cherciu, C.; Soare, C.; Murensan, C.; Dragomir, D.; Chitu, C.; Nachila, C.

    2015-09-01

    The REXUS/BEXUS is a programme realized under a bilateral agency agreement between the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) and the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB) (Source: www.rexusbexus.net) . Within this programme, the experiment proposed by LOW Gravity was given the opportunity to fly on board of REXUS 16 from Kiruna, Sweden, in May 2014. Since space settlements are within our reach and material processing in reduced gravity is a key requirement, we aim to improve this field by investigating the melting and welding processes taking place in milligravity on board of a sounding rocket. Our main objective is to analyze the surface deformation and physical properties of titanium and acid core solder alloys welded/melted under miligravity conditions with a 25W LASER diode. The main components of our experiment are the metal samples, the LASER diode and the control electronics. The metal samples are placed in front of an optical system and are shifted during approximately 120 seconds of milligravity. The optical system is connected via an optic fiber to the LASER diode. The electronics consists of two custom-made boards: the mainboard which is connected to the REXUS interface and controls the LASER diode and the sample shifting and the logboard which has an SD card to log all experiment data (sample position, experiment acceleration and rotation rate, pressure and temperature, battery voltage and LASER diode status). During the flight, due to unexpected vibration levels, the fiber optics was damaged at T+70 and the experiment could not fulfill its main objective. A GoPro camera mounted inside the experiment box recorded the experiment operation. Valuable information regarding temperature and battery voltage was also sent remotely to our Ground Station. This data enabled us to perform a thorough failure analysis. Parallel readings of these parameters taken by other experiments and by the REXUS Service Module corroborate our data and increase the accuracy of our analysis

  5. Principal Facts of Gravity data in the Northern Willamette Valley and Vicinity, Northwestern Oregon and Southwestern Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, Robert L.; Wheeler, Karen L.; McPhee, Darcy K.; Dinterman, Philip A.; Watt, Janet T.

    2007-01-01

    Gravity data were collected from 2004 through 2006 to assist in mapping subsurface geology in the northern Willamette Valley and vicinity, northwestern Oregon and southwestern Washington. Prior to this effort to improve the gravity data coverage in the study area, very little regional data were available. This report gives the principle facts for 2710 new gravity stations and 1446 preexisting gravity stations. Much of the study area is now covered with data of sufficient density to define basin boundaries and correlate with many of the larger fault systems. ,p> The study area lies between 44? 52.5 and 46? N latitude and between 122? 15 and 123? 37.5 W longitude. Although this is a continuing project and more gravity data is expected to be collected, this report is being published to show the progress of the data collection. The majority of these data are spaced at about 1.6 km (1 mile), but three closely spaced profiles were measured in the Portland area across several faults. To obtain a 1.6 km grid of data points would require about 5120 gravity stations. To date we have collected 2710 stations. Including the preexisting data points, the total number of stations is 4156, and complete regional coverage is about 80 percent at this time.

  6. Absolute calibration of ultraviolet filter photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, R. C.; Fairchild, T.; Code, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The essential features of the calibration procedure can be divided into three parts. First, the shape of the bandpass of each photometer was determined by measuring the transmissions of the individual optical components and also by measuring the response of the photometer as a whole. Secondly, each photometer was placed in the essentially-collimated synchrotron radiation bundle maintained at a constant intensity level, and the output signal was determined from about 100 points on the objective. Finally, two or three points on the objective were illuminated by synchrotron radiation at several different intensity levels covering the dynamic range of the photometers. The output signals were placed on an absolute basis by the electron counting technique described earlier.

  7. MAGSAT: Vector magnetometer absolute sensor alignment determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for accurately determining the absolute alignment of the magnetic axes of a triaxial magnetometer sensor with respect to an external, fixed, reference coordinate system. The method does not require that the magnetic field vector orientation, as generated by a triaxial calibration coil system, be known to better than a few degrees from its true position, and minimizes the number of positions through which a sensor assembly must be rotated to obtain a solution. Computer simulations show that accuracies of better than 0.4 seconds of arc can be achieved under typical test conditions associated with existing magnetic test facilities. The basic approach is similar in nature to that presented by McPherron and Snare (1978) except that only three sensor positions are required and the system of equations to be solved is considerably simplified. Applications of the method to the case of the MAGSAT Vector Magnetometer are presented and the problems encountered discussed.

  8. Absolute geostrophic currents in global tropical oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lina; Yuan, Dongliang

    2016-03-01

    A set of absolute geostrophic current (AGC) data for the period January 2004 to December 2012 are calculated using the P-vector method based on monthly gridded Argo profiles in the world tropical oceans. The AGCs agree well with altimeter geostrophic currents, Ocean Surface Current Analysis-Real time currents, and moored current-meter measurements at 10-m depth, based on which the classical Sverdrup circulation theory is evaluated. Calculations have shown that errors of wind stress calculation, AGC transport, and depth ranges of vertical integration cannot explain non-Sverdrup transport, which is mainly in the subtropical western ocean basins and equatorial currents near the Equator in each ocean basin (except the North Indian Ocean, where the circulation is dominated by monsoons). The identified non-Sverdrup transport is thereby robust and attributed to the joint effect of baroclinicity and relief of the bottom (JEBAR) and mesoscale eddy nonlinearity.

  9. Absolute Measurement of Electron Cloud Density

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Seidl, P A; Logan, G; Bieniosek, F; Baca, D; Vay, J; Orlando, E; Vujic, J L

    2007-06-21

    Beam interaction with background gas and walls produces ubiquitous clouds of stray electrons that frequently limit the performance of particle accelerator and storage rings. Counterintuitively we obtained the electron cloud accumulation by measuring the expelled ions that are originated from the beam-background gas interaction, rather than by measuring electrons that reach the walls. The kinetic ion energy measured with a retarding field analyzer (RFA) maps the depressed beam space-charge potential and provides the dynamic electron cloud density. Clearing electrode current measurements give the static electron cloud background that complements and corroborates with the RFA measurements, providing an absolute measurement of electron cloud density during a 5 {micro}s duration beam pulse in a drift region of the magnetic transport section of the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL.

  10. Absolute instability of a viscous hollow jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M.

    2007-02-01

    An investigation of the spatiotemporal stability of hollow jets in unbounded coflowing liquids, using a general dispersion relation previously derived, shows them to be absolutely unstable for all physical values of the Reynolds and Weber numbers. The roots of the symmetry breakdown with respect to the liquid jet case, and the validity of asymptotic models are here studied in detail. Asymptotic analyses for low and high Reynolds numbers are provided, showing that old and well-established limiting dispersion relations [J. W. S. Rayleigh, The Theory of Sound (Dover, New York, 1945); S. Chandrasekhar, Hydrodynamic and Hydromagnetic Stability (Dover, New York, 1961)] should be used with caution. In the creeping flow limit, the analysis shows that, if the hollow jet is filled with any finite density and viscosity fluid, a steady jet could be made arbitrarily small (compatible with the continuum hypothesis) if the coflowing liquid moves faster than a critical velocity.

  11. Stitching interferometry: recent results and absolute calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Stitching Interferometry is a method of analysing large optical components using a standard "small" interferometer. This result is obtained by taking multiple overlapping images of the large component, and numerically "stitching" these sub-apertures together. We have already reported the industrial use our Stitching Interferometry systems (Previous SPIE symposia), but experimental results had been lacking because this technique is still new, and users needed to get accustomed to it before producing reliable measurements. We now have more results. We will report user comments and show new, unpublished results. We will discuss sources of error, and show how some of these can be reduced to arbitrarily small values. These will be discussed in some detail. We conclude with a few graphical examples of absolute measurements performed by us.

  12. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometer metrological performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, J.; Fratter, I.; Bertrand, F.; Jager, T.; Morales, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) has been developed for the ESA Earth Observation Swarm mission, planned for launch in November 2012. As its Overhauser magnetometers forerunners flown on Oersted and Champ satellites, it will deliver high resolution scalar measurements for the in-flight calibration of the Vector Field Magnetometer manufactured by the Danish Technical University. Latest results of the ground tests carried out to fully characterize all parameters that may affect its accuracy, both at instrument and satellite level, will be presented. In addition to its baseline function, the ASM can be operated either at a much higher sampling rate (burst mode at 250 Hz) or in a dual mode where it also delivers vector field measurements as a by-product. The calibration procedure and the relevant vector performances will be discussed.

  13. Absolute nonlocality via distributed computing without communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekaj, Ł.; Pawłowski, M.; Vértesi, T.; Grudka, A.; Horodecki, M.; Horodecki, R.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the role that quantum entanglement plays as a resource in various information processing tasks is one of the crucial goals of quantum information theory. Here we propose an alternative perspective for studying quantum entanglement: distributed computation of functions without communication between nodes. To formalize this approach, we propose identity games. Surprisingly, despite no signaling, we obtain that nonlocal quantum strategies beat classical ones in terms of winning probability for identity games originating from certain bipartite and multipartite functions. Moreover we show that, for a majority of functions, access to general nonsignaling resources boosts success probability two times in comparison to classical ones for a number of large enough outputs. Because there are no constraints on the inputs and no processing of the outputs in the identity games, they detect very strong types of correlations: absolute nonlocality.

  14. Gravity wave initiated convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The vertical velocity of convection initiated by gravity waves was investigated. In one particular case, the convective motion-initiated and supported by the gravity wave-induced activity (excluding contributions made by other mechanisms) reached its maximum value about one hour before the production of the funnel clouds. In another case, both rawinsonde and geosynchronous satellite imagery were used to study the life cycles of severe convective storms. Cloud modelling with input sounding data and rapid-scan imagery from GOES were used to investigate storm cloud formation, development and dissipation in terms of growth and collapse of cloud tops, as well as, the life cycles of the penetration of overshooting turrets above the tropopause. The results based on these two approaches are presented and discussed.

  15. Antimatter gravity experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.E.; Camp, J.B.; Darling, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    An experiment is being developed to measure the acceleration of the antiproton in the gravitational field of the earth. Antiprotons of a few MeV from the LEAR facility at CERN will be slowed, captured, cooled to a temperature of about 10 K, and subsequently launched a few at a time into a drift tube where the effect of gravity on their motion will be determined by a time-of-flight method. Development of the experiment is proceeding at Los Alamos using normal matter. The fabrication of a drift tube that will produce a region of space in which gravity is the dominant force on moving ions is of major difficulty. This involves a study of methods of minimizing the electric fields produced by spatially varying work functions on conducting surfaces. Progress in a number of areas is described, with stress on the drift-tube development.

  16. Local quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, N.; Knorr, B.; Meibohm, J.; Pawlowski, J. M.; Reichert, M.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the ultraviolet behavior of quantum gravity within a functional renormalization group approach. The present setup includes the full ghost and graviton propagators and, for the first time, the dynamical graviton three-point function. The latter gives access to the coupling of dynamical gravitons and makes the system minimally self-consistent. The resulting phase diagram confirms the asymptotic safety scenario in quantum gravity with a nontrivial UV fixed point. A well-defined Wilsonian block spinning requires locality of the flow in momentum space. This property is discussed in the context of functional renormalization group flows. We show that momentum locality of graviton correlation functions is nontrivially linked to diffeomorphism invariance, and is realized in the present setup.

  17. Plant gravity sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, F. D.

    1991-01-01

    This review of plant gravity sensing examines sensing in organ gravitropism, sensing in single-cell gravitropism, and nongravitropic sensing. Topics related to sensing in organ gravitropism are (1) identification of the gravitropic susceptors, including intracellular asymmetry in equilibrium position and after reorientation, susceptor signal-to-noise ratio, signal integration over threshold stimulation periods, intracellular asymmetry and gravitropic competence, and starch deficiency and gravitropic competence; (2) possible root statocytes and receptors, including identification of presumptive statocytes, cytology, and possible receptors and models of sensing; and (3) negatively gravitropic organs, including identification and distribution of presumptive statocytes and cytology and possible receptors. Topics related to nongravitropic sensing include gravitaxis, reaction wood, gravimorphogenesis, other gravity-influenced organ movements, and cytoplasmic streaming.

  18. Computing Gravity's Strongest Grip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2008-04-01

    Gravitational physics is entering a new era, one driven by observation, that will begin once gravitational wave interferometers such as LIGO make their first detections. The gravitational waves are produced during violent events such as the merger of two black holes. The detection of these waves or ripples in the fabric of spacetime is a formidable undertaking, requiring innovative engineering, powerful data analysis tools and careful theoretical modeling. In support of this theoretical modeling, recent breakthroughs in numerical relativity have lead to the development of computational tools that allow us to explore where and how gravitational wave observations can constrain or inform our understanding of gravity and astrophysical phenomena. I will review these latest developments, focusing on binary black hole simulations and the role these simulations play in our new understanding of physics and astronomy where gravity exhibits its strongest grip on our spacetime.

  19. Hamiltonian spinfoam gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieland, Wolfgang M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a Hamiltonian formulation of spinfoam gravity, which leads to a straightforward canonical quantization. To begin with, we derive a continuum action adapted to a simplicial decomposition of space-time. The equations of motion admit a Hamiltonian formulation, allowing us to perform the constraint analysis. We do not find any secondary constraints, but only get restrictions on the Lagrange multipliers enforcing the reality conditions. This comes as a surprise—in the continuum theory, the reality conditions are preserved in time, only if the torsionless condition (a secondary constraint) holds true. Studying an additional conservation law for each spinfoam vertex, we discuss the issue of torsion and argue that spinfoam gravity may still miss an additional constraint. Finally, we canonically quantize and recover the EPRL (Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine) face amplitudes. Communicated by P R L V Moniz

  20. Time lapse gravity monitoring at Coso geothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Rachel Vest

    An extensive time lapse gravity data set was acquired over the Coso geothermal field near Ridgecrest, California starting in 1987, with the latest data set acquired in 2013. In this thesis I use these gravity data to obtain a better understanding of mass changes occurring within the geothermal field. Geothermal energy is produced by flashing naturally heated ground water into steam which is used to turn turbines. Brine and re-condensed steam are then re-injected into the reservoir. A percentage of the water removed from the system is lost to the process. The time lapse gravity method consists of gravity measurements taken at the same locations over time, capturing snap shots of the changing field. After careful processing, the final data are differenced to extract the change in gravity over time. This change in gravity can then be inverted to recover the change in density and therefore mass over time. The inversion process also produces information on the three dimensional locations of these mass changes. Thirty five gravity data sets were processed and a subsection were inverted with two different starting times, a sixteen point data set collected continuously between 1991 and 2005, and a thirty-eight point data set collected between 1996 and 2005. The maximum change in gravity in the 1991 data group was -350 microGal observed near station CSE2. For the 1996 data group the maximum gravity change observed over the nine year period was -248 microGal. The gravity data were then inverted using the surface inversion method. Three values of density contrast were used, -0.05 g/cm3, -0.10 g/cm3, and -0.20 g/cm3. The starting surface in 1991 was set to 2,500 ft above sea level. The changes in surfaces were then converted to mass changes. The largest total mass change recovered was -1.39x1011 kg. This mass value is of the same order of magnitude as published well production data for the field. Additionally, the gravity data produces a better understanding of the spatial

  1. More about scalar gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittencourt, E.; Moschella, U.; Novello, M.; Toniato, J. D.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss a class of models for gravity based on a scalar field. The models include and generalize the old approach by Nordström which predated and, in some ways, inspired general relativity. The class include also a model that we have recently introduced and discussed in terms of its cosmological aspects (GSG). We present here a complete characterization of the Schwarschild geometry as a vacuum solution of GSG and sketch a discussion of the first post-Newtonian approximation.

  2. Artificial gravity Mars spaceship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Benton C.

    1989-01-01

    Experience gained in the study of artificial gravity for a manned trip to Mars is reviewed, and a snowflake-configured interplanetary vehicle cluster of habitat modules, descent vehicles, and propulsion systems is presented. An evolutionary design is described which permits sequential upgrading from five to nine crew members, an increase of landers from one to as many a three per mission, and an orderly, phased incorporation of advanced technologies as they become available.

  3. New improved massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereli, T.; Yetişmişoğlu, C.

    2016-06-01

    We derive the field equations for topologically massive gravity coupled with the most general quadratic curvature terms using the language of exterior differential forms and a first-order constrained variational principle. We find variational field equations both in the presence and absence of torsion. We then show that spaces of constant negative curvature (i.e. the anti de-Sitter space AdS 3) and constant torsion provide exact solutions.

  4. Gravity gradient study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, C. C.

    1971-01-01

    The results of the noise and drift test, and the comparison of the experimental simulation tests with the theoretical predictions, confirm that the rotating gravity gradiometer is capable of extracting information about mascon distributions from lunar orbit, and that the sensitivity of the sensor is adequate for lunar orbital selenodesy. The experimental work also verified analytical and computer models for the directional and time response of the sensor.

  5. Gravity, Time, and Lagrangians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2010-01-01

    Feynman mentioned to us that he understood a topic in physics if he could explain it to a college freshman, a high school student, or a dinner guest. Here we will discuss two topics that took us a while to get to that level. One is the relationship between gravity and time. The other is the minus sign that appears in the Lagrangian. (Why would one…

  6. Space station executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An executive summary of the modular space station study is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) design characteristics, (2) experiment program, (3) operations, (4) program description, and (5) research implications. The modular space station is considered a candidate payload for the low cost shuttle transportation system.

  7. "Inventive" Learning Stations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Learning stations can be used for myriad purposes--to teach concepts, integrate subject matter, build interest, and allow for inquiry--the possibilities are limited only by the imagination of the teacher and the supplies available. In this article, the author shares suggestions and a checklist for setting up successful learning stations. In…

  8. Space station dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berka, Reg

    1990-01-01

    Structural dynamic characteristics and responses of the Space Station due to the natural and induced environment are discussed. Problems that are peculiar to the Space Station are also discussed. These factors lead to an overall acceleration environment that users may expect. This acceleration environment can be considered as a loading, as well as a disturbance environment.

  9. The Station System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, David W.

    1970-01-01

    Describes an introductory college chemistry course utilizing laboratory stations and laboratory instruction by video taped presentations. Author discusses the general operation of the laboratory, the method used in evaluating students' progress, the teaching effectiveness and economy of the station system. Results of a student questionnaire reveal…

  10. Orbiting Deep Space Relay Station (ODSRS). Volume 1: Requirement determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The deep space communications requirements of the post-1985 time frame are described and the orbiting deep space relay station (ODSRS) is presented as an option for meeting these requirements. Under current conditions, the ODSRS is not yet cost competitive with Earth based stations to increase DSN telemetry performance, but has significant advantages over a ground station, and these are sufficient to maintain it as a future option. These advantages include: the ability to track a spacecraft 24 hours per day with ground stations located only in the USA; the ability to operate at higher frequencies that would be attenuated by Earth's atmosphere; and the potential for building very large structures without the constraints of Earth's gravity.

  11. Space Station Environmental Health System water quality monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincze, Johanna E.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    One of the unique aspects of the Space Station is that it will be a totally encapsulated environment and the air and water supplies will be reclaimed for reuse. The Environmental Health System, a subsystem of CHeCS (Crew Health Care System), must monitor the air and water on board the Space Station Freedom to verify that the quality is adequate for crew safety. Specifically, the Water Quality Subsystem will analyze the potable and hygiene water supplies regularly for organic, inorganic, particulate, and microbial contamination. The equipment selected to perform these analyses will be commercially available instruments which will be converted for use on board the Space Station Freedom. Therefore, the commercial hardware will be analyzed to identify the gravity dependent functions and modified to eliminate them. The selection, analysis, and conversion of the off-the-shelf equipment for monitoring the Space Station reclaimed water creates a challenging project for the Water Quality engineers and scientists.

  12. Granular Superconductors and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David; Koczor, Ron

    1999-01-01

    As a Bose condensate, superconductors provide novel conditions for revisiting previously proposed couplings between electromagnetism and gravity. Strong variations in Cooper pair density, large conductivity and low magnetic permeability define superconductive and degenerate condensates without the traditional density limits imposed by the Fermi energy (approx. 10(exp -6) g cu cm). Recent experiments have reported anomalous weight loss for a test mass suspended above a rotating Type II, YBCO superconductor, with a relatively high percentage change (0.05-2.1%) independent of the test mass' chemical composition and diamagnetic properties. A variation of 5 parts per 104 was reported above a stationary (non-rotating) superconductor. In experiments using a sensitive gravimeter, bulk YBCO superconductors were stably levitated in a DC magnetic field and exposed without levitation to low-field strength AC magnetic fields. Changes in observed gravity signals were measured to be less than 2 parts in 108 of the normal gravitational acceleration. Given the high sensitivity of the test, future work will examine variants on the basic magnetic behavior of granular superconductors, with particular focus on quantifying their proposed importance to gravity.

  13. Branes in Gravity's Rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashour, Amani; Faizal, Mir; Ali, Ahmed Farag; Hammad, Fayçal

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we investigate the thermodynamics of black p-branes (BB) in the context of Gravity's Rainbow. We investigate this using rainbow functions that have been motivated from loop quantum gravity and κ -Minkowski non-commutative spacetime. Then for the sake of comparison, we examine a couple of other rainbow functions that have also appeared in the literature. We show that, for consistency, Gravity's Rainbow imposes a constraint on the minimum mass of the BB, a constraint that we interpret here as implying the existence of a black p-brane remnant. This interpretation is supported by the computation of the black p-brane's heat capacity that shows that the latter vanishes when the Schwarzschild radius takes on a value that is bigger than its extremal limit. We found that the same conclusion is reached for the third version of rainbow functions treated here but not with the second one for which only standard black p-brane thermodynamics is recovered.

  14. Targeting space station technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olstad, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    NASA's Space Station Technology Steering Committee has undertaken the definition of the level of technology that is desirable for use in the initial design and operation of an evolutionary, long service life space station, as well as the longer term technology required for the improvement of capabilities. The technology should initially become available in 1986, in order to support a space station launch as early as 1990. Toward this end, the committee seeks to assess technology forecasts based on existing research and testing capacity, and then plan and monitor a program which will move current technology to the requisite level of sophistication and reliability. The Space Shuttle is assumed to be the vehicle for space station delivery, assembly, and support on a 90-day initial cycle. Space station tasks will be military, commercial, and scientific, including on-orbit satellite servicing.

  15. The quest for the perfect gravity anomaly: Part 1 - New calculation standards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, X.; Hildenbrand, T.G.; Hinze, W. J.; Keller, Gordon R.; Ravat, D.; Webring, M.

    2006-01-01

    The North American gravity database together with databases from Canada, Mexico, and the United States are being revised to improve their coverage, versatility, and accuracy. An important part of this effort is revision of procedures and standards for calculating gravity anomalies taking into account our enhanced computational power, modern satellite-based positioning technology, improved terrain databases, and increased interest in more accurately defining different anomaly components. The most striking revision is the use of one single internationally accepted reference ellipsoid for the horizontal and vertical datums of gravity stations as well as for the computation of the theoretical gravity. The new standards hardly impact the interpretation of local anomalies, but do improve regional anomalies. Most importantly, such new standards can be consistently applied to gravity database compilations of nations, continents, and even the entire world. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  16. Image processing applied to gravity and topography data covering the continental United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Guinness, E. A.; Strebeck, J. W.; Davies, G. F.; Schulz, K. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The applicability of fairly standard image processing techniques to processing and analyzing large geologic data sets in addressed. Image filtering techniques were used to interpolate between gravity station locations to produce a regularly spaced data array that preserves detail in areas with good coverage, and that produces a continuous tone image rather than a contour map. Standard image processing techniques were used to digitally register and overlay topographic and gravity data, and the data were displayed in ways that emphasize subtle but pervasive structural features. The potential of the methods is illustrated through a discussion of linear structures that appear in the processed data between the midcontinent gravity high and the Appalachians.

  17. Problem of artificial gravity from the point of view of experimental physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuganov, Y. M.; Yemelyanov, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Artificial gravity in spacecraft and orbital stations is considered as prophylactic method for preventing disorders under weightlessness conditions and for readaptation of astronauts to the gravity of earth. The creation of 0.28 to 0.31 g artificial gravity during weightlessness is adequate to orient the human body in space, to preserve movement coordination, as well as to maintain the necessary level of certain physiological indices. This range of artificial weightiness can be reached by various angular accelerations of the satellite rotation as a function of the radius or orientation.

  18. Space Station/Skylab Sketch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Seldom in aerospace history has a major decision been as promptly and concisely recorded as with the Skylab shown in this sketch. At a meeting at the Marshall Space Flight Center on August 19, 1966, George E. Mueller, NASA Associate Administrator for Marned Space Flight, used a felt pen and poster paper to pin down the final conceptual layout for the budding space station's (established as the Skylab in 1970) major elements. General Davy Jones, first program director, added his initials and those of Dr. Mueller in the lower right corner. The goals of the Skylab were to enrich our scientific knowledge of the Earth, the Sun, the stars, and cosmic space; to study the effects of weightlessness on living organisms, including man; to study the effects of the processing and manufacturing of materials utilizing the absence of gravity; and to conduct Earth resource observations. The Skylab also conducted 19 selected experiments submitted by high school students. Skylab's 3 different 3-man crews spent up to 84 days in Earth orbit. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) had responsibility for developing and integrating most of the major components of the Skylab: the Orbital Workshop (OWS), Airlock Module (AM), Multiple Docking Adapter (MDA), Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM), Payload Shroud (PS), and most of the experiments. MSFC was also responsible for providing the Saturn IB launch vehicles for three Apollo spacecraft and crews and a Saturn V launch vehicle for the Skylab.

  19. Gravity field information from Gravity Probe-B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Lerch, F. J.; Colombo, O. L.; Everitt, C. W. F.

    1989-01-01

    The Gravity Probe-B Mission will carry the Stanford Gyroscope relativity experiment into orbit in the mid 1990's, as well as a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver whose tracking data will be used to study the earth gravity field. Estimates of the likely quality of a gravity field model to be derived from the GPS data are presented, and the significance of this experiment to geodesy and geophysics are discussed.

  20. Homopolar artificial gravity generator based on frame-dragging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajmar, M.

    2010-05-01

    Space exploration is linked in many ways to the generation and challenges of artificial gravity. Space stations and drag-free satellite platforms are used to provide microgravity environments for scientific experiments. On the other hand, microgravity or reduced gravity environments such as on Moon and Mars are known to put limits for long-term human presence. Large centrifuges in space may provide Earth-like gravity environments during long-term travels, however, such technology certainly has its limits to provide similar environments for human outposts on other moons and planets. One can imagine a different technology using a prediction out of Einstein's general relativity theory which is called frame-dragging. In principle, frame-dragging might be used to generate artificial gravitational fields similar to electric fields generated by time-varying or moving magnetic fields. We will show that it is also possible to generate constant artificial gravitational fields that could provide microgravity or artificial gravity environments. Although such technology is possible in principle, the field strengths calculated from Einstein's theory are too small to be useful so far. However, recently detected anomalies around low-temperature spinning matter as well as fly-by anomalies point to possible enhancement mechanisms that might make an artificial gravity generator based on frame-dragging a reality in the future.